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Sample records for fluorinel dissolution process

  1. ICPP Fluorinel Dissolution Process (FDP) Plant Protection System (PPS) baseline criteria evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, G.W.; Clayton, R.J.; Fielding, K.D.; Mozes, M.L.

    1993-06-01

    This report documents a baseline criteria evaluation of the FAST Plant Protection System (PPS) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO), Computer Process Application (CPA) personnel originally prepared this report as requested by the FAST Fluorinel Dissolution Process (FDP) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) committee. It was required by the ORR committee for the 1992 restart of FDP operations. However on April 29, 1992, the Department of Energy (DOE) directed WINCO to discontinue reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel at the ICPP. This eliminated the mission of the FDP. The report includes an evaluation of the PPS against criteria requested by the ORR committee and against criteria contained in the WINCO PPS Requirements Manual. This second criteria evaluation is summarized in Appendix A.

  2. HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Fluorinel Dissolution Process Makeup and Cooling and Heating Systems Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Action Plan Tank Systems INTEC-066, INTEC-067, INTEC-068, and INTEC-072

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.E. Davis

    2007-01-01

    This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the fluorinel dissolution process makeup and cooling and heating systems located in the Fluorinel Dissolution Process and Fuel Storage Facility (CPP-666), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The systems to be closed include waste piping associated with the fluorinel dissolution process makeup systems. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards

  3. Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R A Montgomery

    2008-01-01

    This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste

  4. Risk-Based Disposal Plan for PCB Paint in the TRA Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Canal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Montgomery

    2008-05-01

    This Toxic Substances Control Act Risk-Based Polychlorinated Biphenyl Disposal plan was developed for the Test Reactor Area Fluorinel Dissolution Process Mockup and Gamma Facilities Waste System, located in Building TRA-641 at the Reactor Technology Complex, Idaho National Laboratory Site, to address painted surfaces in the empty canal under 40 CFR 761.62(c) for paint, and under 40 CFR 761.61(c) for PCBs that may have penetrated into the concrete. The canal walls and floor will be painted with two coats of contrasting non-PCB paint and labeled as PCB. The canal is covered with open decking; the access grate is locked shut and signed to indicate PCB contamination in the canal. Access to the canal will require facility manager permission. Protective equipment for personnel and equipment entering the canal will be required. Waste from the canal, generated during ultimate Decontamination and Decommissioning, shall be managed and disposed as PCB Bulk Product Waste.

  5. Fast facility spent-fuel and waste assay instrument. [Fluorinel Dissolution and Fuel Storage (FAST) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Johnson, S.S.; Menlove, H.O.; Van Lyssel, T.; Black, D.; Carlson, B.; Decker, L.; Echo, M.W.

    1983-01-01

    A delayed-neutron assay instrument was installed in the Fluorinel Dissolution and Fuel Storage Facility at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The dual-assay instrument is designed to measure both spent fuel and waste solids that are produced from fuel processing. A set of waste standards, fabricated by Los Alamos using uranium supplied by Exxon Nuclear Idaho Company, was used to calibrate the small-sample assay region of the instrument. Performance testing was completed before installation of the instrument to determine the effects of uranium enrichment, hydrogenous materials, and neutron poisons on assays. The unit was designed to measure high-enriched uranium samples in the presence of large neutron backgrounds. Measurements indicate that the system can assay low-enriched uranium samples with moderate backgrounds if calibrated with proper standards.

  6. Dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, G.L.

    1976-01-01

    This review contains more than 100 observations and 224 references on the dissolution phenomenon. The dissolution processes are grouped into three categories: methods of aqueous attack, fusion methods, and miscellaneous observations on phenomena related to dissolution problems

  7. Effect of aluminum and silicon reactants and process parameters on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    In this report, the effects of aluminum and silicon reactants, process soak time and the initial calcine particle size on glass-ceramic waste form characteristics for immobilization of the high-level fluorinel-sodium calcined waste stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) are investigated. The waste form characteristics include density, total and normalized elemental leach rates, and microstructure. Glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a pre-compacted mixture of pilot plant fluorinel-sodium calcine, Al, and Si metal powders at 1050 degrees C, 20,000 psi for 4 hours. One of the formulations with 2 wt % Al was HIPed for 4, 8, 16 and 24 hours at the same temperature and pressure. The calcine particle size range include as calcined particle size smaller than 600 μm (finer than -30 mesh, or 215 μm Mass Median Diameter, MMD) and 180 μm (finer than 80 mesh, or 49 μm MMD)

  8. Glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the fluorinel-sodium, alumina, and zirconia calcines stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinjamuri, K. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Glass-ceramics appear to be very good candidate waste forms for immobilization of the calcined high level solid wastes, fluorinel-sodium (Fl/Na), alumina and zirconia that are stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Candidate experimental glass-ceramics were synthesized at ICPP by hot isostatically pressing (HIPing) a mixture of precompacted pilot plant calcine and additives. The glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of the Fl/Na, alumina, and zirconia calcines consist of 70 wt% Fl/Na calcine, 23.9 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 1.1 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}; 70 wt% alumina calcine, 30 wt% SiO{sub 2}; and 70 wt% zirconia calcine, 20.25 wt% SiO{sub 2}, 5 wt% Ti, 2.25 wt% Na{sub 2}O, 1.75 wt% B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 0.75 wt% Li{sub 2}O, respectively. The characteristics of the waste forms including density, chemical durability, glass and crystalline phases, and the microstructure are investigated. The 14-day MCC-1 total mass loss rates and the normalized elemental leach rates for aluminum, boron, calcium, cadmium, chromium, cesium, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, titanium, and zirconium are all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}-day. The crystalline phases for the Fl/Na and zirconia waste forms include zirconia, zircon, calcium fluoride, and titanates. In addition, cadmium sulphide in Fl/Na, and cadmium metal in zirconia waste form were also identified. The crystalline phases for the alumina waste form are alpha, gamma, and delta alumina, cristobalite, albite, and mullite. Glass phase separation was not observed in alumina and zirconia waste forms. The observed glass phase separation in Fl/Na waste form appears to be chemically durable.

  9. Catalysed electrolytic metal oxide dissolution processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrometallurgical processes designed for recovering valuable metals from mineral ores as well as industrial wastes usually require preliminary dissolution of inorganic compounds in aqueous media before extraction and purification steps. Unfortunately, most of the minerals concerned hardly or slowly dissolve in acidic or basic solutions. Metallic oxides, sulfides and silicates are among the materials most difficult to dissolve in aqueous solutions. They are also among the main minerals containing valuable metals. The redox properties of such materials sometimes permit to improve their dissolution by adding oxidizing or reducing species to the leaching solution, which leads to an increase in the dissolution rate. Moreover, limited amounts of redox promoters are required if the redox agent is regenerated continuously thanks to an electrochemical device. Nuclear applications of such concepts have been suggested since the dissolution of many actinide compounds (e.g., UO 2 , AmO 2 , PuC, PuN,...) is mainly based on redox reactions. In the 1980s, improvements of the plutonium dioxide dissolution process have been proposed on the basis of oxidation-reduction principles, which led a few years later to the design of industrial facilities (e.g., at Marcoule or at the french reprocessing plant of La Hague). General concepts and well-established results obtained in France at the Atomic Energy Commission (''Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique'') will be presented and will illustrate applications to industrial as well as analytical problems. (author)

  10. HEME and HEPA filter element dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicero, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Plant to remove volatile and semi-volatile effluents from the off-gases generated during the vitrification process. When removed, these filters are likely to contain radioactive contaminants, organics, and hazardous materials, which make their disposal by normal methods impractical. Hence, an alternative disposal method is needed. The alternative disposal method evaluated in this study is dissolution of the filters with caustic and acid solutions. Dissolution converts the waste into an aqueous stream, which can be transferred to the Tank Farm and disposed of by normal means. This process was shown to be effective on a small scale in earlier studies, but the results were not well documented and the studies were not performed on fouled filters

  11. Applications of plutonium dioxide oxydising dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, M.; Bourges, J.; Madic, C.

    1987-01-01

    Laboratory investigations having demonstrated the outstanding effectiveness of Ag 2+ ions for the dissolution of plutonium dioxide in nitric medium, two applications of this method were developed at the CEA: dissolution of off-standard PuO 2 , recovery of the plutonium contained in ashes produced by incineration of solid wastes. With respect to PuO 2 dissolution, the parametric investigation of the electrogeneration of Ag (II) and of its reaction with PuO 2 , led to the development of a process and of the equipment required for its implementation. The prototype facility used to dissolve in 4 hours 1 kg of plutonium, in oxide form, was built and tested in the laboratory. This equipment was used to dissolve 30 kg of plutonium oxide in batches of about 700 grams. An in-line spectrophotometric method was developed for process control. The application of this process to the recovery of plutonium from incineration ash is currently being developed. Tested on the scale of about 1 kg of ash, the process helps to recover the plutonium with yields higher than 98 % [fr

  12. System and process for dissolution of solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liezers, Martin; Farmer, III, Orville T.

    2017-10-10

    A system and process are disclosed for dissolution of solids and "difficult-to-dissolve" solids. A solid sample may be ablated in an ablation device to generate nanoscale particles. Nanoparticles may then swept into a coupled plasma device operating at atmospheric pressure where the solid nanoparticles are atomized. The plasma exhaust may be delivered directly into an aqueous fluid to form a solution containing the atomized and dissolved solids. The composition of the resulting solution reflects the composition of the original solid sample.

  13. Study of dissolution process and its modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of mathematical concepts and language aiming to describe and represent the interactions and dynamics of a system is known as a mathematical model. Mathematical modelling finds a huge number of successful applications in a vast amount of science, social and engineering fields, including biology, chemistry, physics, computer sciences, artificial intelligence, bioengineering, finance, economy and others. In this research, we aim to propose a mathematical model that predicts the dissolution of a solid material immersed in a fluid. The developed model can be used to evaluate the rate of mass transfer and the mass transfer coefficient. Further research is expected to be carried out to use the model as a base to develop useful models for the pharmaceutical industry to gain information about the dissolution of medicaments in the body stream and this could play a key role in formulation of medicaments.

  14. Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O'Brien, B.H.

    1992-06-01

    Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500 degrees C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect

  15. Magnetite Dissolution Performance of HYBRID-II Decontamination Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seonbyeong; Lee, Woosung; Won, Huijun; Moon, Jeikwon; Choi, Wangkyu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we conducted the magnetite dissolution performance test of HYBRID-II (Hydrazine Based Reductive metal Ion Decontamination with sulfuric acid) as a part of decontamination process development. Decontamination performance of HYBRID process was successfully tested with the results of the acceptable decontamination factor (DF) in the previous study. While following-up studies such as the decomposition of the post-decontamination HYBRID solution and corrosion compatibility on the substrate metals of the target reactor coolant system have been continued, we also seek for an alternate version of HYBRID process suitable especially for decommissioning. Inspired by the relationship between the radius of reacting ion and the reactivity, we replaced the nitrate ion in HYBRID with bigger sulfate ion to accommodate the dissolution reaction and named HYBRID-II process. As a preliminary step for the decontamination performance, we tested the magnetite dissolution performance of developing HYBRID-II process and compared the results with those of HYBRID process. HYBRID process developed previously is known have the acceptable decontamination performance, but the relatively larger volume of secondary waste induced by anion exchange resin to treat nitrate ion is the one of the problems related in the development of HYBRID process to be applicable. Therefore we alternatively devised HYBRID-II process using sulfuric acid and tested its dissolution of magnetite in numerous conditions. From the results shown in this study, we can conclude that HYBRID-II process improves the decontamination performance and potentially reduces the volume of secondary waste. Rigorous tests with metal oxide coupons obtained from reactor coolant system will be followed to prove the robustness of HYBRID-II process in the future

  16. Dissolution -- A new approach to NORM processing and disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeLeux, D.E.

    1995-11-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has become a significant issue for regulatory agencies and oil companies in recent years. With oil and gas production, Radium 226 and Radium 228 are carried to the surface dissolved in the produced saltwater. NORM is formed when these radioactive isotopes are precipitated from the produced waters in the form of metal scales in tubulars and production equipment. One NORM disposal technique, developed by AMBAR, Inc., of Lafayette, Louisiana, employs a dissolution process using proprietary chemistry which dissolves scales, releasing the radioactive isotopes back into their natural liquid state. The resulting by products of the process are solids and liquids which meet regulatory requirements for non-hazardous oilfield waste (NOW) disposal. This article will present: A NORM description; Problems associated with NORM; Solutions to the problems; The dissolution method and chemistry; Field operational procedures, and future regulator impact.

  17. Selection of a glass-ceramic formulation to immobilize fluorinel- sodium calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, B.A.; Wood, H.C.

    1994-12-01

    One option for immobilizing calcined high level wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is conversion to a glass-ceramic form through hot isostatic pressing. Calcines exist in several different chemical compositions, and thus candidate formulations have been developed for converting each to glass-ceramic forms which are potentially resistant to aqueous corrosion and stable enough to qualify for repository storage. Fluorinel/Na, a chemically complex calcine type, is one of the types being stored at ICPP, and development efforts have identified three formulations with potential for immobilizing it. These are a glass forming additive that uses aluminum metal to enhance reactivity, a second glass forming additive that uses titanium metal to enhance reactivity and a third that uses not only a combination of silicon and titanium metals but enough phosphorous pentoxide to form a calcium phosphate host phase in the glass-ceramic product. Glass-ceramics of each formulation performed well in restricted characterization tests. However, none of the three was subjected to rigorous testing that would provide information on whether each was processable, that is able to retain favorable characteristics over a practical range of processing conditions.

  18. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME`s) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump.

  19. Pilot-scale tests of HEME and HEPA dissolution process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qureshi, Z.H.; Strege, D.K.

    1994-06-01

    A series of pilot-scale demonstration tests for the dissolution of High Efficiency Mist Eliminators (HEME's) and High Efficiency Particulate Airfilters (HEPA) were performed on a 1/5th linear scale. These fiberglass filters are to be used in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) to decontaminate the effluents from the off-gases generated during the feed preparation process and vitrification. When removed, these filters will be dissolved in the Decontamination Waste Treatment Tank (DWTT) using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The contaminated fiberglass is converted to an aqueous stream which will be transferred to the waste tanks. The filter metal structure will be rinsed with process water before its disposal as low-level solid waste. The pilot-scale study reported here successfully demonstrated a simple one step process using 5 wt% NaOH solution. The proposed process requires the installation of a new water spray ring with 30 nozzles. In addition to the reduced waste generated, the total process time is reduced to 48 hours only (66% saving in time). The pilot-scale tests clearly demonstrated that the dissolution process of HEMEs has two stages - chemical digestion of the filter and mechanical erosion of the digested filter. The digestion is achieved by a boiling 5 wt% caustic solutions, whereas the mechanical break down of the digested filter is successfully achieved by spraying process water on the digested filter. An alternate method of breaking down the digested filter by increased air sparging of the solution was found to be marginally successful are best. The pilot-scale tests also demonstrated that the products of dissolution are easily pumpable by a centrifugal pump

  20. Enhanced dissolution of oxcarbazepine microcrystals using a static mixer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douroumis, D; Fahr, A

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to form micronized powders of Oxcarbazepine (OXC), a poorly water-soluble drug, using a static mixer technique to enhance the dissolution rate. Controlled precipitation was achieved injecting the organic OXC solution rapidly into an aqueous methylcellulose (MC) protective solution by means of a static mixer thus providing turbulent and homogeneous mixing. Furthermore, a factorial design was implemented for data analysis. The physicochemical properties of the freeze-dried dispersions were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Drug microcrystals showed a narrow size distribution with approximately 2 microm mean particle size and high drug loading. DSC and FTIR studies revealed that the drug remained in crystalline state and no drug-polymer interaction occurred. The dissolution studies showed enhanced dissolution of OXC microcrystals compared to the pure drug. The static mixer technique was proved capable for micro-sized polymeric particles. This is an inexpensive, less time consuming and fully scalable process for development of poorly soluble drugs.

  1. Neutron interrogator assay system for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant waste canisters and spent fuel: preliminary description and operating procedures manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Eccleston, G.; Close, D.A.; Speir, L.G.

    1978-05-01

    A neutron interrogation assay system is being designed for the measurement of waste canisters and spent fuel packages at the new Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to be operated by Allied Chemical Corp. The assay samples consist of both waste canisters from the fluorinel dissolution process and spent fuel assemblies. The assay system is a 252 Cf ''Shuffler'' that employs a cyclic sequence of fast-neutron interrogation with a 252 Cf source followed by delayed-neutron counting to determine the 235 U content

  2. Reflectometric monitoring of the dissolution process of thin polymeric films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Räty, Jukka; Korhonen, Kristiina; Ketolainen, Jarkko; Peiponen, Kai-Erik

    2017-05-15

    Pharmaceutical thin films are versatile drug-delivery platforms i.e. allowing transdermal, oral, sublingual and buccal administration. However, dissolution testing of thin films is challenging since the commonly used dissolution tests for conventional dosage forms correspond rather poorly to the physiological conditions at the site of administration. Here we introduce a traditional optical reflection method for monitoring the dissolution behavior of thin polymeric films. The substances, e.g. drug molecules, released from the film generate an increase in the refractive index in the liquid medium which can be detected by reflectance monitoring. Thin EUDRAGIT ® RL PO poly(ethyl acrylate-co-methyl methacrylate-co trimethylammonioethyl methacrylate chloride) (RLPO) films containing the model drug perphenazine (PPZ) were prepared by spraying on a glass substrate. The glass substrates were placed inside the flow cell in the reflectometer which was then filled with phosphate buffer solution. Dissolution was monitored by measuring the reflectance of the buffer liquid. The method was able to detect the distinctive dissolution characteristics of different film formulations and measured relatively small drug concentrations. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that a traditional optical reflection method can provide valuable information about the dissolution characteristics of thin polymeric films in low liquid volume surroundings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dissolution enhancement of Deflazacort using hollow crystals prepared by antisolvent crystallization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, A S; Rauber, G; Campos, C E M; Maurício, M H P; de Avillez, R R; Capobianco, G; Cardoso, S G; Cuffini, S L

    2013-05-13

    Deflazacort (DFZ), a derivate of prednisolone, is a poorly soluble drug which has been proposed to have major advantages over other corticosteroids. Poorly soluble drugs present limited bioavailability due to their low solubility and dissolution rate and several strategies have been developed in order to find ways to improve them. In general, pharmaceutical laboratories use a micronized process to reduce the particle size in order to increase the dissolution of the drugs. However, this process causes changes such as polymorphic transitions, particle agglomeration and a reduction in fluidity and wettability. These solid-state properties affect the dissolution behavior and stability performance of drugs. Crystallization techniques are widely used in the pharmaceutical industry and antisolvent crystallization has been used to obtain ultrafine particles. In this study, DFZ was investigated in terms of its antisolvent crystallization in different solvents and under various preparation conditions (methanol/water ratio, stirring and evaporation rate, etc.), in order to compare the physicochemical properties between crystallized samples and raw materials available on the Brazilian market with and without micronization. Crystalline structure, morphology, and particle size, and their correlation with the Intrinsic Dissolution Rate (IDR) and dissolution profile as relevant biopharmaceutical properties were studied. Crystallization conditions were achieved which provided crystalline samples of hollow-shaped crystals with internal channels, which increased the dissolution rate of DFZ. The antisolvent crystallization process allowed the formation of hollow crystals, which demonstrated a better dissolution profile than the raw material (crystalline and micronized), making this a promising technique as a crystallization strategy for improving the dissolution and thus the bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissolution of metallic uranium and its alloys. Part 1. Review of analytical and process-scale metallic uranium dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laue, C.A.; Gates-Anderson, D.; Fitch, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    This review focuses on dissolution/reaction systems capable of treating uranium metal waste to remove its pyrophoric properties. The primary emphasis is the review of literature describing analytical and production-scale dissolution methods applied to either uranium metal or uranium alloys. A brief summary of uranium's corrosion behavior is included since the corrosion resistance of metals and alloys affects their dissolution behavior. Based on this review, dissolution systems were recommended for subsequent screening studies designed to identify the best system to treat depleted uranium metal wastes at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). (author)

  5. Chemistry of proposed calcination/dissolution processing of Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Plans exist to separate radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in south central Washington State into low-level and high-level fractions, and to immobilize the separate fractions in high-integrity vitrified forms for long-term disposal. Calcination with water dissolution has been proposed as a possible treatment for achieving low/high-level separation. Chemistry development activities conducted since 1992 with simulated and genuine tank waste show that calcination/dissolution destroys organic carbon and converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide and benign offgases. The process also dissolves significant quantities of bulk chemicals (aluminum, chromium, and phosphate), allowing their redistribution from the high-level to the low-level fraction. Present studies of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution processing of genuine wastes, conducted in the period October 1993 to September 1994, show the importance of sodium fluoride phosphate double salt in controlling phosphate dissolution. Peptization of waste solids is of concern if extensive washing occurs. Strongly oxidizing conditions imposed by calcination reactions were found to convert transition metals to soluble anions in the order chromate > manganate > > ferrate. In analogy with manganese behavior, plutonium dissolution, presumably by oxidation to more soluble anionic species, also occurs by calcination/dissolution. Methods to remove plutonium from the product low-level solution stream must be developed

  6. Dissolution Dominating Calcification Process in Polar Pteropods Close to the Point of Aragonite Undersaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednaršek, Nina; Tarling, Geraint A.; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Fielding, Sophie; Feely, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Thecosome pteropods are abundant upper-ocean zooplankton that build aragonite shells. Ocean acidification results in the lowering of aragonite saturation levels in the surface layers, and several incubation studies have shown that rates of calcification in these organisms decrease as a result. This study provides a weight-specific net calcification rate function for thecosome pteropods that includes both rates of dissolution and calcification over a range of plausible future aragonite saturation states (Ωar). We measured gross dissolution in the pteropod Limacina helicina antarctica in the Scotia Sea (Southern Ocean) by incubating living specimens across a range of aragonite saturation states for a maximum of 14 days. Specimens started dissolving almost immediately upon exposure to undersaturated conditions (Ωar∼0.8), losing 1.4% of shell mass per day. The observed rate of gross dissolution was different from that predicted by rate law kinetics of aragonite dissolution, in being higher at Ωar levels slightly above 1 and lower at Ωar levels of between 1 and 0.8. This indicates that shell mass is affected by even transitional levels of saturation, but there is, nevertheless, some partial means of protection for shells when in undersaturated conditions. A function for gross dissolution against Ωar derived from the present observations was compared to a function for gross calcification derived by a different study, and showed that dissolution became the dominating process even at Ωar levels close to 1, with net shell growth ceasing at an Ωar of 1.03. Gross dissolution increasingly dominated net change in shell mass as saturation levels decreased below 1. As well as influencing their viability, such dissolution of pteropod shells in the surface layers will result in slower sinking velocities and decreased carbon and carbonate fluxes to the deep ocean. PMID:25285916

  7. Development of dissolution process for metal foil target containing low enriched uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, B.; Hutter, J.C.; Johnson, G.K.; Vandegrift, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    About six times more low enriched uranium (LEU) metal is needed to produce the same quantity of 99 Mo as from a high enriched uranium (HEU) oxide target, under similar conditions of neutron irradiation. In view of this, the post-irradiation processing procedures of the LEU target are likely to be different from the Cintichem process procedures now in use for the HEU target. The authors have begun a systematic study to develop modified procedures for LEU target dissolution and 99 Mo separation. The dissolution studies include determination of the dissolution rate, chemical state of uranium in the solution, and the heat evolved in the dissolution reaction. From these results the authors conclude that a mixture of nitric and sulfuric acid is a suitable dissolver solution, albeit at higher concentration of nitric acid than in use for the HEU targets. Also, the dissolver vessel now in use for HEU targets is inadequate for the LEU target, since higher temperature and higher pressure will be encountered in the dissolution of LEU targets. The desire is to keep the modifications to the Cintichem process to a minimum, so that the switch from HEU to LEU can be achieved easily

  8. Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AJ Schmidt; CH Delegard; KL Silvers; PR Bredt; CD Carlson; EW Hoppe; JC Hayes; DE Rinehart; SR Gano; BM Thornton

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO 3 ) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the dissolver

  9. Validation Testing of the Nitric Acid Dissolution Step Within the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AJ Schmidt; CH Delegard; KL Silvers; PR Bredt; CD Carlson; EW Hoppe; JC Hayes; DE Rinehart; SR Gano; BM Thornton

    1999-03-24

    The work described in this report involved comprehensive bench-scale testing of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) dissolution of actual sludge materials from the Hanford K East (KE) Basin to confirm the baseline chemical pretreatment process. In addition, process monitoring and material balance information was collected to support the development and refinement of process flow diagrams. The testing was performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)for the US Department of Energy's Office of Spent Fuel Stabilization (EM-67) and Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to assist in the development of the K Basin Sludge Pretreatment Process. The baseline chemical pretreatment process for K Basin sludge is nitric acid dissolution of all particulate material passing a 1/4-in. screen. The acid-insoluble fraction (residual solids) will be stabilized (possibly by chemical leaching/rinsing and grouting), packaged, and transferred to the Hanford Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The liquid fraction is to be diluted with depleted uranium for uranium criticality safety and iron nitrate for plutonium criticality safety, and neutralized with sodium hydroxide. The liquid fraction and associated precipitates are to be stored in the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) pending vitrification. It is expected that most of the polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), associated with some K Basin sludges, will remain with the residual solids for ultimate disposal to ERDF. Filtration and precipitation during the neutralization step will further remove trace quantities of PCBs within the liquid fraction. The purpose of the work discussed in this report was to examine the dissolution behavior of actual KE Basin sludge materials at baseline flowsheet conditions and validate the.dissolution process step through bench-scale testing. The progress of the dissolution was evaluated by measuring the solution electrical conductivity and concentrations of key species in the

  10. Cognitive processing in the aftermath of relationship dissolution: Associations with concurrent and prospective distress and posttraumatic growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Palacio-González, Adriana; Clark, David A; O'Sullivan, Lucia F

    2017-12-01

    Non-marital romantic relationship dissolution is amongst the most stressful life events experienced by young adults. Yet, some individuals experience posttraumatic growth following relationship dissolution. Little is known about the specific and differential contribution of trait-like and event-specific cognitive processing styles to each of these outcomes. A longitudinal design was employed in which trait-like (brooding and reflection) and dissolution-specific (intrusive and deliberate) cognitive processing was examined as predictors of growth (Posttraumatic Growth Inventory) and distress (Breakup Distress Scale) following a recent relationship dissolution. Initially, 148 participants completed measures of trait-like and dissolution-specific cognitive processing, growth, and distress (T1). A subsample completed a seven-month follow-up (T2). Higher frequency of relationship-dissolution intrusive thoughts predicted concurrent distress after accounting for brooding and relationship characteristics. Further, higher brooding and lower reflection predicted higher distress prospectively. Concurrent growth was predicted by both higher brooding and more deliberate relationship-dissolution thoughts. Prospectively, T1 dissolution intrusive thoughts predicted higher T2 deliberate thoughts, and the interaction between these two constructs predicted higher T2 growth. Therefore, deliberately thinking of the dissolution was related to positive psychological outcomes. In contrast, intrusive dissolution cognitions and a tendency for brooding had a mixed (paradoxical) association with psychological adjustment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Development of a continuous dissolution process for the new reprocessing plants at La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auchapt, P.; Patarin, L.; Tarnero, M.

    1984-01-01

    The French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique has designed a continuous rotary dissolver for LWR fuel reprocessing. An industrial prototype has been tested since 1979 at the Service des Prototypes Industriels, at Marcoule. This type of dissolver will be installed at the COGEMA's Reprocessing Plants at La Hague. The advantages of a continuous process are listed, compared to batch dissolutions (chemistry, operation, capacity). The industrial prototype, featuring safe geometry, is described. The R and D program is indicated, and the main results of inactive tests already performed on the industrial prototype are given, including heating, mechanical, and chemical tests (UO 2 dissolutions at 4tU per day)

  12. Dissolution process of atmospheric aerosol particles into cloud droplets; Processus de dissolution des aerosols atmospheriques au sein des gouttes d'eau nuageuses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desboeufs, K.

    2001-01-15

    Clouds affect both climate via the role they play in the Earth's radiation balance and tropospheric chemistry since they are efficient reaction media for chemical transformation of soluble species. Cloud droplets are formed in the atmosphere by condensation of water vapour onto aerosol particles, the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The water soluble fraction of these CCN governs the cloud micro-physics, which is the paramount factor playing on the radiative properties of clouds. Moreover, this soluble fraction is the source of species imply in the oxidation/reduction reactions in the aqueous phase. Thus, it is of particular importance to understand the process controlling the solubilization of aerosols in the cloud droplets. The main purpose of this work is to investigate experimentally and theoretically the dissolution of particles incorporated in the aqueous phase. From the studies conducted up to now, we have identify several factors playing on the dissolution reaction of aerosols. However, the quantification of the effects of these factors is difficult since the current means of study are not adapted to the complexity of cloud systems. First, this work consisted to perform a experimental system, compound by an open flow reactor, enabling to follow the kinetic of dissolution in conditions representative of cloud. This experimental device is used to a systematic characterisation of the known factors playing on the dissolution, i.e. pH, aerosol nature, aerosol weathering... and also for the identification and the quantification of the effects of other factors: ionic strength, acid nature, clouds processes. These experiments gave quantitative results, which are used to elaborate a simple model of aerosol dissolution in the aqueous phase. This model considers the main factors playing on the dissolution and results in a general mechanism of aerosol dissolution extrapolated to the cloud droplets. (author)

  13. Intensification of zinc dissolution process in sulphuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many high purity salts are produced by dissolving pure metal in non-oxidizing mineral acids. If hydrogen overpotential on the given metal is high, then the rate of overall process is defined by reaction of hydrogen ion reduction. This study investigated the possibility of accelerated dissolving of metal zinc in sulphuric acid by introducing copper cathode on which evolving hydrogen is much easier than on zinc. It was found out that the acceleration of zinc dissolving is possible and, at constant surface of copper cathode depends on the quality of electrical contact between copper electrode and zinc.

  14. The mathematical model of the stripping voltammetry hydrogen evolution/dissolution process on Pd layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skital, Piotr M.; Sanecki, Przemyslaw T.; Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    The advanced two-plate mathematical model of electrochemical hydrogen evolution/dissolution process has been presented and discussed. The model, with Langmuir adsorption equation, has been experimentally verified by the use of the glassy carbon/Pd layer electrode system at different scan rates. The two cathodic-anodic stages of hydrogen evolution/dissolution process in 0.1 M and 0.001 M HCl solutions have been interpreted and discussed. The thickness of the layer and the way of deposition were also investigated. The fundamental kinetic problem of a change of electrode properties during electrode process as an effect of the elementary hydrogen presence in the solid electrode is presented and interpreted. The isopotential point phenomenon, an electrochemical analog of isosbestic point in absorption spectroscopy, was unexpectedly discovered as experimental effect of hydrogen adsorption and α variability.

  15. Method for improving dissolution efficiency in gas-absorption and liquid extraction processes. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanak, B.E.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1980-01-11

    A method is described for improving dissolution efficiency in processes in which a feed fluid is introduced to a zone where it is contacted with a liquid solvent for preferentially removing a component of the feed and where part of the solvent so contacted undergoes transfer into the feed fluid to saturate the same. It has been found that such transfer significantly impairs dissolution efficiency. In accordance with the invention, an amount of the above-mentioned solvent is added to the feed fluid being introduced to the contact zone, the solvent being added in an amount sufficient to effect reduction or elimination of the above-mentioned transfer. Preferably, the solvent is added to the feed fluid in an amount saturating or supersaturating the feed fluid under the conditions prevailing in the contact zone.

  16. Method for improving dissolution efficiency in gas-absorption and liquid extraction processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanak, Brant E.; Stephenson, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    This invention is a method for improving dissolution efficiency in processes in which a feed fluid is introduced to a zone where it is contacted with a liquid solvent for preferentially removing a component of the feed and where part of the solvent so contacted undergoes transfer into the feed fluid to saturate the same. It has been found that such transfer significantly impairs dissolution efficiency. In accordance with the invention, an amount of the above-mentioned solvent is added to the feed fluid being introduced to the contact zone, the solvent being added in an amount sufficient to effect reduction or elimination of the above-mentioned transfer. Preferably, the solvent is added to the feed fluid in an amount saturating or supersaturating the feed fluid under the conditions prevailing in the contact zone.

  17. Fracture Dissolution of Carbonate Rock: An Innovative Process for Gas Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James W. Castle; Ronald W. Falta; David Bruce; Larry Murdoch; Scott E. Brame; Donald Brooks

    2006-10-31

    The goal of the project is to develop and assess the feasibility and economic viability of an innovative concept that may lead to commercialization of new gas-storage capacity near major markets. The investigation involves a new approach to developing underground gas storage in carbonate rock, which is present near major markets in many areas of the United States. Because of the lack of conventional gas storage and the projected growth in demand for storage capacity, many of these areas are likely to experience shortfalls in gas deliverability. Since depleted gas reservoirs and salt formations are nearly non-existent in many areas, alternatives to conventional methods of gas storage are required. The need for improved methods of gas storage, particularly for ways to meet peak demand, is increasing. Gas-market conditions are driving the need for higher deliverability and more flexibility in injection/withdrawal cycling. In order to meet these needs, the project involves an innovative approach to developing underground storage capacity by creating caverns in carbonate rock formations by acid dissolution. The basic concept of the acid-dissolution method is to drill to depth, fracture the carbonate rock layer as needed, and then create a cavern using an aqueous acid to dissolve the carbonate rock. Assessing feasibility of the acid-dissolution method included a regional geologic investigation. Data were compiled and analyzed from carbonate formations in six states: Indiana, Ohio, Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York. To analyze the requirements for creating storage volume, the following aspects of the dissolution process were examined: weight and volume of rock to be dissolved; gas storage pressure, temperature, and volume at depth; rock solubility; and acid costs. Hydrochloric acid was determined to be the best acid to use because of low cost, high acid solubility, fast reaction rates with carbonate rock, and highly soluble products (calcium chloride

  18. Application of a newly developed portable NIR imaging device to monitor the dissolution process of tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Daitaro; Murayama, Kodai; Awa, Kimie; Genkawa, Takuma; Komiyama, Makoto; Kazarian, Sergei G; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-11-01

    We have recently developed a novel portable NIR imaging device (D-NIRs), which has a high speed and high wavelength resolution. This NIR imaging approach has been developed by utilizing D-NIRs for studying the dissolution of a model tablet containing 20 % ascorbic acid (AsA) as an active pharmaceutical ingredient and 80 % hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, where the tablet is sealed by a special cell. Diffuse reflectance NIR spectra in the 1,000 to 1,600 nm region were measured during the dissolution of the tablet. A unique band at around 1,361 nm of AsA was identified by the second derivative spectra of tablet and used for AsA distribution NIR imaging. Two-dimensional change of AsA concentration of the tablet due to water penetration is clearly shown by using the band-based image at 1,361 nm in NIR spectra obtained with high speed. Moreover, it is significantly enhanced by using the intensity ratio of two bands at 1,361 and 1,354 nm corresponding to AsA and water absorption, respectively, showing the dissolution process. The imaging results suggest that the amount of AsA in the imaged area decreases with increasing water penetration. The proposed NIR imaging approach using the intensity of a specific band or the ratio of two bands combined with the developed portable NIR imaging instrument, is a potentially useful practical way to evaluate the tablet at every moment during dissolution and to monitor the concentration distribution of each drug component in the tablet.

  19. Physical and chemical characteristics of fluorinel/sodium calcine generated during 30 cm Pilot-Plant Run 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Kessinger, G.F.; Littleton, L.L.; Olson, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    The 30 centimeter (cm) pilot plant calciner Run 17, of March 9, 1987, was performed to study the calcination of fluroinel-sodium blended waste blended at the ratio 3.5:1 fluorinel to sodium, respectively. The product of the run was analyzed by a variety of analytical techniques that included X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to deduce physical and chemical characteristics. The analytical data, as well as data analyses and conclusions drawn from the data, are presented

  20. Mockup testing of remote systems for zirconium fuel dissolution process at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    A facility is being constructed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for storage and dissolution of spent zirconium reactor fuels. The dissolution is carried out in chemical type equipment contained in a large shielded cell. The design provides for remote operations and maintenance as required. Equipment predicted to fail within 5 years is designed for remote maintenance. Each system was fabricated for mockup testing using readily available materials. The mockups were tested, redesigned, and retested until satisfactory remote designs were achieved. Records were made of all the work. All design changes were then incorporated into the ongoing detailed design for the actual equipment. Several of these systems are discussed and they include valve replacement, pump replacement, waste solids handling, mechanism operations and others. The mockup program has saved time and money by eliminating many future problems. In addition, the mockup program will continue through construction, cold startup, and hot operations

  1. Testing of the Defense Waste Processing Facility Cold Chemical Dissolution Method in Sludge Batch 9 Qualification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coleman, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Young, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Brown, L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-10

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) tests the applicability of the digestion methods used by the DWPF Laboratory for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt samples and SRAT Product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a method referred to as the DWPF Cold Chemical or Cold Chem Method (CC), (see DWPF Procedure SW4- 15.201). Testing indicates that the CC method produced mixed results. The CC method did not result in complete dissolution of either the SRAT Receipt or SRAT Product with some fine, dark solids remaining. However, elemental analyses did not reveal extreme biases for the major elements in the sludge when compared with analyses obtained following dissolution by hot aqua regia (AR) or sodium peroxide fusion (PF) methods. The CC elemental analyses agreed with the AR and PF methods well enough that it should be adequate for routine process control analyses in the DWPF after much more extensive side-by-side tests of the CC method and the PF method are performed on the first 10 SRAT cycles of the Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) campaign. The DWPF Laboratory should continue with their plans for further tests of the CC method during these 10 SRAT cycles.

  2. Process control plan for Single Shell Tank (SST) Saltcake Dissolution Proof of Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    2001-01-01

    This document describes the process controls for the tank 241-U-107 (U-107) saltcake dissolution proof-of-concept operations. Saltcake dissolution is defined as a method by which water-soluble salts will be retrieved from the Hanford Site radioactive waste tanks utilizing dissolution as the mobilizing mechanism. The proof-of-concept operations will monitor the retrieval process and transfer at least 100 kgal of fluid from tank U-107 to the double-shell tank (DST) system during the performance period. Tank U-107 has been identified as posing the highest long-term risk to the Columbia River of all single shell tanks (SSTs). This is because of the high content of mobile, long-lived radionuclides mostly in the saltcake waste in the tank. To meet current contractual and consent decree commitments, tank U-107 is being prepared for interim stabilization in August 2001. It is currently scheduled for saltcake retrieval in 2023, near the end of the SST retrieval campaign because of a lack of infrastructure in U-Farm. The proof-of-concept test will install a system to dissolve and retrieve a portion of the saltcake as part of, and operating in parallel with, the standard interim stabilization system to be installed on tank U-107. This proof-of-concept should provide key information on spray nozzle selection and effective spray patterns, leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) and in-tank saltcake solubility data that will help in the design of a full-tank retrieval demonstration system

  3. Dissolution and precipitation behaviour in steels microalloyed with niobium during thermomechanical processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, P.; Palmiere, E.J.; Rainforth, W.M.

    2015-01-01

    The thermomechanical processing of high strength low allow (HSLA) steels during low-temperature roughing, followed by rapid reheating to higher temperatures was investigated to better understand the Nb dissolution kinetics in austenite, and the subsequent precipitation behaviour during the final finishing passes. For comparative purposes, two experimental 0.06 wt% C steels were studied, one containing 0.03 wt% Nb (Nb steel), and the second containing both 0.03 wt% Nb and 0.02 wt% Ti (Nb–Ti steel). Processing of these steels consisted of a simulated roughing schedule, with the final roughing pass taking place at 850 °C. The strain-induced precipitation intensity in the steels subsequently quenched where characterised using transmission electron microscopy. Following this, the steels were rapidly reheated at a rate of 10 °C/s to a temperature of 1200 °C, held at temperature for various times, and water quenched to room temperature so that both the precipitate dissolution kinetics, together with the austenite grain coarsening kinetics could be established

  4. Study of the solubility and stability of polystyrene wastes in a dissolution recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Teresa; Gracia, Ignacio; Duque, Gema; Lucas, Antonio de; Rodríguez, Juan Francisco

    2009-06-01

    Dissolution with suitable solvents is one of the cheapest and more efficient processes for polystyrene waste management. In this work the solubility of polystyrene foams in several solvents benzene, toluene, xylene, tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, 1,3-butanediol, 2-butanol, linalool, geraniol, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, terpineol, menthol, eucalyptol, cinnamaldheyde, nitrobenzene, N,N-dimethylformamide and water has been determined. Experimental results have shown that to develop a "green process" the constituents of essential oils, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, are the most appropriate solvents. The action of these solvent does not produce any degradation of polymer chains. The solubility of the polymer in the mentioned solvents at different temperatures has been investigated. The solvent can be easily recycled by distillation.

  5. Study of the solubility and stability of polystyrene wastes in a dissolution recycling process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Maria Teresa; Gracia, Ignacio; Duque, Gema; Lucas, Antonio de; Rodriguez, Juan Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Dissolution with suitable solvents is one of the cheapest and more efficient processes for polystyrene waste management. In this work the solubility of polystyrene foams in several solvents benzene, toluene, xylene, tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, 1,3-butanediol, 2-butanol, linalool, geraniol, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, terpineol, menthol, eucalyptol, cinnamaldheyde, nitrobenzene, N,N-dimethylformamide and water has been determined. Experimental results have shown that to develop a 'green process' the constituents of essential oils, d-limonene, p-cymene, terpinene, phellandrene, are the most appropriate solvents. The action of these solvent does not produce any degradation of polymer chains. The solubility of the polymer in the mentioned solvents at different temperatures has been investigated. The solvent can be easily recycled by distillation.

  6. The Influence of Various Process Parameters on Dissolution Kinetics and Mechanism of Struvite Seed Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyanto, Eko; Ang, Ha Ming; Sen, Tushar Kanti

    2017-09-01

    The basic understanding of struvite dissolution chemistry is essential to designers and operators for anticipating struvite problem and remediating existing struvite damage in a wastewater treatment. The dissolution kinetic of struvite seed crystals is very important parameters to determine a solid substance entering in solvent to yield a solution. In this study the dissolution kinetics of struvite crystals (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) in deionized water was investigated in a batch crystallizer. The effects of stirrer speeds, temperature and seed crystals size on the dissolution rate were determined. The results showed that an increase of struvite dissolution rate with increasing stirring speed. Struvite dissolution occurred via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the range of stirrer speeds 120-400 rpm but became interfacial-reaction-controlling at over 400 rpm. The influence of temperature on dissolution kinetic of struvite crystals was also investigated at stirrer speeds of 200 and 500 rpm. The dissolution rates increased with an increase in the temperature for both stirrer speeds. The change in activation energies at different stirrer speeds confirmed that the change of dissolution mechanism from a diffusion-controlled mechanism at low stirrer speeds to an interfacial-reaction-controlled mechanism at higher stirrer speeds. The dissolution rate of struvite crystals increased with smaller crystal sizes.

  7. Rapid Automated Dissolution and Analysis Techniques for Radionuclides in Recycle Process Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudowe, Ralf; Roman, Audrey; Dailey, Ashlee; Go, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of process samples for radionuclide content is an important part of current procedures for material balance and accountancy in the different process streams of a recycling plant. The destructive sample analysis techniques currently available necessitate a significant amount of time. It is therefore desirable to develop new sample analysis procedures that allow for a quick turnaround time and increased sample throughput with a minimum of deviation between samples. In particular, new capabilities for rapid sample dissolution and radiochemical separation are required. Most of the radioanalytical techniques currently employed for sample analysis are based on manual laboratory procedures. Such procedures are time- and labor-intensive, and not well suited for situations in which a rapid sample analysis is required and/or large number of samples need to be analyzed. To address this issue we are currently investigating radiochemical separation methods based on extraction chromatography that have been specifically optimized for the analysis of process stream samples. The influence of potential interferences present in the process samples as well as mass loading, flow rate and resin performance is being studied. In addition, the potential to automate these procedures utilizing a robotic platform is evaluated. Initial studies have been carried out using the commercially available DGA resin. This resin shows an affinity for Am, Pu, U, and Th and is also exhibiting signs of a possible synergistic effects in the presence of iron.

  8. Investigation of the interactions of enteric and hydrophilic polymers to enhance dissolution of griseofulvin following hot melt extrusion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ryan C; Keen, Justin M; Bi, Yunxia Vivian; Porter, Stuart; Dürig, Thomas; McGinity, James W

    2015-07-01

    This study focuses on the application of hot melt extrusion (HME) to produce solid dispersions containing griseofulvin (GF) and investigates the in-vitro dissolution performance of HME powders and resulting tablet compositions containing HME-processed dispersions. Binary, ternary and quaternary dispersions containing GF, enteric polymer (Eudragit L100-55 or AQOAT-LF) and/or vinyl pyrrolidone-based polymer (Plasdone K-12 povidone or S-630 copovidone) were processed by HME. Two plasticizers, triethyl citrate (TEC) and acetyl tributyl citrate (ATBC), were incorporated to aid in melt processing and to modify release of GF in neutral media following a pH-change in dissolution. Products were characterized for GF recovery, degrees of compositional amorphous character, intermolecular interactions and non-sink dissolution performance. Binary dispersions exhibited lower maximum observed concentration values and magnitudes of supersaturated GF in neutral media dissolution in comparison with the ternary dispersions. The quaternary HME products, 1 : 2 : 1 : 0.6 GF : L100-55 : S-630 : ATBC and GF : AQOAT-LF : K-12 : ATBC, were determined as the most optimal concentration-enhancing compositions due to increased hydrogen bonding of enteric functional groups with carbonyl/acetate groups of vinyl pyrrolidone-based polymers, reduced compositional crystallinity and presence of incorporated hydrophobic plasticizer. HME products containing combinations of concentration-enhancing polymers can supersaturate and sustain GF dissolution to greater magnitudes in neutral media following the pH-transition and be compressed into immediate-release tablets exhibiting similar dissolution profiles. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Iron dissolution of dust source materials during simulated acidic processing: the effect of sulfuric, acetic, and oxalic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haihan; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-09-17

    Atmospheric organic acids potentially display different capacities in iron (Fe) mobilization from atmospheric dust compared with inorganic acids, but few measurements have been made on this comparison. We report here a laboratory investigation of Fe mobilization of coal fly ash, a representative Fe-containing anthropogenic aerosol, and Arizona test dust, a reference source material for mineral dust, in pH 2 sulfuric acid, acetic acid, and oxalic acid, respectively. The effects of pH and solar radiation on Fe dissolution have also been explored. The relative capacities of these three acids in Fe dissolution are in the order of oxalic acid > sulfuric acid > acetic acid. Oxalate forms mononuclear bidentate ligand with surface Fe and promotes Fe dissolution to the greatest extent. Photolysis of Fe-oxalate complexes further enhances Fe dissolution with the concomitant degradation of oxalate. These results suggest that ligand-promoted dissolution of Fe may play a more significant role in mobilizing Fe from atmospheric dust compared with proton-assisted processing. The role of atmospheric organic acids should be taken into account in global-biogeochemical modeling to better access dissolved atmospheric Fe deposition flux at the ocean surface.

  10. Effects of gastric pH on oral drug absorption: In vitro assessment using a dissolution/permeation system reflecting the gastric dissolution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Makoto; Fukahori, Miho; Ikemura, Atsumi; Kubota, Ayaka; Higashino, Haruki; Sakuma, Shinji; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of gastric pH on the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs using an in vitro system. A dissolution/permeation system (D/P system) equipped with a Caco-2 cell monolayer was used as the in vitro system to evaluate oral drug absorption, while a small vessel filled with simulated gastric fluid (SGF) was used to reflect the gastric dissolution phase. After applying drugs in their solid forms to SGF, SGF solution containing a 1/100 clinical dose of each drug was mixed with the apical solution of the D/P system, which was changed to fasted state-simulated intestinal fluid. Dissolved and permeated amounts on applied amount of drugs were then monitored for 2h. Similar experiments were performed using the same drugs, but without the gastric phase. Oral absorption with or without the gastric phase was predicted in humans based on the amount of the drug that permeated in the D/P system, assuming that the system without the gastric phase reflected human absorption with an elevated gastric pH. The dissolved amounts of basic drugs with poor water solubility, namely albendazole, dipyridamole, and ketoconazole, in the apical solution and their permeation across a Caco-2 cell monolayer were significantly enhanced when the gastric dissolution process was reflected due to the physicochemical properties of basic drugs. These amounts resulted in the prediction of higher oral absorption with normal gastric pH than with high gastric pH. On the other hand, when diclofenac sodium, the salt form of an acidic drug, was applied to the D/P system with the gastric phase, its dissolved and permeated amounts were significantly lower than those without the gastric phase. However, the oral absorption of diclofenac was predicted to be complete (96-98%) irrespective of gastric pH because the permeated amounts of diclofenac under both conditions were sufficiently high to achieve complete absorption. These estimations of the effects of

  11. Effects of wet-granulation process parameters on the dissolution and physical stability of a solid dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Ryo; Ohta, Tomoaki; Shiraki, Koji; Higashi, Kenjirou; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2017-05-30

    This study investigated how the process parameters of wet-granulation affect the properties of solid dispersions (SDs), such as dissolution and physical stability. SDs of nilvadipine (NIL) and hypromellose prepared by spray-drying were wet-granulated and dried under various conditions. The NIL concentration at 4h and area under the curve from dissolution tests were taken to indicate dissolution. Then, the NIL crystallinity calculated from powder X-ray diffraction patterns of SD granules stored at 60°C for 3 months was evaluated to indicate physical stability. A statistical analysis revealed that the amount of granulation liquid (w/w%) and the ratio of water to ethanol in the liquid (v/v%) significantly affected the dissolution property, and that the drying temperature had a significant effect on the physical stability. Although exposure to water makes the wet-granulation process seem less suitable for granulating a SD, the results indicated that the process can be used to develop SD granules by selecting appropriate conditions, such as a lower proportion of granulation liquid, a higher water to ethanol ratio in the liquid, and a higher drying temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effect of Shear Rate on Dissolution of Gas and Cell Density in Continuous Foaming Process

    OpenAIRE

    M.H.N. Famili; M. Ako

    2009-01-01

    The effect of shear rate on dissolution of carbon dioxide in viscoelastic wheat flour matrix and cell density in a glass barrel twin screw extruder is investigated. It is found that by increasing the shear rate there will be a decrease in the required thermodynamic conditions and hence, it improves blowing agent dissolution and increases the cell density. Shear rate breaks up big bubbles and helps to better distribute the blowing agent in the matrix and hence it increases the cell density. Ce...

  13. The Effect of Shear Rate on Dissolution of Gas and Cell Density in Continuous Foaming Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.N. Famili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of shear rate on dissolution of carbon dioxide in viscoelastic wheat flour matrix and cell density in a glass barrel twin screw extruder is investigated. It is found that by increasing the shear rate there will be a decrease in the required thermodynamic conditions and hence, it improves blowing agent dissolution and increases the cell density. Shear rate breaks up big bubbles and helps to better distribute the blowing agent in the matrix and hence it increases the cell density. Cell density decreases by dropping foam cooling rate. For a given cell density, a higher screw speed is needed, ifthe cooling rate is decreased.

  14. Optimization of LiCoO2 powder extraction process from cathodes of lithium-ion batteries by chemical dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Evangelista Sita

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A chemical process has been applied to extract LiCoO2 powder from cathodes of spent lithium-ion batteries by dissolution of the binder that agglutinate the powder particle each other as well to the Al collector surface. As solvents dimethylformamide (DMF and N-methyilpirrolidone (NMP were employed and the variables, cathode area, solution temperature, ultrasound bath power and solution stirring were chosen to optimize the extraction process. NMP solutions presented best results for powder extraction than DMF solutions. At 100 oC and under mechanical stirring or low power ultrasound bath NMP solution optimizes the binder dissolution. Powder extractions under DMF solutions are slow and an increase in the powder extraction efficiency was observed for crushed cathodes on solutions under ultrasound bath, at medium power. Filtration processes can separate the decanted LiCoO2 powder extracted upon DMF dissolution while the powder in suspension in the NMP solutions is separated by centrifugation techniques.

  15. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  16. An evaluation of the dissolution process of natural uranium ore as an analogue of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, V.H.

    1991-08-01

    The assumption of congruent dissolution of uraninite as a mechanism for the dissolution behaviour of spent fuel was critically examined with regard to the fate of toxic radionuclides. The fission and daughter products of uranium are typically present in spent unreprocessed fuel rods in trace abundances. The principles of trace element geochemistry were applied in assessing the behaviour of these radionuclides during fluid/solid interactions. It is shown that the behaviour of radionuclides in trace abundances that reside in the crystal structure can be better predicted from the ionic properties of these nuclides rather than from assuming that they are controlled by the dissolution of uraninite. Geochemical evidence from natural uranium ore deposits (Athabasca Basin, Northern Territories of Australia, Oklo) suggests that in most cases the toxic radionuclides are released from uraninite in amounts that are independent of the solution behaviour of uranium oxide. Only those elements that have ionic and thus chemical properties similar to U 4+ , such as plutonium, americium, cadmium, neptunium and thorium can be satisfactorily modelled by the solution properties of uranium dioxide and then only if the environment is reducing. (84 refs., 7 tabs.)

  17. [Process monitoring of dissolution of valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide tablets by fiber-chemical sensor assisted by mathematical separation model of linear equations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hai-Yan; Li, Gai-Ru; Yu, Ying-Ge; Guo, Wei; Zhi, Ling; Li, Xin-Xia

    2014-04-01

    A method for on-line monitoring the dissolution of Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide tablets assisted by mathematical separation model of linear equations was established. UV spectrums of valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide were overlapping completely at the maximum absorption wavelength respectively. According to the Beer-Lambert principle of absorbance additivity, the absorptivity of Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide was determined at the maximum absorption wavelength, and the dissolubility of Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide tablets was detected by fiber-optic dissolution test (FODT) assisted by the mathematical separation model of linear equations and compared with the HPLC method. Results show that two ingredients were real-time determined simultaneously in given medium. There was no significant difference for FODT compared with HPLC (p > 0.05). Due to the dissolution behavior consistency, the preparation process of different batches was stable and with good uniformity. The dissolution curves of valsartan were faster and higher than hydrochlorothiazide. The dissolutions at 30 min of Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide were concordant with US Pharmacopoeia. It was concluded that fiber-optic dissolution test system assisted by the mathematical separation model of linear equations that can detect the dissolubility of Valsartan and hydrochlorothiazide simultaneously, and get dissolution profiles and overall data, which can directly reflect the dissolution speed at each time. It can provide the basis for establishing standards of the drug. Compared to HPLC method with one-point data, there are obvious advantages to evaluate and analyze quality of sampling drug by FODT.

  18. A superior preparation method for daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complexes with improved solubility and dissolution: Supercritical fluid process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Hao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Advantages of the supercritical fluid (SCF process compared to the conventional solution stirring method (CSSM in the preparation of daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD complexes were investigated. Formation of daidzein/ HPβCD inclusion complexes was confirmed by Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Particle size, inclusion yield, drug solubility and dissolution of daidzein/HPβCD complexes were evaluated. Compared to CSSM, the SCF process resulted in higher inclusion yield and higher solubility. Also, extended dissolution of daidzein from the SCF processed HPβCD inclusion complexes was observed, with only 22.94 % released in 45 min, compared to its rapid release from those prepared by CSSM, with 98.25 % drug release in 15 min. This extended release of daidzein from SCF prepared inclusion complexes was necessary to avoid drug precipitation and improve drug solubilisation in the gastrointestinal tract. The results showed that the SCF process is a superior preparation method for daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complexes.

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DISSELKAMP RS

    2011-01-06

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E{sub A}, of A = 5.0 x 10{sup 12} hour{sup -1} and E{sub A} = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A KINETIC MODEL OF BOEHMITE DISSOLUTION IN CAUSTIC SOLUTIONS APPLIED TO OPTIMIZE HANFORD WASTE PROCESSING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disselkamp, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    Boehmite (e.g., aluminum oxyhydroxide) is a major non-radioactive component in Hanford and Savannah River nuclear tank waste sludge. Boehmite dissolution from sludge using caustic at elevated temperatures is being planned at Hanford to minimize the mass of material disposed of as high-level waste (HLW) during operation of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). To more thoroughly understand the chemistry of this dissolution process, we have developed an empirical kinetic model for aluminate production due to boehmite dissolution. Application of this model to Hanford tank wastes would allow predictability and optimization of the caustic leaching of aluminum solids, potentially yielding significant improvements to overall processing time, disposal cost, and schedule. This report presents an empirical kinetic model that can be used to estimate the aluminate production from the leaching of boehmite in Hanford waste as a function of the following parameters: (1) hydroxide concentration; (2) temperature; (3) specific surface area of boehmite; (4) initial soluble aluminate plus gibbsite present in waste; (5) concentration of boehmite in the waste; and (6) (pre-fit) Arrhenius kinetic parameters. The model was fit to laboratory, non-radioactive (e.g. 'simulant boehmite') leaching results, providing best-fit values of the Arrhenius A-factor, A, and apparent activation energy, E A , of A = 5.0 x 10 12 hour -1 and E A = 90 kJ/mole. These parameters were then used to predict boehmite leaching behavior observed in previously reported actual waste leaching studies. Acceptable aluminate versus leaching time profiles were predicted for waste leaching data from both Hanford and Savannah River site studies.

  1. Can we get a better knowledge on dissolution processes in chalk by using microfluidic chips?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuville, Amélie; Minde, Mona; Renaud, Louis; Vinningland, Jan Ludvig; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Hiorth, Aksel

    2017-04-01

    This work has been initiated in the context of research on improving the oil recovery in chalk bedrocks. One of the methods to improve the oil recovery is to inject "smart water" (acidic water/brines). Experiments on core scale and field tests that have been carried out the last decade have clearly shown that water chemistry affects the final oil recovery. However, there is generally no consensus in the scientific community of why additional oil is released, and it is also still not understood what are the mineralogical and structural changes. Direct in situ observation of the structural changes that occur when chalk is flooded with brines could resolve many of the open questions that remain. One of the highlights of this work is thus the development of an innovative methodology where fluid/rock interactions are observed in-situ by microscopy. To do so, we create several types of custom-made microfluidic systems that embeds reactive materials like chalk and calcite. The methodology we develop can be applied to other reactive materials. We will present an experiment where a calcite window dissolves with a fluid, where we observe in-situ the topography features of the calcite window, as well as the dissolution rate [1]. The injected fluid circulates at controlled flowrates in a channel which is obtained by xurography: double sided tape is cut out with a cutter plotter and placed between the reactive window and a non-reactive support. While the calcite window reacts, its topography is measured in situ every 10 s using an interference microscope, with a pixel resolution of 4.9 μm and a vertical resolution of 50 nm. These experiments are also compared with reactive flow simulations done with Lattice Boltzmann methods. Then, we will present a dissolution experiment done with a microfluidic system that embeds chalk. In this experiment, the main flow takes place at the chalk surface, in contact with fluid flowing in a channel above the chalk sample. Thus the reaction

  2. TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION: GLASS FORMULATION PROCESSING WINDOW PREDICTIONS FOR SB5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, K.; Tommy Edwards, T.; David Peeler, D.

    2007-01-01

    Composition projections for Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) were developed, based on a modeling approach at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), to evaluate possible impacts of the Al-dissolution process on the availability of viable frit compositions for vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The study included two projected SB5 compositions that bound potential outcomes (or degrees of effectiveness) of the Al-dissolution process, as well as a nominal SB5 composition projection based on the results of the recent Al-dissolution demonstration at SRNL. The three SB5 projections were the focus of a two-stage paper study assessment. A Nominal Stage assessment combined each of the SB5 composition projections with an array of 19,305 frit compositions over a wide range of waste loading (WL) values and evaluated them against the DWPF process control models. The Nominal Stage results allowed for the down-selection of a small number of frits that provided reasonable projected operating windows (typically 27 to 42 wt% WL). The frit/sludge systems were mostly limited by process related constraints, with only one system being limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization, a waste form affecting constraint. The criteria applied in selecting the frit compositions somewhat restricted the compositional flexibility of the candidate frits for each individual SB5 composition projection, which may limit the ability to further tailor the frit for improved melt rate. Variation Stage assessments were then performed using the down-selected frits and the three SB5 composition projections with variation applied to each sludge component. The Variation Stage results showed that the operating windows were reduced in width, as expected when variation in the sludge composition is applied. However, several of the down-selected frits exhibited a relatively high degree of robustness to the applied sludge variation, providing WL windows of approximately 30 to 39 wt%. The

  3. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO 2 as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 deg C and 60 deg C, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  4. In-line ATR-UV and Raman Spectroscopy for Monitoring API Dissolution Process During Liquid-Filled Soft-Gelatin Capsule Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Boyong; Zordan, Christopher A; Lu, Xujin; McGeorge, Gary

    2016-10-01

    Complete dissolution of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) is critical in the manufacturing of liquid-filled soft-gelatin capsules (SGC). Attenuated total reflectance UV spectroscopy (ATR-UV) and Raman spectroscopy have been investigated for in-line monitoring of API dissolution during manufacturing of an SGC product. Calibration models have been developed with both techniques for in-line determination of API potency. Performance of both techniques was evaluated and compared. The ATR-UV methodology was found to be able to monitor the dissolution process and determine the endpoint, but was sensitive to temperature variations. The Raman technique was also capable of effectively monitoring the process and was more robust to the temperature variation and process perturbations by using an excipient peak for internal correction. Different data preprocessing methodologies were explored in an attempt to improve method performance.

  5. On the nucleation and dissolution process of Z-phase Cr(V,Nb)N in martensitic 12%Cr steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Hald, John

    2009-01-01

    Precipitation of large Z-phase particles, Cr(V,Nb)N, replacing fine MX nitrides, (V,Nb)N, has recently been identified as a major cause of premature breakdown in long-term creep strength of a number of new 9–12%Cr martensitic steels. The Z-phase precipitates slowly during long-term exposure...... at around 650 ◦C accelerated by high Cr content in the steels. It appears that the nucleation process controls the precipitation rate of Z-phase. A 12%Cr steel, which had precipitated Z-phase during long-term operation at 660 ◦C/12,000 h, was further heat treated in order to investigate the dissolution...

  6. Synthesis and characterization of alumina-coated aluminum sponges manufactured by sintering and dissolution process as possible structured reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Méndez, Franklin J., E-mail: fmendez@ivic.gob.ve [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Rivero-Prince, Sayidh [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Escalante, Yelisbeth; Villasana, Yanet [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Brito, Joaquín L., E-mail: joabrito@ivic.gob.ve [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado Postal 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al sponges were manufactured by sintering and dissolution process with the aim of using these materials as structured catalytic reactors. For this purpose, several synthesis conditions were examined for the design of the cellular material, such as: particle size of NaCl, weight fraction of Al, compaction pressure, and sintering temperature or time. An alumina layers was grown on top of the aluminum surfaces during both: sintering and thermal treatment. The obtained results showed that the synthesized materials could be promising as structured reactors for endothermic or exothermic reactions. - Highlights: • An efficient method for manufactured of aluminum sponges is reported. • Methods for productions of superficial Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} are studied. • Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Al sponges could be used as structured reactors.

  7. Cognitive Processing in the Aftermath of Relationship Dissolution: Associations with Concurrent and Prospective Distress and Posttraumatic Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    del Palacio Gonzalez, Adriana; Clark, David; O'Sullivan, Lucia F.

    2017-01-01

    Non-marital romantic relationship dissolution is amongst the most stressful life events experienced by young adults. Yet, some individuals experience posttraumatic growth following relationship dissolution. Little is known about the specific and differential contribution of trait-like and event-s...

  8. Dissolution-precipitation processes in tank experiments for testing numerical models for reactive transport calculations: Experiments and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonoosamy, Jenna; Kosakowski, Georg; Van Loon, Luc R.; Mäder, Urs

    2015-06-01

    In the context of testing reactive transport codes and their underlying conceptual models, a simple 2D reactive transport experiment was developed. The aim was to use simple chemistry and design a reproducible and fast to conduct experiment, which is flexible enough to include several process couplings: advective-diffusive transport of solutes, effect of liquid phase density on advective transport, and kinetically controlled dissolution/precipitation reactions causing porosity changes. A small tank was filled with a reactive layer of strontium sulfate (SrSO4) of two different grain sizes, sandwiched between two layers of essentially non-reacting quartz sand (SiO2). A highly concentrated solution of barium chloride was injected to create an asymmetric flow field. Once the barium chloride reached the reactive layer, it forced the transformation of strontium sulfate into barium sulfate (BaSO4). Due to the higher molar volume of barium sulfate, its precipitation caused a decrease of porosity and lowered the permeability. Changes in the flow field were observed with help of dye tracer tests. The experiments were modelled using the reactive transport code OpenGeosys-GEM. Tests with non-reactive tracers performed prior to barium chloride injection, as well as the density-driven flow (due to the high concentration of barium chloride solution), could be well reproduced by the numerical model. To reproduce the mineral bulk transformation with time, two populations of strontium sulfate grains with different kinetic rates of dissolution were applied. However, a default porosity permeability relationship was unable to account for measured pressure changes. Post mortem analysis of the strontium sulfate reactive medium provided useful information on the chemical and structural changes occurring at the pore scale at the interface that were considered in our model to reproduce the pressure evolution with time.

  9. Dissolution Processes at Step Edges of Calcite in Water Investigated by High-Speed Frequency Modulation Atomic Force Microscopy and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kazuki; Tracey, John; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Haapasilta, Ville; Spijker, Peter; Kawagoe, Yuta; Foster, Adam S; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Fukuma, Takeshi

    2017-07-12

    The microscopic understanding of the crystal growth and dissolution processes have been greatly advanced by the direct imaging of nanoscale step flows by atomic force microscopy (AFM), optical interferometry, and X-ray microscopy. However, one of the most fundamental events that govern their kinetics, namely, atomistic events at the step edges, have not been well understood. In this study, we have developed high-speed frequency modulation AFM (FM-AFM) and enabled true atomic-resolution imaging in liquid at ∼1 s/frame, which is ∼50 times faster than the conventional FM-AFM. With the developed AFM, we have directly imaged subnanometer-scale surface structures around the moving step edges of calcite during its dissolution in water. The obtained images reveal that the transition region with typical width of a few nanometers is formed along the step edges. Building upon insight in previous studies, our simulations suggest that the transition region is most likely to be a Ca(OH) 2 monolayer formed as an intermediate state in the dissolution process. On the basis of this finding, we improve our understanding of the atomistic dissolution model of calcite in water. These results open up a wide range of future applications of the high-speed FM-AFM to the studies on various dynamic processes at solid-liquid interfaces with true atomic resolution.

  10. Enhanced performance large volume dissolution-DNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bowen, Sean; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study of the performance of the dissolution process in dissolution-DNP is presented. A relatively simple set of modifications is made to the standard Hypersense dissolution system to enable polarization of large volume samples. These consist of a large volume sample cup along with su...

  11. Dissolution Processes, Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemistry by its very nature is concerned with change. There are simple but significant interactions between air, water, and minerals that impact our natural environment. Minerals with well-defined structure are converted by various environmental chemical reactions into their e...

  12. Studies of the thermal dissolution process of the Suzuki phase of the Eu2+ ion in KBr single crystals by analysis of photoacoustic signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MejIa-Uriarte, E V; Castaneda-Guzman, R; Villagran-Muniz, M; Camarillo, E; A, J Hernandez; S, H Murrieta; Navarrete, M

    2003-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the thermal behaviour of the dissolution process of the Suzuki phase (SP) by continuous heating (1 deg. C min -1 ) of KBr:Eu 2+ crystals is reported in this work. The thermal profiles were determined by the correlation functions between subsequent photoacoustic (PA) signals registered during the dissolution process. The behaviour of the thermal profile is directly related to the absorption coefficient of the Eu 2+ ion in precipitated states that are present in the crystal. The PA signal is detected as a consequence of the non-radiative processes that take place after the excitation of the low-energy band of the Eu 2+ ion by means of a focused laser pulse at 355 nm. The results obtained by this method are compared with those simultaneously obtained by the photoluminescence (PL) technique. The samples were heated from room temperature to 205 deg. C. The PA signal and PL spectrum were obtained every 6 deg. C. The temperature range of the SP dissolution process was from 77 to 115 deg. C. These results are in agreement with those obtained by the PL technique and with the data reported in the literature

  13. Glass melting and its innovation potentials: the potential role of glass flow in the sand-dissolution process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němec, Lubomír; Cincibusová, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2009), s. 145-155 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA MPO 2A-1TP1/063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : sand dissolution * temperature gradients * glass flow patterns * space utilisation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  14. Mathematical modeling of drug dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siepmann, J; Siepmann, F

    2013-08-30

    The dissolution of a drug administered in the solid state is a pre-requisite for efficient subsequent transport within the human body. This is because only dissolved drug molecules/ions/atoms are able to diffuse, e.g. through living tissue. Thus, generally major barriers, including the mucosa of the gastro intestinal tract, can only be crossed after dissolution. Consequently, the process of dissolution is of fundamental importance for the bioavailability and, hence, therapeutic efficacy of various pharmaco-treatments. Poor aqueous solubility and/or very low dissolution rates potentially lead to insufficient availability at the site of action and, hence, failure of the treatment in vivo, despite a potentially ideal chemical structure of the drug to interact with its target site. Different physical phenomena are involved in the process of drug dissolution in an aqueous body fluid, namely the wetting of the particle's surface, breakdown of solid state bonds, solvation, diffusion through the liquid unstirred boundary layer surrounding the particle as well as convection in the surrounding bulk fluid. Appropriate mathematical equations can be used to quantify these mass transport steps, and more or less complex theories can be developed to describe the resulting drug dissolution kinetics. This article gives an overview on the current state of the art of modeling drug dissolution and points out the assumptions the different theories are based on. Various practical examples are given in order to illustrate the benefits of such models. This review is not restricted to mathematical theories considering drugs exhibiting poor aqueous solubility and/or low dissolution rates, but also addresses models quantifying drug release from controlled release dosage forms, in which the process of drug dissolution plays a major role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Collective dissolution of microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelin, Sébastien; Guérin, Etienne; Lauga, Eric

    2018-04-01

    A microscopic bubble of soluble gas always dissolves in finite time in an undersaturated fluid. This diffusive process is driven by the difference between the gas concentration near the bubble, whose value is governed by the internal pressure through Henry's law, and the concentration in the far field. The presence of neighboring bubbles can significantly slow down this process by increasing the effective background concentration and reducing the diffusing flux of dissolved gas experienced by each bubble. We develop theoretical modeling of such diffusive shielding process in the case of small microbubbles whose internal pressure is dominated by Laplace pressure. We first use an exact semianalytical solution to capture the case of two bubbles and analyze in detail the shielding effect as a function of the distance between the bubbles and their size ratio. While we also solve exactly for the Stokes flow around the bubble, we show that hydrodynamic effects are mostly negligible except in the case of almost-touching bubbles. In order to tackle the case of multiple bubbles, we then derive and validate two analytical approximate yet generic frameworks, first using the method of reflections and then by proposing a self-consistent continuum description. Using both modeling frameworks, we examine the dissolution of regular one-, two-, and three-dimensional bubble lattices. Bubbles located at the edge of the lattices dissolve first, while innermost bubbles benefit from the diffusive shielding effect, leading to the inward propagation of a dissolution front within the lattice. We show that diffusive shielding leads to severalfold increases in the dissolution time, which grows logarithmically with the number of bubbles in one-dimensional lattices and algebraically in two and three dimensions, scaling respectively as its square root and 2 /3 power. We further illustrate the sensitivity of the dissolution patterns to initial fluctuations in bubble size or arrangement in the case

  16. Kozeny-Carman permeability relationship with disintegration process predicted from early dissolution profiles of immediate release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Parveen; Rathi, Pooja; Kumar, Virender; Lal, Jatin; Kaur, Harmeet; Singh, Jasbir

    2017-07-01

    This study was oriented toward the disintegration profiling of the diclofenac sodium (DS) immediate-release (IR) tablets and development of its relationship with medium permeability k perm based on Kozeny-Carman equation. Batches (L1-L9) of DS IR tablets with different porosities and specific surface area were prepared at different compression forces and evaluated for porosity, in vitro dissolution and particle-size analysis of the disintegrated mass. The k perm was calculated from porosities and specific surface area, and disintegration profiles were predicted from the dissolution profiles of IR tablets by stripping/residual method. The disintegration profiles were subjected to exponential regression to find out the respective disintegration equations and rate constants k d . Batches L1 and L2 showed the fastest disintegration rates as evident from their bi-exponential equations while the rest of the batches L3-L9 exhibited the first order or mono-exponential disintegration kinetics. The 95% confidence interval (CI 95% ) revealed significant differences between k d values of different batches except L4 and L6. Similar results were also spotted for dissolution profiles of IR tablets by similarity (f 2 ) test. The final relationship between k d and k perm was found to be hyperbolic, signifying the initial effect of k perm on the disintegration rate. The results showed that disintegration profiling is possible because a relationship exists between k d and k perm . The later being relatable with porosity and specific surface area can be determined by nondestructive tests.

  17. Influence of dissolution processing of PVA blends on the characteristics of their hydrogels synthesized by radiation—Part I: Gel fraction, swelling, and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcântara, M.T.S.; Brant, A.J.C.; Giannini, D.R.; Pessoa, J.O.C.P.; Andrade, A.B.; Riella, H.G.; Lugão, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this work several hydrogels were obtained with two different poly(vinyl alcohol)s/PVAs as the main polymer in aqueous solutions containing 10% of PVA, 0.6% of agar, and 0.6% of κ-carrageenan (KC), cross-linked by gamma-rays from a 60 Co irradiation source. The PVAs tested have different degrees of hydrolysis and viscosities at 4% with values closed to 30 mPa s. The aqueous polymeric solutions were prepared using two distinct processes: the simple process of heating–stirring and that of making use of an autoclave. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the dissolution process by means of both methods on the hydrogels’ properties obtained. These were investigated by means of degree of cross-linking/gel fraction, degree of swelling in water, and some mechanical properties. The results that are obtained for hydrogels synthesized from solutions of PVA, agar, KC, and blends thereof prepared by both dissolution processes showed higher degrees of swelling for hydrogels from the autoclaved polymer solutions than those from the solutions prepared by simple heating–stirring process. Furthermore, their hydrogels containing totally hydrolyzed PVA displayed higher tensile strength and lower elongation properties. - Highlights: ► Hydrogels from γ-irradiated PVA and PVA-polysaccharide blends were obtained. ► PVA molar mass and degree of hydrolysis play an important role in their hydrogels. ► Dissolution processes of PVAs have influenced on their hydrogel characteristics. ► Degrees of swelling of hydrogels were lower when prepared from autoclaved solutions.

  18. Dissolution of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Pereira Sanchez, G.

    1968-01-01

    The dissolution of aluminum with acid solutions ( nitric acid-mercuric nitrate) and alkaline solutions (sodium hydroxide-sodium nitrate) has been studied. The instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) has been studied in function of the concentration of the used reagents and the dissolution temperature. The complete dissolution has been included in the second part of this report, to know the total dissolution time, the consume of reagents and the stability of the resultant solutions. (Author)

  19. Original research paper. A superior preparation method for daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complexes with improved solubility and dissolution: Supercritical fluid process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Hao; Wang, Han-Bing; Yu, Yi-Bin; Cheng, Bing-Chao; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Ying

    2017-03-01

    Advantages of the supercritical fluid (SCF) process compared to the conventional solution stirring method (CSSM) in the preparation of daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) complexes were investigated. Formation of daidzein/ HPβCD inclusion complexes was confirmed by Fourier transformed-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Particle size, inclusion yield, drug solubility and dissolution of daidzein/HPβCD complexes were evaluated. Compared to CSSM, the SCF process resulted in higher inclusion yield and higher solubility. Also, extended dissolution of daidzein from the SCF processed HPβCD inclusion complexes was observed, with only 22.94 % released in 45 min, compared to its rapid release from those prepared by CSSM, with 98.25 % drug release in 15 min. This extended release of daidzein from SCF prepared inclusion complexes was necessary to avoid drug precipitation and improve drug solubilisation in the gastrointestinal tract. The results showed that the SCF process is a superior preparation method for daidzein-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin complexes.

  20. Effect drug loading process on dissolution mechanism of encapsulated amoxicillin trihydrate in hydrogel semi-IPN chitosan methyl cellulose with pore forming agent KHCO3 as a floating drug delivery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fithawati, Garnis; Budianto, Emil

    2018-04-01

    Common treatment for Helicobacter pylori by repeated oral consumption of amoxicillin trihydrate is not effective. Amoxicillin trihydrate has a very short residence time in stomach which leads into its ineffectiveness. Residence time of amoxicillin trihydrate can be improved by encapsulating amoxicillin trihydrate into a floating drug delivery system. In this study, amoxicillin trihydrate is encapsulated into hydrogel semi-IPN chitosan methyl cellulose matrix as a floating drug delivery system and then treated with 20% KHCO3 as pore forming agent. Drug loading process used are in-situ loading and post loading. In-situ loading process has higher efficiency percentage and dissolution percentage than post loading process. In-situ loading process resulted 100% efficiency with 92,70% dissolution percentage. Post loading process resulted 98,7% efficiency with 90,42% dissolution percentage. Mechanism of drug dissolution study by kinetics approach showed both in-situ loading process and post loading process are diffusion and degradation process (n=0,4913) and (n=0,4602) respectively. These results are supported by characterization data from optical microscope and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data from optical microscope showed both loading process resulted in coarser hydrogel surface. Characterization using SEM showed elongated pores in both loading process after dissolution test.

  1. Home Dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten; Bech-Danielsen, Claus

    2008-01-01

    Building a home and creating a family are highly inter­connec­ted processes. So what happens with the home when people separate or divorce? In this paper we address this question both from a quantitative and a qualitative approach. Based on an extensive database with socio-economic background data...... problems of dissolving a home. How to decide who should stay, who should move and how was it to stay alone in or to leave the matrimonial home?...

  2. Dissolution Methods Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — For a drug product that does not have a dissolution test method in the United States Pharmacopeia (USP), the FDA Dissolution Methods Database provides information on...

  3. Formation, transformation and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    The basic mechanisms of film growth, transformation, and dissolution of phases formed on surfaces are discussed. Film growth can occur via solid-state processes or via substrate (usally metal or alloy) dissolution, followed by local supersaturation and precipitation of an insoluble phase. The phase(s) formed may be metastable and transform to a more stable phase, via either solid-state or dissolution-reprecipitation processes. Film dissolution reactions can also occur via a variety of mechanisms, including: (i) direct chemical dissolution when no oxidation state change occurs; (ii) redox dissolution when the film dissolves via a redox reaction involving a reducing or oxidizing agent in solution; and (iii) autoreduction, where film dissolution is coupled to metal dissolution. Such film-growth and dissolution processes, which often produce complex multilayer films, are common in the nuclear industry. A number of examples are discussed

  4. Thorium oxide dissolution: kinetics and mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonnet, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of new energy sources are necessary to meet the rising global demand. In the nuclear area, Th-U cycle has been reinvestigated to supplement or replace the currently used U-Pu cycle. This project though needs further improvement to be operated in an industrial plant, especially on the reprocessing process, which consists in fuel dissolution in nitric acid medium, followed by liquid-liquid extraction. Still, unlike uranium, thorium oxide does not dissolve in concentrated nitric acid. Small amounts of fluoride are required to achieve the dissolution. The dissolution is rather slow and HNO 3 -HF mixture is very corrosive. The aim of this project is thus to find an efficient dissolution method which both decreases corrosion and improves dissolution rate. The synthesized thorium oxide powder has been dissolved in chosen conditions. Effects of solid parameters, dissolution method and dissolution medium have been studied. Results show a strong dependence on oxide crystallinity. No improvement on dissolution rate was observed with power ultrasounds, except for the temperature increase, which greatly enhances dissolution rate. No other complexing agents than fluoride allows total dissolution. Rising HNO 3 and HF concentrations increases dissolution rate until the amount of fluorides is so high that a precipitate forms at the surface. This study led to the proposal of a dissolution mechanism whose limiting step is the formation of an activated complex. Based on kinetics and equilibrium equations, initial dissolution rate was then written as a function of the different studied parameters. Experimental results were finally fitted by this relation to find kinetics and thermodynamics constants, proving the accuracy of the proposed mechanism. (author)

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and Dissolution Rate In Vitro Evaluation of Total Panax Notoginsenoside Nanoparticles, Typical Multicomponent Extracts from Traditional Chinese Medicine, Using Supercritical Antisolvent Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Total Panax notoginsenosides nanoparticles, typical multicomponent extracts from traditional Chinese medicine, were prepared with a supercritical antisolvent (SAS process using ethanol as solvent and carbon dioxide as antisolvent. The optimum conditions were determined to be as follows: TPNS solution concentration of 2.5 mg/mL, TPNS solution flow rate of 6.6 mL/min, precipitation temperature of 40°C, and precipitation pressure of 20 MPa. Under the optimum conditions, TPNS nanoparticles with a MPS of 141.5 ± 18.2 nm and total saponins amounts (TSA of 78.9% were obtained. The TPNS nanoparticles obtained were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, dynamic light scattering (DLS, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimeters (DSC, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The results showed that the chemical and crystal structure of the obtained TPNS nanoparticles has not changed. Dissolution in vitro studies showed that the solubility and dissolution rate of notoginsenosides R1 and ginsenoside Rb1 in TPNS nanoparticles are higher than these in raw TPNS, with no obvious difference in Rg1. These results suggest that TPNS nanoparticles can be helpful to the improvement of its bioavailability for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Random effects in drug dissolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čupera, J.; Lánský, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 41, 3-4 (2010), s. 430-439 ISSN 0928-0987 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC06024 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : dissolution * stochastic differential equations * Wiener process Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 3.291, year: 2010

  7. On the dissolution of vapors and gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüstneck, N; Wüstneck, R; Pison, U; Möhwald, H

    2007-02-13

    The captive bubble technique in combination with axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA-CB) and with micro gas chromatography is used to study the dynamics of dissolution of different gases and vapors in water in situ. The technique yields the changes in the interfacial tension and bubble volume and surface. As examples, the dissolution of methanol and hexane vapors, inhaled anesthetic vapors, and gases, that is, diethyl ether, chloroform, isoflurane, enflurane, sevoflurane, desflurane, N2O, and xenon, and as nonimmobilizers perfluoropentane and 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoro-ethane (R113) were investigated. The examination of interfacial tension-time and bubble volume-time functions permits us to distinguish between water-soluble and -insoluble substances, gases, and vapors. Vapors and gases generally differ in terms of the strength of their intermolecular interactions. The main difference between dissolution processes of gases and vapors is that, during the entire process of gas dissolution, no surface tension change occurs. In contrast, during vapor dissolution the surface tension drops immediately and decreases continuously until it reaches the equilibrium surface tension of water at the end of dissolution. The results of this study show that it is possible to discriminate anesthetic vapors from anesthetic gases and nonimmobilizers by comparing their dissolution dynamics. The nonimmobilizers have extremely low or no solubility in water and change the surface tension only negligibly. By use of newly defined molecular dissolution/diffusion coefficients, a simple model for the determination of partition coefficients is developed.

  8. Kinetics of oxidic phase dissolution in acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorichev, I.G.; Kipriyanov, N.A.

    1981-01-01

    The critical analysis of the experimental data on dissolution kinetics of metal oxides (BeO, V 2 O 5 , UO 2 , Nb 2 O 5 , Ta 2 O 5 etc.) in acid media is carried out. Kinetic peculiarities of oxide dissolution are explained on the basis of the notions of electron- proton theory. It is established that the surface nonstoichiometric ccomposition of oxide phase and potential jump, appearing on the interface of the oxide-electrolyte phase are the important factors, determining the dissolution rate of a solid phase. The dissolution rate of metal oxides is limited by the transition of protons into the solid oxide phase. Morphological models of heterogeneous kinetics are used when explaining kinetic regularities of oxide dissolution process [ru

  9. Electrochemical dissolution of fresh and passivated chalcopyrite electrodes. Effect of pyrite on the reduction of Fe3+ ions and transport processes within the passive film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olvera, O.G.; Quiroz, L.; Dixon, D.G.; Asselin, E.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • FeS 2 increased the dissolution rate of fresh and passivated CuFeS 2 electrodes. • Fe 3+ reduction was the rate controlling step in the dissolution of fresh CuFeS 2 . • Diffusion within the passive film controlled the dissolution rate of passivated CuFeS 2 . - Abstract: The effect of pyrite (FeS 2 ) on the electrochemical dissolution of fresh and passivated chalcopyrite (CuFeS 2 ) electrodes has been studied. Current density values for the dissolution of CuFeS 2 were calculated from EIS measurements. FeS 2 increased the dissolution rate of fresh and passivated CuFeS 2 electrodes indicating that the galvanic effect continued even after the electrode was chemically passivated. The dissolution rate of CuFeS 2 decreased by a factor of 3 after the passivation treatment. Due to the low diffusion rates of ions within the CuFeS 2 passive film and due to an increase in the resistance to the transfer of electrons at the electrode/film interface, the activity of FeS 2 for the reduction of Fe 3+ ions was also reduced by a factor of 2.3 even though FeS 2 was not exposed to any chemical treatment. The results in this work indicate that the dissolution rate of the fresh CuFeS 2 electrode was controlled by the reduction of Fe 3+ ions whereas for the passivated CuFeS 2 electrode the dissolution rate was controlled by diffusion within the passive film

  10. Calcite Dissolution Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berelson, W.; Subhas, A.; Dong, S.; Naviaux, J.; Adkins, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    A geological buffer for high atmospheric CO2 concentrations is neutralization via reaction with CaCO3. We have been studying the dissolution kinetics of carbonate minerals using labeled 13C calcite and Picarro-based measurements of 13C enrichments in solution DIC. This methodology has greatly facilitated our investigation of dissolution kinetics as a function of water carbonate chemistry, temperature and pressure. One can adjust the saturation state Omega by changing the ion activity product (e.g. adjusting carbonate ion concentration), or by changing the solubility product (e.g. adjusting temperature or pressure). The canonical formulation of dissolution rate vs. omega has been refined (Subhas et al. 2015) and shows distinct non-linear behavior near equilibrium and rates in sea water of 1-3 e-6 g/cm2day at omega = 0.8. Carbonic anhydrase (CA), an enzyme that catalyzes the hydration of dissolved CO2 to carbonic acid, was shown (in concentrations 500x. This result points to the importance of carbonic acid in enhancing dissolution at low degrees of undersaturation. CA activity and abundance in nature must be considered regarding the role it plays in catalyzing dissolution. We also have been investigating the role of temperature on dissolution kinetics. An increase of 16C yields an order of magnitude increase in dissolution rate. Temperature (and P) also change Omega critical, the saturation state where dissolution rates change substantially. Increasing pressure (achieved in a pressure reaction chamber we built) also shifts Omega critical closer to equilibrium and small pressure increases have large impact on dissolution kinetics. Dissolution rates are enhanced by an order of magnitude for a change in pressure of 1500 psi relative to the dissolution rate achieved by water chemistry effects alone for an omega of 0.8. We've shown that the thermodynamic determination of saturation state does not adequately describe the kinetics of dissolution. The interplay of mineral

  11. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  12. Dissolution Kinetics of Alumina Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2001-09-01

    Dissolution kinetics of alumina type non-radioactive calcine was investigated as part of ongoing research that addresses permanent disposal of Idaho High Level Waste (HLW). Calcine waste was produced from the processing of nuclear fuel at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Acidic radioactive raffinates were solidified at ~500°C in a fluidized bed reactor to form the dry granular calcine material. Several Waste Management alternatives for the calcine are presented in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The Separations Alternative addresses the processing of the calcine so that the HLW is ready for removal to a national geological repository by the year 2035. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the separations alternative.

  13. Dissolution of metallic uranium in alkalis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, Angel V.; Wilkinson, Maria V.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of U metallic foils has been studied in the framework of the development of an improved 99 Mo-production process. The best conditions for the dissolution of uranium foils of approximately 150 μm are the following: a) NaClO concentrations of 0.20 and 0.23 M with NaOH of 0.27 and 0.31 M respectively; b) temperature of the solution, 70 C degrees; c) volume of the solution, 15 ml / cm 2 of uranium foil; d) dissolution time, 30 minutes. (author)

  14. Monitoring Lidocaine Single-Crystal Dissolution by Ultraviolet Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Ye, Fengbin; Rantanen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    ) imaging for conducting single‐crystal dissolution studies was performed. Using lidocaine as a model compound, the aim was to develop a setup capable of monitoring and quantifying the dissolution of lidocaine into a phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, under stagnant conditions. A single crystal of lidocaine...... was placed in the quartz dissolution cell and UV imaging was performed at 254 nm. Spatially and temporally resolved mapping of lidocaine concentration during the dissolution process was achieved from the recorded images. UV imaging facilitated the monitoring of lidocaine concentrations in the dissolution...... media adjacent to the single crystals. The concentration maps revealed the effects of natural convection due to density gradients on the dissolution process of lidocaine. UV imaging has great potential for in vitro drug dissolution testing...

  15. Dissolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Rainey, R.

    1968-01-01

    A laboratory study was made of the instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) for unirradiated uranium metal rods and UO 2 , PuO 2 and PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets in boiling nitric acid alone and with additives. The uranium metal and UO 2 dissolved readily in nitric acid alone; PuO 2 dissolved slowly even with the addition of fluoride; PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets containing as much as 35% PuO 2 in UO 2 gave values of the instantaneous dissolution rate to indicate can be dissolved with nitric acid alone. An equation to calculate the time for complete dissolution has been determinate in function of the instantaneous dissolution rates. The calculated values agree with the experimental. Uranium dioxide pellets from various sources but all having a same density varied in instantaneous dissolution rate. All the pellets, however, have dissolved ved in the same time. The time for complete dissolution of PuO 2 -UO 2 pellets, having the same composition, and the concentration of the used reagents are function of the used reagents are function of the fabrication method. (Author) 8 refs

  16. Dissolution of minerals with rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis, Thiago A.; Aarão Reis, Fábio D. A.

    2018-05-01

    We study dissolution of minerals with initial rough surfaces using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and a scaling approach. We consider a simple cubic lattice structure, a thermally activated rate of detachment of a molecule (site), and rough surface configurations produced by fractional Brownian motion algorithm. First we revisit the problem of dissolution of initial flat surfaces, in which the dissolution rate rF reaches an approximately constant value at short times and is controlled by detachment of step edge sites. For initial rough surfaces, the dissolution rate r at short times is much larger than rF ; after dissolution of some hundreds of molecular layers, r decreases by some orders of magnitude across several time decades. Meanwhile, the surface evolves through configurations of decreasing energy, beginning with dissolution of isolated sites, then formation of terraces with disordered boundaries, their growth, and final smoothing. A crossover time to a smooth configuration is defined when r = 1.5rF ; the surface retreat at the crossover is approximately 3 times the initial roughness and is temperature-independent, while the crossover time is proportional to the initial roughness and is controlled by step-edge site detachment. The initial dissolution process is described by the so-called rough rates, which are measured for fixed ratios between the surface retreat and the initial roughness. The temperature dependence of the rough rates indicates control by kink site detachment; in general, it suggests that rough rates are controlled by the weakest microscopic bonds during the nucleation and formation of the lowest energy configurations of the crystalline surface. Our results are related to recent laboratory studies which show enhanced dissolution in polished calcite surfaces. In the application to calcite dissolution in alkaline environment, the minimal values of recently measured dissolution rate spectra give rF ∼10-9 mol/(m2 s), and the calculated rate

  17. USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2005-10-31

    This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

  18. Wastewater parameters after the process of phosphorus compounds removal by the metal dissolution method in comparison with precipitation and electrocoagulation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Wysocka Izabela

    2017-01-01

    Precipitation methods are commonly used for removing phosphorus compounds from wastewater. Chemical precipitation method, based on adding iron, aluminium or calcium salts to the treated wastewater, is often used. Another possible way of precipitating phosphates is metal dissolution method, which is presented in this paper. The main difference between these two methods is how the phosphate precipitating ions are introduced to the wastewater.

  19. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  20. Wastewater parameters after the process of phosphorus compounds removal by the metal dissolution method in comparison with precipitation and electrocoagulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysocka Izabela

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Precipitation methods are commonly used for removing phosphorus compounds from wastewater. Chemical precipitation method, based on adding iron, aluminium or calcium salts to the treated wastewater, is often used. Another possible way of precipitating phosphates is metal dissolution method, which is presented in this paper. The main difference between these two methods is how the phosphate precipitating ions are introduced to the wastewater.

  1. DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyser, E.

    2010-06-17

    A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

  2. Determinants of marriage dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Mohd Amirul Rafiq Abu; Shafie, Siti Aishah Mohd; Hadi, Az'lina Abdul; Razali, Nornadiah Mohd; Azid @ Maarof, Nur Niswah Naslina

    2015-10-01

    Nowadays, the number of divorce cases among Muslim couples is very worrisome whereby the total cases reported in 2013 increased by half of the total cases reported in the previous year. The questions on the true key factors of dissolution of marriage continue to arise. Thus, the objective of this study is to reveal the factors that contribute to the dissolution of marriage. A total of 181 cases and ten potential determinants were included in this study. The potential determinants considered were age at marriage of husband and wife, educational level of husband and wife, employment status of husband and wife, income of husband and wife, the number of children and the presence at a counseling session. Logistic regression analysis was used to analyze the data. The findings revealed that four determinants, namely the income of husband and wife, number of children and the presence at a counselling session were significant in predicting the likelihood of divorce among Muslim couples.

  3. Jarosite dissolution rates in perchlorate brine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legett, Carey; Pritchett, Brittany N.; Elwood Madden, Andrew S.; Phillips-Lander, Charity M.; Elwood Madden, Megan E.

    2018-02-01

    Perchlorate salts and the ferric sulfate mineral jarosite have been detected at multiple locations on Mars by both landed instruments and orbiting spectrometers. Many perchlorate brines have eutectic temperatures <250 K, and may exist as metastable or stable liquids for extended time periods, even under current Mars surface conditions. Therefore, jarosite-bearing rocks and sediments may have been altered by perchlorate brines. Here we measured jarosite dissolution rates in 2 M sodium perchlorate brine as well as dilute water at 298 K to determine the effects of perchlorate anions on jarosite dissolution rates and potential reaction products. We developed a simple method for determining aqueous iron concentrations in high salinity perchlorate solutions using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry that eliminates the risk of rapid oxidation reactions during analyses. Jarosite dissolution rates in 2 M perchlorate brine determined by iron release rate (2.87 × 10-12 ±0.85 × 10-12 mol m-2 s-1) were slightly slower than the jarosite dissolution rate measured in ultrapure (18.2 MΩ cm-1) water (5.06 × 10-12 mol m-2 s-1) using identical methods. No additional secondary phases were observed in XRD analyses of the reaction products. The observed decrease in dissolution rate may be due to lower activity of water (ɑH2O = 0.9) in the 2 M NaClO4 brine compared with ultrapure water (ɑH2O = 1). This suggests that the perchlorate anion does not facilitate iron release, unlike chloride anions which accelerated Fe release rates in previously reported jarosite and hematite dissolution experiments. Since dissolution rates are slower in perchlorate-rich solutions, jarosite is expected to persist longer in perchlorate brines than in dilute waters or chloride-rich brines. Therefore, if perchlorate brines dominate aqueous fluids on the surface of Mars, jarosite may remain preserved over extended periods of time, despite active aqueous processes.

  4. Dissolution of pollucite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, T.; Vezza, T.; White, W.B.; Pantano, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    The dissolution of single crystal and polycrystalline pollucite (Cs 2 O.Al 2 O 3 .4SiO 2 ) has been investigated under static and Soxhlet conditions. Polycrystalline ceramics were prepared from a commercial pollucite powder by sintering at 1100 0 C, 1200 0 C and 1300 0 C, and also by hot isostatic pressing (hip) at 1200 0 C. The static tests were run at 40 0 C and 90 0 C in water (for up to 183 days) and in brine and silicate solutions (for 28 days). The solutions were analyzed with DC-plasma emission and the leached surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and other surface analysis techniques. It is concluded that the dissolution of polycrystalline pollucite is due largely to the preferential release of the glassy phase constituents since the single crystal studies verify the insolubility of the pollucite grains at near-neutral pH under static conditions. The dissolution behavior of polycrystalline pollucite under static and Soxhlet conditions is drastically different. Under static conditions, the pollucite grains are in equilibrium with the solution and the dissolved species originate only from the glassy phase. The glassy phase is more prevalent and has a higher Cs 2 O content in the denser ceramics sintered at 1200 0 C; thus, the denser ceramics exhibit higher Cs leach rates. Under Soxhlet conditions the leach rates are linear and proportional to the specific surface area. Thus, the glassy phase is depleted from the surface region of the ceramics very rapidly, and the congruent dissolution of the pollucite grain continues at a linear rate. The Cs leach rates were highest in water, and lowest in the brine solution. 1 table

  5. Effect of Initial Iron Content in a Zinc Bath on the Dissolution Rate of Iron During a Hot Dip Galvanizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Myung; Lee, Suk Kyu; Paik, Doo-Jin; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-04-01

    The mechanism of iron dissolution and the effect of initial Fe content in a Zn bath on the dissolution rate of iron were investigated using a finger rotating method (FRM). When the initial iron content, [Fe]°, in the zinc bath was less than the solubility limit, the iron content in the zinc bath showed a rapid increase, whereas a moderate increase was observed when [Fe]° was close to the solubility limit. Based on Eisenberg's kinetic model, the mass transfer coefficient of iron in the present experimental condition was calculated to be k M = 1.2 × 10-5 m/s, which was similar to the results derived by Giorgi et al. under industrial practice conditions. A dissolution of iron occurred even when the initial iron content in the zinc bath was greater than the solubility limit, which was explained by the interfacial thermodynamics in conjunction with the morphology of the surface coating layer. By analyzing the diffraction patterns using TEM, the outermost dendritic-structured coating layer was confirmed as FeZn13 ( ζ). In order to satisfy the local equilibrium based on the Gibbs-Thomson equation, iron in the dendrite-structured phase spontaneously dissolved into the zinc bath, resulting in the enrichment of iron in front of the dendrite tip. Through the diffusion boundary layer in front of the dendritic-structured layer, dissolved Fe atoms diffused out and reacted with Zn and small amounts of Al, resulting in the formation of dross particles such as FeZn10Al x ( δ). It was experimentally confirmed that the smaller the difference between the initial iron content in the zinc bath and the iron solubility limit at a given temperature, the lower the number of formed dross particles.

  6. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Fate of PCBs During K Basin Sludge Dissolution in Nitric Acid and with Hydrogen Peroxide Addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Hoppe, E.W.; Mong, G.M.; Pool, K.H.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The work described in this report is part of the studies being performed to address the fate of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in K Basin sludge before the sludge can be transferred to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) double shell tanks. One set of tests examined the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the disposition of PCBs in a simulated K Basin dissolver solution containing 0.5 M nitric acid/1 M Fe(NO 3 ) 3 . A second series of tests examined the disposition of PCBs in a much stronger (∼10 M) nitric acid solution, similar to that likely to be encountered in the dissolution of the sludge

  7. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong [and others

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation`s defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO{sub 2} feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO{sub 2} dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides.

  8. Plutonium dioxide dissolution in glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vienna, J.D.; Alexander, D.L.; Li, Hong

    1996-09-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) is charged with providing technical support for evaluation of disposition options for excess fissile materials manufactured for the nation's defense. One option being considered for the disposition of excess plutonium (Pu) is immobilization by vitrification. The vitrification option entails immobilizing Pu in a host glass and waste package that are criticality-safe (immune to nuclear criticality), proliferation-resistant, and environmentally acceptable for long-term storage or disposal. To prove the technical and economic feasibility of candidate vitrification options it is necessary to demonstrate that PuO 2 feedstock can be dissolved in glass in sufficient quantity. The OFMD immobilization program has set a Pu solubility goal of 10 wt% in glass. The life cycle cost of the vitrification options are strongly influenced by the rate at which PUO 2 dissolves in glass. The total number of process lines needed for vitrification of 50 t of Pu in 10 years is directly dependent upon the time required for Pu dissolution in glass. The objective of this joint Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) - Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) study was to demonstrate a high Pu solubility in glass and to identify on a rough scale the time required for Pu dissolution in the glass. This study was conducted using a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass composition designed at the SRTC for the vitrification of actinides

  9. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO 3 ) 3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines

  10. Dissolution studies on Nickel ferrite in dilute chemical decontamination formulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranganathan, S. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Srinivasan, M.P. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) (India). Water and Steam Chemistry Laboratory; Raghavan, P.S. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India); Narasimhan, S.V. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India); Gopalan, R. [Madras Christian College, Chennai (India). Department of Chemistry

    2004-09-01

    Nickel ferrite is one of the important corrosion products in the pipeline surfaces of water-cooled nuclear reactors. The dissolution of the nickel ferrite by chelating agents is very sensitive to the nature of the chelant, the nature of the reductant used in the formulation and the temperature at which the dissolution studies are performed. The dissolution is mainly controlled by the reductive dissolution of the ferrite particles, but complexing agents also play a significant role in the dissolution process. This study deals with the leaching of iron and nickel from nickel ferrite prepared by the solid-state method. The dissolution studies are performed in pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) formulations containing organic reductants like ascorbic acid and low oxidation state transition metal ion reductants like Fe(II)-L (where L = PDCA, NTA, EDTA) at 85 C. The dissolution of nickel ferrite in PDCA, NTA and EDTA formulations is influenced by the presence of reductants in the formulations. The addition of Fe(II)-L in the formulation greatly enhances the dissolution of nickel ferrite. The preferential leaching of nickel over iron during the dissolution of nickel ferrite was observed in all the formulations. (orig.)

  11. Solubility limits on radionuclide dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1984-12-31

    This paper examines the effects of solubility in limiting dissolution rates of a number of important radionuclides from spent fuel and high-level waste. Two simple dissolution models were used for calculations that would be characteristics of a Yucca Mountain repository. A saturation-limited dissolution model, in which the water flowing through the repository is assumed to be saturated with each waste element, is very conservative in that it overestimates dissolution rates. A diffusion-limited dissolution model, in which element-dissolution rates are limited by diffusion of waste elements into water flowing past the waste, is more realistic, but it is subject to some uncertainty at this time. Dissolution rates of some elements (Pu, Am, Sn, Th, Zr, Sm) are always limited by solubility. Dissolution rates of other elements (Cs, Tc, Np, Sr, C, I) are never solubility limited; their release would be limited by dissolution of the bulk waste form. Still other elements (U, Cm, Ni, Ra) show solubility-limited dissolution under some conditions. 9 references, 3 tables.

  12. Efavirenz Dissolution Enhancement I: Co-Micronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helvécio Vinícius Antunes Rocha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available AIDS constitutes one of the most serious infectious diseases, representing a major public health priority. Efavirenz (EFV, one of the most widely used drugs for this pathology, belongs to the Class II of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System for drugs with very poor water solubility. To improve EFV’s dissolution profile, changes can be made to the physical properties of the drug that do not lead to any accompanying molecular modifications. Therefore, the study objective was to develop and characterize systems with efavirenz able to improve its dissolution, which were co-processed with sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP. The technique used was co-micronization. Three different drug:excipient ratios were tested for each of the two carriers. The drug dispersion dissolution results showed significant improvement for all the co-processed samples in comparison to non-processed material and corresponding physical mixtures. The dissolution profiles obtained for dispersion with co-micronized SLS samples proved superior to those of co-micronized PVP, with the proportion (1:0.25 proving the optimal mixture. The improvements may be explained by the hypothesis that formation of a hydrophilic layer on the surface of the micronized drug increases the wettability of the system formed, corroborated by characterization results indicating no loss of crystallinity and an absence of interaction at the molecular level.

  13. Potential of Bio-Enhanced DNAPL Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J. M.; Kitanidis, P. K.; McCarty, P. L.

    2006-12-01

    DNAPL contamination is one of most challenging environmental problems. According to EPA's estimation, the total number of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) impacted sites in the U.S. could range from 15,000 to 25,000. It has been generally believed that promoting biological reactions that transform contaminants in DNAPL source zones can increase mass transfer rates, thereby shortening source longevity and total cleanup time. Use of bioremediation to enhance residual DNAPL dissolution, therefore, has potential as an economical and effective approach to accelerate DNAPL cleanup. While promising, some biological processes, such as biomass growth and gas production (CO2 and CH4), may occur together with biodegradation in source zones and adversely affect dissolution enhancement. In addition, the toxic effects of DNAPL compounds and transformation products produced by microorganisms may also adversely affect microbial activity and the extent of the bio-active zones. An understanding of how such factors control the efficiency of bio-enhanced dissolution is of great importance in helping to predict the potential benefits of DNAPL bioremediation. In this presentation, we will integrate the results of experimental and theoretical studies over the past six years on bio-enhanced tetrachloroethene (PCE) DNAPL dissolution to illustrate the effects on dissolution enhancement. Specifically, we will discuss the significance of our theoretical work on: (1) how biomass accumulation can affect dissolution enhancement for a PCE DNAPL pool and (2) the evolution of a bio-active zone in a residual DNAPL area under the influence of DNAPL toxicity. In addition, we will show the interplay between various groups of microorganisms within and around PCE DNAPL source zones as well as how our experimental work can help better understand the toxic effects of PCE and its transformation products on the activity of PCE dehalogenating bacteria. Finally, the presentation will highlight

  14. DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, B.A.

    1959-11-10

    A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

  15. Microbially mediated barite dissolution in anoxic brines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Bingjie; Akob, Denise M.; Dunlap, Darren; Renock, Devon

    2017-01-01

    Fluids injected into shale formations during hydraulic fracturing of black shale return with extraordinarily high total-dissolved-solids (TDS) and high concentrations of barium (Ba) and radium (Ra). Barite, BaSO 4 , has been implicated as a possible source of Ba as well as a problematic mineral scale that forms on internal well surfaces, often in close association with radiobarite, (Ba,Ra)SO 4 . The dissolution of barite by abiotic processes is well quantified. However, the identification of microbial communities in flowback and produced water necessitates the need to understand barite dissolution in the presence of bacteria. Therefore, we evaluated the rates and mechanisms of abiotic and microbially-mediated barite dissolution under anoxic and hypersaline conditions in the laboratory. Barite dissolution experiments were conducted with bacterial enrichment cultures established from produced water from Marcellus Shale wells located in northcentral Pennsylvania. These cultures were dominated by anaerobic halophilic bacteria from the genus Halanaerobium. Dissolved Ba was determined by ICP-OES and barite surfaces were investigated by SEM and AFM. Our results reveal that: 1) higher amounts of barium (up to ∼5 × ) are released from barite in the presence of Halanaerobium cultures compared to brine controls after 30 days of reaction, 2) etch pits that develop on the barite (001) surface in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is distinct from those that form during control experiments without bacteria, 3) etch pits that develop in the presence of Halanaerobium exhibit a morphology that is similar to the morphology of etch pits formed in the presence of strong organic chelators, EDTA and DTPA, and 4) experiments using dialysis membranes to separate barite from bacteria suggest that direct contact between the two is not required in order to promote dissolution. These results suggest that Halanaerobium increase the rate of barite dissolution in anoxic

  16. A new approach to dissolution testing by UV imaging and finite element simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtker, Johan Peter; Rantanen, Jukka; Rades, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Most dissolution testing systems rely on analyzing samples taken remotely from the dissolving sample surface at different time points with poor time resolution and therefore provide relatively unresolved temporally and spatially information on the dissolution process. In this study, a fl...... provided experimental validation of the FEM model as well as a detailed description of the dissolution process.......PURPOSE: Most dissolution testing systems rely on analyzing samples taken remotely from the dissolving sample surface at different time points with poor time resolution and therefore provide relatively unresolved temporally and spatially information on the dissolution process. In this study......, a flexible numerical model was combined with a novel UV imaging system, allowing monitoring of the dissolution process with sub second time resolution. METHODS: The dissolution process was monitored by both effluent collection and UV imaging of compacts of paracetamol. A finite element model (FEM) was used...

  17. Effects of Bacillus subtilis endospore surface reactivity on the rate of forsterite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrold, Z.; Gorman-Lewis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Primary mineral dissolution products, such as silica (Si), calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg), play an important role in numerous biologic and geochemical cycles including microbial metabolism, plant growth and secondary mineral precipitation. The flux of these and other dissolution products into the environment is largely controlled by the rate of primary silicate mineral dissolution. Bacteria, a ubiquitous component in water-rock systems, are known to facilitate mineral dissolution and may play a substantial role in determining the overall flux of dissolution products into the environment. Bacterial cell walls are complex and highly reactive organic surfaces that can affect mineral dissolution rates directly through microbe-mineral adsorption or indirectly by complexing dissolution products. The effect of bacterial surface adsorption on chemical weathering rates may even outweigh the influence of active processes in environments where a high proportion of cells are metabolically dormant or cell metabolism is slow. Complications associated with eliminating or accounting for ongoing metabolic processes in long-term dissolution studies have made it challenging to isolate the influence of cell wall interactions on mineral dissolution rates. We utilized Bacillus subtilis endospores, a robust and metabolically dormant cell type, to isolate and quantify the effects of bacterial surface reactivity on forsterite (Mg2SiO4) dissolution rates. We measured the influence of both direct and indirect microbe-mineral interactions on forsterite dissolution. Indirect pathways were isolated using dialysis tubing to prevent mineral-microbe contact while allowing free exchange of dissolved mineral products and endospore-ion adsorption. Homogenous experimental assays allowed both direct microbe-mineral and indirect microbe-ion interactions to affect forsterite dissolution rates. Dissolution rates were calculated based on silica concentrations and zero-order dissolution kinetics

  18. Biorelevant dissolution media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilardia-Arana, David; Kristensen, Henning G; Müllertz, Anette

    2006-01-01

    Biorelevant dissolution media containing bile salt and lecithin at concentrations appropriate for fed and fasted state are useful when testing oral solid formulations of poorly water-soluble drugs. Dilution of amphiphile solutions affects the aggregation state of the amphiphiles because bile salt......, and oleic acid) and a combination of these were prepared at high bile salt concentration. Micelles in the glycocholate solutions decreased in size when diluted. The addition of insoluble amphiphiles led to bigger micelles with no clear correlation between size of the micelles and amphiphile concentration....... Dilution of the two- and four component media caused enlargement of the mixed micelles and formation of vesicles. The solubility of estradiol in the buffer solution was increased with addition of the amphiphiles. A good correlation (R(2) = 0.987) was found between estradiol solubility and mass...

  19. Robotic dissolution station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beugelsdijk, T.J.; Hollen, R.M.; Temer, D.J.; Haggart, R.J.; Erkkila, T.H.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a robotic station for dissolving active metals in acid in an automated fashion. A vessel with cap, containing the active metal is placed onto a shuttle which retracts to a point at which it is directly beneath a cap removing and retaining mechanism. After the cap is removed, a tube carrying an appropriate acid is inserted into the vessel, and the acid is introduced. The structure of the station forms an open hood which is swept of gases generated by the dissolution and the air removed to a remote location for scrubbing. After the reaction is complete, the shuttle extends and the vessel may be removed by a robot arm.

  20. Aluminum Target Dissolution in Support of the Pu-238 Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Benker, Dennis [ORNL; DePaoli, David W [ORNL; Felker, Leslie Kevin [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Selection of an aluminum alloy for target cladding affects post-irradiation target dissolution and separations. Recent tests with aluminum alloy 6061 yielded greater than expected precipitation in the caustic dissolution step, forming up to 10 wt.% solids of aluminum hydroxides and aluminosilicates. We present a study to maximize dissolution of aluminum metal alloy, along with silicon, magnesium, and copper impurities, through control of temperature, the rate of reagent addition, and incubation time. Aluminum phase transformations have been identified as a function of time and temperature, using X-ray diffraction. Solutions have been analyzed using wet chemical methods and X-ray fluorescence. These data have been compared with published calculations of aluminum phase diagrams. Temperature logging during the transients has been investigated as a means to generate kinetic and mass transport data on the dissolution process. Approaches are given to enhance the dissolution of aluminum and aluminosilicate phases in caustic solution.

  1. A new method for alkaline dissolution of uranium metal foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondino, A.V.; Wilkinson, M.V.; Manzini, A.C.

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop a production process of 99 Mo by fission of low-enriched uranium, the first purification step, which consists of dissolution of a uranium metal foil target, was studied. It was found that alkaline NaClO gave good results, reaching the dissolution of up to 300 μm of uranium foil. The different conditions for the dissolution were studied and the optimum ones were found. The influence of NaClO and NaOH concentration, temperature, dissolving solution volume per unit of surface and dissolution time were investigated. During this step, a gas identified as H 2 , was generated, and a precipitate characterized as Na 2 U 2 O 7 was observed. A stoichiometric reaction for this uranium dissolution is proposed. (author)

  2. Hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Minsu

    2016-06-11

    Mineral dissolution is inherently a chemo-hydro-mechanical coupled process. Field evidence and laboratory results show that dissolution may localize and form open conduits in cohesive media such as carbonate rocks. This study focuses on the evolution of localized dissolution in soils (i.e., frictional and non-cohesive granular materials) under effective confining stresses. Experimental results show the development of localized dissolution (“pipe”) when a carbonate-quartz sand is subjected to reactive fluid flow: only loosely packed quartz grains remain within pipes, and the number of pipes decreases away from the inlet port. Concurrent shear wave velocity measurements show a decrease in stiffness during dissolution due to stress and fabric changes, and more complex signal codas anticipate the development of internal heterogeneity. The discrete element method is used to simulate localized vertical dissolution features in granular materials, under constant vertical stress and zero lateral strain far-field boundaries. As porosity increases along dissolution pipes, vertical load is transferred to the surrounding soils and marked force chains develop. In terms of equivalent stress, principal stress rotation takes place within pipes and the sediment reaches the Coulomb failure condition inside pipes and in the surrounding medium. Dissolution pipes alter the geo-plumbing of the subsurface, enhance fluid transport but limit the long term performance of storage systems, alter the fluid pressure and effective stress fields, soften the sediment and may trigger shear failures.

  3. Dissolution of Sn, SnO, and SnS in a Thiol-Amine Solvent Mixture: Insights into the Identity of the Molecular Solutes for Solution-Processed SnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jannise J; McCarthy, Carrie L; Del Pilar-Albaladejo, Joselyn; Rasul, Golam; Brutchey, Richard L

    2016-03-21

    Binary solvent mixtures of alkanethiols and 1,2-ethylenediamine have the ability to readily dissolve metals, metal chalcogenides, and metal oxides under ambient conditions to enable the facile solution processing of semiconductor inks; however, there is little information regarding the chemical identity of the resulting solutes. Herein, we examine the molecular solute formed after dissolution of Sn, SnO, and SnS in a binary solvent mixture comprised of 1,2-ethanedithiol (EDT) and 1,2-ethylenediamine (en). Using a combination of solution (119)Sn NMR and Raman spectroscopies, bis(1,2-ethanedithiolate)tin(II) was identified as the likely molecular solute present after the dissolution of Sn, SnO, and SnS in EDT-en, despite the different bulk material compositions and oxidation states (Sn(0) and Sn(2+)). All three semiconductor inks can be converted to phase-pure, orthorhombic SnS after a mild annealing step (∼350 °C). This highlights the ability of the EDT-en solvent mixture to dissolve and convert a variety of low-cost precursors to SnS semiconductor material.

  4. Nontronite dissolution rates and implications for Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainey, S. R.; Hausrath, E. M.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Milliken, R. E.

    2014-02-01

    The Fe-rich smectite nontronite M+1.05[Si6.98Al1.02][Al0.29Fe3.68Mg0.04]O20(OH)4 has been detected using orbital data at multiple locations in ancient terrains on Mars, including Mawrth Vallis, Nilli Fossae, north of the Syrtis Major volcanic plateau, Terra Meridiani, and the landing site of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), Gale Crater. Given the antiquity of these sites (>3.0 Ga), it is likely that nontronite has been exposed to the martian environment for long periods of time and therefore provides an integrated record of processes in near surface environments including pedogenesis and diagenesis. In particular, nontronite detected at Mawrth Vallis is overlain by montmorillonite and kaolinite, and it has been previously suggested that this mineralogical sequence may be the result of surface weathering. In order to better understand clay mineral weathering on Mars, we measured dissolution rates of nontronite in column reactors at solution pH values of 0.9, 1.7, and 3.0, and two flow rates (0.16 ml/h and 0.32 ml/h). Solution chemistry indicates stoichiometric dissolution at pH = 0.9 and non-stoichiometric dissolution at pH = 1.7 and 3.0. Mineral dissolution rates based on elemental release rates at pH = 1.7 and 3.0 of Ca, Si and Fe follow the order interlayer > tetrahedral > octahedral sites, respectively. The behavior of all experiments suggests far from equilibrium conditions, with the exception of the experiment performed at pH 3.0 and flow rate 0.16 ml/h. A pH-dependent dissolution rate law was calculated through Si release from experiments that showed no dependence on saturation (far from equilibrium conditions) under both flow rates and is r = 10-12.06 (±0.123) · 10-0.297 (±0.058)·pH where r has the units mol mineral m-2 s-1. When compared to dissolution rates from the literature, our results indicate that nontronite dissolution is significantly slower than dissolution of the primary phases present in basalt under acidic conditions, suggesting that once

  5. Extraction and characterization of lignin from oil palm biomass via ionic liquid dissolution and non-toxic aluminium potassium sulfate dodecahydrate precipitation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtar, S S; Tengku Malim Busu, T N Z; Md Noor, A M; Shaari, N; Yusoff, N A; Bustam Khalil, M A; Abdul Mutalib, M I; Mat, H B

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study is to extract and characterize lignin from oil palm biomass (OPB) by dissolution in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([bmim][Cl]), followed by the lignin extraction through the CO2 gas purging prior to addition of aluminum potassium sulfate dodecahydrate (AlK(SO4)2 · 12H2O). The lignin yield, Y(L) (%wt.) was found to be dependent of the types of OPB observed for all precipitation methods used. The lignin recovery, RL (%wt.) obtained from CO2-AlK(SO4)2 · 12H2O precipitation was, however dependent on the types of OPB, which contradicted to that of the acidified H2SO4 and HCl solutions of pH 0.7 and 2 precipitations. Only about 54% of lignin was recovered from the OPB. The FTIR results indicate that the monodispersed lignin was successfully extracted from the OPT, OPF and OPEFB having a molecular weight (MW) of 1331, 1263 and 1473 g/mol, and degradation temperature of 215, 207.5 and 272 °C, respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dissolution of covalent adaptable network polymers in organic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Yang, Hua; Dao, Binh H.; Shi, Qian; Yakacki, Christopher M.

    2017-12-01

    It was recently reported that thermosetting polymers can be fully dissolved in a proper organic solvent utilizing a bond-exchange reaction (BER), where small molecules diffuse into the polymer, break the long polymer chains into short segments, and eventually dissolve the network when sufficient solvent is provided. The solvent-assisted dissolution approach was applied to fully recycle thermosets and their fiber composites. This paper presents the first multi-scale modeling framework to predict the dissolution kinetics and mechanics of thermosets in organic solvent. The model connects the micro-scale network dynamics with macro-scale material properties: in the micro-scale, a model is developed based on the kinetics of BERs to describe the cleavage rate of polymer chains and evolution of chain segment length during the dissolution. The micro-scale model is then fed into a continuum-level model with considerations of the transportation of solvent molecules and chain segments in the system. The model shows good prediction on conversion rate of functional groups, degradation of network mechanical properties, and dissolution rate of thermosets during the dissolution. It identifies the underlying kinetic factors governing the dissolution process, and reveals the influence of different material and processing variables on the dissolution process, such as time, temperature, catalyst concentration, and chain length between cross-links.

  7. Dissolution of mega-voids in resin transfer molding

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Paul Nordstrom

    2007-01-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a common composite manufacturing process. Voids are a common defect encountered in RTM components. A new type of void, the 'Mega-Void', has been identified and addressed by this research. To produce acceptable RTM components requires that the mega-void be eliminated either through prevention or through dissolution. The latter is the topic of this research. Three process parameters affecting mega-void dissolution are researched; 1) Preform/mold vacuum , 2) Resin...

  8. Anomalous dissolution of metals and chemical corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGUTIN M. DRAZIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of the anomalous behavior of some metals, in particular Fe and Cr, in acidic aqueous solutions during anodic dissolution. The anomaly is recognizable by the fact that during anodic dissolutionmore material dissolves than would be expected from the Faraday law with the use of the expected valence of the formed ions. Mechanical disintegration, gas bubble blocking, hydrogen embrittlement, passive layer cracking and other possible reasons for such behavior have been discussed. It was shown, as suggested by Kolotyrkin and coworkers, that the reason can be, also, the chemical reaction in which H2O molecules with the metal form metal ions and gaseous H2 in a potential independent process. It occurs simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process, but the electrochemical process controls the corrosion potential. On the example of Cr in acid solution itwas shown that the reason for the anomalous behavior is dominantly chemical dissolution, which is considerably faster than the electrochemical corrosion, and that the increasing temperature favors chemical reaction, while the other possible reasons for the anomalous behavior are of negligible effect. This effect is much smaller in the case of Fe, but exists. The possible role of the chemical dissolution reacton and hydrogen evolution during pitting of steels and Al and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue are discussed.

  9. Automated Dissolution for Enteric-Coated Aspirin Tablets: A Case Study for Method Transfer to a RoboDis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sarah A; Martini, Luigi

    2014-08-01

    Dissolution method transfer is a complicated yet common process in the pharmaceutical industry. With increased pharmaceutical product manufacturing and dissolution acceptance requirements, dissolution testing has become one of the most labor-intensive quality control testing methods. There is an increased trend for automation in dissolution testing, particularly for large pharmaceutical companies to reduce variability and increase personnel efficiency. There is no official guideline for dissolution testing method transfer from a manual, semi-automated, to automated dissolution tester. In this study, a manual multipoint dissolution testing procedure for an enteric-coated aspirin tablet was transferred effectively and reproducibly to a fully automated dissolution testing device, RoboDis II. Enteric-coated aspirin samples were used as a model formulation to assess the feasibility and accuracy of media pH change during continuous automated dissolution testing. Several RoboDis II parameters were evaluated to ensure the integrity and equivalency of dissolution method transfer from a manual dissolution tester. This current study provides a systematic outline for the transfer of the manual dissolution testing protocol to an automated dissolution tester. This study further supports that automated dissolution testers compliant with regulatory requirements and similar to manual dissolution testers facilitate method transfer. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Dissolution of FFTF vendor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on FFTF vendor fuel (both mechanically mixed and coprecipitated) during 1974, 1975, and 1976. A marked improvement was noted in the completeness of fuel dissolution from 1974 to 1976. The reason for this is unknown but may have been attributable to slight changes in fuel fabrication conditions. In general, the bulk of the fuel pellets tested dissolved to greater than 99.9% in nitric acid alone

  11. Dissolution of FFTF vendor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerch, R.E.

    1979-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on FFTF vendor fuel (both mechanically mixed and coprecipitated) during 1974, 1975, and 1976. A marked improvement was noted in the completeness of fuel dissolution from 1974 to 1976. The reason for this is unknown but may have been attributable to slight changes in fuel fabrication conditions. In general, the bulk of the fuel pellets tested dissolved to greater than 99.9% in nitric acid alone.

  12. Influence of the Efavirenz Micronization on Tableting and Dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Mendes Cabral

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to propose an analytical procedure that provides the effects of particle size and surface area on dissolution of efavirenz. Five different batches obtained by different micronization processes and with different particle size distribution and surface area were studied. The preformulation studies and dissolution curves were used to confirm the particle size distribution effect on drug solubility. No polymorphic variety or amorphization was observed in the tested batches and the particle size distribution was determined as directly responsible for the improvement of drug dissolution. The influence of the preparation process on the tablets derived from efavirenz was observed in the final dissolution result in which agglomeration, usually seen in non-lipophilic micronized material, was avoided through the use of an appropriate wet granulation method. For these reasons, micronization may represent one viable alternative for the formulation of brick dust drugs.

  13. Dissolution glow curve in LLD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkamp, U.; Wiezorek, C.; Poetter, R.

    1990-01-01

    Lyoluminescence dosimetry is based upon light emission during dissolution of previously irradiated dosimetric materials. The lyoluminescence signal is expressed in the dissolution glow curve. These curves begin, depending on the dissolution system, with a high peak followed by an exponentially decreasing intensity. System parameters that influence the graph of the dissolution glow curve, are, for example, injection speed, temperature and pH value of the solution and the design of the dissolution cell. The initial peak does not significantly correlate with the absorbed dose, it is mainly an effect of the injection. The decay of the curve consists of two exponential components: one fast and one slow. The components depend on the absorbed dose and the dosimetric materials used. In particular, the slow component correlates with the absorbed dose. In contrast to the fast component the argument of the exponential function of the slow component is independent of the dosimetric materials investigated: trehalose, glucose and mannitol. The maximum value, following the peak of the curve, and the integral light output are a measure of the absorbed dose. The reason for the different light outputs of various dosimetric materials after irradiation with the same dose is the differing solubility. The character of the dissolution glow curves is the same following irradiation with photons, electrons or neutrons. (author)

  14. Investigating Dissolution and Precipitation Phenomena with a Smartphone Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Arcia, Edgar

    2016-10-11

    A novel smartphone microscope can be used to observe the dissolution and crystallization of sodium chloride at a microscopic level. Observation of these seemingly simple phenomena through the microscope at 100× magnification can actually reveal some surprising behavior. These experiments offer the opportunity to discuss some basic concepts such as how the morphological features of the crystals dictates how the dissolution process proceeds, and how materials can be purified by re-crystallization techniques.

  15. Development of Dissolution Test Method for Drotaverine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Sink conditions, drug stability and specificity in different dissolution media were tested to optimize a dissolution test method using a USP paddle type dissolution test apparatus set at a speed of. 50 rpm. The dissolution medium consisted of 900 ml of phosphate buffer (pH 6.8) containing 0.25% w/v cetrimide at 37 ...

  16. Dissolution of aluminium; Disolucion de aluminio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Pereira Sanchez, G.

    1968-07-01

    The dissolution of aluminum with acid solutions ( nitric acid-mercuric nitrate) and alkaline solutions (sodium hydroxide-sodium nitrate) has been studied. The instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) has been studied in function of the concentration of the used reagents and the dissolution temperature. The complete dissolution has been included in the second part of this report, to know the total dissolution time, the consume of reagents and the stability of the resultant solutions. (Author)

  17. Alloy dissolution in argon stirred steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Darryl Scott

    Alloying is required for the production of all steel products from small castings to large beams. Addition of large quantities of bulk alloys can result in alloy segregation and inconsistent alloy recovery. The objective of this research was to better understand alloy dissolution in liquid steel especially as it relates to Missouri S&Ts' patented continuous steelmaking process. A 45-kilogram capacity ladle with a single porous plug was used to evaluate the effect of four experimental factors on alloy dissolution: alloy species, alloy size or form, argon flow rate, and furnace tap temperature. Four alloys were tested experimentally including Class I low carbon ferromanganese, nickel and tin (as a surrogate for low melting alloys) and Class II ferroniobium. The alloys ranged in size and form from granular to 30 mm diameter lumps. Experimental results were evaluated using a theoretically based numerical model for the steel shell period, alloy mixing (Class I) and alloy dissolution (Class II). A CFD model of the experimental ladle was used to understand steel motion in the ladle and to provide steel velocity magnitudes for the numerical steel shell model. Experiments and modeling confirmed that smaller sized alloys have shorter steel shell periods and homogenize faster than larger particles. Increasing the argon flow rate shortened mixing times and reduced the delay between alloy addition and the first appearance of alloy in the melt. In addition, for every five degree increase in steel bath temperature the steel shell period was shortened by approximately four percent. Class II ferroniobium alloy dissolution was an order of magnitude slower than Class I alloy mixing.

  18. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  19. Plutonium dissolution from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1985-06-01

    Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell) soon will commence recovery of plutonium from Rocky Flats Plant incinerator ash. In preparation for this processing, Rockwell undertook literature and laboratory studies to identify, select and optimize plutonium dissolution methods for treating the ash. Ash reburning, followed by dissolution in nitric acid containing calcium fluoride, was selected as the processing method for the ash. Recommended values of process parameters were identified. Using the selected process, 99.5% plutonium recovery was achieved, leaving about 12.7 wt % heel residue for an equal weight composite of the three ashes tested. 15 refs., 26 figs

  20. In vitro dissolution of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusbert, P.J.; Carter, M.W. (Alligator Rivers Region Research Inst., Jabiru, NT (Australia)); Woods, D.A. (Office of the Supervising Scientist, Parkes, ACT (Australia))

    1994-01-01

    As part of the recommended procedure for calculating radiation doses from inhaled radioactive material, the ICR divides radionuclides into three transportability classes on the basis of their dissolution half-times. A method of measuring dissolution rates of uranium compounds in lung fluid using a batch replacement method has been commonly used to determine the transportability class for dosimetry purposes. A report by Stockwell et al however, suggested that the batch replacement technique produced results that varied with the experimental design. Studies are reported of measurements of the dissolution rate of uranium concentrate from an Australian mill and a NBS uranium reference material and the results confirm that the batch replacement method does not produce valid results. The apparent transportability of the uranium is affected by the frequency of solvent replacement. Hence a change in technique will cause a change in the result. (Author).

  1. Actor bonds after relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2000-01-01

    Most of the presented papers at the 1st NoRD Workshop can be classified as belonging to the business marketing approach to relationship dissolution. Two papers were conceptual, and the remaining six were empirical studies. The first conceptual study by Skaates (2000) focuses on the nature...... of the actor bonds that remain after a business relationship has ended. The study suggests that an interdisciplinary approach would provide a richer understanding of the phenomenon; this could be achieved by using e.g. Bourdieu's sociological concepts in dissolution research....

  2. Dissolution Threats and Legislative Bargaining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becher, Michael; Christiansen, Flemming Juul

    2015-01-01

    Chief executives in many parliamentary democracies have the power to dissolve the legislature. Despite a well-developed literature on the endogenous timing of parliamentary elections, political scientists know remarkably little about the strategic use of dissolution power to influence policymaking....... To address this gap, we propose and empirically evaluate a theoretical model of legislative bargaining in the shadow of executive dissolution power. The model implies that the chief executive's public support and legislative strength, as well as the time until the next constitutionally mandated election...

  3. Dissolution of mixed oxide spent fuel from FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyoshi, H.; Nishina, H.; Toyota, O.; Yamamoto, R.; Nemoto, S.; Okamoto, F.; Togashi, A.; Kawata, T.; Hayashi, S.

    1991-01-01

    At the Tokai Works of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC), the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) has been continuing operation since 1982 for laboratory scale hot experiments on reprocessing of FBR mixed oxide fuel. As a part of these experiments, dissolution experiments have been performed to define the key parameters affecting dissolution rates such as concentration of nitric acid, temperature and burnup and also to confirm the amount of insoluble residue. The dissolution rate of the irradiated fuel was determined to be in proportion to the 1.7 power of the nitric acid concentration. The activation energy determined from the experiments varied from 6 to 11 kcal/mol depending on the method of dissolution. The dissolution rate decreased as the fuel burnup increased in low nitric acid media below 5 mol/l. However, it was found that the effect of the burnup became negligible in a high concentration of nitric acid media. The amount of insoluble residue and its constituents were evaluated by changing the dissolution condition. (author)

  4. Deeply subducted continental fragments - Part 1: Fracturing, dissolution-precipitation, and diffusion processes recorded by garnet textures of the central Sesia Zone (western Italian Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Francesco; Lanari, Pierre; Engi, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Contiguous continental high-pressure terranes in orogens offer insight into deep recycling and transformation processes that occur in subduction zones. These remain poorly understood, and currently debated ideas need testing. The approach we chose is to investigate, in detail, the record in suitable rock samples that preserve textures and robust mineral assemblages that withstood overprinting during exhumation. We document complex garnet zoning in eclogitic mica schists from the Sesia Zone (western Italian Alps). These retain evidence of two orogenic cycles and provide detailed insight into resorption, growth, and diffusion processes induced by fluid pulses in high-pressure conditions. We analysed local textures and garnet compositional patterns, which turned out remarkably complex. By combining these with thermodynamic modelling, we could unravel and quantify repeated fluid-rock interaction processes. Garnet shows low-Ca porphyroclastic cores that were stable under (Permian) granulite facies conditions. The series of rims that surround these cores provide insight into the subsequent evolution: the first garnet rim that surrounds the pre-Alpine granulite facies core in one sample indicates that pre-Alpine amphibolite facies metamorphism followed the granulite facies event. In all samples documented, cores show lobate edges and preserve inner fractures, which are sealed by high-Ca garnet that reflects high-pressure Alpine conditions. These observations suggest that during early stages of subduction, before hydration of the granulites, brittle failure of garnet occurred, indicating high strain rates that may be due to seismic failure. Several Alpine rims show conspicuous textures indicative of interaction with hydrous fluid: (a) resorption-dominated textures produced lobate edges, at the expense of the outer part of the granulite core; (b) peninsulas and atoll garnet are the result of replacement reactions; and (c) spatially limited resorption and enhanced transport

  5. The velocity dependent dissolution of spent nuclear fuel in a geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nutt, W.M.

    1990-02-01

    A model describing the dissolution of fission products and transuranic isotopes from spent nuclear fuel into flowing ground water has been developed. This model is divided into two parts. The first part of the model calculates the temperature within a consolidated spent fuel waste form at a given time and ground water velocity. This model was used to investigate whether water flowing at rates representative of a geological repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, will cool a wasteform consisting of consolidated spent nuclear fuel pins. Time and velocity dependent temperature profiles were generated. These profiles were input into the second model, which calculates the dissolution rate of waste isotopes from a spent fuel pin. Two dissolution limiting processes were modeled; the processes are dissolution limited by the solubility limit of an isotopes in the ground water, and dissolution limited by the diffusion of waste isotopes from the interior of a spent fuel pin to the surface where dissolution can occur

  6. Rates and mechanisms of uranyl oxyhydroxide mineral dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Steefel, Carl I.; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2017-06-01

    Uranyl oxyhydroxide minerals are important weathering products in uranium-contaminated surface and subsurface environments that regulate dissolved uranium (U) concentrations. However, dissolution rates for this class of minerals and associated dissolution mechanisms have not been previously reported for circumneutral pH conditions, particularly for the case of flow through porous media. In this work, the dissolution rates of K- and Na-compreignacite (K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O and Na2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O, respectively) were measured using flow-through columns reacted with two simulated background porewater (BPW) solutions of low and high dissolved carbonate concentration (ca. 0.2 and 2.8 mmol L-1). Column materials were characterized before and after reaction with electron microscopy, bulk chemistry, and EXAFS to identify structural and chemical changes during dissolution and to obtain insight into molecular-scale processes. The reactive transport code CrunchFlow was used to calculate overall dissolution rates while accounting for fluid transport and changes in mineral volume and reactive surface area, and results were compared to steady-state dissolution rate calculations. In low carbonate BPW systems, interlayer K and Na were initially leached from both minerals, and in Na-compreignacite, K and minor divalent cations from the input solution were incorporated into the mineral structure. Results of characterization analyses suggested that after reaction both K- and Na-compreignacite resembled a disordered K-compreignacite with altered surfaces. A 10-fold increase in dissolved carbonate concentration and corresponding increase in pH (from 6.65 to 8.40) resulted in a net removal of 58-87% of total U mass from the columns, compared to importance of coupling reaction and transport processes during the quantification of mineral dissolution rates to accurately predict the fate of contaminants such as U in porous geomedia.

  7. Disintegration of highly soluble immediate release tablets: a surrogate for dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Abhay; Hunt, Robert L; Shah, Rakhi B; Sayeed, Vilayat A; Khan, Mansoor A

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to investigate correlation between disintegration and dissolution for immediate release tablets containing a high solubility drug and to identify formulations where disintegration test, instead of the dissolution test, may be used as the acceptance criteria based on International Conference on Harmonization Q6A guidelines. A statistical design of experiments was used to study the effect of filler, binder, disintegrating agent, and tablet hardness on the disintegration and dissolution of verapamil hydrochloride tablets. All formulation variables, i.e., filler, binder, and disintegrating agent, were found to influence tablet dissolution and disintegration, with the filler and disintegrating agent exerting the most significant influence. Slower dissolution was observed with increasing disintegration time when either the filler or the disintegrating agent was kept constant. However, no direct corelationship was observed between the disintegration and dissolution across all formulations due to the interactions between different formulation components. Although all tablets containing sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as the disintegrating agent, disintegrated in less than 3 min, half of them failed to meet the US Pharmacopeia 30 dissolution criteria for the verapamil hydrochloride tablets highlighting the dependence of dissolution process on the formulation components other than the disintegrating agent. The results identified only one formulation as suitable for using the disintegration test, instead of the dissolution test, as drug product acceptance criteria and highlight the need for systematic studies before using the disintegration test, instead of the dissolution test as the drug acceptance criteria.

  8. The influence of milling on the dissolution performance of simvastatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimper, Ulrike; Aaltonen, Jaakko; Krauel-Goellner, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Particle size reduction is a simple means to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble BCS-class II and IV drugs. However, the major drawback of this process is the possible introduction of process induced disorder. Drugs with different molecular arrangements may exhibit altered proper...

  9. Nonmarital romantic relationship commitment and leave behavior: the mediating role of dissolution consideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderdrift, Laura E; Agnew, Christopher R; Wilson, Juan E

    2009-09-01

    Two studies investigated the process by which individuals in nonmarital romantic relationships characterized by low commitment move toward enacting leave behaviors. Predictions based on the behavioral, goal, and implementation intention literatures were tested using a measure of dissolution consideration developed for this research. Dissolution consideration assesses how salient relationship termination is for an individual while one's relationship is intact. Study 1 developed and validated a measure of dissolution consideration and Study 2 was a longitudinal test of the utility of dissolution consideration in predicting the enactment of leave behaviors. Results indicated that dissolution consideration mediates the association between commitment and enacting leave behaviors, is associated with taking more immediate action, and provides unique explanatory power in leave behavior beyond the effect of commitment alone. Collectively, the findings suggest that dissolution consideration is an intermediate step between commitment and stay/leave behavior in close relationships.

  10. Dissolution kinetics of nanoscale liquid Pb/Bi inclusions at a grain boundary in aluminum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokofjev, S.I.; Johnson, Erik; Zhilin, V.M.

    2008-01-01

    . Dissolution of the inclusions was observed until their complete disappearance. Digitized video recordings of the process of dissolution were used to obtain the dependence of the inclusion size with time. The kinetics of the dissolution of the grain boundary inclusions can be described with a model where......In situ transmission electron microscopy is used to study dissolution of liquid single-phase Pb/Bi inclusions attached to a grain boundary in an alloy of Al99.29Pb0.65Bi0.06 at temperatures of 343, 370, and 389 degrees C, respectively. The initial size of the inclusions was smaller than 60 nm...

  11. Study of dissolution factors of U, Th and Ta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Maristela; Medeiros, Geiza; Zouain, Felipe; Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Pitassi, Gabriel; Lima, Cintia; Leite, Carlos Vieira Barros; Nascimento, Jose Eduardo; Dalia, Kely Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Air pollution can be a problem in industrial processes, but monitoring and controlling the aerosols in the work place is not enough to estimate the occupational risk due to dust particle inhalation. The solubility in lung fluid is considered to estimate this risk. The aim of this study is to determine in vitro specific dissolution parameters for thorium (Th), uranium (U) and tantalum (Ta) associated to crystal lattice of a niobium mineral (pyrochlore). Th, U and Ta dissolution factors in vitro were obtained using the Gamble solution (Simulant Lung Fluid, SLF), PIXE (Particle Induced X ray Emission) and alpha spectrometry as analytical techniques. Ta, Th and U are present in the pyrochlore crystal lattice as oxide; however they have shown different dissolution parameters. The rapid dissolution fraction (fr), rapid dissolution rate (λr); slow dissolution rate (fs) and slow dissolution fraction ((λs) measured for tantalum oxide were equal to 0.1, 0.45 d -1 and 0.00007 d -1 , respectively; for uranium oxide fr was equal to 0.05, (λr equal to 1.1 d -1 ; (λs equal to 0.000068 d -1 ; for thorium oxide fr was 0.025, (λr was 1.5 d -1 and (λs: 0.000065 d -1 . These results show that chemical behavior of these 3 compounds in the SLF could not be represented by the same parameter. The ratio of uranium concentration in urine and feces samples from workers exposed to pyrochlore dust particle was determined. These values agree with the theoretical values of estimated uranium concentration using specific parameters for uranium oxide present in pyrochlore. (author)

  12. Mechanism of single-layer 193-nm dissolution inhibition resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenglin; Houlihan, Francis M.; Reichmanis, Elsa; Nalamasu, Omkaram; Reiser, Arnost; Dabbagh, Gary; Hutton, Richard S.; Osei, Dan; Sousa, Jose; Bolan, Kevin J.

    2000-06-01

    We have found that the progress of developer base into films of terpolymers of norbornene (NB)-maleic anhydride (MA) and acrylic acid (AA) is a percolation process with a critical site concentration of x(c) equals 0.084 which suggests that every acrylic acid site in the terpolymer of norbornene-maleic anhydride-acrylic acid can make 12 monomer units of the polymer water compatible. In practice these systems are being used with various tert-butyl esters of cholic acid as dissolution inhibitors. The cholates differ very much in their dissolution inhibition factors (lowest t-butyl cholate (1.3) to highest t-butyl lithocholate glutarate dimer (7.4). The change in these factors corrected for molarity follow the hydrophobic character of the dissolution as measured by log(p). A quick screening method has also been established to evaluate dissolution inhibitors based on our observation that the cloud point (the volume % acetone in a water/acetone which gives persistent cloudiness) parallels the dissolution inhibiting power as measured by the dissolution inhibition factor. For dissolution promotion, optimal results are obtained with t-butyl 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylate (f equals -6.3) and poorest results with t-butyl lithocholate (f equals -2.8); this appears to track with the number of carboxyl groups and the hydrophobicity of the carboxylic acids. The Rmax found for resist formulations tracks well with these findings. Another factor in determining the ultimate achievable contrast is the degree of acidolytic deprotection achieved by the material. It appears that acidolyticaly cleaveable carboxylate esters with a higher concentration of electron withdrawing groups such as t-butyl 1,3,5-cyclohexanetricarboxylate are more effective.

  13. Development of dissolution test method for a telmisartan/amlodipine besylate combination using synchronous derivative spectrofluorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panikumar Durga Anumolu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution process is considered an important in vitro tool to evaluate product quality and drug release behavior. Single dissolution methods for the analysis of combined dosage forms are preferred to simplify quality control testing. The objective of the present work was to develop and validate a single dissolution test for a telmisartan (TEL and amlodipine besylate (AML combined tablet dosage form. The sink conditions, stability and specificity of both drugs in different dissolution media were tested to choose a discriminatory dissolution method, which uses an USP type-II apparatus with a paddle rotating at 75 rpm, with 900 mL of simulated gastric fluid (SGF without enzymes as the dissolution medium. This dissolution methodology provided good dissolution profiles for both TEL and AML and was able to discriminate changes in the composition and manufacturing process. To quantify both drugs simultaneously, a synchronous first derivative spectrofluorimetric method was developed and validated. Drug release was analyzed by a fluorimetric method at 458 nm and 675 nm for AML and TEL, respectively. The dissolution method was validated as per ICH guidance.

  14. The Influence of Milling on the Dissolution Performance of Simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rades

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Particle size reduction is a simple means to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water soluble BCS-class II and IV drugs. However, the major drawback of this process is the possible introduction of process induced disorder. Drugs with different molecular arrangements may exhibit altered properties such as solubility and dissolution rate and, therefore, process induced solid state modifications need to be monitored. The aim of this study was two-fold: firstly, to investigate the dissolution rates of milled and unmilled simvastatin; and secondly, to screen for the main milling factors, as well as factor interactions in a dry ball milling process using simvastatin as model drug, and to optimize the milling procedure with regard to the opposing responses particle size and process induced disorder by application of a central composite face centered design. Particle size was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and image analysis. Process induced disorder was determined by partial least squares (PLS regression modeling of respective X-ray powder diffractograms (XRPD and Raman spectra. Valid and significant quadratic models were built. The investigated milling factors were milling frequency, milling time and ball quantity at a set drug load, out of which milling frequency was found to be the most important factor for particle size as well as process induced disorder. Milling frequency and milling time exhibited an interaction effect on the responses. The optimum milling settings using the maximum number of milling balls (60 balls with 4 mm diameter was determined to be at a milling frequency of 21 Hz and a milling time of 36 min with a resulting primary particle size of 1.4 μm and a process induced disorder of 6.1% (assessed by Raman spectroscopy and 8.4% (assessed by XRPD, at a set optimization limit of < 2 μm for particle size and < 10% for process induced disorder. This optimum was tested experimentally and the process induced disorder

  15. Dissolution kinetics of calcined ulexite in ammonium sulfate solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizamettin Demirkıran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ulexite is one of the boron minerals, which include a respectable amount of hydration water. It can be used as a raw material in the production of boron compounds. Some part of water in the composition of ulexite can be removed from the solid matrix applying dehydration treatment, and a porous structure can be obtained to increase the reaction rate. In the present study, the effect of dehydration temperature on dissolution kinetics of ulexite in ammonium sulfate solutions was researched in a batch reactor utilizing the parameters of solution concentration, solid-to-liquid ratio, stirring speed and reaction temperature. It was determined that the dissolution rate of calcined material increased with increasing solution concentration and reaction temperature and with decreasing solid-to-liquid ratio. The highest dissolution rate was attained with the sample calcined at 150 °C. It was found that the dissolution rate fit to the first order pseudo-homogeneous model. The activation energy of the dissolution process was estimated to be 42 kJ·mol-1.

  16. Monitoring the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets with a fiber-optic dissolution system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydrolyzation of aspirin during the process of dissolution testing for aspirin delayed-release tablets. Hydrolysis product of salicylic acid can result in adverse effects and affect the determination of dissolution rate assaying. In this study, the technique of differential spectra was employed, which made it possible to monitor the dissolution testing in situ. The results showed that the hydrolyzation of aspirin made the percentage of salicylic acid exceed the limit of free salicylic acid (4.0, and the hydrolyzation may affect the quality detection of aspirin delayed-release tablets. Keywords: Aspirin delayed-release tablets, Drug dissolution test, Fiber-optic dissolution system, UV–vis spectrum

  17. Bench Scale Saltcake Dissolution Test Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BECHTOLD, D.B.; PACQUET, E.A.

    2000-01-01

    A potential scenario for retrieving saltcake from single shell tanks is the ''Rainbird(reg s ign) sprinkler'' method. Water is distributed evenly across the surface of the saltcake and allowed to percolate by gravity through the waste. The salt dissolves in the water, forming a saturated solution. The saturated liquid is removed by a saltwell pump situated near the bottom of the tank. By this method, there is never a large inventory of liquid in the tank that could pose a threat of leakage. There are many variables or factors that can influence the hydrodynamics of this retrieval process. They include saltcake porosity; saltwell pumping rate; salt dissolution chemistry; factors that could promote flow channeling (e.g. tank walls, dry wells, inclusions or discontinuities in the saltcake); method of water distribution; plug formation due to crystal formations or accumulation of insoluble solids. A brief literature search indicates that very little experimental data exist on these aspects of saltcake dissolution (Wiersma 1996, 1997). The tests reported here were planned (Herting, 2000) to provide preliminary data and information for planning future, scaled-up tests of the sprinkler method

  18. Dissolution of kinetics of nanoscale liquid Pb/Bi inclusions at a grain boundary in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokofjev, Sergei I.; Johnson, Erik; Zhilin, Victor M.

    2008-01-01

    of the inclusions was observed until their complete disappearance. Digitized video recordings of the process of dissolution were used to obtain the dependence of the inclusion size with time. The kinetics of the dissolution of the grain boundary inclusions can be described with a model where it is assumed...

  19. Kinetics of Crystalline Iodine Dissolution in Ethanol at Room Temperature and at 60°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyubin, V. V.; Klyubina, K. A.; Makovetskaya, K. N.

    2018-02-01

    The kinetics of crystalline iodine dissolution in ethanol at room temperature and 60°C is studied using the electronic absorption spectra of iodine solutions. Dissolution is shown to proceed for more than three months. It is found that the process begins with the formation of hydroiodic acid HI and is complete with the formation of I 3 - anions.

  20. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  1. Effects of ammonium on uranium partitioning and kaolinite mineral dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Hilary P; Di Pietro, Silvina; Katsenovich, Yelena; Szecsody, Jim

    2017-02-01

    Ammonia gas injection is a promising technique for the remediation of uranium within the vadose zone. It can be used to manipulate the pH of a system and cause co-precipitation processes that are expected to remove uranium from the aqueous phase and decrease leaching from the solid phase. The work presented in this paper explores the effects of ammonium and sodium hydroxide on the partitioning of uranium and dissolution of the kaolinite mineral in simplified synthetic groundwaters using equilibrium batch sorption and sequential extraction experiments. It shows that there is a significant increase in uranium removal in systems with divalent cations present in the aqueous phase but not in sodium chloride synthetic groundwaters. Further, the initial conditions of the aqueous phase do not affect the dissolution of kaolinite. However, the type of base treatment does have an effect on mineral dissolution. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Dissolution-recrystallization method for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Fei; Luo, Junsheng; Wan, Zhongquan; Liu, Xingzhao; Jia, Chunyang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissolution-recrystallization method can improve perovskite crystallization. • Dissolution-recrystallization method can improve TiO 2 /perovskite interface. • The optimal perovskite solar cell obtains the champion PCE of 16.76%. • The optimal devices are of high reproducibility. - Abstract: In this work, a dissolution-recrystallization method (DRM) with chlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide treating the perovskite films during the spin-coating process is reported. This is the first time that DRM is used to control perovskite crystallization and improve the device performance. Furthermore, the DRM is good for reducing defects and grain boundaries, improving perovskite crystallization and even improving TiO 2 /perovskite interface. By optimizing, the DRM2-treated perovskite solar cell (PSC) obtains the best photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 16.76% under AM 1.5 G illumination (100 mW cm −2 ) with enhanced J sc and V oc compared to CB-treated PSC.

  3. Transient refractory material dissolution by a volumetrically-heated melt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiler, Jean Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.seiler@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ratel, Gilles [CEA, DEN, DTN, 17 Rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Combeau, Hervé [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198, Lorraine University, Ecole des Mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Gaus-Liu, Xiaoyang; Kretzschmar, Frank; Miassoedov, Alexei [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    , the liquid composition at the interface is concentrated in the refractory species. During the transient, the interface temperature is equal to the liquidus temperature corresponding to the local and instantaneous composition of the liquid at the interface. Regarding the design of a protective layer made of refractory materials, we can answer the question of how much ceramic can be dissolved and its impact on melt temperature evolution during the dissolution process. It also impacts on subsequent corium solidification since the additional mass of dissolved ceramic leads to increased volume of the molten material, significantly increasing the time required for complete solidification. For the long term, ceramic material does not offer better confinement than a crust made of solidified corium. This work served as support to a generalisation of the model of transient evolution of interface temperature in various severe accident situations (Seiler and Combeau, 2014)

  4. Developing a quality by design approach to model tablet dissolution testing: an industrial case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekpe, Ketsia; Abatzoglou, Nicolas; Bataille, Bernard; Gosselin, Ryan; Sharkawi, Tahmer; Simard, Jean-Sébastien; Cournoyer, Antoine

    2017-11-02

    This study applied the concept of Quality by Design (QbD) to tablet dissolution. Its goal was to propose a quality control strategy to model dissolution testing of solid oral dose products according to International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The methodology involved the following three steps: (1) a risk analysis to identify the material- and process-related parameters impacting the critical quality attributes of dissolution testing, (2) an experimental design to evaluate the influence of design factors (attributes and parameters selected by risk analysis) on dissolution testing, and (3) an investigation of the relationship between design factors and dissolution profiles. Results show that (a) in the case studied, the two parameters impacting dissolution kinetics are active pharmaceutical ingredient particle size distributions and tablet hardness and (b) these two parameters could be monitored with PAT tools to predict dissolution profiles. Moreover, based on the results obtained, modeling dissolution is possible. The practicality and effectiveness of the QbD approach were demonstrated through this industrial case study. Implementing such an approach systematically in industrial pharmaceutical production would reduce the need for tablet dissolution testing.

  5. Factors affecting the differences in reactivity and dissolution rates between UO2 and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoesmith, D.W.; Tait, J.C.; Sunder, S.; Steward, S.; Russo, R.E.; Rudnicki, J.D.

    1996-08-01

    Strategies for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel are being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Yucca Mountain site and by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in plutonic rock formations in the Canadian Shield. Uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel and dissolution of the matrix is regarded as a necessary step for the release of radionuclides to repository groundwaters. In order to develop models to describe the dissolution of the U0 2 fuel matrix and subsequent release of radionuclides, it is necessary to understand both chemical and oxidative dissolution processes and how they can be affected by parameters such as groundwater composition, pH, temperature, surface area, radiolysis and redox potential. This report summarizes both published and on-going dissolution studies of U0 2 and both LWR and CANDU spent fuels being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in the U.S. and at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Canada. The studies include both dissolution tests and electrochemical experiments to measure uranium dissolution rates. The report focuses on identifying differences in reactivity towards aqueous dissolution between U0 2 and spent fuel samples as well as estimating bounding values for uranium dissolution rates. This review also outlines the basic tenets for the development of a dissolution model that is based on electrochemical principles. (author). 49 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  6. Role of natural convection in the dissolution of sessile droplets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, E.; Wildeman, S.; Visser, C.W.; Hofhuis, K.A.; Kooij, Ernst S.; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Lohse, Detlef

    2016-01-01

    The dissolution process of small (initial (equivalent) radius R0 < 1 mm) long-chain alcohol (of various types) sessile droplets in water is studied, disentangling diffusive and convective contributions. The latter can arise for high solubilities of the alcohol, as the density of the alcohol–water

  7. Principles of calcite dissolution in human and artificial otoconia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Erik Walther

    Full Text Available Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV.

  8. Experimental observations of dolomite dissolution in geologic carbon sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    One sequestration scenario proposed to reduce CO2 emissions involves injecting CO2 into saline formations or hydrocarbon reservoirs, where dolomite frequently occurs. To better understand fluid-mineral interactions in these sequestration settings, we have conducted a series of single-pass, flow-through experiments on dolomite core samples with CO2-bearing brine. An important component of the experimental design was to maintain the fabric of the rock so as to more accurately simulate fluid flow in natural dolomite-bearing systems. Seven experiments were conducted at 100°C and a pore-fluid pressure of 150 bars with a fluid containing 1 molal NaCl and 0.6 molal dissolved CO2. Flow rates ranged from 0.01 to 1 ml/min. Each experiment was terminated before dissolution breakthrough, but permeability increased by approximately an order of magnitude for all experiments. In general, Ca and Mg concentrations were initially high, but then decreased with reaction progress. We hypothesize that time-dependent changes in fluid chemistry reflect reduction in reactive surface area. Fluid chemistry also indicates preferential removal of Ba, Mn, and Sr with respect to Ca and Mg. In the extreme case, 70% of the Ba was removed from one core, while only 3% of the Ca, Mg, or the entire core mass was removed by dissolution. Ongoing work is focused on identifying elemental distributions throughout the rock to better understand the dissolution process. With fluid chemistry and BET surface area, we model dissolution rate as a function of core length using reactive transport simulations and compare our whole rock, far from equilibrium dissolution rates with analogous data reported in the literature. Finally, X-ray computed tomography images enable reconstructions of dissolution patterns, and they are being used to explore the effect of pore space heterogeneity on flow path development. Geologic carbon sequestration in dolomite will produce significant dissolution at the brine/CO2 interface

  9. Dissolution and compaction instabilities in geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; de Sauvage, J.

    2014-12-01

    Compaction bands play an important role in reservoir engineering and geological storage. Their presence in geological formations may also provide useful information on various geological processes. Several mechanisms can be involved at different scales and may be responsible for compaction band instabilities [1]. Compaction bands can be seen as a particular instability of the governing mathematical system leading to localization of deformation [2-4]. In a saturated porous rock, the progressive mechanical damage of the solid skeleton during compaction, results in the increase of the interface area of the reactants and consequently in the acceleration of the dissolution rate of the solid phase [2,5]. Thus, the solid skeleton is degraded more rapidly (mass removal because of dissolution), the overall mechanical properties of the system diminish (contraction of the elastic domain - chemical softening), deformations increase and the solid skeleton is further damaged (intergranular fractures, debonding, breakage of the porous network etc.). The stability of this positive feedback process is investigated analytically through linear stability analysis by considering the strong chemo-poro-mechanical coupling due to chemical dissolution. The post bifurcation behavior is then studied analytically and numerically revealing the compaction band thickness and periodicity. The effect of various parameters is studied as for instance the influence of the hydraulic diffusivity on the compaction band thickness. [1] P. Baud, S. Vinciguerra, C. David, A. Cavallo, E. Walker and T. Reuschlé (2009), Pure Appl. Geophys., 166(5-7), 869-898 [2] I. Stefanou and J. Sulem (2014), JGR: Solid Earth, 119(2), 880-899. doi:10.1002/2013JB010342I [3] J.W. Rudnicki and J.R. Rice (1975), Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 23(6),: 371-394 [4] K.A. Issen and J.W. Rudnicki (2000), JGR, 105(B9), 21529. doi:10.1029/2000JB900185 [5] R. Nova, R. Castellanza and C. Tamagnini (2003), International

  10. K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westra, A.G.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel

  11. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    OpenAIRE

    D. Jeong; K. Kim; W. Choi

    2012-01-01

    Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a~new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4), the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phas...

  12. Effect of pseudo-gravitational acceleration on the dissolution rate of miscible drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viner, Gloria; La Monica, Tatiana; Lombardo, Renato; Pojman, John A

    2017-10-01

    The effect of pseudo-gravitational acceleration on the dissolution process of two phase miscible systems has been investigated at high acceleration values using a spinning drop tensiometer with three systems: 1-butanol/water, isobutyric acid/water, and triethylamine/water. We concluded that the dissolution process involves at least three different transport phenomena: diffusion, barodiffusion, and gravitational (buoyancy-driven) convection. The last two phenomena are significantly affected by the centrifugal acceleration acting at the interface between the two fluids, and the coupling with the geometry of the dissolving drop leads to a change of the mass flux during the course of the dissolution process.

  13. Optimization of Dissolution Compartments in a Biorelevant Dissolution Apparatus Golem v2, Supported by Multivariate Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Stupák

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biorelevant dissolution instruments represent an important tool for pharmaceutical research and development. These instruments are designed to simulate the dissolution of drug formulations in conditions most closely mimicking the gastrointestinal tract. In this work, we focused on the optimization of dissolution compartments/vessels for an updated version of the biorelevant dissolution apparatus—Golem v2. We designed eight compartments of uniform size but different inner geometry. The dissolution performance of the compartments was tested using immediate release caffeine tablets and evaluated by standard statistical methods and principal component analysis. Based on two phases of dissolution testing (using 250 and 100 mL of dissolution medium, we selected two compartment types yielding the highest measurement reproducibility. We also confirmed a statistically ssignificant effect of agitation rate and dissolution volume on the extent of drug dissolved and measurement reproducibility.

  14. Solubility and dissolution enhancement strategies: current understanding and recent trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shashank; Patel, Niketkumar; Lin, Senshang

    2015-06-01

    Identification of lead compounds with higher molecular weight and lower aqueous solubility has become increasingly prevalent with the advent of high throughput screening. Poor aqueous solubility of these lipophilic compounds can drastically affect the dissolution rate and subsequently the drug absorbed in the systemic circulation, imposing a significant burden of time and money during drug development process. Various pre-formulation and formulation strategies have been applied in the past that can improve the aqueous solubility of lipophilic compounds by manipulating either the crystal lattice properties or the activity coefficient of a solute in solution or both, if possible. However, despite various strategies available in the armor of formulation scientist, solubility issue still remains an overriding problem in the drug development process. It is perhaps due to the insufficient conceptual understanding of solubility and dissolution phenomenon that hinders the judgment in selecting suitable strategy for improving aqueous solubility and/or dissolution rate. This article, therefore, focuses on (i) revisiting the theoretical and mathematical concepts associated with solubility and dissolution, (ii) their application in making rationale decision for selecting suitable pre-formulation and formulation strategies and (iii) the relevant research performed in this field in past decade.

  15. Surface sediment characteristics and tower karst dissolution, Guilin, southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tao

    2003-01-01

    Dissolution of extensive outcrops of limestone and dolostone in humid tropical and subtropical southern China produced numerous caves and residual hills that are referred as tower karst. This study identifies and relates the physical and chemical characteristics of the surface sediment with the limestone bedrock in Guilin to assess the influence of the limestone dissolution process on sediment composition. The results of this study indicated that (i) both limestone and dolostone of the region are very pure (99.5% and 98.5% of CaCO 3 and MgCO 3, respectively); (ii) the material composition of limestone and dolostone is different from that of soil and sediment of the region: constituents of surface sediments are highly related with the clastic sedimentary rocks, such as the mudstone, but show negative correlation with limestone and dolostone; (iii) the limestone formations are highly resistant to physical weathering and disintegration; their durability versus physical weathering and their high susceptibility to chemical dissolution account for why residual towers can form and persist; (iv) a dual-zone environmental structure exists vertically downward from the surface in Guilin: the zone of unconsolidated clastic sediments that is predominantly acidic, and the zone of karstified limestone that is predominantly basic. The evidence suggests that the environment and processes differ in these two zones. The chemical dissolution of limestone that formed tower karst of the region is not mainly responsible for the accumulation of clastic sediment on the surface.

  16. How does natural groundwater flow affect CO2 dissolution in saline aquifers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, R.; Michel-Meyer, I.; Tsinober, A.; Shavit, U.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of supercritical CO2 in aquifer brine is one of the most important trapping mechanisms in CO2 geological storage. Diffusion-limited dissolution is a very slow process. However, since the CO2-rich water is slightly denser than the CO2-free water, when CO2-free water is overlaid by heavier CO2-rich water, convective instability results in fingers of dense CO2-rich water that propagate downwards, causing CO2-unsaturated water to move upwards. This convection process significantly accelerates the dissolution rate of CO2 into the aquifer water.Most previous works have neglected the effect of natural groundwater flow and assumed it has no effect on the dissolution dynamics. However, it was found that in some of the saline aquifers groundwater flow rate, although small, is not zero. In this research, we study the effect of groundwater flow on dissolution by performing laboratory experiments in a bead pack cell using a mixture of methanol and ethylene-glycol as a CO2 analog while varying the water horizontal flow rate. We find that water horizontal flow decreases the number of fingers, their wavelength and their propagation velocity. When testing high water flow rates, no fingers were developed and the dissolution process was entirely diffusive. The effect of water flow on the dissolution rate did not show a clear picture. When increasing the horizontal flow rate the convective dissolution flux slightly decreased and then increased again. It seems that the combination of density-driven flow, water horizontal flow, mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion affect the dissolution rate in a complex and non-monotonic manner. These intriguing dynamics should be further studied to understand their effect on dissolution trapping.

  17. Dissolution Flowsheet for High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Karay, N. S [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy, and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas, allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  18. Kinetics of the niobium dissolution in liquid aluminium, for in situ composite production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urtiga Filho, Severino L.; Robert, Maria Helena

    1996-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility of the production of composites in the system Al-Nb through the in situ formation of the reinforcement phase, i.e., the intermetallic Nb Al 3 . This composites are produced by the addition of metallic Nb to. The intermetallic is then formed when the Nb is dissolved into the liquid Al. The thermodynamic conditions, the dissolution kinetics and the mechanisms involved are investigated. Different test parameters (temperature and time) are used, with the aim of assessing the dissolution rate. Results show that the dissolution rate depends on the temperature and on stress condition which are induced by the dissolution process. Furthermore, the results also present the necessary conditions for the Nb dissolution to produce the intermetallic formation, which are dispersed in the Al matrix, in such a way that the composite shows a good dispersion of reinforcements. (author)

  19. The Use of Artificial Neural Network for Prediction of Dissolution Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Elçiçek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colemanite is a preferred boron mineral in industry, such as boric acid production, fabrication of heat resistant glass, and cleaning agents. Dissolution of the mineral is one of the most important processes for these industries. In this study, dissolution of colemanite was examined in water saturated with carbon dioxide solutions. Also, prediction of dissolution rate was determined using artificial neural networks (ANNs which are based on the multilayered perceptron. Reaction temperature, total pressure, stirring speed, solid/liquid ratio, particle size, and reaction time were selected as input parameters to predict the dissolution rate. Experimental dataset was used to train multilayer perceptron (MLP networks to allow for prediction of dissolution kinetics. Developing ANNs has provided highly accurate predictions in comparison with an obtained mathematical model used through regression method. We conclude that ANNs may be a preferred alternative approach instead of conventional statistical methods for prediction of boron minerals.

  20. Dissolution of Used Nuclear Fuel Using a TBP/N-Paraffin Solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shehee, T. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jones, D. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DelCul, G. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-10-02

    The dissolution of unirradiated used nuclear fuel (UNF) pellets pretreated for tritium removal was demonstrated using a tributly phosphate (TBP) solvent. Dissolution of pretreated fuel in TBP could potentially combine dissolution with two cycle of solvent extraction required for separating the actinides and lanthanides from other fission products. Dissolutions were performed using UNF surrogates prepared from both uranyl nitrate and uranium trioxide produced from the pretreatment process by adding selected actinide and stable fission product elements. In laboratory-scale experiments, the U dissolution efficiency ranged from 80-99+% for both the nitrate and oxide surrogate fuels. On average, 80% of the Pu and 50% of the Np and Am in the nitrate surrogate dissolved; however, little of the transuranic elements dissolved in the oxide form. The majority of the 3+ lanthanide elements dissolved. Only small amounts of Sr (0-1.6%) and Mo (0.1-1.7%) and essentially no Cs, Ru, Zr, or Pd dissolved.

  1. Emotional and Cognitive Coping in Relationship Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrape, Elizabeth R.; Jenkins, Sharon Rae; Callahan, Jennifer L.; Nowlin, Rachel B.

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution of a romantic relationship can adversely affect functioning among college students and represents one primary reason for seeking campus counseling. This study examined the associations among common coping strategies and distress following relationship dissolution. Avoidance and repetitive negative thinking (RNT) were significantly…

  2. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    During the initial phase, the dissolution rate of a soluble compound is very high due to the high concentration gradient, and as dissolution progresses, its effective solubility decreases with change in mole fraction. At higher pore volumes, the mole fractions of lower solubility fractions increase which can result in higher ...

  3. Dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater: Mechanism and rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.L.; Honnorez, J.; Eberhart, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Basaltic glasses are considered as natural analogues for nuclear waste glasses. Thermodynamic computer codes used to evaluate long term behavior of both nuclear waste and basaltic glasses require the knowledge of the dissolution mechanism of the glass network. The paper presents the results of a series of experiments designed to study the structure and chemical composition of alteration layers formed on the surface of artificial tholeiitic glass altered in artificial seawater. Experiments were performed at 60 degree C, 1 bar and 350 bars in non-renewed conditions. A natural sample from Palagonia (Sicily) has been studied by electron microscopy and comparison between natural and experimental palagonitic layers is made. The behavior of dissolved silica during experiments, and both the structure and the chemical composition of the palagonitic layers, indicate that they form by precipitation of secondary minerals from solution after a total breakdown of the glassy network, i.e., congruent dissolution of the glass. Hence the dissolution equation necessary for thermodynamic modelling of basaltic glass dissolution in seawater at low temperature must be written as a simple stoichiometric process. These experiments indicate that the transformation of glass to palagonitic material is not isovolumetric. Hence it is preferable to use Fe or Ti as conservative elements for chemical budget calculations

  4. FY 2000 Saltcake Dissolution and Feed Stability Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, R.D.; McGinnis, C.P.; Weber, C.F.; Welch, T.D.; Jewett, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) continues to work closely with the Office of River Protection (ORP) to better understand the chemistry involved with the retrieval, transport, and pretreatment of nuclear wastes at Hanford. Since a private contractor is currently responsible for the pretreatment and immobilization activities in this remediation effort, the TFA has concentrated on saltcake dissolution and waste transport at the request of the ORP. Researchers at Hanford have performed a series of dissolution experiments on actual saltcake samples. Staff members at Mississippi State University (MSU) continue to model the dissolution results with the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP), which is used extensively by ORP personnel. Several ways to improve the predictive capabilities of the ESP were identified. Since several transfer lines at Hanford have become plugged, TFA tasks at AEA Technologies, Florida International University (FIU), MSU, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are investigating the behavior of the supernatants and slurries during transport. A combination of experimental and theoretical techniques is used to study the transport chemistry. This effort is expected to develop process control tools for waste transfer. The results from these TFA tasks were presented to ORP personnel during the FY 2000 Saltcake Dissolution and Feed Stability Workshop, which was held on May 16-17 in Richland, Washington. The minutes from this workshop are provided in this report

  5. Initial Drug Dissolution from Amorphous Solid Dispersions Controlled by Polymer Dissolution and Drug-Polymer Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuejie; Wang, Shujing; Wang, Shan; Liu, Chengyu; Su, Ching; Hageman, Michael; Hussain, Munir; Haskell, Roy; Stefanski, Kevin; Qian, Feng

    2016-10-01

    ); while drug released much slower than the polymer when molecular level mixing or drug-polymer interaction was absent (SDD-PB systems). For ASDs without drug-polymer interaction (i.e., KTZ/HPMC systems), the mixing homogeneity had little impact on the release rate of either the drug or the polymer thus SDD and SDD-PB demonstrated the same drug or polymer release rate, while the drug released slowly and independently of polymer release. The initial drug release from an ASD was controlled by 1) the polymer release rate; 2) the strength of drug-polymer interaction, including the intrinsic interaction caused by the chemistry of the drug and the polymer (measured by the χ value), as well as that the apparent interaction caused by the drug-polymer ratio (measure by the extent of peak shift on spectroscopic analysis); and 3) the level of mixing homogeneity between the drug and polymer. In summary, the selection of polymer, drug-polymer ratio, and ASD processing conditions have profound impacts on the dissolution behavior of ASDs. Graphical Abstract Relationship between initial drug and polymer dissolution rates from amorphous solid dispersions with different mixing uniformity and drug-polymer interactions.

  6. EVALUATION OF LOW TEMPERATURE ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION IN TANK 51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, J

    2008-01-01

    Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days, which became the baseline aluminum dissolution process. LWO initiated a project to modify a waste tank to meet these requirements. Subsequent to an alternative evaluation, LWO management identified an opportunity to perform aluminum dissolution on sludge destined for Sludge Batch 5, but within a limited window that would not allow time for any modifications for tank heating. A variation of the baseline process, dubbed Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), was developed based on the constraint of available energy input in Tank 51 and the window of opportunity, but was not constrained to a minimum extent of dissolution, i.e. dissolve as much aluminum as possible within the time available. This process was intended to operate between 55 and 70 C, but for a significantly longer time than the baseline process. LTAD proceeded in parallel with the baseline project. The preliminary evaluation at the completion of LTAD focused on the material balance and extent of the aluminum dissolved. The range of values of extent of dissolution, 56% to 64%, resulted from the variation in liquid phase sample data available at the time. Additional solid phase data is available from a sample taken after LTAD to refine this range. This report provides additional detailed evaluation of the LTAD process based on analytical and field data and includes: a summary of the process chronology; a determination of an acceptable blending strategy for the aluminum-laden supernate stored in Tank 11; an update to the determination of aluminum dissolved using more complete sample results; a determination of the effect of LTAD on uranium, plutonium, and other metals; a determination of the rate of heat

  7. Mechanism and Kinetics for the Dissolution of Apatitic Materials in Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calmanovici C.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - This work concerns the study of the digestion step in the production process of phosphoric acid. Some qualitative experiments indicate that the difference between the pH at the surface of the phosphate and that in the bulk of the solution is negligible and that the dissolution is controlled by diffusion of products away from the phosphate particle. In further experiments, to isolate the dissolution phenomenon from the formation of calcium sulfate, the sulfuric acid normally used industrially is replaced by hydrochloric acid. The phosphate material used in our experiments is a model apatitic material: synthetic hydroxyapatite (HAP. The dissolution of calcium hydroxyapatite was studied with increasing amounts of calcium and phosphate at different temperatures. A simple method was developed for this observation based on the time required for complete dissolution of the HAP powder. The results confirm that the dissolution is controlled by a diffusional process through an interface of calcium and phosphate ions released from the solid surface. A kinetic model for the dissolution of apatitic materials is proposed which assumes a shrinking particle behaviour controlled by diffusion of calcium ions. The experimental results are fitted to this model to determine the mass transfer constant for HAP dissolution in acid solutions. The activation energy of the reaction is about 14kJ/mol. This study was carried on in conditions similar to the industrial ones for the production of phosphoric acid by the dihydrate-process

  8. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite: Implications for surface dynamics and dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Balic-Zunic, T.

    2014-02-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200 h of dissolution. Results are analyzed in terms of changes in surface area, surface reactivity and dissolution rates. All surfaces studied present fast changes in topography during the initial 200 h of dissolution. The controlling factors that cause the development of topography are the stability of the step edges forming the initial surface and its inclination to the closest stable planes, which are specific for each surface orientation. During an initial dissolution regime dissolution rates decrease significantly, even though the total surface area increases. During a second dissolution regime, some surfaces continue to present significant changes in topography, while for others the topography tends to remain approximately constant. The observed variation of dissolution rates are attributed to a decrease of the density of step edges on the surface and the continuous increase in exposure of more stable surfaces. Calculations of dissolution rates, which assume that dissolution rates are directly proportional to surface area, are not valid for the type of surfaces studied. Instead, to develop accurate kinetic dissolution models and more realistic stochastic dissolution simulations the surface reactivity, determined by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure.

  9. A mathematical analysis of drug dissolution in the USP flow through apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, David; D'Arcy, D. M.; Crane, L. J.; Redmond, Brendan

    2018-03-01

    This paper applies boundary layer theory to the process of drug dissolution in the USP (United States Pharmacopeia) Flow Through Apparatus. The mass transfer rate from the vertical planar surface of a compact within the device is examined. The theoretical results obtained are then compared with those of experiment. The paper also examines the effect on the dissolution process caused by the interaction between natural and forced convection within the apparatus and the introduction of additional boundaries.

  10. Carbonate ions and arsenic dissolution by groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.-J.; Nriagu, J.; Haack, S.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of Marshall Sandstone, a major source of groundwater with elevated arsenic levels in southeast Michigan, were exposed to bicarbonate ion under controlled chemical conditions. In particular, effects of pH and redox conditions on arsenic release were evaluated. The release of arsenic from the aquifer rock was strongly related to the bicarbonate concentration in the leaching solution. The results obtained suggest that the carbonation of arsenic sulfide minerals, including orpiment (As2S3) and realgar (As2S2), is an important process in leaching arsenic into groundwater under anaerobic conditions. The arseno-carbonate complexes formed, believed to be As(CO3)2-, As(CO3)(OH)2-, and AsCO3+, are stable in groundwater. The reaction of ferrous ion with the thioarsenite from carbonation process can result in the formation of arsenopyrite which is a common mineral in arsenic-rich aquifers.Samples of Marshall Sandstone, a major source of groundwater with elevated arsenic levels in southeast Michigan, were exposed to bicarbonate ion under controlled chemical conditions. In particular, effects of pH and redox conditions on arsenic release were evaluated. The release of arsenic from the aquifer rock was strongly related to the bicarbonate concentration in the leaching solution. The results obtained suggest that the carbonation of arsenic sulfide minerals, including orpiment (As2S3) and realgar (As2S2), is an important process in leaching arsenic into groundwater under anaerobic conditions. The arseno-carbonate complexes formed, believed to be As(CO3)2-, As(CO3)(OH)2-, and AsCO3+, are stable in groundwater. The reaction of ferrous ion with the thioarsenite from carbonation process can result in the formation of arsenopyrite which is a common mineral in arsenic-rich aquifers.The role of bicarbonate in leaching arsenic into groundwater was investigated by conducting batch experiments using core samples of Marshall Sandstone from southeast Michigan and different bicarbonate

  11. Peroxide formation and kinetics of sodium dissolution in alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muralidaran, P.; Chandran, K.; Ganesan, V.; Periaswami, G.

    1997-01-01

    Suitable techniques for sodium removal and decontamination of sodium wetted components of Liquid Metal Fast Reactors (LMFRs) are necessary both for repair, reuse and decommissioning of such components. Among the methods followed for sodium removal, alcohol dissolution is usually employed for small components like bellow sealed valves, gripping tools to handle core components and sodium sampling devices (primary and secondary). One of the concerns in the alcohol dissolution method is the possible role of peroxide formation in the ethoxy group during storage and handling leading to explosion. This paper describes the study of peroxide formation in ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve as well as some of the results of dissolution kinetic studies carried out in our laboratory using different alcohols. The peroxide formation of ethyl carbitol and butyl cellosolve were studied by iodometric technique. It has been found that the peroxide formation is less in sodium containing alcohol than in pure one. Ethyl carbitol, butyl cellosolve and Jaysol-SS (mixture of ethyl alcohol, methyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol and methyl isobutyl ketone) were used in dissolution kinetics studies. The effects due to area and orientation of the fresh sodium surface have also been investigated. The reaction rates were studied in the temperature range of 303-343 K. The rate of dissolution was estimated by measuring the sodium content of alcohol at periodic intervals. It is found that the reaction rate varies in the order of ethyl alcohol-water mixture > Jaysol-SS > butyl cellosolve > ethyl carbitol. While cleaning sodium using alcohol, the concentration of alcohol is held essentially constant throughout the process. The rate of reaction depends only on the amount of sodium and follows pseudo-first order kinetics. Increase in surface area has a marked impact on the dissolution rate at lower temperatures while at higher temperatures, the temperature factor overrides the effect due to surface area

  12. A Model for Dissolution of Lime in Steelmaking Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Rahul; Roy, Ushasi; Ghosh, Dinabandhu

    2016-08-01

    In a previous study by Sarkar et al. (Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015), a dynamic model of the LD steelmaking was developed. The prediction of the previous model (Sarkar et al. in Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) for the bath (metal) composition matched well with the plant data (Cicutti et al. in Proceedings of 6th International Conference on Molten Slags, Fluxes and Salts, Stockholm City, 2000). However, with respect to the slag composition, the prediction was not satisfactory. The current study aims to improve upon the previous model Sarkar et al. (Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) by incorporating a lime dissolution submodel into the earlier one. From the industrial point of view, the understanding of the lime dissolution kinetics is important to meet the ever-increasing demand of producing low-P steel at a low basicity. In the current study, three-step kinetics for the lime dissolution is hypothesized on the assumption that a solid layer of 2CaO·SiO2 should form around the unreacted core of the lime. From the available experimental data, it seems improbable that the observed kinetics should be controlled singly by any one kinetic step. Accordingly, a general, mixed control model has been proposed to calculate the dissolution rate of the lime under varying slag compositions and temperatures. First, the rate equation for each of the three rate-controlling steps has been derived, for three different lime geometries. Next, the rate equation for the mixed control kinetics has been derived and solved to find the dissolution rate. The model predictions have been validated by means of the experimental data available in the literature. In addition, the effects of the process conditions on the dissolution rate have been studied, and compared with the experimental results wherever possible. Incorporation of this submodel into the earlier global model (Sarkar et al. in Metall. Mater. Trans. B 46B:961 2015) enables the prediction of the lime dissolution rate

  13. Dissolution of steel slags in aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shashikant; Mehra, Anurag

    2017-07-01

    Steel slag is a major industrial waste in steel industries, and its dissolution behavior in water needs to be characterized in the larger context of its potential use as an agent for sequestering CO 2 . For this purpose, a small closed system batch reactor was used to conduct the dissolution of steel slags in an aqueous medium under various dissolution conditions. In this study, two different types of steel slags were procured from steel plants in India, having diverse structural features, mineralogical compositions, and particle sizes. The experiment was performed at different temperatures for 240 h of dissolution at atmospheric pressure. The dissolution rates of major and minor slag elements were quantified through liquid-phase elemental analysis using an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy at different time intervals. Advanced analytical techniques such as field emission gun-scanning electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray, BET, and XRD were also used to analyze mineralogical and structural changes in the slag particles. High dissolution of slags was observed irrespective of the particle size distribution, which suggests high carbonation potential. Concentrations of toxic heavy metals in the leachate were far below maximum acceptable limits. Thus, the present study investigates the dissolution behavior of different mineral ions of steel slag in aqueous media in light of its potential application in CO 2 sequestration.

  14. UO2 dissolution rates: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report reviews literature data on UO 2 dissolution kinetics and provides a framework for guiding future experimental studies as well as theoretical modeling studies. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution involves formation of an oxidized surface layer which is then dissolved by formation of aqueous complexes. Higher oxygen pressures or other oxidants are required at higher temperatures to have dissolution rates independent of oxygen pressure. At high oxygen pressures (1-5 atm, 25-70 C), the dissolution rate has a one-half order dependence on oxygen pressure, whereas at oxygen pressures below 0.2 atm, Grandstaff (1976), but nobody else, observed a first-order dependence on dissolution rate. Most people found a first-order dependence on carbonate concentration; Posey-Dowty (1987) found independence of carbonate at pH 7 to 8.2. Dissolution rates increase with temperature except in experiments involving granitic groundwater. Dissolution rates were generally greater under acid or basic conditions than near neutral pH

  15. Mechanistic Basis of Cocrystal Dissolution Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Fengjuan; Amidon, Gordon L; Rodríguez-Hornedo, Naír; Amidon, Gregory E

    2018-01-01

    Current interest in cocrystal development resides in the advantages that the cocrystal may have in solubility and dissolution compared with the parent drug. This work provides a mechanistic analysis and comparison of the dissolution behavior of carbamazepine (CBZ) and its 2 cocrystals, carbamazepine-saccharin (CBZ-SAC) and carbamazepine-salicylic acid (CBZ-SLC) under the influence of pH and micellar solubilization. A simple mathematical equation is derived based on the mass transport analyses to describe the dissolution advantage of cocrystals. The dissolution advantage is the ratio of the cocrystal flux to drug flux and is defined as the solubility advantage (cocrystal to drug solubility ratio) times the diffusivity advantage (cocrystal to drug diffusivity ratio). In this work, the effective diffusivity of CBZ in the presence of surfactant was determined to be different and less than those of the cocrystals. The higher effective diffusivity of drug from the dissolved cocrystals, the diffusivity advantage, can impart a dissolution advantage to cocrystals with lower solubility than the parent drug while still maintaining thermodynamic stability. Dissolution conditions where cocrystals can display both thermodynamic stability and a dissolution advantage can be obtained from the mass transport models, and this information is useful for both cocrystal selection and formulation development. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of soluble nuclide dissolution rates from spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Gray, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    Gaining a better understanding of the potential release behavior of water-soluble radionuclides is the focus of new laboratory spent fuel dissolution studies being planned in support of the Yucca Mountain Project. Previous studies have suggested that maximum release rates for actinide nuclides, which account for most of the long-term radioactivity in spent fuel, should be solubility-limited and should not depend on the characteristics or durability of the spent fuel waste form. Maximum actinide concentrations should be sufficiently low to meet the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) annual release limits. Potential release rates for soluble nuclides such as 99 Tc, 135 Cs, 14 C and 129 I, which account for about 1-2% of the activity in spent fuel at 1,000 years, are less certain and may depend on processes such as oxidation of the fuel in the repository air environment. Dissolution rates for several soluble nuclides have been measured from spent fuel specimens using static and semi-static methods. However, such tests do not provide a direct measurement of fuel matrix dissolution rates that may ultimately control soluble-nuclide release rates. Flow-through tests are being developed as a potential supplemental method for determining the matrix component of soluble-nuclide dissolution. Advantages and disadvantages of both semi-static and flow-through methods are discussed. Tests with fuel specimens representing a range of potential fuel states that may occur in the repository, including oxidized fuel, are proposed. Preliminary results from flow-through tests with unirradiated UO 2 suggesting that matrix dissolution rates are very sensitive to water composition are also presented

  17. In silico dissolution rates of pharmaceutical ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Berna; Schneider, Julian; Reuter, Karsten

    2016-10-01

    The correlation between in vitro dissolution rates and the efficiency of drug formulations establishes an opportunity for accelerated drug development. Using in silico methods to predict the dissolution rates bears the prospect of further efficiency gains by avoiding the actual synthesis of candidate formulations. Here, we present a computational protocol that achieves such prediction for molecular crystals at low undersaturation. The protocol exploits the classic spiral dissolution model to minimize the number of material parameters that require explicit molecular simulations. Comparison to available data for acetylsalicylic acid and alpha lactose monohydrate indicates a tunable accuracy within one order of magnitude.

  18. MICRONIZATION: AN EFFICIENT TOOL FOR DISSOLUTION ENHANCEMENT OF DIENOGEST

    OpenAIRE

    Pant Pankaj; Bansal Kailash; P Rama Therdana Rao; Padhee Kumud; Sathapathy Ajit; Kochhar Prithipal Singh

    2011-01-01

    Dienogest is orally active synthetic progesterone. In this study, Dienogest Oral Tablet 2 mg is being developed for use as in therapy of endometriosis, hysteromyoma and uterine leiomyoma. Micronization is a process involves reducing the size of the solid drug particles to 1 to 10 microns commonly by use of attrition methods (Fluid energy or Air Jet Mill). Micronization technique is a cost effective technique for improving the dissolution of Dienogest, a poorly soluble drug. Particle size redu...

  19. UV imaging for in vitro dissolution and release studies: Initial experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Jesper; Lenke, James; Jensen, Sabrine Smedegaard

    2014-01-01

    UV imaging has recently been introduced as a method in drug dissolution and release testing. Spatially and temporally resolved mapping of drug oncentrations in a 7 × 9 mm imaging area provides new opportunities for visualization and study of drug dissolution and release. This review describes...... in hydrogels with relevance for characterization of parenteral depots. UV imaging may be of particular use when the amounts of material are sparse and detailed insights into dissolution and release processes are required, that is in solid form screening, preformulation, and early drug development....

  20. [Phytobezoar dissolution with Coca-Cola].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Juan, F; Martínez-Lapiedra, C; Picazo, V

    2006-05-01

    The treatment of phytobezoar is empiric. The various therapeutic choices include dietary modifications, prokinetic drugs, gastric lavage, enzymatic dissolution, endoscopic treatment, and surgery. We present two cases of phytobezoar with successful outcome after Coca-Cola administration.

  1. Low temperature dissolution flowsheet for plutonium metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Almond, P. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-05-01

    The H-Canyon flowsheet used to dissolve Pu metal for PuO2 production utilizes boiling HNO3. SRNL was requested to develop a complementary dissolution flowsheet at two reduced temperature ranges. The dissolution and H2 generation rates of Pu metal were investigated using a dissolving solution at ambient temperature (20-30 °C) and for an intermediate temperature of 50-60 °C. Additionally, the testing included an investigation of the dissolution rates and characterization of the off-gas generated from the ambient temperature dissolution of carbon steel cans and the nylon bags that contain the Pu metal when charged to the dissolver.

  2. SIMFUEL dissolution studies in granitic groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Caceci, M.S.; Bruno, J; Sandino, A.

    1991-09-01

    The dissolution behavior of an unirradiated chemical analogue of spent nuclear fuel (SIMFUEL) has been studied in the presence of two different synthetic groundwaters at 25 degrees C and under both oxic and anoxic conditions. The release of U, Mo, Ba, Y and Sr was monitored during static (batch) leaching experiments of long duration (about 250 days). Preliminary results from continuous flow-through reactor experiments are also reported. The results obtained indicate the usefulness and limitations of SIMFUEL in the study of the kinetics and mechanism of dissolution of the minor components of spent nuclear fuel. Molybdenum, barium and strontium have shown a trend of congruent dissolution with the SIMFUEL matrix after a higher initial fractional release has been found to be solubility controlled under the experimental conditions. A clear dependence on the partial pressure of O 2 of the rate of dissolution of uranium has been observed. (au)

  3. Dissolution studies of synthetic soddyite and uranophane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Perez, I.; Torrero, E.; Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Duro, L.

    1997-09-01

    The dissolution of synthetically obtained soddyite and uranophane has been studied in solutions of low ionic strength. These are the likely final phases of the oxidative alternation pathway of uranium dioxide. The thermodynamic and kinetic dissolution properties of these phases have been determined at different bicarbonate concentrations. The solubilities determined in the experiments with soddyite correspond fairly well to the theoretical model calculated with a log K 0 s0 =3.9±0.7. For uranophane, the best fitting was obtained for a log K 0 s0 =11.7±0.6. The dissolution rate in the presence of bicarbonate gave for soddyite an average value of 6.8(±4.4) 10 -10 mol m -2 s -1 . For uranophane, under the same experimental conditions, the following dissolution rate equation has been derived: r 0 (mol m -2 s -1 )=10 -9±2. [HCO 3 - ] 0.69±0.09 2

  4. Nonaqueous Phase Liquid Dissolution in Porous Media: Multi-Scale Effects of Multi-Component Dissolution Kinetics on Cleanup Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNab, W; Ezzedine, S; Detwiler, R

    2007-02-26

    Industrial organic solvents such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) constitute a principal class of groundwater contaminants. Cleanup of groundwater plume source areas associated with these compounds is problematic, in part, because the compounds often exist in the subsurface as dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Ganglia (or 'blobs') of DNAPL serve as persistent sources of contaminants that are difficult to locate and remediate (e.g. Fenwick and Blunt, 1998). Current understanding of the physical and chemical processes associated with dissolution of DNAPLs in the subsurface is incomplete and yet is critical for evaluating long-term behavior of contaminant migration, groundwater cleanup, and the efficacy of source area cleanup technologies. As such, a goal of this project has been to contribute to this critical understanding by investigating the multi-phase, multi-component physics of DNAPL dissolution using state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. Through this research, we have explored efficient and accurate conceptual and numerical models for source area contaminant transport that can be used to better inform the modeling of source area contaminants, including those at the LLNL Superfund sites, to re-evaluate existing remediation technologies, and to inspire or develop new remediation strategies. The problem of DNAPL dissolution in natural porous media must be viewed in the context of several scales (Khachikian and Harmon, 2000), including the microscopic level at which capillary forces, viscous forces, and gravity/buoyancy forces are manifested at the scale of individual pores (Wilson and Conrad, 1984; Chatzis et al., 1988), the mesoscale where dissolution rates are strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics, and the field-scale. Historically, the physico-chemical processes associated with DNAPL dissolution have been addressed through the use of lumped mass transfer coefficients which attempt to

  5. Long-term kinetic effects and colloid formations in dissolution of LWR spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.M.

    1996-11-01

    This report evaluates continuous dissolution and colloid formation during spent-fuel performance under repository conditions in high-level waste disposal. Various observations suggest that reprecipitated layers formed on spent-fuel surfaces may not be protective. This situation may lead to continuous dissolution of highly soluble radionuclides such as C-14, Cl-36, Tc-99, I-129, and Cs-135. However, the diffusion limits of various species involved may retard dissolution significantly. For low-solubility actinides such as Pu-(239+240) or Am-(241+243), various processes regarding colloid formation have been analyzed. The processes analyzed are condensation, dispersion, and sorption. Colloid formation may lead to significant releases of low-solubility actinides. However, because there are only limited data available on matrix dissolution, colloid formation, and solubility limits, many uncertainties still exist. These uncertainties must be addressed before the significance of radionuclide releases can be determined. 118 refs

  6. Soluble collagen dissolution and assembling in pressurized carbon dioxide water solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zubal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution and gelation procedures have a great influence on gelation time, microstructure and mechanical properties of reconstituted collagen products. We have investigated the dissolution of atelocollagen in CO2/water solutions at low temperature (4 °C at different CO2 pressures (0.3–0.9 MPa, as well as gelation kinetics and physico-chemical properties of the hydrogel obtained after CO2 removal. Compared to conventional methods, the CO2-assisted technique resulted in faster soluble collagen dissolution and faster gelation into transparent gels characterized by thin 10 nm fibrils. Electrophoresis and CD spectroscopy demonstrated that the process did not denature the soluble collagen. The possibility to obtain collagen dissolution and gelation without the use of chemical agent other than water and CO2 makes this process particularly appealing for biomedical applications.

  7. Dissolution behavior of negative-type photoresists for display manufacture studied by quartz crystal microbalance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneishi, Asuka; Uchiyama, Sachiyo; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    Photoresists have been widely used as patterning materials for electronic devices such as displays and semiconductors. Understanding pattern formation mechanisms is essential for the efficient development of resist materials. In particular, the dissolution mechanism of resist materials is an important process in pattern formation. In this study, the dissolution mechanisms of negative-type resists for display manufacture were investigated using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method. The changes in frequency during development were measured for polymer and resist films. The observed major trend was as follows. The development type changed from an insoluble state to a peeling type and a dissolution type with Case II diffusion with an increase in the acid value of the polymers. The characteristics of the dissolution with Case II diffusion are the formation of a transient swelling layer (dissolution front) and steady-state front motion (linear weight loss). For the dissolution with Case II diffusion, the dissolution time and the original thickness of the transient swelling layer decreased with an increase in the acid value of the polymers.

  8. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  9. Dissolution of UO2 in redox conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casas, I.; Pablo de, J.; Rovira, M.

    1998-01-01

    The performance assessment of the final disposal of the spent nuclear fuel in geological formations is strongly dependent on the spent fuel matrix dissolution. Unirradiated uranium (IV) dioxide has shown to be very useful for such purposes. The stability of UO 2 is very dependent on vault redox conditions. At reducing conditions, which are expected in deep groundwaters, the dissolution of the UO 2 -matrix can be explained in terms of solubility, while under oxidizing conditions, the UO 2 is thermodynamically unstable and the dissolution is kinetically controlled. In this report the parameters which affect the uranium solubility under reducing conditions, basically pH and redox potential are discussed. Under oxidizing conditions, UO 2 dissolution rate equations as a function of pH, carbonate concentration and oxidant concentration are reported. Dissolution experiments performed with spent fuel are also reviewed. The experimental equations presented in this work, have been used to model independent dissolution experiments performed with both unirradiated and irradiated UO 2 . (Author)

  10. Experimental determination of chlorite dissolution rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochelle, C.A.; Bateman, K.; MacGregor, R.; Pearce, J.M.; Wetton, P.D.; Savage, D.

    1995-01-01

    Current concepts of the geological disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the UK envisage the construction of a mined facility (incorporating cementitious engineered barriers) in chlorite-bearing rocks. To model accurately the fluid-rock reactions within the disturbed zone surrounding a repository requires functions that describe mineral dissolution kinetics under pH conditions that vary from near neutral to highly alkaline. Therefore, an experimental study to determine the dissolution rates of Fe-rich chlorite has been undertaken as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Program. Four experiments have been carried out at 25 C and four at 70 C, both sets using a range of NaCl/NaOH solutions of differing pH (of nominal pH 9.0, 10.3, 11.6 and 13.0 [at 25 C]). Dissolution rates have been calculated and were found to increase with increasing pH and temperature. However, increased pH resulted in non-stoichiometric dissolution possibly due to preferential dissolution of part of the chlorite structure relative to another, or reprecipitation of some elements as thin hydroxide or oxyhydroxide surface coatings on the chlorite. These results also show that chlorite dissolution is appreciably slower than that of albite and quartz at both 25 and 70 C, but slightly faster than that of muscovite at 70 C

  11. Evaluation of a three compartment in vitro gastrointestinal simulator dissolution apparatus to predict in vivo dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Susumu; Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gregory E; Amidon, Gordon L

    2014-11-01

    In vitro dissolution tests are performed for new formulations to evaluate in vivo performance, which is affected by the change of gastrointestinal (GI) physiology, in the GI tract. Thus, those environmental changes should be introduced to an in vitro dissolution test. Many studies have successfully shown the improvement of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVC) by introducing those physiological changes into dissolution tests. The gastrointestinal simulator (GIS), a multicompartment in vitro dissolution apparatus, was developed to evaluate in vivo drug dissolution. A gastric-emptying rate along with transit rate are key factors to evaluate in vivo drug dissolution and, hence, drug absorption. Dissolution tests with the GIS were performed with Biopharmaceutical Classification System class I drugs at five different gastric-emptying rates in the fasted state. Computational models were used to determine in vivo gastric-emptying time for propranolol and metoprolol based on the GIS dissolution results. Those were compared with published clinical data to determine the gastric half-emptying time. In conclusion, the GIS is a practical tool to assess dissolution properties and can improve IVIVC. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  12. Dissolution of Platinum in Hydrochloric Acid Under Industrial-Scale Alternating Current Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrzabekov, B. E.; Bayeshov, A. B.; Makhanbetov, A. B.; Mishra, B.; Baigenzhenov, O. S.

    2018-02-01

    The electrochemical behavior of platinum in a hydrochloric acid solution under polarization by an industrial-scale alternating current has been investigated. For the electrical dissolution of platinum, titanium is used as an auxiliary electrode, which increases the yield of platinum dissolution by 12.5 pct. The influence of the concentration of hydrochloric acid, the current densities of the platinum and titanium electrodes, and the temperature of the electrolyte on the efficiency of the process of dissolving platinum have all been studied.

  13. Plant-scale anodic dissolution of unirradiated IFR fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, E.C.; Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses anodic dissolution which is a major operation in the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor design developed at Argonne National Laboratory. This process involves electrorefining the heavy metals (uranium and plutonium) from chopped, steel-clad fuel segments. The heavy metals are electrotransported from anodic dissolution baskets to solid and liquid cathodes in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI) at 500 degrees C. Uranium is recovered on a solid cathode mandrel, while a uranium-plutonium mixture is recovered in a liquid cadmium cathode. The anode configuration consists of four baskets mounted on an anode shaft. These baskets provide parallel circuits in the electrolyte and salt flow through the chopped fuelbed as the baskets are rotated. The baskets for the engineering-scale tests were sized to contain up to 2.5 kg of heavy metal. Anodic dissolution of 10 kg batches of chopped, steel-clad simulated tuel (U-10% Zr and U-Zr-Fs alloy) was demonstrated

  14. Raman diagnostics of silicon nanocrystals dissolution in aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alykova, A. F.; Zavestovskaya, I. N.; Yakunin, V. G.; Timoshenko, V. Yu

    2018-01-01

    Raman scattering in ensembles of silicon (Si) nanocrystals (NCs), which were prepared by differed methods and then stored in an aqueous medium, was studied to reveal features of the Si NC dissolution process. Arrays of crystalline Si nanowires, mesoporous Si nanoparticles and spherical Si NCs have been analyzed after exposure in water during dialysis for elimination of the dissolution products from the medium. According to the one-phonon Raman spectroscopy the Si nanowires with cross-section size of the order of 100 nm were resistant to the dissolution process both in water and physiological saline for 2 weeks at least. The storage of mesoporous Si nanoparticles in water for 1 day resulted in a strong decrease of the Raman intensity and a low energy shift of the Raman spectrum, which was explained by size reduction of Si NCs below 10 nm. Si NCs with the initial size distribution from 5 to 100 nm after exposure in water during 24 hours revealed a decrease in the contribution of small NCs that narrowed the size distribution. The obtained results can be used in order to choose appropriate type of Si NPs for biomedical applications.

  15. Modeling of Pilot-Scale Salt-cake Dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toghiani, R.K.; Smith, L.T.; Lindner, J.S.; Tachiev, G.I.; Yaari, G.

    2006-01-01

    Large portions of the high-level waste present at the Hanford Site and Savannah River Site are comprised of porous salts with associated interstitial liquors. Various processes have been proposed wherein the aqueous phase is removed followed by dissolution of the salt with further mixing or blending of the resulting stream in a receiver tank. This leads to a large reduction in the radioactivity for the dissolved salt-cake; however, the interstitial retrieval process is hindered by capillary forces within the salt-cake pores and large aqueous phase fractions may remain. Thus, the interim stabilized or low-curie salt processes may have less separation effectiveness than desired. In addition, based on the initial extent of pretreatment of the waste, the salt-cake may be either unsaturated or hydraulically saturated. Different interactions are expected based on the contact of the diluent with the salt and/or on mixing the diluent with the salt and some fraction of interstitial liquid. The initial approximation is that the dissolution is governed by the associated thermodynamics of the system. This may be correct assuming sufficient time for contact between the salt and diluent has occurred. Pilot-scale simulant salt-cake dissolution experiments have been conducted by the Applied Research Center (ARC) at Florida International University. As part of a companion program, these experiments have been modeled at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL, Mississippi State University) using the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP, OLI Systems, Inc.). Hanford simulant compositions were examined under unsaturated and saturated conditions. To account for channeling that occurred during the unsaturated experiment, additional operations were required for the process flowsheet. Direct modeling of the saturated bed was possible without this consideration. The results have impacts on the salt-cake retrieval process. First, depending on the extent of interstitial

  16. Development and Validation of a Dissolution Test Method for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and validate a dissolution test method for dissolution release of artemether and lumefantrine from tablets. Methods: A single dissolution method for evaluating the in vitro release of artemether and lumefantrine from tablets was developed and validated. The method comprised of a dissolution medium of ...

  17. Analysis of dissolution residues of irradiated fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regnaud, F.; Tcherniatine, N.

    1980-12-01

    In the industrial dissolution conditions obtaining in reprocessing plants, the acid digests the irradiated nuclear fuels and leaves an insoluble product. This phenomenon is particularly conspicuous in the case of the UO 2 , PuO 2 mixed oxides of the fast neutron system irradiated at high specific burn-up. It is observed to a lesser degree in the case of UO 2 oxides of the ordinary water system. The quantity of insoluble product appears to depend on the specific burn-up. These residues are attributed to metallic phases comprising uranium, plutonium, ruthenium, palladium, rhodium and molybdenum. Owing to the existence of these residues, the radioactivity of which is high, the reprocessing plant requires a separation process, particular care in order to avoid their build-up, and packaging and storage facilities. This is why a programme on the physical-chemical study of the compounds has been initiated to develop a chemical digestion method, elemental analysis methods and the study of certain physical parameters such as granulometry [fr

  18. Carbonate mineral dissolution kinetics in high pressure experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Dörr, C.; Schäfer, D.; Ebert, M.

    2012-04-01

    reaction kinetics should be acknowledged when using reactive transport models, especially when modeling kinetically controlled pH-buffering processes between a CO2 leakage an a receptor like a ground water well. Currently, further experiments for the determination of the dolomite dissolution kinetics are being performed. Here, the knowledge of the dissolution rate constants can be even more important compared to the (still) fast calcite dissolution. This study is being funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF), EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg AG, E.ON Energie AG, E.ON Gas Storage AG, RWE Dea AG, Vattenfall Europe Technology Research GmbH, Wintershall Holding AG and Stadtwerke Kiel AG as part of the CO2-MoPa joint project in the framework of the Special Program GEOTECHNOLOGIEN. Literature Lasaga, A. C., 1984. Chemical Kinetics of Water-Rock Interactions. Journal of Geophysical Research 89, 4009-4025. Palandri, J. L. and Kharaka, Y. K., 2004. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modeling. USGS, Menlo Park, CA, USA. v. Grinsven, J. J. M. and Riemsdijk, W. H., 1992. Evaluation of batch and column techniques to measure weathering rates in soils. Geoderma 52, 41-57.

  19. Impact of vibration and agitation speed on dissolution of USP prednisone tablets RS and various IR tablet formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Nicole; Lange, Sigrid; Klein, Sandra

    2015-08-01

    Dissolution testing is an in vitro procedure which is widely used in quality control (QC) of solid oral dosage forms and, given that real biorelevant test conditions are applied, can also be used as a predictive tool for the in vivo performance of such formulations. However, if a dissolution method is intended to be used for such purposes, it has to deliver results that are only determined by the quality of the test product, but not by other variables. In the recent past, more and more questions were arising on how to address the effects of vibration on dissolution test results. The present study was performed to screen for the correlation of prednisone dissolution of USP Prednisone Tablets RS with vibration caused by a commercially available vibration source as well as to investigate how drug release from a range of immediate release formulations containing class 1-4 drugs of the biopharmaceutical classification scheme is affected by vibration when performing dissolution experiments at different agitation rates. Results of the present study show that the dissolution process of oral drug formulations can be affected by vibration. However, it also becomes clear that the degree of which a certain level of vibration impacts dissolution is strongly dependent on several factors such as drug properties, formulation parameters, and the design of the dissolution method. To ensure the establishment of robust and predictive dissolution test methods, the impact of variation should thus be considered in method design and validation.

  20. Preparation of chromous complexes and their effect on the dissolution of ferrites and chromites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.; Pavithra, E.

    2012-09-01

    Decontamination of reactor coolant circuits is inevitable in minimising radiation exposure hazard especially during maintenance. Dilute chemical decontamination processes involving organic complexing agents viz., EDTA or NTA along with reducing agents such as ascorbic acid or oxalic acid are quite effective in dissolving magnetite, the predominant corrosion product oxide in carbon steel systems viz., PHWRs. However, dissolution of hematite, mixed ferrites and chromites found in stainless steel systems of BWRs and PWRs are not that easy to dissolve. A two-step process involving oxidation and reduction processes is required to dissolve these oxides. Studies were carried out to develop a single step process. Our earlier studies on high temperature decontamination at 160 deg. C have showed improved dissolution of magnetite, nickel ferrite and other oxides. In the present study, attempt has been made to carry out the oxide dissolution in formulations containing strong reducing agents such as chromous complexes. Dissolution of hematite is very effective under reducing conditions. Addition of ascorbic acid to the formulation containing EDTA and citric acid (EC) enhanced the kinetics 20 folds, while the addition of Cr (II)-EDTA to EC formulation increased the rate 100 folds. In the case of formulation containing NTA and citric acid (NC), the addition of chromous-NTA increased the rate 14 folds. NiFe 2 O 4 showed hardly any dissolution in EC formulation. However, in EAC (formulation containing EDTA, citric acid and ascorbic acid), the rate constant for the dissolution was 1.2x10 -3 min -1 , while it was 8.5x10 -3 min -1 in the case of ECCr (EDTA, citric acid containing chromous ions) formulation. In NTA based formulations also, dissolution rate was found to be enhanced in the presence of chromous ions. Further, there was no preferential dissolution of either Fe or Ni by both EDTA and NTA based formulations and also the rate of dissolution was found to depend linearly on the

  1. Dissolution of illite in saline-acidic solutions at 25 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Irshad; Singh, Balwant; Silvester, Ewen

    2011-06-01

    of octahedral cations (Fe, Mg and Al), the dissolution of Si is the limiting step in the illite dissolution process. A dissolution rate law showing the dependence of illite dissolution rate on proton concentration in the acid-sulfate solutions was derived from the steady state dissolution rates and can be used in predicting the impact of illite dissolution in saline acid-sulfate environments. The fractional reaction orders of 0.32 ( I = 0.25) and 0.36 ( I = 0.01) obtained in the study for illite dissolution are similar to the values reported for smectite. The dissolution rate of illite is mainly controlled by solution pH and no effect of ionic strength was observed on the dissolution rates.

  2. Effect of Acid Dissolution Conditions on Recovery of Valuable Metals from Used Plasma Display Panel Scrap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan-Mi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this particular study was to recover valuable metals from waste plasma display panels using high energy ball milling with subsequent acid dissolution. Dissolution of milled (PDP powder was studied in HCl, HNO3, and H2SO4 acidic solutions. The effects of dissolution acid, temperature, time, and PDP scrap powder to acid ratio on the leaching process were investigated and the most favorable conditions were found: (1 valuable metals (In, Ag, Mg were recovered from PDP powder in a mixture of concentrated hydrochloric acid (HCl:H2O = 50:50; (2 the optimal dissolution temperature and time for the valuable metals were found to be 60°C and 30 min, respectively; (3 the ideal PDP scrap powder to acid solution ratio was found to be 1:10. The proposed method was applied to the recovery of magnesium, silver, and indium with satisfactory results.

  3. Dissolution of kinetics of nanoscale liquid Pb/Bi inclusions at a grain boundary in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prokofjev, Sergei I.; Johnson, Erik; Zhilin, Victor M.

    2008-01-01

    of the inclusions was observed until their complete disappearance. Digitized video recordings of the process of dissolution were used to obtain the dependence of the inclusion size with time. The kinetics of the dissolution of the grain boundary inclusions can be described with a model where it is assumed......In situ transmission selctron microscopy is used to study dissolution of liquid single-phase Pb/Bi inclusions attached to grain boundary in an alloy of Al99.29Pb0.65Bi0.06 at temperatures of 343, 370, and 389 °C, respectively.  The initial size of the inclusions was smaller than 60 nm.  Dissolution...

  4. Transient dissolution of a steel structure in an aluminum melt pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, F.B.; Yang, B.C.; Cho, D.H.; Tan, M.J.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model is developed to describe the process of transient dissolution of the interior surface of a reactor bottom head in a pool of molten aluminum resulting from a severe core meltdown accident. The model accounts for the transient heat conduction in the steel structure, the mass transfer due to dissolution, and the time variations of the bulk pool temperature and concentration. Results indicate that over the range of accident conditions considered in the study, the bulk pool always attains a saturated state while the interface temperature approaches an asymptotic value. Once this saturated state is achieved, no further dissolution would take place. For a given pool inventory, the critical time for achieving the saturated state is found to be a function of the Nusselt number and the dissolution coefficient. On the other hand, the fraction of the steel structure that is dissolved before reaching the saturated state is a function of the Nusselt number alone

  5. The kinetics of anodic dissolution of rhenium in aqueous electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atanasyants, A.G.; Kornienko, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics of anodic rhenium dissolution was investigated by means of potentiodynamic and potentiostatic polarization curves recorded at temperature from 293 to 333 K in different media (NaOH, KOH, NaCl, NaBr, HCl, H 2 SO 4 ) using the rotating disc technique. It is shown that the kinetics of anodic rhenium dissolution and effective activation energy depend not only on the composition and pH value of the solutions but also on the structure of the dissolving rhenium surface. The investigation of the anodic behaviour of the rhenium monocrystal revealed the existence of anisotropy of the monocrystal electrochemical properties. The experimental results point to an important role of adsorption processes in anodic rhenium dissolution. Rhenium dissolution proceeds with formation of intermediate surface adsorption complexes between the metal and the components of the solution

  6. Investigation of CO2 dissolution via mass transfer inside a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patmonoaji, Anindityo; Suekane, Tetsuya

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of trapped carbon dioxide (CO2) gas under various water flow rate inside a porous medium was experimentally studied using X-ray microtomography. Image processing techniques were used to determine the morphologies, CO2 fractions, and interfacial areas of the trapped bubbles. Based on fractal dimension analysis, the bubble morphology was classified into single-pore bubbles and multi-pore bubbles. Different dissolution phenomena with liquid-liquid systems were observed. First, the calculated mass transfer coefficient was lower than one order of magnitude. Second, two consecutive dissolution fronts appeared. These two fronts were not triggered by a difference in solute concentration because they occurred at CO2 concentrations far from saturated conditions. However, velocity-dependent mass transfer indicated a power function with a power value similar with liquid-liquid system dissolution experiment.

  7. Solvent mediated stabilisation of dissolution at the resorcinol-water interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, M.; Sahudin, S. [Faculty of Pharmacy, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Jalan Raja Muda Abdul Aziz, 50300 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2010-02-15

    Experimental evidence suggests dissolution along the polar c-axis of {alpha}-resorcinol in water preferentially occurs at the {l_brace}011{r_brace} surface. In an attempt to understand the mechanism by which solvent influences this process, dissolution at the resorcinol {l_brace}011{r_brace} and {l_brace}011{r_brace} surfaces has been studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Our computations indicate dissolution at the two faces is dependent upon solvent behaviour at the crystal surface, where strong water-crystal interactions serve to stabilise the crystal surface and retard dissolution. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for

  9. Dissolution-recrystallization method for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fei; Luo, Junsheng; Wan, Zhongquan; Liu, Xingzhao; Jia, Chunyang, E-mail: cyjia@uestc.edu.cn

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Dissolution-recrystallization method can improve perovskite crystallization. • Dissolution-recrystallization method can improve TiO{sub 2}/perovskite interface. • The optimal perovskite solar cell obtains the champion PCE of 16.76%. • The optimal devices are of high reproducibility. - Abstract: In this work, a dissolution-recrystallization method (DRM) with chlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide treating the perovskite films during the spin-coating process is reported. This is the first time that DRM is used to control perovskite crystallization and improve the device performance. Furthermore, the DRM is good for reducing defects and grain boundaries, improving perovskite crystallization and even improving TiO{sub 2}/perovskite interface. By optimizing, the DRM2-treated perovskite solar cell (PSC) obtains the best photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 16.76% under AM 1.5 G illumination (100 mW cm{sup −2}) with enhanced J{sub sc} and V{sub oc} compared to CB-treated PSC.

  10. In vitro dissolution/release methods for mucosal delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Jug

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro dissolution/release tests are an indispensable tool in the drug product development, its quality control and the regulatory approval process. Mucosal drug delivery systems are designed to provide both local and systemic drug action following ocular, nasal, oromucosal, vaginal or rectal administration. They exhibit significant differences in formulation design, physicochemical characteristics and drug release properties. Therefore it is not possible to devise a single method which would be suitable for release testing of such versatile and complex dosage forms. Different apparatuses and techniques for in vitro release testing for mucosal delivery systems considering the specific conditions at the administration site are described. In general, compendial apparatuses and methods should be used as a first approach in method development when applicable. However, to assure adequate simulation of conditions in vivo, novel biorelevant in vitro dissolution/release methods should be developed. Equipment set up, the selection of dissolution media and volume, membrane type, agitation speed, temperature, and assay analysis technique need to be carefully defined based on mucosal drug delivery system characteristics. All those parameters depend on the delivery system and physiological conditions at the site of application and may vary in a wide range, which will be discussed in details.

  11. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process; Estudios de disolucion de analogos naturales de combustible nuclear irradiado y de fases de U(VI)-Silicio representativas de un proceso de alteracion oxidativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-07-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO{sub 2} as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 degree centigree and 60 degree centigree, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  12. Arresting dissolution by interfacial rheology design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Peter J.; Gupta, Manish; Alicke, Alexandra; Liascukiene, Irma; Gunes, Deniz Z.; Baroud, Charles N.

    2017-01-01

    A strategy to halt dissolution of particle-coated air bubbles in water based on interfacial rheology design is presented. Whereas previously a dense monolayer was believed to be required for such an “armored bubble” to resist dissolution, in fact engineering a 2D yield stress interface suffices to achieve such performance at submonolayer particle coverages. We use a suite of interfacial rheology techniques to characterize spherical and ellipsoidal particles at an air–water interface as a function of surface coverage. Bubbles with varying particle coverages are made and their resistance to dissolution evaluated using a microfluidic technique. Whereas a bare bubble only has a single pressure at which a given radius is stable, we find a range of pressures over which bubble dissolution is arrested for armored bubbles. The link between interfacial rheology and macroscopic dissolution of ∼ 100 μm bubbles coated with ∼ 1 μm particles is presented and discussed. The generic design rationale is confirmed by using nonspherical particles, which develop significant yield stress at even lower surface coverages. Hence, it can be applied to successfully inhibit Ostwald ripening in a multitude of foam and emulsion applications. PMID:28893993

  13. Crystal modifications and dissolution rate of piroxicam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyn, Lim Yee; Sze, Huan Wen; Rajendran, Adhiyaman; Adinarayana, Gorajana; Dua, Kamal; Garg, Sanjay

    2011-12-01

    Piroxicam is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with low aqueous solubility which exhibits polymorphism. The present study was carried out to develop polymorphs of piroxicam with enhanced solubility and dissolution rate by the crystal modification technique using different solvent mixtures prepared with PEG 4000 and PVP K30. Physicochemical characteristics of the modified crystal forms of piroxicam were investigated by X-ray powder diffractometry, FT-IR spectrophotometry and differential scanning calorimetry. Dissolution and solubility profiles of each modified crystal form were studied and compared with pure piroxicam. Solvent evaporation method (method I) produced both needle and cubic shaped crystals. Slow crystallization from ethanol with addition of PEG 4000 or PVP K30 at room temperature (method II) produced cubic crystal forms. Needle forms produced by method I improved dissolution but not solubility. Cubic crystals produced by method I had a dissolution profile similar to that of untreated piroxicam but showed better solubility than untreated piroxicam. Cubic shaped crystals produced by method II showed improved dissolution, without a significant change in solubility. Based on the XRPD results, modified piroxicam crystals obtained by method I from acetone/benzene were cube shaped, which correlates well with the FTIR spectrum; modified needle forms obtained from ethanol/methanol and ethanol/acetone showed a slight shift of FTIR peak that may be attributed to differences in the internal structure or conformation.

  14. Experimental investigation of the dissolution of fractures. From early stage instability to phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselin, Florian; Budek, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Olgierd; Kondratiuk, Pawel; Garstecki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution of natural rocks is a fundamental geological process and a key part of landscape formation and weathering processes. Moreover, in current hot topics like Carbon Capture and Storage or Enhanced Oil Recovery, mastering dissolution of the host rock is fundamental for the efficiency and the security of the operation. The basic principles of dissolution are well-known and the theory of the reactive infiltration instability has been extensively studied. However, the experimental aspect has proved very challenging because of the strong dependence of the outcome with pore network, chemical composition, flow rate... In this study we are trying to tackle this issue by using a very simple and efficient device consisting of a chip of pure gypsum inserted between two polycarbonate plates and subjected to a constant flow rate of pure water. Thanks to this device, we are able to control all parameters such as flow rate, fracture aperture, roughness of the walls... but also to observe in situ the progression of the dissolution thanks to the transparency of the polycarbonate which is impossible with 3D rocks. We have been using this experimental set-up to explore and investigate all aspects of the dissolution in a fracture, such as initial instability and phase diagram of different dissolution patterns, and to compare it with theory and simulations, yielding very good agreement and interesting feedbacks on the coupling between flow and chemistry in geological media

  15. Salt dissolution and collapse : one key to Western Canadian oil and gas plays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halabura, S.P. [North Rim Exploration Ltd., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Potter, D. [Sito Energy Ltd., (Canada)

    1999-11-01

    Issues regarding the poorly understood processes of salt dissolution and collapse within the Williston and Western Canada basins were explained. Salt collapse was described as being the dissolution and removal of various Paleozoic salts present within the basins. This process results in the altered structural attitude of overlying beds. Present understanding of salt collapse comes from subsurface mapping, seismic analysis and core examination. Good examples have been documented at Hummingbird, Kisbey and Rosetown, Saskatchewan. Examples of hydrocarbon pools associated with salt dissolution and collapse have been found in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. In Saskatchewan, salt dissolution and collapse has been known to control the occurrence of heavy oil and natural gas pools by creating a favourable structure and localizing the accumulation of reservoir-quality sand. The two immediate effects which are observed with the removal of salt from a dissolution site are: (1) lithified sediments forming the overburden fracture, sag and eventually collapse into the dissolution cavern, and (2) as salt is removed, but before breakage, the land at the surface begins to sag, creating a microbasin which fills with sediment, thus forming a stratigraphic anomaly. Core samples were exhibited which showed examples of both reservoir enhancement and reservoir destruction. 2 figs.

  16. Modeling of Dissolution Effects on Waterflooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexeev, Artem; Shapiro, Alexander; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Physico-chemical interactions between the fluid and reservoir rock due to the presence of active components in the injected brine produce changes within the reservoir and can significantly impact the fluid flow. We have developed a 1D numerical model for waterflooding accounting for dissolution...... and precipitation of the components. Extending previous studies, we consider an arbitrary chemical non-equilibrium reaction-induced dissolution. We account for different individual volumes that a component has when precipitated or dissolved. This volume non-additivity also affects the pressure and the flow rate......-additivity is found to be responsible for insignificant change in the velocity of the displacement front....

  17. Chrysotile dissolution rates: Implications for carbon sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thom, James G.M.; Dipple, Gregory M.; Power, Ian M.; Harrison, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Uncertainties in serpentine dissolution kinetics hinder carbon sequestration models. • A pH dependent, far from equilibrium dissolution rate law for chrysotile. • F chrysotile (mol/m 2 /s) = 10 −0.21pH−10.57 at 22 °C over pH 2–10. • Laboratory dissolution rates consistent with mine waste weathering observations. • Potential for carbon sequestration in mine tailings and aquifers is assessed. - Abstract: Serpentine minerals (e.g., chrysotile) are a potentially important medium for sequestration of CO 2 via carbonation reactions. The goals of this study are to report a steady-state, far from equilibrium chrysotile dissolution rate law and to better define what role serpentine dissolution kinetics will have in constraining rates of carbon sequestration via serpentine carbonation. The steady-state dissolution rate of chrysotile in 0.1 m NaCl solutions was measured at 22 °C and pH ranging from 2 to 8. Dissolution experiments were performed in a continuously stirred flow-through reactor with the input solutions pre-equilibrated with atmospheric CO 2 . Both Mg and Si steady-state fluxes from the chrysotile surface, and the overall chrysotile flux were regressed and the following empirical relationships were obtained: F Mg =-0.22pH-10.02;F Si =-0.19pH-10.37;F chrysotile =-0.21pH-10.57 where F Mg , F Si , and F chrysotile are the log 10 Mg, Si, and molar chrysotile fluxes in mol/m 2 /s, respectively. Element fluxes were used in reaction-path calculations to constrain the rate of CO 2 sequestration in two geological environments that have been proposed as potential sinks for anthropogenic CO 2 . Carbon sequestration in chrysotile tailings at 10 °C is approximately an order of magnitude faster than carbon sequestration in a serpentinite-hosted aquifer at 60 °C on a per kilogram of water basis. A serpentinite-hosted aquifer, however, provides a larger sequestration capacity. The chrysotile dissolution rate law determined in this study has

  18. Assessing the effect of dissolved organic ligands on mineral dissolution rates: An example from calcite dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMaio, T.; Grandstaff, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    Experiments suggest that dissolved organic ligands may primarily modify mineral dissolution rates by three mechanisms: (1) metal-ligand (M-L) complex formation in solution, which increases the degree of undersaturation, (2) formation of surface M-L complexes that attack the surface, and (3) formation of surface complexes which passivate or protect the surface. Mechanisms (1) and (2) increase the dissolution rate and the third decreases it compared with organic-free solutions. The types and importance of these mechanisms may be assessed from plots of dissolution rate versus degree of undersaturation. To illustrate this technique, calcite, a common repository cementing and vein-filling mineral, was dissolved at pH 7.8 and 22 C in Na-Ca-HCO 3 -Cl solutions with low concentrations of three organic ligands. Low citrate concentrations (50 microM) increased the dissolution rate consistent with mechanism (1). Oxalate decreased the rate, consistent with mechanism (3). Low phthalate concentration (<50 microM) decreased calcite dissolution rates; however, higher concentrations increased the dissolution rates, which became faster than in inorganic solutions. Thus, phthalate exhibits both mechanisms (2) and (3) at different concentrations. In such cases linear extrapolations of dissolution rates from high organic ligand concentrations may not be valid

  19. Dissolution kinetics of magnesium hydroxide for CO2 separation from coal-fired power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, Hari Krishna; Lee, Joo-Youp; Li, Xin; Liu, Zhouyang; Keener, Tim C

    2013-04-15

    The dissolution of magnesium hydroxide in water for the release of magnesium and hydroxyl ions into the solution to maintain suitable alkalinity is a crucial step in the Mg(OH)2-based CO2 absorption process. In this study, the rate of dissolution of Mg(OH)2 was investigated under different operating conditions using a pH stat apparatus. The dissolution process was modeled using a shrinking core model and the overall Mg(OH)2 dissolution process was found to be controlled by the surface chemical reaction of Mg(OH)2 with H(+) ions. Under the chemical reaction control regime, the dissolution of Mg(OH)2 in alkaline conditions was found not to follow a first-order reaction, and the fractional order of reaction was estimated to lie between 0.20 and 0.31. This suggests that the dissolution reaction is a non-elementary reaction, consisting of a sequence of elementary reactions, via most likely forming a surface magnesium complex. The true activation energy value of 76 ± 11 kJ/gmol was found to be almost twice as much as the observed activation energy value of 42 ± 6 kJ/gmol determined at pH 8.6, and was comparable with the previously reported values. The particle sizes predicted from the intrinsic kinetics determined from the model were in good agreement with the experimentally measured particle sizes during the dissolution process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Deep-water carbonate dissolution in the northern South China Sea during Marine Isotope Stage 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The production, transportation, deposition, and dissolution of carbonate profoundly form part of the global carbon cycle and affect the amount and distribution of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and alkalinity (ALK, which drive atmospheric CO2 changes during glacial/interglacial cycles. These processes may provide significant clues for better understanding of the mechanisms that control the global climate system. In this study, we calculate and analyze the foraminiferal dissolution index (FDX and the fragmentation ratios of planktonic foraminifera for the 60–25 ka B.P. time-span, based on samples from Core 17924 and ODP Site 1144 in the northeastern South China Sea (SCS, so as to reconstruct the deep-water carbonate dissolution during Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS 3. Our analysis shows that the dissolution of carbonate increases gradually in Core 17924, whereas it remains stable at ODP Site 1144. This difference is caused by the deep-sea carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] that affected the dissolution in Core 17924 where the depth of 3440 m is below the saturation horizon. However, the depth of ODP Site 1144 is 2037 m, which is above the lysocline where the water is always saturated with calcium carbonate; the dissolution is therefore less dependent of chemical changes of the seawater. The combined effect of the productivity and the deep-water chemical evolution may decrease deep-water [CO32−] and accelerate carbonate dissolution. The fall of the sea-level increased the input of DIC and ALK to the deep ocean and deepened the carbonate saturation depth, which caused an increase of the deep-water [CO32−]. The elevated [CO32−] partially neutralized the reduced [CO32−] contributed by remineralization of organic matter and slowdown of thermohaline. These consequently are the fundamental reasons for the difference in dissolution rate between these two sites.

  1. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt; Ebert, William

    2015-07-01

    The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO2 and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO2 and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO2 and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H2O2 and O2). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit fuel degradation to chemical dissolution, which results in radionuclide source term values that are four or five orders of magnitude lower than when oxidative dissolution processes are operative. This paper presents the scientific basis of the model, the approach for modeling used fuel in a disposal system, and preliminary

  2. Effect of glucosamine HCl on dissolution and solid state behaviours of piroxicam upon milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidi, Hiba; Edwards, Alison A; Douroumis, Dionysis; Asare-Addo, Kofi; Nayebi, Alireza Mohajjel; Reyhani-Rad, Siamak; Mahmoudi, Javad; Nokhodchi, Ali

    2013-03-01

    Piroxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug that is characterised by low solubility and high permeability. In order to improve the drug dissolution rate, the co-grinding method was used as an approach to prepare piroxicam co-ground in the carriers such as glucosamine hydrochloride. As, this amino sugar (glucosamine HCl) has been shown to decrease pain and improve mobility in osteoarthritis in joints, therefore, the incorporation of glucosamine in piroxicam formulations would be expected to offer additional benefits to patients. The effect of the order of grinding on the dissolution of piroxicam was also investigated. Co-ground drug and glucosamine were prepared in different ratios using a ball mill. The samples were then subjected to different grinding times. In order to investigate the effect of the grinding process on the dissolution behaviour of piroxicam, the drug was ground separately in the absence of glucosamine. Mixtures of ground piroxicam and unground D-glucosamine HCl were prepared. Physical mixtures of piroxicam and glucosamine were also prepared for comparison. The properties of prepared co-ground systems and physical mixtures were studied using a dissolution tester, FTIR, SEM, XRPD and DSC. These results showed that the presence of glucosamine HCl can increase dissolution rate of piroxicam compared to pure piroxicam. Generally, all dissolution profiles showed the fastest dissolution rate when ground piroxicam was mixed with unground glucosamine. This was closely followed by the co-grinding of piroxicam with glucosamine where lower grinding times showed the fastest dissolution. The solid state studies showed that the grinding of piroxicam for longer times had no effect on polymorphic form of piroxicam, whereas mixtures of piroxicam-glucosamine ground for longer times (60 min) converted piroxicam polymorph II to polymorph I. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Dissolution study of tremolite and anthophyllite: pH effect on the reaction kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozalen, M.; Ramos, M.E.; Gervilla, F.; Kerestedjian, T.; Fiore, S.; Huertas, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Dissolution rates strongly depend on pH and it is different for each mineral. • Anthophyllite dissolves up to 8 times faster than tremolite in similar conditions. • SEM images show different particle breakage and carbonation effects at basic pHs. • Our results are a good background to develop remediation processes of contaminated sites. - Abstract: The effect of pH on the kinetics of tremolite and anthophyllite dissolution was investigated at 25 °C in batch reactors over the pH range of 1–13.5, in inorganic buffered solutions. Dissolution rates were obtained based on the release of Si and Mg. Results obtained in this study show different behaviors for both minerals. For tremolite, dissolution rates show a noticeable dependence on pH between 1 and 8, decreasing as pH increases and reaching a minimum around neutral conditions. At basic pH this dependence becomes even stronger, but dissolution takes place together with collateral effects of saturation and carbonation. A preferential release of Ca and Mg is observed in acid media, lowering the Mg/Si ratio to the extent that Mg solubility decreases with pH. For anthophyllite, dissolution rates also show a strong dependence on pH, between 1 and 9.5. At the same pH, anthophyllite dissolves up to 8 times faster than tremolite. For pH > 9.5 this dependence is smooth, and it is probably associated with effects of saturation and carbonation. Dissolution is also non-stoichiometric with a faster release of Mg with respect to Si in acid media. SEM observations show differences in the breakage mechanism of the fibers. The anthophyllite particle breakage during dissolution consists of the splitting of bundle fibers parallel to the fiber longitudinal direction. However, for tremolite, other than fiber splitting, particles shorten induced by coalescence of etch pits developed perpendicular to c axe

  4. Observation of the Dissolution from Residual Phase Multicomponent Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, P. P.; Harmon, T. C.

    2001-05-01

    Nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) subsurface contaminants (e.g., fuels, solvents) are typically complex mixtures. This work examines the impact of intra-NAPL diffusion and mixture nonideality on dissolution from multicomponent NAPL mixtures through a computational and experimental approach. Downstream concentrations are observed during the controlled dissolution of three-component residual NAPL in a three-dimensional model aquifer. These results, when compared to single-component residual NAPL results, are used to identify (1) if and when intra-NAPL interactions contribute significantly to the overall dissolution process, and (2) the role that factors, such as length scale, hydrodynamic conditions, and/or mixture ideality, play in determining (1). Model ternary mixtures were chosen to represent a range of ideality based on UNIFAC-estimated activity coefficients. In this case, tetrachloroethene (PCE), trichloroethene (TCE), and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were selected as the ideal mixture. The mixture of PCE, TCE, and octanol was shown to exhibit significant deviations from ideality and selected to represent a nonideal mixture. Experimental results for the two mixtures are compared to each other and to analogous results from pure PCE dissolution experiments. The experimental results are further interpreted using a three-dimensional transport model subject to a boundary concentration history calculated using a ternary intra-NAPL diffusion/dissolution submodel. The combined experimental and computational findings are used to delineate conditions for which a detailed physical-chemical description of NAPL dissolution is warranted and those for which a simplified description will suffice.

  5. Solid phospholipid nano-particles: investigations into formulation and dissolution properties of griseofulvin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann-Trettenes, Ulla; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2014-06-05

    Solid phospholipid (PL) nanoparticles with griseofulvin (GRIS) as a model drug were prepared by co-spray drying. Their dissolution properties were compared with formulations containing the physical blends of the native crystalline drug and excipient materials, and physical blends of the spray dried materials. Co-spray drying was performed from ethanol+water solutions (80+20) using Büchi Nano Spray Dryer B-90. Dissolution profiles in phosphate buffer (PBS), simulated intestinal fluids (fasted state simulated intestinal fluid (FaSSIF)) and pancreatin containing media (PAN) were studied. It was found that the influence of PL on the dissolution profile was affected by both the solid state of the drug formulation and the dissolution medium: the co-SD formulations showed the fastest release in all media. The amount of GRIS dissolved after 5h increases by a factor of 7 for the co SD as compared to physical blend of native materials in PBS, and a factor of 4 in FaSSIF respectively. Surprisingly, in contrast to PBS, dissolution rate in FaSSIF decreased with increasing the PL content. All the pancreatin containing media showed a decrease in dissolution rate and extent independently of the processing methods due to an incompatibility between GRIS and PAN. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Insights into the early dissolution events of amlodipine using UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetker, Johan P; Savolainen, Marja; Koradia, Vishal; Tian, Fang; Rades, Thomas; Müllertz, Anette; Cornett, Claus; Rantanen, Jukka; Østergaard, Jesper

    2011-08-01

    Traditional dissolution testing determines drug release to the bulk, but does not enable an understanding of the events happening close to the surface of a solid or a tablet. UV imaging is a new imaging approach that can be used to study the dissolution behavior of chemical compounds. The UV imaging instrumentation offers recording of absorbance maps with a high spatial and temporal resolution which facilitates the abundant collection of information regarding the evolving solution concentrations. In this study, UV imaging was used to visualize the dissolution behavior of amlodipine besylate (amorphous and dihydrate forms) and amlodipine free base. The dissolution of amlodipine besylate was faster from the amorphous form than from the crystalline forms. The UV imaging investigations suggested that a solvent mediated phase transformation occurred for the amorphous amlodipine besylate and the amlodipine free base samples. Raman spectroscopy was used to confirm and probe the changes at the solid surface occurring upon contact with the dissolution media and verified the recrystallization of the amorphous form to the monohydrate. The combination of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy is an efficient tool to obtain a deeper insight into the early events of the dissolution process.

  7. Dissolution Coupled Biodegradation of Pce by Inducing In-Situ Biosurfactant Production Under Anaerobic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominic, J.; Nambi, I. M.

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have proven to enhance the bioavailability and thereby elevate the rate of degradation of Light Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (LNAPLs) such as crude oil and petroleum derivatives. In spite of their superior characteristics, use of these biomolecules for remediation of Dense Non Aqueous Phase Liquids (DNAPLs) such as chlorinated solvents is still not clearly understood. In this present study, we have investigated the fate of tetrachloroethylene (PCE) by inducing in-situ biosurfactants production, a sustainable option which hypothesizes increase in bioavailability of LNAPLs. In order to understand the effect of biosurfactants on dissolution and biodegradation under the inducement of in-situ biosurfactant production, batch experiments were conducted in pure liquid media. The individual influence of each process such as biosurfactant production, dissolution of PCE and biodegradation of PCE were studied separately for getting insights on the synergistic effect of each process on the fate of PCE. Finally the dissolution coupled biodegradation of non aqueous phase PCE was studied in conditions where biosurfactant production was induced by nitrate limitation. The effect of biosurfactants was differentiated by repeating the same experiments were the biosurfactant production was retarded. The overall effect of in-situ biosurfactant production process was evaluated by use of a mathematical model. The process of microbial growth, biosurfactant production, dissolution and biodegradation of PCE were translated as ordinary differential equations. The modelling exercise was mainly performed to get insight on the combined effects of various processes that determine the concentration of PCE in its aqueous and non-aqueous phases. Model simulated profiles of PCE with the kinetic coefficients evaluated earlier from individual experiments were compared with parameters fitted for observations in experiments with dissolution coupled biodegradation process using optimization

  8. Biphasic dissolution method for quality control and assurance of drugs containing active substances in the form of weak acid salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franc Aleš

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Substances in the form of weak acid salts have been found to be problematic for dissolution testing. Their absorption can start only after they are turned into the form of an acid following the gastric passage although they were administered in the form of a salt. Due to poor solubility, they cannot be tested in acidic gastric environment for a biased dissolution profile. The biphasic dissolution method is promising for overcoming this obstacle. Tablets with warfarin clathrate sodium salt in two concentrations and two different particle size distributions were tested as a suitable model for finding the medium and process conditions of dissolution. The dissolution method based on the use of the upper organic layer (1-octanol and the lower aqueous layer 0.1 mol L−1 HCl was found suitable and discriminatory for tablets containing active substances in the form of salts of weak acids. The method also reflects physical differences in the quality of used substances.

  9. Modification of NaK (Na and K) dissolution device at the L.E.C.I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansard, Bernard; Ducas, Serge; Riviere, Michel

    1969-12-01

    As three NaK dissolution devices had been operated since 1965 and as irradiation assemblies with a greater capacity (2 to 3 times) are now to be used, the modification of these dissolution devices is addressed. This requires a better control of the dissolution reaction (the NaK + alcohol reaction is highly exothermic and results in an effervescence which requires a greater volume). The objectives are therefore to delay the dissolution, to trigger it, to stop it, to control it at will, and to release heat. The new device is then described with its vessel, its cap, its ball valve, and its two tight sleeves. The operation principle is described, as well as the NaK draining process, and the NaK dissolution. Safety, time saving and raw matter saving issues are finally outlined

  10. Simulation of surface dynamics during dissolution as a function of the surface orientation: Implications for non-constant dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, J. R. A.; Piazolo, S.; Evans, L.

    2014-12-01

    An important problem in geochemistry is the understanding of how changes occurring on a surface during dissolution affect the variability of measured dissolution rates. In this study a new approach to study the effect of surface dynamics on dissolution rates is tested by coupling experimental data with a numerical model that simulates the retreat of surface profiles during dissolution. We present specific results from the simulation of dissolution of fluorite surfaces. The equations that determine the retreat of a surface are based on experimentally obtained equations that relate the retreat rate of a surface to a single variable, the crystallographic orientation of the surface. Our results show that depending on the starting orientation, different types of topography are developed, similar to those observed experimentally. During the initial dissolution phase, changes of topography are rapid and associated with fast dissolution rates. The progressively slower dissolution rates are coupled with the development of surface segments with orientations that dissolve at a slower rate. Consequently, the overall retreat rate of a profile decreases during the simulation, and tends to a near-constant value. The results show a close relationship between dissolution rates, surface orientation and surface dynamics, which suggests that the dissolution rate of a specific mineral phase is not constant but varies with dissolution time and surface structure. This variability needs to be considered in the evaluation of experimentally derived dissolution rates, future dissolution experiments, and predictive kinetic models of dissolution.

  11. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marc, Philippe; Magnaldo, Alastair; Godard, Jérémy; Schaer, Éric

    2018-03-01

    Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the "true" chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  12. A method for phenomenological and chemical kinetics study of autocatalytic reactive dissolution by optical microscopy. The case of uranium dioxide dissolution in nitric acid media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Philippe

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dissolution is a milestone of the head-end of hydrometallurgical processes, as the stabilization rates of the chemical elements determine the process performance and hold-up. This study aims at better understanding the chemical and physico-chemical phenomena of uranium dioxide dissolution reactions in nitric acid media in the Purex process, which separates the reusable materials and the final wastes of the spent nuclear fuels. It has been documented that the attack of sintering-manufactured uranium dioxide solids occurs through preferential attack sites, which leads to the development of cracks in the solids. Optical microscopy observations show that in some cases, the development of these cracks leads to the solid cleavage. It is shown here that the dissolution of the detached fragments is much slower than the process of the complete cleavage of the solid, and occurs with no disturbing phenomena, like gas bubbling. This fact has motivated the measurement of dissolution kinetics using optical microscopy and image processing. By further discriminating between external resistance and chemical reaction, the “true” chemical kinetics of the reaction have been measured, and the highly autocatalytic nature of the reaction confirmed. Based on these results, the constants of the chemical reactions kinetic laws have also been evaluated.

  13. The kinetics of Dissolution of Biologically Formed Calcific Deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokidi, Stamatia; Koutsoukos, Petros

    2015-04-01

    The calcification of aortic valves results in the formation of non stoichiometric apatitic deposits which may have serious health implications because of the fact that these minerals adhere tenaciously on tissues like heart valves and arteries causing permanent damage which is partly due to their low solubility. In the present work, calcium phosphate biominerals were extracted from clinically removed tissues and were characterized with respect to their mineralogical constituents and other properties including morphology, specific surface area analyses and thermogravimetric analysis. In all cases, the biominerals may be described as non stoichiometric apatitic materials, although traces of the precursor phase of octacalcium phosphate (Ca8H2(PO4)6•5H2O, OCP) were identified on the basis of their morphological examination. The kinetics of dissolution of the biomineral deposits was investigated in solutions undersaturated with respect to hydroxyapatite (Ca5(PO4)3OH, HAP) at conditions of constant undersaturation at pH 7.40, 37°C, 0.15M NaCl. Synthetic stoichiometric HAP was used as the control mineral. The experiments in the present work used solutions prepared from calcium chloride and sodium hydrogen phosphate and the relative undersaturation, σ, was in the range 0.38-0.74 with respect to HAP and 0.49-0.85 with respect to OCP (σ=1 in water). The dissolution process started immediately upon the introduction of an accurately weighted amount of powdered biomineral in the undersaturated solutions homogenized by magnetic stirring. Inert atmosphere was ensured with the bubbling of water vapor saturated nitrogen through the demineralizing solutions. A glass/Ag/AgCl combination electrode was used as a probe to monitor the process and to control the addition of diluent solutions with the stoichiometry of the dissolving mineral. The measurements of the rates of crystal dissolution, showed a parabolic dependence on the relative solution undersaturation for HAP and higher

  14. Optimization of the dissolution of molybdenum disks. FY-16 results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krebs, John F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is providing technical development assistance to NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC in its pursuit of two pathways for production of molybdenum-99: the 98Mo(n,γ) 99Mo reaction and the photonuclear reaction, 100Mo(γ,n)99Mo. Processing of irradiated targets, from either production mode, requires dissolution of the target material in H2O2 followed by a concentration step, addition of ferric ion to precipitate impurities, and conversion of the final solution to 5M potassium hydroxide solution of potassium molybdate. Currently, NorthStar is using pressed and sintered Mo disks as targets. Several options are being considered for the design of Mo targets for the production of 99Mo using the (γ,n) reaction. In the current design, the target holder contains a series of sintered Mo disks lined up perpendicular to two incident electron beams, one entering from each side of the target stack. In this configuration, the front-most disks absorb most of the heat from the electron beam and need to be thinner to allow for better cooling, while the middle of the target can be thicker. Distribution of the total mass of Mo allows for larger masses of Mo material and thus larger production batches of 99Mo. A limitation of the sintering approach is the production of very thin disks. Recent advances in 3D printing allow for much thinner target components can be achieved than when the traditional press-and-sinter approach is used. We have demonstrated that several factors can play important roles in dissolution behavior: particle size of Mo metal used for production of targets, sintering conditions, degree of open porosity, and thickness of the sintered Mo targets. Here we report experimental results from studies of small-scale dissolution of sintered Mo disks fabricated from various recycled and commercial Mo materials, and dissolution of 3D-printed Mo disks that were

  15. A new model for coupled multicomponent NAPL dissolution and aqueous-phase transport, with application to creosote dissolution in discrete fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper concerns a new modeling approach to multicomponent NAPL dissolution and transport, based on analytic solutions and Laguerre series. This approach allows virtually any of the numerous existing 1-D analytic transport solutions in the literature to be coupled with arbitrary boundary conditions stemming from nonlinear NAPL dissolution, as dictated by Raoult's Law. A computer implementation of this approach to coupled dissolution and transport in parallel fractures—which no other screening tool known to the authors covers—is presented. This is verified against an existing analytic transport solution that assumes a constant boundary condition. Subsequently, the model is demonstrated via a study of separation of PAH and phenolic plumes generated by dissolution of creosote, using the new computer implementation. The PAH and phenolic constituents of creosote strongly differ in both their dissolution and their transport behavior, and this is shown to necessitate the use of a tool that can account for both processes, such as the one developed here. We also find the possibility of PAH and phenolic plumes becoming entirely disjoint.

  16. Fundamental study on dissolution behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) by quartz crystal microbalance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konda, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Shusuke; Kozawa, Takahiro

    2016-03-01

    Ionizing radiations such as extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and electron beam (EB) are the most promising exposure source for next-generation lithographic technology. In the realization of high resolution lithography, it is necessary for resist materials to improve the trade-off relationship among sensitivity, resolution, and line width roughness (LWR). In order to overcome them, it is essential to understand basic chemistry of resist matrices in resist processes. In particular, the dissolution process of resist materials is a key process. Therefore, it is essential for next-generation resist design for ionizing radiation to clarify the dissolution behavior of the resist film into developer. However, the details in dissolution process of EUV and EB resist films have not been investigated thus far. In this study, main chain scission and dissolution behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) as main chain scission type resist was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) in order to understand the relationship between the degree of PMMA degradation and dissolution behavior. The relationship between the molecular weight after irradiation and the swelling behavior was clarified.

  17. Prediction of dissolution profiles by non-destructive near infrared spectroscopy in tablets subjected to different levels of strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Eduardo; Pawar, Pallavi; Keyvan, Golshid; Wang, Yifan; Velez, Natasha; Callegari, Gerardo; Cuitino, Alberto; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena; Muzzio, Fernando J; Romañach, Rodolfo J

    2016-01-05

    This study describes how the strain on formulation components affects dissolution and how near infrared spectroscopy can be used to predict dissolution. Strain (exposure to shear stress) applied during powder mixing affects the interaction between formulation components. Particles experience shear strain when they move relative to each other in a process affecting the properties of the final product. This stress affects the dissolution of oral solid dosages forms. However, dissolution testing destroys the entire tablet, making it impossible to further evaluate tablet properties when an out of specification result is obtained. Thus, a nondestructive technique such as near infrared spectroscopy is desirable to predict dissolution. The aim of this study was to predict dissolution on tablets with different levels of strain (shear) using near infrared spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis. Shear was induced using a modified Couette cell on the powder mixture and tablets from these mixtures were produced using a tablet press emulator. Tablets produced with different strain levels were measured using near infrared spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained in diffuse reflectance mode and pretreated with baseline correction to maintain the physical and chemical information of the tablets. Dissolution profiles were obtained using USP Apparatus 2 as a reference method. Principal component analysis was used to study the sources of variation in the spectra obtained. Partial least squares 2 was used to predict dissolution on tablets with different levels of strain.

  18. Evaluating the role of re-adsorption of dissolved Hg(2+) during cinnabar dissolution using isotope tracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ping; Li, Yanbin; Liu, Guangliang; Yang, Guidi; Lagos, Leonel; Yin, Yongguang; Gu, Baohua; Jiang, Guibin; Cai, Yong

    2016-11-05

    Cinnabar dissolution is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) cycling. Recent studies have suggested the co-occurrence of re-adsorption of the released Hg during the course of cinnabar dissolution. However, there is a lack of feasible techniques that can quantitatively assess the amount of Hg re-adsorbed on cinnabar when investigating cinnabar dissolution. In this study, a new method, based on isotope tracing and dilution techniques, was developed to study the role of Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar dissolution. The developed method includes two key components: (1) accurate measurement of both released and spiked Hg in aqueous phase and (2) estimation of re-adsorbed Hg on cinnabar surface via the reduction in spiked (202)Hg(2+). By adopting the developed method, it was found that the released Hg for trials purged with oxygen could reach several hundred μgL(-1), while no significant cinnabar dissolution was detected under anaerobic condition. Cinnabar dissolution rate when considering Hg re-adsorption was approximately 2 times the value calculated solely with the Hg detected in the aqueous phase. These results suggest that ignoring the Hg re-adsorption process can significantly underestimate the importance of cinnabar dissolution, highlighting the necessity of applying the developed method in future cinnabar dissolution studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dissolution, agglomerate morphology, and stability limits of protein-coated silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew N; Allen, Andrew J; MacCuspie, Robert I; Hackley, Vincent A

    2014-09-30

    Little is understood regarding the impact that molecular coatings have on nanoparticle dissolution kinetics and agglomerate formation in a dilute nanoparticle dispersion. Dissolution and agglomeration processes compete in removing isolated nanoparticles from the dispersion, making quantitative time-dependent measurements of the mechanisms of nanoparticle loss particularly challenging. In this article, we present in situ ultra-small-angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) results, simultaneously quantifying dissolution, agglomeration, and stability limits of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) coated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein. When the BSA corona is disrupted, we find that the loss of silver from the nanoparticle core is well matched by a second-order kinetic rate reaction, arising from the oxidative dissolution of silver. Dissolution and agglomeration are quantified, and morphological transitions throughout the process are qualified. By probing the BSA-AgNP suspension around its stability limits, we provide insight into the destabilization mechanism by which individual particles rapidly dissolve as a whole rather than undergo slow dissolution from the aqueous interface inward, once the BSA layer is breached. Because USAXS rapidly measures over the entire nanometer to micrometer size range during the dissolution process, many insights are also gained into the stabilization of NPs by protein and its ability to protect the labile metal core from the solution environment by prohibiting the diffusion of reactive species. This approach can be extended to a wide variety of coating molecules and reactive metal nanoparticle systems to carefully survey their stability limits, revealing the likely mechanisms of coating breakdown and ensuing reactions.

  20. Chemistry of application of calcination/dissolution to the Hanford tank waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elcan, T.D.; Hey, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Approximately 330,000 metric tons of sodium-rich radioactive waste originating from separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Fractionation of the waste into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) streams is envisioned via partial water dissolution and limited radionuclide extraction operations. Under optimum conditions, LLW would contain most of the chemical bulk while HLW would contain virtually all of the transuranic and fission product activity. Calcination at around 850 C, followed by water dissolution, has been proposed as an alternative initial treatment of Hanford Site waste to improve waste dissolution and the envisioned LLW/HLW split. Results of literature and laboratory studies are reported on the application of calcination/dissolution (C/D) to the fractionation of the Hanford Site tank waste inventory. Both simulated and genuine Hanford Site waste materials were used in the lab tests. To evaluation confirmed that C/D processing reduced the amount of several components from the waste. The C/D dissolutions of aluminum and chromium allow redistribution of these waste components from the HLW to the LLW fraction. Comparisons of simple water-washing with C/D processing of genuine Hanford Site waste are also reported based on material (radionuclide and chemical) distributions to solution and solid residue phases. The lab results show that C/D processing yielded superior dissolution of aluminum and chromium sludges compared to simple water dissolution. 57 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs

  1. Chemistry of application of calcination/dissolution to the Hanford tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elcan, T.D.; Hey, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Approximately 330,000 metric tons of sodium-rich radioactive waste originating from separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Fractionation of the waste into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) streams is envisioned via partial water dissolution and limited radionuclide extraction operations. Under optimum conditions, LLW would contain most of the chemical bulk while HLW would contain virtually all of the transuranic and fission product activity. Calcination at around 850 C, followed by water dissolution, has been proposed as an alternative initial treatment of Hanford Site waste to improve waste dissolution and the envisioned LLW/HLW split. Results of literature and laboratory studies are reported on the application of calcination/dissolution (C/D) to the fractionation of the Hanford Site tank waste inventory. Both simulated and genuine Hanford Site waste materials were used in the lab tests. To evaluation confirmed that C/D processing reduced the amount of several components from the waste. The C/D dissolutions of aluminum and chromium allow redistribution of these waste components from the HLW to the LLW fraction. Comparisons of simple water-washing with C/D processing of genuine Hanford Site waste are also reported based on material (radionuclide and chemical) distributions to solution and solid residue phases. The lab results show that C/D processing yielded superior dissolution of aluminum and chromium sludges compared to simple water dissolution. 57 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  2. On the dissolution of iridium by aluminum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewson, John C.

    2009-08-01

    The potential for liquid aluminum to dissolve an iridium solid is examined. Substantial uncertainties exist in material properties, and the available data for the iridium solubility and iridium diffusivity are discussed. The dissolution rate is expressed in terms of the regression velocity of the solid iridium when exposed to the solvent (aluminum). The temperature has the strongest influence in the dissolution rate. This dependence comes primarily from the solubility of iridium in aluminum and secondarily from the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficient. This dissolution mass flux is geometry dependent and results are provided for simplified geometries at constant temperatures. For situations where there is negligible convective flow, simple time-dependent diffusion solutions are provided. Correlations for mass transfer are also given for natural convection and forced convection. These estimates suggest that dissolution of iridium can be significant for temperatures well below the melting temperature of iridium, but the uncertainties in actual rates are large because of uncertainties in the physical parameters and in the details of the relevant geometries.

  3. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Characterization of aquifers contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons is limited by the use of dissolution mass transfer correlations developed for single com- pounds without considering the effects of the mass transfer limitations in presence of other components. A one-dimensional implicit numerical model is ...

  4. Physicochemical characterization and dissolution properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    calorimetry (DSC), powder x-ray diffractometry (PXRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Phase solubility studies revealed an AL-type diagram indicating a 1:1 stoichiometric inclusion complex and a stability constant value of 914 M-1. Solubility and dissolution rates of PYR and the binary systems were ...

  5. 25 CFR 11.605 - Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolution of marriage if: (1) The court finds that the marriage is irretrievably broken, if the finding is... affecting the attitude of one or both of the parties towards the marriage; (2) The court finds that either..., or provided for child custody, the support of any child entitled to support, the maintenance of...

  6. Numerical modelling of multicomponent LNAPL dissolution kinetics ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Johnson et al 2003; Liu et al 2007). The complexity associated with dissolution mass transfer of organic compounds is closely related to their relative hydrophobic nature, distribution of the non-aqueous phase mass within the aquifer pore volume, prevailing flow and other geochemical properties of the porous medium.

  7. Dissolution of aluminium-cladded fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, G.; Boessert, W.; Hladik, O.; Schwarzbach, R.

    1984-01-01

    In the molybdenum production plant at Rossendorf (AMOR) short-term irradiated aluminium-cladded fuel elements from the Rossendorf research reactor RFR are dissolved for the purpose of molybdenum 99 production. The dissolution behaviour of these fuel elements and the appropriate dissolver are described. (author)

  8. Facies, dissolution seams and stable isotope compositions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stable isotope analysis of the limestone shows that 13C and 18O values are compatible with the early Mesoproterozoic open seawater composition. The ribbon limestone facies in the Rohtas Limestone is characterized by micritic beds, each decoupled in a lower band enriched and an upper band depleted in dissolution ...

  9. Dissolution flowsheet for high flux isotope reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the

  10. Dissolution-recrystallization method for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Luo, Junsheng; Wan, Zhongquan; Liu, Xingzhao; Jia, Chunyang

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a dissolution-recrystallization method (DRM) with chlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide treating the perovskite films during the spin-coating process is reported. This is the first time that DRM is used to control perovskite crystallization and improve the device performance. Furthermore, the DRM is good for reducing defects and grain boundaries, improving perovskite crystallization and even improving TiO2/perovskite interface. By optimizing, the DRM2-treated perovskite solar cell (PSC) obtains the best photoelectric conversion efficiency (PCE) of 16.76% under AM 1.5 G illumination (100 mW cm-2) with enhanced Jsc and Voc compared to CB-treated PSC.

  11. A multiphase interfacial model for the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerden, James L., E-mail: jerden@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Frey, Kurt [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ebert, William [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • This model accounts for chemistry, temperature, radiolysis, U(VI) minerals, and hydrogen effect. • The hydrogen effect dominates processes determining spent fuel dissolution rate. • The hydrogen effect protects uranium oxide spent fuel from oxidative dissolution. - Abstract: The Fuel Matrix Dissolution Model (FMDM) is an electrochemical reaction/diffusion model for the dissolution of spent uranium oxide fuel. The model was developed to provide radionuclide source terms for use in performance assessment calculations for various types of geologic repositories. It is based on mixed potential theory and consists of a two-phase fuel surface made up of UO{sub 2} and a noble metal bearing fission product phase in contact with groundwater. The corrosion potential at the surface of the dissolving fuel is calculated by balancing cathodic and anodic reactions occurring at the solution interfaces with UO{sub 2} and NMP surfaces. Dissolved oxygen and hydrogen peroxide generated by radiolysis of the groundwater are the major oxidizing agents that promote fuel dissolution. Several reactions occurring on noble metal alloy surfaces are electrically coupled to the UO{sub 2} and can catalyze or inhibit oxidative dissolution of the fuel. The most important of these is the oxidation of hydrogen, which counteracts the effects of oxidants (primarily H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}). Inclusion of this reaction greatly decreases the oxidation of U(IV) and slows fuel dissolution significantly. In addition to radiolytic hydrogen, large quantities of hydrogen can be produced by the anoxic corrosion of steel structures within and near the fuel waste package. The model accurately predicts key experimental trends seen in literature data, the most important being the dramatic depression of the fuel dissolution rate by the presence of dissolved hydrogen at even relatively low concentrations (e.g., less than 1 mM). This hydrogen effect counteracts oxidation reactions and can limit

  12. The effect of the mineral dissolution and deformation of slope stability on nature terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Chae, B.

    2012-12-01

    A landslide on nature terrane is mainly occurred by rainfall, snowmelt, earthquakes and rock/soil weathering process. Especially, the role of rainfall and rock/soil weathering in slope stability is very important because it causes decreased in shear strength by reducing the soil cohesion. Quartz is the most abundant crust-forming mineral on earth. This mineral contributes to the formation of crystalline rocks such as granite, gneiss, and sandstone. Therefore, in case of the slope consisted by granite, gneiss, and sandstone, the slope stability can be affected by the mineral weathering process such as mineral dissolution and deformation because the shear strength, one of the key factors to calculate the slope stability, can be reduced by mineral weathering. That is, mineral weathering including dissolution and deformation between the minerals can reduce the soil cohesion on nature terrane. Many studies have found that quartz exhibits a notably slow rate of dissolution at room temperature. Therefore, to achieve rapid dissolution at room temperature, other methods should be considered, including 1) expanding the surface area of quartz to increase the reaction area and 2) applying high pressure to the contact area of crystals to increase the dissolution rate. However, dissolution of the surface of quartz is difficult to observe when using powdered quartz to maximize the surface area. Therefore, we used beads and single quartz crystals to observe and analyze the dissolution of the surface. The former can be used to maximize the surface area of quartz, and high-pressure conditions can be applied to the latter. A confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) was subsequently used to observe the dissolution patterns on the quartz surface. Numerical analyses using the finite element method (FEM) were also performed to quantify the deformation of the contact area. Quartz dissolution was observed in both experiments. This deformation was due to a concentrated compressive stress

  13. Multi-level dissolution and hydrolysis of lignocellulosic waste with a semi-flow hydrothermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Tan, Haobo; Xu, Yingjie; Zou, Lei

    2016-08-01

    The hydrothermal process is efficient in lignocellulosic conversion and is beneficial to potential bioethanol production. In batch- and flow-type processes, concurrent dissolution and hydrolysis of lignocellulose result in product loss and inhibitory intermediates. Therefore, multi-level hydrothermal conversion of corn stalks was implemented with a semi-flow system to provide different residence times to undissolved compounds and facilitate dissolution or hydrolysis at respective optimal conditions. First-stage dissolution dissolved amorphous hemicellulose and lignin at 195-200°C. Xylan, acid soluble lignin, and part of Klason lignin were dissolved without affecting glucan. In second-stage dissolution, the crystallinity of the undissolved materials suddenly decreased at 245-250°C. The cellulose dissolution ratio was higher than 75%. Soluble sugars were obtained after the hydrolysis of dissolved cellulose at 280°C. The results provide significant information on the multi-level hydrothermal process and its potential applications for recovering valuable chemicals from lignocellulosic waste. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In vitro Dissolution Studies on Solid Dispersions of Mefenamic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, K R S Sambasiva; Nagabhushanam, M V; Chowdary, K P R

    2011-03-01

    Solid dispersions of mefanamic acid with a water-soluble polymer polyvinyl pyrrolidine and a super disintegrant, primojel were prepared by common solvent and solvent evaporation methods employing methanol as the solvent. The dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency of the prepared solid dispersions were evaluated in comparison to the corresponding pure drug. Solid dispersions of mefenamic acid showed a marked enhancement in dissolution rate and dissolution efficiency. At 1:4 ratio of mefenamic acid-primojel a 2.61 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid was observed with solid dispersion. The solid dispersions in combined carriers gave much higher rates of dissolution than super disintegrants alone. Mefanamic acid-primojel-polyvinyl pyrrolidine (1:3.2:0.8) solid dispersion gave a 4.11 fold increase in the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid. Super disintegrants alone or in combination with polyvinyl pyrrolidine could be used to enhance the dissolution rate of mefenamic acid.

  15. Effect of different water conditions on dissolution of nanosilver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Feng; Zhang, Hongyin; Lin, Qing-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluates the time-dependent dissolution of nanosilver (nAg) in common electrolytes and natural waters. nAg was synthesized via Tollens' method using sodium citrate as stabilizer; its morphology, UV-Vis spectrum, and particle size were characterized. The dissolved silver was monitored over time using filtration, centrifugation, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). Our results indicated that nanoparticle aggregation, Cl(-) presence, and natural organic compounds could affect the dissolution behavior of nAg. The dissolution of nAg was highly dependent on Cl(-) concentration. Excessive Cl(-) enhanced nanoparticle dissolution, whereas natural organic compound inhibited the dissolution. The dissolution data fitted well with the first-order kinetic model, and the dissolution rate coefficients were calculated using the first-order equation. This study showed the dissolution of nAg under various water conditions. The obtained results may be helpful in predicting nAg behavior in relevant environmental aquatic systems.

  16. Electrochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Nielsen, Gregers

    1997-01-01

    The notes describe in detail primary and secondary galvanic cells, fuel cells, electrochemical synthesis and electroplating processes, corrosion: measurments, inhibitors, cathodic and anodic protection, details of metal dissolution reactions, Pourbaix diagrams and purification of waste water from...... galvanic industries....

  17. The impact of antibacterial handsoap constituents on the dynamics of triclosan dissolution from dry sand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Daniel A; Strevett, Keith A; Papelis, Charalambos; Kibbey, Tohren C G

    2017-11-01

    Triclosan has been widely used as an antibacterial agent in consumer and industrial products, and large quantities continue to be discharged to natural waters annually. The focus of this work was on studying the dynamics of triclosan dissolution following evaporative drying. Warm weather can cause the water in intermittent streams or the unsaturated zone to evaporate, causing nonvolatile compounds to form solid precipitates. Because dissolution of precipitates is a relatively slow process, the dynamics of dissolution following evaporation may play an important role in controlling the release of contaminants to the environment. The specific purpose of the work was to explore the effects of surfactant co-contaminants from an industrial antibiotic handsoap on the dissolution dynamics of triclosan. The work used a fiber optic-based optical cell to conduct stirred-batch dissolution experiments for sands coated with different mass loadings of triclosan. Results show that the presence of surfactants from the hand soap not only increase the apparent equilibrium solubility, but also increase the rate of approach to equilibrium. A model describing the dissolution process was developed, and was found to be consistent with experimental data. Results of the work suggest that even small solubility enhancement by surfactant co-contaminants may have a significant impact on dissolution dynamics. Because waters containing significant quantities of triclosan are also among those most likely to contain surfactant co-contaminants, it is likely that the release of triclosan to the environment following evaporation may be faster in many cases than would be predicted from experiments based on pure triclosan. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development and validation of dissolution test for Metoprolol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dissolution method which uses USP apparatus I (Basket) with rotating at 100 rpm, 900 ml of different dissolution medium, ultra violet spectroscopy for quantification was demonstrated to be robust, discriminating and transferable. Dissolution tests conditions were selected after it was demonstrated that the Metoprolol ...

  19. Investigation of dissolution kinetics of a Nigerian columbite in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of dissolution kinetics of a Nigerian columbite in hydrofluoric acid using the shrinking core model. ... Experimental results indicate that the dissolution rate is chemical reaction controlled, with reaction order of 0.57. Dissolution of over 90 % of the columbite was achieved in 5 h, using 20 M HF at 90 oC with 100 ...

  20. Characterization and Dissolution Kinetics Testing of Radioactive H-3 Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2002-09-01

    Characterization and dissolution kinetics testing were performed with Idaho radioactive H-3 calcine. Calcine dissolution is the key front-end unit operation for the Separations Alternative identified in the Idaho High Level Waste Draft EIS. The impact of the extent of dissolution on the feasibility of Separations must be clearly quantified.

  1. Evaluating the role of re-adsorption of dissolved Hg{sup 2+} during cinnabar dissolution using isotope tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Ping [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Li, Yanbin [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology, Ministry of Education/Qingdao Collaborative Innovation Center of Marine Science and Technology, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Guangliang [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Yang, Guidi [College of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Lagos, Leonel [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Yin, Yongguang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Gu, Baohua [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States); Jiang, Guibin [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Cai, Yong, E-mail: cai@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States)

    2016-11-05

    Highlights: • Develop a new method to study Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar. • Both isotope dilution and tracer techniques were adopted. • The presence of O{sub 2} can significantly enhance the dissolution of cinnabar. • Prove the necessity of including re-adsorption in estimating cinnabar dissolution. - Abstract: Cinnabar dissolution is an important factor controlling mercury (Hg) cycling. Recent studies have suggested the co-occurrence of re-adsorption of the released Hg during the course of cinnabar dissolution. However, there is a lack of feasible techniques that can quantitatively assess the amount of Hg re-adsorbed on cinnabar when investigating cinnabar dissolution. In this study, a new method, based on isotope tracing and dilution techniques, was developed to study the role of Hg re-adsorption in cinnabar dissolution. The developed method includes two key components: (1) accurate measurement of both released and spiked Hg in aqueous phase and (2) estimation of re-adsorbed Hg on cinnabar surface via the reduction in spiked {sup 202}Hg{sup 2+}. By adopting the developed method, it was found that the released Hg for trials purged with oxygen could reach several hundred μg L{sup −1}, while no significant cinnabar dissolution was detected under anaerobic condition. Cinnabar dissolution rate when considering Hg re-adsorption was approximately 2 times the value calculated solely with the Hg detected in the aqueous phase. These results suggest that ignoring the Hg re-adsorption process can significantly underestimate the importance of cinnabar dissolution, highlighting the necessity of applying the developed method in future cinnabar dissolution studies.

  2. A potentiostatic and galvanostatic study of the selective dissolution of Cd/Pb eutectic alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokharev, N.P.; Rabdel, A.A.; Zhadanov, V.V.

    1986-01-01

    The authors consider the selective dissolution (SD) of the electronegative component of a two-phase, eutectic alloy (Cd/Pb) under galvanostatic conditions. Treating this process as the extraction of a solid substance from a porous matrix, the distribution of the concentration of EC ions, c(x, t), can be described by a differential equation (presented). Experimental data are presented in two equations which are applicable for the description of the selective dissolution process of the electronegative component of a eutectic alloy under conditions of concentration polarization

  3. Evaluation of alkaline dissolution of Al 6061 and Al 1050 for the production of Mo-99 from LEU targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mindrisz, Ana C.; Camilo, Ruth L.; Araujo, Izilda C.; Forbicini, Christina A.L.G. de O.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, due to the global crisis in the production of radioisotope 99 Mo, which product of decay, 99m Tc, is the tracer element most often used in nuclear medicine and accounts for about 80% of all diagnostic procedures in vivo. Studies on the alkaline dissolution to obtain 9 9M o from irradiated UAl x -Al LEU targets are under development. Processing time should be minimized, considering the short half-life of 99 Mo and 99m Tc, about 66 h and 6 h, respectively. This makes dissolution time a significant factor in the development of the process. This paper presents the results of alkaline dissolution of 'scraps' of Al 6061 and 1050, used to simulate the dissolution process of UAl x -Al targets. Dissolution time and gas releasing were evaluated using the following alkaline solutions: a) NaOH 3 mol.L -1 and NaNO 3 2 mol.L -1 , b) NaOH 3 mol.L -1 and NaNO 3 4 mol.L -1 . The initial temperature of dissolution was 85 deg C in all cases. Al 6061 showed values of dissolution time greater than that for Al 1050, 25% for NaNO 3 2 mol.L -1 and 104.55% for NaNO 3 4 mol.L -1 . The dissolution with NaNO 3 2 mol.L -1 showed that the gas releasing for Al 6061 was 2.7% greater than for Al 1050. However Al 1050 showed that gas releasing 9.92% greater than for Al 6061 during the dissolution with NaNO 3 4 mol.L -1 . The decision about what type of alloy has to be used, Al 1050 or Al 6061, it will be upto the group that will manufacture the targets for the RMB. (author)

  4. Drug-polymer-water interaction and its implication for the dissolution performance of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuejie; Liu, Chengyu; Chen, Zhen; Su, Ching; Hageman, Michael; Hussain, Munir; Haskell, Roy; Stefanski, Kevin; Qian, Feng

    2015-02-02

    The in vitro dissolution mechanism of an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) remains elusive and highly individualized, yet rational design of ASDs with optimal performance and prediction of their in vitro/in vivo performance are very much desirable in the pharmaceutical industry. To this end, we carried out comprehensive investigation of various ASD systems of griseofulvin, felodipine, and ketoconazole, in PVP-VA or HPMC-AS at different drug loading. Physiochemical properties and processes related to drug-polymer-water interaction, including the drug crystallization tendency in aqueous medium, drug-polymer interaction before and after moisture exposure, supersaturation of drug in the presence of polymer, polymer dissolution kinetics, etc., were characterized and correlated with the dissolution performance of ASDs at different dose and different drug/polymer ratio. It was observed that ketoconazole/HPMC-AS ASD outperformed all other ASDs in various dissolution conditions, which was attributed to the drug's low crystallization tendency, the strong ketoconazole/HPMC-AS interaction and the robustness of this interaction against water disruption, the dissolution rate and the availability of HPMC-AS in solution, and the ability of HPMC-AS in maintaining ketoconazole supersaturation. It was demonstrated that all these properties have implications for the dissolution performance of various ASD systems, and further quantification of them could be used as potential predictors for in vitro dissolution of ASDs. For all ASDs investigated, HPMC-AS systems performed better than, or at least comparably with, their PVP-VA counterparts, regardless of the drug loading or dose. This observation cannot be solely attributed to the ability of HPMC-AS in maintaining drug supersaturation. We also conclude that, for fast crystallizers without strong drug-polymer interaction, the only feasible option to improve dissolution might be to lower the dose and the drug loading in the ASD. In this

  5. The Mechanism of Transpassive Dissolution of AISI 321 Stainless Steel in Sulphuric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fattah-Alhosseini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The transpassive dissolution mechanism of AISI 321 stainless steel in a 0.5 M sulphate solution was studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. On the basis of the experimental results, surface charge approach, and point defect model, a kinetic model of the transpassive dissolution process is proposed. The transpassive film is modeled as a highly doped n-type semiconductor—insulator-p-type semiconductor structure. Injection of negative defects at the transpassive film/solution interface results in their accumulation as a negative surface charge. It alters the nonstationary transpassive film growth rate controlled by the transport of positive defects (oxygen vacancies. The model describes the process as dissolution of Cr as Cr (VI and Fe as Fe (III through the transpassive film via parallel reaction paths.

  6. The dissolution rate of silicate glasses and minerals: an alternative model based on several activated complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, G.

    1997-01-01

    Most of the mineral reactions in natural water-rock systems progress at conditions close to the chemical equilibrium. The kinetics of these reactions, in particular the dissolution rate of the primary minerals, is a major constrain for the numerical modelling of diagenetic and hydrothermal processes. In the case of silicates, recent experimental studies have pointed out the necessity to better understand the elementary reactions which control the dissolution process. This article presents several models that have been proposed to account for the observed dissolution rate/chemical affinity relationships. The case of glasses (R7T7), feldspars and clays, in water, in near neutral pH aqueous solutions and in acid/basic media, are reviewed. (A.C.)

  7. Magnesite dissolution and precipitation rates at hydrothermal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saldi, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Magnesite (MgCO 3 ) is the stable anhydrous member of a series of Mg-carbonates with different degrees of hydration. Despite its relative scarcity in the natural environments, it constitutes an important mineral phase for the permanent sequestration of CO 2 as carbonate minerals. Experimental determination of magnesite precipitation and dissolution rates at conditions representative of the storage sites is therefore fundamental for the assessment of magnesite sequestration potential in basaltic and ultramafic rocks and the optimization of the techniques of CO 2 storage. Magnesite precipitation rates have been measured using mixed-flow and batch reactors as a function of temperature (100 ≤ T ≤ 200 deg. C), solution composition and CO 2 partial pressure (up to 30 bar). Rates were found to be independent of aqueous solution ionic strength at 0.1 M 3 2- activity at pH > 8. All rates obtained from mixed flow reactor experiments were found to be consistent with the model of Pokrovsky et al. (1999) where magnesite precipitation rates are proportional to the concentration of the >MgOH 2 + surface species. The study of magnesite crystallization using hydrothermal atomic force microscopy (HAFM) demonstrated the consistency of the rates derived from microscopic measurements with those obtained from bulk experiments and showed that these rates are also consistent with a spiral growth mechanism. According to AFM observations this mechanism controls magnesite growth over a wide range of temperatures and saturation states (15≤ Ω ≤200 for 80 ≤T 2 to accelerate the rate of the overall carbonation process, avoiding the inhibiting effect of carbonate ions on magnesite precipitation and increasing the rates of Mg-silicate dissolution via acidification of reacting solutions. Determination of magnesite dissolution rates by mixed flow reactor at 150 and 200 deg. C and at neutral to alkaline conditions allowed us to improve and extend to high temperatures the surface

  8. Budesonide nanoparticle agglomerates as dry powder aerosols with rapid dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nashwa; Gorman, Eric M.; Munson, Eric J.; Berkland, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Nanoparticle technology represents an attractive approach for formulating poorly water soluble pulmonary medicines. Unfortunately, nanoparticle suspensions used in nebulizers or metered dose inhalers often suffer from physical instability in the form of uncontrolled agglomeration or Ostwald ripening. In addition, processing such suspensions into dry powders can yield broad particle size distributions. To address these encumbrances, a controlled nanoparticle flocculation process has been developed. Method Nanosuspensions of the poorly water soluble drug budesonide were prepared by dissolving the drug in organic solvent containing surfactants followed by rapid solvent extraction in water. Different surfactants were employed to control the size and surface charge of the precipitated nanoparticles. Nanosuspensions were flocculated using leucine and lyophilized. Results Selected budesonide nanoparticle suspensions exhibited an average particle size ranging from ~160–230 nm, high yield and high drug content. Flocculated nanosuspensions produced micron-sized agglomerates. Freeze-drying the nanoparticle agglomerates yielded dry powders with desirable aerodynamic properties for inhalation therapy. In addition, the dissolution rates of dried nanoparticle agglomerate formulations were significantly faster than that of stock budesonide. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that nanoparticle agglomerates possess the microstructure desired for lung deposition and the nanostructure to facilitate rapid dissolution of poorly water soluble drugs. PMID:19130469

  9. [Direct gallstone dissolution therapy with GS-100].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, F; Igimi, H

    1993-07-01

    We have developed GS-100, a new direct dissolving drug with strong dissolution property for cholesterol stone by supplementing d-limonene, a dissolvent used since 1974, with 30% medium-chain monoglyceride (MCM). The new drug was applied in 23 patients with gallbladder stones and three with bile duct stone. The presumptive analysis of the composition of the stones was drawn from the CT recordings. As non-invasive therapies, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) dissolution and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL), which are commonly used in Europe and America, have been reported as being favourable; however, GS-100 is superior in respect to safety and applicative dimension, suggesting of the possibility of using GS-100 as an important drug in the non-invasive therapy for gallstone in the near future.

  10. The impact of ART on union dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Mariana Veloso; Vassard, Ditte; Hougaard, Charlotte Ørsted

    2018-01-01

    and to deal with the surrounding stigma. Using a population-based study and couple-level data, we investigated the extent to which ART treatment increases the risk for divorce/marital dissolution during up to 16 years of follow-up. STUDY DESIGN SIZE, DURATION: Register-based national cohort study including...... was prospectively sampled. Participants could change status during follow-up if they entered ART. The final sample had 148 972 couples, followed until marital dissolution, death of self/spouse, migration or until 31 December 2010. We used Cox regression models adjusting for female and male age, education, marriage......, common child at baseline and live-born child during follow-up. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE: At baseline, the majority of couples were married (69%). More non-ART couples opted for marriage (70% versus 64%; P

  11. Critical-ionization model for the dissolution of phenolic polymers in aqueous base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagin, Lewis Wayne

    The microelectronics industry owes much of its success to the miniaturization of the integrated circuit. Advances in the design of photoresists used in microlithography have enabled this progress to continue. The majority of photoresist formulations contain phenolic polymers, and their imaging capabilities arise from the radiation- induced differences in dissolution rate between exposed and unexposed regions of the photoresist in basic aqueous solutions. The Critical-Ionization Model provides an understanding at the molecular level of the important factors in the aqueous dissolution of phenolic polymers below the entanglement molecular weight. The model postulates that a critical fraction of the acidic sites on a phenolic polymer must ionize for the polymer to dissolve in aqueous base. A functional relationship between the dissolution rate and the degree of ionization is developed based on this hypothesis. Quantitative predictions for the effects of polymer structure on the dissolution rate follow from equations relating the degree of ionization to the degree of polymerization, the polymer pKa, and the developer concentration. Experimental verification is' provided through tests of model predictions for the minimum base concentration required for development and the effects of polymer structure on the dissolution rate. Molecular simulations of resist dissolution based on the Critical-Ionization Model are used to probe the mechanism of surface inhibition and the evolution of edge roughness and surface roughness in photoresist profiles. These simulations demonstrate the dependence of the dissolution rate and surface roughness on the molecular-weight distribution of the polymer, degree of deprotection, void fraction, and developer concentration. Model parameters are evaluated using experimental data from turbidimetry, potentiometry, and copolymer studies. Means to extend the scope of the Critical-Ionization Model to describe and ultimately simulate other steps in the

  12. Chitosan and chitosan chlorhydrate based various approaches for enhancement of dissolution rate of carvedilol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shete Amol S

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and the purpose of the study Carvedilol nonselective β-adrenoreceptor blocker, chemically (±-1-(Carbazol-4-yloxy-3-[[2-(o-methoxypHenoxy ethyl] amino]-2-propanol, slightly soluble in ethyl ether; and practically insoluble in water, gastric fluid (simulated, TS, pH 1.1, and intestinal fluid (simulated, TS without pancreatin, pH 7.5 Compounds with aqueous solubility less than 1% W/V often represents dissolution rate limited absorption. There is need to enhance the dissolution rate of carvedilol. The objective of our present investigation was to compare chitosan and chitosan chlorhydrate based various approaches for enhancement of dissolution rate of carvedilol. Methods The different formulations were prepared by different methods like solvent change approach to prepare hydrosols, solvent evaporation technique to form solid dispersions and cogrind mixtures. The prepared formulations were characterized in terms of saturation solubility, drug content, infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD, electron microscopy, in vitro dissolution studies and stability studies. Results The practical yield in case of hydrosols was ranged from 59.76 to 92.32%. The drug content was found to uniform among the different batches of hydrosols, cogrind mixture and solid dispersions ranged from 98.24 to 99.89%. There was significant improvement in dissolution rate of carvedilol with chitosan chlorhdyrate as compare to chitosan and explanation to this behavior was found in the differences in the wetting, solubilities and swelling capacity of the chitosan and chitosan salts, chitosan chlorhydrate rapidly wet and dissolve upon its incorporation into the dissolution medium, whereas the chitosan base, less water soluble, would take more time to dissolve. Conclusion This technique is scalable and valuable in manufacturing process in future for enhancement of dissolution of poorly water soluble

  13. Monitoring carbonate dissolution using spatially resolved under-sampled NMR propagators and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederman, A. J.; Colbourne, A.; Mantle, M. D.; Gladden, L. F.; Oliveira, R.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of a porous rock matrix by an acidic flow causes a change in the pore structure and consequently the pattern of fluid flow and rock permeability. This process is relevant to many areas of practical relevance such as enhanced oil recovery, water contaminant migration and sequestration of supercritical CO2. The most important governing factors for the type of change in the pore space are related by the Péclet (Pe) and Damköhler (Da) dimensionless numbers; these compare the transport properties of the fluid in the porous medium with the reactive properties of the solid matrix and the incident fluid respectively. Variation in Pe and Da can cause very different evolution regimes of the pore space and flow can occur, ranging from a uniform dissolution through different "wormholing" regimes (shown on the left hand side of figure 1) to face dissolution. NMR has a unique capability of measuring both the flow and structural changes during such dissolution whilst the characteristics of flow in the highly heterogeneous matrix that is formed can be predicted by the CTRW modelling approach. Here, NMR measurements of displacement probability distributions, or propagators, have been used to monitor the evolution of fluid flow during a reactive dissolution rock core floods. Developments in the NMR method by undersampling the acquisition data enable spatially resolved measurements of the propagators to be done at sufficient displacement resolution and in a timescale that is short enough to capture the changes in structure and flow. The highly under-sampled (4%) data, which typically reduces the acquisition time from 2 hours to 6 minutes, has been shown to produce equivalent propagator results to the fully sampled experiment. Combining these propagator measurements with quantitative and fast imaging techniques a full time-resolved picture of the dissolution reaction is built up. Experiments have been done for both Ketton and Estaillades carbonate rock cores, which

  14. Bacterial Association with Particles: Aggregation to Dissolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.

    an important role in the trophic dynamics of an ecosystem (Fig. 1) Bacterial role in aggregation formation and dissolution In aquatic systems particles are important components in the turnover, decomposition and sinking flux of both organic and inorganic... (Nicholas and Walling, 1998). Although bacteria are responsible for assimilating most of the DOC in aquatic ecosystem, yet the fluxes of DOC through bacteria include a wide variety of compounds derived from unknown sources and composition (Azam et al., 1993...

  15. Aggregation, sedimentation, dissolution and bioavailability of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    To understand their fate and transport in estuarine systems, the aggregation, sedimentation, and dissolution of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) in seawater were investigated. Hydrodynamic size increased from 40 to 60 nm to >1 mm within 1 h in seawater, and the aggregates were highly polydispersed. Their sedimentation rates in seawater were measured to be 4–10 mm/day. Humic acid (HA), further increased their size and polydispersity, and slowed sedimentation. Light increased their dissolution and release of dissolved Cd. The ZnS shell also slowed release of Cd ions. With sufficient light, HA increased the dissolution of QDs, while with low light, HA alone did not change their dissolution. The benthic zone in estuarine systems is the most probable long-term destination of QDs due to aggregation and sedimentation. The bioavailability of was evaluated using the mysid Americamysis bahia. The 7-day LC50s of particulate and dissolved QDs were 290 and 23 μg (total Cd)/L, respectively. For mysids, the acute toxicity appears to be from Cd ions; however, research on the effects of QDs should be conducted with other organisms where QDs may be lodged in critical tissues such as gills or filtering apparatus and Cd ions may be released and delivered directly to those tissues. Because of their increasing use and value to society, cadmium-based quantum dots (QDs) will inevitably find their way into marine systems. In an effort to understand the fate and transport of CdSe QDs in estuar

  16. Dissolution and permeation characteristics of artemether tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    U.S.P. dissolution apparatus (Panomex Inc,. India) using the modified method of Sharma et al. [17]. Segments of the intestine of freshly sacrificed pig were obtained and used as donor compartments. Each segment was tied at one end and filled with 5 ml of SGF (pH 1.2) or SIF. (pH 6.8) produced based on USP 33 – NF 28.

  17. Aluminosilicate Dissolution and Silicate Carbonation during Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yujia

    Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is considered a promising method to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission. Assessing the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) gas or liquid phase water (g, l)-mineral interactions is critical to evaluating the viability of GCS processes. This work contributes to our understanding of geochemical reactions at CO 2-water (g, l)-mineral interfaces, by investigating the dissolution of aluminosilicates in CO2-acidified water (l). Plagioclase and biotite were chosen as model minerals in reservoir rock and caprock, respectively. To elucidate the effects of brine chemistry, first, the influences of cations in brine including Na, Ca, and K, have been investigated. In addition to the cations, the effects of abundant anions including sulfate and oxalate were also examined. Besides the reactions in aqueous phase, we also examine the carbonation of silicates in water (g)-bearing supercritical CO2 (scCO2) under conditions relevant to GCS. For the metal carbonation, in particular, the effects of particle sizes, water, temperature, and pressure on the carbonation of wollastonite were systematically examined. For understanding the cations effects in brine, the impacts of Na concentrations up to 4 M on the dissolution of plagioclase and biotite were examined. High concentrations of Na significantly inhibited plagioclase dissolution by competing adsorption with proton and suppressing proton-promoted dissolution. Ca has a similar effect to Na, and their effects did not suppress each other when Na and Ca co-existed. For biotite, the inhibition effects of Na coupled with an enhancing effect due to ion exchange reaction between Na and interlayer K, which cracked the basal surfaces of biotite. The K in aqueous phase significantly inhibited the dissolution. If the biotite is equilibrated with NaCl solutions initially, the biotite dissolved faster than the original biotite and the dissolution was inhibited by Na and K in brine. The outcomes improve our current knowledge of

  18. Fault controlled dissolution of bedded rock salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Neil L.; Knapp, Ralph W. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States); Brown, R. James [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of well log and seismic data suggest that about 40 m of Famennian-age bedded rock salt was uniformly deposited within the Wabamun Group in the Stettler area, southeastern Alberta, Canada. Subsequent to deposition, this original rock salt was leached to the extent that is preserved, now only as isolated-to-contiguous bodies of irregular shape and variable thickness. In the immediate study area, dissolution appears to have been initiated by regional faulting and/or fracturing during the mid-Late Cretaceous, and accentuated thereafter by various large-scale mechanisms including glaciation. In this paper, seismic data across a prominent NNE trending salt-dissolution feature in the Stettler area are presented. In short cross-section, this subsidence feature is manifested as an up-ward-expanding zone of measurable subsidence, characterized by increased structural relief at greater depths, and small-amplitude near-vertical offsets. This subsidence feature is consistent with: the onset of salt dissolution as a result of regional faulting and/or fracturing during mid-Late Cretaceous time; the plastic deformation of rock salt creep; the gradual (as opposed to catastrophic) subsidence of the post-salt strata; and accelerated rates of leaching during the Pleistocene and Holocene in response to glacial loading and unloading. (author). 12 refs., 4 figs

  19. Microbubble dissolution in a multigas environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, James J; Borden, Mark A

    2010-05-04

    Microbubbles occur naturally in the oceans and are used in many industrial and biomedical applications. Here, a theoretical and experimental study was undertaken to determine the fate of a microbubble suddenly suspended in a medium with several gas species as in, for example, the injection of an ultrasound contrast agent into the bloodstream. The model expands on Epstein and Plesset's analysis to include any number of gases. An experimental system was developed which isolates the microbubble in a permeable hollow fiber submerged in a perfusion chamber, allowing rapid exchange of the external aqueous medium. Experimental verification of the model was performed with individual sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) microbubbles coated with the soluble surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). SDS-coated microbubbles suddenly placed in an air-saturated medium initially grew with the influx of O(2) and N(2) and then dissolved under Laplace pressure. SF(6)-filled microbubbles coated with the highly insoluble lipid, dibehenoylphosphatidylcholine, were found to exhibit significantly different behavior owing to a dynamic surface tension. The initial growth phase was diminished, possibly owing to a shell "breakup" tension that exceeded the pure gas/liquid surface tension. Three dissolution regimes were observed: (1) an initial rapid dissolution to the initial diameter followed by (2) steady dissolution with monolayer collapse and finally (3) stabilization below 10 microm diameter. Results indicated that the lipid shell becomes increasingly rigid as the microbubble dissolves, which has important implications on microbubble size distribution, stability, and acoustic properties.

  20. Solubility and dissolution studies of tibolone polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Bonfilio

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Different solid forms of an active pharmaceutical ingredient can have distinct chemical and physical characteristics. In this work, we studied the solubility and dissolution properties of the described tibolone polymorphic forms (I and II. Both forms were successively recrystallized and characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy. Equilibrium solubility and dissolution profiles were performed for both forms. Solubility studies demonstrated that form II is statistically more soluble in water, 0.01 mol L-1 HCl and pH 4.5 acetate buffer. The solubility of forms I and II were explained in terms of crystal packing. Dissolution tests of tablets showed a lower release of polymorphic form II than form I from tablets. The results showed an impact of polymorphism on the quality of tibolone tablets and suggest that tibolone forms I and II can show distinct interactions with pharmaceutical excipients used in tablets. Therefore, only form I is acceptable for the preparation of tablet forms. Based on our results, we propose the quality control on tibolone raw materials using X-ray diffraction analysis and attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy.

  1. Results of urinary dissolution therapy for radiolucent calculi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinha Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose In this paper we present our experience with dissolution therapy of radiolucent calculi. Materials and Methods This was a retrospective analysis of patients who were offered urinary dissolution therapy between January 2010 and June 2011. Patients were treated with tablets containing potassium citrate and magnesium oxide. Partial dissolution was defined as at least a 50% reduction in stone size. Patients with complete or partial dissolution were classified in the successful dissolution group. Patients with no change, inadequate reduction, increase in stone size and those unable to tolerate alkali therapy were classified as failures. Patient sex, stenting before alkalinization, stone size, urine pH at presentation and serum uric acid levels were analyzed using Fisher t-test for an association with successful dissolution. Results Out of 67, 48 patients reported for follow up. 10 (15% had complete dissolution and 13 (19% had partial dissolution. Alkalinization was unsuccessful in achieving dissolution in 25 (37%. Stenting before alkalinization, patient weight ( 75kg and serum uric acid levels (≤ 6 vs. > 6 were the only factors to significantly affected dissolution rates (p = 0.039, p 0.035, p 0.01 respectively. CONCLUSIONS A policy of offering dissolution therapy to patients with radiolucent calculi had a successful outcome in 34% of patients.

  2. Coupling between different superficial kinetics: segregation, precipitation and dissolution; Cinetiques couplees au voisinage des surfaces: segregation, precipitation et dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delage, St

    1998-12-31

    In most of alloys, the surface composition is different from bulk one. This phenomenon, called `surface segregation` have drawn up to now much attention in this case of alloys which have reached thermodynamic equilibrium in the solid solution. Using a kinetic model including bulk and surface driving forces, we study segregation phenomenon during dissolution and precipitation kinetics, in the case of the Fe-Cu alloy. Within a mean field approximation, we point out the dissolution modes for Fe/Cu and Cu/Fe deposit. If the substrate surface energy is lower than the deposit one (case of Fe/Cu deposit) the substrate element climbs through the deposit to reach the surface and forms a layer of the substrate element floating on the deposit. In the case of thick deposit (typically 10 monolayers), a competition between two layer by layer dissolution modes leads to a wide range of behaviours, depending on temperature and deposit thickness. Furthermore, the major part of the concentration profiles obtained during kinetics is at local equilibrium in a region near the surface. In the second part of this work, we study the surface influence during phase separation kinetics in thin layers using Monte-Carlo simulations. A surface directed spinodal decomposition occurs, leading to the appearance of a Cu-rich layer at the surface, which goes toward the layer`s core with time. This process is linked with bulk precipitation in layer`s core, and leads to different behaviours depending on average concentration and layer thickness. (authors) 125 refs.

  3. On the Impact of the Fuel Dissolution Rate Upon Near-Field Releases From Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Pereira

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calculations of the impact of the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel on the release from a damaged canister in a KBS-3 repository are presented. The dissolution of the fuel matrix is a complex process and the dissolution rate is known to be one of the most important parameters in performance assessment models of the near-field of a geological repository. A variability study has been made to estimate the uncertainties associated with the process of fuel dissolution. The model considered in this work is a 3D model of a KBS-3 copper canister. The nuclide used in the calculations is Cs-135. Our results confirm that the fuel degradation rate is an important parameter, however there are considerable uncertainties associated with the data and the conceptual models. Consequently, in the interests of safety one should reduce, as far as possible, the uncertainties coupled to fuel degradation.

  4. Solid-state, triboelectrostatic and dissolution characteristics of spray-dried piroxicam-glucosamine solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebisi, Adeola O; Kaialy, Waseem; Hussain, Tariq; Al-Hamidi, Hiba; Nokhodchi, Ali; Conway, Barbara R; Asare-Addo, Kofi

    2016-10-01

    This work explores the use of both spray drying and d-glucosamine HCl (GLU) as a hydrophilic carrier to improve the dissolution rate of piroxicam (PXM) whilst investigating the electrostatic charges associated with the spray drying process. Spray dried PXM:GLU solid dispersions were prepared and characterised (XRPD, DSC, SEM). Dissolution and triboelectric charging were also conducted. The results showed that the spray dried PXM alone, without GLU produced some PXM form II (DSC results) with no enhancement in solubility relative to that of the parent PXM. XRPD results also showed the spray drying process to decrease the crystallinity of GLU and solid dispersions produced. The presence of GLU improved the dissolution rate of PXM. Spray dried PXM: GLU at a ratio of 2:1 had the most improved dissolution. The spray drying process generally yielded PXM-GLU spherical particles of around 2.5μm which may have contributed to the improved dissolution. PXM showed a higher tendency for charging in comparison to the carrier GLU (-3.8 versus 0.5nC/g for untreated material and -7.5 versus 3.1nC/g for spray dried materials). Spray dried PXM and spray dried GLU demonstrated higher charge densities than untreated PXM and untreated GLU, respectively. Regardless of PXM:GLU ratio, all spray dried PXM:GLU solid dispersions showed a negligible charge density (net-CMR: 0.1-0.3nC/g). Spray drying of PXM:GLU solid dispersions can be used to produce formulation powders with practically no charge and thereby improving handling as well as dissolution behaviour of PXM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous UV imaging and raman spectroscopy for the measurement of solvent-mediated phase transformations during dissolution testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Østergaard, Jesper; Wu, Jian X; Naelapää, Kaisa; Boetker, Johan P; Jensen, Henrik; Rantanen, Jukka

    2014-04-01

    The current work reports the simultaneous use of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy for detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior including solid-state phase transformations during dissolution. The dissolution of drug substances from compacts of sodium naproxen in 0.1 HCl as well as theophylline anhydrate and monohydrate in water was studied utilizing a flow-through setup. The decreases in dissolution rates with time observed by UV imaging were associated with concomitant solid form changes detected by Raman spectroscopy. Sodium naproxen and theophylline anhydrate were observed to convert to the more stable forms (naproxen, and theophylline monohydrate) within approximately 5 min. Interestingly, the new approach revealed that three intermediate forms are involved in the dissolution process prior to the appearance of the neutral naproxen during dissolution in an acidic medium. The combination of UV imaging and Raman spectroscopy offers a detailed characterization of drug dissolution behavior in a time-effective and sample-sparing manner. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  6. An electrochemical investigation on the dissolution of bilayered porous anodic alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Jinfu; Ling, Zhiyuan; Li, Yi; Hu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Pulse polarization was introduced to investigate the dissolution of PAA. • Electric field within the bilayers was estimated. • The formation of the barrier layer involves mainly solid-state processes. • The structure should be the determining factor in the dissolution of the bilayers. - Abstract: Anodic alumina attracts much research interest in many disciplines for its versatility. Meanwhile, some aspects regarding its growth are still not well-understood, such as the formation and properties of its bilayer structure. In this paper, along with capacitance measurement, pulse polarization is introduced to study the dissolution of bilayered porous anodic alumina (PAA). Combined with electron microscope observation, the electric field in the outer layer is estimated to be slightly higher than that in the inner layer. By comparing with (oxy-)hydroxide layers, the electric field distribution within barrier layer of PAA confirms that the bilayers are compact and are formed mainly by solid-state ionic migration. The changes of dissolution rates after annealing and application of electric pulses suggest that structure may be a determining factor for the dissolution behaviors of the bilayers.

  7. Evaluation of in vivo dissolution behavior and GI transit of griseofulvin, a BCS class II drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yoshitsugu; Metsugi, Yukiko; Ogawara, Ken-Ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2008-03-20

    Mean plasma concentration-time profile of griseofulvin, a BCS class II drug, orally administered as powders into rats, was predicted based on GITA model. However, it was very difficult to predict the individual plasma profile because of large inter-individual difference. As the absorption of griseofulvin would be rate-limited by the dissolution process, we tried to analyze the in vivo dissolution kinetics of griseofulvin by focusing on gastric emptying and intestinal transit as physiological factors influencing the in vivo dissolution kinetics. After oral administration of griseofulvin, theophylline and sulfasalazine into rats, gastric emptying and intestinal transit were simultaneously estimated by analyzing the absorption kinetics of theophylline and observing the appearance of sulfapyridine in plasma, respectively. Gastric emptying kinetics was not significantly correlated with absorption or dissolution behavior of griseofulvin. On the other hand, the cecum-arriving time reflecting the intestinal transit was significantly correlated with both AUC and total dissolved amount of griseofulvin. T(max) of griseofulvin also increased with the increase of cecum-arriving time. These results clearly indicate that the longer residence time could lead to the higher dissolution and absorption of griseofulvin and that the variance of intestinal transit could be responsible for the inter-individual difference of the in vivo absorption behavior.

  8. Effect of magnesium stearate concentration on dissolution properties of ranitidine hydrochloride coated tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunović, Alija; Vranić, Edina

    2007-08-01

    Most pharmaceutical formulations also include a certain amount of lubricant to improve their flowability and prevent their adhesion to the surfaces of processing equipment. Magnesium stearate is an additive that is most frequently used as a lubricant. Magnesium stearate is capable of forming films on other tablet excipients during prolonged mixing, leading to a prolonged drug liberation time, a decrease in hardness, and an increase in disintegration time. It is hydrophobic, and there are many reports in the literature concerning its adverse effect on dissolution rates. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different concentrations of magnesium stearate on dissolution properties of ranitidine hydrochloride coated tablet formulations labeled to contain 150 mg. The uniformity content was also checked. During the drug formulation development, several samples were designed for choice of the formulation. For this study, two formulations containing 0,77 and 1,1% of magnesium stearate added in the manufacture of cores were chosen. Fraction of ranitidine hydrochloride released in dissolution medium was calculated from calibration curves. The data were analyzed using pharmacopeial test for similarity of dissolution profiles ( f2 equation), previously proposed by Moore and Flanner. Application of f2 equation showed differences in time-course of ranitidine hydrochloride dissolution properties. The obtained values indicate differences in drug release from analyzed ranitidine hydrochloride formulations and could cause differences in therapeutic response.

  9. Effect of Magnesium Stearate Concentration on Dissolution Properties of Ranitidine Hydrochloride Coated Tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alija Uzunović

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Most pharmaceutical formulations also include a certain amount of lubricant to improve their flowability and prevent their adhesion to the surfaces of processing equipment. Magnesium stearate is an additive that is most frequently used as a lubricant. Magnesium stearate is capable of forming films on other tablet excipients during prolonged mixing, leading to a prolonged drug liberation time, a decrease in hardness, and an increase in disintegration time. It is hydrophobic, and there are many reports in the literature concerning its adverse effect on dissolution rates.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of two different concentrations of magnesium stearate on dissolution properties of ranitidine hydrochloride coated tablet formulations labeled to contain 150 mg. The uniformity content was also checked.During the drug formulation development, several samples were designed for choice of the formulation. For this study, two formulations containing 0,77 and 1,1% of magnesium stearate added in the manufacture of cores were chosen. Fraction of ranitidine hydrochloride released in dissolution medium was calculated from calibration curves. The data were analyzed using pharmaco-peial test for similarity of dissolution profiles (f2 equation, previously proposed by Moore and Flanner.Application of f2 equation showed differences in time-course of ranitidine hydrochloride dissolution properties. The obtained values indicate differences in drug release from analyzed ranitidine hydrochloride formulations and could cause differences in therapeutic response.

  10. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization of Non-Self-Glassing Agents: Spectroscopy and Relaxation of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]Acetate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flori, Alessandra; Liserani, Matteo; Bowen, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic physicochemical properties of the sample formulation are the key factors for efficient hyperpolarization through dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution-DNP). We provide a comprehensive characterization of the DNP process for Na-[1-13C]acetate selected as a model for non...

  11. High temperature dissolution of ferrites, chromites and bonaccordite in chelating media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Subramanian, H.; Anupkumar, B.; Rufus, A.L.; Velmurugan, S.; Narasimhan, S.V., E-mail: snv@igcar.gov.in [BARC Facilities, Water and Steam Chemistry Div., Tamilnadu (India)

    2010-07-01

    Different methods have been employed world wide for the decontamination of reactor coolant system surfaces. The success of a decontamination process mainly depends on the oxide dissolution efficiency of the decontamination formulation. Among the oxides, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} undergoes easy dissolution in organic acid media at normal temperatures. However, dissolution of chromites and mixed ferrites is not that easy in organic chelant media at normal temperatures even in the presence of redox reagents. Hence, a high temperature process was attempted for the dissolution of ferrites and chromites. A re-circulation system consisting of an autoclave, pump, heat exchanger etc. all lined with teflon was used for carrying out high temperature dissolution experiments. This study describes the high temperature dissolution kinetics of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), a well known solvent for metal oxides, was applied at temperatures ranging from 80 to 180{sup o}C. About six fold increase in dissolution rate was observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in this temperature range. Effect of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} on oxide dissolution was studied. Lower dissolution rates were observed for Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the presence of hydrazine. Oxide dissolution efficiency of other chelating agents like EDTA, PDCA etc. and the effect of reducing agents like oxalic acid and ascorbic acid on high temperature dissolution also has been studied. The effect of incorporation of boron and zinc in the iron and chromium oxides has also been studied. Bonaccordite (Ni{sub 2}FeBO{sub 5}) has been observed in the fuel deposits of pressurized Water Reactors especially in the AOA affected plants. Zinc ferrite/chromite are formed in reactors adopting zinc injection passivation technique to control radiation field. Bonaccordite and zinc ferrite/chromite formed over the reactor coolant system structural materials are also difficult to dissolve

  12. Modeling of a dissolution system for transuranic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Z.; Dease, C.

    1991-02-01

    A system is currently being developed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to treat transuranic wastes by means of a mediated electrochemical oxidation process. The process involves generating Ag( ++ ) from a solution of silver nitrate and nitric acid in an electrochemical cell. Ag( ++ ) is highly reactive and is capable of attacking many organic and inorganic substances. In particular, if a mixture of particles containing transuranic and other scrap metal oxides is allowed to react with Ag( ++ ) in a nitric acid solution, the transuranic oxides will dissolve and can be removed with the solution leaving the other insoluble oxides behind. The dissolution of the transuranic oxides by reactions with Ag( ++ ) occurs due to further oxidation to higher valence states and the formation of soluble ions such as MO 2 + and MO 2 ++ . 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Preparation, characterization, and dissolution studies of naproxen solid dispersions using polyethylene glycol 6000 and labrafil M2130

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Naproxen is a poor water soluble, non-steroidal analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug. The enhancement of oral bioavailability of poor water soluble drugs remains one of the most challenging aspects of drug development. Although salt formation, solubilization and particle size reduction have commonly been used to increase dissolution rate and thereby oral absorption and bioavailability of low water soluble drugs, there are practical limitation of these techniques. However, the most attractive option for increasing the release rate is improvement of solubility through formulation approaches. In this study, solid dispersions (SD of naproxen were prepared by hot melt method using various ratios of drug to polymers (PEG6000 separately and characterized for physical appearance, FTIR, DSC, X-Ray crystallography, and in-vitro dissolution studies. The influence of several amounts of Labrafil M2130 was also studied. FTIR study revealed that drug was stable in SDs, and great state of amorphous formed particles was proofed by DSC analysis. The in vitro dissolution studies were carried using USP type II (paddle dissolution apparatus at medium (pH 1.5. Solubility of naproxen from SDs was increased in dissolution media. The prepared dispersion showed increase in the dissolution rate of naproxen comparing to that of physical mixtures of drug and polymers and pure drug. Percent of drug released in 60 minutes was 23.92% for pure naproxen witch is increased in SDs and reached to100% for best formulations of PEG6000 and labrafil based SDs respectively, considering ratio of drug to polymers.It is concluded that dissolution of the naproxen could be improved by the solid dispersion. Although physical mixtures have increased the rate of dissolution, dissolution shows faster release from SDs which would therefore be due to formation of amorphous particles through the hot melt process which was also revealed by DSC analysis and XRD.

  14. Use of carbonate rocks for flue gas desulfurization: Reactive dissolution of limestone particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasio, Cataldo De; Mäkilä, Ermei; Westerlund, Tapio

    2012-01-01

    Sedimentary rocks, such as limestone, are widely utilized in flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes because of their ability to form sulfur compounds. The most common system adopted for FGD is the wet scrubbing process, in which the dissolution rate of sedimentary rocks represents one of the most important factors. Evaluation of the dissolution and the reactivity of solid particles involved is therefore a key factor for FGD process design and plant operation. The rate of dissolution affects the cost of makeup and waste disposal. For this reason a method to test different qualities of raw materials can give us a better understanding of the desulfurization process and reasonable economical effects. In the present work the dissolution of carbonate rocks was investigated by utilizing hydrochloric acid and the mass transport phenomena involved in batch stirred tank reactors (BSTRs) were modeled. By evaluating the ratio of convective to diffusive mass transport and the ratio of momentum and mass diffusivity, it was possible to relate the quality of raw materials in terms of a defined Time Of Exposure (TOE). The model involved takes into account the variation of the particle size distribution derived from the allocation of the scattered light energy using the Fraunhofer diffraction theory. Improvements from previous studies were done .

  15. Mercury-free dissolution of aluminum-clad fuel in nitric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Jerry D.; Anderson, Philip A.

    1994-01-01

    A mercury-free dissolution process for aluminum involves placing the aluminum in a dissolver vessel in contact with nitric acid-fluoboric acid mixture at an elevated temperature. By maintaining a continuous flow of the acid mixture through the dissolver vessel, an effluent containing aluminum nitrate, nitric acid, fluoboric acid and other dissolved components are removed.

  16. Preservation and Dissolution of the Target Firm's Embedded Ties in Acquisitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spedale-Latimer (Simona); F.A.J. van den Bosch (Frans); H.W. Volberda (Henk)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractOur study builds on extant theory on embeddness to concentrate on the process of preservation and dissolution of the target firm’s embedded ties in acquisitions. We identify four critical areas - communication, idiosyncratic investments, inter-personal relations and, personnel turnover –

  17. Dissolution rate enhancement of piroxicam by ordered mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saharan, Vikas Anand; Choudhury, Pratim Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Micronized piroxicam was mixed with lactose, mannitol, sorbitol, maltitol and sodium chloride to produce ordered mixture in a glass vial by manual hand shaking method. The effect of excipients, surfactant, superdisintegrant, drug concentration and carrier particle size on dissolution rate was investigated. Dissolution rate studies of the prepared ordered mixtures revealed that all water soluble excipients increased the dissolution rate of piroxicam when compared to the dissolution rate of piroxicam or its suspension. Ordered mixture formulation PLF4, consisting of lactose as water soluble excipient, SSG (8% w/s) and SLS (1% w/w), released piroxcam at a very fast rate so much so that about 90% of the composition had passed into solution within 2 min. The order of the dissolution rate enhancement for ordered mixtures of various water soluble excipients was: lactose > mannitol > maltitol > sorbitol > sodium chloride. Carrier granules of size 355-710 µm were most effective in increasing the dissolution rate of drug from ordered mixtures. Decreasing the carrier particle size reduced drug dissolution from ordered mixtures. The dissolution rate of ordered mixtures consisting of 1-5% w/w piroxicam was superior to dissolution rate of piroxicam suspension. The dissolution data fitting and the resulting regression parameters indicated Hixson Crowell, cube root law, as the best fit to drug release data of ordered mixtures.

  18. Experimental observations of deformation caused by mineral dissolution in variable-aperture fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detwiler, Russell L.

    2008-08-01

    Problems such as CO2 sequestration, petroleum production and nuclear waste isolation involve the potential for rock-water reactions. Mineral alteration resulting from reactive fluid flow can lead to significant changes to fracture transport properties. At depth, these processes are further influenced by stresses in the host rock. To quantitatively explore these coupled processes, we built a new experimental apparatus designed to directly measure changes in fracture aperture in analog fractures subjected to the combined influence of a reactive fluid and an applied normal stress. Light transmission techniques provided direct measurements of the changing fracture aperture at high spatial resolution during two experiments in identical fractures with an initial mean fracture aperture of 95 μm. The two experiments were carried out at values of the dimensionless Damkohler number (Da = reaction rate/advection rate) that differed by a factor of 2. The high-Da experiment resulted in the formation of a large-scale dissolution channel in the middle of the fracture and regions with little dissolution and slow closure of the fracture surfaces. By contrast, the low-Da experiment exhibited relatively uniform dissolution across the width of the fracture, with locally enhanced dissolution in small aperture regions. This resulted in increased stresses in contacting asperities and eventual damage of the asperities accompanied by large (up to 50 μm), instantaneous displacements of the surfaces and corresponding reductions in fracture aperture. The results demonstrate the importance of the spatial variability of dissolution rates, which are controlled by both local reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics, in fractures deforming because of combined dissolution and mechanical stress.

  19. Study of the dissolution of (U,P)O2 mixed oxides with a high plutonium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, S.

    2001-01-01

    Plutonium from nuclear reactors is partially integrated in the fuel cycle as Mixed OXide (U,Pu)O 2 (MOX). Their dissolution in nitric acid is needed to reprocess them in present reprocessing plants. The main difficulty of this study is that dissolution is a phenomenon depending on solution characteristics as well as the structural properties of the pellets, which depend themselves on the material fabrication process. After showing kinetic and thermodynamic dissolution data of mixed oxides in nitric media, an inventory of the parameters which affect the dissolution process has been made. A separable variable concept was introduced in order to describe the process by studying separately the role of chemical parameters of the solution and geometric parameters of the material. The first part of the study estimates the effect of nitric solution chemical parameters (concentrations, acidity, temperature) on the dissolution and underlines the role of the oxide surface protonation step. The second part of this work deals with the study of surface area evolution for materials with controlled plutonium rich heterogeneities. Experimental results show that the pellet surface undergoes erosion and is progressively weakened by the formation of fault lines in the bulk of the material followed by the dispersion of sub-millimeter fragments in the solution. An heterogeneous kinetic model derived from study of solid-gas interface systems has been applied to fuel pellets dissolution, allowing a mechanism to be proposed, based on surface dissolution of the oxide as well as fault creation in the volume. The dissolution kinetics are therefore dependant on the microstructure and mechanical strength and cohesion of the pellets. (author)

  20. Uranothorite solid solutions: From synthesis to dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costin, Dan-Tiberiu

    2012-01-01

    USiO 4 coffinite appears as one of the potential phases formed in the back-end of the alteration of spent fuel, in reducing storage conditions. A study aiming to assess the thermodynamic data associated with coffinite through an approach based on the preparation of Th 1-x U x SiO 4 uranothorite solid solutions was then developed during this work. First, the preparation of uranothorite samples was successfully undertaken in hydrothermal conditions. However, the poly-phased samples systematically formed for x ≥ 0,2 underlined the kinetic hindering linked with the preparation of uranium-enriched samples, including coffinite end-member. Nevertheless, the characterization of the various samples led to confirm the formation of an ideal solid solution and allowed the constitution of a spectroscopic database. The purification of the samples was then performed by the means of different protocols based on physical (dispersion-centrifugation) or chemical (selective dissolution of secondary phases) methods. This latter led to a complete of the impurities (Th 1-y U y O 2 mixed oxide and amorphous silica) through successive washing steps in acid then basic media. Finally, dissolution experiments were undertaken on uranothorite samples (0 ≤ xexp. ≤ 0,5) and allowed pointing out the influence of composition, pH and temperature on the normalized dissolution rate of the compounds. Also, the associated thermodynamic data, such as activation energy, indicate that the reaction is controlled by surface reactions. Once the equilibrium is reached, the analogous solubility constants were determined for each composition studied, then allowing the extrapolation to coffinite value. It was then finally possible to conclude on the inversion of coffinitisation reaction with temperature. (author) [fr

  1. Dissolution of LMFBR fuel-sodium aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, M.D.; Moss, O.R.

    1979-01-01

    Plutonium dioxide, normally insoluble in biological fluids, becomes much more soluble when mixed with sodium as the aerosol is formed. Sodium-fuel aerosols are approximately 20 times less soluble in simulated lung fluid than in distilled water. Solubility of sodium-fuel aerosols increases when Na 2 CO 3 are added to the distilled-water dissolution fluid. Mixed-oxide fuel aerosols without sodium present are relatively insoluble in distilled water, simulated lung fluid, and distilled water with Na 2 CO 3 and NaHCO 3 added

  2. Dissolution behavior of lithium compounds in ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Furukawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to exchange the components which received irradiation damage during the operation at the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility, the adhered lithium, which is partially converted to lithium compounds such as lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide, should be removed from the components. In this study, the dissolution experiments of lithium compounds (lithium nitride, lithium hydroxide, and lithium oxide were performed in a candidate solvent, allowing the clarification of time and temperature dependence. Based on the results, a cleaning procedure for adhered lithium on the inner surface of the components was proposed.

  3. Surface controlled dissolution rates of gypsum in aqueous solutions exhibit nonlinear dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Alexander A.; Vosbeck, Katrin; Dreybrodt, Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    The effective dissolution rates of gypsum are determined by mixed kinetics, where the rate constants of dissolution at the surface and the transport constant of molecular diffusion of dissolved material are similar. To obtain the surface reaction rate law it is necessary to know the transport constant. We have determined the surface rate law for monocrystalline selenite by using a rotating disc set-up, where the transport coefficients are well known. As a result, up to a calcium concentration of 0.6 · ceq, we find a nearly linear rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, where cs is the total calcium concentration at the surface and ceq the equilibrium concentration with respect to gypsum, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2, and ksl = 1.1 · 10 -4 mmol cm -2 s -1 ± 15%. We also employed batch-experiments for selenite, alabaster and gypsum rock samples. The result of these experiments were interpreted by using a transport constant determined by NaCl dissolution experiments under similar physical conditions. The batch experiments reveal a dissolution rate law Rs = ksl (1- cs/ ceq) n1, ksl = 1.3 · 10 -4 mmol · cm -2 s -1, n1 = 1.2 ± 0.2 for c ≤ 0.94 · ceq. Close to equilibrium a nonlinear rate law, Rs = ks2 (1- cs/ ceq) n2, is observed, where ks2 is in the order of 10 mmol · cm -2 s -1 and n2 ≈ 4.5. The experimentally observed gypsum dissolution rates from the batch experiments could be accurately fitted, with only minor variations of the surface reaction constant obtained from the rotating disk experiment and the transport coefficient from the NaCl dissolution batch experiment. Batch experiments on pure synthetic gypsum, reveal a linear rate law up to equilibrium. This indicates inhibition of dissolution in natural samples close to equilibrium, as is known also for calcite minerals.

  4. Scoping studies to reduce ICPP high-level radioactive waste volumes for final disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knecht, D.A.; Berreth, J.R.; Chipman, N.A.; Cole, H.S.; Geczi, L.S.; Kerr, W.B.; Staples, B.A.

    1985-08-01

    This report presents the results of scoping studies carried out to determine the feasibility of the following candidate options to reduce high-level waste volume: (1) low-fluoride, low-volume glass, (2) glass-ceramic and ceramic, (3) Modified Zirflex, (4) inerts removal by neutralization, and (5) modified Fluorinel processes. The results of the scoping studies show that the glass-ceramic/ceramic waste forms and neutralization process with potential HLW volume reductions ranging from 60 to 80% appear feasible, based on laboratory-scale tests. The presently used Fluorinel process modified by reducing HF usage also appears to be feasible and could result in up to a 10% potential volume reduction. If the current process start-up tests verify the practicality, reduced HF usage will be implemented. The low-volume glass and Modified Zirflex processes may also be feasible, based on laboratory tests, but would require significantly more process development and/or modifications and could result in only a 20 to 30% potential volume reduction. Based on these scoping studies, it is recommended that (1) the glass-ceramic/ceramic and neutralization processes be developed further, (2) reduced HF use for the Modified Fluorinel process be implemented as soon as practical and other options reducing chemical usage for criticality control be evaluated, (3) basic development for the glass process be continued as a back-up technology, and (4) laboratory-scale radioactive fuel dissolution testing for the Modified Zirflex process be completed with further process development discontinued unless needed in the future

  5. A Study on the Anodic Dissolution of Aluminum(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, C. W.; Park, C. S.; Park, C. S.

    1978-01-01

    In many cases oxide films formed on metals in atmosphere or aqueous solution are chemically inactive, especially it is the case with aluminum. In this study, anodic dissolution of aluminum was done using various electrolyte and cathode, mechanism of which was examined. As a consequence, oxide film on aluminum surface was dissolved together with the dissolution reaction of metal by the anodic current. It was shown that the dissolution reaction due to the contact between electrolyte and metal happened in the same time

  6. Dissolution Model Development: Formulation Effects and Filter Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Ragna; Holm, Rene; Jacobsen, Jette

    2016-01-01

    This study describes various complications related to sample preparation (filtration) during development of a dissolution method intended to discriminate among different fenofibrate immediate-release formulations. Several dissolution apparatus and sample preparation techniques were tested. The fl....... With the tested drug–formulation combination, the best in vivo–in vitro correlation was found after filtration of the dissolution samples through 0.45-μm hydrophobic PTFE membrane filters....

  7. Buffering children from marital conflict and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, L F; Gottman, J M

    1997-06-01

    Examined several protective mechanisms that may reduce deleterious correlates of marital conflict and marital dissolution in young children. One set of potential buffers focused on parent-child interaction: parental warmth, parental scaffolding/praise, and inhibition of parental rejection. As a second set of potential buffers, each parent was interviewed about their "meta-emotion philosophy"--that is, their feelings about their own emotions, and their attitudes and responses to their children's anger and sadness. The third set of potential buffers concerned intraindividual characteristics of the child, including the child's intelligence and regulatory physiology (basal vagal tone and vagal suppression). Fifty-six families with a preschool child were studied at two time points: when the children were 5 years old (Time 1) and again when the children were 8 years old (Time 2). At Time 1, naturalistic observations of marital and parent-child interaction were conducted and assessment of child regulatory physiology was obtained through measures of basal vagal tone and suppression of vagal tone. Parents were also interviewed individually about their feelings about their own and their children's emotions, and children's intelligence was assessed. At Time 2, assessment of child outcomes were obtained, including observations of peer interaction, mother ratings of behavior problems and mother and teacher ratings of peer aggression, mother ratings of child physical illness, and measures of achievement. Results indicated that all Time 1 buffering factors protected children in face of marital conflict and dissolution.

  8. Biogenic silica dissolution in diatom aggregates: insights from reactive transport modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Moriceau, B

    2014-12-15

    © Inter-Research 2014. Diatom aggregates contribute significantly to the vertical sinking flux of particulate matter in the ocean. These fragile structures form a specific microhabitat for the aggregated cells, but their internal chemical and physical characteristics remain largely unknown. Studies on the impact of aggregation on the Si cycle led to apparent inconsistency. Despite a lower biogenic silica (bSiO2) dissolution rate and diffusion of the silicic acid (dSi) being similar in aggregates and in sea-water, dSi surprisingly accumulates in aggregates. A reaction-diffusion model helps to clarify this incoherence by reconstructing dSi accumulation measured during batch experiments with aggregated and non-aggregated Skeletonema marinoi and Chaetoceros decipiens. The model calculates the effective bSiO2 dissolution rate as opposed to the experimental apparent bSiO2 dissolution rate, which is the results of the effective dissolution of bSiO2 and transport of dSi out of the aggregate. In the model, dSi transport out of the aggregate is modulated by alternatively considering retention (decrease of the dSi diffusion constant) and adsorption (reversible chemical bonds between dSi and the aggregate matrix) processes. Modelled bSiO2 dissolution is modulated by the impact of dSi concentration inside aggregates and diatom viability, as enhanced persistence of metabolically active diatoms has been observed in aggregates. Adsorption better explains dSi accumulation within and outside aggregates, raising the possible importance of dSi travelling within aggregates to the deep sea (potentially representing 20% of the total silica flux). The model indicates that bSiO2 dissolution is effectively decreased in aggregates mainly due to higher diatom viability but also to other parameters discussed herein.

  9. Effect of alteration phase formation on the glass dissolution rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Technology Div. (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The dissolution rates of many glasses have been observed to increase upon the formation of certain alteration phases. While simulations have predicted the accelerating effect of formation of certain phases, the phases predicted to form in computer simulations are usually different than those observed to form in experiments. This is because kinetically favored phases form first in experiments, while simulations predict the thermodynamically favored phases. Static dissolution tests with crushed glass have been used to measure the glass dissolution rate after alteration phases form. Because glass dissolution rates are calculated on a per area basis, an important effect in tests conducted with crushed glass is the decrease in the surface area of glass that is available for reaction as the glass dissolves. This loss of surface area must be taken into account when calculating the dissolution rate. The phases that form and their effect on the dissolution rate are probably related to the glass composition. The impact of phase formation on the glass dissolution rate also varies according to the solubility products of the alteration phases and how the orthocilicic acid activity is affected. Insight into the relationship between the glass dissolution rate, solution chemistry and alteration phase formation is provided by the results of accelerated dissolution tests.

  10. Dissolution behavior of PFBR MOX fuel in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelkar, Anoop; Kapoor, Y.S.; Singh, Mamta; Meena, D.L.; Pandey, Ashish; Bhatt, R.B.; Behere, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Present paper describes the dissolution characteristics of PFBR MOX fuel (U,Pu)O 2 in nitric acid. An overview of batch dissolution experiments, studying the percentage dissolution of uranium and plutonium in (U, Pu)O 2 MOX sintered pellets with different percentage of PuO 2 with reference to time and nitric acid concentration are described. 90% of uranium and plutonium of PFBR MOX gets dissolves in 2 hrs and amount of residue increases with the decrease in nitric acid concentration. Overall variation in percentage residue in PFBR MOX fuel after dissolution test also described. (author)

  11. Mathematical methods for quantification and comparison of dissolution testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranić, Edina; Mehmedagić, Aida; Hadzović, Sabira

    2002-12-01

    In recent years, drug release/dissolution from solid dosage forms has been the subject of intense and profitable scientific developments. Whenever a new solid dosage form is developed or produced, it is necessary to ensure that drug dissolution occurs in an appropriate manner. The pharmaceutical industry and the registration authorities do focus, nowadays, on drug dissolution studies. The quantitative analysis of the values obtained in dissolution/release tests is easier when mathematical formulas that express the dissolution results as a function of some of the dosage forms characteristics are used. This work discusses the analysis of data obtained for dissolution profiles under different media pH conditions using mathematical methods of analysis described by Moore and Flanner. These authors have described difference factor (f1) and similarity factor (f2), which can be used to characterise drug dissolution/release profiles. In this work we have used these formulas for evaluation of dissolution profiles of the conventional tablets in different pH of dissolution medium (range of physiological variations).

  12. Enhanced dissolution of nanosize CuO in the presence of meso- and micro-pores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-H.; Wang, H. Paul; Huang, H.-L.; Hsiung, T.-L.; Tang, F.-C.

    2007-01-01

    Dissolution of nanosize CuO in the chemical mechanical planarization (CMP) waste water in the presence of micropores (0.74 nm) of Y and mesopores (4 nm) of MCM-41 has been studied by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in the present work. Since pore openings of Y and MCM-41 are much less than the size of nano-CuO (about 13 nm) in the CMP waste water, CuO is not able to be incorporated directly into the pore systems. At least two reaction paths might be involved in the incorporation process: (1) dissolution of CuO and (2) incorporation of Cu 2+ into Y and MCM-41. Experimentally, during the incorporation process, Y might possess equivalent electric fields of 20-50 V/cm for dissolution of nanosize CuO. Interestingly we found that dissolution of nanosize CuO in the CMP waste water was enhanced, for instance, about 65% and 87% of nanosize CuO were incorporated (as Cu 2+ ) and incorporated into Y and MCM-41, respectively

  13. Improving the API dissolution rate during pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion I: Effect of the API particle size, and the co-rotating, twin-screw extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Gogos, Costas G; Ioannidis, Nicolas

    2015-01-15

    The dissolution rate of the active pharmaceutical ingredients in pharmaceutical hot-melt extrusion is the most critical elementary step during the extrusion of amorphous solid solutions - total dissolution has to be achieved within the short residence time in the extruder. Dissolution and dissolution rates are affected by process, material and equipment variables. In this work, we examine the effect of one of the material variables and one of the equipment variables, namely, the API particle size and extruder screw configuration on the API dissolution rate, in a co-rotating, twin-screw extruder. By rapidly removing the extruder screws from the barrel after achieving a steady state, we collected samples along the length of the extruder screws that were characterized by polarized optical microscopy (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to determine the amount of undissolved API. Analyses of samples indicate that reduction of particle size of the API and appropriate selection of screw design can markedly improve the dissolution rate of the API during extrusion. In addition, angle of repose measurements and light microscopy images show that the reduction of particle size of the API can improve the flowability of the physical mixture feed and the adhesiveness between its components, respectively, through dry coating of the polymer particles by the API particles. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. In situ Microscopic Observation of Sodium Deposition/Dissolution on Sodium Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Yuhki Yui; Masahiko Hayashi; Jiro Nakamura

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical sodium deposition/dissolution behaviors in propylene carbonate-based electrolyte solution were observed by means of in situ light microscopy. First, granular sodium was deposited at pits in a sodium electrode in the cathodic process. Then, the sodium particles grew linearly from the electrode surface, becoming needle-like in shape. In the subsequent anodic process, the sodium dissolved near the base of the needles on the sodium electrode and the so-called ?dead sodium? broke a...

  15. Kinetics and thermodynamics of the dissolution of Th1-xMxO2 solid solutions (M = U, Pu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, S.; Heisbourg, G.; Dacheux, N.; Moisy, Ph.; Purans, J.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetics of the dissolution of Th 1-x M x O 2 (M = U, Pu) solid solutions was investigated as a function of several chemical parameters such as pH, substitution ratio, temperature, ionic strength, and electrolyte. Several compositions of Th 1-x U x O 2 and Th 1-x Pu x O 2 were synthesized and characterized before and after leaching by using several methods such as XRD, EXAFS, BET, PIXE, SEM, and XPS. Leaching tests were performed in nitric, hydrochloric or sulfuric media and groundwater. The normalized dissolution rates were evaluated for Th 1-x U x O 2 , and Th 0.88 Pu 0.12 O 2 leading to the determination of the partial order related to the proton concentration, n, and to the corresponding normalized dissolution rate constant at pH = 0, k'T. While for Th enriched solids, the solid solutions Th 1-x U x O 2 have the same dissolution behaviour than ThO 2 with a partial order n ∼ 0.3, in the case of uranium enriched solids, Th 1-x U x O 2 has the same dissolution behaviour than UO 2 with a partial order of n = 1, indicating that uranium oxidation rate becomes the limiting step of the dissolution process. The stoichiometry of the release of both actinides (U or Pu, Th) was verified until the precipitation of thorium occurred in the leachate for pH > 2, while uranium was released in the solution as an uranyl form. For uranium enriched solid solutions, thermodynamic equilibrium was reached after 100 days, and solubility constant of secondary phase was determined. In the case of Th 1-x Pu x O 2 , the dissolution behaviour is similar to that of ThO 2 , but only kinetic aspect of the dissolution can be studied. From the analysis of XPS and EXAFS data on leached and un-leached Th 1-x U x O 2 samples, the dissolution mechanism of solid solutions was explained and will be discussed. The role of the electrolytes on the dissolution of the solid solutions is discussed. Kinetics parameters of dissolution are also given in groundwater and in neutral media

  16. CaCO3 dissolution by holothurians (sea cucumber): a case study from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, K.; Silverman, J.; Kravitz, B.; Woolsey, E.; Eriksson, H.; Schneider-Mor, A.; Barbosa, S.; Rivlin, T.; Byrne, M.; Caldeira, K.

    2012-12-01

    Holothurians (sea cucumbers) are among the largest and most important deposit feeder in coral reefs. They play a role in nutrient and CaCO3 cycling within the reef structure. As a result of their digestive process they secrete alkalinity due to CaCO3 dissolution and organic matter degradation forming CO2 and ammonium. In a survey at station DK13 on One Three Reef we found that the population density of holothurians was > 1 individual m-2. The dominant sea cucumber species Holothuria leucospilota was collected from DK13. The increase in alkalinity due to CaCO3 dissolution in aquaria incubations was measured to be 47±7 μmol kg-1 in average per individual. Combining this dissolution rate with the sea cucumbers concentrations at DK13 suggest that they may account for a dissolution rate of 34.9±17.8 mmol m-2 day-1, which is equivalent to about half of night time community dissolution measured in DK13. This indicates that in reefs where the sea cucumber population is healthy and protected from fishing they can be locally important in the CaCO3 cycle. Preliminary result suggests that the CaCO3 dissolution rates are not affected by the chemistry of the sea water they are incubated in. Measurements of the empty digestive track volume of two sea cucumbers H. atra and Stichopus herrmanni were 36 ± 4 ml and 151 ± 14 ml, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni are 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. Our result that the primary parameter determining the CaCO3 dissolution by sea cucumber is the amount of carbonate send in their gut

  17. Dissolution kinetics of pyrite ore by hydrochloric acid | Baba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of HCl concentration, tem-perature and particle size on the dissolution rate indicated that about 76.4 % of the ore of < 0.1 mm particle size was dissolved at 80 ¢ªC and stirring rate of 360 rpm. The dissolution rate was also dependence on hydrogen ion concentration of the reaction system. Activation energy of ...

  18. 20 CFR 404.1219 - Dissolution of political subdivision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dissolution of political subdivision. 404.1219 Section 404.1219 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND... Agreements Is Obtained and Continues § 404.1219 Dissolution of political subdivision. If a political...

  19. Dissolution rate enhancement of repaglinide by solid dispersion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    formation, cyclodextrin complexation, salt formation, use of surface active agents, co-solvency are some of the approaches to improve the dissolution rate of the drugs [3]. Solid dispersion (SD) is one of the most widely used techniques to improve solubility as well as dissolution rate of poorly water soluble drugs. This method ...

  20. Development and validation of dissolution test for Metoprolol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-03-02

    Mar 2, 2007 ... Dissolution test for sustained release capsules of Metoprolol 125 mg was developed and validated according to FDA and ICH guidelines. Metoprolol coated pellets were coated with microcrystalline wax and glyceryl distearate for slow release of drug. The dissolution method which uses USP apparatus I.

  1. Dissolution enhancement of drugs. part i: technologies and effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and steam aided granulation. In these techniques carrier plays an important role in improving solubility and dissolution rate. Polymers, superdisintegrants, surfactants are extensively studied in recent years for dissolution enhancement in drugs. This part of this review discusses technological overview and effect of polymers,

  2. The effect of sentencing types on singlehood and relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Andersen, Lars Højsgaard

    Prior research shows that imprisonment may matter for the risk of experiencing divorce or other types of relationship dissolution, as imprisonment implies separation and the social stigma of criminal conviction. Despite these straightforward theoretical mechanisms, we currently lack empirical kno...... monitoring significantly and persistently lower the risk of both singlehood and relationship dissolution following conviction....

  3. Influence of dissolution media pH and USP1 basket speed on erosion and disintegration characteristics of immediate release metformin hydrochloride tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Divyakant; Wong, Benjamin; Huang, Yande; Tang, Dan; Hemenway, Jeffrey; Paruchuri, Srinivasa; Guo, Hang; Hsieh, Daniel; Timmins, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the pH of the dissolution medium on immediate release 850 mg metformin hydrochloride tablets. A traditional wet granulation method was used to manufacture metformin hydrochloride tablets with or without a disintegrant. Tablet dissolution was conducted using the USP apparatus I at 100 rpm. In spite of its pH-independent high solubility, metformin hydrochloride tablets dissolved significantly slower in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) and 50 mM pH 4.5 acetate buffer compared with 50 mM pH 6.8 phosphate buffer, the dissolution medium in the USP. Metformin hydrochloride API compressed into a round 1200 mg disk showed a similar trend. When basket rotation speed was increased from 100 to 250 rpm, the dissolution of metformin hydrochloride tablets was similar in all three media. Incorporation of 2% w/w crospovidone in the tablet formulation improved the dissolution although the pH-dependent trend was still evident, but incorporation of 2% w/w croscarmellose sodium resulted in rapid pH-independent tablet dissolution. In absence of a disintegrant in the tablet formulation, the dissolution was governed by the erosion-diffusion process. Even for a highly soluble drug, a super-disintegrant was needed in the formulation to overcome the diffusion layer limitation and change the dissolution mechanism from erosion-diffusion to disintegration.

  4. Chemical Dissolution of Simulant FCA Cladding and Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pierce, R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-11-08

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has received some fast critical assembly (FCA) fuel from the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for disposition. Among the JAEA FCA fuel are approximately 7090 rectangular Stainless Steel clad fuel elements. Each element has an internal Pu-10.6Al alloy metal wafer. The thickness of each element is either 1/16 inch or 1/32 inch. The dimensions of each element ranges from 2 inches x 1 inch to 2 inches x 4 inches. This report discusses the potential chemical dissolution of the FCA clad material or stainless steel. This technology uses nitric acid-potassium fluoride (HNO3-KF) flowsheets of H-Canyon to dissolve the FCA elements from a rack of materials. Historically, dissolution flowsheets have aimed to maximize Pu dissolution rates while minimizing stainless steel dissolution (corrosion) rates. Because the FCA cladding is made of stainless steel, this work sought to accelerate stainless steel dissolution.

  5. A novel high throughput method to investigate polymer dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Mallapragada, Surya K; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2010-02-16

    The dissolution behavior of polystyrene (PS) in biodiesel was studied by developing a novel high throughput approach based on Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microscopy. A multiwell device for high throughput dissolution testing was fabricated using a photolithographic rapid prototyping method. The dissolution of PS films in each well was tracked by following the characteristic IR band of PS and the effect of PS molecular weight and temperature on the dissolution rate was simultaneously investigated. The results were validated with conventional gravimetric methods. The high throughput method can be extended to evaluate the dissolution profiles of a large number of samples, or to simultaneously investigate the effect of variables such as polydispersity, crystallinity, and mixed solvents. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Looking for the Self: Phenomenology, Neurophysiology and Philosophical Significance of Drug-induced Ego Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millière, Raphaël

    2017-01-01

    There is converging evidence that high doses of hallucinogenic drugs can produce significant alterations of self-experience, described as the dissolution of the sense of self and the loss of boundaries between self and world. This article discusses the relevance of this phenomenon, known as "drug-induced ego dissolution (DIED)", for cognitive neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. Data from self-report questionnaires suggest that three neuropharmacological classes of drugs can induce ego dissolution: classical psychedelics, dissociative anesthetics and agonists of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR). While these substances act on different neurotransmitter receptors, they all produce strong subjective effects that can be compared to the symptoms of acute psychosis, including ego dissolution. It has been suggested that neuroimaging of DIED can indirectly shed light on the neural correlates of the self. While this line of inquiry is promising, its results must be interpreted with caution. First, neural correlates of ego dissolution might reveal the necessary neurophysiological conditions for the maintenance of the sense of self, but it is more doubtful that this method can reveal its minimally sufficient conditions. Second, it is necessary to define the relevant notion of self at play in the phenomenon of DIED. This article suggests that DIED consists in the disruption of subpersonal processes underlying the "minimal" or "embodied" self, i.e., the basic experience of being a self rooted in multimodal integration of self-related stimuli. This hypothesis is consistent with Bayesian models of phenomenal selfhood, according to which the subjective structure of conscious experience ultimately results from the optimization of predictions in perception and action. Finally, it is argued that DIED is also of particular interest for philosophy of mind. On the one hand, it challenges theories according to which consciousness always involves self-awareness. On the other

  7. Dissolution of thorium/uranium mixed oxide in nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, S.A.C.

    1984-01-01

    The dissolution process of thorium oxide and mixed uranium-thorium oxide is studied, as a step of the head-end of the fuel reprocessing. An extensive bibliography was analysed, concerning the main aspects of the system, specially the most important process variables. Proposed mechanisms and models for the thorium oxide dissolution are presented. The laboratory tests were performed in two phases: at first, powdered thoria was used as the material to be dissolved. The objective was to know how changes in he concentrations of the dissolvent solution components HNO 3 , HF and Al(NO 3 ) 3 affect the dissolution rate. The tests were planned according to the fractional factorial method. Thes results showed that it is advantageous to work with powdered material, since the reaction occurs rapidly. And, if the Thorex solution (HNO 3 13M, HF 0.05M and Al(NO 3 ) 3 0.10M) is a suitable dissolvent, it was verified that it is possible to reduce the concentration of either nitric or fluoridric acid, without reducing the reaction rate to an undesirable value. It was also observed significant interaction between the components of the dissolvent solution. In the second phase of the tests, (Th, 5%U)O 2 sintered pellets were used. The main goals were to know the pellets dissolution behaviour and to compare the results for different pellets among themselves. It was observed that the metallurgical history of the material strongly influences its dissolution, specially the density and the microstructure. It was also studied how the (Th,U)O 2 mass/Thorex solution volume ratio affects the time needed to obtain an 1 M Th/liter solution. The activation energy for the reaction was obtained. (Author) [pt

  8. Dissolution characteristics of sericite in chalcopyrite bioleaching and its effect on copper extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ying-bo; Li, Hao; Lin, Hai; Zhang, Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sericite particle size, rotation speed, and leaching temperature on sericite dissolution and copper extraction in a chalcopyrite bioleaching system were examined. Finer particles, appropriate temperature and rotation speed for Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans resulted in a higher Al3+ dissolution concentration. The Al3+ dissolution concentration reached its highest concentration of 38.66 mg/L after 48-d leaching when the sericite particle size, temperature, and rotation speed were -43 μm, 30°C, and 160 r/min, respectively. Meanwhile, the sericite particle size, rotation speed, and temperature can affect copper extraction. The copper extraction rate is higher when the sericite particle size is finer. An appropriately high temperature is favorable for copper leaching. The dissolution of sericite fitted the shrinking core model, 1-(2/3) α-(1- α)2/3 = k 1 t, which indicates that internal diffusion is the decision step controlling the overall reaction rate in the leaching process. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed small precipitates covered on the surface of sericite after leaching, which increased the diffusion resistance of the leaching solution and dissolved ions.

  9. Comminution of ibuprofen to produce nano-particles for rapid dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakkot, S; de Matas, M; York, P; Saunders, M; Sulaiman, B

    2011-08-30

    A critical problem associated with poorly soluble drugs is low and variable bioavailability derived from slow dissolution and erratic absorption. The preparation of nano-formulations has been identified as an approach to enhance the rate and extent of drug absorption for compounds demonstrating limited aqueous solubility. A new technology for the production of nano-particles using high speed, high efficiency processes that can rapidly generate nano-particles with rapid dissolution rate has been developed. Size reduction of a low melting ductile model compound was achieved in periods less than 1h. Particle size reduction of ibuprofen using this methodology resulted in production of crystalline particles with average diameter of approximately 270nm. Physical stability studies showed that the nano-suspension remained homogeneous with slight increases in mean particle size, when stored at room temperature and under refrigerated storage conditions 2-8°C for up to 2 days. Powder containing crystalline drug was prepared by spray-drying ibuprofen nano-suspensions with mannitol dissolved in the aqueous phase. Dissolution studies showed similar release rates for the nano-suspension and powder which were markedly improved compared to a commercially available drug product. Ibuprofen nano-particles could be produced rapidly with smaller sizes achieved at higher suspension concentrations. Particles produced in water with stabilisers demonstrated greatest physical stability, whilst rapid dissolution was observed for the nano-particles isolated in powder form. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hanford Supplemental Treatment: Literature and Modeling Review of SRS HLW Salt Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, A. S.; Flach, G. P.; Martino, C. J.; Zamecnik, J. R.; Harris, M. K.; Wilmarth, W. R.; Calloway, T. B.

    2005-03-23

    In order to accelerate waste treatment and disposal of Hanford tank waste by 2028, the Department of Energy (DOE) and CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG), Inc. are evaluating alternative technologies which will be used in conjunction with the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) to safely pretreat and immobilize the tank waste. Several technologies (Bulk Vitrification and Steam Reforming) are currently being evaluated for immobilizing the pretreated waste. Since the WTP does not have sufficient capacity to pretreat all the waste going to supplemental treatment by the 2028 milestone, two technologies (Selective Dissolution and Fractional Crystallization) are being considered for pretreatment of salt waste. The scope of this task was to: (1) evaluate the recent Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 41 dissolution campaign and other literature to provide a more complete understanding of selective dissolution, (2) provide an update on the progress of salt dissolution and modeling activities at SRS, (3) investigate SRS experience and outside literature sources on industrial equipment and experimental results of previous fractional crystallization processes, and (4) evaluate recent Hanford AP104 boildown experiments and modeling results and recommend enhancements to the Environmental Simulation Program (ESP) to improve its predictive capabilities. This report provides a summary of this work and suggested recommendations.

  11. Inhibition of cobalt active dissolution by benzotriazole in slightly alkaline bicarbonate aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallant, Danick [Departement de Chimie, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada); Departement de Biologie, Chimie et Geographie, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 300, Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada); E-mail: danick.gallant.1@ulaval.ca; Pezolet, Michel [Departement de Chimie, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: michel.pezolet@chm.ulaval.ca; Simard, Stephan [Departement de Chimie, Universite Laval, Quebec (Canada); Departement de Biologie, Chimie et Geographie, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, 300, Allee des Ursulines, Rimouski, Quebec (Canada); E-mail: stephan_simard@uqar.qc.ca

    2007-04-20

    The efficiency of benzotriazole as inhibiting agent for the corrosion of cobalt was probed at pH ranging from 8.3 to 10.2 in a sodium bicarbonate solution, chosen to simulate mild natural environments. From electrochemical, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and ellipsometry experiments, we have demonstrated that benzotriazole markedly affects the electrodissolution reactions, which become modeled by the formation of a [Co(II)(BTA){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O] {sub n} film according to two different mechanisms. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy has shown that the polarization of a cobalt electrode at cathodic potentials with respect to its potential of zero charge allows a mechanism of specific adsorption of the neutral form of benzotriazole to take place through a suspected metal-to-molecule electron transfer and which follows Frumkin's adsorption isotherms. At the onset of the anodic dissolution, some experimental evidence suggests that these adsorbed neutral benzotriazole molecules deprotonate to yield a very thin [Co(II)(BTA){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O] {sub n} polymer-like and water-insoluble protective film, responsible for the inhibition of active dissolution processes occurring at slightly more anodic potentials. In the anodic dissolution region, deprotonated benzotriazole species present in the bulk solution favors the formation of a multilayered [Co(II)(BTA){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O] {sub n} film, which also contributes to the inhibition of any further cobalt dissolution usually observed at higher electrode potentials.

  12. Novel silk fibroin films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Jinfa; Liu, Zhi; Bie, Shiyu; Zhang, Feng; Zuo, Baoqi

    2014-04-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin from the silkworm was firstly found to be soluble in formic acid/hydroxyapatite system. The rheological behavior of silk fibroin solution was significantly influenced by HAp contents in dissolved solution. At the same time, silk fibroin nanofibers were observed in dissolved solution with 103.6±20.4nm in diameter. Moreover, the structure behavior of SF films prepared by formic acid/hydroxyapatite dissolution method was examined. The secondary structure of silk fibroin films was attributed to silk II structure (β-sheet), indicating that the hydroxyapatite contents in dissolved solution were not significantly affected by the structure of silk fibroin. The X-ray diffraction results exhibited obviously hydroxyapatite crystalline nature existing in silk fibroin films; however, when the hydroxyapatite content was 5.0wt.% in dissolved solution, some hydroxyapatite crystals were converted to calcium hydrogen phosphate dehydrate in silk fibroin dissolution process. This result was also confirmed by Fourier transform infrared analysis and DSC measurement. In addition, silk fibroin films prepared by this dissolution method had higher breaking strength and extension at break. Based on these analyses, an understanding of novel SF dissolution method may provide an additional tool for designing and synthesizing advanced materials with more complex structures, which should be helpful in different fields, including biomaterial applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of pH and temperature on alunite dissolution rates and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Patricia; Hudson-Edwards, Karen

    2015-04-01

    , leading to dissolved Al/K ratios between 0.5 and 2.5. This depletion of Al in the solution is especially clear for the experiments at pH 4.5-4.8 and 8 and it is consistent with the results of elemental quantifications of the same proportions in the reacted alunite surfaces using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). REFERENCES Flaten, T.P. (2001): Aluminium as a risk factor in Alzheimzer's disease, with emphasis on drinking water. Brain Research Bulletin 55: 187-196. Nordstrom, D.K. (2011): Hydrogeochemical processes governing the origin, transport and fate of major and trace elements from mine wastes and mineralized rock to surface waters. Applied Geochemistry 26: 1777-1791. Prietzel, J., & Hirsch, C. (1998). Extractability and dissolution kinetics of pure and soil-added synthesized aluminium hydroxy sulphate minerals. European journal of soil science, 49(4), 669-681. Swayze, G.A., Ehlmann, B.L., Milliken, R.E., Poulet, F., Wray, J.J., Rye, R.O., Clark, R.N., Desborough, G.A., Crowley, J.K., Gondet, B., Mustard, J.F., Seelos, K.D. and Murchie, S.L., 2008. Discovery of the Acid-Sulfate Mineral Alunite in Terra Sirenum, Mars, Using MRO CRISM: Possible Evidence for Acid-Saline Lacustrine Deposits?, American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2008, abstract #P44A-04. Welch, S. A., Kirste, D., Christy, A. G., Beavis, F. R., & Beavis, S. G. (2008): Jarosite dissolution II'Reaction kinetics, stoichiometry and acid flux. Chemical Geology, 254(1), 73-86.

  14. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F

    2004-07-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high {beta}{gamma} activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO{sub 4} in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO{sup 3+} solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO{sub 2},xH{sub 2}O and Ru{sup 0} in nitric acid media. (authors)

  15. Studies of dissolution solutions of ruthenium metal, oxide and mixed compounds in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousset, F.; Eysseric, C.; Bedioui, F.

    2004-01-01

    Ruthenium is one of the fission products generated by irradiated nuclear fuel. It is present throughout all the steps of nuclear fuel reprocessing-particularly during extraction-and requires special attention due to its complex chemistry and high βγ activity. An innovative electro-volatilization process is now being developed to take advantage of the volatility of RuO 4 in order to eliminate it at the head end of the Purex process and thus reduce the number of extraction cycles. Although the process operates successfully with synthetic nitrato-RuNO 3+ solutions, difficulties have been encountered in extrapolating it to real-like dissolution solutions. In order to better approximate the chemical forms of ruthenium found in fuel dissolution solutions, kinetic and speciation studies on dissolved species were undertaken with RuO 2 ,xH 2 O and Ru 0 in nitric acid media. (authors)

  16. Physical heterogeneity control on effective mineral dissolution rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Heewon; Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis

    2018-04-01

    Hydrologic heterogeneity may be an important factor contributing to the discrepancy in laboratory and field measured dissolution rates, but the governing factors influencing mineral dissolution rates among various representations of physical heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Here, we present multiple reactive transport simulations of anorthite dissolution in 2D latticed random permeability fields and link the information from local grid scale (1 cm or 4 m) dissolution rates to domain-scale (1m or 400 m) effective dissolution rates measured by the flux-weighted average of an ensemble of flow paths. We compare results of homogeneous models to heterogeneous models with different structure and layered permeability distributions within the model domain. Chemistry is simplified to a single dissolving primary mineral (anorthite) distributed homogeneously throughout the domain and a single secondary mineral (kaolinite) that is allowed to dissolve or precipitate. Results show that increasing size in correlation structure (i.e. long integral scales) and high variance in permeability distribution are two important factors inducing a reduction in effective mineral dissolution rates compared to homogeneous permeability domains. Larger correlation structures produce larger zones of low permeability where diffusion is an important transport mechanism. Due to the increased residence time under slow diffusive transport, the saturation state of a solute with respect to a reacting mineral approaches equilibrium and reduces the reaction rate. High variance in permeability distribution favorably develops large low permeability zones that intensifies the reduction in mixing and effective dissolution rate. However, the degree of reduction in effective dissolution rate observed in 1 m × 1 m domains is too small (equilibrium conditions reduce the effective dissolution rate by increasing the saturation state. However, in large domains where less- or non-reactive zones develop, higher

  17. Controlled in-situ dissolution of an alkali metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey Donald; Dooley, Kirk John; Tolman, David Donald

    2012-09-11

    A method for the controllable dissolution of one or more alkali metals from a vessel containing a one or more alkali metals and/or one or more partially passivated alkali metals. The vessel preferably comprising a sodium, NaK or other alkali metal-cooled nuclear reactor that has been used. The alkali metal, preferably sodium, potassium or a combination thereof, in the vessel is exposed to a treatment liquid, preferably an acidic liquid, more preferably citric acid. Preferably, the treatment liquid is maintained in continuous motion relative to any surface of unreacted alkali metal with which the treatment liquid is in contact. The treatment liquid is preferably pumped into the vessel containing the one or more alkali metals and the resulting fluid is extracted and optionally further processed. Preferably, the resulting off-gases are processed by an off-gas treatment system and the resulting liquids are processed by a liquid disposal system. In one preferred embodiment, an inert gas is pumped into the vessel along with the treatment liquid.

  18. Modeling growth and dissolution of inclusions during fusion welding of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Tao

    The characteristics of inclusions in the weld metals are critical factors to determine the structure, properties and performance of weldments. The research in the present thesis applied computational modeling to study inclusion behavior considering thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation, growth and dissolution of inclusion along its trajectory calculated from the heat transfer and fluid flow model in the weld pool. The objective of this research is to predict the characteristics of inclusions, such as composition, size distribution, and number density in the weld metal from different welding parameters and steel compositions. To synthesize the knowledge of thermodynamics and kinetics of nucleation, growth and dissolution of inclusion in the liquid metal, a set of time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagrams are constructed to represent the effects of time and temperature on the isothermal growth and dissolution behavior of fourteen types of individual inclusions. The non-isothermal behavior of growth and dissolution of inclusions is predicted from their isothermal behavior by constructing continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams using Scheil additive rule. A well verified fluid flow and heat transfer model developed at Penn State is used to calculate the temperature and velocity fields in the weld pool for different welding processes. A turbulent model considering enhanced viscosity and thermal conductivity (k-ε model) is applied. The calculations show that there is vigorous circulation of metal in the weld pool. The heat transfer and fluid flow model helps to understand not only the fundamentals of the physical phenomena (luring welding, but also the basis to study the growth and dissolution of inclusions. The calculations of particle tracking of thousands of inclusions show that most inclusions undergo complex gyrations and thermal cycles in the weld pool. The inclusions experience both growth and dissolution during their lifetime. Thermal cycles of

  19. Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for preformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsenz, Jochem; Haenel, Elisabeth; Anedda, Aline; Du Castel, Pauline; Cirelli, Giorgio

    2016-05-25

    This study describes a novel Miniaturized INtrinsic DISsolution Screening (MINDISS) assay for measuring disk intrinsic dissolution rates (DIDR). In MINDISS, compacted mini disks of drugs (2-5mg/disk) are prepared in custom made holders with a surface area of 3mm(2). Disks are immersed, pellet side down, into 0.35ml of appropriate dissolution media per well in 96-well microtiter plates, media are stirred and disk-holders are transferred to new wells after defined periods of time. After filtration, drug concentration in dissolution media is quantified by Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) and solid state property of the disk is characterized by Raman spectroscopy. MINDISS was identified as an easy-to-use tool for rapid, parallel determination of DIDR of compounds that requires only small amounts of compound and of dissolution medium. Results obtained with marketed drugs in MINDISS correlate well with large scale DIDR methods and indicate that MINDISS can be used for (1) rank-ordering of compounds by intrinsic dissolution in late phase discovery and early development, (2) comparison of polymorphic forms and salts, (3) screening and selection of appropriate dissolution media, and (4) characterization of the intestinal release behavior of compounds along the gastro intestinal tract by changing biorelevant media during experiments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. High temperature dissolution of oxides in complexing media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyaseelan, Valil S.; Rufus, Appadurai L.; Subramanian, Hariharan; Bhaskarapillai, Anupkumar; Wilson, Shiny; Narasimhan, Sevilimedu V.; Velmurugan, Sankaralingam

    2011-12-01

    Dissolution of transition metal oxides such as magnetite (Fe 3O 4), mixed ferrites (NiFe 2O 4, ZnFe 2O 4, MgFe 2O 4), bonaccordite (Ni 2FeBO 5) and chromium oxide (Cr 2O 3) in organic complexing media was attempted at higher temperatures (80-180 °C). On increasing the temperature from 80 to 180 °C, the dissolution rate of magnetite in nitrilo triacetic acid (NTA) medium increased six folds. The trend obtained for the dissolution of other oxides was ZnFe 2O 4 > NiFe 2O 4 > MgFe 2O 4 > Cr 2O 3, which followed the same trend as the lability of their metal-oxo bonds. Other complexing agents such as ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA), pyridine dicarboxylic acid (PDCA), citric acid and reducing agents viz., oxalic acid and ascorbic acid were also evaluated for their oxide dissolution efficiency at 160 °C. EDTA showed maximum dissolution rate of 21.4 μm/h for magnetite. Addition of oxalic acid/ascorbic acid to complexing media (NTA/EDTA) showed identical effect on the dissolution of magnetite. Addition of hydrazine, another reducing agent, to NTA decreased the rate of dissolution of magnetite by 50%.

  1. Evaluation of fluorinated dissolution inhibitors for 157-nm lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Alyssandrea H.; Houlihan, Francis M.; Seger, Larry; Chang, Chun; Ober, Christopher K.

    2003-06-01

    Fluorinated diesters were synthesized and evaluated as dissolution inhibitors (DIs) for 157 nm lithography. The results of dissolution rate measurements, exposure studies, and etching experiments on blends of fluorinated polymers containing these dissolution inhibitors are reported. It was shown that the DIs effectively slow the dissolution rate of the matrix polymer, poly(hexafluorohydroxyisopropyl styrene) (PHFHIPS). Etching studies show that they enhance the plasma etch resistance of poly(methyl methacrylate) using tetrafluoromethane plasma. Addition of the best performing dissolution inhibitor, cyclohexane-1,4-dicarboxylic acid bis-(1-cyclohexyl-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-methyl-ethyl) ester) (FCDE1) to candidate 157 nm photoresist polymers, Duvcor and poly(hexafluorohydroxyisopropyl styrene)-co-poly(t-butyl methacrylate) [pPHFHIPS-co-pt-BMA], improves the imaging behavior of these polymers. Our attempts to elucidate the mechanism of dissolution inhibition for this series of compounds will be discussed. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) studies in conjunction with dissolution rate measurements performed on a series of DI analogues suggest a mechanism based on hydrogen bonding.

  2. Evidence for microbial dissolution of pyrite from the Lower Cambrian oolitic limestone, South China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.; Zhang, X.-L.

    2011-03-01

    The oxidative dissolution of the sulphide mineral pyrite (FeS2) has been of significant interest since it affects global geochemical cycles, generates acid mine drainage, and is used in industrial metal extraction. Several different groups of prokaryotes are known to catalyze the dissolution of pyrite and use the free energy generated from the oxidation, which may result in the dissolution of the mineral and the precipitation of the secondary ferric iron minerals either on the cell surface or is separated from the cells. However, straightforward evidence for such metabolic process in the ancient sediments is rare. Here we report pyrite crystals from the Lower Cambrian oolitic limestones that show indications of microbial erosion in various degrees. Erosion pits and tubular micro-tunnels with characteristic shapes and sizes in our samples are generally similar to those obtained from the laboratory studies on the oxidative dissolution of pyrite by iron-oxidizing bacteria. Diagenetic examination demonstrates that the bioerosion predates the consolidation of the limestone. In addition, bacillus-sized and -shaped microfossils encrusted with iron oxides are present in our samples, which are very likely to be fossilized sheaths produced by iron-oxidizing bacteria. Our findings indicate that the microbial oxidative dissolution of pyrite existed in the Cambrian shallow marine carbonate sediments. Furthermore, we suggest that characteristic pitting patterns on the pyrite crystals from ancient sediments are an important clue to trace the evolution of life, in particular, the evolution of metabolism like microbial iron oxidation in the remote past on our planet, independent of biomarkers, isotopic signals and body fossils as well.

  3. The effect of multicomponent diffusion on NAPL dissolution from spherical ternary mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Priti P.; Harmon, Thomas C.

    2003-12-01

    This paper investigates the dissolution characteristics of ternary nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mixtures with the goal of comparing the relative contributions of multicomponent (intra-NAPL) diffusion, film transfer and thermodynamic nonideality. These contributions are compared at the pore scale and intermediate scale (several centimeters downstream from the source). Trichloroethene (TCE), tetrachloroethene (PCE) and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA) were selected to model a reasonably ideal mixture; TCE, PCE and octanol were selected as a relevant nonideal mixture. A multicomponent diffusion-based dissolution model incorporating hydrodynamic theory was formulated to estimate intra-NAPL concentration gradients and associated aqueous interfacial concentrations for ideally shaped (spherical) NAPL blobs. Pore scale dissolution times for this model were compared to those generated using the conventional well-mixed NAPL dissolution model, applying the same film transfer boundary condition in both cases. Activity coefficients (spatially and temporally variable for the diffusion model, temporally variable for the well-mixed model) were estimated using UNIFAC. NAPL interfacial concentration histories generated using the pore scale models were used as input in a three-dimensional groundwater transport model (MT3DMS) to compare downstream concentration distributions. For the relatively large NAPL bodies simulated ( r=0.6 cm), intra-NAPL diffusion effects were found to be significant at the pore scale and were strongly impacted by the mixture's thermodynamic ideality. At the intermediate scale, and for the conditions tested, modest differences in the simulations suggested that intra-NAPL diffusion effects would be negligible compared to those associated with mixture composition uncertainty, dissolution rate processes related to NAPL-induced permeability effects and hydrodynamic issues associated with flow field heterogeneity.

  4. Short-time dissolution mechanisms of kaolinitic tropical soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malengreau, N.; Sposito, Garrison

    1996-01-01

    Previous research on the short-time dissolution behavior of kaolinitic Oxisols suggested pH-dependent kinetics involving ligand-promoted dissolution, metal readsorption, and colloidal dispersion, with soil organic matter conjectured to play a decisive role. A novel combination of spectroscopy, lightscattering, and batch dissolution experiments, conducted at controlled pH and ionic strength over five dissolution periods ranging from 1 to 12 h, was applied to evaluate this mechanism for samples of a representative kaolinitic Oxisol; collected at both forested and cultivated field sites (leading to significant differences in organic matter content and field soil pH). The overall characteristics of the pH-dependent net release kinetics of Al, Fe, and Si by the soil samples, for any dissolution period in the range investigated, were determined by the pH value at which colloid dispersion commenced, which decreased significantly as the soil organic matter content increased. Plots of log(Si/Al released) (or Si/Fe released) vs. -log [H+] ([H+] is proton concentration) were superimposable for all dissolution periods studied, rising to a plateau value above the point of zero net charge of the soils (pH 3.2). Light-scattering and X-ray diffraction data showed conclusively that this plateau represented the release of siliceous colloids containing kaolinite and X-ray amorphous material. X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, and electron spin resonance spectroscopy, applied to the soil samples before and after dissolution, and after conventional chemical extractions to remove Al, C, Fe, and Si, showed that kaolinite and iron oxide phases (the latter being highly Al-substituted and present in both coatings and occlusions) were essentially unaltered by dissolution, even at -log [H+] = 2, whereas substantial dissolution loss of soil quartz occurred. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy gave strong evidence that C in these soils occurs principally in discrete

  5. Role of the Capillary Transition Zone on the Dissolution of CO2 into Brine in Saline Reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, M. J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Geologic carbon storage in deep saline reservoirs is a promising technology for reducing anthropogenic emissions into the atmosphere. Dissolution of injected CO2 into resident brines is one of the primary trapping mechanisms generally considered necessary to provide long-term storage security. Given that diffusion of CO2 in brine is woefully slow, convective dissolution, driven by a small increase in brine density with CO2 saturation, is considered to be the primary mechanism of dissolution trapping. Previous studies of convective dissolution have typically only considered the convective process in the single phase region below the gas-water contact (GWC) and have ignored the over-lying two-phase region where dissolution actually takes place. Our objective is to improve estimates of the long-term dissolution rate of CO2 into brine by including the two-phase region above the gas-water contact in model simulations. In the two-phase model, there is a capillary transition zone above the GWC over which the brine saturation decreases with increasing elevation. Our simulations show that when the capillary fringe height is small, which corresponds to very low entry pressure, assuming CO2-saturated brine in the two-phase region is well-motivated, as has been assumed in analyses of dissolution without the capillary transition. For typical finite entry pressures, the fringe thickness is finite and upwelling convection currents of fresh, un-carbonated brine must extend above the GWC to saturate the brine with CO2. Our results show the long-term dissolution rate can be enhanced by greater than 3 times the dissolution rates derived from ignoring the capillary transition zone. The single-phase, closed-top dissolution rate is recovered in the limit of vanishing entry pressure. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science

  6. Improvement on dissolution rate of inclusion complex of Rifabutin drug with β-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuga Priya, Arumugam; Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam; Stalin, Thambusamy

    2013-11-01

    The effect of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the improvement of solubility and antimicrobial activity of poorly water soluble drug Rifabutin (RFB) was studied. The solid inclusion complex is prepared under different methods and it is characterized by FT-IR, XRD, DSC and SEM methods. Solubility type, stability constant, stoichiometric ratio were investigated from phase solubility diagram of inclusion complex (RFB with β-CD). The dissolution profiles of the inclusion complexes were carried out and obvious increase in dissolution rate was observed when compared with pure RFB drug. Inclusion complexation process was further confirmed by molecular docking studies using PatchDock server. The in vitro antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of RFB sensible microorganisms was significantly increased by on inclusion complexation process. This trend of inclusion complexation of poorly water soluble drugs is highly recognized as a successful and useful approach for the application in pharmaceutical field. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cytotoxicity and intracellular dissolution of nickel nanowires

    KAUST Repository

    Perez, Jose E.

    2015-12-22

    The assessment of cytotoxicity of nanostructures is a fundamental step for their development as biomedical tools. As widely used nanostructures, nickel nanowires (Ni NWs) seem promising candidates for such applications. In this work, Ni NWs were synthesized and then characterized using vibrating sample magnetometry, energy dispersive X-Ray analysis and electron microscopy. After exposure to the NWs, cytotoxicity was evaluated in terms of cell viability, cell membrane damage and induced apoptosis/necrosis on the model human cell line HCT 116. The influence of NW to cell ratio (10:1 to 1000:1) and exposure times up to 72 hours was analyzed for Ni NWs of 5.4 µm in length, as well as for Ni ions. The results show that cytotoxicity markedly increases past 24 hours of incubation. Cellular uptake of NWs takes place through the phagocytosis pathway, with a fraction of the dose of NWs dissolved inside the cells. Cell death results from a combination of apoptosis and necrosis, where the latter is the outcome of the secondary necrosis pathway. The cytotoxicity of Ni ions and Ni NWs dissolution studies suggest a synergistic toxicity between NW aspect ratio and dissolved Ni, with the cytotoxic effects markedly increasing after 24 hours of incubation.

  8. Importance of surface structure on dissolution of fluorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godinho, Jose; Piazolo, Sandra; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2014-01-01

    Dissolution rates are usually calculated as a function of surface area, which is assumed to remain constant ignoring the changes occurring on the surface during dissolution. Here we present a study of how topography of natural fluorite surfaces with different orientation changes during up to 3200...... by the relative stability of the planes and type of edges that constitute a surface needs to be considered. Significant differences between dissolution rates calculated based on surface area alone, and based on surface reactivity are expected for materials with the fluorite structure....

  9. Mongol Warfare in the Pre-Dissolution Period »

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy May

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the Mongols used many of the tactics and strategies that steppe nomads had used for centuries, the Mongols refined steppe warfare so that this style of warfare reached its apogee during the Mongol Empire. Furthermore, the Mongols developed a style of warfare that made them possibly the greatest military force in history. This work examines several facets of the pre-dissolution period (1200–1260. With the dissolution of the Mongol Empire, Mongol warfare once again changed. In some areas it remained complex while in others it regressed to traditional forces of steppe warfare, still potent but not as effective as the pre-dissolution period.

  10. Dissolution behaviour of silicon nitride coatings for joint replacements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Maria [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Bryant, Michael [Institute of Functional Surfaces (iFS), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Schmidt, Susann [Thin Film Physics, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, Linköping (Sweden); Engqvist, Håkan [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hall, Richard M. [Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (iMBE), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Neville, Anne [Institute of Functional Surfaces (iFS), School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Persson, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.persson@angstrom.uu.se [Materials in Medicine Group, Div. of Applied Materials Science, Dept. of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the dissolution rate of SiN{sub x} coatings was investigated as a function of coating composition, in comparison to a cobalt chromium molybdenum alloy (CoCrMo) reference. SiN{sub x} coatings with N/Si ratios of 0.3, 0.8 and 1.1 were investigated. Electrochemical measurements were complemented with solution (inductively coupled plasma techniques) and surface analysis (vertical scanning interferometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The dissolution rate of the SiN{sub x} coatings was evaluated to 0.2–1.4 nm/day, with a trend of lower dissolution rate with higher N/Si atomic ratio in the coating. The dissolution rates of the coatings were similar to or lower than that of CoCrMo (0.7–1.2 nm/day). The highest nitrogen containing coating showed mainly Si–N bonds in the bulk as well as at the surface and in the dissolution area. The lower nitrogen containing coatings showed Si–N and/or Si–Si bonds in the bulk and an increased formation of Si–O bonds at the surface as well as in the dissolution area. The SiN{sub x} coatings reduced the metal ion release from the substrate. The possibility to tune the dissolution rate and the ability to prevent release of metal ions encourage further studies on SiN{sub x} coatings for joint replacements. - Graphical abstract: Dissolution rates of SiN{sub 0.3}, SiN{sub 0.8}, and SiN{sub 1.1} coatings on CoCrMo compared to uncoated CoCrMo. Dissolution rates were obtained from i) electrochemical measurements of I{sub corr}, ii) the step height between covered and solution-exposed surfaces, measured using VSI, and iii) the ion concentration in the solution, measured with ICP. - Highlights: • The dissolution of SiN{sub x} coatings was investigated in comparison to (bulk) CoCrMo. • The coatings gave a lower or similar dissolution rate to CoCrMo, of 0.2–1.2 nm/day. • An increased nitrogen content in the coatings gave lower dissolution rates. • SiN{sub x} coatings on CoCrMo reduced the metal ion release

  11. Reactive Transport at the Pore Scale with Applications to the Dissolution of Carbonate Rocks for CO2 Sequestration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, E.; Gray, F.; Welch, N.; Shah, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2014-12-01

    In CO2 sequestration operations, CO2 injected into a brine aquifer dissolves in the liquid to create an acidic solution. This may result in dissolution of the mineral grains in the porous medium. Experimentally, it is hard to investigate this process at the pore scale. Therefore we develop a new hybrid particle simulation algorithm to study the dissolution of solid objects in a laminar flow field, as encountered in porous media flow situations. First, we calculate the flow field using a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm implemented on GPUs, which demonstrates a very efficient use of the GPU device and a considerable performance increase over CPU calculations. Second, using a stochastic particle approach, we solve the advection-diffusion equation for a single reactive species and dissolve solid voxels according to our reaction model. To validate our simulation, we first calculate the dissolution of a solid sphere as a function of time under quiescent conditions. We compare with the analytical solution for this problem [1] and find good agreement. Then we consider the dissolution of a solid sphere in a laminar flow field and observe a significant change in the sphericity with time due to the coupled dissolution - flow process. Second, we calculate the dissolution of a cylinder in channel flow in direct comparison with corresponding dissolution experiments. We discuss the evolution of the shape and dissolution rate. Finally, we calculate the dissolution of carbonate rock samples at the pore scale in direct comparison with micro-CT experiments. This work builds on our recent research on calculation of multi-phase flow [2], [3] and hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular propagator distributions for solute transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media using LB simulations [4]. It turns out that the hybrid simulation model is a suitable tool to study reactive flow processes at the pore scale. This is of great importance for CO2 storage and

  12. A study on the dissolution rates of K-Cr(VI)-jarosites: kinetic analysis and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Iván A; Mireles, Ister; Patiño, Francisco; Pandiyan, Thangarasu; Flores, Mizraim U; Palacios, Elia G; Gutiérrez, Emmanuel J; Reyes, Martín

    2016-01-01

    The presence of natural and industrial jarosite type-compounds in the environment could have important implications in the mobility of potentially toxic elements such as lead, mercury, arsenic, chromium, among others. Understanding the dissolution reactions of jarosite-type compounds is notably important for an environmental assessment (for water and soil), since some of these elements could either return to the environment or work as temporary deposits of these species, thus would reduce their immediate environmental impact. This work reports the effects of temperature, pH, particle diameter and Cr(VI) content on the initial dissolution rates of K-Cr(VI)-jarosites (KFe3[(SO4)2 - X(CrO4)X](OH)6). Temperature (T) was the variable with the strongest effect, followed by pH in acid/alkaline medium (H3O(+)/OH(-)). It was found that the substitution of CrO4 (2-)in Y-site and the substitution of H3O(+) in M-site do not modify the dissolution rates. The model that describes the dissolution process is the unreacted core kinetic model, with the chemical reaction on the unreacted core surface. The dissolution in acid medium was congruent, while in alkaline media was incongruent. In both reaction media, there is a release of K(+), SO4 (2-) and CrO4 (2-) from the KFe3[(SO4)2 - X(CrO4)X](OH)6 structure, although the latter is rapidly absorbed by the solid residues of Fe(OH)3 in alkaline medium dissolutions. The dissolution of KFe3[(SO4)2 - X(CrO4)X](OH)6 exhibited good stability in a wide range of pH and T conditions corresponding to the calculated parameters of reaction order n, activation energy E A and dissolution rate constants for each kinetic stages of induction and progressive conversion. The kinetic analysis related to the reaction orders and calculated activation energies confirmed that extreme pH and T conditions are necessary to obtain considerably high dissolution rates. Extreme pH conditions (acidic or alkaline) cause the preferential release of K(+), SO4 (2

  13. Mechanism of Non-Steady State Dissolution of Goethite in the Presence of Siderophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, P. U.; Kretzschmar, R.; Kraemer, S. M.

    2003-12-01

    reproducible and the magnitude of dissolved iron corresponds to the reaction time of goethite with oxalate. Analogous non-steady state experiments were conducted, but with two other siderophores or citrate to induce non-steady state conditions: 40 microM of the bacterial siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), 40 microM of the fungal siderophore Ferrichrome, and 3 mM of citrate. Fast dissolution of iron was observed as a response to non-steady state. We also substituted the non-siderophore ligand oxalate by 500 microM citrate or 750 microM malonate and again observed fast dissolution after the non-steady state siderophore additions. Independent of the type of the ligands, a reproducible fast dissolution of iron followed by steady state dissolution was observed after the addition of the non-steady state ligand concentrations. Thus it can be said that the reproducible fast dissolution of iron under non-steady state conditions represents a general geochemical mechanism and an important process in the context of biological iron acquisition in natural systems. References Marschner, H., Roemheld, V. et al. (1986). "Different Strategies in Higher-Plants in Mobilization and Uptake of Iron". Journal of Plant Nutrition 9(3-7): 695-713. Roemheld, V. and Marschner, H. (1986)." Evidence for a Specific Uptake System for Iron Phytosiderophore in Roots of Grasses". Plant Physiology 80(1): 175-180.

  14. Accelerating action of water on dissolution of stainless steel in the anodic regime of pitting corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frejman, L.I.; Zamaletdinov, I.I.

    1982-01-01

    Anode limiting current of the 12Kh18N10T steel dissolution completely activated by chlorine ions in water-methanol 5 M LiCl solutions at 30-90 deg C exponentially increases with the increase of water concentration at the expense of decrease of the seeming activation energy epsilon of the process. Low epsilon values indicates diffusion nature of deceleration stage

  15. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Isik

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels.

  16. General Lines of Disregard for the Legal Personality on Irregular Dissolution the Company

    OpenAIRE

    Fábio Augusto Barcelos Moreira Corrêa; Tereza Cristina Monteiro Mafra

    2016-01-01

    This article will analyze the Institute of disregard for the legal personality in situations involving irregular dissolution the limited liability company, in light of the jurisprudence of the Superior Court Tribunal. We highlight the impact that new code of Civil procedure will provide for analysis to safeguard the autonomy of assets of the legal person, as well as the guarantee of due process and of ample defense, directly impacting on business law. The analysis aims to contribute to the un...

  17. Ionic Liquids and Cellulose: Dissolution, Chemical Modification and Preparation of New Cellulosic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Mehmet; Sardon, Haritz; Mecerreyes, David

    2014-01-01

    Due to its abundance and a wide range of beneficial physical and chemical properties, cellulose has become very popular in order to produce materials for various applications. This review summarizes the recent advances in the development of new cellulose materials and technologies using ionic liquids. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquids has been used to develop new processing technologies, cellulose functionalization methods and new cellulose materials including blends, composites, fibers and ion gels. PMID:25000264

  18. Design of water debinding and dissolution stages of metal injection moulded porous Ti foam production

    OpenAIRE

    Shbeh, M.M.; Goodall, R.

    2015-01-01

    Foams are advanced materials with controlled meso- and micro-structure, with huge potential in a variety of applications such as in the biomedical and automotive sectors. One promising technique for the production of Ti foams is Metal Injection Moulding in combination with Space Holders (MIMSH). Most existing work in the literature on MIM-SH foams reports very long debinding and dissolution periods that can extend for more than two days. In this paper, the effect on process speed of different...

  19. Calcination/dissolution testing for Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, S.A.; Delegard, C.H.; McLaughlin, D.F.; Danielson, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Thermal treatment by calcination offers several benefits for the treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes, including the destruction of organics and ferrocyanides and an hydroxide fusion that permits the bulk of the mostly soluble nonradioactive constituents to be easily separated from the insoluble transuranic residue. Critical design parameters were tested, including: (1) calciner equipment design, (2) hydroxide fusion chemistry, and (3) equipment corrosion. A 2 gal/minute pilot plant processed a simulated Tank 101-SY waste and produced a free flowing 700 C molten calcine with an average calciner retention time of 20 minutes and >95% organic, nitrate, and nitrite destruction. Laboratory experiments using actual radioactive tank waste and the simulated waste pilot experiments indicate that 98 wt% of the calcine produced is soluble in water, leaving an insoluble transuranic fraction. All of the Hanford Site tank wastes can benefit from calcination/dissolution processing, contingent upon blending various tank waste types to ensure a target of 70 wt% sodium hydroxide/nitrate/nitrite fluxing agent. Finally, corrosion testing indicates that a jacketed nickel liner cooled to below 400 C would corrode <2 mil/year (0.05 mm/year) from molten calcine attack

  20. The timing of abortions, births, and union dissolutions in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heini Väisänen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: People make fertility decisions within the wider context of their lives. Previous studies have shown that there are factors that drive both relationship transitions and childbearing decisions. However, there is a lack of research on whether these factors also drive abortion decisions and decisions to end a romantic relationship, and whether their effect depends on being in a cohabitating or marital union. Objective: To study whether the factors that influence relationship transitions and childbearing decisions are also associated with abortion decision-making. Methods: I analysed nationally representative register data of Finnish women born in 1965-1969 (N=17,666 using multi-level multi-process event history models. Results: Women's unobserved characteristics affected union dissolution, abortion, and childbearing decisions: Women with a tendency towards unstable relationships were more likely to have an abortion and less likely to give birth. The observed likelihood of abortion was lower for married than cohabiting women in the early years of a relationship, but became similar over time. Conclusions: Characteristics such as personality and religiosity may partly explain these results. In line with previous research on other union characteristics, the likelihood of abortion in long-term cohabitation becomes similar to marriage over time. Contribution: This study is the first to jointly estimate these three decision-making processes using reliable longitudinal data.

  1. Coordination chemistry of weathering: Kinetics of the surface-controlled dissolution of oxide minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumm, Werner; Wollast, Roland

    1990-02-01

    Chemical weathering processes, essentially caused by the interaction of water and the atmosphere with the Earth's crust, transform primary minerals into solutes and clays and, eventually, into sedimentary rocks; these processes participate in controlling the global hydrogeochemical cycles of many elements. Many mineral dissolution processes are controlled by a chemical mechanism at the solid-water interface. The reaction-controlling steps can be interpreted in terms of a surface coordination model. The tendency of a mineral to dissolve is influenced by the interaction of solutes—H+, OH-, ligands, and metal ions—with its surface. The surface reactivity is shown to depend on the surface species and their structural identity; specifically, the dependence of dissolution rates on pH and on dissolved ligand concentrations can be explained in terms of surface protonation (and deprotonation) and of ligand surface complexes. A general rate law for the dissolution of minerals is derived by considering, in addition to the surface coordination chemistry, established models of lattice statistics and activated complex theory.

  2. Effect of sea component dissolution on fibrous structure of islands-in-the-sea spunbond nonwovens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvari, F.; Ulcay, Y.; Pourdeyhimi, B.

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the preliminary results of our efforts that focused on the development of lightweight and more fibrous nonwoven. For this objective, nonwoven webs that contain bicomponent filaments with island-in-the-sea cross section was produced by spunbonding, which involves extruding of sea and island polymer melts through dies, cooling, and attenuating the bicomponent filaments by high velocity air streams. Nylon-6 and Polyethylene were chosen as the island and sea polymers, respectively. Bonding process was applied to web first to keep structural integrity after removing the sea polymer. The web was hydroentangled with high speed water jets prior to the dissolving process to obtain fiber entanglement. Xylene, which is one of the few chemical that can dissolve Polyethylene, was used for the dissolution of the sea component from the fibrous structure of the spunbond nonwoven. Removal of the sea polymer from spunbond nonwovens that contain bicomponent filaments with islands-in-the-sea cross section was achieved by the developed dissolution process. Weight, thickness, and area of the nonwoven samples changed after the dissolution. After removing the sea polymer, spunbond nonwoven contains only thin island fibers and also gets lighter. Lightweight and more fibrous nonwovens can be obtained with the method given in this study.

  3. Predicting the dissolution kinetics of silicate glasses using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoop Krishnan, N. M.; Mangalathu, Sujith; Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Tandia, Adama; Burton, Henry; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2018-05-01

    Predicting the dissolution rates of silicate glasses in aqueous conditions is a complex task as the underlying mechanism(s) remain poorly understood and the dissolution kinetics can depend on a large number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Here, we assess the potential of data-driven models based on machine learning to predict the dissolution rates of various aluminosilicate glasses exposed to a wide range of solution pH values, from acidic to caustic conditions. Four classes of machine learning methods are investigated, namely, linear regression, support vector machine regression, random forest, and artificial neural network. We observe that, although linear methods all fail to describe the dissolution kinetics, the artificial neural network approach offers excellent predictions, thanks to its inherent ability to handle non-linear data. Overall, we suggest that a more extensive use of machine learning approaches could significantly accelerate the design of novel glasses with tailored properties.

  4. Dissolution of cellulose in ionic liquid: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd, N.; Draman, S. F. S.; Salleh, M. S. N.; Yusof, N. B.

    2017-02-01

    Dissolution of cellulose with ionic liquids (IL) and deep eutectic solvent (DES) lets the comprehensive dissolution of cellulose. Basically, cellulose can be dissolved, in some hydrophilic ionic liquids, such as 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (BMIMCl) and 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (AMIMCl). Chloride based ionic liquids are suitable solvents for cellulose dissolution. Although the ILs is very useful in fine chemical industry, its application in the pharmaceutical and food industry have been very limited due to issues with toxicity, purity, and high cost. Seeing to these limitations, new green alternative solvent which is DES was used. This green solvents, may be definitely treated as the next-generation reagents for more sustainable industrial development. Thus, this review aims to discuss the dissolution of cellulose either with ionic liquids or DES and its application.

  5. Comparative dissolution study on counterfeit medicines of PDE-5 inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Deconinck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Counterfeit medicines are a growing problem in both developing and industrialised countries. In general the evaluation of these medicines is limited to the identification and the dosage of the active ingredients. In this study in vitro dissolution tests were conducted on two sets of counterfeit medicines containing PDE-5 inhibitors (sildenafil citrate and tadalafil. The dissolution profiles were statistically compared to the ones of the genuine products using the f2-method and a comparison at each time point using the Cochran test.The results showed low equivalences between counterfeit and genuine products as well as higher variations around the mean dissolution value at the different time points for the counterfeit products. Keywords: Counterfeit, PDE-5 inhibitors, In vitro dissolution, f2-Method, Cochran test

  6. Evolution, dissolution and reversible generation of gold and silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    with variable flux density) in the presence of nonionic micelle, TX-100. Even their cyano complexes break down in TX-100 under UV and hence dissolution and reevolution of almost monodispersed nanoparticles (∼ 3 nm) are possible.

  7. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized...

  8. Silver-catalyzed PuO2 dissolution with persulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, F.D.; Barney, G.S.; Cooper, T.D.; Duchsherer, M.J.

    1991-06-01

    This report consists of 14 slides and associated narrative for a presentation to be given at the 15th Annual Actinide Separations Conference on silver-catalyzed PuO 2 dissolution with persulfate. (JL)

  9. Studies on PEM fuel cell noble metal catalyst dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. M.; Grahl-Madsen, L.; Skou, E. M.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of electrochemical, spectroscopic and gravimetric methods was carried out on Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell electrodes with the focus on platinum and ruthenium catalysts dissolution, and the membrane degradation. In cyclic voltammetry (CV) experiments, the noble metals were...... found to dissolve in 1 M sulfuric acid solution and the dissolution increased exponentially with the upper potential limit (UPL) between 0.6 and 1.6 vs. RHE. 2-20% of the Pt (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved during the experiments. Under the same conditions, 30-100% of the Ru...... (depending on the catalyst type) was found to be dissolved. The faster dissolution of ruthenium compared to platinum in the alloy type catalysts was also confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The dissolution of the carbon supported catalyst was found one order of magnitude higher than the unsupported...

  10. The effect of sentencing types on singlehood and relationship dissolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallesen, Peter; Andersen, Lars Højsgaard

    Prior research shows that imprisonment may matter for the risk of experiencing divorce or other types of relationship dissolution, as imprisonment implies separation and the social stigma of criminal conviction. Despite these straightforward theoretical mechanisms, we currently lack empirical...

  11. In vivo dissolution measurement with indium-111 summation peak ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay, M.; Woodward, M.A.; Brouwer, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    Dissolution of [ 111 In]labeled tablets was measured in vivo in a totally noninvasive manner by using a modification of the perturbed angular correlation technique known as the summation peak ratio method. This method, which requires the incorporation of only 10-12 microCi into the dosage form, provided reliable dissolution data after oral administration of [ 111 In]lactose tablets. These results were supported by in vitro experiments which demonstrated that the dissolution rate as measured by the summation peak ratio method was in close agreement with the dissolution rate of salicylic acid in a [ 111 In]salicylic acid tablet. The method has the advantages of using only one detector, thereby avoiding the need for complex coincidence counting systems, requiring less radioactivity, and being potentially applicable to a gamma camera imaging system

  12. Biologically mediated dissolution of volcanic glass in seawater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staudigel, H.; Chastain, R.A.; Yayanos, A.; Davies, G.R.; Verdurmen, E.; Schiffman, P.; Bourcier, R.; de Baar, H.

    1998-01-01

    We studied the effects of biological mediation on the dissolution of basaltic glass in seawater. Experiments with typical seawater microbial populations were contrasted with a sterile control, and reactions were monitored chemically and isotopically. Biologically mediated experiments produce twice

  13. Selective dissolution of americium by ferricyanide ions in basic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, D.; Fouchard, S.; Simoni, E.

    2000-01-01

    of americium by a basic ferricyanide solution could set the stage for a process whereby Am can be separated from other transplutonium elements and from lanthanides. The dissolved americium is highly pure but its low solubility poses a possible limitation to process development. From the more fundamental standpoint, the broad outlines of a mechanism accounting for americium dissolution by ferricyanide ions in basic media were established from experimental findings. (authors)

  14. Hyperpolarized 13C metabolic imaging using dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurd, Ralph E.; Yen, Yi‐Fen; Chen, Albert

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation of this techn......This article describes the basic physics of dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization (dissolution‐DNP), and the impact of the resulting highly nonequilibrium spin states, on the physics of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection. The hardware requirements for clinical translation...

  15. Characterization of the hydrodynamics in a miniaturized dissolution apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer E; Plum, Jakob; Mosleh, Majid

    2018-01-01

    The hydrodynamics of a miniaturized dissolution apparatus was characterized using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and analyzed in relation to the biorelevance and robustness of measurements of drug dissolution and precipitation kinetics from supersaturated drug solutions. The effect...... geometry influences the hydrodynamics of the system and indicates that an off-center probe position may result in more robust measurements. Furthermore, the study shows that the agitator geometry has a significant effect on supersaturation studies due to differences in the hydrodynamic shear produced...

  16. Dissolution of Kansas evaporites: the radioactive waste disposal problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.J.

    1977-01-01

    The radioactive waste repository at Lyons, Kansas, focused attention on the problem of evaporite dissolution. More study is needed in the determination of the mechanisms responsible for deterioration. Also, recent water-use policies have been questioned with the need pointed out for increased effectiveness in planning. Good water planning has to take into account the role of evaporite dissolution in water quality. 23 references

  17. Etudes des mecanismes de dissolution des phosphates naturels de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dans le cadre de la recherche sur la dissolution du phosphate calcique apatitique, une étude du mécanisme de cette dissolution basé sur la complexation des ions métalliques du minerai par deux acides humiques extraits d'un sol (AHS) et d'un compost (AHC) a été réalisée. L'ion calcium (Ca2+), ion majoritaire dans les ...

  18. AFS-2 FLOWSHEET MODIFICATIONS TO ADDRESS THE INGROWTH OF PU(VI) DURING METAL DISSOLUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapse, K.; Rudisill, T.; O' Rourke, P.; Kyser, E.

    2014-07-02

    In support of the Alternate Feed Stock Two (AFS-2) PuO{sub 2} production campaign, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) conducted a series of experiments concluding that dissolving Pu metal at 95°C using a 6–10 M HNO{sub 3} solution containing 0.05–0.2 M KF and 0–2 g/L B could reduce the oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) as compared to dissolving Pu metal under the same conditions but at or near the boiling temperature. This flowsheet was demonstrated by conducting Pu metal dissolutions at 95°C to ensure that PuO{sub 2} solids were not formed during the dissolution. These dissolution parameters can be used for dissolving both Aqueous Polishing (AP) and MOX Process (MP) specification materials. Preceding the studies reported herein, two batches of Pu metal were dissolved in the H-Canyon 6.1D dissolver to prepare feed solution for the AFS-2 PuO{sub 2} production campaign. While in storage, UV-visible spectra obtained from an at-line spectrophotometer indicated the presence of Pu(VI). Analysis of the solutions also showed the presence of Fe, Ni, and Cr. Oxidation of Pu(IV) produced during metal dissolution to Pu(VI) is a concern for anion exchange purification. Anion exchange requires Pu in the +4 oxidation state for formation of the anionic plutonium(IV) hexanitrato complex which absorbs onto the resin. The presence of Pu(VI) in the anion feed solution would require a valence adjustment step to prevent losses. In addition, the presence of Cr(VI) would result in absorption of chromate ion onto the resin and could limit the purification of Pu from Cr which may challenge the purity specification of the final PuO{sub 2} product. Initial experiments were performed to quantify the rate of oxidation of Pu(IV) to Pu(VI) (presumed to be facilitated by Cr(VI)) as functions of the HNO{sub 3} concentration and temperature in simulated dissolution solutions containing Cr, Fe, and Ni. In these simulated Pu dissolutions studies, lowering the temperature from near boiling

  19. Preparation, characterization and dissolution of passive oxide film on the 400 series stainless steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyaseelan, V.S.; Rufus, A.L.; Chandramohan, P.; Subramanian, H.; Velmurugan, S., E-mail: svelu@igcar.gov.in

    2015-12-15

    Full system decontamination of Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) resulted in low decontamination factors (DF) on stainless steel (SS) surfaces. Hence, studies were carried out with 403 SS and 410 SS that are the material of construction of “End-Fitting body” and “End-Fitting Liner tubes”. Three formulations were evaluated for the dissolution of passive films formed over these alloys viz., i) Two-step process consisting of oxidation and reduction reactions, ii) Dilute Chemical Decontamination (DCD) and iii) High Temperature Process. The two-step and high temperature processes could dissolve the oxide completely while the DCD process could remove only 60%. Various techniques like XRD, Raman spectroscopy and SEM-EDX were used for assessing the dissolution process. The two-step process is time consuming, laborious while the high temperature process is less time consuming and is recommended for SS decontamination. - Graphical abstract: SEM micrograph of the oxide film formed in an autoclave over the 403 SS and 410 SS surfaces, the “End-Fitting Body and End-Fitting Liner” materials of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). - Highlights: • The oxides formed over 403 and 410 SS are spinels similar to magnetite. • Oxide is duplex in nature with chromium rich inner layer. • Dilute Chemical Decontamination process could dissolve only 60% of the oxide. • Oxidation-Reduction process dissolves 100% oxide layer but time consuming. • High Temperature process is 100% efficient and less time consuming.

  20. Dissolution of nuclear fuels; Disolucion de combustibles Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uriarte Hueda, A.; Berberana Eizmendi, M.; Rainey, R.

    1968-07-01

    A laboratory study was made of the instantaneous dissolution rate (IDR) for unirradiated uranium metal rods and UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} pellets in boiling nitric acid alone and with additives. The uranium metal and UO{sub 2} dissolved readily in nitric acid alone; PuO{sub 2} dissolved slowly even with the addition of fluoride; PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} pellets containing as much as 35% PuO{sub 2} in UO{sub 2} gave values of the instantaneous dissolution rate to indicate can be dissolved with nitric acid alone. An equation to calculate the time for complete dissolution has been determinate in function of the instantaneous dissolution rates. The calculated values agree with the experimental. Uranium dioxide pellets from various sources but all having a same density varied in instantaneous dissolution rate. All the pellets, however, have dissolved ved in the same time. The time for complete dissolution of PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} pellets, having the same composition, and the concentration of the used reagents are function of the used reagents are function of the fabrication method. (Author) 8 refs.

  1. DISSOLUTION CHARACTERISTIC OF CHLORAMPHENICOL PALMITATE-LIPOSOMAL PREPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Rafiee-Tehrani

    1990-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid dispersions of chloramphenicol palmitate and dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (lecithin have been produced both as copreci-pitate and physical mixtures. The dissolution behavior of both forms were compared with pure chloramphenicol palrnitate st different weight ratios of chloramphenicol palrnitate-lecithin (liposomal system; as well as various pH. The dissolution characteristic of physical mixtures for different weight ratios of chloramphenicol palmitate-lecithin was similar to the pure drug. Whereas, the coprecipitates produced a 2.8 fold greater initial dissolution rate (1DR and a 2.4 fold greater drug release concentration after 60 min at a chloramphenicol palmitatc-lecithin weight ratio of 19:1. However, lecithin content enhancement to 9:1, 4:1 and 1.5:1 compositions, resulted in a further increase of 6%, 21%. and 24%. respectively in the initial dissolution rate. In¬creasing the lecithin content shows only a slight increase (8.5°c on drug release after 60 min when, the chloramphenicol palrnitate lecithin weight ratio was 1.5:1. However, other weight ratios did not show any effect on the improvement of drug release after 60 min. I he effect of pH of the medium on dissolution was slight, but varied with composition of the system."nIn conclusion, liposome encapsulation of chloramphenicol palmitale has a significant effect on dissolution improvement of this drug.

  2. Dissolution and Precipitation Behaviour during Continuous Heating of Al–Mg–Si Alloys in a Wide Range of Heating Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Julia; Milkereit, Benjamin; Schick, Christoph; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, the dissolution and precipitation behaviour of four different aluminium alloys (EN AW-6005A, EN AW-6082, EN AW-6016, and EN AW-6181) in four different initial heat treatment conditions (T4, T6, overaged, and soft annealed) was investigated during heating in a wide dynamic range. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to record heating curves between 20 and 600 °C. Heating rates were studied from 0.01 K/s to 5 K/s. We paid particular attention to control baseline stability, generating flat baselines and allowing accurate quantitative evaluation of the resulting DSC curves. As the heating rate increases, the individual dissolution and precipitation reactions shift to higher temperatures. The reactions during heating are significantly superimposed and partially run simultaneously. In addition, precipitation and dissolution reactions are increasingly suppressed as the heating rate increases, whereby exothermic precipitation reactions are suppressed earlier than endothermic dissolution reactions. Integrating the heating curves allowed the enthalpy levels of the different initial microstructural conditions to be quantified. Referring to time–temperature–austenitisation diagrams for steels, continuous heating dissolution diagrams for aluminium alloys were constructed to summarise the results in graphical form. These diagrams may support process optimisation in heat treatment shops.

  3. Microfibrous Solid Dispersions of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs Produced via Centrifugal Spinning: Unexpected Dissolution Behavior on Recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Stefania; Barker, Susan A; Raimi-Abraham, Bahijja T; Missaghi, Shahrzad; Rajabi-Siahboomi, Ali; Aliev, Abil E; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2017-05-01

    Temperature-controlled, solvent-free centrifugal spinning may be used as a means of rapid production of amorphous solid dispersions in the form of drug-loaded sucrose microfibers. However, due to the high content of amorphous sucrose in the formulations, such microfibers may be highly hygroscopic and unstable on storage. In this study, we explore both the effects of water uptake of the microfibers and the consequences of deliberate recrystallization for the associated dissolution profiles. The stability of sucrose microfibers loaded with three selected BCS class II model drugs (itraconazole (ITZ), olanzapine (OLZ), and piroxicam (PRX)) was investigated under four different relative humidity conditions (11, 33, 53, and 75% RH) at 25 °C for 8 months, particularly focusing on the effect of the highest level of moisture (75% RH) on the morphology, size, drug distribution, physical state, and dissolution performance of microfibers. While all samples were stable at 11% RH, at 33% RH the ITZ-sucrose system showed greater resistance against devitrification compared to the OLZ- and PRX-sucrose systems. For all three samples, the freshly prepared microfibers showed enhanced dissolution and supersaturation compared to the drug alone and physical mixes; surprisingly, the dissolution advantage was largely maintained or even enhanced (in the case of ITZ) following the moisture-induced recrystallization under 75% RH. Therefore, this study suggests that the moisture-induced recrystallization process may result in considerable dissolution enhancement compared to the drug alone, while overcoming the physical stability risks associated with the amorphous state.

  4. Effects of Biorelevant Media Components on Dissolution Behaviour of 1,2,4-Thiadiazole Derivative Designed for Alzheimer's Disease Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promzeleva, Maria; Chislov, Mikhail; Volkova, Tatyana; Proshin, Alexey; Kumeev, Roman; Terekhova, Irina

    2018-02-01

    In this study, dissolution behaviour of 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivative (1-[5-(3-chloro-phenylamino)-1,2,4-thiadiazol-3-yl]-propan-2-ol) displaying an anti-Alzheimer activity was examined in biorelevant media such as Simulated Gastric Fluid (SGF, pH 1.2), Fasted State Simulated Gastric Fluid (FaSSGF, pH 1.6) and Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF, pH 6.5). It was found that solubility and dissolution rate of 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivative under consideration are not strongly dependent on pH, whereas these parameters are significantly affected by the buffer composition. Dissolution was found to be more effective in buffers composed of the surfactant micelles. It was demonstrated that considerable increase in solubility and dissolution rate in SGF is achieved through the interaction of 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivative with the micelles of sodium dodecyl sulfate. On the contrary, CMC of sodium taurochalate was shifted in the presence of 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivative, therefore, dissolution process is not so efficient in FaSSIF. Interactions occurring between 1,2,4-thiadiazole derivative and the components of biorelevant media were investigated in detail by means of UV/VIS spectroscopy, 1 H-NMR and phase solubility methods. © 2018 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  5. The measurement of mixture homogeneity and dissolution to predict the degree of drug agglomerate breakdown achieved through powder mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, M M; Van der Watt, J G

    1994-11-01

    Interactive mixing of agglomerates of small, cohesive particles with coarse carrier particles facilitate the deaggregation of agglomerates. In this study dispersion of agglomerates of microfine furosemide particles by such a mixing process was followed by measuring changes in the content uniformity and area under the dissolution curve. Interactive mixtures between agglomerates of different sized furosemide particles and coarse sodium chloride particles were prepared using different mixers, mixing times and mixer speeds. The dissolution rate of the drug from and content uniformity of the mixtures were measured, and degrees of dispersion were calculated. These degrees of dispersion were compared to the dispersion values obtained from the decrease in agglomerate size after mixing. An increase in mixing time led to an increase in dispersion. An initial fast deagglomeration, indicated by an increase in dissolution, increase in content uniformity and a decrease in particle size, was followed by substantially slower deaggregation of remaining agglomerates and smaller aggregates. For all mixtures studied the degree of dispersion estimated from dissolution measurements, when compared to equivalent content uniformity measurements, agreed closely with the degree of dispersion as indicated by the decrease in particle size. The use of the area under the dissolution curve to predict agglomerate breakdown proved useful and may find application in situations where it is impossible to follow directly deagglomeration through particle size measurements.

  6. Impact of evaporite dissolution and collapse on highways and other cultural features in the Texas Panhandle and Eastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpkins, W.W.; Gustavson, T.C.; Alhades, A.B.; Hoadley, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    Geological investigations in the Texas Panhandle and eastern New Mexico indicate that regional subsurface dissolution of Permian evaporites has occurred and is an ongoing process. Evidence of removal of large volumes of evaporites (mainly halite) and collapse of overlying beds is demonstrated by cross sections constructed from gamma-ray logs. Surface manifestation of subsurface dissolution and collapse is clearly shown in Hall County, Texas, where over 400 sinkholes and undrained depressions have been identified from aerial photographs. Sinkhole diameters up to approximately 100 m (300 ft) and depths to 15 m (50 ft) have been observed. Eleven active northeast- and southwest-trending fractures and faults have been recognizd, some of which are demonstrated as patched sections of highways. Formation of collapse features and faults that damage highways is a recognized problem in the region. Stock tanks and large reservors are also affected to a lesser degree. Dissolution and collapse pose difficult problems for geologists, highway engineers, and maintenance crews. Areas of active subsurface dissolution have been identified, but development of collapse features and faults at the surface generally follows no predictable pattern. The history of, and potential for, evaporite dissolution sould be investigated in each area before construction of highways, reservoirs, and stock tanks. Areas with high densities of collapse features, fractures, and faults should be avoided when possible

  7. Montmorillonite dissolution kinetics: Experimental and reactive transport modeling interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelli, Chiara; Yokoyama, Shingo; Cama, Jordi; Huertas, F. Javier

    2018-04-01

    The dissolution kinetics of K-montmorillonite was studied at 25 °C, acidic pH (2-4) and 0.01 M ionic strength by means of well-mixed flow-through experiments. The variations of Si, Al and Mg over time resulted in high releases of Si and Mg and Al deficit, which yielded long periods of incongruent dissolution before reaching stoichiometric steady state. This behavior was caused by simultaneous dissolution of nanoparticles and cation exchange between the interlayer K and released Ca, Mg and Al and H. Since Si was only involved in the dissolution reaction, it was used to calculate steady-state dissolution rates, RSi, over a wide solution saturation state (ΔGr ranged from -5 to -40 kcal mol-1). The effects of pH and the degree of undersaturation (ΔGr) on the K-montmorillonite dissolution rate were determined using RSi. Employing dissolution rates farthest from equilibrium, the catalytic pH effect on the K-montmorillonite dissolution rate was expressed as Rdiss = k·aH0.56±0.05 whereas using all dissolution rates, the ΔGr effect was expressed as a non-linear f(ΔGr) function Rdiss = k · [1 - exp(-3.8 × 10-4 · (|ΔGr|/RT)2.13)] The functionality of this expression is similar to the equations reported for dissolution of Na-montmorillonite at pH 3 and 50 °C (Metz, 2001) and Na-K-Ca-montmorillonite at pH 9 and 80 °C (Cama et al., 2000; Marty et al., 2011), which lends support to the use of a single f(ΔGr) term to calculate the rate over the pH range 0-14. Thus, we propose a rate law that also accounts for the effect of pOH and temperature by using the pOH-rate dependence and the apparent activation energy proposed by Rozalén et al. (2008) and Amram and Ganor (2005), respectively, and normalizing the dissolution rate constant with the edge surface area of the K-montmorillonite. 1D reactive transport simulations of the experimental data were performed using the Crunchflow code (Steefel et al., 2015) to quantitatively interpret the evolution of the released cations

  8. High contrast XMT studies of in-situ electrochemical dissolution of broken dental tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, David; Mitchell, Alison; Khine, Sean; Davis, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Fracture of nickel-titanium (NiTi) endodontic files is an uncommon but potentially damaging occurrence during root canal preparation. If the broken portion of the file remains inside the tooth canal it can prevent complete preparation of the root canal with consequent negative impact on treatment outcomes. Removal of file fragment from the tooth canal is currently a mechanical process, which due to the limited working space and restricted view can lead to further problems including perforation of the tooth. Electrochemical dissolution is a relatively new method proposed to dissolve a fractured instrument, fully or partially within the canal, to enable its removal. In this article we explore the effects of electrochemical dissolution on the root canal environment using high contrast time delay integration (TDI) X-ray micro-tomography (XMT) designed specifically for dental research.

  9. Influence of Experimental Conditions on Electronic Tongue Results—Case of Valsartan Minitablets Dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Wesoły

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A potentiometric electronic tongue was applied to study the release of valsartan from pharmaceutical formulations, i.e., minitablets uncoated and coated with Eudragit E. Special attention was paid to evaluate the influence of medium temperature and composition, as well as to compare the performances of the sensor arrays working in various hydrodynamic conditions. The drug dissolution profiles registered with the ion-sensitive electrodes were compared with standard dissolution tests performed with USP Apparatus 2 (paddle. Moreover, the signal changes of all sensors were processed by principal component analysis to visualize the release modifications, related to the presence of the coating agent. Finally, the importance and influence of the experimental conditions on the results obtained using potentiometric sensor arrays were discussed.

  10. Chlorite, Biotite, Illite, Muscovite, and Feldspar Dissolution Kinetics at Variable pH and Temperatures up to 280 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lammers, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Summary Sheet silicates and clays are ubiquitous in geothermal environments. Their dissolution is of interest because this process contributes to scaling reactions along fluid pathways and alteration of fracture surfaces, which could affect reservoir permeability. In order to better predict the geochemical impacts on long-term performance of engineered geothermal systems, we have measured chlorite, biotite, illite, and muscovite dissolution and developed generalized kinetic rate laws that are applicable over an expanded range of solution pH and temperature for each mineral. This report summarizes the rate equations for layered silicates where data were lacking for geothermal systems.

  11. Dynamic Self-Assembly Induced Rapid Dissolution of Cellulose at Low Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.; Zhang, L.; Liu, S.; Liu, Y.; Xu, X.; Chen, X.; Chu, B.; Guo, X.; Xu, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose can be dissolved in precooled (-12 C) 7 wt % NaOH-12 wt % urea aqueous solution within 2 min. This interesting process, to our knowledge, represents the most rapid dissolution of native cellulose. The results from 13C NMR, 15N NMR, 1H NMR, FT-IR, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) suggested that NaOH 'hydrates' could be more easily attracted to cellulose chains through the formation of new hydrogen-bonded networks at low temperatures, while the urea hydrates could not be associated directly with cellulose. However, the urea hydrates could possibly be self-assembled at the surface of the NaOH hydrogen-bonded cellulose to form an inclusion complex (IC), leading to the dissolution of cellulose. Scattering experiments, including dynamic and static light scattering, indicated that most cellulose molecules, with limited amounts of aggregation, could exist as extended rigid chains in dilute solution. Further, the cellulose solution was relatively unstable and could be very sensitive to temperature, polymer concentration, and storage time, leading to additional aggregations. TEM images and WAXD provided experimental evidence on the formation of a wormlike cellulose IC being surrounded with urea. Therefore, we propose that the cellulose dissolution at -12 C could arise as a result of a fast dynamic self-assembly process among solvent small molecules (NaOH, urea, and water) and the cellulose macromolecules.

  12. Effect of ingested lipids on drug dissolution and release with concurrent digestion: a modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukozturk, Fulden; Di Maio, Selena; Budil, David E.; Carrier, Rebecca L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To mechanistically study and model the effect of lipids, either from food or self-emulsifying drug delivery systems (SEDDS), on drug transport in the intestinal lumen. Methods Simultaneous lipid digestion, dissolution/release, and drug partitioning were experimentally studied and modeled for two dosing scenarios: solid drug with a food-associated lipid (soybean oil) and drug solubilized in a model SEDDS (soybean oil and Tween 80 at 1:1 ratio). Rate constants for digestion, permeability of emulsion droplets, and partition coefficients in micellar and oil phases were measured, and used to numerically solve the developed model. Results Strong influence of lipid digestion on drug release from SEDDS and solid drug dissolution into food-associated lipid emulsion were observed and predicted by the developed model. 90 minutes after introduction of SEDDS, there was 9% and 70% drug release in the absence and presence of digestion, respectively. However, overall drug dissolution in the presence of food-associated lipids occurred over a longer period than without digestion. Conclusion A systems-based mechanistic model incorporating simultaneous dynamic processes occurring upon dosing of drug with lipids enabled prediction of aqueous drug concentration profile. This model, once incorporated with a pharmacokinetic model considering processes of drug absorption and drug lymphatic transport in the presence of lipids, could be highly useful for quantitative prediction of impact of lipids on bioavailability of drugs. PMID:24234918

  13. Accurate rates of the complex mechanisms for growth and dissolution of minerals using a combination of rare event theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stack, Andrew G.; Raiten, Paolo; Gale, Julian D.

    2012-01-01

    Mineral growth and dissolution are often treated as occurring via a single, reversible process that governs the rate of reaction. We show that multiple, distinct intermediate states can occur during both growth and dissolution. Specifically, we have used metadynamics, a method to efficiently explore the free energy landscape of a system, coupled to umbrella sampling and reactive flux calculations, to examine the mechanism and rates of attachment and detachment of a barium ion onto a stepped, barite (BaSO4) surface. The activation energies calculated for the rate limiting reactions, which are different for attachment and detachment, precisely match those measured experimentally during both growth and dissolution. These results can potentially explain anomalous, non-steady state mineral reaction rates observed experimentally, and will enable the design of more efficient growth inhibitors and facilitate an understanding of the effect of impurities.

  14. Dissolution of biogenic ooze over basement edifices in the equatorial Pacific with implications for hydrothermal ventilation of the oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekins, B.A.; Spivack, A.J.; Davis, E.E.; Mayer, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Recent observations indicate that curious closed depressions in carbonate sediments overlying basement edifices are widespread in the equatorial Pacific. A possible mechanism for their creation is dissolution by fluids exiting basement vents from off-axis hydrothermal flow. Quantitative analysis based on the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate and cooling of basement fluids during ascent provides an estimate for the dissolution capacity of the venting fluids. Comparison of the dissolution capacity and fluid flux with typical equatorial Pacific carbonate mass accumulation rates shows that this mechanism is feasible. By maintaining sediment-free basement outcrops, the process may promote widespread circulation of relatively unaltered seawater in the basement in an area where average sediment thicknesses are 300-500 m. The enhanced ventilation can explain several previously puzzling observations in this region, including anomalously low heat flux, relatively unaltered seawater in the basement, and aerobic and nitrate-reducing microbial activity at the base of the sediments. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  15. Study of the kinetics and mechanism of the dissolution of PUO2 by Cr(II) ion in acidic medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machuron-Mandard, X.

    1991-11-01

    The study of the dissolution of actinides oxides is a topic of particular importance in nuclear energy production. The present study deals with the understanding of the reductive dissolution of PuO 2 in sulfuric acid media under the action of Cr 2+ aq ion. In the first chapter of the document, crystallographic and electronic properties of PuO 2 are described, followed by informations related to its dissolution in acidic media. The second chapter concerns the presentation of the different theories usable to interpret the kinetics of heterogeneous reaction and those for the understanding of electronic transfer applied to semi-conductors. With the help of the above mathematical tools an empirical law rate is established and a reactional model proposed. It appears that the electronic transfer is purely of the heterogenous nature and that the limiting step of the overall process corresponds certainly to the rupture of plutonium oxygen bond [fr

  16. Dissolution studies of poorly soluble drug nanosuspensions in non-sink conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; De Wulf, Odile; Laru, Johanna; Heikkilä, Teemu; van Veen, Bert; Kiesvaara, Juha; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-06-01

    Sink conditions used in dissolution tests lead to rapid dissolution rates for nanosuspensions, causing difficulties in discriminating dissolution profiles between different formulations. Here, non-sink conditions were studied for the dissolution testing of poorly water-soluble drug nanosuspensions. A mathematical model for polydispersed particles was established to clarify dissolution mechanisms. The dissolution of nanosuspensions with either a monomodal or bimodal size distribution was simulated. In the experimental part, three different particle sizes of indomethacin nanosuspensions were prepared by the wet milling technique. The effects of the dissolution medium pH and agitation speed on dissolution rate were investigated. The dissolution profiles in sink and non-sink conditions were obtained by changing the ratio of sample amount to the saturation solubility. The results of the simulations and experiments indicated that when the sample amount was increased to the saturation solubility of drug, the slowest dissolution rate and the best discriminating dissolution profiles were obtained. Using sink conditions or too high amount of the sample will increase the dissolution rate and weaken the discrimination between dissolution profiles. Furthermore, the low solubility by choosing a proper pH of the dissolution medium was helpful in getting discriminating dissolution profiles, whereas the agitation speed appeared to have little influence on the dissolution profiles. This discriminatory method is simple to perform and can be potentially used in any nanoproduct development and quality control studies.

  17. The sonochemical dissolution of colloidal CdS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostaric, J.; Mulvaney, P.; Grieser, F.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The passage of ultrasonic radiation through water leads to the formation and subsequent violent collapse of gas/vapour filled microbubbles in solution. The collapse of these microbubbles is extremely rapid, resulting in a virtually adiabatic process in which high temperatures and pressures are produced. In fact, the conditions are vigorous enough to lead to the thermal homolysis of water molecules within the microbubble, resulting in the formation of the highly reactive hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. These radicals can recombine or, in the presence of air, react with oxygen to produce a number of chemically active species which can readily diffuse into the bulk solution. The dissolution of colloidal CdS at pH=10.5 appears to be due to the reaction of H 2 O 2 and O 2 - with the colloid. It was found that the reaction could be inhibited by the addition of Na 2 S to the colloidal solution. Results also show that the reactions involved in the presence of Na 2 S are complex and that sulfur oxyanions most likely partake in the overall scheme once they are formed. The Cd 2+ concentration was measured directly using an ion selective electrode and compared well with an indirect measurement of the concentration obtained from the absorbance of the colloid at 300 nm

  18. Dissolution test for low-activity waste product acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, W. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have measured the mean and standard deviation of the solution concentrations of B, Na, and Si attained in replicate dissolution tests conducted at temperatures of 20, 40, and 70 C, for durations of 3 and 7 days, and at glass/water mass ratios of 1:10 and 1:1. These and other tests were conducted to evaluate the adequacy of the test methods specified in privatization contracts and to develop a data base that can be used to evaluate the reliability of reported results for tests performed on the waste products. Tests were conducted with a glass that we formulated to be similar to low-activity waste products that will be produced during the remediation of Hanford tank wastes. Statistical analyses indicated that, while the mean concentrations of B, Na, and Si were affected by the values of test parameters, the standard deviation of replicate tests was not. The precision of the tests was determined primarily by uncertainties in the analysis of the test solutions. Replicate measurements of other glass properties that must be reported for Hanford low-activity waste products were measured to evaluate the possible adoption of the glass used in these tests as a standard test material for the product acceptance process

  19. The dissolution of adult life and youth as a value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guita Grin Debert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Three intertwined social processes give a special configuration to the dissolution of adult life in contemporary societies. (1 the extension of the age range of the young segment of the population; (2 the creation of new categories to demarcate the later stages of the life cycle 3 the transformation of youth into a commodity, a value that should be attained at any stage of life through the adoption of adequate forms of consumption and lifestyles. Based on how these changes are represented in the media and analyzed in the academic literature, the central argument is that the adulthood acquires different meanings in contemporary Brazilian hierarchical society: when referring to the privileged sectors of our society that figure indicates a "failed consumer" who are incapable of adopting appropriate lifestyles and forms of consumption targeted at ensuring youthfulness; when referring to the poor it indicates a sort of "unattainable fantasy", because the poor are discriminated as individuals unable to reach a stage characterized by maturity, responsibility and commitment.

  20. Growth and dissolution of spherical density enhancements in SCDEW cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonometto, Silvio A.; Mainini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    Strongly Coupled Dark Energy plus Warm dark matter (SCDEW) cosmologies are based on the finding of a conformally invariant (CI) attractor solution during the early radiative expansion, requiring then the stationary presence of ~ 1 % of coupled-DM and DE, since inflationary reheating. In these models, coupled-DM fluctuations, even in the early radiative expansion, grow up to non-linearity, as shown in a previous associated paper. Such early non-linear stages are modelized here through the evolution of a top-hat density enhancement. As expected, its radius R increases up to a maximum and then starts to decrease. Virial balance is reached when the coupled-DM density contrast is just 25-26 and DM density enhancement is Script O(10 %) of total density. Moreover, we find that this is not an equilibrium configuration as, afterwards, coupling causes DM particle velocities to increase, so that the fluctuation gradually dissolves. We estimate the duration of the whole process, from horizon crossing to dissolution, and find zhorizon/zerasing ~ 3 × 104. Therefore, only fluctuations entering the horizon at z lesssim 109-1010 are able to accrete WDM with mass ~ 100 eV—as soon as it becomes non-relativistic—so avoiding full disruption. Accordingly, SCDEW cosmologies, whose WDM has mass ~ 100 eV, can preserve primeval fluctuations down to stellar mass scale.

  1. Enhancement of the dissolution of albendazole from pellets using MTR technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; Al-Anazi, Fars K.

    2012-01-01

    Albendazole (ABZ), a broad-spectrum anthelmintic agent, is poorly absorbed after oral administration due to its low aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to improve albendazole dissolution rate by formulating avicel pellets loaded with 10% w/w drug using extrusion/spheronization technique. In addition the wet masses were characterized by mix torque rheometry (MTR) prior to pelletization process. Different additives (i.e., lactose, Tween 80 and low molecular weight chitosan) were formulated with avicel to enhance the dissolution rate of ABZ from the produced pellets. Moreover, mix torque rheometer was used to quantitatively determine the suitable moisture content in the pastes before the extrusion process. The produced pellets were characterized for their ABZ content, particle size, particle shape, dissolution profile and thermal behaviors. The maximum consistencies (the peak torques) of the wet granules were obtained using 0.667–1.333 ml/g of water or water containing surfactant. Also, the produced pellets have size range from 1036 to 1246 μm. The calculated drug RDR30 for 10%, 30% and 50% lactose concentrations were 1.08, 1.08 and 2.03, respectively, while that calculated for 10%, 30% and 50% w/w chitosan concentrations were 1.71, 3.62 and 3.62, respectively. The results revealed also that increasing the weight ratio of lactose and chitosan was accompanied by a significant reduction of the peak torque magnitude and this was accompanied by an enhanced ABZ dissolution rate. PMID:23960837

  2. Pore-scale supercritical CO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chun; Zhou, Quanlin; Oostrom, Mart; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Mehta, Hardeep

    2017-02-01

    Abstract: Recently, both core- and pore-scale imbibition experiments have shown non-equilibrium dissolution of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and a prolonged depletion of residual scCO2. In this study, pore-scale scCO2 dissolution and mass transfer under drainage conditions were investigated using a two-dimensional heterogeneous micromodel and a novel fluorescent water dye with a sensitive pH range between 3.7 and 6.5. Drainage experiments were conducted at 9 MPa and 40 °C by injecting scCO2 into the sandstone-analogue pore network initially saturated by water without dissolved CO2 (dsCO2). During the experiments, time-lapse images of dye intensity, reflecting water pH, were obtained. These images show non-uniform pH in individual pores and pore clusters, with average pH levels gradually decreasing with time. Further analysis on selected pores and pore clusters shows that (1) rate-limited mass transfer prevails with slowly decreasing pH over time when the scCO2-water interface area is low with respect to the volume of water-filled pores and pore clusters, (2) fast scCO2 dissolution and phase equilibrium occurs when scCO2 bubbles invade into water-filled pores, significantly enhancing the area-to-volume ratio, and (3) a transition from rate-limited to diffusion-limited mass transfer occurs in a single pore when a medium area-to-volume ratio is prevalent. The analysis also shows that two fundamental processes – scCO2 dissolution at phase interfaces and diffusion of dsCO2 at the pore scale (10-100 µm) observed after scCO2 bubble invasion into water-filled pores without pore throat constraints – are relatively fast. The overall slow dissolution of scCO2 in the millimeter-scale micromodel can be attributed to the small area-to-volume ratios that represent pore-throat configurations and characteristics of phase

  3. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harvey, James [NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  4. Purex process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starks, J.B.

    1977-01-01

    The following aspects of the Purex Process are discussed: head end dissolution, first solvent extraction cycle, second plutonium solvent extraction cycle, second uranium solvent extraction cycle, solvent recovery systems, primary recovery column for high activity waste, low activity waste, laboratory waste evaporation, vessel vent system, airflow and filtration, acid recovery unit, fume recovery, and discharges to seepage basin

  5. Electrochemical studies of the effect of H2 on UO2 dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2004-09-01

    This report summarises evidence for the effect of H 2 on the oxidation and dissolution of UO 2 derived from electrochemical studies. In the presence of γ-radiation or with SIMFUEL electrodes containing ε-particles, the corrosion potential (E CORR ) of UO 2 is observed to be suppressed in the presence of H 2 by up to several hundred milli volts. This effect has been observed at room temperature with 5 MPa H 2 (in the case of γ-irradiated solutions) and at 60 deg C with a H 2 partial pressure of only 0.002-0.014 MPa H 2 with the SIMFUEL electrode. The suppression of E CORR in the presence of H 2 indicates that the degree of surface oxidation and the rate of dissolution of UO 2 is lower in the presence of H 2 .The precise mechanism of the effect of H 2 is unclear at this time. The mechanism appears to involve a surface heterogeneous process, rather than a homogeneous solution process. Under some circumstances the value of E CORR approaches the equilibrium potential for the H 2 /H + couple, suggesting galvanic coupling between sites on which this electrochemical process is catalysed and the rest of the UO 2 surface. It is also possible that H* radical species, either produced radiolytically from H 2 O or by dissociation of H 2 on ε-particles or surface-active UO 2+x sites, reduce oxidised U(V)/U(VI) surface states to U(IV). The effect of H 2 on reducing the degree of surface oxidation is only partially reversible, since surfaces reduced in H 2 atmospheres (re-)oxidise more slowly and to a lesser degree than surfaces not previously exposed to H 2 . Homogeneous reactions between dissolved H 2 and either oxidants or dissolved U(VI) cannot explain the observed effects.Regardless of the precise mechanism, the suppression of the degree of surface oxidation results in lower UO 2 dissolution rates in the presence of H 2 . Application of an electro-chemical dissolution model to the observed E CORR values suggests that the fractional dissolution rate of used fuel in the

  6. Dissolution of morphology-controlled Th1-xUxO2 model dioxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingant, N.; Hubert, S.; Barre, N.; Clavier, N.; Dacheux, N.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the morphology of Th 1-x U x O 2 solid solutions on their chemical durability was evaluated considering two routes of preparation, involving either direct precipitation of a precursor or hydrothermal conditions. The great differences in terms of morphology and crystallization state of the so-obtained samples were correlated to an important variation of the specific surface area of the final dioxides then to the density of the sintered pellets fired at 1500 deg. C. In order to evaluate the chemical durability of such materials, leaching tests were undertaken. The dissolution of the samples was associated to low normalized dissolution rates typically ranging from 3.10 -6 g.m -2 .day -1 (HNO 3 10 -4 M) to 2 10 -5 g.m -2 .day -1 (HNO 3 10 -1 M) at 25 deg. C for x equals 0.25. The influence of the x value on the normalized dissolution rate was found to be limited due to the homogenization of the cationic distribution obtained through the precipitation process. Moreover, the good crystallization state initially obtained from hydrothermal conditions led to a higher chemical durability. (authors)

  7. Solubility modelling and thermodynamic dissolution functions of phthalimide in ten organic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Renjie; Wang, Jian; Han, Shuo; Du, Cunbin; Meng, Long; Zhao, Hongkun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The solubility of phthalimide in ten organic solvents were determined. • The solubility were correlated with four thermodynamic models. • The dissolution thermodynamic properties of solution were obtained. - Abstract: In this work, a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was employed to determine the solubilities of phthalimide in methanol, isopropanol, n-propanol, ethyl acetate, acetonitrile, i-butanol, n-butanol, toluene, acetone and ethanol at temperatures ranging from (283.15 to 318.15) K under 0.1 MPa. The solubility of phthalimide in a fixed solvent increases with an increase in temperature. At a certain temperature, the solubility in different solvents decreases according to the following order: acetone > ethyl acetate > (methanol, isopropanol, n-propanol, acetonitrile, i-butanol, n-butanol, ethanol) > toluene. Four models, modified Apelblat equation, λh equation, Wilson model and NRTL model were employed to correlate the solubility of phthalimide in the solvents studied. The evaluated solubilities provide better agreement with the modified Apelblat equation than the other three models. The four thermodynamic models are all acceptable for correlating the solubility of phthalimide in the solvents studied. Furthermore, the standard dissolution enthalpy and excess enthalpy of the solutions were obtained. The dissolution process of phthalimide in the selected solvents is discussed.

  8. Dissolution and powder flow characterization of solid self-emulsified drug delivery system (SEDDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vikas; Siddiqui, Akhtar; Ali, Hazem; Nazzal, Sami

    2009-01-21

    In this study, the dynamics of powder flow upon griseofulvin-self-emulsified drug delivery system (SEDDS) addition to silica and silicates and the effect of these adsorbents on drug release were investigated. SEDDS was adsorbed at SEDDS/adsorbent ratios from 0.25:1 to 3:1 on magnesium aluminum silicate [5 and 80 microm], calcium silicate [25 microm], and silicon dioxide [3.6, 20, and 300 microm]. Powder flow was evaluated using the powder rheometer and compared to angle of repose. Release of drug from a 1:1 SEDDS/adsorbent powder was determined by dissolution using USP Type 2 apparatus. Powder rheometer profiles indicated that effect of SEDDS on the flow behavior of the adsorbents could be correlated to stepwise or continuous growing behavior as observed in wet granulation process. However, due to their porous nature, adsorbents exhibited an initial lag phase during which no change in flow was observed. Dissolution of drug from adsorbed-SEDDS was found to be dependent on pore length and nucleation at the lipid/adsorbent interface. Increase in dissolution rate was observed with an increase in surface area and was independent of the chemical nature of the adsorbents. Therefore, in order to manufacture free flowing powder containing liquid SEDDS, special attention should be given to particle size, specific surface area, type and amount of adsorbent.

  9. Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Terrones, Guillermo; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Sukamto, Johanes H.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2000-01-24

    Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.

  10. The pH-dependent dissolution of wind-transported Saharan dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desboeufs, Karine V.; Losno, RéMi; Vimeux, FrançOise; Cholbi, Sylvain

    1999-09-01

    An open flow reactor was developed and used to study the pH dependency of atmospheric aerosol weathering. Under ultraclean conditions, this reactor enables experiments below the saturation of hydroxy salts and over the short time span (2 hours) that is typical for weathering by rain and cloud water. The weathering simulations show a two-step process of dissolution rates: First, the rate increases quickly during the hydration of the solid particle surface, then after a maximum, it progressively decreases. In general, there is an increase in the dissolution rate of dissolved elements as the pH is lowered. However, between pH 3.80 and 5.30, the dissolution rate for Fe and Cu depends on both H+ and OH- concentrations and exhibits a minimum as a function of pH. This minimum can be related to pHpzc of the mineral containing these elements. The affinity of minerals for H+ was also determined by correlating hydration constants and pH.

  11. Simulating the postprandial stomach: physiological considerations for dissolution and release testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziolek, Mirko; Garbacz, Grzegorz; Neumann, Marco; Weitschies, Werner

    2013-05-06

    Food effects on drug release and absorption from solid oral dosage forms are a common biopharmaceutical problem. The fed state is characterized by different motility and secretory activity of the complete gastrointestinal (GI) tract compared to fasting conditions. Due to long gastric transit times, the postprandial stomach plays an essential role for drug release and the appearance of food effects. Therefore, a concise comprehension of the relationship between food intake and its effect on drug release from solid oral dosage forms is essential to understand their dissolution behavior under fed conditions. This review describes important aspects of stomach physiology occurring after meal ingestion with particular reference to the FDA standard breakfast. A brief overview of oral and gastric food processing and their potential influence on drug release is given. The key factors affecting the intragastric dissolution of solid oral dosage forms and their regional distribution in the stomach are discussed. Additionally, the effects of food properties on gastric emptying kinetics are presented. Mechanical aspects such as intragastric pressures and hydrodynamics caused by gastric peristalsis are defined. The initial state and the dynamic changes of the gastric content during digestion are characterized since the different physicochemical aspects such as pH value, buffer capacity, rheological properties or surface tension may be essential for the in vivo dissolution profiles of oral dosage forms. Possible effects of the discrete interplay of the physiological factors on the in vivo drug delivery behavior of solid oral dosage forms are discussed.

  12. The role of mass balance equations in growth mechanics illustrated in surface and volume dissolutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateshian, Gerard A

    2011-01-01

    Growth mechanics problems require the solution of mass balance equations that include supply terms and account for mass exchanges among constituents of a mixture. Though growth may often be accompanied by a variety of concomitant phenomena that increase modeling complexity, such as solid matrix deformation, evolving traction-free configurations, cell division, and active cell contraction, it is important to distinguish these accompanying phenomena from the fundamental growth process that consists of deposition or removal of mass from the solid matrix. Therefore, the objective of this study is to present a canonical problem of growth, namely, dissolution of a rigid solid matrix in a solvent. This problem illustrates a case of negative growth (loss of mass) of the solid in a mixture framework that includes three species, a solid, a solvent, and a solute, where the solute is the product of the solid dissolution. By analyzing both volumetric and surface dissolutions, the two fundamental modes of growth are investigated within the unified framework of mixture theory.

  13. The anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO2) in slightly alkaline sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keech, P.G.; Goldik, J.S.; Qin, Z.; Shoesmith, D.W.

    2011-01-01

    The corrosion of nuclear fuel under waste disposal conditions is likely to be influenced by the bicarbonate/carbonate content of the groundwater since it increases the solubility of the U VI corrosion product, [UO 2 ] 2+ . As one of the half reactions involved in the corrosion process, the anodic dissolution of SIMFUEL (UO 2 ) has been studied in bicarbonate/carbonate solutions (pH 9.8) using voltammetric and potentiostatic techniques and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The reaction proceeds by two consecutive one electron transfer reactions (U IV → U V → U VI ). At low potentials (≤250 mV (vs. SCE) the rate of the first electron transfer reaction is rate determining irrespective of the total carbonate concentration. At potentials >250 mV (vs. SCE) the formation of a U VI O 2 CO 3 surface layer begins to inhibit the dissolution rate and the current becomes independent of potential indicating rate control by the chemical dissolution of this layer.

  14. Electrochemical mechanism of uranium mononitride dissolution in aqueous solutions of nitric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ershov, Boris G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frumkin Inst. of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry

    2017-09-01

    It was shown that the dissolution of UN with metallic conduction follows an electrochemical mechanism when it proceeds in contact with an electrically conductive medium (HNO{sub 3} solution). According to this mechanism, the oxidation of UN (at the anode) passes an electron into the UN matrix, which is a conductor, and can then reduce nitric acid in a parallel reaction a short distance away at another exposed surface of the UN (at the cathode). As a result, the reduction of HNO{sub 3} affords NO and NO{sub 2}, while oxidation of uranium mononitride affords NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O. The occurrence of these two separate processes accounts for the composition and yields of the products formed from UN and HNO{sub 3} as well as for the nitrogen isotope distribution between them when UN and HNO{sub 3} were labeled with {sup 14} N or {sup 15}N. A mathematical equation describing the dependence of N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O yields on HNO{sub 3} concentration was derived. It was also shown that the calculated value of standard electromotive force of the galvanic pair formed on the UN surface during its dissolution in HNO{sub 3} is high enough to initiate and support the electrochemical mechanism of its dissolution in nitric acid.

  15. The effect of superdisintegrants on the properties and dissolution profiles of liquisolid tablets containing rosuvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vraníková, Barbora; Gajdziok, Jan; Doležel, Petr

    2017-03-01

    The preparation of liquisolid systems (LSS) represents a promising method for enhancing a dissolution rate and bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. The release of the drug from LSS tablets is affected by many factors, including the disintegration time. The evaluation of differences among LSS containing varying amounts and types of commercially used superdisintegrants (Kollidon® CL-F, Vivasol® and Explotab®). LSS were prepared by spraying rosuvastatin solution onto Neusilin® US2 and further processing into tablets. Varying amounts of superdisintegrants were used and the differences among LSS were evaluated. The multiple scatter plot method was used to visualize the relationships within the obtained data. All disintegrants do not showed negative effect on the flow properties of powder blends. The type and concentration of superdisintegrant had an impact on the disintegration time and dissolution profiles of tablets. Tablets with Explotab® showed the longest disintegration time and the smallest amount of released drug. Fastest disintegration and dissolution rate were observed in tablets containing Kollidon® CL-F (≥2.5% w/w). Also tablets with Vivasol® (2.5-4.0% w/w) showed fast disintegration and complete drug release. Kollidon® CL-F and Vivasol® in concentration ≥2.5% are suitable superdisintegrants for LSS with enhanced release of drug.

  16. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamic Dissolution Theory for Multi-Component Solid/Liquid Surfaces Involving Surface Adsorption and Radiolysis Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R B

    2001-01-01

    one of the two models developed, the propagation velocity of the solid-liquid dissolution interface is assumed proportional to configurational entropy discontinuity across the interface. Based on this assumption, the derived functional forms for non-equilibrium rate-thermodynamic force relationships are different from the near-equilibrium, linear rate-thermodynamic force relationships derived from the non-negative entropy dissipation requirement used in the classical approach of Onsager. These analyses of non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes across a propagating discontinuity, along with other idealized dissolution processes that depend on surface adsorption and radiolysis kinetics, provide generic dissolution response functions for empirical and/or regression analysis of data

  17. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of a miniaturized dissolution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenning, G; Ahnfelt, E; Sjögren, E; Lennernäs, H

    2017-04-15

    Dissolution testing is an important tool that has applications ranging from fundamental studies of drug-release mechanisms to quality control of the final product. The rate of release of the drug from the delivery system is known to be affected by hydrodynamics. In this study we used computational fluid dynamics to simulate and investigate the hydrodynamics in a novel miniaturized dissolution method for parenteral formulations. The dissolution method is based on a rotating disc system and uses a rotating sample reservoir which is separated from the remaining dissolution medium by a nylon screen. Sample reservoirs of two sizes were investigated (SR6 and SR8) and the hydrodynamic studies were performed at rotation rates of 100, 200 and 400rpm. The overall fluid flow was similar for all investigated cases, with a lateral upward spiraling motion and central downward motion in the form of a vortex to and through the screen. The simulations indicated that the exchange of dissolution medium between the sample reservoir and the remaining release medium was rapid for typical screens, for which almost complete mixing would be expected to occur within less than one minute at 400rpm. The local hydrodynamic conditions in the sample reservoirs depended on their size; SR8 appeared to be relatively more affected than SR6 by the resistance to liquid flow resulting from the screen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of solution saturation state and temperature on diopside dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, S; Carroll, S A

    2007-03-23

    Steady-state dissolution rates of diopside are measured as a function of solution saturation state using a titanium flow-through reactor at pH 7.5 and temperature ranging from 125 to 175 C. Diopside dissolved stoichiometrically under all experimental conditions and rates were not dependent on sample history. At each temperature, rates continuously decreased by two orders of magnitude as equilibrium was approached and did not exhibit a dissolution plateau of constant rates at high degrees of undersaturation. The variation of diopside dissolution rates with solution saturation can be described equally well with a ion exchange model based on transition state theory or pit nucleation model based on crystal growth/dissolution theory from 125 to 175 C. At 175 C, both models over predict dissolution rates by two orders of magnitude indicating that a secondary phase precipitated in the experiments. The ion exchange model assumes the formation of a Si-rich, Mg-deficient precursor complex. Lack of dependence of rates on steady-state aqueous calcium concentration supports the formation of such a complex, which is formed by exchange of protons for magnesium ions at the surface.

  19. Dissolution rates of amorphous silica in highly alkaline solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niibori, Yuichi; Tochiyama, Osamu; Kunita, Masahisa; Chida, Tadashi

    2000-01-01

    Cement is an essential materials to construct the subsurface radioactive waste disposal system. However, cementitious materials alter the groundwater pH to highly alkaline condition about 13. To comprehend the effect of such a hyperalkaline condition on the repository surroundings, this study focused on the dissolution rates of amorphous silica at [NaOH]=10 -1 mol·dm -3 . The used samples were three kinds of pure commercial silica and a natural silica scale which was obtained from inside wall of the hot-water pipe of a geothermal power plant. The observed dissolution rates were interpreted with using the model, which assumed that the particle sizes decrease with the progress of dissolution. Moreover, due to the particle size distribution anticipated in the natural silica scale, this analysis assumed it contained particles with various initial diameters. In the results, (1) all pure silica samples and at least 60 wt% of the silica scale showed good agreement of the activation energy of the dissolution in the range of 77 through 88 kJ·mol -1 in the highly alkaline solution, (2) these rate constants were of the order of 10 -8 - 10 -7 mol·m -2 ·s -1 at around 310 K and were definitely larger than those already reported for quartz, (3) the specific surface area based on BET method was revealed to be an important factor to give the main difference in the dissolution rates between the synthetic silica and the natural silica. (author)

  20. Solubility and dissolution improvement of ketoprofen by emulsification ionic gelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmaniar, Revika; Tristiyanti, Deby; Hamdani, Syarif; Afifah

    2018-02-01

    Ketoprofen or [2-(3-benzoylphenyl) propionic acid] is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) and an analgesic which has high permeability and low solubility. The purpose of this work was to improve the solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble ketoprofen prepared by emulsification ionic gelation method and utilizing polymer (chitosan) and cross linker (tripolyphosphate, TPP) for particles formulation. The results show that increasing pH value of TPP, higher solubility and dissolution of as-prepared ketoprofen-chitosan was obtained. The solubility in water of ketoprofen-chitosan with pH 6 for TPP increased 2.71-fold compared to untreated ketoprofen. While the dissolution of ketoprofen-chitosan with pH 6 of TPP in simulated gastric fluid without enzyme (0.1 N HCl), pH 4.5 buffer and simulated intestinal fluid without enzyme (phosphate buffer pH 6.8) was increased 1.9-fold, 1.6-fold and 1.2-fold compared to untreated ketoprofen for dissolution time of 30 minutes, respectively. It could be concluded that chitosan and TPP in the emulsification ionic gelation method for ketoprofen preparation effectively increases solubility and dissolution of poorly water-soluble ketoprofen.

  1. Dissolution Enhancement of Rosuvastatin Calcium by Liquisolid Compact Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. J. Kapure

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In present investigation liquisolid compact technique is investigated as a tool for enhanced dissolution of poorly water-soluble drug Rosuvastatin calcium (RVT. The model drug RVT, a HMG-Co A reductase inhibitor was formulated in form of directly compressed tablets and liquisolid compacts; and studied for in-vitro release characteristics at different dissolution conditions. In this technique, liquid medications of water insoluble drugs in non-volatile liquid vehicles can be converted into acceptably flowing and compressible powders. Formulated systems were assessed for precompression parameters like flow properties of liquisolid system, Fourior transform infra red spectra (FTIR analysis, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, and post compression parameters like content uniformity, weight variation, hardness and friability, disintegration test, wetting time, in vitro dissolution studies, effect of dissolution volume on drug release rate, and estimation of fraction of molecularly dispersed drug in liquid medication. As liquisolid compacts demonstrated significantly higher drug release rates, we lead to conclusion that it could be a promising strategy in improving the dissolution of poor water soluble drugs and formulating immediate release solid dosage forms.

  2. Determination of uranium metal concentration in irradiated fuel storage basin sludge using selective dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Sinkov, S.I.; Chenault, J.W.; Schmidt, A.J.; Pool, K.N.; Welsh, T.L.

    2014-01-01

    Irradiated uranium metal fuel was stored underwater in the K East and K West storage basins at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site. The uranium metal under damaged cladding reacted with water to generate hydrogen gas, uranium oxides, and spalled uranium metal particles which intermingled with other particulates to form sludge. While the fuel has been removed, uranium metal in the sludge remains hazardous. An expeditious routine method to analyze 0.03 wt% uranium metal in the presence of >30 wt% total uranium was needed to support safe sludge management and processing. A selective dissolution method was designed based on the rapid uranium oxide dissolution but very low uranium metal corrosion rates in hot concentrated phosphoric acid. The uranium metal-bearing heel from the phosphoric acid step then is rinsed before the uranium metal is dissolved in hot concentrated nitric acid for analysis. Technical underpinnings of the selective dissolution method, including the influence of sludge components, were investigated to design the steps and define the reagents, quantities, concentrations, temperatures, and times within the selective dissolution analysis. Tests with simulant sludge proved the technique feasible. Tests with genuine sludge showed a 0.0028 ± 0.0037 wt% (at one standard deviation) uranium metal analytical background, a 0.011 wt% detection limit, and a 0.030 wt% quantitation limit in settled (wet) sludge. In tests using genuine K Basin sludge spiked with uranium metal at concentrations above the 0.030 wt% ± 25 % (relative) quantitation limit, uranium metal recoveries averaged 99.5 % with a relative standard deviation of 3.5 %. (author)

  3. Dissolution performance of binary amorphous drug combinations--Impact of a second drug on the maximum achievable supersaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasi, Niraj S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-12-30

    An increased number of amorphous formulations of poorly water soluble drugs are being introduced into the market due to their higher transient solubility and thus faster absorption and higher bioavailability. While most amorphous drug products contain a single drug substance, there is a growing trend towards co-formulating compounds in the same dosage form to improve patient compliance. The purpose of the present work was to evaluate the dissolution behavior and maximum achievable solution concentrations of amorphous solid dispersions of co-formulated ritonavir and lopinavir, and to compare the results with individual amorphous solid dispersion formulations. Dispersions of ritonavir and lopinavir were prepared in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) or hydroxypropylmethylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) at a 20% (w/w) total drug loading, both alone and in combination, at three different lopinavir:ritonavir weight ratios. Amorphous films containing both drugs, but no polymer, were also prepared. The dissolution behavior of the dispersions and the amorphous films in non-sink conditions was evaluated, using ultracentrifugation to separate any colloidal material from molecularly dissolved drug. Nanoparticle tracking analysis was used to characterize colloidal material formed during the dissolution process. Results from the dissolution study revealed that, although supersaturated solutions resulted following dissolution, the maximum achievable concentration of each drug, when present in combination, was dramatically lower than when the individual dispersions were dissolved. The maximum achievable solution concentration for systems containing both drugs was found to decrease as the mole fraction of the drug in the amorphous phase decreased. The type of polymer used to formulate the dispersion also appeared to influence the dissolution behavior whereby the HPMCAS dispersions dissolved rapidly, resulting in the generation of a nanodroplets, while the PVP dispersions did not

  4. Feasibility of Using Gluconolactone, Trehalose and Hydroxy-Propyl Gamma Cyclodextrin to Enhance Bendroflumethiazide Dissolution Using Lyophilisation and Physical Mixing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Saleh

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Hydrophobic drugs are facing a major challenge in dissolution rate enhancement and solubility in aqueous solutions; therefore, a variety of methods have been used to improve dissolution rate and/or solubility of bendroflumethiazide as a model hydrophobic drug. Methods: In this study, two main methods (physical mixing and lyophilisation were used with gluconolactone, hydroxyl propyl γ-ccyclodextrin, and trehalose to explore this challenge. Bendroflumethiazide, practically insoluble in water, was mixed with one of the three excipients gluconolactone, hydroxyl propyl γ-cyclodextrin, and trehalose in three different ratios 1:1, 1:2, 1:5. To the best of our knowledge, the dissolution of the drug has not been previously enhanced by using either these methods or any of the used excipients. Samples containing drug and each of the excipients were characterized via dissolution testing, Fourier Transform infra-red spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and scanning electron microscopy. Results: The used methods showed a significant enhancement in dug dissolution rate; physical mixing significantly, p < 0.05, increased the percentage of the drug released with time; for example, bendroflumethiazide dissolution in distilled water was improved from less than 20% to 99.79% within 90 min for physically mixed drug-cyclodextrin 1:5. The lyophilisation process was enhanced and the drug dissolution rate and the highest drug dissolution was achieved for (drug-gluconolactone 1:1 with 98.98% drug release within 90 min. Conclusions: the physical mixing and freeze drying processes significantly increased the percentage of drug release with time.

  5. On the present and future of dissolution-DNP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Dissolution-DNP is a method to create solutions of molecules with nuclear spin polarization close to unity. The many orders of magnitude signal enhancement have enabled many new applications, in particular in vivo MR metabolic imaging. The method relies on solid state dynamic nuclear polarization...... where new ideas will make an impact. Most certainly, the future will take unpredicted directions, but hopefully the thoughts presented here will stimulate new ideas that can further advance the field. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....... at low temperature followed by a dissolution to produce the room temperature solution of highly polarized spins. This work describes the present and future of dissolution-DNP in the mind of the author. The article describes some of the current trends in the field as well as outlines some of the areas...

  6. Characteristics of MOX dissolution with silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeda, Miki; Nakazaki, Masato; Kida, Takashi; Sato, Kenji; Kato, Tadahito; Kihara, Takehiro; Sugikawa, Susumu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    MOX dissolution with silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method is to be applied to the preparation of plutonium nitrate solution to be used for criticality safety experiments at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Safety Engineering Research Facility (NUCEF). Silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method uses the strong oxidisation ability of Ag(II) ion. This method is though to be effective for the dissolution of MOX, which is difficult to be dissolved with nitric acid. In this paper, the results of experiments on dissolution with 100 g of MOX are described. It was confirmed from the results that the MOX powder to be used at NUCEF was completely dissolved by silver mediated electrolytic oxidation method and that Pu(VI) ion in the obtained solution was reduced to tetravalent by means of NO{sub 2} purging. (author)

  7. Turbulent solutal convection and surface patterning in solid dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.S.; Liu, Y.; Ecke, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    We describe experiments in which crystals of NaCl, KBr, and KCl are dissolved from below by aqueous solutions containing concentrations of the respective salts from zero concentration to near saturation. The solution near the solid-liquid interface is gravitationally unstable, producing turbulent hydrodynamic motion similar to thermal convection from a single surface cooled from above. The coupling of the fluid flow with the solid dissolution produces irregular patterns at the solid-liquid interface with a distribution of horizontal length scales. The dissolution mass flux and the pattern length scales are compared with a turbulent boundary layer model. Remarkable agreement is found, showing that the fluid motion controls both the dissolution rate and the interface patterning. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Dissolution of a Tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool in an Anaerobic Sand Tank Aquifer System: Bioenhancement, Ecology, and Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Sara; Becker, Jennifer; Seagren, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Dehalorespiring bacteria that reductively dechlorinate and grow on chlorinated ethenes in the aqueous phase can also achieve treatment of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants in the subsurface via bioenhanced dissolution, i.e., enhanced mass transfer from the DNAPL to the aqueous phase. Theoretical and experimental analyses predict that a number of interrelated physicochemical processes (e.g., advection and dispersion) and biological factors (e.g., biokinetics and competition) may influence the degree of bioenhancement. This research focused on understanding the interrelated roles that hydrodynamics and ecological interactions among dehalorespiring populations play in determining the distribution of dehalorespiring populations and the impact on bioenhanced dissolution and detoxification. The hypotheses driving this research are that: (1) ecological interactions between different dehalorespiring strains can significantly impact the dissolution rate bioenhancement and extent of dechlorination; and (2) hydrodynamics near the DNAPL pool will affect the outcome of ecological interactions and the potential for bioenhancement and detoxification. These hypotheses were evaluated via a multi-objective modeling and experimental framework focused on quantifying the impact of microbial interactions and hydrodynamics on the dissolution rate bioenhancement and plume detoxification using a model co-culture of Desulfuromonas michiganensis BB1 and Dehalococcoides mccartyi 195. The experiments were performed in a saturated intermediate-scale flow cell (1.2 m), with flow parallel to a tetrachloroethene (PCE) pool. Bioenhancement of PCE dissolution by the two dehalorespirers was evaluated using a steady-state mass balance, and initially resulted in a two- to three-fold increase in the dissolution rate, with cis-dichloroethene (cDCE) as the primary dechlorination product. Quantitative analysis of microbial population distribution and abundance using a 16S rRNA gene-based q

  9. Looking for the Self: Phenomenology, Neurophysiology and Philosophical Significance of Drug-induced Ego Dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Millière

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There is converging evidence that high doses of hallucinogenic drugs can produce significant alterations of self-experience, described as the dissolution of the sense of self and the loss of boundaries between self and world. This article discusses the relevance of this phenomenon, known as “drug-induced ego dissolution (DIED”, for cognitive neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. Data from self-report questionnaires suggest that three neuropharmacological classes of drugs can induce ego dissolution: classical psychedelics, dissociative anesthetics and agonists of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR. While these substances act on different neurotransmitter receptors, they all produce strong subjective effects that can be compared to the symptoms of acute psychosis, including ego dissolution. It has been suggested that neuroimaging of DIED can indirectly shed light on the neural correlates of the self. While this line of inquiry is promising, its results must be interpreted with caution. First, neural correlates of ego dissolution might reveal the necessary neurophysiological conditions for the maintenance of the sense of self, but it is more doubtful that this method can reveal its minimally sufficient conditions. Second, it is necessary to define the relevant notion of self at play in the phenomenon of DIED. This article suggests that DIED consists in the disruption of subpersonal processes underlying the “minimal” or “embodied” self, i.e., the basic experience of being a self rooted in multimodal integration of self-related stimuli. This hypothesis is consistent with Bayesian models of phenomenal selfhood, according to which the subjective structure of conscious experience ultimately results from the optimization of predictions in perception and action. Finally, it is argued that DIED is also of particular interest for philosophy of mind. On the one hand, it challenges theories according to which consciousness always involves

  10. Composition and Dissolution of a Migratory, Weathered Coal Tar Creosote DNAPL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin E. Scherr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Opaque, viscous tars derived from the carbonization of fossile carbon feedstocks, such coal tars and creosote, are long-term sources of groundwater contamination, predominantly with poly- and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH. The dissolution, ageing and migratory behavior of dense, non aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL coal tar blobs and pools forming at the aquitard is not sufficiently understood to estimate the risk and adequately design groundwater treatment measures at a contaminated site. In this study, we investigate the composition and dissolution of a migrated, aged creosote DNAPL and corresponding experimental and groundwater profiles using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GCxGC-MS. GC-FID unresolved compounds were attributed to methylated homocyclic species using GCxGC-MS in the Methylanthracene weight range. Equilibrium concentrations were estimated using Raoult’s law, assuming non-ideal behavior. Low molecular weight compounds were found to be prevalent even after decades of weathering, with Naphthalene (8% by mass representing the most abundant identified compound, contrary to the expected preferential depletion of hydrophilic compounds. Morevoer, dimethylnaphthalenes were relatively more abundant in the aqueous boundary layer than in the DNAPL. DNAPL migration over 400m with the groundwater flow effected lower viscosity and specific gravity of the migrated phase body in a superposition of weathering, transport and aquifer chromatography effects. Based on a decomposition of analysed and estimated constituents using the group contribution approach, reference DNAPL values for activity coefficients γi were used to model aqueous solubilities for selected compounds. Anthracene was close to its theoretical precipitation limit in the bulk DNAPL. While laboratory and modelled DNAPL dissolution behavior agree well, field data imply the presence of specific interfacial in situ processes significantly impacting dissolution

  11. Oxidation and dissolution of UO{sub 2} in bicarbonate media: Implications for the spent nuclear fuel oxidative dissolution mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimenez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: francisco.javier.gimenez@upc.edu; Clarens, F. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Casas, I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Rovira, M. [CTM Centre Tecnologic, Avda. Bases de Manresa 1. 08240 Manresa (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bruno, J. [Enresa-Enviros Environmental Science and Waste Management Chair, UPC, Jordi Girona 1-3 B2, 08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2005-10-15

    The objective of this work is to study the UO{sub 2} oxidation by O{sub 2} and dissolution in bicarbonate media and to extrapolate the results obtained to improve the knowledge of the oxidative dissolution of spent nuclear fuel. The results obtained show that in the studied range the oxygen consumption rate is independent on the bicarbonate concentration while the UO{sub 2} dissolution rate does depend on. Besides, at 10{sup -4} mol dm{sup -3} bicarbonate concentration, the oxygen consumption rate is almost two orders of magnitude higher than the UO{sub 2} dissolution rate. These results suggest that at low bicarbonate concentration (<10{sup -2} mol dm{sup -3}) the alteration of the spent nuclear fuel cannot be directly derived from the measured uranium concentrations in solution. On the other hand, the study at low bicarbonate concentrations of the evolution of the UO{sub 2} surface at nanometric scale by means of the SFM technique shows that the difference between oxidation and dissolution rates is not due to the precipitation of a secondary solid phase on UO{sub 2}.

  12. Development of in situ ion selective sensors for dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohets, Hugo; Vanhoutte, Koen; De Maesschalck, Roy; Cockaerts, Paul; Vissers, Bert; Nagels, Luc J.

    2007-01-01

    The dissolution of formulations of the drugs dapoxetine, paliperidone, cinnarizine, tetrazepam, mebeverine, loperamide, galantamine and ibuprofen was studied by an in-line potentiometric measurement system. The transpose of a Nikolskii-Eisenman type function performed the conversion of potential to percentage of dissolution. A novel gradient membrane electrode was developed especially for dissolution, varying continuously in composition from an ionically conducting rubber phase to an electronically conducting solid state PVC/graphite composite. The gradient part had a thickness of 200 μm. The electrodes life span exceeded 6 months. An ion exchange procedure was used to prepare them for one specific drug. This enabled us to use one universal electrode built to measure a wide array of drugs. The system parameters such as accuracy, reproducibility and linearity were presented with the data obtained for the drug dapoxetine. In dissolution, accurate measurements were possible from 10 -9 to 10 -3 M concentrations, for high log P drugs. The effect of t 90 response times on the measurement error was estimated. The t 90 response times of the electrodes were concentration dependent, and varied between 50 and 10 s for, respectively, 10 -6 and 10 -3 M concentrations. Potential drift was studied in detail. The measurements performed with these electrodes showed an accuracy of 1%, and inter- and intra electrode variabilities of 0.6 and 1.7%, respectively. The electrodes were successfully applied in colloidal media containing suspended matter, typically formed during dissolution of tablets. The advantages and pitfalls of potentiometry over the presently used techniques for dissolution testing are discussed

  13. Development of in situ ion selective sensors for dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohets, Hugo [Antwerp University, Chemistry Department, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Vanhoutte, Koen [Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse (Belgium); De Maesschalck, Roy [Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse (Belgium); Cockaerts, Paul [Johnson and Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, Turnhoutseweg 30, B-2340 Beerse (Belgium); Vissers, Bert [Antwerp University, Chemistry Department, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium); Nagels, Luc J. [Antwerp University, Chemistry Department, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerpen (Belgium)]. E-mail: luc.nagels@ua.ac.be

    2007-01-02

    The dissolution of formulations of the drugs dapoxetine, paliperidone, cinnarizine, tetrazepam, mebeverine, loperamide, galantamine and ibuprofen was studied by an in-line potentiometric measurement system. The transpose of a Nikolskii-Eisenman type function performed the conversion of potential to percentage of dissolution. A novel gradient membrane electrode was developed especially for dissolution, varying continuously in composition from an ionically conducting rubber phase to an electronically conducting solid state PVC/graphite composite. The gradient part had a thickness of 200 {mu}m. The electrodes life span exceeded 6 months. An ion exchange procedure was used to prepare them for one specific drug. This enabled us to use one universal electrode built to measure a wide array of drugs. The system parameters such as accuracy, reproducibility and linearity were presented with the data obtained for the drug dapoxetine. In dissolution, accurate measurements were possible from 10{sup -9} to 10{sup -3} M concentrations, for high log P drugs. The effect of t {sub 90} response times on the measurement error was estimated. The t {sub 90} response times of the electrodes were concentration dependent, and varied between 50 and 10 s for, respectively, 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -3} M concentrations. Potential drift was studied in detail. The measurements performed with these electrodes showed an accuracy of 1%, and inter- and intra electrode variabilities of 0.6 and 1.7%, respectively. The electrodes were successfully applied in colloidal media containing suspended matter, typically formed during dissolution of tablets. The advantages and pitfalls of potentiometry over the presently used techniques for dissolution testing are discussed.

  14. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of dissolution-induced changes in permeability and porosity in 3D CO2 reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiwei; Wang, Junye

    2018-02-01

    Dissolution and precipitation of rock matrix are one of the most important processes of geological CO2 sequestration in reservoirs. They change connections of pore channels and properties of matrix, such as bulk density, microporosity and hydraulic conductivity. This study builds on a recently developed multi-layer model to account for dynamic changes of microporous matrix that can accurately predict variations in hydraulic properties and reaction rates due to dynamic changes in matrix porosity and pore connectivity. We apply the model to simulate the dissolution and precipitation processes of rock matrix in heterogeneous porous media to quantify (1) the effect of the reaction rate on dissolution and matrix porosity, (2) the effect of microporous matrix diffusion on the overall effective diffusion and (3) the effect of heterogeneity on hydraulic conductivity. The results show the CO2 storage influenced by factors including the matrix porosity change, reaction front movement, velocity and initial properties. We also simulated dissolution-induced permeability enhancement as well as effects of initial porosity heterogeneity. The matrix with very low permeability, which can be unresolved on X-ray CT, do contribute to flow patterns and dispersion. The concentration of reactant H+ increases along the main fracture paths where the flow velocity increases. The product Ca++ shows the inversed distribution pattern against the H+ concentration. This demonstrates the capability of this model to investigate the complex CO2 reactive transport in real 3D heterogeneous porous media.

  15. Dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization capability study with fluid path

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malinowski, Ronja Maja; Lipsø, Hans Kasper Wigh; Lerche, Mathilde Hauge

    2016-01-01

    Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden of the hyperp......Signal enhancement by hyperpolarization is a way of overcoming the low sensitivity in magnetic resonance; MRI in particular. One of the most well-known methods, dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization, has been used clinically in cancer patients. One way of ensuring a low bioburden...

  16. Effects of alteration product precipitation on glass dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strachan, Denis M.; Neeway, James J.

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control the durability of nuclear waste glass is paramount if reliable models are to be constructed so that the glass dissolution rate in a given geological repository can be calculated. Presently, it is agreed that (boro)silicate glasses dissolve in water at a rate dependent on the solution concentration of orthosilicic acid (H4SiO4) with higher [H4SiO4] leading to lower dissolution rates. Once the reaction has slowed as a result of the buildup of H4SiO4, another increase in the rate has been observed that corresponds to the precipitation of certain silica-bearing alteration products. However, it has also been observed that the concentration of silica-bearing solution species does not significantly decrease, indicating saturation, while other glass tracer elements concentrations continue to increase, indicating that the glass is still dissolving. In this study, we have used the Geochemist’s Workbench code to investigate the relationship between glass dissolution rates and the precipitation rate of a representative zeolitic silica-bearing alteration product, analcime [Na(AlSi2O6)∙H2O]. To simplify the calculations, we suppressed all alteration products except analcime, gibbsite (Al(OH)3), and amorphous silica. The pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix for amorphous silica was substituted for the glass pseudo-equilibrium-constant matrix because it has been shown that silicate glasses act as a silica-only solid with respect to kinetic considerations. In this article, we present the results of our calculations of the glass dissolution rate at different values for the analcime precipitation rate constant and the effects of varying the glass dissolution rate constant at a constant analcime precipitation rate constant. From the simulations we conclude, firstly, that the rate of glass dissolution is dependent on the kinetics of

  17. Evaluation of a dynamic dissolution/permeation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sironi, Daniel; Christensen, Mette; Rosenberg, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    -steady state). To this end, a model case was construed: compacts of pure crystalline hydrocortisone methanolate (HC·MeOH) of slow release rates were prepared, and their dissolution and permeation determined simultaneously in a side-by-side setup, separated by a biomimetic barrier (Permeapad...... dissolution rate and flux influenced each other. Interestingly, for all the dynamic scenarios, the incremental flux values obtained correlated nicely with the corresponding actual donor concentrations. Furthermore, donor depletion was tested using a HC solution. The dynamic interplay between decrease in donor...

  18. Dissolution Kinetics of Stilbite at Various Temperatures under ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pH conditions of the buffer solutions ranged from 8.5 to 12.5. The dissolution rates calculated from silicon concentration of the reacting fluid increased with increasing temperature (4–60 oC) and pH. The dissolution rates ranged from 3.45 x 10-15 (mol cm-2 s-1) at pH 10.7 and 4oC to 1.93 x 10-9 (mol cm-2 s-1) at pH 12 ...

  19. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L.; Rice, Jarret A.; Pantano, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  20. Glass composition and solution speciation effects on stage III dissolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivelpiece, Cory L. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rice, Jarret A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Pantano, Carlo G. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-10-03

    To understand and mitigate the onset of Stage III corrosion of multicomponent oxides waste glasses. Stage III refers to a resumption of the high initial rate of glass dissolution in some glass samples that have otherwise exhibited dissolution at the much lower residual rate for a long time (Stage II). Although the onset of Stage III is known to occur concurrently with the precipitation of particular alteration products, the root cause of the transition is still unknown. Certain glass compositions (notably AFCI) and high pH environmental conditions are also associated with this observed transition.

  1. Observance of polymorphic behaviour during dissolution of insulin and lysozyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bernardo

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Although protein crystallization is a unit operation with potentially high separation factors, it has not been widely used in industry. Protein crystallization studies and practices have hitherto been largely limited to crystallography protocols. Knowledge of the behaviour of protein in solution would help to overcome empiric limitations in protein crystallisation. Thus, dissolution of porcine insulin and hen egg white lysozyme was studied and an unusual variation in solute concentration, with a concentration peak for short dissolution times, was verified. Polymorphic behaviour of protein in solution was observed, which altered physical properties such as solubility.

  2. In situ monitoring of the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebsz, Melinda [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Kollender, Jan Philipp [Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Hassel, Achim Walter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Combinatorial Oxide Chemistry at ICTAS, Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technology of Inorganic Materials (ICTAS), Johannes Kepler University Linz (Austria)

    2017-09-15

    In the present work, which is aimed to monitor in situ the electrochemical dissolution of tungsten by using a Flow-Type Scanning Droplet Cell Microscope (FT-SDCM) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), novel results are reported. The anodic oxide growth and its dissolution on the surface of W have been monitored in situ. The results of this current study show the importance of coupling electrochemical experiments to ICP-MS. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Do Workplace Sex Ratios Affect Partnership Formation and Dissolution?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Michael

    In this paper, I analyse the association between workplace sex ratios and partnership formation and dissolution. I find that the risk of dissolution increases with the fraction of coworkers of the opposite sex at both the female and male workplace. On the other hand, workplace sex ratios...... are not important for the overall transition rate from singlehood to partnership. The results suggest that the workplace constitutes a more important marriage market segment for individuals who are already in a partnership presumably due to higher search cost for (alternative) partners in general....

  4. Dissolution Behaviour of Metal Elements from Several Types of E-waste Using Leaching Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Nik Hisyamudin Muhd; Amira Nordin, Nurul; Mohamad, Fariza; Jaibee, Shafizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Omar, Badrul; Fauzi Ahmad, Mohd; Rahim, Abd Khalil Abd; Kamaruddin, Muhamad Khalif Ikhwan Mohd; Turan, Faiz Mohd; Abu Bakar, Elmi; Yokoyama, Seiji

    2017-08-01

    Rapid development of the electrical and electronic was increasing annually due to the demand by the human being. Increasing production of electrical and electronic product led to the increasing of electric and electronic waste or can be called as the e-waste. The UN Environment Programme estimates that the world generates 20-50 million tons of the e-waste each year and the amount is raising three times faster than other forms of municipal waste. This study is focusing on the investigation of the dissolution behaviour of metal element from several types of e-waste by hydrometallurgical process. Leaching test was conducted on the e-waste by using acid as the reagent solution. Prior to the leaching test, manual dismantling, separation, and crushing process were carried out to the e-waste. The e-waste were characterized by Scanning Electron Microcopy (SEM) and the Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) to define the elements inside the sample of e-waste. While the liquid residue from leaching test was analyzed by using Inductively Couple Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) to define the dissolution behaviour of the metal element that contain in the e-waste. It was found that the longest time for dismantling process was the dismantling of laptop. The dissolution behaviour of Fe, Al, Zn and Pb elements in the e-waste has affected to the increase of pH. The increasing pH led to the reduction of the metals element during leaching process.

  5. Pure drug nanoparticles in tablets: what are the dissolution limitations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heng, Desmond; Ogawa, Keiko; Cutler, David J.; Chan, Hak-Kim; Raper, Judy A.; Ye Lin; Yun, Jimmy

    2010-01-01

    There has been increasing interests for drug companies to incorporate drug nanoparticles into their existing formulations. However, technical knowledge in this area is still in its infancy and more study needs to be done to stimulate growth in this fledging field. There is a need to scrutinize the performance of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets, particularly relating formulation variables to their dissolution performance. Application of the pure form, synthesized without the use of surfactants or stabilizers, is often preferred to maximize drug loading and also to minimize toxicity. Cefuroxime axetil, a poorly water-soluble cephalosporin antibiotic, was used as the model drug in the formulation development. Drug release rate, tablet disintegration time, tensile strength and energy of failure were predominantly influenced by the amount of super-disintegrant, amount of surfactant, compression force and diluent species, respectively. The compression rate had minimal impact on the responses. The main hurdle confronting the effective use of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets is the difficulty in controlling aggregation in solution, which could potentially be aggravated by the tabletting process. Through the use of elevated levels of surfactants (8 w/w% sodium dodecyl sulphate), drug release from the nanoparticle preparation was enhanced from 58.0 ± 2.7% to 72.3 ± 0.7% in 10 min. Hence, it is recommended that physical formulations for pure drug nanoparticles be focused on the particle de-aggregation step in solution, if much higher rates are to be desired. In conclusion, even though pure drug nanoparticles could be easily synthesized, limitations from aggregation may need to be overcome, before successful application in tablets can be fully realized.

  6. Pure drug nanoparticles in tablets: what are the dissolution limitations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heng, Desmond [Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (Singapore); Ogawa, Keiko [Nitto Denko Co. Ltd., Medical Division (Japan); Cutler, David J.; Chan, Hak-Kim, E-mail: kimc@pharm.usyd.edu.a [University of Sydney, Advanced Drug Delivery Group, Faculty of Pharmacy, A15 (Australia); Raper, Judy A. [University of Wollongong, Vice Chancellor' s Unit (Australia); Ye Lin [University of Sydney, School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering (Australia); Yun, Jimmy [Nanomaterials Technology Pty. Ltd. (Singapore)

    2010-06-15

    There has been increasing interests for drug companies to incorporate drug nanoparticles into their existing formulations. However, technical knowledge in this area is still in its infancy and more study needs to be done to stimulate growth in this fledging field. There is a need to scrutinize the performance of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets, particularly relating formulation variables to their dissolution performance. Application of the pure form, synthesized without the use of surfactants or stabilizers, is often preferred to maximize drug loading and also to minimize toxicity. Cefuroxime axetil, a poorly water-soluble cephalosporin antibiotic, was used as the model drug in the formulation development. Drug release rate, tablet disintegration time, tensile strength and energy of failure were predominantly influenced by the amount of super-disintegrant, amount of surfactant, compression force and diluent species, respectively. The compression rate had minimal impact on the responses. The main hurdle confronting the effective use of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets is the difficulty in controlling aggregation in solution, which could potentially be aggravated by the tabletting process. Through the use of elevated levels of surfactants (8 w/w% sodium dodecyl sulphate), drug release from the nanoparticle preparation was enhanced from 58.0 {+-} 2.7% to 72.3 {+-} 0.7% in 10 min. Hence, it is recommended that physical formulations for pure drug nanoparticles be focused on the particle de-aggregation step in solution, if much higher rates are to be desired. In conclusion, even though pure drug nanoparticles could be easily synthesized, limitations from aggregation may need to be overcome, before successful application in tablets can be fully realized.

  7. Pure drug nanoparticles in tablets: what are the dissolution limitations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Desmond; Ogawa, Keiko; Cutler, David J.; Chan, Hak-Kim; Raper, Judy A.; Ye, Lin; Yun, Jimmy

    2010-06-01

    There has been increasing interests for drug companies to incorporate drug nanoparticles into their existing formulations. However, technical knowledge in this area is still in its infancy and more study needs to be done to stimulate growth in this fledging field. There is a need to scrutinize the performance of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets, particularly relating formulation variables to their dissolution performance. Application of the pure form, synthesized without the use of surfactants or stabilizers, is often preferred to maximize drug loading and also to minimize toxicity. Cefuroxime axetil, a poorly water-soluble cephalosporin antibiotic, was used as the model drug in the formulation development. Drug release rate, tablet disintegration time, tensile strength and energy of failure were predominantly influenced by the amount of super-disintegrant, amount of surfactant, compression force and diluent species, respectively. The compression rate had minimal impact on the responses. The main hurdle confronting the effective use of pure drug nanoparticles in tablets is the difficulty in controlling aggregation in solution, which could potentially be aggravated by the tabletting process. Through the use of elevated levels of surfactants (8 w/w% sodium dodecyl sulphate), drug release from the nanoparticle preparation was enhanced from 58.0 ± 2.7% to 72.3 ± 0.7% in 10 min. Hence, it is recommended that physical formulations for pure drug nanoparticles be focused on the particle de-aggregation step in solution, if much higher rates are to be desired. In conclusion, even though pure drug nanoparticles could be easily synthesized, limitations from aggregation may need to be overcome, before successful application in tablets can be fully realized.

  8. An immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann model for biofilm growth and its impact on the NAPL dissolution in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benioug, M.; Yang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The evolution of microbial phase within porous medium is a complex process that involves growth, mortality, and detachment of the biofilm or attachment of moving cells. A better understanding of the interactions among biofilm growth, flow and solute transport and a rigorous modeling of such processes are essential for a more accurate prediction of the fate of pollutants (e.g. NAPLs) in soils. However, very few works are focused on the study of such processes in multiphase conditions (oil/water/biofilm systems). Our proposed numerical model takes into account the mechanisms that control bacterial growth and its impact on the dissolution of NAPL. An Immersed Boundary - Lattice Boltzmann Model (IB-LBM) is developed for flow simulations along with non-boundary conforming finite volume methods (volume of fluid and reconstruction methods) used for reactive solute transport. A sophisticated cellular automaton model is also developed to describe the spatial distribution of bacteria. A series of numerical simulations have been performed on complex porous media. A quantitative diagram representing the transitions between the different biofilm growth patterns is proposed. The bioenhanced dissolution of NAPL in the presence of biofilms is simulated at the pore scale. A uniform dissolution approach has been adopted to describe the temporal evolution of trapped blobs. Our simulations focus on the dissolution of NAPL in abiotic and biotic conditions. In abiotic conditions, we analyze the effect of the spatial distribution of NAPL blobs on the dissolution rate under different assumptions (blobs size, Péclet number). In biotic conditions, different conditions are also considered (spatial distribution, reaction kinetics, toxicity) and analyzed. The simulated results are consistent with those obtained from the literature.

  9. Dissolution of Simulated and Radioactive Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Sludges with Oxalic Acid & Citric Acid Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STALLINGS, MARY

    2004-01-01

    sludge solids. We recommend that these results be evaluated further to determine if these solutions contain sufficient neutron poisons. We observed low general corrosion rates in tests in which carbon steel coupons were contacted with solutions of oxalic acid, citric acid and mixtures of oxalic and citric acids. Wall thinning can be minimized by maintaining short contact times with these acid solutions. We recommend additional testing with oxalic and oxalic/citric acid mixtures to measure dissolution performance of sludges that have not been previously dried. This testing should include tests to clearly ascertain the effects of total acid strength and metal complexation on dissolution performance. Further work should also evaluate the downstream impacts of citric acid on the SRS High-Level Waste System (e.g., radiochemical separations in the Salt Waste Processing Facility and addition of organic carbon in the Saltstone and Defense Waste Processing facilities)

  10. Comparative in vitro dissolution study of carbamazepine immediate-release products using the USP paddles method and the flow-through cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José Raúl; Salazar, Dulce Karina; Hurtado, Marcela; Cortés, Alma Rosa; Domínguez-Ramírez, Adriana Miriam

    2013-01-01

    Dissolution profiles of four carbamazepine immediate-release generic products (200 mg tablets) and the reference product Tegretol® were evaluated using the USP paddles method and an alternative method with the flow-through cell system, USP Apparatus 4. Under official conditions all products met the Q specification, dissolution profiles of generic products were similar to the dissolution profile of the reference product (f2 > 50) and model-independent parameters showed non significant differences to the reference product except mean dissolution time for product A (p < 0.05). On the other hand, when the flow-through cell system was used, none of the products met the pharmacopeial specification at 15 min and product A did not reach dissolution criteria at 60 min, dissolution profiles of all generic products were not similar to the reference product profile (f2 < 50) and all model-independent parameters showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05). Weibull’s model was more useful for adjusting the dissolution data of all products in both USP apparatuses and Td values showed significant differences compared to the reference product (p < 0.05) when USP Apparatus 4 was used. These results indicate that the proposed method, using the flow-through cell system, is more discriminative in evaluating both, rate and extent of carbamazepine dissolution process from immediate-release generic products. PMID:24648826

  11. The effect of formulation additives on in vitro dissolution-absorption profile and in vivo bioavailability of telmisartan from brand and generic formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbás, Enikő; Nagy, Zsombor K; Nagy, Brigitta; Balogh, Attila; Farkas, Balázs; Tsinman, Oksana; Tsinman, Konstantin; Sinkó, Bálint

    2018-03-01

    In this study, brand and four generic formulations of telmisartan, an antihypertensive drug, were used in in vitro simultaneous dissolution-absorption, investigating the effect of different formulation additives on dissolution and on absorption through an artificial membrane. The in vitro test was found to be sensitive enough to show even small differences between brand and generic formulations caused by the use of different excipients. By only changing the type of filler from sorbitol to mannitol in the formulation, the flux through the membrane was reduced by approximately 10%. Changing the salt forming agent as well resulted in approximately 20% of flux reduction compared to the brand formulation. This significant difference was clearly shown in the published in vivo results as well. The use of additional lactose monohydrate in the formulation also leads to approximately 10% reduction in flux. The results show that by changing excipients, the dissolution of telmisartan was not altered significantly, but the flux through the membrane was found to be significantly changed. These results pointed out the limitations of traditional USP dissolution tests and emphasized the importance of simultaneously measuring dissolution and absorption, which allows the complex effect of formulation excipients on both processes to be measured. Moreover, the in vivo predictive power of the simultaneous dissolution-absorption test was demonstrated by comparing the in vitro fluxes to in vivo bioequivalence study results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prediction of oral absorption of griseofulvin, a BCS class II drug, based on GITA model: utilization of a more suitable medium for in-vitro dissolution study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Yoshitsugu; Kadono, Keitaro; Fujie, Yasuko; Metsugi, Yukiko; Ogawara, Ken-ichi; Higaki, Kazutaka; Kimura, Toshikiro

    2007-06-04

    The in-vivo absorbability of drugs categorized into the biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class II is very difficult to be predicted because of the large variability in the absorption and/or dissolution kinetics and the lack of an adequate in-vitro system for evaluating the dissolution behavior. We tried to predict the in-vivo absorption kinetics of griseofulvin, categorized into BCS class II, orally administrated as powders into rats, based on Gastrointestinal-Transit-Absorption model (GITA model), consisting of the absorption, dissolution and GI-transit processes. Using the dissolution rate constants (k(dis)) of griseofulvin obtained with JP 1st solution, JP 2nd solution, FaSSIF, FeSSIF and modified SIBLM as a medium, simulation lines were not able to describe the observed mean plasma profile at all. On the other hand, a calculated line provided by employing k(dis) obtained with MREVID 2 (medium reflecting in-vivo dissolution 2), a new medium, was in better agreement with the observed mean plasma profile than existing media, indicating that the utilization of adequate k(dis) value made it possible to predict the in-vivo absorption kinetics of drugs classified into BCS class II based on GITA model and that MREVID 2 could be a useful medium for describing the in-vivo dissolution kinetics.

  13. The use of commercial microwave dissolution equipment for the fast and reliable dissolution of high-fired POX and MOX samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tushingham, J.; McInnes, C.; Firkin, S.

    1998-09-01

    The use of commercially available microwave dissolution equipment for the fast and reliable dissolution of high-fired plutonium dioxide (POX) and mixed oxide (MOX) samples has been evaluated for application to Safeguards Analysis. Under the auspices of the UK R and D Support Programme to the IAEA, equipment has been purchased and tested for the high-pressure microwave dissolution of POX samples fired to 1250 deg. C and MOX samples fired to 1600 deg. C, in concentrated nitric acid and hydrofluoric acid mixture. Considerable problems were encountered during development of procedures for microwave dissolution, resulting largely from sudden changes in pressure within dissolution vessels, which resulted in actuation of safety interlocks designed to prevent overpressurisation. These difficulties were alleviated by controlling the microwave power to reduce the reaction temperature and pressure, and also by introducing additional safety valves into the digestion vessels. Using microwave digestion, dissolution times for high fired POX and MOX samples were substantially reduced. Samples which required ca. 10 hours to dissolve by conventional means could be dissolved in ca. 80 minutes by microwave digestion. Whilst a similar performance in terms of plutonium recovery was achieved for some materials by microwave and conventional dissolution, for other materials microwave dissolution gave higher plutonium recoveries but with poorer precision. This suggests the possible presence of some plutonium oxide within high-fired materials which is more difficult to dissolve than the bulk, and which is perhaps dissolved to an additional but variable degree by the current microwave dissolution procedure. Microwave dissolution has been demonstrated to increase the speed of dissolution of high-fired POX and MOX materials, compared with conventional dissolution. However, the technique has not yet proved satisfactory for the complete dissolution of all high-fired materials tested because of

  14. Dissolution origin of Ontario Lacus on Titan: evidences from geomorphological mapping, terrestrial analogs (Namibia) and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, T.; Bourgeois, O.; Le Mouélic, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Chevrier, V.; Luspay-Kuti, A.; Wasiak, F. C.; Welivitiya, W. D. D. P.; Lopez Gonzalez, T.; Tobie, G.; Fleurant, C.; Sotin, C.; Barnes, J. W.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Clark, R. N.; Nicholson, P. D.

    2011-10-01

    We compiled an interpretative geomorphological map of this region by merging all these datasets and by making comparisons with terrestrial landforms that closely resemble Titan's lakes: the Etosha pans in Namibia [6]. These terrestrial analogs develop through dissolution process under a semi-arid climate that is probably similar to Titan's climate [6,7]. On the basis of this analogy, we discuss the formation process of Ontario Lacus and other lakes on Titan.

  15. Dissolution kinetics of soil clays in sulfuric acid solutions: Ionic strength and temperature effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bibi, Irshad; Singh, Balwant; Silvester, Ewen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Acid sulfate dissolution of clay-rich sediments from inland acid sulfate site in flow-through reactor experiments at pH 1–4. • Enhanced Al and K release at the higher ionic strength of solutions compared to the lower ionic strength. • Acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of 1.11 kg H 2 SO 4 /tonne clay-rich sediment/day was provided at pH 1, 25 °C. • ANC provided at 45 °C by the same amount of clay-rich sediment was more than three times higher than the ANC at 25 °C. - Abstract: Significant amounts of sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) rich saline water can be produced by the oxidation of sulfide minerals contained in inland acid sulfate soils (IASS). In the absence of carbonate minerals, the dissolution of phyllosilicate minerals is one of very few processes that can provide long-term acid neutralisation. It is therefore important to understand the acid dissolution behavior of naturally occurring clay minerals from IASS under saline–acidic solutions. The objective of this study was to investigate the dissolution of a natural clay-rich sample under saline–acidic conditions (pH 1–4; ionic strengths = 0.01 and 0.25 M; 25 °C) and over a range of temperatures (25–45 °C; pH 1 and pH 4). The clay-rich sample referred to as Bottle Bend clay (BB clay) used was from an IASS (Bottle Bend lagoon) in south-western New South Wales (Australia) and contained smectite (40%), illite (27%), kaolinite (26%) and quartz (6%). Acid dissolution of the BB clay was initially rapid, as indicated by the fast release of cations (Si, Al, K, Fe, Mg). Relatively higher Al (pH 4) and K (pH 2–4) release was obtained from BB clay dissolution in higher ionic strength solutions compared to the lower ionic strength solutions. The steady state dissolution rate (as determined from Si, Al and Fe release rates; R Si , R Al , R Fe ) increased with decreasing solution pH and increasing temperature. For example, the highest log R Si value was obtained at pH 1 and 45 °C (−9

  16. Stability and Comparative Dissolution Studies of Five Brands of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dissolution profiles of five different brands of norfloxacin (400 mg) tablets designated as A, B, C, D, and E, marketed in Addis Ababa were compared with those of an innovator product (F). The stability of these tablets was evaluated under the influence of accelerated conditions (40 °C + 2 °C and 75% ± 5% RH).

  17. Dissolution and Quantification of Tantalum-Containing Compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    The 100 % recovery for both the halide salts clearly indicates the complete dissolution and accurate quantification of the tantalum compounds using nitric acid or a methanol/nitric acid mixture. The small standard deviation also points to good precision in these analyses. The recovery results for Ta2O5 and Ta metal powder ...

  18. Facility for electrochemical dissolution of rejected fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deniskin, V.P.; Filatov, O.N.; Konovalov, E.A.; Kolesnikov, B.P.; Bukharin, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    A facility for electrochemical dissolution of rejected fuel elements with the stainless steel can and uranium of 90% enrichment is described. The start-adjustment works and trial-commercial tests of the facility are carried out. A s a result its technological parameters are determined [ru

  19. Aluminium dissolution for spray pulverization with nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F.; Morales Calvo, G.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative study of the nitric acid dissolution of aluminium, by immersion and spray pulverization has been carried out in laboratory scale. As a result, the optimum operation conditions to control reaction in the plant are fixed. Operation costs are also evaluated. (author) [es

  20. Saving Sinking Ships: Implications from a Theory of Marital Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, Mary Riege

    1978-01-01

    A recently developed theory of marital dissolution that utilizes a systems perspective is briefly presented. The theory was derived from almost 1,300 propositions in extant literature, and is readily understandable to layman, practitioner, and academician. Implications contained within the theory for those concerned with saving floundering marital…

  1. Enhanced dissolution of sildenafil citrate as dry foam tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawatdee, Somchai; Atipairin, Apichart; Sae Yoon, Attawadee; Srichana, Teerapol; Changsan, Narumon

    2017-01-30

    Dry foam formulation technology is alternative approach to enhance dissolution of the drug. Sildenafil citrate was suspended in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution and adding a mixture of maltodextrin and mannitol as diluent to form a paste. Sildenafil citrate paste was passed through a nozzle spray bottle to obtain smooth foam. The homogeneous foam was dried in a vacuum oven and sieved to obtain dry foam granules. The granules were mixed with croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate and compressed into tablet. All formulations were evaluated for their physicochemical properties and dissolution profiles. All the tested excipients were compatible with sildenafil citrate by both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and infrared (IR) analysis. There are no X-ray diffraction (XRD) peaks representing crystals of sildenafil citrate observed form dry foam formulations. The hardness of tablets was about 5 kg, friability test dry foam tablet had higher dissolution rate in 0.1 N HCl in comparison with commercial sildenafil citrate tablet, sildenafil citrate prepared by direct compression and wet granulation method. Sildenafil citrate dry foam tablet with the high-level composition of surfactant, water and diluent showed enhanced dissolution rate than that of the lower-level composition of these excipients. This formulation was stable under accelerated conditions for at least 6 months.

  2. An autoclave system for uranium oxide dissolution experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nykyri, Mikko

    1985-05-01

    According to the decision in principle of the Council of State of Finland the nuclear energy producers must provide preparedness for carrying out the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel in Finland. By the present principal concept the spent fuel will be disposed deep into the granitic bedrock. A parameter needed by risk analysis models is the dissolution rate of the uranium oxide matrix in the fuel pellets. In order to approach conditions prevailing deep in the groundwater, and autoclave system for dissolution experiments was developed at the Technical Research Centre of Finland. The low oxygen content and high pressure at elevated temperatures are simulated in the system. 20 MPa and 100 deg C are the upper operation limits of pressure and temperature. Water can be changed in the experiment autoclave without remarkable pressure and temperature variations. This has been arranged by using three pressure vessels: a supply vessel, a dissolution vessel and a depletion vessel. The extreme vessels serve pressure balancing purposes during water exchange. The water is deoxygenated during a preparation phase in the supply vessel by flushing it with nitrogen gas. Polytetrafluoroethylene is the principal material in contact with the water. A redox electrode couple was developed for potential measurements inside the dissolution vessel. The reference electrode is of Ag/AgCl-type with saturated KC1 electrolyte. A platinum wire operates as a measuring electrode

  3. Investigating Dissolution and Precipitation Phenomena with a Smartphone Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Arcia, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    A novel smartphone microscope can be used to observe the dissolution and crystallization of sodium chloride at a microscopic level. Observation of these seemingly simple phenomena through the microscope at 100× magnification can actually reveal some surprising behavior. These experiments offer the opportunity to discuss some basic concepts such as…

  4. Thin film modeling of crystal dissolution and growth in confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Luca; Pierre-Louis, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    We present a continuum model describing dissolution and growth of a crystal contact confined against a substrate. Diffusion and hydrodynamics in the liquid film separating the crystal and the substrate are modeled within the lubrication approximation. The model also accounts for the disjoining pressure and surface tension. Within this framework, we obtain evolution equations which govern the nonequilibrium dynamics of the crystal interface. Based on this model, we explore the problem of dissolution under an external load, known as pressure solution. We find that in steady state, diverging (power-law) crystal-surface repulsions lead to flat contacts with a monotonic increase of the dissolution rate as a function of the load. Forces induced by viscous dissipation then surpass those due to disjoining pressure at large enough loads. In contrast, finite repulsions (exponential) lead to sharp pointy contacts with a dissolution rate independent of the load and the liquid viscosity. Ultimately, in steady state, the crystal never touches the substrate when pressed against it. This result is independent from the nature of the crystal-surface interaction due to the combined effects of viscosity and surface tension.

  5. Dissolution of Metal Supported Spent Auto Catalysts in Acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornalczyk A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metal supported auto catalysts, have been used in sports and racing cars initially, but nowadays their application systematically increases. In Metal Substrate (supported Converters (MSC, catalytic functions are performed by the Platinum Group Metals (PGM: Pt, Pd, Rh, similarly to the catalysts on ceramic carriers. The contents of these metals make that spent catalytic converters are valuable source of precious metals. All over the world there are many methods for the metals recovery from the ceramic carriers, however, the issue of platinum recovery from metal supported catalysts has not been studied sufficiently yet. The paper presents preliminary results of dissolution of spent automotive catalyst on a metal carrier by means of acids: H2SO4, HCl, HNO3, H3PO4. The main assumption of the research was the dissolution of base metals (Fe, Cr, Al from metallic carrier of catalyst, avoiding dissolution of PGMs. Dissolution was the most effective when concentrated hydrochloric acid, and 2M sulfuric acid (VI was used. It was observed that the dust, remaining after leaching, contained platinum in the level of 0.8% and 0.7%, respectively.

  6. Evaluation of dissolution of nonconventional phosphate fertilizers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dissolution of phosphate rock (PR) depends on inherent chemical and physical properties of the rock and on external factors such as soils and plants. The objective of this study was to investigate, with a soil incubation experiment, the relationship between selected soil factors and extractable phosphorus (P) in order to ...

  7. Enhancement of solubility and dissolution rate of atorvastatin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the formation of atorvastatin calcium (AC) co-crystal to improve its solubility and dissolution rate. Method: Co-crystallization of AC in equimolar ratio with isonicotinamide (INA) was carried out by slow solvent evaporation method using methanol. The solid obtained was characterized by powder x-ray ...

  8. Stability and drug dissolution evaluation of Qingkailing soft/hard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To carry out a post-marketing evaluation of the stability and drug dissolution of Qingkailing soft/hard capsules. Methods: High performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) method was developed for the determination of three key ingredients (chlorogenic acid, geniposide and ...

  9. Scale and distribution of marine carbonate burial dissolution pores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjiang Shen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is gradually accepted that porosity can be created in burial settings via dissolution by organic acid; TSR derived or hydrothermal fluids. The role of deep-buried carbonate reservoirs is becoming more and more important since the degree and difficulty in petroleum exploration of shallow strata are increasing. A profound understanding of the development scale and prediction of the deep-buried carbonate reservoirs is economically crucial. In addition to the formation mechanism, scale and distribution of burial dissolution pores in burial settings are focused on in recent studies. This paper is based on case studies of deep-buried (>4500 m carbonate reservoirs from the Tarim Basin and Sichuan Basin. Case studies mentioned includes dissolution simulation experiments proposes that an open system is of crucial importance in the development of large-scale burial dissolution pores, the distribution pattern of which is controlled by lithology, pre-existing porosity, and pore throat structures. These findings provided the basis for evaluation and prediction of deep-buried carbonate reservoirs.

  10. Controlled dissolution of colossal quantities of nitrogen in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    The solubility of nitrogen in austenitic stainless steel was investigated thermogravimetrically by equilibrating thin foils of AISI 304 and AISI 316 in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. Controlled dissolution of colossal amounts of nitrogen under metastable equilibrium conditions was realized, with ...

  11. Dissolution kinetics and mechanism of pandermite in acetic acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-06-07

    Jun 7, 2010 ... In this study, the dissolution kinetics and mechanism of pandermite mineral was investigated using a batch reactor employing the parameters of particle size, acid concentration, solid/liquid ratio, stirring speed and reaction temperature. From experimental data, it was determined that the conversion rate of.

  12. Anodic dissolution of alloys during electrochemical dimensional machining of parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydov, A.D.

    1980-01-01

    Analysis of the main regularities of anodic dissolution of alloys at current high densities, which is necessary for the explanation and prediction of the results of electrochemical dimensional machining of parts, is carried out. Examples when chemical composition produces the determining effect upon anodic behaviour and electrochemical treatment of the alloys are analyzed

  13. Ocean acidification: Towards a better understanding of calcite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmus, Monica M.; Adkins, Jess; Menemenlis, Dimitris

    2016-11-01

    The drastic increase of anthropogenic CO2 emissions over the past two centuries has altered the chemical structure of the ocean, acidifying upper ocean waters. The net impact of this pH decrease on marine ecosystems is still unclear, given the unprecedented rate at which CO2 is being released into the atmosphere. As part of the carbon cycle, calcium carbonate dissolution in sediments neutralizes CO2: phytoplankton at the surface produce carbonate minerals, which sink and reach the seafloor after the organisms die. On time scales of thousands of years, the calcium carbonate in these shells ultimately reacts with CO2 in seawater. Research in this field has been extensive; nevertheless, the dissolution rate law, the impact of boundary layer transport, and the feedback with the global ocean carbon cycle remain controversial. Here, we (i) develop a comprehensive numerical framework via 1D modeling of carbonate dissolution in sediments, (ii) approximate its impact on water column properties by implementing a polynomial approximation to the system's response into a global ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model (OBGCM), and (iii) examine the OBGCM sensitivity response to different formulations of sediment boundary layer properties. We find that, even though the buria