WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluoride salts potentialities

  1. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich,...

  2. Salt fluoridation and oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M. Marthaler

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to make known the potential of fluoridated salt in community oral health programs, particularly in South Eastern Europe. Since 1922, the addition of iodine to salt has been successful in Switzerland. Goiter is virtually extinct. By 1945, the cariesprotective effect of fluorides was well established. Based on the success of water fluoridation, a gynecologist started adding of fluoride to salt. The sale of fluoridated salt began in 1956 in the Swiss Canton of Zurich, and several other cantons followed suit. Studies initiated in the early seventies showed that fluoride, when added to salt, inhibits dental caries. The addition of fluoride to salt for human consumption was officially authorized in 1980-82. In Switzerland 85% of domestic salt consumed is fluoridated and 67% in Germany. Salt fluoridation schemes are reaching more than one hundred million in Mexico, Colombia, Peru and Cuba. The cost of salt fluoridation is very low, within 0.02 and 0.05 € per year and capita. Children and adults of the low socio-economic strata tend to have substantially more untreated caries than higher strata. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method for improving oral health. Conclusions. Salt fluoridation has cariostatic potential like water fluoridation (caries reductions up to 50%. In Europe, meaningful percentages of users have been attained only in Germany (67% and Switzerland (85%. In Latin America, there are more than 100 million users, and several countries have arrived at coverage of 90 to 99%. Salt fluoridation is by far the cheapest method of caries prevention, and billions of people throughout the world could benefit from this method.

  3. Comparison of molten chloride and fluoride salts potentialities for An/Ln separation by electrodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laplace, A.; Peron, F.; Marrot, F.; Lacquement, J. [DRCP/SCPS/LPP - CEA/CEN Valrho - BP 17171 - 30207 Bagnols/Ceze (France)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this paper is the comparison of molten fluoride and chloride salts potentialities for Am/Nd separation by electrodeposition on inert cathode, on a purely thermodynamic point of view. The molten LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic (77-23 mol.%, at 780 deg. C) was considered for this study. Cyclic voltammetry showed a one step Am(III)/Am reduction at a potential of {approx_equal}+0.5 V vs. Li{sup +}/Li. A potential difference of 290 mV between Am and Nd metallic deposition was estimated by square-wave voltammetry. This Am/Nd potential difference is more important than in molten chlorides (220 mV in the LiCl-KCl eutectic at 500 deg. C). Moreover in molten fluoride salt, the americium and neodymium (+II) oxidation state is not stable contrary to the molten chloride one where corrosion of deposited Am would be potential. However this larger potential difference in molten fluorides is quite balanced by the higher working temperature. (authors)

  4. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Clifton M.; Erin C. Holahan; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing i...

  5. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  6. An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2010-09-01

    Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years

  7. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  8. High Temperature Fluoride Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, Adam M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cunningham, Richard Burns [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Fugate, David L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peretz, Fred J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yoder, Jr, Graydon L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Effective high-temperature thermal energy exchange and delivery at temperatures over 600°C has the potential of significant impact by reducing both the capital and operating cost of energy conversion and transport systems. It is one of the key technologies necessary for efficient hydrogen production and could potentially enhance efficiencies of high-temperature solar systems. Today, there are no standard commercially available high-performance heat transfer fluids above 600°C. High pressures associated with water and gaseous coolants (such as helium) at elevated temperatures impose limiting design conditions for the materials in most energy systems. Liquid salts offer high-temperature capabilities at low vapor pressures, good heat transport properties, and reasonable costs and are therefore leading candidate fluids for next-generation energy production. Liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled, graphite-moderated reactors, referred to as Fluoride Salt Reactors (FHRs), are specifically designed to exploit the excellent heat transfer properties of liquid fluoride salts while maximizing their thermal efficiency and minimizing cost. The FHR s outstanding heat transfer properties, combined with its fully passive safety, make this reactor the most technologically desirable nuclear power reactor class for next-generation energy production. Multiple FHR designs are presently being considered. These range from the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) [1] design originally developed by UC-Berkeley to the Small Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR) and the large scale FHR both being developed at ORNL [2]. The value of high-temperature, molten-salt-cooled reactors is also recognized internationally, and Czechoslovakia, France, India, and China all have salt-cooled reactor development under way. The liquid salt experiment presently being developed uses the PB-AHTR as its focus. One core design of the PB-AHTR features multiple 20 cm diameter, 3.2 m long fuel channels

  9. Analysis of 1-Minute Potentially Available Fluoride from Dentifrice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M; Holahan, Erin C; Schmuck, Burton D

    2014-01-01

    Previous reports found that some fluoride-containing dentifrices do not release effective concentrations of fluoride during brushing. Failure to release fluoride can be due to dentifrice matrix components that interfere with the solubilization of the fluoride salts during brushing. A new generation of dentifrices has the capability to precipitate beneficial fluoride salts during tooth brushing. Therefore, a method that assesses the potentially available fluoride during the 1-minute brushing is needed. A new filter-paper absorption method to assess the 1-min bioavailable fluoride concentration was developed to meet this need. This method utilizes coiled filter paper that rapidly absorbs the aqueous phase of the dentifrice slurry followed by centrifugation to recover that fluid for fluoride measurement via fluoride ion-selective electrode. The analytical method was used to successfully determine the total fluoride and 1-min bioavailable fluoride in eight dentifrice products containing sodium fluoride (NaF), disodium monofluorophosphate (Na2FPO3, MFP), stannous fluoride (SnF2), or NaF with amorphous calcium phosphate (NaF + ACP). The results showed that some of the dentifrices tested had significantly lower potentially available fluoride than the total fluoride. For a MFP-containing sample, aged seven years past its expiry date, there was significant reduction in the bioavailable fluoride compared to MFP products that were not aged. Other than the aged MFP and the SnF2-containing samples the bioavailable fluoride for all products tested had at least 80 % of the label fluoride concentration. The filter paper absorption method yielded reproducible results for the products tested with MFP samples showing the largest variations. PMID:25821392

  10. Alloys compatibility in molten salt fluorides: Kurchatov Institute related experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, Victor, E-mail: ignatiev@vver.kiae.ru; Surenkov, Alexandr

    2013-10-15

    In the last several years, there has been an increased interest in the use of high-temperature molten salt fluorides in nuclear power systems. For all molten salt reactor designs, materials selection is a very important issue. This paper summarizes results, which led to selection of materials for molten salt reactors in Russia. Operating experience with corrosion thermal convection loops has demonstrated good capability of the “nickel–molybdenum alloys + fluoride salt fueled by UF{sub 4} and PuF{sub 3} + cover gas” system up to 750 °C. A brief description is given of the container material work in progress. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys in stressed and unloaded conditions studies was also tested in different molten salt mixtures at temperatures up to 700–750 °C, also with measurement of the redox potential. HN80MTY alloy with 1% added Al is the most resistant to tellurium intergranular cracking of Ni-base alloys under study.

  11. Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride To Purify Molten Salt Reactor Coolant and Heat Transfer Fluoride Salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2017-05-02

    Abstract: The molten salt cooled nuclear reactor is included as one of the Generation IV reactor types. One of the challenges with the implementation of this reactor is purifying and maintaining the purity of the various molten fluoride salts that will be used as coolants. The method used for Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s molten salt experimental test reactor was to treat the coolant with a mixture of H2 and HF at 600°C. In this article we evaluate thermal NF3 treatment for purifying molten fluoride salt coolant candidates based on NF3’s 1) past use to purify fluoride salts, 2) other industrial uses, 3) commercial availability, 4) operational, chemical, and health hazards, 5) environmental effects and environmental risk management methods, 6) corrosive properties, and 7) thermodynamic potential to eliminate impurities that could arise due to exposure to water and oxygen. Our evaluation indicates that nitrogen trifluoride is a viable and safer alternative to the previous method.

  12. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Williams, David F [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Caja, Joseph [Electrochemical Systems, Inc.; Caja, Mario [ORNL; Jordan, John [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Salinas, Roberto [Texas A& M University, Kingsville

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  13. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith C Barker

    Full Text Available Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California's rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61 were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers' experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having 'extra' benefits. Once informed about fluoride's safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Alloys in Molten Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guiqiu

    The molten fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature nuclear reactor (FHR) has been proposed as a candidate Generation IV nuclear reactor. This reactor combines the latest nuclear technology with the use of molten fluoride salt as coolant to significantly enhance safety and efficiency. However, an important challenge in FHR development is the corrosion of structural materials in high-temperature molten fluoride salt. The structural alloys' degradation, particularly in terms of chromium depletion, and the molten salt chemistry are key factors that impact the lifetime of nuclear reactors and the development of future FHR designs. In support of materials development for the FHR, the nickel base alloy of Hastelloy N and iron-chromium base alloy 316 stainless steel are being actively considered as critical structural alloys. Enriched 27LiF-BeF2 (named as FLiBe) is a promising coolant for the FHR because of its neutronic properties and heat transfer characteristics while operating at atmospheric pressure. In this study, the corrosion behavior of Ni-5Cr and Ni-20Cr binary model alloys, and Hastelloy N and 316 stainless steel in molten FLiBe with and without graphite were investigated through various microstructural analyses. Based on the understanding of the corrosion behavior and data of above four alloys in molten FLiBe, a long-term corrosion prediction model has been developed that is applicable specifically for these four materials in FLiBe at 700ºC. The model uses Cr concentration profile C(x, t) as a function of corrosion distance in the materials and duration fundamentally derived from the Fick's diffusion laws. This model was validated with reasonable accuracy for the four alloys by fitting the calculated profiles with experimental data and can be applied to evaluate corrosion attack depth over the long-term. The critical constant of the overall diffusion coefficient (Deff) in this model can be quickly calculated from the experimental measurement of alloys' weight

  15. Acceptability of Salt Fluoridation in a Rural Latino Community in the United States: An Ethnographic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Judith C.; Hoeft, Kristin S.

    2016-01-01

    Compared to other population groups in the United States, caries (tooth decay) is a disproportionately prevalent disease among Latino populations, especially among low-income and rural sub-groups and children under five years of age. Fluoride is a primary preventive for caries. While water fluoridation is a major and effective public health means for delivering fluoride on a mass scale, it does not reach many rural areas or population groups such as Latinos who eschew drinking water from municipal sources. This study examines the acceptability to such groups of salt fluoridation, an alternate means of delivering fluoride long used on a global scale. An ethnographic study in California’s rural Central Valley was performed. Thirty individual interviews and 5 focus groups (N = 61) were conducted in Spanish to investigate low-income Latino migrant caregivers’ experiences, views and understandings of domestic salt, oral health, caries prevention and fluoride. Audio data were transcribed, translated, coded and thematically analyzed. Table salt was readily available and frequently consumed. Both adult and child daily sodium consumption was high. Despite a general feeling that it was good, and present in dentifrices or dietary supplements, most participants had little knowledge about fluoride. Concerns were raised about cardio-vascular and other possibly deleterious effects if an increase in salt consumption occurred because fluoridated salt was viewed as having ‘extra’ benefits. Once informed about fluoride’s safety and role in caries prevention, most participants expressed willingness to use fluoridated salt, especially if it benefitted children. Reassurance about its safety and benefits, and demonstration of its taste, were important aspects of acceptance. Taste was paramount. Participants would not consume more fluoridated salt than their current salt as that would result in unpleasant changes in food flavor and taste. While salt fluoridation is acceptable

  16. Thermodynamic investigation of fluoride salts for nuclear energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilmann, Markus

    2013-06-28

    In this work thermodynamic properties of molten fluoride salts and salt mixtures are investigated. Fluoride salts have advantageous properties to be used in energy producing systems based on the conversion from heat to energy like i.e in Molten Salt Reactors. For this purpose it is very important to have detailed information about the heat capacity of the pure salts and salt mixtures. To get a better understanding about the heat capacity in mixtures drop calorimetry measurements of mixtures of LiF with other alkali fluorides were conducted and compared. The investigation of fluoride salts at elevated temperatures is complicated by the fact that fluoride vapour is aggressive to many materials. In order to protect our sensitive measurement equipment the salt samples were encapsulated in nickel crucibles using a laser welding technique and afterwards the whole nickel capsule was measured. This method was verified by the measurement of unmixed CsF and KF where in both examples an excellent agreement with literature data was obtained. Afterwards various intermediate compositions of the systems LiF-KF, LiF-CsF and LiF-RbF were investigated and a general trend according to the difference in cation radii could be established. In combination with literature data for the LiF-NaF system the heat capacity of the liquid state follows the order LiF-NaF

  17. AN EXPERIMENT TO STUDY PEBBLE BED LIQUID-FLUORIDE-SALT HEAT TRANSFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; McCarthy, Mike [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    A forced-convection liquid-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This loop was designed as a versatile experimental facility capable of supporting general thermal/fluid/corrosion testing of liquid fluoride salts. The initial test configuration is designed to support the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor and incorporates a test section designed to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. The loop is constructed of Inconel 600 and is capable of operating at up to 700oC. It contains a total of 72 kg of FLiNaK salt and uses an overhung impeller centrifugal sump pump that can provide FLiNaK flow at 4.5 kg/s with a head of 0.125 MPa. The test section is made of silicon carbide (SiC) and contains approximately 600 graphite spheres, 3 cm in diameter. The pebble bed is heated using a unique inductive technique. A forced induction air cooler removes the heat added to the pebble bed. The salt level within the loop is maintained by controlling an argon cover gas pressure. Salt purification is performed in batch mode by transferring the salt from the loop into a specially made nickel crucible system designed to remove oxygen, moisture and other salt impurities. Materials selection for the loop and test section material was informed by 3 months of Inconel 600 and SiC corrosion testing as well as tests examining subcomponent performance in the salt. Several SiC-to-Inconel 600 mechanical joint designs were considered before final salt and gas seals were chosen. Structural calculations of the SiC test section were performed to arrive at a satisfactory test section configuration. Several pump vendors provided potential loop pump designs; however, because of cost, the pump was designed and fabricated in-house. The pump includes a commercial rotating dry gas shaft seal to maintain loop cover gas inventory. The primary instrumentation on the loop includes temperature, pressure, and loop flow rate

  18. Development of electrochemical separation methods from molten fluoride salts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straka, M.; Tulackova, R.; Chuchvalcova Bimova, K. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, 250 68 Husinec, Rez 130, (Czech Republic)

    2008-07-01

    Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is liquid-fueled reactor that can be used for actinide burning, production of electricity, production of hydrogen, and production of fissile fuels (breeding). The MSR concept was identified, along with five other concepts, as a suitable candidate of cooperative development by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). The MSR concept takes into account a circulating molten fluoride salts fuel mixture. Use of liquid fuel mixture results in possibility of its continuous (online) reprocessing. Within the proposed MSR fuel cycle, the electro-separation methods are considered as important techniques. The main aim of this work is to determine the electrochemical behaviour of selected actinides and lanthanides, which represents the fissile material and fission products, in suitable molten fluoride media as the general framework of our work is to verify the separation capability of the electrochemical methods and proposal of its integration into the MSR fuel cycle. Presented results were obtained by the method of cyclic voltammetry. The experimental set-up, preparation of the melt and results of selected measurements are presented in this paper and electrochemical behaviour of uranium and selected lanthanides are demonstrated by respective voltammograms evaluation. (authors)

  19. First-principles molecular dynamics modeling of the molten fluoride salt with Cr solute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, H.O.; Bengtson, A.; Vörtler, K.; Saha, S.; Sakidja, R.; Morgan, D., E-mail: ddmorgan@wisc.edu

    2014-06-01

    Fluoride salts and their interactions with metals are of wide interest for the nuclear community. In this work, first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) was employed to study both pure molten fluoride salt and fluoride salt with dissolved solute Cr ions (a common corrosion product) at high temperature (823–1423 K). Two types of molten fluoride salts, namely flibe (LiF–BeF{sub 2}) and flinak (LiF–NaF–KF), with the Cr{sup 0}, Cr{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} ions were chosen as a target system for the FPMD modeling. The prediction of thermo-kinetic properties of pure fluoride salt, such as the equilibrium volume, density, bulk modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, and self-diffusion coefficient, provide useful extensions of existing data and verify the accuracy of the FPMD simulation in modeling of fluoride salts. The FPMD modeling of solute Cr in fluoride salt shows the effect of Cr valence on diffusivity and local structure in the salt.

  20. A basic study on fluoride-based molten salt electrolysis technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Il Soon [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea); Kim, Kwang Bum [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea); Park, Byung Gi [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this project is to study on the physicochemical properties of fluoride molten salt, to develop numerical model for simulation of molten salt electrolysis, and to establish experimental technique of fluoride molten salt. Physicochemical data of fluoride molten salt are investigated and summarized. The numerical model, designated as REFIN is developed with diffusion-layer theory and electrochemical reaction kinetics. REFIN is benchmarked with published experimental data. REFIN has a capability to simulate multicomponent electrochemical system at transient conditions. Experimental device is developed to measure electrochemical properties of structural material for fluoride molten salt. Ni electrode is measured with cyclic voltammogram in the conditions of 600 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2} and 700 .deg. C LiF-BeF{sub 2}. 74 refs., 23 figs., 57 tabs. (Author)

  1. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, J.P.M. van der

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of wh

  2. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  3. CURRENT STATUS OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR A FLUORIDE SALT HEAT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION LOOP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A small forced convection liquid fluoride salt loop is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK in a heated pebble bed. Loop operation serves several purposes: (1) reestablishing the infrastructure necessary for fluoride salt loop testing, (2) demonstrating a wireless heating technique for simulating pebble type fuel, (3) demonstration of the integration of silicon carbide (SiC) and metallic components into a liquid salt loop, and (4) demonstration of the functionality of distinctive instrumentation required for liquid fluoride salts. Loop operation requires measurement of a broad set of process variables including temperature, flow, pressure, and level. Coolant chemistry measurements (as a corrosion indicator) and component health monitoring are also important for longer-term operation. Two dominating factors in sensor and instrument selection are the high operating temperature of the salt and its chemical environment.

  4. Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2010-09-28

    This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

  5. Mesocarbon microbead based graphite for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yajuan; Zhang, Junpeng; Lin, Jun; Xu, Liujun; Zhang, Feng; Xu, Hongxia; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Haitao; Li, Ziwei; Zhu, Zhiyong; Guo, Quangui

    2017-07-01

    Mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) and quasi-isostatic pressing method were used to prepare MCMB based graphite (MG) for spherical fuel element to inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt in molten salt reactor (MSR). Characteristics of mercury infiltration and molten salt infiltration in MG were investigated and compared with A3-3 (graphite for spherical fuel element in high temperature gas cooled reactor) to identify the infiltration behaviors. The results indicated that MG had a low porosity about 14%, and an average pore diameter of 96 nm. Fluoride salt occupation of A3-3 (average pore diameter was 760 nm) was 10 wt% under 6.5 atm, whereas salt gain did not infiltrate in MG even up to 6.5 atm. It demonstrated that MG could inhibit the infiltration of liquid fluoride salt effectively. Coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of MG lies in 6.01 × 10-6 K-1 (α∥) and 6.15 × 10-6 K-1 (α⊥) at the temperature range of 25-700 °C. The anisotropy factor of MG calculated by CTE maintained below 1.02, which could meet the requirement of the spherical fuel element (below 1.30). The constant isotropic property of MG is beneficial for the integrity and safety of the graphite used in the spherical fuel element for a MSR.

  6. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Fugate, David L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  7. Fluorosis and dental caries in Mexican schoolchildren residing in areas with different water fluoride concentrations and receiving fluoridated salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pérez, A; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E; Borges-Yáñez, A

    2013-01-01

    To explore the association between fluoride in drinking water and the prevalence and severity of fluorosis and dental caries in children living in communities receiving fluoridated salt. Participants were schoolchildren (n = 457) living in two rural areas of the State of Morelos, Mexico, where the water fluoride concentration was 0.70 or 1.50 ppm. Dental caries status was assessed using Pitts' criteria. Lesions that were classified as D3 (decayed) were identified to determine the decayed, missing, and filled teeth index (D3MFT). Fluorosis was assessed using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI). Information regarding drinking water source and oral hygiene practices (tooth brushing frequency, dentifrice use, and oral hygiene index) was obtained. The prevalence of fluorosis (TFI ≥1) in communities with 0.70 and 1.50 ppm water fluoride was 39.4 and 60.5% (p = 0.014), respectively, while the prevalence of more severe forms (TFI ≥4) was 7.9 and 25.5% (p 1) showed that higher fluorosis categories (TFI 5-6 OR = 6.81, p = 0.001) were associated with higher caries experience, adjusted by age, number of teeth present, tooth brushing frequency, bottled water use, and natural water fluoride concentration. The prevalence of fluorosis was associated with the water fluoride concentration. Fluorosis at moderate and severe levels was associated with a higher prevalence of dental caries, compared with lesser degrees of fluorosis. The impact of dental fluorosis should be considered in dental public health programs. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Development of a Forced-Convection Liquid-Fluoride-Salt Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Romanoski, Glenn R [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    A small forced-convection molten-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. Objectives of the experiment include reestablishing infrastructure needed for fluoride-salt loop testing, developing a unique inductive heating technique for performing heat transfer (or other) experiments, measuring heat transfer characteristics in a liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled pebble bed, and demonstrating the use of silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural component for salt systems. The salt loop will consist of an Inconel 600 piping system, a sump-type pump, a SiC test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, as well as auxiliary systems needed to pre-heat the loop, transport salt into and out of the loop, and maintain an inert cover gas over the salt. A 30,000 Hz inductive heating system will be used to provide up to 250 kW of power to a 15 cm diameter SiC test section containing a packed bed of 3 cm graphite spheres. A SiC-to-Inconel 600 joint will use a conventional nickel/grafoil spiral wound gasket sandwiched between SiC and Inconel flanges. The loop system can provide up to 4.5 kg/s of salt flow at a head of 0.125 MPa and operate at a pressure just above atmospheric. Pebble Reynolds numbers of up to 2600 are possible with this configuration. A sump system is provided to drain and store the salt when not in use. Instrumentation on the loop will include pressure, temperature, and flow measurements, while the test section will be instrumented to provide pebble and FLiNaK temperatures.

  9. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current

  10. Fluoride partitioning R and D programme for molten salt transmutation reactor systems in the Czech Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlir, J. [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, CZ (Czech Republic); Priman, V.; Vanicek, J. [Czech Power Company, Praha (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    The transmutation of spent nuclear fuel is considered a prospective alternative conception to the current conception based on the non-reprocessed spent fuel disposal into underground repository. The Czech research and development programme in the field of partitioning and transmutation is founded on the Molten Salt Transmutation Reactor system concept with fluoride salts based liquid fuel, the fuel cycle of which is grounded on pyrochemical / pyrometallurgical fluoride partitioning of spent fuel. The main research activities in the field of fluoride partitioning are oriented mainly towards technological research of Fluoride Volatility Method and laboratory research on electro-separation methods from fluoride melts media. The Czech national conception in the area of P and T research issues from the national power industry programme and from the Czech Power Company intentions of the extensive utilization of nuclear power in our country. The experimental R and D work is concentrated mainly in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc that plays a role of main nuclear research workplace for the Czech Power Company. (author)

  11. Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

    2007-08-16

    Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

  12. Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluoride is used to prevent tooth decay. It is taken up by teeth and helps to strengthen ... and block the cavity-forming action of bacteria. Fluoride usually is prescribed for children and adults whose ...

  13. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu Guifeng; Zou Yang; Xu Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PB-FHR) is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF2) salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC). Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics,...

  14. Process Heat Exchanger Options for Fluoride Salt High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Eung Soo Kim; Michael McKellar; Nolan Anderson

    2011-04-01

    The work reported herein is a significant intermediate step in reaching the final goal of commercial-scale deployment and usage of molten salt as the heat transport medium for process heat applications. The primary purpose of this study is to aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for power production and process heat application, which would support large-scale deployment.

  15. Production and release of ISOL beams from molten fluoride salt targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonca, T.M., E-mail: taniamel@mail.cern.ch [IFIMUP and IN – Institut of Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Hodak, R. [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina F1, SK-842 15 Bratislava (Slovakia); Ghetta, V.; Allibert, M.; Heuer, D. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie – LPSC, 53 Rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Noah, E. [Section de Physique, Université de Genève, 1211 Genève 4 (Switzerland); Cimmino, S. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Delonca, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); IRTES-M3M, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbeliard, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); IRTES-LERMPS, Université de Technologie de Belfort-Montbeliard, 90010 Belfort Cedex (France); Gottberg, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia CSIC, E28006 Madrid (Spain); Kronberger, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Survontie 9, Jyväskylä FI-40014 (Finland); Ramos, J.P. [European Organization for Nuclear Research – CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, University of Aveiro, CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); and others

    2014-06-01

    In the framework of the Beta Beams project, a molten fluoride target has been proposed for the production of the required 10{sup 1318}Ne/s. The production and extraction of such rates are predicted to be possible on a circulating molten salt with 160 MeV proton beams at close to 1 MW power. As a most important step to validate the concept, a prototype has been designed and investigated at CERN-ISOLDE using a static target unit. The target material consisted of a binary fluoride system, NaF:LiF (39:61 mol.%), with melting point at 649 °C. The production of Ne beams has been monitored as a function of the target temperature and proton beam intensity. The prototype development and the results of the first online tests with 1.4 GeV proton beam are presented in this paper.

  16. Production and Release of ISOL Beams from Molten Fluoride Salt Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonca, T M; Ghetta, V; Alibert, M; Heuer, D; Noah, E; Cimmino, S; Delonca, M; Gottberg, A; Kronberger, M; Ramos, J; Seiffert, C; Stora, T; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the Beta Beams study, a molten fluoride target has been proposed for the production of the required 1013 18Ne/s. The production and extraction of such rates are obtained on a circulating molten salt with proton beam energy beams at close to 1 MW power. As a most important step to validate the concept, a prototype has been designed and investigated at CERN-ISOLDE using a static target unit. The target material consisted of a binary fluoride system, NaF:LiF (39:61 % mol.), with melting point at 649ºC. The production of Ne beams has been monitored as a function of the target temperature and proton beam intensity. The prototype development and the results of the first online tests with 1.4 GeV proton beam are presented in this paper.

  17. The prevalence of dental fluorosis in relation to water or salt fluoridation and reported use of fluoride toothpaste in school-age children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagheri, D; McLoughlin, J; Clarkson, J J

    2007-03-01

    To compare prevalence of dental fluorosis (DF) in permanent teeth in children whose domestic water supply was fluoridated since birth with that in a community where fluoridated salt was available. A second aim was to analyse the relationship between DF prevalence and reported use of fluoride toothpaste in early childhood. Cross-sectional study. A representative, random sample of 12-year-old children was examined in water fluoridated Dublin (Ireland) and non-water fluoridated Freiburg (Germany), where fluoridated salt was available. DF was recorded using the Dean's Index. The child's early experience of toothpaste use was recorded using a questionnaire. 377 children in Dublin and 322 children in Freiburg were examined. In Dublin 11.7% of the whole sample had a 'Questionable' level of DF, 9.8% had 'Very Mild', 3.7% had 'Mild' and 0.3% had 'Moderate' fluorosis. The corresponding percentages in Freiburg for all children were 10.9%, 4.0%, 3.4% and 0%. The results suggest that children in Dublin started brushing their teeth at an older age than in Freiburg, but no difference in DF levels was found between 'early' and 'late' users. Fisher's test revealed that the difference in DF levels between the two populations was statistically significant (p=0.03). The prevalence of aesthetically important DF ('Mild' and 'Moderate') was low and similar in both communities and considerably lower than the expected level at water fluoridation concentrations of 1 ppm. However, the prevalence of 'Very Mild' fluorosis was twice as frequent in Dublin than in Freiburg.

  18. Electrochemistry of samarium in lithium-beryllium fluoride salt mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Straka; Michal Korenko; Frantisek Lisy; Lórant Szatmáry

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of samarium was investigated in LiF-BeF2 system on an inert (Mo) electrode by cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry at 804,833,847 and 872 K.Redox process Sm3++e-→Sm2+ was recognized and analysed.Cyclic voltammetry data suggested that at potential sweep rates lower than 0.25 V/s,the reduction was limited by the diffusion of Sm3+ ions.It was not possible to observe reduction process of Sm2++2e-→Sm0 due to insufficient electrochemical stability of LiF-BeF2.Diffusion coefficients of Sm3+ ions in LiF- BeF2 were calculated from voltammetric and chronopotentiometric data in the temperature range 804-872 K.Diffusion coefficient values obeyed Arrhenius law.Activation energy was calculated to be 102.5 kJ/mol.

  19. The current status of fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) technology and its overlap with HIF target chamber concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarlat, Raluca O.; Peterson, Per F.

    2014-01-01

    The fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) is a class of fission reactor designs that use liquid fluoride salt coolant, TRISO coated particle fuel, and graphite moderator. Heavy ion fusion (HIF) can likewise make use of liquid fluoride salts, to create thick or thin liquid layers to protect structures in the target chamber from ablation by target X-rays and damage from fusion neutron irradiation. This presentation summarizes ongoing work in support of design development and safety analysis of FHR systems. Development work for fluoride salt systems with application to both FHR and HIF includes thermal-hydraulic modeling and experimentation, salt chemistry control, tritium management, salt corrosion of metallic alloys, and development of major components (e.g., pumps, heat exchangers) and gas-Brayton cycle power conversion systems. In support of FHR development, a thermal-hydraulic experimental test bay for separate effects (SETs) and integral effect tests (IETs) was built at UC Berkeley, and a second IET facility is under design. The experiments investigate heat transfer and fluid dynamics and they make use of oils as simulant fluids at reduced scale, temperature, and power of the prototypical salt-cooled system. With direct application to HIF, vortex tube flow was investigated in scaled experiments with mineral oil. Liquid jets response to impulse loading was likewise studied using water as a simulant fluid. A set of four workshops engaging industry and national laboratory experts were completed in 2012, with the goal of developing a technology pathway to the design and licensing of a commercial FHR. The pathway will include experimental and modeling efforts at universities and national laboratories, requirements for a component test facility for reliability testing of fluoride salt equipment at prototypical conditions, requirements for an FHR test reactor, and development of a pre-conceptual design for a commercial reactor.

  20. An integrated model of tritium transport and corrosion in Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) – Part I: Theory and benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stempien, John D., E-mail: john.stempien@inl.gov; Ballinger, Ronald G., E-mail: hvymet@mit.edu; Forsberg, Charles W., E-mail: cforsber@mit.edu

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A model was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. • Model results match results of tritium diffusion experiments. • Corrosion simulations show reasonable agreement with molten salt loop experiments. • This is the only existing model of tritium transport and corrosion in FHRs. • Model enables proposing and evaluating tritium control options in FHRs. - Abstract: The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) is a pebble bed nuclear reactor concept cooled by a liquid fluoride salt known as “flibe” ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}). A model of TRITium Diffusion EvolutioN and Transport (TRIDENT) was developed for use with FHRs and benchmarked with experimental data. TRIDENT is the first model to integrate the effects of tritium production in the salt via neutron transmutation, with the effects of the chemical redox potential, tritium mass transfer, tritium diffusion through pipe walls, tritium uptake by graphite, selective chromium attack by tritium fluoride, and corrosion product mass transfer. While data from a forced-convection polythermal loop of molten salt containing tritium did not exist for comparison, TRIDENT calculations were compared to data from static salt diffusion tests in flibe and flinak (0.465LiF-0.115NaF-0.42KF) salts. In each case, TRIDENT matched the transient and steady-state behavior of these tritium diffusion experiments. The corrosion model in TRIDENT was compared against the natural convection flow-loop experiments at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from the 1960s and early 1970s which used Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) fuel-salt containing UF{sub 4}. Despite the lack of data required by TRIDENT for modeling the loops, some reasonable results were obtained. The TRIDENT corrosion rates follow the experimentally observed dependence on the square root of the product of the chromium solid-state diffusion coefficient with time. Additionally the TRIDENT model predicts mass

  1. The electrical conductivity, density and surface tension of molten salts containing zirconium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katyshev, S F; Teslyuk, L M; Eltsova, N V [Urals State Technical University-UPI, 19 Mira Str., Ekaterinburg 620002 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: tnv@htf.ustu.ru, E-mail: ksf@mail.ustu.ru

    2008-02-15

    The temperature dependencies of specific electric conductivity, density and surface tension of molten LiF-KF-ZrF{sub 4} mixtures in a wide concentration range were investigated using relative capillary method and method of maximum pressure in a gas bubble. The obtained values of molar electric conductivity, molar volumes and excess thermodynamic functions of melt surface layer have noticeable deviations from those calculated for ideal mixtures. This phenomenon can be explained by some specific interaction between the components of studied ternary mixtures. Mixing the components in such melts is accompanied by a noticeable interaction with predominant formation of stable zirconium fluoride complex ions. The values of deviations depend on the ionic composition of the salt mixtures.

  2. Fluoride release and cariostatic potential of orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride rinsing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chin, Yeen; Sandham, John; Rumachik, Elena N.; Ruben, Jan L.; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D. N. J. M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, we aimed to evaluate the fluoride-release profiles and caries lesion development in an enamel model with brackets cemented with 4 orthodontic adhesives with and without daily fluoride exposure. Methods: Four orthodontic adhesives (Ketac Cem mu, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany;

  3. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  4. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PB-FHR is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF2 salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC. Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite. This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9Be(n,2n reaction and low neutron absorption of 6Li (even at 1000 ppm in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel.

  5. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  6. Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-15

    This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

  7. [Dental fluorosis prevalence in eight cohorts of Mexicans born during the implementation of the Fluoridated Domestic Salt National Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova-Rosado, Alejandro José; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Vallejos-Sánchez, Ana Alicia; de la Rosa-Santillana, Rubén; Mendoza-Rodríguez, Martha; Villalobos-Rodelo, Juan José; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    to determine the effect of birth cohort on dental fluorosis in Mexican schoolchildren during the implementation of the national program to fluoridate domestic salt. in a cross-sectional study we examined 1,644 schoolchildren 6-13 years old born between 1985-1992 in Campeche, México; a community where there is negligible naturally available fluoride in water supplies. Dental fluorosis was assessed with the Dean’s index in the permanent dentition. Questionnaires were used to identify diverse socio-demographic and socio-economic variables. In the statistical analysis logistic regression was used. the prevalence of fluorosis was 15.5%. In the multivariate model,we observed fluorosis was associated with larger family sizes (OR: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84-0.99) and female sex (OR: 0.74; 95%CI: 0.57-0.98). Furthermore, using the cohort of 1985 as a comparison group, no significant dental fluorosis differences were found with those born between 1986-1987; in contrast, in the cohorts born between 1989-1992 the risk of dental fluorosis increased by almost four times (p fluorosis was low compared to other studies in Mexico. In this community with negligible fluoride in water supplies the likelihood of dental fluorosis increased as the windows of susceptibility in birth cohorts were closer to the chronologic beginning of the national domestic salt fluoridation program in 1991. This trend was more apparent after 1991.

  8. Preparation of Ti3C2 and Ti2C MXenes by fluoride salts etching and methane adsorptive properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fanfan; Zhou, Aiguo; Chen, Jinfeng; Jia, Jin; Zhou, Weijia; Wang, Libo; Hu, Qianku

    2017-09-01

    Here we reported the preparation of Ti3C2 MXene and Ti2C MXene by etching Ti3AlC2 and Ti2AlC with various fluoride salts in hydrochloric acid (HCl), including lithium fluoride (LiF), sodium fluoride (NaF), potassium fluoride (KF), and ammonium fluoride (NH4F). As-prepared Ti2C was further delaminated by urea, dimethylsulfoxide or ammonium hydroxide. Based on theoretical calculation and XPS results, the type of positive ions (Li+, Na+, K+, or NH4+) in etchant solution affect the surface structure of prepared MXene, which, in turn, affects the methane adsorption properties of MXene. The highest methane adsorption capacity is 8.5 cm3/g for Ti3C2 and 11.6 cm3/g for Ti2C. MXenes made from LiF and NH4F can absorb methane under high pressure and can keep methane under normal pressure, these MXenes may have important application on capturing methane or other hazardous gas molecules. MXenes made from NaF and KF can absorb methane under high pressure and release methane under low pressure. They can have important application in the adsorb storage of nature gas.

  9. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  10. TiB2 coating formed on nickel substrates by electroplating in molten salt of fluoride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONG Jin-ming; GUO Zhong-cheng; HAN Xia-yun

    2004-01-01

    The TiB2 coatings deposited over nickel substrate by electroplating was investigated, which is in molten salt of a fluoride mixture involving KF, NaF, K2 TiF6 and KBF4. Effects of temperature, cathodic current density (Jc) and duration on the coating's formation were examined. The composition, morphology and structure of the coatings were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the coatings, with black, smooth and uniform appearance, are composed of predominating TiB2 and small amounts of nickel titanium oxide (Ni0.75 Ti0.125 O). The coatings show a nodular morphology and the grain size is dependent on the Jc and ranges about 1 - 10 μm. There is a linear relationship between the coating's thickness and the time of electrolysis within certain duration range. The reduction of the potassium can take place simultaneously with the electrochemical synthesis of TiB2 as the Jc is in excess of certain level. The hardness of the TiB2 coatings is likely to be deteriorated due to the presence of potassium and Ni0.75Ti0.125 O in the coatings.

  11. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  12. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR

  13. Anticaries potential of a stabilized stannous-containing sodium fluoride dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Robert V; Eversole, Sandra L; Yan, Janet

    2010-09-01

    To evaluate the anticaries potential of a stabilized stannous-containing sodium fluoride dentifrice relative to appropriate control products. A series of in vitro studies was conducted using the following standard anticaries efficacy measures: (1) fluoride uptake; (2) pH cycling remineralization/inhibition of demineralization; and (3) surface microhardness. In each study, the stannous-containing sodium fluoride test dentifrice (1450 ppm F) was compared to a negative control dentifrice (0 ppm F) and a positive control fluoride dentifrice (either 1100 ppm F or 1450 ppm F). Fluoride uptake: The mean fluoride uptake from both the test dentifrice and the positive control dentifrice was significantly greater than the negative control. There was no statistically significant difference between the two fluoride dentifrices, although the test dentifrice was directionally higher. pH cycling: The remineralization measured with the test dentifrice was directionally higher though not significantly different from the positive control dentifrice. Remineralization by both fluoride-containing dentifrices was significantly greater versus the negative control. Surface microhardness: The percent increase in surface microhardness measured on enamel surfaces after treatments with the test dentifrice was found to be significantly higher than that measured for the positive control and the negative control.

  14. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  15. Salt Marshes as Potential Indicatore of Global Climate Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Daehyun; Cairens, David; Jung, S.H.;

    2011-01-01

    Coastal scientists postulate that salt marshes are significantly affected by dynamics of global climate. However, few studies have explicitly proposed a perspective that regards salt marshes as potential indicators of climate change. This review article evaluates the possibility of salt marshes a...

  16. Synthesis and characterization of binder-free Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} coatings on nickel-based alloys for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brupbacher, Michael C.; Zhang, Dajie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Buchta, William M. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Graybeal, Mark L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Rhim, Yo-Rhin [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Nagle, Dennis C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Spicer, James B., E-mail: spicer@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Under various conditions, chromium carbides appear to be relatively stable in the presence of molten fluoride salts and this suggests that their use in corrosion resistant coatings for fluoride salt environments could be beneficial. One method for producing these coatings is the carburization of sprayed Cr coatings using methane-containing gaseous precursors. This process has been investigated for the synthesis of binder-free chromium carbide coatings on nickel-based alloy substrates for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance. The effects of the carburization process on coating microstructure have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both plasma-sprayed and cold-sprayed Cr coatings have been successfully converted to Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, with the mechanism of conversion being strongly influenced by the initial porosity in the as-deposited coatings.

  17. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  18. Fluoridated salt for caries prevention and control - a 2-year field study in a disadvantaged community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wennhall, Inger; Hajem, Samara; Ilros, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    and progression rate, assessed from bitewing radiographs, was scored. Information on diet, oral hygiene, and fluoride exposure was collected through a baseline questionnaire. RESULTS: The dropout rate was high (IS 27%; RS 18%). At baseline, the IS children displayed more unfavourable risk factors and a higher...

  19. Organ-wise accumulation of fluoride in Prosopis juliflora and its potential for phytoremediation of fluoride contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Poonam; Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Sharma, Vinay

    2012-10-01

    Fluoride (F) contamination is a global environmental problem, as there is no cure of fluorosis available yet. Prosopis juliflora is a leguminous perennial, phreatophyte tree, widely distributed in arid and semi-arid regions of world. It extensively grows in F endemic areas of Rajasthan (India) and has been known as a "green" solution to decontaminate cadmium, chromium and copper contaminated soils. This study aims to check the tolerance potential of P. juliflora to accumulate fluoride. For this work, P. juliflora seedlings were grown for 75 d on soilrite under five different concentrations of F viz., control, 25, 50, 75 and 100 mg NaF kg(-1). Organ-wise accumulation of F, bioaccumulation factor (BF), translocation factor (TF), growth ratio (GR) and F tolerance index (TI) were examined. Plant accumulated high amounts of F in roots. The organ-wise distribution showed an accumulation 4.41 mg kg(-1)dw, 12.97 mg kg(-1)dw and 16.75 mg kg(-1)dw F, in stem, leaves and roots respectively. The results indicated significant translocation of F from root into aerial parts. The bioaccumulation and translocation factor values (>1.0) showed high accumulation efficiency and tolerance of P. juliflora to F. It is concluded that P. juliflora is a suitable candidate for phytoremediation purpose and can be explored further for the decontamination of F polluted soils.

  20. Geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples, and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children in four municipalities of the department of Huila (Colombia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martignon, Stefania; Opazo-Gutiérrez, Mario Omar; Velásquez-Riaño, Möritz; Orjuela-Osorio, Iván Rodrigo; Avila, Viviana; Martinez-Mier, Esperanza Angeles; González-Carrera, María Clara; Ruiz-Carrizosa, Jaime Alberto; Silva-Hermida, Blanca Cecilia

    2017-06-01

    Fluoride is an element that affects teeth and bone formation in animals and humans. Though the use of systemic fluoride is an evidence-based caries preventive measure, excessive ingestion can impair tooth development, mainly the mineralization of tooth enamel, leading to a condition known as enamel fluorosis. In this study, we investigated the geochemical characterization of fluoride in water, table salt, active sediment, rock and soil samples in four endemic enamel fluorosis sentinel municipalities of the department of Huila, Colombia (Pitalito, Altamira, El Agrado and Rivera), and its possible relationship with the prevalence of enamel fluorosis in children. The concentration of fluoride in drinking water, table salt, active sediment, rock, and soil was evaluated by means of an ion selective electrode and the geochemical analyses were performed using X-ray fluorescence. Geochemical analysis revealed fluoride concentrations under 15 mg/kg in active sediment, rock and soil samples, not indicative of a significant delivery to the watersheds studied. The concentration of fluoride in table salt was found to be under the inferior limit (less than 180 μg/g) established by the Colombian regulations. Likewise, exposure doses for fluoride water intake did not exceed the recommended total dose for all ages from 6 months. Although the evidence does not point out at rocks, soils, fluoride-bearing minerals, fluoridated salt and water, the hypothesis of these elements as responsible of the current prevalence of enamel fluorosis cannot be discarded since, aqueducts might have undergone significant changes overtime.

  1. Effect of using FLiBe and FLiNaBe molten salts bearing plutonium fluorides on the neutronic performance of PACER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acir, Adem [Gazi Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, the effects of using FLiBe and FLiNaBe Molten Salts Bearing Plutonium Fluorides on the neutronic performance of the PACER are investigated. The optimum radial thickness for tritium self-sufficiency of the blankets addition of plutonium fluorides to FLiNaBe (LiF-/NaF BeF{sub 2}) and FLiBe (LiF-/BeF{sub 2}) of a dual purpose modified PACER concept are determined. The calculations are carried out with the one dimensional transport code XSDRNPM/SCALE5. The tritium breeding capacities of FLiNaBe and FLiBe with addition of plutonium fluorides in molten salt zone are investigated and compared. The optimum molten salt zone thickness is computed as 155 cm for tritium self-sufficiency of the blankets using FLiBe +1% PuF{sub 4} whereas, the optimum thickness with FLiNaBe +1% PuF{sub 4} is calculated as 170 cm. In addition, neutron transport calculations have been performed to evaluate the energy multiplication factor, total fission rate, displacement per atom and helium gas generation for optimal radial thickness in the blanket. Also, the tritium production and the radiation damage limits should be evaluated together in a fusion blanket for determining the optimum thickness of molten salt layer. (orig.)

  2. Anti-erosive potential of amine fluoride, cerium chloride and laser irradiation application on dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2011-12-01

    Ninety-six dentine samples were prepared from human premolars and randomly assigned to eight groups (G1-G8). Samples were treated for 30s with the following solutions: placebo (G1/G2), amine fluoride (Elmex fluid; G3/G4), cerium chloride (G5/G6) and combined fluoride/cerium chloride application (G7/G8). Samples of groups G2, G4, G6 and G8 were additionally irradiated with a carbon dioxide laser through the solutions for 30s. Acid resistance was assessed in a six-time 5-min consecutive lactic acid (pH 3.0) erosion model and calcium release was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, six additional samples per group were prepared and subjected to EDS-analysis. In the non-irradiated groups, specimens of G1 (placebo) showed the highest calcium release when compared to the other treatments (G3, G5 and G7). The highest acid resistance was observed for G7. In G3, calcium release was lower than in G5, but higher than in G7. In general (except for the placebo groups), calcium release in the laser-irradiated groups was higher compared with the respective non-irradiated groups. EDS showed a replacement of calcium by cerium and of phosphor by fluoride. The highest anti-erosive potential was found after combined cerium chloride and amine fluoride application. Laser irradiation had not adjunctive effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Enrichment of fluoride in groundwater under the impact of saline water intrusion at the salt lake area of Yuncheng basin, northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xubo; Wang, Yanxin; Li, Yilian; Guo, Qinghai

    2007-12-01

    Long-term intake of high-fluoride groundwater causes endemic fluorosis. This study, for the first time, discovered that the salt lake water intrusion into neighboring shallow aquifers might result in elevation of fluoride content of the groundwater. Two cross-sections along the groundwater flow paths were selected to study the geochemical processes controlling fluoride concentration in Yuncheng basin, northern China. There are two major reasons for the observed elevation of fluoride content: one is the direct contribution of the saline water; the other is the undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to fluorite due to salt water intrusion, which appears to be more important reason. The processes of the fluorine activity reduction and the change of Na/Ca ratio in groundwater induced by the intrusion of saline water favor further dissolution of fluorine-bearing mineral, and it was modeled using PHREEQC. With the increase in Na concentration (by adding NaCl or Na2SO4 as Na source, calcium content kept invariable), the increase of NaF concentration was rapid at first and then became slower; and the concentrations of HF, HF{2/-}, CaF+, and MgF+ were continuously decreasing. The geochemical conditions in the study area are advantageous to the complexation of F- with Na+ and the decline of saturation index of CaF2, regardless of the water type (Cl-Na or SO4-Na type water).

  4. Expected brine movement at potential nuclear waste repository salt sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCauley, V.S.; Raines, G.E.

    1987-08-01

    The BRINEMIG brine migration code predicts rates and quantities of brine migration to a waste package emplaced in a high-level nuclear waste repository in salt. The BRINEMIG code is an explicit time-marching finite-difference code that solves a mass balance equation and uses the Jenks equation to predict velocities of brine migration. Predictions were made for the seven potentially acceptable salt sites under consideration as locations for the first US high-level nuclear waste repository. Predicted total quantities of accumulated brine were on the order of 1 m/sup 3/ brine per waste package or less. Less brine accumulation is expected at domal salt sites because of the lower initial moisture contents relative to bedded salt sites. Less total accumulation of brine is predicted for spent fuel than for commercial high-level waste because of the lower temperatures generated by spent fuel. 11 refs., 36 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. Effect of fluoride on the cell viability, cell organelle potential, and photosynthetic capacity of freshwater and soil algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yooeun; Kim, Dokyung; An, Youn-Joo

    2016-12-01

    Although fluoride occurs naturally in the environment, excessive amounts of fluoride in freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems can be harmful. We evaluated the toxicity of fluoride compounds on the growth, viability, and photosynthetic capacity of freshwater (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata) and terrestrial (Chlorococcum infusionum) algae. To measure algal growth inhibition, a flow cytometric method was adopted (i.e., cell size, granularity, and auto-fluorescence measurements), and algal yield was calculated to assess cell viability. Rhodamine123 and fluorescein diacetate were used to evaluate mitochondrial membrane potential (MMA, ΔΨm) and cell permeability. Nine parameters related to the photosynthetic capacity of algae were also evaluated. The results indicated that high concentrations of fluoride compounds affected cell viability, cell organelle potential, and photosynthetic functions. The cell viability measurements of the three algal species decreased, but apoptosis was only observed in C. infusionum. The MMA (ΔΨm) of cells exposed to fluoride varied among species, and the cell permeability of the three species generally decreased. The decrease in the photosynthetic activity of algae may be attributable to the combination of fluoride ions (F(-)) with magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) in chlorophyll. Our results therefore provide strong evidence for the potential risks of fluoride compounds to microflora and microfauna in freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Determination of thermal physical properties of alkali fluoride/carbonate eutectic molten salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xue-Hui; Cheng, Jin-Hui; Su, Tao; Zhang, Peng

    2017-06-01

    Molten salts used in high temperatures are more and more interested in the CSP for higher energy conversion efficiency. Thermal physical properties are the basic engineering data of thermal hydraulic calculation and safety analysis. Therefore, the thermophysical performances involving density, specific heat capacity, viscosity and thermal conductivity of FLiNaK, (LiNaK)2CO3 and LiF(NaK)2CO3 molten salts are experimentally determined and through comparison the general rules can be summarized. Density measurement was performed on the basis of Archimedes theory; specific heat capacity was measured using the DSC technique; viscosity was tested based on the rotating method; and the thermal conductivity was gained by laser flash method with combination of the density, specific heat capacity and thermal diffusivity through a formula. Finally, the energy storage capacity and figures of merit are calculated to evaluate their feasibility as TES and HFT media. The results show that FLiNaK has the largest energy storage capacity and best heat transfer performance, LiF(NaK)2CO3 is secondary, and (LiNaK)2CO3 has the smallest.

  7. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  8. Synthesis, physical and chemical properties, and potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1987-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fibers can be produced by fluorinating pristine or intercalated graphite fibers. The higher the degree of graphitization of the fibers, the higher the temperature needed to reach the same degree of fluorination. Pitched based fibers were fluorinated to flourine-to-carbon atom rations between 0 and 1. The graphite fluoride fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ration near 1 have extensive visible structural damage. On the other hand, fluorination of fibers pretreated with bromine or fluorine and bromine result in fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ratio nearly equal to 0.5 with no visible structural damage. The electrical resistivity of the fibers is dependent upon the fluorine to carbon atom ratio and ranged from .01 to 10 to the 11th ohm/cm. The thermal conductivity of these fibers ranged from 5 to 73 W/m-k, which is much larger than the thermal conductivity of glass, which is the regular filler in epoxy composites. If graphite fluoride fibers are used as a filler in epoxy or PTFE, the resulting composite may be a high thermal conductivity material with an electrical resistivity in either the insulator or semiconductor range. The electrically insulating product may provide heat transfer with lower temperature gradients than many current electrical insulators. Potential applications are presented.

  9. Erosive potential of saliva stimulating tablets with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajer, Christel; Buchwald, Christian; Nauntofte, Birgitte;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients irradiated in the head and neck region often suffer from severe dry mouth and use acidic saliva stimulating products, which may cause erosion of teeth. PURPOSE: To determine saliva stimulating effects and erosive potential (EP) of acidic saliva stimulating tablets (Xerodent......) with and without fluoride in irradiated head and neck cancer patients. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Nineteen irradiated patients (median age 57 years) sucked Xerodent tablets with and without fluoride. Saliva collections were divided into three 10-min sessions in the sequence: unstimulated whole saliva, Xerodent...... likely due to the limited drop in pH resulting in saliva that was still supersaturated with respect to FAp. CONCLUSION: Both Xerodent with and without fluoride were evaluated as non-erosive, however, for additional caries protection the fluoride variant is preferable....

  10. Combining CPP-ACP with fluoride: a synergistic remineralization potential of artificially demineralized enamel or not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayad, I. I.; Sakr, A. K.; Badr, Y. A.

    2008-08-01

    Background and objective: Minimal intervention dentistry (MID) calls for early detection and remineralization of initial demineralization. Laser fluorescence is efficient in detecting changes in mineral tooth content. Recaldent is a product of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP- ACP) which delivers calcium and phosphate ions to enamel. A new product which also contains fluoride is launched in United States. The remineralizing potential of CPP- ACP per se, or when combined with 0.22% Fl supplied in an oral care gel on artificially demineralised enamel using laser fluorescence was investigated. Methods: Fifteen sound human molars were selected. Mesial surfaces were tested using He-Cd laser beam at 441.5nm with 18mW power as excitation source on a suitable set-up based on Spex 750 M monochromator provided with PMT for detection of collected auto-fluorescence from sound enamel. Mesial surfaces were subjected to demineralization for ten days. The spectra from demineralized enamel were measured. Teeth were then divided according to the remineralizing regimen into three groups: group I recaldent per se, group II recaldent combined with fluoride gel and group III artificial saliva as a positive control. After following these protocols for three weeks, the spectra from remineralized enamel from the three groups were measured. The spectra of enamel auto-fluorescence were recorded and normalized to peak intensity at about 540 nm to compare between spectra from sound, demineralized and remineralized enamel surfaces. Results: A slight red shift was noticed in spectra from demineralized enamel, while a blue shift may occur in remineralized enamel. Group II showed the highest remineralizing potential. Conclusions: Combining fluoride with CPP-ACP had a synergistic effect on enamel remineralization. In addition, laser auto-fluorescence is an accurate technique for assessment of changes in tooth enamel minerals.

  11. Staining potential of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF foam on dental restorations in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the staining potential of acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF foam on restorations in vitro. Materials and Methods: Two hundred ovine molars were used. Except 40 teeth remained unrestored as the controls, each was randomly selected to receive one of four restorative materials including preparation without restoration, glass ionomer cement (GIC, resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC, or composite resin (CR. Following the procedure, topical APF was applied with a predetermined frequency. Staining formation was then evaluated. Results: APF-treated teeth and restorations appeared with a darker shade, an orange-colored surface and/or a brown margin. The staining rates on GIC, RMGIC, and CR were 50%, 27.5%, and 17.5%, respectively. GIC had a higher staining potential than RMGIC (χ2 = 4.266, df = 1, P = 0.039 and CR (χ2 = 9.448, df = 1, P = 0.002, whereas the difference between RMGIC and CR was indiscernible (χ2 = 1.147, df = 1, P = 0.284. Repeated applications of topical APF increased the risk of staining on RMGIC (χ2 = 8.436 df = 1, P = 0.004 and CR (χ2 = 6.873, df = 1, P = 0.009 but not on GIC (χ2 = 0, df = 1, P = 1 and the controls (χ2 = 4.051, df = 3, P = 0.256. Conclusions: APF-foam-related staining was confirmed in vitro. GIC was more susceptible to fluoride staining. This study suggested aesthetic implications when applying fluorides to restored teeth.

  12. Fluoride exposure of East African consumers using alkaline salt deposits known as magadi (trona) as a food preparation aid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joan Maj; Dahi, E.

    2002-01-01

    The fluoride content of Tanzanian and Kenyan magadi has been estimated to be in the range 0.1-17.9 mg F- g(-1), which is comparable with that reported elsewhere, but indicating a considerable variation in levels. The median fluoride content of crystalline magadi harvested from the alkaline lakes...... was 2.1 mg g(-1), which was higher than the median of 1.4 mg g(-1) for scooped magadi harvested from the surface soil. The highest median fluoride contents of 3.2 and 2.9 mg g(-1) were found in magadi originating from Lake Magadi, Kenya, and Lake Natron, Tanzania, respectively. It was found...

  13. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas, Jr.

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids---flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF)---from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate in a high-temperature low-pressure design space that has beneficial safety and economic implications. In 2012, UC Berkeley was charged with developing a pre-conceptual design of a commercial prototype FHR---the Pebble Bed- Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)---as part of the Nuclear Energy University Programs' (NEUP) integrated research project. The Mark 1 design of the PB-FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) is 236 MWt flibe cooled pebble bed nuclear heat source that drives an open-air Brayton combine-cycle power conversion system. The PB-FHR's pebble bed consists of a 19.8% enriched uranium fuel core surrounded by an inert graphite pebble reflector that shields the outer solid graphite reflector, core barrel and reactor vessel. The fuel reaches an average burnup of 178000 MWt-d/MT. The Mk1 PB-FHR exhibits strong negative temperature reactivity feedback from the fuel, graphite moderator and the flibe coolant but a small positive temperature reactivity feedback of the inner reflector and from the outer graphite pebble reflector. A novel neutronics and depletion methodology---the multiple burnup state methodology was developed for an accurate and efficient search for the equilibrium composition of an arbitrary continuously refueled pebble bed reactor core. The Burnup Equilibrium Analysis Utility (BEAU) computer program was developed to implement this methodology. BEAU was successfully benchmarked against published results generated with existing equilibrium depletion codes VSOP

  14. 18F-Labeled Silicon-Based Fluoride Acceptors: Potential Opportunities for Novel Positron Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Bernard-Gauthier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over the recent years, radiopharmaceutical chemistry has experienced a wide variety of innovative pushes towards finding both novel and unconventional radiochemical methods to introduce fluorine-18 into radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET. These “nonclassical” labeling methodologies based on silicon-, boron-, and aluminium-18F chemistry deviate from commonplace bonding of an [18F]fluorine atom (18F to either an aliphatic or aromatic carbon atom. One method in particular, the silicon-fluoride-acceptor isotopic exchange (SiFA-IE approach, invalidates a dogma in radiochemistry that has been widely accepted for many years: the inability to obtain radiopharmaceuticals of high specific activity (SA via simple IE. Methodology. The most advantageous feature of IE labeling in general is that labeling precursor and labeled radiotracer are chemically identical, eliminating the need to separate the radiotracer from its precursor. SiFA-IE chemistry proceeds in dipolar aprotic solvents at room temperature and below, entirely avoiding the formation of radioactive side products during the IE. Scope of Review. A great plethora of different SiFA species have been reported in the literature ranging from small prosthetic groups and other compounds of low molecular weight to labeled peptides and most recently affibody molecules. Conclusions. The literature over the last years (from 2006 to 2014 shows unambiguously that SiFA-IE and other silicon-based fluoride acceptor strategies relying on 18F− leaving group substitutions have the potential to become a valuable addition to radiochemistry.

  15. Evaluation of potential crushed-salt constitutive models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, G.D.; Loken, M.C.; Sambeek, L.L. Van; Chen, R.; Pfeifle, T.W.; Nieland, J.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Hansen, F.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Repository Isolation Systems Dept.

    1995-12-01

    Constitutive models describing the deformation of crushed salt are presented in this report. Ten constitutive models with potential to describe the phenomenological and micromechanical processes for crushed salt were selected from a literature search. Three of these ten constitutive models, termed Sjaardema-Krieg, Zeuch, and Spiers models, were adopted as candidate constitutive models. The candidate constitutive models were generalized in a consistent manner to three-dimensional states of stress and modified to include the effects of temperature, grain size, and moisture content. A database including hydrostatic consolidation and shear consolidation tests conducted on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and southeastern New Mexico salt was used to determine material parameters for the candidate constitutive models. Nonlinear least-squares model fitting to data from the hydrostatic consolidation tests, the shear consolidation tests, and a combination of the shear and hydrostatic tests produces three sets of material parameter values for the candidate models. The change in material parameter values from test group to test group indicates the empirical nature of the models. To evaluate the predictive capability of the candidate models, each parameter value set was used to predict each of the tests in the database. Based on the fitting statistics and the ability of the models to predict the test data, the Spiers model appeared to perform slightly better than the other two candidate models. The work reported here is a first-of-its kind evaluation of constitutive models for reconsolidation of crushed salt. Questions remain to be answered. Deficiencies in models and databases are identified and recommendations for future work are made. 85 refs.

  16. Remineralization potential of fluoride and amorphous calcium phosphate-casein phospho peptide on enamel lesions: An in vitro comparative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This in vitro study was conducted on enamel blocks of human premolars with the aim of evaluating the remineralization potential of fluoride and ACP-CPP and the combination of ACP-CPP and fluoride on early enamel lesions. Materials and Methods: Fifteen intact carious free human premolars were selected. The coronal part of each tooth was sectioned into four parts to make 4 enamel blocks. The baseline SMH (surface microhardness was measured for all the enamel specimens using Vickers microhardness (VHN testing machine. Artificial enamel carious lesions were created by inserting the specimens in demineralization solution for 3 consecutive days. The SMH of the demineralised specimens was evaluated. Then the four enamel sections of each tooth were subjected to various surface treatments , i.e. Group 1- Fluoride varnish, Group 2- ACP-CPP cream, Group 3- Fluoride + ACP-CPP & Group 4- Control (No surface treatment. A caries progression test (pH cycling was carried out, which consisted of alternative demineralization (3hours and remineralization with artificial saliva (21 hours for five consecutive days. After pH cycling again SMH of each specimen was assessed to evaluate the remineralization potential of each surface treatment agent. Then, to asses the remineralization potential of various surface treatments at the subsurface level, each enamel specimen was longitudinally sectioned through the centre to expose the subsurface enamel area. Cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH was evaluated to assess any subsurface remineralization Results: Statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA followed by multiple comparisons test was applied to detect significant differences at P ≤ 0.05 levels between various surface treatments at different phases. Conclusions: With in the limits, the present study concludes that; ACP-CPP cream is effective, but to a lesser extent than fluoride in remineralizing early enamel caries at surface level. Combination of fluoride and ACP

  17. Potential effect of salt reduction in processed foods on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, M.A.H.; Hoogenveen, R.T.; Hoekstra, J.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Raaij, van J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Excessive salt intake has been associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Reducing salt intake is considered an important public health strategy in the Netherlands. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the health benefits of

  18. Potential effect of salt reduction in processed foods on health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriksen, M.A.H.; Hoogenveen, R.T.; Hoekstra, J.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Raaij, van J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Excessive salt intake has been associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Reducing salt intake is considered an important public health strategy in the Netherlands. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the health benefits of salt-reduct

  19. Potential effect of salt reduction in processed foods on health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Marieke A H; Hoogenveen, Rudolf T; Hoekstra, Jeljer; Geleijnse, Johanna M; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; van Raaij, Joop M A

    2014-03-01

    Excessive salt intake has been associated with hypertension and increased cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Reducing salt intake is considered an important public health strategy in the Netherlands. The objective was to evaluate the health benefits of salt-reduction strategies related to processed foods for the Dutch population. Three salt-reduction scenarios were developed: 1) substitution of high-salt foods with low-salt foods, 2) a reduction in the sodium content of processed foods, and 3) adherence to the recommended maximum salt intake of 6 g/d. Health outcomes were obtained in 2 steps: after salt intake was modeled into blood pressure levels, the Chronic Disease Model was used to translate modeled blood pressures into incidences of cardiovascular diseases, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), and life expectancies. Health outcomes of the scenarios were compared with health outcomes obtained with current salt intake. In total, 4.8% of acute myocardial infarction cases, 1.7% of congestive heart failure cases, and 5.8% of stroke cases might be prevented if salt intake meets the recommended maximum intake. The burden of disease might be reduced by 56,400 DALYs, and life expectancy might increase by 0.15 y for a 40-y-old individual. Substitution of foods with comparable low-salt alternatives would lead to slightly higher salt intake reductions and thus to more health gain. The estimates for sodium reduction in processed foods would be slightly lower. Substantial health benefits might be achieved when added salt is removed from processed foods and when consumers choose more low-salt food alternatives.

  20. Preparation and optimization of calcium fluoride particles for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeser, Joachim; Carvalho, Thiago Saads; Pieles, Uwe; Lussi, Adrian

    2014-07-01

    Fluorides are used in dental care due to their beneficial effect in tooth enamel de-/remineralization cycles. To achieve a desired constant supply of soluble fluorides in the oral cavity, different approaches have been followed. Here we present results on the preparation of CaF2 particles and their characterization with respect to a potential application as enamel associated fluoride releasing reservoirs. CaF2 particles were synthesized by precipitation from soluble NaF and CaCl2 salt solutions of defined concentrations and their morphology analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. CaF2 particles with defined sizes and shapes could be synthesized by adjusting the concentrations of the precursor salt solutions. Such particles interacted with enamel surfaces when applied at fluoride concentrations correlating to typical dental care products. Fluoride release from the synthesized CaF2 particles was observed to be largely influenced by the concentration of phosphate in the solution. Physiological solutions with phosphate concentration similar to saliva (3.5 mM) reduced the fluoride release from pure CaF2 particles by a factor of 10-20 × as compared to phosphate free buffer solutions. Fluoride release was even lower in human saliva. The fluoride release could be increased by the addition of phosphate in substoichiometric amounts during CaF2 particle synthesis. The presented results demonstrate that the morphology and fluoride release characteristics of CaF2 particles can be tuned and provide evidence of the suitability of synthetic CaF2 particles as enamel associated fluoride reservoirs.

  1. Anticaries Potential of Low Fluoride Dentifrices Found in The Brazilian Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Adriana de Cássia; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Tabchoury, Cínthia Pereira Machado; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Low-fluoride (F) dentifrices (potential of low-F dentifrices found in the Brazilian market, using a validated and tested pH-cycling model. Enamel blocks were selected by surface hardness (SH) and randomized into four treatment groups (n=12): non-F dentifrice (negative control), low-F dentifrice (500 μg F/g), low-F acidulated dentifrice (550 μg F/g) and 1,100 μg F/g dentifrice (positive control). The blocks were subjected to pH-cycling regimen for 8 days and were treated 2x/day with dentifrice slurries prepared in water (1:3, w/v). The pH of the slurries was checked, and only the acidulated one had low pH. After the pH cycling, SH was again determined and the percentage of surface hardness loss was calculated as indicator of demineralization. Loosely- and firmly-bound F concentrations in enamel were also determined. The 1,100 μg F/g dentifrice was more effective than the low-F ones to reduce enamel demineralization and was the only one that differed from the non-F (pmarket, irrespective of their formulation, do not have anticaries potential.

  2. High accuracy and transferability of a neural network potential through charge equilibration for calcium fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Somayeh; Ghasemi, S. Alireza; Rostami, Samare; Rasoulkhani, Robabe; Schaefer, Bastian; Goedecker, Stefan; Amsler, Maximilian

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the accuracy and transferability of a recently developed high-dimensional neural network (NN) method for calcium fluoride, fitted to a database of ab initio density functional theory (DFT) calculations based on the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange correlation functional. We call the method charge equilibration via neural network technique (CENT). Although the fitting database contains only clusters (i.e., nonperiodic structures), the NN scheme accurately describes a variety of bulk properties. In contrast to other available empirical methods the CENT potential has a much simpler functional form, nevertheless it correctly reproduces the PBE energetics of various crystalline phases both at ambient and high pressure. Surface energies and structures as well as dynamical properties derived from phonon calculations are also in good agreement with PBE results. Overall, the difference between the values obtained by the CENT potential and the PBE reference values is less than or equal to the difference between the values of local density approximation (LDA) and Born-Mayer-Huggins (BMH) with those calculated by the PBE exchange correlation functional.

  3. Fluoride and Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S; Lennon, M A; Petersen, P E; Rugg-Gunn, A J; Whelton, H; Whitford, G M

    2016-06-01

    The discovery during the first half of the 20th century of the link between natural fluoride, adjusted fluoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fluoride in improving oral health. Epidemiological studies of fluoridation programmes have confirmed their safety and their effectiveness in controlling dental caries. Major advances in our knowledge of how fluoride impacts the caries process have led to the development, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of other fluoride vehicles including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fluorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fields of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fluorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fluoride strategies has come from many sources including government health departments as well as international and national grant agencies. In addition, the unique role which industry has played in the development, formulation, assessment of effectiveness and promotion of the various fluoride vehicles and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of 'Fluoride and Oral Health' has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fluoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published in peer reviewed literature.

  4. Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, a potentiator of neuropathy, alters the interaction of organophosphorus compounds with soluble brain esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2012-11-19

    Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) is a protease and esterase inhibitor that causes protection or potentiation/promotion of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy (OPIDN) depending on whether it is dosed before or after an inducer of delayed neuropathy. The molecular target of promotion has not yet been identified. Kinetic data of esterase inhibition were first obtained for PMSF with a soluble chicken brain fraction and then analyzed using a kinetic model with a multienzymatic system in which inhibition occurred with the simultaneous chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and ongoing inhibition (inhibition during the substrate reaction). The best fitting model was a model with resistant fraction, Eα (28%), and two sensitive enzymatic entities, Eβ (61%) and Eγ (11%), with I(50) at 20 min of 70 and 447 μM, respectively. The estimated constant of the chemical hydrolysis of PMSF was kh = 0.23 min(-1). Eα, which is sensitive to mipafox and resistant to PMSF, became less sensitive to mipafox when the preparation was preincubated with PMSF. Its Eα I(50) (30 min) of mipafox increased with the PMSF concentration used to preincubate it. Eγ is sensitive to both PMSF and mipafox, and after preincubation with PMSF, Eγ became less sensitive to mipafox and was totally resistant after preincubation with 10 μM PMSF or more. The sensitivity of Eα to paraoxon (I(50) 30 min from 9 to 11 nM) diminished after PMSF preincubation (I(50) 30 min 185 nM) and showed no spontaneous reactivation capacity. The nature of these interactions is unknown but might be due to covalent binding at sites other than the substrate catalytic center. Such interactions should be considered to interpret the potentiation/promotion phenomenon of PMSF and to understand the effects of multiple exposures to chemicals.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and potential application of Mn2+-intercalated bentonite in fluoride removal: adsorption modeling and mechanism evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzielwana, Rabelani; Gitari, Wilson M.; Akinyemi, Segun A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-09-01

    The study synthesizes a low-cost adsorbent made from Mn2+-modified bentonite clay for groundwater defluoridation. The clays were characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared techniques. The fluoride adsorption capacity of the modified clay was evaluated using batch experiments. The adsorption kinetics results showed that the optimum fluoride (F-) uptake was achieved within the 30 min' contact time. The data fitted well to pseudo-second-order of reaction kinetics indicating that adsorption of F- occurred via chemisorption. In addition, the adsorption isotherm data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model indicating that adsorption occurred on a mono-layered surface. Maximum F- removal of 57% was achieved from groundwater with an initial F- concentration of 5.4 mg L-1 and natural pH of 8.6 using adsorbent dosage of 1 g/100 mL. Fluoride adsorption occurred through ligands and ion exchange mechanisms. The synthesized adsorbent was successfully regenerated for up to five times. The study shows that Mn2+-intercalated bentonite clay has potential for application in defluoridation of groundwater.

  6. Fluoride and chlorhexidine release from filled resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, C; Zhang, N-Z; Anusavice, K J

    2010-09-01

    Resin-based materials that release either fluoride or chlorhexidine have been formulated for inhibiting caries activity. It is not known if the two agents, when incorporated into one material, would interact and affect their release potential. We hypothesized that the ratio of fluoride to chlorhexidine incorporated into a resin, and the pH of the storage medium, will affect their releases from the material. The material investigated contained 23 wt% of filler, and the ratios of calcium fluoride to chlorhexidine diacetate were 8/2, 5/5, and 2/8. The release was conducted in pH 4, 5, and 6 acetate buffers. The results showed that release of either agent increased as the pH of the medium decreased. The presence of fluoride salt substantially reduced the chlorhexidine release, while the presence of a specific quantity of chlorhexidine significantly increased fluoride release. This interaction can be utilized to optimize the release of either agent for therapeutic purposes.

  7. Experimental Validation of Passive Safety System Models: Application to Design and Optimization of Fluoride-Salt-Cooled, High-Temperature Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibaum, Nicolas

    The development of advanced nuclear reactor technology requires understanding of complex, integrated systems that exhibit novel phenomenology under normal and accident conditions. The advent of passive safety systems and enhanced modular construction methods requires the development and use of new frameworks to predict the behavior of advanced nuclear reactors, both from a safety standpoint and from an environmental impact perspective. This dissertation introduces such frameworks for scaling of integral effects tests for natural circulation in fluoride-salt-cooled, high-temperature reactors (FHRs) to validate evaluation models (EMs) for system behavior; subsequent reliability assessment of passive, natural- circulation-driven decay heat removal systems, using these validated models; evaluation of life cycle carbon dioxide emissions as a key environmental impact metric; and recommendations for further work to apply these frameworks in the development and optimization of advanced nuclear reactor designs. In this study, the developed frameworks are applied to the analysis of the Mark 1 pebble-bed FHR (Mk1 PB-FHR) under current investigation at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  8. A buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for passive reactivity control of a Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blandford, Edward D., E-mail: edb@unm.edu [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We develop a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for a FHR. • Shutdown rod system can be actively or passively activated during transients. • Response of the rod was computationally simulated and experimentally validated. • Initial results indicate rod could provide effective transient reactivity control. -- Abstract: This paper presents a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod concept for use in Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs). The baseline design considered here is a 900 MWth modular version of the FHR class called the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) that uses pebble fuel. Due to the high volumetric heat capacity of the primary coolant, the FHRs operate with a high power density core with a similar average coolant temperature as in modular helium reactors. The reactivity control system for the baseline PB-AHTR uses a novel buoyantly-driven shutdown rod system that can be actively or passively activated during reactor transients. In addition to a traditional active insertion mechanism, the new shutdown rod system is designed to also operate passively, fulfilling the role of a reserve shutdown system. The physical response of the shutdown rod was simulated both computationally and experimentally, using scaling arguments where applicable, with an emphasis on key phenomena identified by a preliminary Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) study. This paper presents results from both the pre-predicted simulation and experimental validation efforts.

  9. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p...

  10. Quantitative similarity analysis of the fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor with HTR-10 and MSRE%氟盐冷却球床堆与HTR-10和MSRE的定量相似性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨群; 于世和; 邹杨; 周波; 严睿; 徐洪杰

    2016-01-01

    Background: The fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor which has not yet been built so far is a new international research reactor, so the selection of similar reactors with operation experience as benchmark is one important part of the applicability analysis for its reactor core nuclear design software. Purpose:This study aims to determine quantitatively the rationality of the 10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor (HTR-10) and the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) to be the benchmarks for the fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor. Methods:The similarities of the fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor with HTR-10 and MSRE were analyzed with the adoption of the similarity analysis software that is often used. Results: The results show that the fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor and MSRE have a high similarity because they have the close spectrum peak energies and almost the same elements in core. The fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor and HTR-10 have the different coolant and more differences in spectrum peak energies, hence the low similarity. Conclusion: MSRE is an ideal benchmark of the reactor core nuclear design software for the fluoride salt-cooled pebble bed reactor.%氟盐冷却球床堆是当前国际上一种新的研究堆型,尚无已经建造完成的反应堆,因此,选择相似且具有运行经验的反应堆作为基准题有助于堆芯核设计软件适用性分析。利用国际上常采用的相似性分析软件,可对熔盐实验堆(Molten Salt Reactor Experiment, MSRE)及10 MW高温气冷堆(10 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor, HTR-10)与氟盐冷却球床堆的相似性进行分析,定量判断它们作为基准题的合理性。分析结果表明, MSRE和氟盐冷却球床堆的能谱峰位能量接近且堆内元素种类相近,二者相似程度较高;常温临界HTR-10和氟盐冷却球床堆冷却剂不同,且能谱峰位能量差异较大,二者相似程

  11. Assessment of potential hazards of fluoride contamination in drinking groundwater of an intensively cultivated district in West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Manik Chandra; Mandal, Biswapati

    2009-05-01

    We assessed the potential of fluoride (F) contamination in drinking groundwater of an intensively cultivated district in India as a function of its lithology and agricultural activities. Three hundred and eight groundwater samples were collected at different depths from various types of wells and analyzed for pH, EC, NO(3)-N load and F content. A typical litholog was constructed and database on fertilizer and pesticide uses were also recorded for the district. The water samples were almost neutral in reaction and non-saline in nature with low NO(3)-N content (0.02 to 4.56 microg mL(-1)). Fluoride content in water was also low (0.01 to 1.18 microg mL(-1)) with only 2.27% of them exceeding 1.0 microg mL(-1) posing a potential threat of fluorosis. On average, its content varied little spatially and along depth of sampling aquifers because of homogeneity in lithology of the district. The F content in these samples showed a significant positive correlation (r = 0.12, P < or = 0.05) with the amount of phosphatic fertilizer (single super phosphate) used for agriculture but no such relation either with the anthropogenic activities of pesticide use or NO(3)-N content, pH and EC values of the samples was found. The results suggest that the use of phosphatic fertilizer may have some role to play in F enrichment of groundwater.

  12. Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo method in Fluoride glass system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kotbi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as Molecular Dynamics (MD and Monte Carlo (MC simulations. On the other hand, the so-called Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the Hybrid Reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a Fluoride glass system BaMnMF7 (M = Fe,V using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions (PDFs. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

  13. Potential advantages of a cesium fluoride scintillator for a time-of-flight positron camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, R; Gresset, C; Vacher, J

    1980-02-01

    In order to improve the quality of positron tomographic imaging, a time-of-flight technique combined with a classical reconstruction method has been investigated. The decay time of NaI(Tl) and bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillators is too long for this application, and efficiency of the plastic scintillators is too low. Cesium fluoride appears to be a very promising detector material. This paper presents preliminary results obtained with a time-of-flight technique using CsF scintillators. The expected advantages were realized.

  14. Potential sea salt aerosol sources from frost flowers in the pan-Arctic region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Li [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Now at Department of Earth System Science, University of California, Irvine California USA; Russell, Lynn M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla California USA; Burrows, Susannah M. [Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-09-23

    In order to better represent observed wintertime aerosol concentrations at Barrow, Alaska, we implemented an observationally-based parameterization for estimating sea salt production from frost flowers in the Community Earth System Model (CESM). In this work, we evaluate the potential influence of this sea salt source on the pan-Arctic (60ºN-90ºN) climate. Results show that frost flower salt emissions substantially increase the modeled surface sea salt aerosol concentration in the winter months when new sea ice and frost flowers are present. The parameterization reproduces both the magnitude and seasonal variation of the observed submicron sea salt aerosol concentration at surface in Barrow during winter much better than the standard CESM simulation without a frost-flower salt particle source. Adding these frost flower salt particle emissions increases aerosol optical depth by 10% and results in a small cooling at surface. The increase in salt particle mass concentrations of a factor of 8 provides nearly two times the cloud condensation nuclei concentration, as well as 10% increases in cloud droplet number and 40% increases in liquid water content near coastal regions adjacent to continents. These cloud changes reduce longwave cloud forcing by 3% and cause a small surface warming, increasing the downward longwave flux at the surface by 2 W m-2 in the pan-Arctic under the present-day climate.

  15. Prevenção da cárie dental: a questão da fluoretação do sal The prevention of dental caries: the question of salt fluoridation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Gomes Pinto

    1982-02-01

    Full Text Available Discute-se a viabilidade da utilização do sal de cozinha como veículo para o flúor no processo de prevenção da cárie no Brasil. Com base na análise do estudo da Colômbia, e na experiência brasileira com o método similar de iodação do sal, conclui-se que o emprego do sal fluoretado é válido somente em áreas restritas e sob controle técnico. A fluoretação da água constitui o método de escolha para o país, que deverá concentrar seus esforços na tentativa de sua máxima expansão.The feasibility of using common salt as a vehicle for fluorine in the combating of dental caries in Brazil is discussed. According to Colombian research, and the Brazilian experience with the similar method of salt iodation, this study concludes that salt fluoridation may be useful in limited areas and under strict control. Water fluoridation is the method most appropriate for Brazil which should concentrate its efforts on extending the use of this method as widely as possible.

  16. Penetration Potential of a Silver Diamine Fluoride Solution on Dentin Surfaces. An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willershausen, Ines; Schulte, Daniel; Azaripour, Adriano; Weyer, Veronica; Briseño, Benjamin; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence of open dentinal tubules as a cause of dental hypersensitivity is a very common pnenomenon in patients. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of a silver diamine fluoride solution (Ag(NH3)2 F) on human dentin samples. A total of five fully retained wisdom teeth were selected for this study. The crowns of the teeth were separated from the roots and the occlusal enamel surface was removed. All dentin samples were treated for 60 seconds with phosphoric acid (36%) and rinsed thoroughly to remove the smear layer. Then the desensitizing agent (Riva Star, SDI; 38% Ag(NH3)2 F) was placed according to the manufacturer's instruction. Three dentin samples were prepared for element analysis using an electron beam microprobe analyzer (JEOL JXA 8900RL). The Ag concentrations in the dentin samples were measured in depths ranging from 5 to 40 μm. The other two dentin samples were vertically fractured and accordingly prepared for visualization with SEM (Zeiss DSM). The application of the desensitizing agent on the dentin areas demonstrated an increased Ag concentration (JEOL JXA 8900RL). On the dentin surface an Ag concentration of 1.7 weight % (? 0.7) was measured, but at a depth of 20 μm only 0.3 weight % (± 0.1) were detected. In depths greater than 40 μm the Ag concentration was below the detection limit. The SEM results showed that deposits could be found in a covering on the dentin layer and in the dentinal tubules to a depth of 20 μm. In this ex vivo study, the effect of silver diamine fluoride on dentin surfaces could be demonstrated. The desensitizing agent formed a film on the dentin surface and in some dentinal tubules deposits were detected. These findings can explain a certain desensitizing effect, but a direct translation to in vivo conditions can only be done with caution.

  17. The potential/pH diagram of silver in aqueous ammonium salt solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyters, J.H.; Wijnen, M.D.; Hul, H.J. van den

    1961-01-01

    The potential/pH diagram of silver in aqueous ammonium salt solution at 25°C has been calculated and verified experimentally. Calculations were carried out on the basis of the standard potential of the silver/silver-ion couple, the dissociation constants of the silver mono- and di-ammonia

  18. Potential of CO2 lasers (10.6 µm associated with fluorides in inhibiting human enamel erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thayanne Monteiro RAMOS-OLIVEIRA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential of CO2 lasers associated with different fluoride agents in inhibiting enamel erosion. Human enamel samples were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 12: G1-eroded enamel; G2-APF gel; G3-AmF/NaF gel; G4-AmF/SnF2 solution; G5-CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µm+APF gel; G6-CO2 laser+AmF/NaF gel; G7-CO2laser+AmF/SnF2solution; G8-CO2 laser; and G9-sound enamel. The CO2 laser parameters were: 0.45 J/cm2; 6 μs; and 128 Hz. After surface treatment, the samples (except from G9 were immersed in 1% citric acid (pH 4.0, 3 min. Surface microhardness was measured at baseline and after surface softening. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s tests (p < 0.05. G2 (407.6 ± 37.3 presented the highest mean SMH after softening, followed by G3 (407.5 ± 29.8 and G5 (399.7 ± 32.9. Within the fluoride-treated groups, G4 (309.0 ± 24.4 had a significantly lower mean SMH than G3 and G2, which were statistically similar to each other. AmF/NaF and APF application showed potential to protect and control erosion progression in dental enamel, and CO2 laser irradiation at 0.45J/cm2 did not influence its efficacy. CO2 laser irradiation alone under the same conditions could also significantly decrease enamel erosive mineral loss, although at lower levels.

  19. In situ study of the anticariogenic potential of fluoride varnish combined with CO2 laser on enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Colucci, Vivian; Tenuta, Lívia Maria Andaló; Serra, Mônica Campos; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2015-06-01

    This in situ study evaluated the effect of fluoride varnish combined with CO2 laser in controlling enamel demineralization caused by cariogenic challenges. In a crossover study conducted in 2 phases of 14 days each, 14 volunteers (n = 14) wore palatal appliances with bovine enamel slabs treated with fluoride varnish + CO2 laser (FV + CO2), fluoride varnish (FV), nonfluoride placebo varnish (PV) and nonfluoride placebo varnish + CO2 laser (PV + CO2). Drops of sucrose solution were dripped onto enamel slabs allowing the accumulation of biofilm. At the first phase, half of the volunteers received 4 enamel slabs treated with FV while the remainders received slabs exposed to the PV with and without CO2 laser. In the second phase, the vonlunteers were reversed treatments. The slabs were evaluated for cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) and the concentration of loosely bound fluoride (CaF2) and firmly bound fluoride (FAp). The concentration of fluoride in biofilm were also determined. Two-way ANOVA showed that the CSMH values were higher in laser-irradiated enamel, regardless of the fluoride varnish. Friedman test showed that FV group presented significantly larger amount of fluoride in biofilm (P fluoride was found in the groups FV + CO2, which was not different from FV (P > 0.05). The synergistic effect of fluoride varnish and CO2 laser on enamel demineralization was not observed, however, CO2 laser reduces enamel demineralization. CO2 laser might reduce the demineralization of subsurface enamel, although its association with a high concentrated fluoride therapy may not result in a positive synergistic interaction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Removal of fluoride from fluoride contaminated industrial waste water by electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Vijaya A; Nanoti, Madan V

    2003-01-01

    Wastewater containing fluoride are generally treated with lime or calcium salt supplemented with aluminium salts. Wastewater generated from different industries does not always behave in the same way due to the presence of interfering contaminants. A number of techniques have been developed and studied for the removal of excessive fluoride. Most of these are based on use of aluminium salt. In alum coagulation the sorption properties of product of hydrolysis of aluminium salts and capacity of fluoride for complex formation plays a very important role. These hydrolysis products of aluminium can be produced by passing direct current through aluminium electrode. The text presented in the paper deals with the various aspect of removal of fluoride by electrolysis using aluminium electrode from fluoride chemical based industrial wastewater.

  1. Intrinsic potential of cell membranes: opposite effects of lipid transmembrane asymmetry and asymmetric salt ion distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    Using atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, we consider the intrinsic cell membrane potential that is found to originate from a subtle interplay between lipid transmembrane asymmetry and the asymmetric distribution of monovalent salt ions on the two sides of the cell membrane. It turns out......Cl saline solution and the PE leaflet is exposed to KCl, the outcome is that the effects of asymmetric lipid and salt ion distributions essentially cancel one another almost completely. Overall, our study highlights the complex nature of the intrinsic potential of cell membranes under physiological...

  2. Comparative evaluation of enamel remineralization potential of processed cheese, calcium phosphate-based synthetic agent, and a fluoride-containing toothpaste: An in situ study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Grewal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enamel remineralization potential of variety of products has been established, but there is a lack of evidence of comparison of remineralization potential of natural versus synthetic products. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the enamel remineralization potential of saliva, cheese, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP-based synthetic agent, and fluoride toothpaste. Design: In situ study was carried out on sixty individuals who wore an intraoral appliance containing demineralized enamel slabs for each agent. One out of six slabs was kept as a control so as to record the baseline values (neither subjected to demineralization nor remineralization. Experimental agents were applied on the designated enamel slabs on day 1, 4, 7, and 10 with a crossover wash out period of 7 days. Quantitative values of mineral content of slab were measured using energy dispersive X-ray and qualitative changes in surface topography of slab were seen under scanning electron microscope at ×20K magnification. Results: Highly significant changes from baseline values were seen in calcium and phosphorus content of slabs treated with cheese and CPP-ACP-based agent whereas levels of fluoride were significantly higher in enamel slabs treated with fluoride-containing toothpaste. Conclusion: Cheese is an organic, economical, and user-friendly option over prescribed synthetic agents. A synergistic effect of fluoride-containing toothpaste with intake of cheese could be a good enamel remineralization protocol.

  3. Dentifrice Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakita, Philip E.

    2004-05-01

    The effectiveness of the fluoride ion in lowering the incidence of dental caries is a major factor in the field of dental health. Observations and research studies in the first half of the 20th century have lead to the widespread adoption of fluoridated water and the use of inorganic fluoride compounds in oral care products, such as toothpaste and dental rinses. This article provides a brief review of the types of compounds used and the chemistry involved.

  4. Evaluation of Alkali Bromide Salts for Potential Pyrochemical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhat K. Tripathy; Steven D. Herrmann; Guy L. Fredrickson; Tedd E. Lister; Toni Y. Gutknecht

    2013-10-01

    Transient techniques were employed to study the electrochemical behavior, reduction mechanism and transport properties of REBr3 (RE - La, Nd and Gd) in pure LiBr, LiBr-KBr (eutectic) and LiBr-KBr-CsBr (eutectic) melts. Gd(III) showed a reversible single step soluble-insoluble exchange phenomenon in LiBr melt at 973K. Although La (III), Nd(III) and Gd(III) ions showed reversible behavior in eutectic LiBr-KBr melts, these ions showed a combination of temperature dependent reversible and pseudo-reversible behavior. While both La(III) and Gd(III) showed one step reduction, the reduction of Nd(III) was observed to be a two step process. La metal could be electrodeposited from the ternary electrolyte at a temperature of 673K. Various electrochemical measurements suggest that both binary and ternary bromide melts can potentially be used to electrodeposit high purity RE metals at comparatively lower operating temperatures.

  5. The potential of remediation of soils affected by salt using halophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaygan, Mandana; Mulligan, David; Baumgartl, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Evaporation ponds containing saline waters may cause soil salinization in the vicinity of these ponds through seeping and leaching of pond water through the embankment. Native set tolerant vegetation like halophytes may assist in the revegetation and rehabilitation of these salt affected soils. As native vegetation for this study of brine affected land native halophytes species were selected including Tecticornia pergranulata, Sclerolaena longicuspis and Frankenia serpyllifoli. Soil samples from adjacent bare and vegetated areas of brine affected land were analysed to assess the physico-chemical properties associated with the vegetation cover. Salt contents of the halophytes, plant bioaccumulation, bioconcentration and translocation factors were measured to evaluate the remediation capacity of the species. The hypothesis was tested whether the halophytes are able to reduce the salt concentrations and as a consequence the salinity (and sodicity) of the soil. The examined halophytes were associated with a reduction in salinity and sodality by an average of 38.5% and 33% in the top 10 cm of the soil, respectively. Tecticornia pergranulata had the highest shoot Na+ content (98 g kg-1 dry weight) and higher factors for bioaccumulation (factor of 14) and translocation (factor of 23) for Na+ and indicated the higher remediation potential of this species. Despite the potentially successful application of this species for remediation, halophytes are in general not able to reduce the salt content within the landscape to create a condition for the growth of glycophytes particularly on a short-term time scale. However, the salt affected land can be revegetated by halophytes, and halophytes probably provide a stable vegetation cover for the landscape in ecological succession. The results also showed that a greater salt leaching potential is likely linked to soil physical parameters and most likely achievable through higher soil hydraulic conductivity which is required for

  6. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Ra?, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual ...

  7. The effective use of fluorides in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A.; Petersen, Poul Erik; Lennon, Michael A.

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research and development was concerned with waterborne fluorides, both naturally occurring and added, and their effects on the prevalence and incidence of dental caries and dental fluorosis. In the latter half of the 20th century, the focus of research was on fluoride toothpastes and mouth rinses. More recently, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on: recent water fluoridation schemes in California, USA; salt fluoridation in Jamaica; milk fluoridation in Chile; and the development of "affordable" fluoride toothpastes in Indonesia. Common themes are the concern to reduce demands for compliance with fluoride regimes that rely upon action by individuals and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher-than-acceptable levels. PMID:16211158

  8. Kinetic interactions of a neuropathy potentiator (phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride) with the neuropathy target esterase and other membrane bound esterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangas, Iris; Vilanova, Eugenio; Estévez, Jorge

    2014-02-01

    Phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) is a protease and esterase inhibitor that causes protection, or potentiation/"promotion," of organophosphorus delayed neuropathy (OPIDN), depending on whether it is dosed before or after an inducer of delayed neuropathy, such as mipafox. The molecular target of the potentiation/promotion of OPIDN has not yet been identified. The kinetic data of phenyl valerate esterase inhibition by PMSF were obtained with membrane chicken brain fractions, the animal model and tissue in which neuropathy target esterase (NTE) was first described. Data were analyzed using a kinetic model with a multienzymatic system in which inhibition, simultaneous chemical hydrolysis of the inhibitor and "ongoing inhibition" (inhibition during the substrate reaction) were considered. Three main esterase components were discriminated: two sensitive enzymatic entities representing 44 and 41 %, with I 50 (20 min) of 35 and 198 μM at 37 °C, respectively, and a resistant fraction of 15 % of activity. The estimated constant of the chemical hydrolysis of PMSF was also calculated (kh = 0.28 min(-1)). Four esterase components were globally identified considering also previously data with paraoxon and mipafox: EPα (4-8 %), highly sensitive to paraoxon and mipafox, spontaneously reactivates after inhibition with paraoxon, and resistant to PMSF; EPβ (38-41 %), sensitive to paraoxon and PMSF, but practically resistant to mipafox, this esterase component has the kinetic characteristics expected for the PMSF potentiator target, even though paraoxon cannot be a potentiator in vivo due to high AChE inhibition; EPγ (NTE) (39-48 %), paraoxon-resistant and sensitive to the micromolar concentration of mipafox and PMSF; and EPδ (10 %), resistant to all the inhibitors assayed. This kinetic characterization study is needed for further isolation and molecular characterization studies, and these PMSF phenyl valerate esterase components will have to be considered in further studies

  9. 由铵盐制备高纯氟化钡的工艺研究%Preparation technology of high purity barium fluoride from ammonium salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许春晓; 刘晓红; 柯春兰; 章小明

    2011-01-01

    以氟化铵和氯化钡为原料,采用沉淀法制备了氟化钡.反应温度为25℃,反应时间为60min,氯化钡初始质量分数为10%,氟化铵与氯化钡物质的量比为2.2,m(洗水):m(滤饼)=10:1,可制备出纯度达99%以上的氟化钡.XRD谱图表明,样品氟化钡的所有衍射峰均与标准立方相氟化钡吻合,属立方晶系.该工艺流程简单,经济效益好.%Barium fluoride (BaF2 ) was prepared by precipitation method with ammonium fluoride and barium chloride as raw materials. BaF2 with purity of more than 99% can be prepared when reaction temperature is 25 ℃ ,reaction time is 60 rnin,initial mass fraction of barium chloride is 10% ,amount-of-substance ratio of ammonium fluoride to barium chloride is 2.2,and the mass ratio of washing water amount to filter cake amount = 10: 1. XRD pattern showed that all the diffraction peaks of barium fluoride sample were consistent with the standard cubic barium fluoride. Therefore it belongs to the cubic crystal system. The technology has short flow route and good economic benefits.

  10. Potential of CO2 lasers (10.6 µm) associated with fluorides in inhibiting human enamel erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro; Ramos, Thaysa Monteiro; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcela; Apel, Christian; Fischer, Horst; Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Steagall, Washington; Freitas, Patricia Moreira de

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential of CO2 lasers associated with different fluoride agents in inhibiting enamel erosion. Human enamel samples were randomly divided into 9 groups (n = 12): G1-eroded enamel; G2-APF gel; G3-AmF/NaF gel; G4-AmF/SnF2 solution; G5-CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 µm)+APF gel; G6-CO2 laser+AmF/NaF gel; G7-CO2laser+AmF/SnF2solution; G8-CO2 laser; and G9-sound enamel. The CO2 laser parameters were: 0.45 J/cm2; 6 μs; and 128 Hz. After surface treatment, the samples (except from G9) were immersed in 1% citric acid (pH 4.0, 3 min). Surface microhardness was measured at baseline and after surface softening. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (p CO2 laser irradiation at 0.45J/cm2 did not influence its efficacy. CO2 laser irradiation alone under the same conditions could also significantly decrease enamel erosive mineral loss, although at lower levels.

  11. Environmental fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marier, J.R.; Rose, D.

    1971-01-01

    Modern-day man is probably exposed to more environmental fluoride than was heretofore suspected, and consideration must be given to the total ingestion from various sources as well as the types of fluoride present in air, foods, beverages, and other commodities. An effort should also be made to study the symptomology of chronic fluorine intoxication, especially the early non-skeletal manifestations of arthritic-like symptoms that may be complicated by metabolic and/or nutritional inadequacies. Finally, it must be emphasized again that dental fluorosis (i.e. mottling) will only be seen in subjects who have been exposed to fluoride during the time when the enamel of the permanent teeth is being formed, and its absence cannot be assumed to indicate freedom from other fluoride-induced effects including effects of organofluorides and their metabolites. 168 references.

  12. Liquid-liquid reductive extraction in molten fluoride salt/liquid aluminium as a core of process for the An/Ln group separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conocar, O

    2007-06-15

    This report concerns a pyrochemical process based on liquid-liquid extraction in a molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system as a core process for actinide (An)/lanthanide (Ln) group separation, studied at CEA. The basic and demonstrative experiments have established the feasibility of the An/Ln group separation in the molten fluoride/liquid aluminium system (U, Pu, Np, Am, Cm traces from Nd, Ce, Eu, Sm, Eu, La - An/Ln separation factors over 1000 - An recovery yield over 98 % in one batch). The main experimental efforts must now be targeted on the recovery of actinides from the Al matrix. A thermodynamic and bibliographical survey has been done. It shows that back-extraction in a molten chloride melt could be a promising technique for this purpose.

  13. Electrochemical studies on cerium(Ⅲ) in molten fluoride mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VIRGIL; CONSTANTIN; ANA-MARIA; POPESCU; MIRCEA; OLTEANU

    2010-01-01

    This study aims to determine the principal electrochemical characteristics of the electrodeposition of cerium metal from molten fluoride systems.The cathodic process of Ce3+ ions in LiF-NaF and LiF-NaF-CaF2 molten salts was studied using electrochemical techniques as steady state and cyclic voltammetry methods.The decomposition potential(Ed) and the overvoltage(η) were determined for NaCeF4 using current-potential curves under galvanostatic conditions.The Ed was found to be 2.025 V in LiF-NaF and 2.045 V in...

  14. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... August 17, 2001;50(RR-14):1–42. Fluoride Products Fluoride Toothpaste Form Concentrations of fluoride in ...

  15. Bottled Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottled water and fluoride. Does bottled water contain fluoride? Bottled water products may contain fluoride, depending on ... How can I find out the level of fluoride in bottled water? The FDA does not require ...

  16. Other Fluoride Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Water Fluoridation Journal Articles for Community Water Fluoridation Other Fluoride Products Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Use the information listed below to compare the other fluoride products that may lower the risk for ...

  17. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Serum Proteins in Wistar Rats Treated with Sodium Fluoride: Insight into the Potential Mechanism and Candidate Biomarkers of Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yan; Zeng, Beibei; Zhang, Hua; Chen, Cheng; Wu, Yanli; Wang, Nanlan; Wu, Yanqiu; Shen, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fluorosis induced by exposure to high level fluoride is quite widespread in the world. The manifestations of fluorosis include dental mottling, bone damage, and impaired malfunction of soft tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of fluorosis has not been clarified until now. To explore the underlying mechanisms of fluorosis and screen out serum biomarkers, we carried out a quantitative proteomics study to identify differentially expressed serum proteins in Wistar rats treated with sodium fluoride (NaF) by using a proteomics approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ). We fed Wistar rats drinking water that had 50, 150, and 250 mg/L of dissolved NaF for 24 weeks. For the experimental duration, each rat was given an examination of the lower incisors to check for the condition of dental fluorosis (DF). By the end of the treatment, fluoride ion concentration in serum and lower incisors were detected. The results showed that NaF treatment can induce rat fluorosis. By iTRAQ analysis, a total of 37 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between NaF-treated and control rats. These proteins were further analyzed by bioinformatics, out of which two proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assays (ELISA). The major proteins were involved in complement and coagulation cascade, inflammatory response, complement activation, defense response, and wound response, suggesting that inflammation and immune reactions may play a key role in fluorosis pathogenesis. These proteins may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of fluoride toxicity, and may serve as potential biomarkers for fluorosis. PMID:27690006

  18. iTRAQ-Based Proteomics Analysis of Serum Proteins in Wistar Rats Treated with Sodium Fluoride: Insight into the Potential Mechanism and Candidate Biomarkers of Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorosis induced by exposure to high level fluoride is quite widespread in the world. The manifestations of fluorosis include dental mottling, bone damage, and impaired malfunction of soft tissues. However, the molecular mechanism of fluorosis has not been clarified until now. To explore the underlying mechanisms of fluorosis and screen out serum biomarkers, we carried out a quantitative proteomics study to identify differentially expressed serum proteins in Wistar rats treated with sodium fluoride (NaF by using a proteomics approach of isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ. We fed Wistar rats drinking water that had 50, 150, and 250 mg/L of dissolved NaF for 24 weeks. For the experimental duration, each rat was given an examination of the lower incisors to check for the condition of dental fluorosis (DF. By the end of the treatment, fluoride ion concentration in serum and lower incisors were detected. The results showed that NaF treatment can induce rat fluorosis. By iTRAQ analysis, a total of 37 differentially expressed serum proteins were identified between NaF-treated and control rats. These proteins were further analyzed by bioinformatics, out of which two proteins were validated by enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assays (ELISA. The major proteins were involved in complement and coagulation cascade, inflammatory response, complement activation, defense response, and wound response, suggesting that inflammation and immune reactions may play a key role in fluorosis pathogenesis. These proteins may contribute to the understanding of the mechanism of fluoride toxicity, and may serve as potential biomarkers for fluorosis.

  19. Fluoride Content in Alcoholic Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschorska, Marta; Gutowska, Izabela; Baranowska-Bosiacka, Irena; Rać, Monika Ewa; Chlubek, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the role of alcoholic drinks as a potential source of dietary fluoride by means of measuring fluoride levels in selected alcoholic drinks available on the Polish market that are also diverse in terms of the percentage content of ethanol. The study was conducted on 48 types of drinks with low, medium, and high alcohol content available on the Polish market and offered by various manufacturers, both Polish and foreign. Fluoride concentrations in individual samples were measured by potentiometric method with a fluoride ion-selective electrode. The highest fluoride levels were determined in the lowest percentage drinks (less than 10 % v/v ethanol), with the lowest fluoride levels observed in the highest percentage drinks (above 40 % v/v ethanol). In terms of types of alcoholic drinks, the highest fluoride levels were determined in beers and wines, while the lowest levels were observed in vodkas. These data confirm the fact that alcoholic beverages need to be considered as a significant source of fluoride delivered into the body.

  20. Assessment of bone synthetic activity in inflammatory lesions and syndesmophytes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis: the potential role of 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Geun; Kim, In-Joo; Kim, Keun-Young; Kim, Hee-Young; Park, Kyoung-June; Kim, Seong-Jang; Park, Eun-Kyoung; Jeon, Yun-Kyung; Yang, Byeong-Yun; Kim, Geun-Tae

    2015-01-01

    18F-fluoride uptake represents active osteoblastic bone synthesis. We assessed bone synthetic activity in inflammatory lesions and syndesmophytes in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) using 18F-fluoride positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MRI, Philips Healthcare, Cleveland, OH, USA) and x-ray. All images of 12 AS patients were recorded with the presence or absence of increased 18F-fluoride uptake lesions on PET, acute (type A) or advanced (type B) corner inflammatory lesions (CILs) on MRI, syndesmophytes on x-ray at the anterior vertebral corners. An increased 18F-fluoride uptake lesion was defined as an uptake which is greater than the uptake in the adjacent normal vertebral body. The association of a CIL or syndesmophyte with an increased 18F-fluoride uptake lesion was investigated by generalised linear latent mixed models analysis to adjust within-patient dependence for total numbers of vertebral corners. There were 67 type A CILs (12.1%), 37 type B CILs (6.7%) and 58 increased 18F-fluoride uptake lesion (10.4%) out of 552 vertebral corners and there were 57 syndesmophytes (19.8%) out of 288 vertebral corners. A type A CIL (OR=3.2, 95% CI=1.6-6.5, p=0.001), type B CIL (OR=59.9, 95% CI=23.5-151.5, p<0.001) and syndesmpophyte (OR=21.8, 95% CI=5.5-85.2, p<0.001) were significantly associated with an increased 18F-fluoride uptake lesion. Our data suggest that an inflammatory lesion as well as a syndesmophyte is associated with active bone synthesis assessed by 18F-fluoride uptake in the spine of AS patients. 18F-fluoride PET-MRI may have the potential for investigating the pathogenesis of structural damage in AS.

  1. Fluoride release from newly marketed fluoride varnishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Beth L; Bartoloni, Joseph A; Hensley, Donna M; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2012-03-01

    New fluoride varnishes have been marketed that reportedly release more fluoride (Enamel Pro) or release fluoride more slowly (Vanish XT). The purpose of this study was to compare the amount and rate of fluoride release of new fluoride varnishes with other traditional fluoride varnishes. Extracted molars were cut into block sections. The enamel surfaces of the sections were painted with Enamel Pro, Duraphat, Vanish, or Vanish XT fluoride varnishes. One group was not treated and served as a negative control. The tooth sections were immersed in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in parts per million was measured after the first 30 minutes, daily for the first week, and weekly until the level was below the limit of detection. Fluoride release was plotted over time. Cumulative fluoride release and rate of release (slope) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Tukey (α = .05). Enamel Pro had the greatest cumulative fluoride release. There was no significant difference between Duraphat and Vanish. Vanish XT had the lowest cumulative fluoride release. The rate of fluoride release from 1 week to limit of detection was Enamel Pro > Vanish > Duraphat > Vanish XT. The two newly marketed fluoride varnishes (Enamel Pro and Vanish XT) had significantly different fluoride release from the two conventional fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Vanish).

  2. Molten fluorides for nuclear applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie. Delpech

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of pyrochemistry is being increasingly acknowledged and becomes unavoidable in the nuclear field. Molten salts may be used for fuel processing and spent fuel recycling, for heat transfer, as a homogeneous fuel and as a breeder material in fusion systems. Fluorides that are stable at high temperature and under high neutron flux are especially promising. Analysis of several field cases reveals that corrosion in molten fluorides is essentially due to the oxidation of metals by uranium fluoride and/or oxidizing impurities. The thermodynamics of this process are discussed with an emphasis on understanding the mass transfer in the systems, selecting appropriate metallic materials and designing effective purification methods.

  3. Fluoridation Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... level in water is not enough to prevent tooth decay; however, some groundwater and natural springs can have ... the tooth’s surface, or enamel. Water fluoridation prevents tooth decay by providing frequent and consistent contact with low ...

  4. Time and temperature affect glycolysis in blood samples regardless of fluoride-based preservatives: a potential underestimation of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Mary; Daly, Niamh; O'Kelly, Ruth; Turner, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background The inhibition of glycolysis prior to glucose measurement is an important consideration when interpreting glucose tolerance tests. This is particularly important in gestational diabetes mellitus where prompt diagnosis and treatment is essential. A study was planned to investigate the effect of preservatives and temperature on glycolysis. Methods Blood samples for glucose were obtained from consented females. Lithium heparin and fluoride-EDTA samples transported rapidly in ice slurry to the laboratory were analysed for glucose concentration and then held either in ice slurry or at room temperature for varying time intervals. Paired fluoride-citrate samples were received at room temperature and held at room temperature, with analysis at similar time intervals. Results No significant difference was noted between mean glucose concentrations when comparing different sample types received in ice slurry. The mean glucose concentrations decreased significantly for both sets of samples when held at room temperature (0.4 mmol/L) and in ice slurry (0.2 mmol/L). A review of patient glucose tolerance tests reported in our hospital indicated that 17.8% exceeded the recommended diagnostic criteria for gestational diabetes mellitus. It was predicted that if the results of fasting samples were revised to reflect the effect of glycolysis at room temperature, the adjusted diagnostic rate could increase to 35.3%. Conclusion Preanalytical handling of blood samples for glucose analysis is vital. Fluoride-EDTA is an imperfect antiglycolytic, even when the samples are transported and analysed rapidly provides such optimal conditions. The use of fluoride-citrate tubes may offer a viable alternative in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus.

  5. Polypyrrole-grafted peanut shell biological carbon as a potential sorbent for fluoride removal: Sorption capability and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunlu; Chen, Nan; Zhao, Yanan; Li, Rui; Feng, Chuanping

    2016-11-01

    In this study, an effective defluoridation adsorbent was developed by depositing polypyrrole (PPy) on granular peanut shell biological carbon (BC) via in situ chemical oxidative polymerization. The variables of defluoridation process (i.e., adsorbent dosage, fluoride solution pH, and anionic interference) were tested. The mechanism was determined by isotherm and kinetic studies, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and automatic titration. The PPy-grafted BC (PPy/BC) composite performed commendably from pH 2.0 to 10.0, and exhibited high selectivity for fluoride in the presence of several co-existing anions. The experimental data were described well by a Langmuir isotherm curve, and the maximum adsorption capacity was 17.15 mg g(-1). Kinetic studies illustrated the adsorption process was accomplished via surface adsorption as well as by intraparticle diffusion. In addition, mesoporous diffusion was the rate-controlling step in intraparticle diffusion process. BET and SEM analysis revealed the sponge-like polymer adhered to the BC and plugged the pores. XPS, FTIR, and SEM confirmed that fluoride removal was accomplished via the replacement of doped ionizable chloride ions (Cl(-)) coupled with positively charged nitrogen (N(+)), computation of XPS data enabled the formulation of a three-layer-deep hypothesis for PPy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Potential of phytoremediation for the removal of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Hugo; Mucha, Ana P; Almeida, C Marisa R; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2014-05-01

    Degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in colonized and un-colonized sediments by salt marsh plants Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis collected in a temperate estuary was investigated during a 5-month greenhouse experiment. The efficiency of two bioremediation treatments namely biostimulation (BS) by the addition of nutrients, and bioaugmentation (BA) by addition of indigenous microorganisms was tested in comparison with hydrocarbon natural attenuation in un-colonized and with rhizoremediation in colonized sediments. Hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms and root biomass were assessed as well as hydrocarbon degradation levels. During the study, hydrocarbon degradation in un-colonized sediments was negligible regardless of treatments. Rhizoremediation proved to be an effective strategy for hydrocarbon removal, yielding high rates in most experiments. However, BS treatments showed a negative effect on the J. maritimus potential for hydrocarbon degradation by decreasing the root system development that lead to lower degradation rates. Although both plants and their associated microorganisms presented a potential for rhizoremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated salt marsh sediments, results highlighted that nutrient requirements may be distinct among plant species, which should be accounted for when designing cleanup strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ion release from, and fluoride recharge of a composite with a fluoride-containing bioactive glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Harry B.; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C.; Ferracane, Jack L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Materials that are capable of releasing ions such as calcium and fluoride, that are necessary for remineralization of dentin and enamel, have been the topic of intensive research for many years. The source of calcium has most often been some form of calcium phosphate, and that for fluoride has been one of several metal fluoride or hexafluorophosphate salts. Fluoride-containing bioactive glass (BAG) prepared by the sol-gel method acts as a single source of both calcium and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions. The objective of this investigation was to determine if BAG, when added to a composite formulation, can be used as a single source for calcium and fluoride ion release over an extended time period, and to determine if the BAG-containing composite can be recharged upon exposure to a solution of 5,000 ppm fluoride. Methods BAG 61 (61% Si; 31% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) and BAG 81 (81% Si; 11% Ca; 4% P; 3% F; 1% B) were synthesized by the sol gel method. The composite used was composed of 50/50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA, 0.8% EDMAB, 0.4% CQ, and 0.05% BHT, combined with a mixture of BAG (15%) and strontium glass (85%) to a total filler load of 72% by weight. Disks were prepared, allowed to age for 24 h, abraded, then placed into DI water. Calcium and fluoride release was measured by atomic absorption spectroscopy and fluoride ion selective electrode methods, respectively, after 2, 22, and 222 h. The composite samples were then soaked for 5 min in an aqueous 5,000 ppm fluoride solution, after which calcium and fluoride release was again measured at 2, 22, and 222 h time points. Results Prior to fluoride recharge, release of fluoride ions was similar for the BAG 61 and BAG 81 composites after 2 h, and also similar after 22 h. At the four subsequent time points, one prior to, and three following fluoride recharge, the BAG 81 composite released significantly more fluoride ions (pfluoride, although the BAG 81 composite was recharged more than the BAG 61 composite. The BAG 61

  8. Geologic technical assessment of the Richton salt dome, Mississippi, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant)

    2006-01-01

    Technical assessment and remodeling of existing data indicates that the Richton salt dome, located in southeastern Mississippi, appears to be a suitable site for expansion of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The maximum area of salt is approximately 7 square miles, at a subsurface elevation of about -2000 ft, near the top of the salt stock. Approximately 5.8 square miles of this appears suitable for cavern development, because of restrictions imposed by modeled shallow salt overhang along several sides of the dome. The detailed geometry of the overhang currently is only poorly understood. However, the large areal extent of the Richton salt mass suggests that significant design flexibility exists for a 160-million-barrel storage facility consisting of 16 ten-million-barrel caverns. The dome itself is prominently elongated from northwest to southeast. The salt stock appears to consist of two major spine features, separated by a likely boundary shear zone trending from southwest to northeast. The dome decreases in areal extent with depth, because of salt flanks that appear to dip inward at 70-80 degrees. Caprock is present at depths as shallow as 274 ft, and the shallowest salt is documented at -425 ft. A large number of existing two-dimensional seismic profiles have been acquired crossing, and in the vicinity of, the Richton salt dome. At least selected seismic profiles should be acquired, examined, potentially reprocessed, and interpreted in an effort to understand the limitations imposed by the apparent salt overhang, should the Richton site be selected for actual expansion of the Reserve.

  9. Screening and Characterization of Potential Bacillus Starter Cultures for Fermenting Low-Salt Soybean Paste (Doenjang).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hye Hee; Jung, Ji Young; Chun, Byung-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Baek, Seong Yeol; Moon, Ji Young; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Jeon, Che Ok

    2016-04-28

    The bacterial strains were screened as potential starters for fermenting low-salt doenjang (a Korean traditional fermented soybean paste) using Korean doenjang based on proteolytic and antipathogenic activities under 6.5-7.5% NaCl conditions. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that they all belonged to the genus Bacillus. Proteolytic and antipathogenic activities against Escherichia coli, Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Aspergillus flavus, as well as fibrinolytic, amylase, and cellulase activities of the 10 strains were quantitatively evaluated. Of these, strains D2-2, JJ-D34, and D12-5 were selected, based on their activities. The functional, phenotypic, and safety-related characteristics of these three strains were additionally investigated and strains D2-2 and D12-5, which lacked antibiotic resistance, were finally selected. Strains D2-2 and D12-5 produced poly-γ-glutamic acid and showed various enzyme activities, including α-glucosidase and β-glucosidase. Growth properties of strains D2-2 and D12-5 included wide temperature and pH ranges, growth in up to 16% NaCl, and weak anaerobic growth, suggesting that they facilitate low-salt doenjang fermentation. Strains D2-2 and D12-5 were not hemolytic, carried no toxin genes, and did not produce biogenic amines. These results suggest that strains D2-2 and D12-5 can serve as appropriate starter cultures for fermenting low-salt doenjang with high quality and safety.

  10. Complete Sensitivity/Uncertainty Analysis of LR-0 Reactor Experiments with MSRE FLiBe Salt and Perform Comparison with Molten Salt Cooled and Molten Salt Fueled Reactor Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mueller, Don [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Patton, Bruce W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-12-01

    In September 2016, reactor physics measurements were conducted at Research Centre Rez (RC Rez) using the FLiBe (2 7LiF + BeF2) salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) in the LR-0 low power nuclear reactor. These experiments were intended to inform on neutron spectral effects and nuclear data uncertainties for advanced reactor systems using FLiBe salt in a thermal neutron energy spectrum. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in collaboration with RC Rez, performed sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) analyses of these experiments as part of the ongoing collaboration between the United States and the Czech Republic on civilian nuclear energy research and development. The objectives of these analyses were (1) to identify potential sources of bias in fluoride salt-cooled and salt-fueled reactor simulations resulting from cross section uncertainties, and (2) to produce the sensitivity of neutron multiplication to cross section data on an energy-dependent basis for specific nuclides. This report provides a final report on the S/U analyses of critical experiments at the LR-0 Reactor relevant to fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) and liquid-fueled molten salt reactor (MSR) concepts. In the future, these S/U analyses could be used to inform the design of additional FLiBe-based experiments using the salt from MSRE. The key finding of this work is that, for both solid and liquid fueled fluoride salt reactors, radiative capture in 7Li is the most significant contributor to potential bias in neutronics calculations within the FLiBe salt.

  11. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV)/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Y; J. G. He; X. X. Xue; Ru, H. Q.; X. W. Huang; Yang, H.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  12. The effective use of fluorides in public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sheila; Burt, Brian A; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    Dental caries remain a public health problem for many developing countries and for underprivileged populations in developed countries. This paper outlines the historical development of public health approaches to the use of fluoride and comments on their effectiveness. Early research......, systematic reviews summarizing these extensive databases have indicated that water fluoridation and fluoride toothpastes both substantially reduce the prevalence and incidence of dental caries. We present four case studies that illustrate the use of fluoride in modern public health practice, focusing on...... and their families, and the issue of cost. We recommend that a community should use no more than one systemic fluoride (i.e. water or salt or milk fluoridation) combined with the use of fluoride toothpastes, and that the prevalence of dental fluorosis should be monitored in order to detect increases in or higher...

  13. [Enamel fluoride uptake following fluoride application and fluoride precipitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchalla, Wolfgang; Lennon, Aine M; Trage, Katrin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This study is on fluoride uptake into enamel following fluoride precipitation with calcium hydroxide. Five specimens each from 12 bovine incisors were polished, covered with a salivary pellicle, and distributed into five groups (n=12). A fluoride solution (43,500 ppm F from magnesiumfluorosilicate, copper-(II)-fluorosilicate and sodium-fluoride, pH 2; Tiefenfluorid Touchierlösung, Humanchemie) and Ca(OH)2-solution (Tiefenfluorid Nachtouchierlösung) were applied subsequently in group TN. "Touchierlosung" only was used in group T, sodium-fluoride (43,500 ppm F, pH 2) in group NaF, and aminefluoride (Elmex fluid, 10,000 ppm F, pH 4) in group EF. No fluoride was used in group NK (negative control). Following rinsing and 24 h storage in artificial saliva surface KOH-soluble fluoride content (KOHF), and structurally bound fluoride content (SBF) from three layers (0-33, 33-66 and 66-99 pm) was determined by fluoride electrode procedures. KOHF (median in microg/cm2) of NK was below the lower limit of quantification of the fluoride electrode. The other group values were significantly higher (Mann-Whitney test, p precipitation reaction with Ca(OH)2 following fluoridation did not increase enamel fluoride uptake.

  14. A Descriptive in vitro Electron Microscopic Study of Acidic Fluoride-Treated Enamel: Potential Anti-Erosion Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjortsjö, Carl; Young, Alix; Kiesow, Andreas; Cismak, Andreas; Berthold, Lutz; Petzold, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface zones of acidic fluoride-treated enamel. Human teeth were each divided into three or four enamel specimens that were treated for 10 min with solutions of 0.2 and 0.4% HF (pH 3.09 and 2.94), 1.74% SnF2 (pH 2.9), 0.68% TiF4 (pH 1.6) and 0.84% NaF (pH 4.5). Untreated specimens functioned as negative controls. The microstructure and elemental composition of the surface zones were studied by scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanospot-EDX following cross-sectional preparation using focused ion beam technology. TEM/EDX analyses of NaF-treated specimens showed a 500-nm-thick closed surface film containing 20-40 at% (atomic percent) F. HF-treated specimens had a distinct surface film 200-600 nm thick (dense, not globular) containing 45-47 at% F. TiF4-treated specimens had a surface film of 200-300 nm in thickness containing 8-11 at% Ti but no detectable fluoride. SnF2-treated specimens had a modified surface enamel layer varying in thickness from 200 to 800 nm with an inhomogeneous distribution of Sn. Local spots were detected with as high as 8 at% Sn (30 wt%, weight percent). The results suggest that the reaction mechanisms of SnF2 and TiF4 solutions with dental enamel differ from those occurring after enamel exposure to acidulated NaF and HF solutions. While the HF and NaF treatments resulted in the formation of CaF2-like material as shown by EDX, no significant surface fluoridation was found for SnF2 and TiF4 solutions within the TEM/EDX detection limits. These results suggest that the erosion-protective mechanisms of these latter compounds probably relate more to the formation of hardly soluble and acid-resistant reaction surface films and less to surface fluoride incorporation.

  15. Inventories and mobilization of unsaturated zone sulfate, fluoride, and chloride related to land use change in semiarid regions, southwestern United States and Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, B.R.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Reedy, R.C.; Leaney, F.W.; Gates, J.; Cresswell, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Unsaturated zone salt reservoirs are potentially mobilized by increased groundwater recharge as semiarid lands are cultivated. This study explores the amounts of pore water sulfate and fluoride relative to chloride in unsaturated zone profiles, evaluates their sources, estimates mobilization due to past land use change, and assesses the impacts on groundwater quality. Inventories of water-extractable chloride, sulfate, and fluoride were determined from borehole samples of soils and sediments collected beneath natural ecosystems (N = 4), nonirrigated ("rain-fed") croplands (N = 18), and irrigated croplands (N = 6) in the southwestern United States and in the Murray Basin, Australia. Natural ecosystems contain generally large sulfate inventories (7800-120,000 kg/ha) and lower fluoride inventories (630-3900 kg/ha) relative to chloride inventories (6600-41,000 kg/ha). Order-of-magnitude higher chloride concentrations in precipitation and generally longer accumulation times result in much larger chloride inventories in the Murray Basin than in the southwestern United States. Atmospheric deposition during the current dry interglacial climatic regime accounts for most of the measured sulfate in both U.S. and Australian regions. Fluoride inventories are greater than can be accounted for by atmospheric deposition in most cases, suggesting that fluoride may accumulate across glacial/ interglacial climatic cycles. Chemical modeling indicates that fluorite controls fluoride mobility and suggests that water-extractable fluoride may include some fluoride from mineral dissolution. Increased groundwater drainage/recharge following land use change readily mobilized chloride. Sulfate displacement fronts matched or lagged chloride fronts by up to 4 m. In contrast, fluoride mobilization was minimal in all regions. Understanding linkages between salt inventories, increased recharge, and groundwater quality is important for quantifying impacts of anthropogenic activities on groundwater

  16. [Dental fluorosis prevalence in Mexican localities of 27 states and the D.F.: six years after the publication of the Salt Fluoridation Mexican Official Regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt-Lineares, Armandor; Irigoyen-Camacho, María Esther; Mejía-González, Adriana; Zepeda-Zapeda, Marco; Sánchez-Pérez, Leonor

    2013-01-01

    To identify the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in communities located in 28 states of Mexico. The National Dental Caries Survey 2001 (NDCS2001) data base was analyzed. The information of 26,893 students, ages 12 and 15 years old, of 27 states and the Federal District was examined. Dean's dental fluorosis index was applied by standardized examiners. The fluorosis prevalence and the Community Fluorosis Index (FCI) were calculated. The fluorosis prevalence was 27.9% (95% CI 24.4, 28.5). A statistical significance difference in the fluorosis prevalence was observed among the states studied (p dental fluorosis index. A low level of the FCI was found in the localities belonging to 19 (67.9%) of the states studied (FCI dental fluorosis is a public health problem. Two-thirds of the states had localities with low prevalence of dental fluorosis; however, approximately, one-third of the states investigated the fluorosis levels showed the need of a reduction in fluoride exposure among the young population.

  17. Distribution and behaviour of fluoride in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries, central west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSousa, S.N.; SenGupta, R.

    Fluoride concentrations in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries are regulated largely by salt water intrusion. Highest concentrations are observed during the premonsoon season, when the salt water intrusion is also the highest, the concentration increasing...

  18. [Reason for dietary salt reduction and potential effect on population health--WHO recommendation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaić-Rak, Antoinette; Pucarin-Cvetković, Jasna; Heim, Inge; Skupnjak, Berislav

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that reduction of salt results in lowering blood pressure and cardiovascular incidents. Daily salt is double the recommended daily quantity and mainly comes from processed food. The assessment of daily salt intake for Croatia is 12 g/day (WHO recommendation is <5 g/day). The main source of sodium is processed food and food prepared in restaurants (77%), natural content of sodium in food (12%), added salt at table (6%) and prepared meals at home (5%). Reduction of salt by 50% would save nearly 180,000 lives per year in Europe. It is necessary to establish better collaboration with food manufacturers in order to reduce the content of salt in processed food and to achieve appropriate salt intake per day in accordance with the WHO recommendation. Further, it is necessary to encourage food manufacturers to produce food and meals with low or reduced salt content (shops, catering, changes in recipes, offer salt substitutions). This kind of collaboration is based on bilateral interests that can result in positive health effects. One of the most important public health tasks is to educate consumers and to give them choice when buying food. This can be achieved by effective campaigns and social marketing, by ensuring a declaration of salt content on the product, or specially designed signs for food products with low or reduced salt content.

  19. Alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The knowledge of background alimentary fluoride intake in preschool children is of utmost importance for introducing optimal and safe caries preventive measures for both individuals and communities. The aim of this study was to assess the daily fluoride intake analyzing duplicate samples of food and beverages. An attempt was made to calculate the daily intake of fluoride from food and swallowed toothpaste. Methods Daily alimentary fluoride intake was measured in a group of 36 children with an average age of 4.75 years and an average weight of 20.69 kg at baseline, by means of a double plate method. This was repeated after six months. Parents recorded their child's diet over 24 hours and collected duplicated portions of food and beverages received by children during this period. Pooled samples of food and beverages were weighed and solid food samples were homogenized. Fluoride was quantitatively extracted from solid food samples by a microdiffusion method using hexadecyldisiloxane and perchloric acid. The content of fluoride extracted from solid food samples, as well as fluoride in beverages, was measured potentiometrically by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode. Results Average daily fluoride intake at baseline was 0.389 (SD 0.054) mg per day. Six months later it was 0.378 (SD 0.084) mg per day which represents 0.020 (SD 0.010) and 0.018 (SD 0.008) mg of fluoride respectively calculated per kg bw/day. When adding the values of unwanted fluoride intake from the toothpaste shown in the literature (0.17-1.21 mg per day) the estimate of the total daily intake of fluoride amounted to 0.554-1.594 mg/day and recalculated to the child's body weight to 0.027-0.077 mg/kg bw/day. Conclusions In the children studied, observed daily fluoride intake reached the threshold for safe fluoride intake. When adding the potential fluoride intake from swallowed toothpaste, alimentary intake reached the optimum range for daily fluoride intake. These results showed that

  20. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.dzubiella@helmholtz-berlin.de [Soft Matter and Functional Materials, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Helmholtz Virtual Institute “Multifunctional Biomaterials for Medicine,” 14513 Teltow (Germany); Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Heyda, Jan [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, 166 28 Praha 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  1. Heterolysis of Dihydrogen by Silver Alkoxides and Fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Brandon K; Nguyen, Jenna T; Bacsa, John; Sadighi, Joseph P

    2015-07-01

    Alkoxide-bridged disilver cations react with dihydrogen to form hydride-bridged cations, releasing free alcohol. Hydrogenolysis of neutral silver fluorides affords hydride-bridged disilver cations as their bifluoride salts. These reactions proceed most efficiently when the supporting ligands are expanded N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) derived from 6- and 7-membered cyclic amidinium salts. Kinetics studies show that silver fluoride hydrogenolysis is first-order in both silver and dihydrogen.

  2. A new look at an old drug: neuroprotective effects and therapeutic potentials of lithium salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dell’Osso L

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Liliana Dell’Osso, Claudia Del Grande, Camilla Gesi, Claudia Carmassi, Laura Musetti Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Increasing evidence highlights bipolar disorder as being associated with impaired neurogenesis, cellular plasticity, and resiliency, as well as with cell atrophy or loss in specific brain regions. This has led most recent research to focus on the possible neuroprotective effects of medications, and particularly interesting findings have emerged for lithium. A growing body of evidence from preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies has in fact documented its neuroprotective effects from different insults acting on cellular signaling pathways, both preventing apoptosis and increasing neurotrophins and cell-survival molecules. Furthermore, positive effects of lithium on neurogenesis, brain remodeling, angiogenesis, mesenchymal stem cells functioning, and inflammation have been revealed, with a key role played through the inhibition of the glycogen synthase kinase-3, a serine/threonine kinase implicated in the pathogenesis of many neuropsychiatric disorders. These recent evidences suggest the potential utility of lithium in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, neurodevelopmental disorders, and hypoxic–ischemic/traumatic brain injury, with positive results at even lower lithium doses than those traditionally considered to be antimanic. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the potential benefits of lithium salts on neuroprotection and neuroregeneration, emphasizing preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting new therapeutic potentials of this drug beyond its mood stabilizing properties. Keywords: bipolar disorder, GSK-3, neurodegeneration, neurogenesis, neurodevelopmental disorders

  3. Influence of the external conditions on salt retention and pressure-induced electrical potential measured across a composite membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benavente, Juana; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    1999-01-01

    Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence on these paramet......Transport on single electrolyte solutions (NaCl and MgCl2) due to pressure gradients across a commercial reverse osmosis membrane was studied by measuring volume flux (J(v)), salt rejection (S) and pressure induced electrical potential (Delta E) in a crossflow cell. The influence...

  4. Reconstructing the Genetic Potential of the Microbially-Mediated Nitrogen Cycle in a Salt Marsh Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Brossi, Maria Julia de L.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana F.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are considered buffer zones for the discharge of land-derived nutrients without accounting for potential negative side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand the ecological assembly and dynamics of the microorganisms that are involved in nitrogen (N) cycling in such systems. Here, we employed two complementary methodological approaches (i.e., shotgun metagenomics and quantitative PCR) to examine the distribution and abundance of selected microbial genes involved in N transformations. We used soil samples collected along a well-established pristine salt marsh soil chronosequence that spans over a century of ecosystem development at the island of Schiermonnikoog, The Netherlands. Across the examined soil successional stages, the structure of the populations of genes involved in N cycling processes was strongly related to (shifts in the) soil nitrogen levels (i.e., NO3−, NH4+), salinity and pH (explaining 73.8% of the total variation, R2 = 0.71). Quantification of the genes used as proxies for N fixation, nitrification and denitrification revealed clear successional signatures that corroborated the taxonomic assignments obtained by metagenomics. Notably, we found strong evidence for niche partitioning, as revealed by the abundance and distribution of marker genes for nitrification (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea) and denitrification (nitrite reductase nirK, nirS and nitrous oxide reductase nosZ clades I and II). This was supported by a distinct correlation between these genes and soil physico-chemical properties, such as soil physical structure, pH, salinity, organic matter, total N, NO3−, NH4+ and SO42−, across four seasonal samplings. Overall, this study sheds light on the successional trajectories of microbial N cycle genes along a naturally developing salt marsh ecosystem. The data obtained serve as a foundation to guide the formulation of ecological models that aim to effectively monitor and manage pristine

  5. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Calderoni, Pattrick [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Scheele, Randall [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Casekka, Andrew [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); McNamara, Bruce [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-22

    The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, culminating in a research reactor which operated for 15,000 hours without major error. This technical success has garnished interest in modern, high temperature, reactor schemes. Research using molten fluoride salts for nuclear applications requires a steady supply of high grade molten salts. There is no bulk supplier of research grade fluoride salts in the world, so a facility which could provide all the salt needed for testing at the University of Wisconsin had to be produced. Two salt purification devices were made for this purpose, a large scale purifier, and a small scale purifier, each designed to clean the salts from impurities and reduce their corrosion potential. As of now, the small scale has performed with flibe salt, hydrogen, and hydrogen fluoride, yielding clean salt. This salt is currently being used in corrosion testing facilities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin. Working with the beryllium based salts requires extensive safety measures and health monitoring to prevent the development of acute or chronic beryllium disease, two pulmonary diseases created by an allergic reaction to beryllium in the lungs. Extensive health monitoring, engineering controls, and environment monitoring had to be set up with the University of Wisconsin department of Environment, Health and Safety. The hydrogen fluoride required for purification was also an extreme health hazard requiring thoughtful planning and execution. These dangers have made research a slow and tedious process. Simple processes, such as chemical handling and clean-up, can take large amounts of ingenuity and time. Other work has complemented the experimental research at Wisconsin to advance high temperature reactor goals. Modeling work has been performed in house to re

  6. Salting of dry-cured meat - A potential cause of contamination with the ochratoxin A-producing species Penicillium nordicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonjak, Silva; Ličen, Mia; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Gunde-Cimerman, Nina

    2011-09-01

    Penicillium nordicum is a known contaminant of protein-rich foods and is primarily found on dry-cured meat products. It is an important producer of the mycotoxin ochratoxin A, which has nephrotoxic and cancerogenic activities. Recently a high number of P. nordicum strains was isolated from different dry-cured meat products from one of the Slovenian meat-processing plants. Since we have isolated P. nordicum in high counts also from Artic habitats, such as sea water and sea ice and due to its ability to grow well at low temperatures and at increased salinity, sea salt was suspected as the possible source of P. nordicum. In the present study contamination of meat products, air in the meat-processing plant and sea salt used for salting were analysed. When 50 g of salt sample from a sealed package was dissolved in sterile water and filtered, 12 colonies of P. nordicum were obtained on solid medium incubated at 15 °C, while a salt sample from an open vessel in the meat-processing area developed high, uncountable number of colonies. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses of P. nordicum isolates from different sources showed that contamination of meat products via salt was possible. Three selected isolates examined for extrolites all produced ochratoxin A. As contamination of dry-cured meat products with P. nordicum represents a potential health risk for consumers and workers in the meat-processing plants, salt should be taken into account as a potential cause of such contaminations.

  7. In vitro lipid peroxidation of intestinal bile salt-based nanoemulsions: potential role of antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courraud, J; Charnay, C; Cristol, J P; Berger, J; Avallone, S

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decades, oxidative stress has been described as a deleterious phenomenon contributing to numerous noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancers. As many authors ascribed the healthy effect of fruit and vegetable consumption mainly to their antioxidant contents, it has been hypothesized that their protection could occur from the gut. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop an original and physiological model of nanoemulsions to study lipid peroxidation within the intestine and to assess the properties of potential antioxidants in this setting. Several nanoemulsions were compared in terms of physical characteristics and reactivity to 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH)-induced oxidation. Formulations included different types of lipids, a detergent (a conjugated bile salt or sodium dodecyl sulfate) and, finally, lipophilic antioxidants. Hemin and myoglobin were also tested as relevant potential oxidants. Fatty acid (FA) peroxidation was monitored by gas chromatography while malondialdehyde and antioxidant contents were measured by HPLC. Investigated nanoemulsions were composed of spherical or cylindrical mixed micelles, the latter being the least resistant to oxidation. In the experimental conditions, AAPH was the only efficient oxidant. Alpha-tocopherol and lutein significantly slowed FA degradation from 4 to 1 μM, respectively. On the contrary, beta-carotene did not show any protective capacity at 4 μM. In conclusion, the tested nanoemulsions were appropriate to assess antioxidant capacity during the intestinal phase of digestion.

  8. Occupational fluoride exposure. [Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, H.C. (Univ. of California, San Francisco); Smith, F.A.

    1977-01-01

    Effects of airborne fluoride on industrial health are discussed with regard to acute and chronic effects. Injuries to lungs and skin from acute exposures are described. Chronic effects are discussed with regard to industrial sources of fluoride and air concentrations vs. urinary concentrations of fluoride. An extensive literature review is presented in the form of a table showing responses in man exposed to industrial airborne fluorides. Osteosclerosis is discussed with regard to the fluoride air standard, bone fluoride, and air fluoride concentrations. Occupational exposures to fluoride are also discussed with regard to arthritis, shortness of breath, asthma, upper respiratory infections, chronic respiratory disease, effects on kidneys, effects on pregnancy, and indices of fluoride intoxication. A table is presented showing references to studies on responses in neighborhood residents exposed to fluoride emissions. (HLW)

  9. Preliminary analyses of scenarios for potential human interference for repositories in three salt formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-10-01

    Preliminary analyses of scenarios for human interference with the performance of a radioactive waste repository in a deep salt formation are presented. The following scenarios are analyzed: (1) the U-Tube Connection Scenario involving multiple connections between the repository and the overlying aquifer system; (2) the Single Borehole Intrusion Scenario involving penetration of the repository by an exploratory borehole that simultaneously connects the repository with overlying and underlying aquifers; and (3) the Pressure Release Scenario involving inflow of water to saturate any void space in the repository prior to creep closure with subsequent release under near lithostatic pressures following creep closure. The methodology to evaluate repository performance in these scenarios is described and this methodology is applied to reference systems in three candidate formations: bedded salt in the Palo Duro Basin, Texas; bedded salt in the Paradox Basin, Utah; and the Richton Salt Dome, Mississippi, of the Gulf Coast Salt Dome Basin.

  10. The corrosion behavior of CVI SiC matrix in SiCf/SiC composites under molten fluoride salt environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongda; Feng, Qian; Wang, Zhen; Zhou, Haijun; Kan, Yanmei; Hu, Jianbao; Dong, Shaoming

    2017-04-01

    High temperature corrosion behavior and microstructural evolution of designed chemical-vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix in SiC fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites in 46.5LiF-11.5NaF-42.0KF (mol. %) eutectic salt at 800 °C for various corrosion time was studied. Worse damage was observed as extending the exposure time, with the mass loss ratio increasing from 0.716 wt. % for 50 h to 5.914 wt. % for 500 h. The mass loss rate showed a trend of first decrease and then increase with the extended corrosion exposure. Compared with the near-stoichiometric SiC matrix layers, the O-contained boundaries between deposited matrix layers and the designed Si-rich SiC matrix layers were much less corrosion resistant and preferentially corroded. Liner relationship between the mass loss ratio and the corrosion time obtained from 50 h to 300 h indicated that the corrosion action was reaction-control process. Further corrosion would lead to matrix layer exfoliation and higher mass loss ratio.

  11. Investigation of melamine derived quaternary as ammonium salt potential shale inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongjiang; Hu, Weimin; Guo, Gang; Huang, Lei; Li, Lili; Gu, Xuefan; Zhang, Zhifang; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Gang

    2017-06-01

    Melamine, sodium chloroacetate and sodium hydroxide were used as raw materials to synthesize a kind of neutral quaternary ammonium salt (NQAS) as potential clay swelling inhibitor and water-based drilling fluid additive, and the reaction conditions were screened based on the linear expansion rate of bentonite. The inhibitive properties of NQASs were investigated by various methods, including montmorillonite (MMT) linear expansion test, mud ball immersing test, particle distribution measurement, thermogravimetric analysis and scanning electron microscopy etc. The results indicate that NQAS can inhibit expansion and dispersion of clay in water effectively. At the same condition, the bentonite linear expansion rate in NQAS-6 solution is much lower than those of others, and the hydration expansion degree of the mud ball in 0.5% NQAS-6 solution is appreciably weaker than the control test. The compatibility test indicates NQAS-6 could be compatible with the conventional additives in water-based drilling fluids, and the temperature resistance of modified starch was improved effectively. Meanwhile, the inhibitive mechanism was discussed through the particle distribution measurement.

  12. Calculation of activities of ions in molten salts with potential application to the pyroprocessing of nuclear waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salanne, Mathieu; Simon, Christian; Turq, Pierre; Madden, Paul A

    2008-01-31

    The ability to separate fission products by electrodeposition from molten salts depends, in part, on differences between the interactions of the different fission product cations with the ions present in the molten salt "solvent". These differences may be expressed as ratios of activity coefficients, which depend on the identity of the solvent and other factors. Here, we demonstrate the ability to calculate these activity coefficient ratios using molecular dynamics simulations with sufficient precision to guide the choice of suitable solvent systems in practical applications. We use polarizable ion interaction potentials which have previously been shown to give excellent agreement with structural, transport, and spectroscopic information of the molten salts, and the activity coefficients calculated in this work agree well with experimental data. The activity coefficients are shown to vary systematically with cation size for a set of trivalent cations.

  13. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in brain injury patients: a potential cause of hyponatremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafonte, R D; Mann, N R

    1997-05-01

    Hyponatremia is a common neuromedical problem seen in survivors of central nervous system injury. The etiology of this hyponatremia is often diagnosed as syndrome of inappropriate diuretic hormone (SIADH). Fluid restriction is usually the first line of treatment. However, this can exacerbate vasospasm and produce resultant ischemia. Cerebral salt wasting is a syndrome of renal sodium loss that may occur commonly after central nervous system injury, yet remains unrecognized. Treatment of cerebral salt wasting consists of hydration and salt replacement. This article uses a case report to discuss the importance of recognition of this syndrome, and treatment concerns are reviewed.

  14. Optical detection of sodium salts of fluoride, acetate and phosphate by a diacylhydrazine ligand by the formation of a colour alkali metal complex

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purnandhu Bose; Ranjan Dutta; I Ravikumar; Pradyut Ghosh

    2011-11-01

    A solution of N, N'-diacylhydrazine ligand in organic solvent is potential for colourimetric detection of F−/AcO−/PO$^{3−}_{4}$ via -NH deprotonation, tautomerization and its stabilization as a colour alkali metal complex.

  15. Drinking Water Fluoride Levels for a City in Northern Mexico (Durango Determined Using a Direct Electrochemical Method and Their Potential Effects on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Molina Frechero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoride is ingested primarily through consuming drinking water. When drinking water contains fluoride concentrations >0.7 parts per million (ppm, consuming such water can be toxic to the human body; this toxicity is called “fluorosis.” Therefore, it is critical to determine the fluoride concentrations in drinking water. The objective of this study was to determine the fluoride concentration in the drinking water of the city of Durango. The wells that supply the drinking water distribution system for the city of Durango were studied. One hundred eighty-nine (189 water samples were analyzed, and the fluoride concentration in each sample was quantified as established by the law NMX-AA-077-SCFI-2001. The fluoride concentrations in such samples varied between 2.22 and 7.23 ppm with a 4.313 ± 1.318 ppm mean concentration. The highest values were observed in the northern area of the city, with a 5.001 ± 2.669 ppm mean value. The samples produced values that exceeded the national standard for fluoride in drinking water. Chronic exposure to fluoride at such concentrations produces harmful health effects, the first sign of which is dental fluorosis. Therefore, it is essential that the government authorities implement water defluoridation programs and take preventative measures to reduce the ingestion of this toxic halogen.

  16. Geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton salt dome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Dennis P.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Bronowski, David R.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Hofer, John H.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to conclude that the dilatational criteria are distinct for the halite-rich and other salts, and that the dilation criteria are pressure dependent. The indirect tensile strengths and unconfined compressive strengths determined are consistently lower than other coastal domal salts. The steady-state-only creep model being developed suggests that Richton salt is intermediate in creep resistance when compared to other domal and bedded salts. The results of the study provide only

  17. Fluoride mouthrinses for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Valeria C C; Chong, Lee Yee; Worthington, Helen V; Walsh, Tanya

    2016-07-29

    Fluoride mouthrinses have been used extensively as a caries-preventive intervention in school-based programmes and by individuals at home. This is an update of the Cochrane review of fluoride mouthrinses for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents that was first published in 2003. The primary objective is to determine the effectiveness and safety of fluoride mouthrinses in preventing dental caries in the child and adolescent population.The secondary objective is to examine whether the effect of fluoride rinses is influenced by:• initial level of caries severity;• background exposure to fluoride in water (or salt), toothpastes or reported fluoride sources other than the study option(s); or• fluoride concentration (ppm F) or frequency of use (times per year). We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (whole database, to 22 April 2016), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2016, Issue 3), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 22 April 2016), Embase Ovid (1980 to 22 April 2016), CINAHL EBSCO (the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, 1937 to 22 April 2016), LILACS BIREME (Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information Database, 1982 to 22 April 2016), BBO BIREME (Bibliografia Brasileira de Odontologia; from 1986 to 22 April 2016), Proquest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 22 April 2016) and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1990 to 22 April 2016). We undertook a search for ongoing trials on the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register (http://clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication when searching electronic databases. We also searched reference lists of articles and contacted selected authors and manufacturers. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials where blind outcome assessment was stated or

  18. Private Well Water and Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well. What do I need to know about fluoride and groundwater from a well? Fluoride is present ... well has less than the recommended level of fluoride for preventing tooth decay? The recommended fluoride level ...

  19. Fluoride and Water (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Teaching Kids to Be Smart About Social Media Fluoride and Water KidsHealth > For Parents > Fluoride and Water ... in healthy tooth development and cavity prevention. About Fluoride Fluoride, which exists naturally in water sources, is ...

  20. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures - paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Michael G; Ellwood, Roger P; Srisilapanan, Patcharawan; Korwanich, Narumanas; Worthington, Helen V; Pretty, Iain A

    2012-06-21

    To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8-13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores). Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F). A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p fluorosis was 0.53 for exposure to high fluoride drinking (≥0.9 ppm) and cooking water (≥1.6 ppm). The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation.

  1. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures – Paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Methods Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8–13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores). Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Results Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F). A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+) rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p fluorosis was 0.53 for exposure to high fluoride drinking (≥0.9 ppm) and cooking water (≥1.6 ppm). Conclusions The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation. PMID:22720834

  2. Chronic Fluoride Toxicity: Dental Fluorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DenBesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2–3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface; with more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix/mineral interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the doserelated decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffleended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As

  3. Chronic fluoride toxicity: dental fluorosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denbesten, Pamela; Li, Wu

    2011-01-01

    Dental fluorosis occurs as a result of excess fluoride ingestion during tooth formation. Enamel fluorosis and primary dentin fluorosis can only occur when teeth are forming, and therefore fluoride exposure (as it relates to dental fluorosis) occurs during childhood. In the permanent dentition, this would begin with the lower incisors, which complete mineralization at approximately 2-3 years of age, and end after mineralization of the third molars. The white opaque appearance of fluorosed enamel is caused by a hypomineralized enamel subsurface. With more severe dental fluorosis, pitting and a loss of the enamel surface occurs, leading to secondary staining (appearing as a brown color). Many of the changes caused by fluoride are related to cell/matrix interactions as the teeth are forming. At the early maturation stage, the relative quantity of amelogenin protein is increased in fluorosed enamel in a dose-related manner. This appears to result from a delay in the removal of amelogenins as the enamel matures. In vitro, when fluoride is incorporated into the mineral, more protein binds to the forming mineral, and protein removal by proteinases is delayed. This suggests that altered protein/mineral interactions are in part responsible for retention of amelogenins and the resultant hypomineralization that occurs in fluorosed enamel. Fluoride also appears to enhance mineral precipitation in forming teeth, resulting in hypermineralized bands of enamel, which are then followed by hypomineralized bands. Enhanced mineral precipitation with local increases in matrix acidity may affect maturation stage ameloblast modulation, potentially explaining the dose-related decrease in cycles of ameloblast modulation from ruffle-ended to smooth-ended cells that occur with fluoride exposure in rodents. Specific cellular effects of fluoride have been implicated, but more research is needed to determine which of these changes are relevant to the formation of fluorosed teeth. As further

  4. Fluoride varnish or fluoride mouth rinse?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, M K; Klausen, B J; Twetman, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In many Danish communities, school-based fluoride programs are offered to children with high caries risk in adjunct to tooth brushing. The purpose of this field trial was to compare the caries-preventive effectiveness of two different fluoride programs in 6-12 year olds. BASIC RESEARCH...... different schools were enrolled after informed consent and their class unit was randomly allocated to one of two fluoride programs. INTERVENTIONS: One group received a semi-annual fluoride varnish applications (FV) and the other group continued with an existing program with fluoride mouth rinses once per...... in caries development over two years among children participating in a school-based fluoride varnish or mouth rinse program....

  5. Potential vertical movement of large heat-generating waste packages in salt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Daniel James; Martinez, Mario J.; Hardin, Ernest.

    2013-05-01

    With renewed interest in disposal of heat-generating waste in bedded or domal salt formations, scoping analyses were conducted to estimate rates of waste package vertical movement. Vertical movement is found to result from thermal expansion, from upward creep or heave of the near-field salt, and from downward buoyant forces on the waste package. A two-pronged analysis approach was used, with thermal-mechanical creep modeling, and coupled thermal-viscous flow modeling. The thermal-mechanical approach used well-studied salt constitutive models, while the thermal-viscous approach represented the salt as a highly viscous fluid. The Sierra suite of coupled simulation codes was used for both approaches. The waste package in all simulations was a right-circular cylinder with the density of steel, in horizontal orientation. A time-decaying heat generation function was used to represent commercial spent fuel with typical burnup and 50-year age. Results from the thermal-mechanical base case showed approximately 27 cm initial uplift of the package, followed by gradual relaxation closely following the calculated temperature history. A similar displacement history was obtained with the package density set equal to that of salt. The slight difference in these runs is attributable to buoyant displacement (sinking) and is on the order of 1 mm in 2,000 years. Without heat generation the displacement stabilizes at a fraction of millimeter after a few hundred years. Results from thermal-viscous model were similar, except that the rate of sinking was constant after cooldown, at approximately 0.15 mm per 1,000 yr. In summary, all calculations showed vertical movement on the order of 1 mm or less in 2,000 yr, including calculations using well-established constitutive models for temperature-dependent salt deformation. Based on this finding, displacement of waste packages in a salt repository is not a significant repository performance issue.

  6. On the potential use of F{sub 2}Be-molten-salt for hybrid reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafuente, A., E-mail: anlafuente@etsii.upm.e [ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2. 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-11-15

    Breeder reactors are considered a unique tool for fully exploiting natural nuclear resources. In current Light Water Reactors (LWR), only 0.5% of the primary energy contained in the nuclei removed from a mine is converted into useful heat. The rest remains in the depleted uranium or spent fuel. This evident need to improve resource-efficiency has stimulated interest in Fast-reactors, and with it, boosted the need to answer many of the remaining safety issues attached to such systems (i.e. coolant positive void coefficients). Among the existing candidates to overcome this fundamental drawback, the F{sub 2}Be-molten-salt, has proved to feature outstanding neutronic properties. In previous studies, in an analysis that took into account requirements for criticality, for breeding, and for safety, it was demonstrated that a design window could be found in the definition of an F{sub 2}Be-cooled system, where the safety requirement was met for a critical breeder reactor. In this paper we give a deeper insight on the neutronic features of F{sub 2}Be coolant by comparing it with the moderator par excellence; light water. Its potential use on a thorium-fuel based system will be completed by a resilience analysis of the design window along the burn-up cycle. The ultimate goal is to give a sound answer to how a F{sub 2}Be-cooled system could contribute to improve the resource-efficiency of nuclear systems without overlooking the main safety aspects. This is one of the main pending questions in the quest to sustainability.

  7. New Insights on Plant Salt Tolerance Mechanisms and Their Potential Use for Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanin, Moez; Ebel, Chantal; Ngom, Mariama; Laplaze, Laurent; Masmoudi, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Soil salinization is a major threat to agriculture in arid and semi-arid regions, where water scarcity and inadequate drainage of irrigated lands severely reduce crop yield. Salt accumulation inhibits plant growth and reduces the ability to uptake water and nutrients, leading to osmotic or water-deficit stress. Salt is also causing injury of the young photosynthetic leaves and acceleration of their senescence, as the Na(+) cation is toxic when accumulating in cell cytosol resulting in ionic imbalance and toxicity of transpiring leaves. To cope with salt stress, plants have evolved mainly two types of tolerance mechanisms based on either limiting the entry of salt by the roots, or controlling its concentration and distribution. Understanding the overall control of Na(+) accumulation and functional studies of genes involved in transport processes, will provide a new opportunity to improve the salinity tolerance of plants relevant to food security in arid regions. A better understanding of these tolerance mechanisms can be used to breed crops with improved yield performance under salinity stress. Moreover, associations of cultures with nitrogen-fixing bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could serve as an alternative and sustainable strategy to increase crop yields in salt-affected fields.

  8. New Insights on plant salt tolerance mechanisms and their potential use for breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moez HANIN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinization is a major threat to agriculture in arid and semi-arid regions, where water scarcity and inadequate drainage of irrigated lands severely reduce crop yield. Salt accumulation inhibits plant growth and reduces the ability to uptake water and nutrients, leading to osmotic or water-deficit stress. Salt is also causing injury of the young photosynthetic leaves and acceleration of their senescence, as the Na+ cation is toxic when accumulating in cell cytosol resulting in ionic imbalance and toxicity of transpiring leaves. To cope with salt stress, plants have evolved mainly two types of tolerance mechanisms based on either limiting the entry of salt by the roots, or controlling its concentration and distribution. Understanding the overall control of Na+ accumulation and functional studies of genes involved in transport processes, will provide a new opportunity to improve the salinity tolerance of plants relevant to food security in arid regions. A better understanding of these tolerance mechanisms can be used to breed crops with improved yield performance under salinity stress. Moreover, associations of cultures with nitrogen-fixing bactéria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi could serve as an alternative and sustainable strategy to increase crop yields in salt affected fields.

  9. Dental fluorosis in populations from Chiang Mai, Thailand with different fluoride exposures – Paper 1: assessing fluorosis risk, predictors of fluorosis and the potential role of food preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGrady Michael G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To determine the severity of dental fluorosis in selected populations in Chiang Mai, Thailand with different exposures to fluoride and to explore possible risk indicators for dental fluorosis. Methods Subjects were male and female lifetime residents aged 8–13 years. For each child the fluoride content of drinking and cooking water samples were assessed. Digital images were taken of the maxillary central incisors for later blind scoring for TF index (10% repeat scores. Interview data explored previous cooking and drinking water use, exposure to fluoride, infant feeding patterns and oral hygiene practices. Results Data from 560 subjects were available for analysis (298 M, 262 F. A weighted kappa of 0.80 was obtained for repeat photographic scores. The prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+ for subjects consuming drinking and cooking water with a fluoride concentration of 0.9 ppm F the prevalence of fluorosis (TF 3+ rose to 37.3%. Drinking and cooking water at age 3, water used for infant formula and water used for preparing infant food all demonstrated an increase in fluorosis severity with increase in water fluoride level (p  Conclusions The consumption of drinking water with fluoride content >0.9 ppm and use of cooking water with fluoride content >1.6 ppm were associated with an increased risk of aesthetically significant dental fluorosis. Fluoride levels in the current drinking and cooking water sources were strongly correlated with fluorosis severity. Further work is needed to explore fluorosis risk in relation to total fluoride intake from all sources including food preparation.

  10. Dental fluorosis and skeletal fluoride content as biomarkers of excess fluoride exposure in marsupials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Death, Clare; Coulson, Graeme; Kierdorf, Uwe; Kierdorf, Horst; Morris, William K; Hufschmid, Jasmin

    2015-11-15

    Particulate and gaseous fluoride emissions contaminate vegetation near fluoride-emitting industries, potentially impacting herbivorous wildlife in neighboring areas. Dental fluorosis has been associated with consumption of fluoride-contaminated foliage by juvenile livestock and wildlife in Europe and North America. For the first time, we explored the epidemiology and comparative pathology of dental fluorosis in Australian marsupials residing near an aluminium smelter. Six species (Macropus giganteus, Macropus rufogriseus, Wallabia bicolor, Phascolarctos cinereus, Trichosurus vulpecula, Pseudocheirus peregrinus) demonstrated significantly higher bone fluoride levels in the high (n=161 individuals), compared to the low (n=67 individuals), fluoride areas (pdental lesions considered characteristic of dental fluorosis in eutherian mammals. Within the high-fluoride area, 67% of individuals across the six species showed dental enamel lesions, compared to 3% in the low-fluoride areas. Molars that erupted before weaning were significantly less likely to display pathological lesions than those developing later, and molars in the posterior portion of the dental arcade were more severely fluorotic than anterior molars in all six species. The severity of dental lesions was positively associated with increasing bone fluoride levels in all species, revealing a potential biomarker of excess fluoride exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modification of zeolities with ammonium fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosinski, E.J.

    1988-05-17

    A method for enhancing the shape selectivity and adjusting catalytic activity of a crystalline zeolite, including a highly siliceous zeolite, is disclosed. Such a method involves contacting the zeolite with an ammonium fluoride solution in the absence of an aluminum source, optionally contacting the treated zeolite with a warm aqueous solution of an ammonium salt, and then calcining the fluoride and ammonium treated zeolite to produce a more shape selective zeolite material. Such treated zeolite are useful in catalysts which promote shape selective conversion of organic compounds including, for example, hydrocarbon cracking reactions.

  12. Fluoride in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - fluoride ... bones and teeth. Too much fluoride in the diet is very rare. Rarely, infants who get too ... of essential vitamins is to eat a balanced diet that contains a variety of foods from the ...

  13. Salt-marsh plants as potential sources of Hg0 into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canário, João; Poissant, Laurier; Pilote, Martin; Caetano, Miguel; Hintelmann, Holger; O'Driscoll, Nelson J.

    2017-03-01

    To assess the role of salt-marsh plants on the vegetation-atmospheric Hg0 fluxes, three salt marsh plant species, Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia fruticosa and Spartina maritima were selected from a moderately contaminated site in the Tagus estuary during May 2012. Total mercury in stems and leaves for each plant as well as total gaseous mercury and vegetation-air Hg0 fluxes were measured over two continuous days. Mercury fluxes were estimated with a dynamic flux Tedlar® bag coupled to a high-resolution automated mercury analyzer (Tekran 2537A). Other environmental parameters such as air temperature, relative humidity and net solar radiation were also measured aside. H. portulacoides showed the highest total mercury concentrations in stems and leaves and the highest average vegetation-air Hg0 flux (0.48 ± 0.40 ng Hg m-2 h-1). The continuous measurements converged to a daily pattern for all plants, with enhanced fluxes during daylight and lower flux during the night. It is noteworthy that throughout the measurements a negative flux (air-vegetation) was never observed, suggesting the absence of net Hg0 deposition. Based on the above fluxes and the total area occupied by each species we have estimated the total amount of Hg0 emitted from this salt-marsh plants. A daily emission of 1.19 mg Hg d-1 was predicted for the Alcochete marsh and 175 mg Hg d-1 for the entire salt marsh area of the Tagus estuary.

  14. Influence of a salt marsh plant (Halimione portulacoides) on the concentrations and potential mobility of metals in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, C Marisa R; Mucha, Ana P; Bordalo, A A; Vasconcelos, M Teresa S D

    2008-09-15

    Influence of Halimione portulacoides, commonly found in temperate salt marshes, on sediment metal contents, speciation and potential mobility in case of sediment re-suspension was evaluated. Both colonized and non-colonized sediments were studied for total Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn contents and metal fraction exchangeable to water collected in situ. Sediment elutriates, prepared with water collected from each site, were used to simulate a sediment re-suspension phenomenon. As the characteristics and degree of contamination of sediments may influence system behaviour, salt marshes of two Portuguese estuaries, Cavado (NW coast) and Sado (SW coast), were studied. Cu, Pb and Zn contents higher than ERL (quality guideline, effect range-low) were observed, indicating potential risks for living organisms. Strong Cu-complexing organic ligands, also determined in both water and elutriates, were higher in rhizosediment elutriates, at concentrations similar, or even higher, to those of Cu. Such ligands condition metals speciation in the water column and probably also metal bioavailability. From rhizosediment significant amounts of Cu and Zn were transferred to the aqueous phase, concentrations 2-8 times higher than concentrations present in water. In contrast, elutriates of non-colonized sediment removed metals from water, Cu and Zn levels in elutriates being 2-6 times lower than initial ones. Cd and Pb levels in water and elutriates were not measurable in most cases. Results clearly indicate that metals potential solubility in the rhizosphere of plants was markedly higher than that in the surrounding sediment. The obtained results indicated that H. portulacoides presence (and probably other salt marsh plants) may cause a marked increase in metals concentrations in dissolved phase (pore water or even water column if rhizosediment is re-suspended). As salt marsh plants may be abundant in temperate and subtropical estuaries and costal lagoons, this phenomenon should not be disregard in

  15. Reviews of the environmental effects of pollutants. IX. Fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, J.S.; Ensminger, J.T.; Hammons, A.S.; Holleman, J.W.; Lewis, E.B.; Preston, E.L.; Shriner, C.R.; Towill, L.E.

    1980-09-01

    This study is a comprehensive, multidisciplinary review of the health and environmental effects of fluoride on microorganisms, plants, wild and domestic animals, and humans. More than 1000 references are cited. Human intake of fluoride is chiefly through the diet; drinking water is normally the largest single source. Low concentrations of fluoride in water (approximately 1 ppM) benefit mammalian systems, making bone and tooth apatite less soluble, but long-term ingestion of water containing more than 8 ppM fluoride causes fluorosis in humans. Fluoride salts are lethal to humans when ingested in doses of about 3 g or more. At concentrations normally encountered by the general public, fluoride is not teratogenic, mutagenic, or carcinogenic to humans, but chronic fluoride toxicosis of both livestock and wildlife is an important problem in many areas of the United States. The principal manifestations of chronic fluoride toxicosis in livestock are dental fluorosis, osteofluorosis, lameness, and impaired performance. Among domestic animals, dairy cattle are the most sensitive to excessive fluoride exposure.

  16. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of a cassava translationally controlled tumor protein gene potentially related to salt stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Brígida, Ailton Borges; dos Reis, Sávio Pinho; Costa, Carinne de Nazaré Monteirou; Cardoso, Cristina Michiko Yokoyama; Lima, Aline Medeiros; de Souza, Cláudia Regina Batista

    2014-03-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is one of the most important tropical crops showing tolerance to abiotic stress and adaptations to a wide range of environmental conditions. Here, we aimed to isolate and characterize the full-length cDNA and genomic sequences of a cassava translationally controlled tumor protein gene (MeTCTP), and evaluate its potential role in response to salt stress. The MeTCTP full-length cDNA sequence encodes for a deduced protein with 168 amino acid residues, with theoretical isoelectric point and molecular weight of 4.53 and 19 kDa, respectively, containing two putative signatures of TCTP family and one site for myristoylation. The MeTCTP genomic sequence includes four introns and five exons within a 1,643 bp coding region, and a 264 bp partial promoter sequence containing several putative cis-acting regulatory elements, among them, two putative GT-1 motifs, which may be related to response to sodium chloride (NaCl) and pathogen infection. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assays showed that MeTCTP transcripts were higher in roots than leaves, and were significantly increased in detached leaves treated with NaCl. Furthermore, the recombinant MeTCTP conferred a protective function against salt stress in bacterial cells. We report for the first time the molecular cloning and characterization of a cassava TCTP with potential role in salt-stress response. Since salinity is one the most important abiotic factors affecting the production of crops worldwide, the MeTCTP gene could be a candidate gene for generation of salt tolerant crops.

  18. Engineering study of the potential uses of salts from selective crystallization of Hanford tank wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1996-04-30

    The Clean Salt Process (CSP) is the fractional crystallization of nitrate salts from tank waste stored on the Hanford Site. This study reviews disposition options for a CSP product made from Hanford Site tank waste. These options range from public release to onsite low-level waste disposal to no action. Process, production, safety, environment, cost, schedule, and the amount of CSP material which may be used are factors considered in each option. The preferred alternative is offsite release of clean salt. Savings all be generated by excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization. Income would be received from sales of salt products. Savings and income from this alternative amount to $1,027 million, excluding the cost of CSP operations. Unless public sale of CSP products is approved, the material should be calcined. The carbonate form of the CSP could then be used as ballast in tank closure and stabilization efforts. Not including the cost of CSP operations, savings of $632 million would be realized. These savings would result from excluding the material from low-level waste stabilization and reducing purchases of chemicals for caustic recycle and stabilization and closure. Dose considerations for either alternative are favorable. No other cost-effective alternatives that were considered had the capacity to handle significant quantities of the CSP products. If CSP occurs, full-scale tank-waste stabilization could be done without building additional treatment facilities after Phase 1 (DOE 1996). Savings in capital and operating cost from this reduction in waste stabilization would be in addition to the other gains described.

  19. Rice GTPase OsRacB: Potential Accessory Factor in Plant Salt-stress Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LUO; Su-Hai GU; Shu-Hui ZHAO; Fang ZHANG; Nai-Hu WU

    2006-01-01

    As the sole ubiquitous signal small guanosine triphosphate-binding protein in plants, Rop gene plays an important role in plant growth and development. In this study, we focus on the relationship between the novel rice Rop gene OsRacB and plant salt tolerance. Results show that OsRacB transcription is highly accumulated in roots after treatment with salinity, but only slightly accumulated in stems and leaves under the same treatment. Promoter analysis showed that OsRacB promoter is induced by salinity and exogenous salicylic acid, not abscisic acid. To elucidate its physiological function, we generated OsRacB sense and antisense transgenic tobacco and rice. Under proper salinity treatment, sense transgenic plants grew much better than the control. This suggests that overexpression of OsRacB in tobacco and rice can improve plant salt tolerance. But under the same treatment, no difference could be observed between OsRacB antisense plants and the control. The results indicated that OsRacB is only an accessory factor in plant salt tolerance.

  20. Assessment of the sensitization potential of persulfate salts used for bleaching hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, María-Jesús; De Vooght, Vanessa; Muñoz, Xavier; Hoet, Peter H M; Morell, Ferran; Nemery, Benoit; Vanoirbeek, J A J

    2009-02-01

    Persulfate salts have been associated with both allergic contact dermatitis and bronchial asthma. Because there is currently no experimental data available on the sensitizing properties of persulfate salts (ammonium, sodium, and potassium persulfates), we determined their dermal sensitizing capacity, using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). For three consecutive days, BALB/c mice were dermally treated with ammonium, sodium, or potassium persulfate or with the vehicle alone (dimethyl sulfoxide) on each ear (2 x 25 microl). On D6, mice were injected intravenously with [(3)H]-methyl thymidine. The draining auricular lymph nodes were removed, and the incorporation of [(3)H]-methyl thymidine was compared with that of vehicle-treated control mice. A stimulation index (SI) relative to the vehicle-treated control value was derived. The sensitizing potency of the chemicals tested was determined by estimating the concentration of chemical required to induce a SI of 3 (EC3). All three chemicals provoked positive responses in the LLNA, with dose-dependent increases in proliferation. Maximal SIs recorded were 6.8 +/- 1.8, 6.5 +/- 1.2, and 5 +/- 1.0 at 5% for ammonium, sodium or potassium persulfate, respectively. The EC3 values were 1.9%, 0.9%, and 2.4% for ammonium, sodium, and potassium persulfates, respectively. All three persulfate salts need to be considered strong-to-moderate sensitizers according to the murine LLNA.

  1. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  2. Zirconium fluoride glass - Surface crystals formed by reaction with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doremus, R. H.; Bansal, N. P.; Bradner, T.; Murphy, D.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrated surfaces of a zirconium barium fluoride glass, which has potential for application in optical fibers and other optical elements, were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Crystalline zirconium fluoride was identified by analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns of the surface crystals and found to be the main constituent of the surface material. It was also found that hydrated zirconium fluorides form only in highly acidic fluoride solutions. It is possible that the zirconium fluoride crystals form directly on the glass surface as a result of its depletion of other ions. The solubility of zirconium fluoride is suggested to be probably much lower than that of barium fluoride (0.16 g/100 cu cm at 18 C). Dissolution was determined to be the predominant process in the initial stages of the reaction of the glass with water. Penetration of water into the glass has little effect.

  3. Thermodynamic characterization of salt components for Molten Salt Reactor fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Capelli, E.

    2016-01-01

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) is a promising future nuclear fission reactor technology with excellent performance in terms of safety and reliability, sustainability, proliferation resistance and economics. For the design and safety assessment of this concept, it is extremely important to have a thorough knowledge of the physico-chemical properties of molten fluorides salts, which are one of the best options for the reactor fuel. This dissertation presents the thermodynamic description of the ...

  4. Synthesis and antitussive evaluation of verticinone-cholic acid salt, a novel and potential cough therapeutic agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang-zhou XU; Chang CHEN; Yong-hui ZHANG; Han-li RUAN; Hui-fang PI; Pong ZHANG; Ji-zhou WU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To seek a novel and potent antitussive drug based on Shedan-Chuanbei powder, a complex of traditional Chinese medicine preparation for cough therapy.Methods: Verticinone-cholic acid (Vet-CA) salt, a novel, salifying derivative of verticinone and cholic acid, both of which are the major bioactive components in Shedan-Chuanbei powder, was synthesized. We then evaluated the antitussive activity and the acute toxicity of the salt. Results: The new compound, with good solubility in water, has much more potent antitussive activity in comparison with the same dose of single verticinone and single cholic acid. The administration 3 mg/kg of Ver-CA could result in over 50% reduction of a citric acid-induced cough.Pretreatment with naloxone (0.8 mg/kg, ip) can only partially antagonize its anti-tussive effect. On the other hand, glybenclamide (3 mg/kg, ip), an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, can also significantly reduce the antitussive effect of Ver-CA.A further acute toxicity study showed that the LD50 values of Ver-CA were 3 times that of verticinone. Conclusion: Based on the studies of pharmacology and acutetoxicity, the salt has a synergic and attenuated toxicity compared with single verticinone and cholic acid. Moreover, the present study also suggests that Ver-CA, a potential novel antitussive agent, may exert its antitussive effect via both the peripheral (modulated by ATP-sensitive K+ channels) and central mechanisms(modulated by the opioid receptor).

  5. Aquatic Insects of New York Salt Marsh Associated with Mosquito Larval Habitat and their Potential Utility as Bioindicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlin, Ilia; Dempsey, Mary E.; Iwanejko, Tom; Ninivaggi, Dominick V.

    2011-01-01

    The aquatic insect fauna of salt marshes is poorly characterized, with the possible exception of biting Diptera. Aquatic insects play a vital role in salt marsh ecology, and have great potential importance as biological indicators for assessing marsh health. In addition, they may be impacted by measures to control mosquitoes such as changes to the marsh habitat, altered hydrology, or the application of pesticides. Given these concerns, the goals of this study were to conduct the first taxonomic survey of salt marsh aquatic insects on Long Island, New York, USA and to evaluate their utility for non-target pesticide impacts and environmental biomonitoring. A total of 18 species from 11 families and five orders were collected repeatedly during the five month study period. Diptera was the most diverse order with nine species from four families, followed by Coleoptera with four species from two families, Heteroptera with three species from three families, then Odonata and the hexapod Collembola with one species each. Water boatmen, Trichocorixa verticalis Fieber (Heteroptera: Corixidae) and a shore fly, Ephydra subopaca Loew (Diptera: Ephydridae), were the two most commonly encountered species. An additional six species; Anurida maritima Guérin-Méneville (Collembola: Neanuridae), Mesovelia mulsanti White (Heteroptera: Mesovelidae), Enochrus hamiltoni Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Tropisternus quadristriatus Horn (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae), Dasyhelea pseudocincta Waugh and Wirth (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae), and Brachydeutera argentata Walker (Diptera: Ephydridae), were found regularly. Together with the less common Erythrodiplax berenice Drury (Odonata: Libellulidae), these nine species were identified as the most suitable candidates for pesticide and environmental impact monitoring due to abundance, position in the food chain, and extended seasonal occurrence. This study represents a first step towards developing an insectbased index of biological integrity for

  6. Exraction and separation of CERIUM(IV/FLUORINE in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the extraction and separation of cerium/fluorine in fluoride-bearing cerium sulfate solution with fluoride coordination agent has been studied. The UV-vis spectra suggest that Zr6+ and Al3+ can scrub the F- from [CeF2] 2+ complex. The separation and conductivity studies show that aluminum salt is the most suitable fluoride coordination agent, and an ion-exchange reaction is involved between Ce4+/ [CeF2] 2+ and hydrogen ion.

  7. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Fluorine is the world's 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed. PMID:24719570

  8. Water Fluoridation: A Critical Review of the Physiological Effects of Ingested Fluoride as a Public Health Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Peckham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine is the world’s 13th most abundant element and constitutes 0.08% of the Earth crust. It has the highest electronegativity of all elements. Fluoride is widely distributed in the environment, occurring in the air, soils, rocks, and water. Although fluoride is used industrially in a fluorine compound, the manufacture of ceramics, pesticides, aerosol propellants, refrigerants, glassware, and Teflon cookware, it is a generally unwanted byproduct of aluminium, fertilizer, and iron ore manufacture. The medicinal use of fluorides for the prevention of dental caries began in January 1945 when community water supplies in Grand Rapids, United States, were fluoridated to a level of 1 ppm as a dental caries prevention measure. However, water fluoridation remains a controversial public health measure. This paper reviews the human health effects of fluoride. The authors conclude that available evidence suggests that fluoride has a potential to cause major adverse human health problems, while having only a modest dental caries prevention effect. As part of efforts to reduce hazardous fluoride ingestion, the practice of artificial water fluoridation should be reconsidered globally, while industrial safety measures need to be tightened in order to reduce unethical discharge of fluoride compounds into the environment. Public health approaches for global dental caries reduction that do not involve systemic ingestion of fluoride are urgently needed.

  9. Fluoride in the environment and its metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Vinay Kumar; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Damodaran, Thukkaram

    2011-01-01

    The presence of environmental fluoride and its impact on human health is well documented. When consumed in adequate quantity, fluoride prevents dental caries, assists in the formation of dental enamels, and prevents deficiencies in bone mineralization. At excessive exposure levels, ingestion of fluoride causes dental fluorosis skeletal fluorosis, and manifestations such as gastrointestinal, neurological, and urinary problems. The distribution of fluoride in the environment is uneven and largely is believed to derive from geogenic causes. The natural sources of fluoride are fluorite, fluorapatite, and cryolite, whereas anthropogenic sources include coal burning, oil refining, steel production, brick-making industries, and phosphatic fertilizer plants, among others. Among the various sources of fluoride in the environment, those of anthropogenic origin have occasionally been considered to be major ones. The gourndwater is more susceptible to fluoride accumulation and contamination than are other environmental media, primarily because of its contact with geological substrates underneath. The high fluoride concentration in water usually reflects the solubility of fluoride (CaF₂). High concentrations are also often associated with soft, alkaline, and calcium-deficient waters. The fluoride compounds that occur naturally in drinking water are almost totally bioavailable (90%) and are completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. As a result, drinking water is considered to be the potential source of fluoride that causes fluorosis. Because the bioavailability of fluoride is generally reduced in humans when consumed with milk or a calcium-rich diet, it is highly recommended that the inhabitants of fluoride-contaminated areas should incorporate calcium-rich foods in their routine diet. Guidelines for limiting the fluoride intake from drinking water have been postulated by various authorities. Such limits are designed to protect public health and should reflect all

  10. Fluoride toothpastes and fluoride mouthrinses for home use

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Rugg-Gunn; Jolan Bánóczy

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To provide a brief commentary review of fluoride-containing toothpastes and mouthrinses with emphasis on their use at home. Toothpastes and mouthrinses are just two of many ways of providing fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The first investigations into incorporating fluoride into toothpastes and mouthrinses were reported in the middle 1940s. Unlike water fluoridation (which is ‘automatic fluoridation’), fluoride-containing toothpastes and fluoride-containing mouthrins...

  11. Development status and potential program for development of proliferation-resistant molten-salt reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, J.R.; Bauman, H.F.; Dearing, J.F.; Grimes, W.R.; McCoy, H.E. Jr.

    1979-03-01

    Preliminary studies of existing and conceptual molten-salt reactor (MSR) designs have led to the identification of conceptual systems that are technologically attractive when operated with denatured uranium as the principal fissile fuel. These denatured MSRs would also have favorable resource-utilization characteristics and substantial resistance to proliferation of weapons-usable nuclear materials. The report presents a summary of the current status of technology and a discussion of the major technical areas of a possible base program to develop commercial denatured MSRs. The general areas treated are (1) reactor design and development, (2) safety and safety related technology, (3) fuel-coolant behavior and fuel processing, and (4) reactor materials. A substantial development effort could lead to authorization for construction of a molten-salt test reactor about 5 years after the start of the program and operation of the unit about 10 years later. A prototype commercial denatured MSR could be expected to begin operating 25 years from the start of the program. The postulated base program would extend over 32 years and would cost about $700 million (1978 dollars, unescalated). Additional costs to construct the MSTR, $600 million, and the prototype commercial plant, $1470 million, would bring the total program cost to about $2.8 billion. Additional allowances probably should be made to cover contingencies and incidental technology areas not explicitly treated in this preliminary review.

  12. PGPR Potentially Improve Growth of Tomato Plants in Salt-Stressed Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Zameer

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are colonized bacterial species that has the capability to improve plant growth by certain direct and indirect means. Environmental factors including both biotic and abiotic stresses are among the major constraints to crop production. In the current study, the effectiveness of microbial inoculation (Bacillus megaterium for enhancing growth of tomato plants under salt stress conditions has been investigated. Significant improvement in shoot length, root length, leaf surface area, number of leaves, total weight of the shoot and root was observed in tomato plants inoculated with zm7 strain post 15 and 30 days of its application. Zm3, Zm4 and Zm6 strains improved the morphological parameters as compared to the control. Chlorophyll content a, chlorophyll content b, anthocyanin and carotenoid content was increased in tomato plants subjected to Zm7, Zm6 and Zm4 strains. Stress responsive genes; metallothionein and glutothion gene were found highly expressed in Zm7 treated tomato plants as compared to control, untreated plants. Significant correlation of anthocyanin was reported for carotenoids, chlorophyll-b, shoot weight and total weight of seedling while carotenoids were significantly correlated with leaf surface area, root length, chlorophyll-b and anthocyanin. Overall, Zm7 strain proved best for improvement in salt stressed plant’s morphological parameters and biochemical parameters as compared to control, untreated plants.

  13. Materials processing apparatus development for fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Guy A.; Kosten, Sue; Workman, Gary L.

    1994-01-01

    Fluoride glasses have great potential for optical fiber communications due to the high transmittance when no microcrystallites occur during drawing operations. This work has developed apparatus to test the occurrence of microcrystallites during recrystallization in reduced gravity on the KC-135. The apparatus allows fluoride glass fiber, such as ZBLAN, to be melted and recrystallized during both the low and high g portions the parabolic flight.

  14. Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-11-01

    The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is

  15. Geologic technical assessment of the Stratton Ridge salt dome, Texas, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Snider, Anna C.; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-11-01

    The Stratton Ridge salt dome is a large salt diapir located only some ten miles from the currently active Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site at Bryan Mound, Texas. The dome is approximately 15 miles south-southwest of Houston. The Stratton Ridge salt dome has been intensively developed, in the desirable central portions, with caverns for both brine production and product storage. This geologic technical assessment indicates that the Stratton Ridge salt dome may be considered a viable, if less-than-desirable, candidate site for potential expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). Past development of underground caverns significantly limits the potential options for use by the SPR. The current conceptual design layout of proposed caverns for such an expansion facility is based upon a decades-old model of salt geometry, and it is unacceptable, according to this reinterpretation of salt dome geology. The easternmost set of conceptual caverns are located within a 300-ft buffer zone of a very major boundary shear zone, fault, or other structural feature of indeterminate origin. This structure transects the salt stock and subdivides it into an shallow western part and a deeper eastern part. In places, the distance from this structural boundary to the design-basis caverns is as little as 150 ft. A 300-ft distance from this boundary is likely to be the minimum acceptable stand-off, from both a geologic and a regulatory perspective. Repositioning of the proposed cavern field is possible, as sufficient currently undeveloped salt acreage appears to be available. However, such reconfiguration would be subject to limitations related to land-parcel boundaries and other existing infrastructure and topographic constraints. More broadly speaking, the past history of cavern operations at the Stratton Ridge salt dome indicates that operation of potential SPR expansion caverns at this site may be difficult, and correspondingly expensive. Although detailed information is

  16. Hydroxy double salts intercalated with Mn(II) complexes as potential contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miao; Li, Wanjing; Spillane, Dominic E. M.; Geraldes, Carlos F. G. C.; Williams, Gareth R.; Bligh, S. W. Annie

    2016-03-01

    A series of Mn(II) aminophosphonate complexes were successfully synthesized and intercalated into the hydroxy double salt [Zn5(OH)8]Cl2·yH2O. Complex incorporation led to an increase in the interlayer spacing from 7.8 to 10-12 Å. Infrared spectroscopy showed the presence of the characteristic vibration peaks of the Mn(II) complexes in the intercalates' spectra, indicating successful incorporation. The complex-loaded composites had somewhat lower proton relaxivities than the pure complexes. Nevertheless, these intercalates may have use as MRI contrast agents for patients with poor kidney function, where traditional Gd(III)-based contrast agents cause severe renal failure.

  17. The potential role of salt abuse on the risk for kidney stone formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Harvey, J. A.; Padalino, P. K.; Whitson, P.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    The kidney stone-forming risk of a high sodium diet was evaluated by assessing the effect of such a diet on the crystallization of stone-forming salts in urine. Fourteen normal subjects participated in 2 phases of study of 10 days duration each, comprising a low sodium phase (basal metabolic diet containing 50 mmol. sodium per day) and a high sodium phase (basal diet plus 250 mmol. sodium chloride per day). The high sodium intake significantly increased urinary sodium (34 +/- 12 to 267 +/- 56 mmol. per day), calcium (2.73 +/- 1.03 to 3.93 +/- 1.51 mmol. per day) and pH (5.79 +/- 0.44 to 6.15 +/- 0.25), and significantly decreased urinary citrate (3.14 +/- 1.19 to 2.52 +/- 0.83 mmol. per day). Arterialized venous blood bicarbonate and total serum carbon dioxide concentrations decreased significantly during the high sodium diet, whereas serum chloride concentration increased. However, no change in arterialized venous pH was detected. Thus, a high sodium intake not only increased calcium excretion, but also increased urinary pH and decreased citrate excretion. The latter effects are probably due to sodium-induced bicarbonaturia and a significant decrease in serum bicarbonate concentration, respectively. Commensurate with these changes, the urinary saturation of calcium phosphate (brushite) and monosodium urate increased, and the inhibitor activity against calcium oxalate crystallization (formation product) decreased. The net effect of a high sodium diet was an increased propensity for the crystallization of calcium salts in urine.

  18. Effects of long term exposure to hydrogen fluoride on grapevines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1984-01-01

    Grapevines Vitis vinifera L. Shiraz were exposed to hydrogen fluoride in open-top chambers for 189 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.27, 0.17 or 0.07 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions outside the chambers were exposed to a mean atmospheric fluoride concentration of 0.08 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/. The maximum leaf fluoride concentrations associated with these treatments were 62, 27, 9 and 15 ..mu..g Fg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was first observed on grapevines exposed to 0.27 and 0.17 ..mu..g HFm/sup -3/ after 83 and 99 days, respectively. Exposure to fluoride increased the fluoride content of berries and peduncles, and reduced leaf chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll concentration at both mid-season and harvest. Exposure to 0.17 ..mu..g HF m/sup -3/ was associated with higher total acid content of grapes than other treatments. Fluoride had no significant effect on bunch weight, number of bunches, grape yield, grape water or potential alcohol content, leaf chlorophyll b or leaf protein concentration. The high accumulation of fluoride in peduncles, but low fluoride accumulation in berries, suggests that the peduncle acts to block the translocation of fluoride from sites of uptake to the fruit. 42 references, 1 figure, 5 tables.

  19. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse......, moderate for fluoride gel and very low for acidulated fluoride foam. No conclusions could be drawn on the cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This review, covering the recent decade, has further substantiated the evidence for a caries-preventive effect of fluoride mouth rinse, fluoride gel and foam...

  20. Fluorides and non-fluoride remineralization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; van Loveren, Cor

    2013-01-01

    Caries develops when the equilibrium between de- and remineralization is unbalanced favoring demineralization. De- and remineralization occur depending on the degree of saturation of the interstitial fluids with respect to the tooth mineral. This equilibrium is positively influenced when fluoride, calcium and phosphate ions are added favoring remineralization. In addition, when fluoride is present, it will be incorporated into the newly formed mineral which is then less soluble. Toothpastes may contain fluoride and calcium ions separately or together in various compounds (remineralization systems) and may therefore reduce demineralization and promote remineralization. Formulating all these compounds in one paste may be challenging due to possible premature calcium-fluoride interactions and the low solubility of CaF2. There is a large amount of clinical evidence supporting the potent caries preventive effect of fluoride toothpastes indisputably. The amount of clinical evidence of the effectiveness of the other remineralization systems is far less convincing. Evidence is lacking for head to head comparisons of the various remineralization systems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Haloalkaliphilic Streptomyces spp. AJ8 isolated from solar salt works and its' pharmacological potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenifer, John Selesteen Charles Adlin; Donio, Mariathason Birdilla Selva; Michaelbabu, Mariavincent; Vincent, Samuel Gnana Prakash; Citarasu, Thavasimuthu

    2015-12-01

    Antagonistic Streptomyces spp. AJ8 was isolated and identified from the Kovalam solar salt works in India. The antimicrobial NRPS cluster gene was characterized by PCR, sequencing and predict the secondary structure analysis. The secondary metabolites will be extracted from different organic solvent extraction and studied the antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral and anticancer activities. In vitro antagonistic activity results revealed that, Streptomyces spp. AJ8 was highly antagonistic against Staphylococcus aureus, Aeromonas hydrophila WPD1 and Candida albicans. The genomic level identification revealed that, the strain was confirmed as Streptomyces spp. AJ8 and submitted the NCBI database (KC603899). The NRPS gene was generated a single gene fragment of 781 bp length (KR491940) and the database analysis revealed that, the closely related to Streptomyces spp. SAUK6068 and S. coeruleoprunus NBRC15400. The secondary metabolites extracted with ethyl acetate was effectively inhibited the bacterial and fungal growth at the ranged between 7 and 19.2 mm of zone of inhibition. The antiviral activity results revealed that, the metabolite was significantly (P < 0.001) controlled the killer shrimp virus white spot syndrome virus at the level of 85 %. The metabolite also suppressed the L929 fibroblast cancer cells at 35.7 % viability in 1000 µg treatment.

  2. PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariasen, W.H.

    1959-08-11

    A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

  3. Synthesis of reagents for fluoride technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gordienko; P.; S.; Kolzunov; V.; A.; Dostovalov; V.; A.; Kaidalova; T.; A.

    2005-01-01

    Growing demand for fluorinating reagents to be used in rare-metal industry has stimulated conducting research in the field of production for these reagents. That is why the fluorinating reagents production has recently formed an independent segment of industry. Main industrial fluorinating reagents include hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, technical ammonium hydrodifluoride, fluorosilicic acid and its salts. To produce technical etching acid, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content at least 92% is used in most cases. To produce anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, fluor-spar with calcium fluoride content 96 %-97 % is necessary. The fluorine-containing raw materials refinement from silica by means of flotation makes the fluorinating reagents production substantially more expensive. In this work we have attempted to process unconcentrated raw materials by fluorine removal in the form of volatile silicon tetrafluoride. In this process silicon tetrafluoride was recovered by liquid ammonia with subsequent hydrolysis of the formed ammonia hexafluorosilicate. Hydrolysis occurred according to the reaction:(NH4)2 SiF6 + 4NH3 + 2 H2O= 6NH4F+ SiO2 The products of the ammonia hexafluorosilicate hydrolysis included ammonia fluoride and amorphous silica gel ("white soot") as by-product. This "white soot" was of high purity-with main component content 99.95% and total admixture content 0.05%. Silica gel is a superfine material with specific surface of 267.6 m2/g and is recommended as filler in the production of rubber, plastics and for other applications.Ammonia fluoride was transformed into ammonia hydrodifluoride (main processing product) according to the reaction:2NH4F→NH3+NH4 HF2 It was stated that the NH4F: NH4 HF2 ratio depends on boiling point temperature-with its increase the ammonia hydrofluoride concentration in solution increases as well.

  4. Methane, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide fluxes from a temperate salt marsh: Grazing management does not alter Global Warming Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Hilary; Garbutt, Angus; Jones, Laurence; Jones, Davey L.

    2012-11-01

    Soil greenhouse gas emissions from cattle grazed and un-grazed temperate upper salt marsh were measured using dark static chambers, monthly for one year. Below-ground gas sampling tubes were also used to measure soil methane (CH4) concentrations. CH4 efflux from grazed and un-grazed salt marsh did not differ significantly although grazing did lead to 'hotspots' of underground CH4 (up to 6% of total air volume) and CH4 efflux (peak of 9 mg m-2 h-1) significantly linked to high soil moisture content, low soil temperatures and the presence of Juncus gerardii. Carbon dioxide (CO2) efflux was greater from the un-grazed marsh (mean of 420 mg m-2 h-1) than the grazed marsh (mean of 333 mg m-2 h-1) throughout most of the year and was positively correlated with the deeper water table and greater soil temperatures. Grazing was not a significant predictor of nitrous oxide (N2O) soil emissions. Global Warming Potential (GWP; over 100 years), calculated from mean yearly chamber fluxes for CH4 and CO2, did not differ significantly with grazing treatment. Seasonal variation in the key drivers of soil greenhouse gas efflux; soil temperature, moisture and water table, plus the presence or absence of aerenchymatous plants such as J. gerardii were more important to the magnitude of greenhouse gas emissions than grazing management per se.

  5. Regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States. Volume 2: Detailed report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States is provided. The assessment is focused on the general characteristics of twelve defined geographic regions. Natural resources essential to solar ponds are surveyed. Meteorological and hydrogeological conditions affecting pond performance are examined. Potentially favorable pond sites are identified. Regional thermal and electrical energy output from solar ponds is calculated. Selected pond design cases are studied. Five major potential market sectors are evaluated in terms of technical and energy-consumption characteristics, and solar-pond applicability and potential. Relevant pond system data and financial factors are analyzed. Solar-pond energy costs are compared with conventional energy costs. The assessment concludes that, excepting Alaska, ponds are applicable in all regions for at least two market sectors. Total solar pond energy supply potential in the five market sectors examined is estimated to be 8.94 quads/yr by the year 2000, approximately 7.2% of the projected total national energy demand.

  6. Necessity to review the Brazilian regulation about fluoride toothpastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Caldarelli, Pablo Guilherme; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the Brazilian legislation about fluoride toothpaste. A search was conducted in LILACS, Medline and SciELO databases about the fluoride concentration found in Brazilians toothpastes, using descriptors on health. Publications since 1981 have shown that some Brazilian toothpastes are not able to maintain, during their expiration time, a minimum of 1,000 ppm F of soluble fluoride in the formulation. However, the Brazilian regulation (ANVISA, Resolution 79, August 28, 2000) only sets the maximum total fluoride (0.15%; 1,500 ppm F) that a toothpaste may contain but not the minimum concentration of soluble fluoride that it should contain to have anticaries potential, which according to systematic reviews should be 1,000 ppm F. Therefore, the Brazilian regulation on fluoride toothpastes needs to be revised to assure the efficacy of those products for caries control. PMID:26487295

  7. Necessity to review the Brazilian regulation about fluoride toothpastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cury, Jaime Aparecido; Caldarelli, Pablo Guilherme; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the Brazilian legislation about fluoride toothpaste. A search was conducted in LILACS, Medline and SciELO databases about the fluoride concentration found in Brazilians toothpastes, using descriptors on health. Publications since 1981 have shown that some Brazilian toothpastes are not able to maintain, during their expiration time, a minimum of 1,000 ppm F of soluble fluoride in the formulation. However, the Brazilian regulation (ANVISA, Resolution 79, August 28, 2000) only sets the maximum total fluoride (0.15%; 1,500 ppm F) that a toothpaste may contain but not the minimum concentration of soluble fluoride that it should contain to have anticaries potential, which according to systematic reviews should be 1,000 ppm F. Therefore, the Brazilian regulation on fluoride toothpastes needs to be revised to assure the efficacy of those products for caries control.

  8. Unraveling the hydrocarbon charge potential of the Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea: An integrated approach to reduce exploration risk in complex salt basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Oliver; Shtukert, Olga; Bishop, Andrew; Kornpihl, Kristijan; Milne, Graham

    2014-05-01

    The Nordkapp Basin, Barents Sea, is an intra-continental syn-rift basin containing many complex salt structures. The salt is late-Carboniferous to Early Permian in age, with regional extension in the Triassic initiating the salt movement resulting in formation of sub- and mini-basins with significant subsidence (especially in the northeastern part of the basin). Subsequent tectonic phases allowed growth and distortion of salt diapirs that were later affected by uplift and erosion during Tertiary resulting in the formation of salt-related traps in Triassic and Lower Jurassic strata. During Plio-Pleistocene, glacial erosion removed additional Mesozoic and Cenozoic strata. This basin is regarded as a frontier salt province. A small hydrocarbon discovery (Pandora well) in the southwestern part of the basin points to the presence several functioning petroleum systems. The primary play type is related to salt traps below overhangs. Such structures are however, very difficult to image with conventional seismic techniques due to i) generation of multiples from sea floor and top of shallow salt bodies and ii) seismic shadow zones within the salt (possibly resulting from shale and carbonate stringers) which cause severe diffractions so that prospective areas adjacent to the salt remain elusive. Arctic exploration is expensive and the ability to focus on the highest potential targets is essential. A unique solution to this challenging subsurface Arctic environment was developed by integrating petroleum system modeling with full azimuth broadband seismic acquisition and processing. This integrated approach allows intelligent location of seismic surveys over structures which have the maximum chance of success of hydrocarbon charge. Petroleum system modeling was conducted for four seismic sections. Salt was reconstructed according to the diapiric evolution presented in Nilsen et al. (1995) and Koyi et al. (1995). Episodes of major erosion were assigned to Tertiary (tectonic) and

  9. Fast Spectrum Molten Salt Reactor Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Patton, Bruce W [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2011-07-01

    During 2010, fast-spectrum molten-salt reactors (FS-MSRs) were selected as a transformational reactor concept for light-water reactor (LWR)-derived heavy actinide disposition by the Department of Energy-Nuclear Energy Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) program and were the subject of a preliminary scoping investigation. Much of the reactor description information presented in this report derives from the preliminary studies performed for the ARC project. This report, however, has a somewhat broader scope-providing a conceptual overview of the characteristics and design options for FS-MSRs. It does not present in-depth evaluation of any FS-MSR particular characteristic, but instead provides an overview of all of the major reactor system technologies and characteristics, including the technology developments since the end of major molten salt reactor (MSR) development efforts in the 1970s. This report first presents a historical overview of the FS-MSR technology and describes the innovative characteristics of an FS-MSR. Next, it provides an overview of possible reactor configurations. The following design features/options and performance considerations are described including: (1) reactor salt options-both chloride and fluoride salts; (2) the impact of changing the carrier salt and actinide concentration on conversion ratio; (3) the conversion ratio; (4) an overview of the fuel salt chemical processing; (5) potential power cycles and hydrogen production options; and (6) overview of the performance characteristics of FS-MSRs, including general comparative metrics with LWRs. The conceptual-level evaluation includes resource sustainability, proliferation resistance, economics, and safety. The report concludes with a description of the work necessary to begin more detailed evaluation of FS-MSRs as a realistic reactor and fuel cycle option.

  10. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-01-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs...... coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition...... need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation....

  11. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  12. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical appl

  13. Fluoride varnishes and enamel caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, Hugo de

    1987-01-01

    Topical fluoride applications have the aim of increasing the fluoride uptake in enamel and consequently reducing caries. In the early ‘60s fluoride varnishes were introduced because they had a long contact period with the enamel which resulted in a higher fluoride uptake than from other topical

  14. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca2+, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca2+ efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca2+ fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca2+ chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca2+ and H+ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca2+-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants. PMID:26742036

  15. Anion Channel Inhibitor NPPB-Inhibited Fluoride Accumulation in Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis) Is Related to the Regulation of Ca²⁺, CaM and Depolarization of Plasma Membrane Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xian-Chen; Gao, Hong-Jian; Yang, Tian-Yuan; Wu, Hong-Hong; Wang, Yu-Mei; Zhang, Zheng-Zhu; Wan, Xiao-Chun

    2016-01-05

    Tea plant is known to be a hyper-accumulator of fluoride (F). Over-intake of F has been shown to have adverse effects on human health, e.g., dental fluorosis. Thus, understanding the mechanisms fluoride accumulation and developing potential approaches to decrease F uptake in tea plants might be beneficial for human health. In the present study, we found that pretreatment with the anion channel inhibitor NPPB reduced F accumulation in tea plants. Simultaneously, we observed that NPPB triggered Ca(2+) efflux from mature zone of tea root and significantly increased relative CaM in tea roots. Besides, pretreatment with the Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) and CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP) suppressed NPPB-elevated cytosolic Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity and CaM concentration in tea roots, respectively. Interestingly, NPPB-inhibited F accumulation was found to be significantly alleviated in tea plants pretreated with either Ca(2+) chelator (EGTA) or CaM antagonists (CPZ and TFP). In addition, NPPB significantly depolarized membrane potential transiently and we argue that the net Ca(2+) and H⁺ efflux across the plasma membrane contributed to the restoration of membrane potential. Overall, our results suggest that regulation of Ca(2+)-CaM and plasma membrane potential depolarization are involved in NPPB-inhibited F accumulation in tea plants.

  16. The prevalence of fluorosis in children is associated with naturally occurring water fluoride concentration in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariño, Rodrigo

    2013-09-01

    Fluorosis and dental caries in Mexican schoolchildren residing in areas with different water fluoride concentrations and receiving fluoridated salt. Garcia-Perez A, Irigoyen-Carnacho ME, Borges-Yanez A. Caries Res 2013;47(4):299-308. Rodrigo Mariño Is there an association between the presence of dental fluorosis and fluoride concentration in drinking water? and Is there an association between the severity of fluorosis and dental caries experience in schoolchildren residing in two rural towns in Mexico (with water fluoride concentrations of 0.70 and 1.50 ppm) that also receive fluoridated salt? Government: National Council of Science and Technology (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia, CONACYT) Other: Autonomous University, Xochimilco (Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, UAM-X) TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Cross-sectional Level 3: Other evidence Not applicable. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The cariostatic mechanisms of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Kata Rošin-Grget; Kristina Peroš; Ivana Šutej; Krešimir Bašić

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the possible cariostatic mechanisms of the action of fluoride. In the past, fluoride inhibition of caries was ascribed to reduced solubility of enamel due to incorporation of fluoride (F–) into the enamel minerals. The present evidence from clinical and laboratory studies suggests that the caries-preventive mode of action of fluoride is mainly topical. There is convincing evidence that fluoride has a major effect on demineralisation and remineralisation of dental hard t...

  18. Geologic technical assessment of the Chacahoula Salt Dome, Louisiana, for potential expansion of the U.S. strategic petroleum reserve.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snider, Anna C.; Rautman, Christopher Arthur; Looff, Karl M. (Geologic Consultant, Lovelady, TX)

    2006-03-01

    The Chacahoula salt dome, located in southern Louisiana, approximately 66 miles southwest of New Orleans, appears to be a suitable site for a 160-million-barrel-capacity expansion facility for the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve, comprising sixteen 10-million barrel underground storage caverns. The overall salt dome appears to cover an area of some 1800 acres, or approximately 2.8 square miles, at a subsea elevation of 2000 ft, which is near the top of the salt stock. The shallowest known salt is present at 1116 ft, subsea. The crest of the salt dome is relatively flatlying, outward to an elevation of -4000 ft. Below this elevation, the flanks of the dome plunge steeply in all directions. The dome appears to comprise two separate spine complexes of quasi-independently moving salt. Two mapped areas of salt overhang, located on the eastern and southeastern flanks of the salt stock, are present below -8000 ft. These regions of overhang should present no particular design issues, as the conceptual design SPR caverns are located in the western portion of the dome. The proposed cavern field may be affected by a boundary shear zone, located between the two salt spines. However, the large size of the Chacahoula salt dome suggests that there is significant design flexibility to deal with such local geologic issues.

  19. Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Coriandrum sativum Seeds in Salt Induced Arrhythmic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Rehman1, Nazish Jahan1*, Khalil-ul-Rahman2, Khalid Mahmood Khan2 and Fatiqa Zafar1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the anti-arrhythmic potential of Coriandrum sativum (seeds was evaluated in BaCl2 induced tachycardia and KCl induced bradycardia in rats. Heart rate and electrocardiogram (ECG was recorded during the experimental period. The BaCl2 increased the heart rate from 111/min to 157/min while KCL decreased the heart rate from 112/min to 60/min in the rats of positive control groups. ECG patterns also confirmed the tachy- and brady-arrhythmia in the rats of both positive control groups. The changes in biochemical cardiac biomarkers (CK-MB, LDH, AST, and ALT were also the studied parameters. The level of cardiac biomarkers was significantly elevated in the serum of positive control rats as compared to their respective absolute controls. In case of both curative and preventive mode of treatment the elevated levels of enzymes, cardiac biomarkers were significantly reduced. Electrocardiogram (ECG pattern revealed that the studied plant possesses a very good anti-arrhythmic potential in case of curative mode of treatment. The antiarrhythmic potential through preventive mode of treatment was also encouraging, but comparatively less than the curative mode of treatment. Anti-tachycardial potential of C. sativum was comparable with standard drug while, recovery in bradycardia was relatively slow than standard drug. Gross pathology and ECG pattern of base line group confirmed the innoxious nature of C. sativum seeds. Treatment of rats with Coriandrum sativum (100 mgkg-1 BW normalized the heart rate and attenuated the cardiac arrhythmia.

  20. Reconstructing the Genetic Potential of the Microbially-Mediated Nitrogen Cycle in a Salt Marsh Ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Brossi, Maria Julia de L.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana F.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are considered buffer zones for the discharge of land-derived nutrients without accounting for potential negative side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand the ecological assembly and dynamics of the microorganisms that are involved in nitrogen (N) cycling

  1. Reconstructing the genetic potential of the microbially-mediated nitrogen cycle in a salt marsh ecosystem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dini-Andreote, Francisco; de L. Brossi, Maria Julia; van Elsas, Jan Dirk; Salles, Joana F

    2016-01-01

    Coastal ecosystems are considered buffer zones for the discharge of land-derived nutrients without accounting for potential negative side effects. Hence, there is an urgent need to better understand the ecological assembly and dynamics of the microorganisms that are involved in nitrogen (N) cycling

  2. Computational investigation of the role of fluoride in Tamao oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2002-01-01

    The Tamao oxidation of alkoxysilanes was investigated computationally to determine the role of fluoride. a key additive. in this reaction. A sequence of fluoride equilibria as well as possible transition states. mediated by basic and neutral peroxide, respectively, were examined, and a potential...

  3. Computational investigation of the role of fluoride in Tamao oxidations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mader, Mary M.; Norrby, Per-Ola

    2002-01-01

    The Tamao oxidation of alkoxysilanes was investigated computationally to determine the role of fluoride. a key additive. in this reaction. A sequence of fluoride equilibria as well as possible transition states. mediated by basic and neutral peroxide, respectively, were examined, and a potential...

  4. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-01

    the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. DESIGN: Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste......: There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h...... after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). CONCLUSIONS: Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste...

  5. Evaluation of the aggressive potential of marine chloride and sulfate salts on mortars applied as renders in the Metropolitan Region of Salvador--Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Eduardo A L; Campos, Vânia P; da Silva Filho, Luiz C P; Greven, Hélio A

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, growing interest has focused on determining the performance of materials and evaluating the service life of structures exposed to various environmental forces. In this context, the determination of the aggressive potential of marine salts on mortars used as external renders is critical. The present study aimed to evaluate the spatial distribution of marine salts relative to distance from the sea. This was done by monitoring the deposition rate of chlorides and sulfates in wet candle sensors, located at nine stations scattered around the Metropolitan Region of Salvador, state of Bahia, Brazil. The study also determined the effectiveness of water-soluble salts at penetrating three different types of mortars of varying cement content via deposition and diffusion. The methodology employed enabled an evaluation of the efficiency of the monitoring sensors' measurement of the aggressiveness potential of local marine aerosol, and determination of the comparative performance of the three mortars tested, from the standpoint of resistance to salt penetration. The type and amount of salts captured both in solution and in powder samples extracted from the mortars were determined by ion chromatography. The analysis of the various types of mortars tested indicated which types are more resistant to the aggressive potential of the region's marine aerosol and the distance from the shore where local buildings are liable to be most strongly affected.

  6. Comparative Analysis of WRKY Genes Potentially Involved in Salt Stress Responses in Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Fatma-Ezzahra; Makhloufi, Emna; Marande, William; Ghorbel, Abdel W.; Bouzayen, Mondher; Bergès, Hélène

    2017-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are involved in multiple aspects of plant growth, development and responses to biotic stresses. Although they have been found to play roles in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses, these roles still need to be explored, especially those pertaining to crops. Durum wheat is the second most widely produced cereal in the world. Complex, large and unsequenced genomes, in addition to a lack of genomic resources, hinder the molecular characterization of tolerance mechanisms. This paper describes the isolation and characterization of five TdWRKY genes from durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum). A PCR-based screening of a T. turgidum BAC genomic library using primers within the conserved region of WRKY genes resulted in the isolation of five BAC clones. Following sequencing fully the five BACs, fine annotation through Triannot pipeline revealed 74.6% of the entire sequences as transposable elements and a 3.2% gene content with genes organized as islands within oceans of TEs. Each BAC clone harbored a TdWRKY gene. The study showed a very extensive conservation of genomic structure between TdWRKYs and their orthologs from Brachypodium, barley, and T. aestivum. The structural features of TdWRKY proteins suggested that they are novel members of the WRKY family in durum wheat. TdWRKY1/2/4, TdWRKY3, and TdWRKY5 belong to the group Ia, IIa, and IIc, respectively. Enrichment of cis-regulatory elements related to stress responses in the promoters of some TdWRKY genes indicated their potential roles in mediating plant responses to a wide variety of environmental stresses. TdWRKY genes displayed different expression patterns in response to salt stress that distinguishes two durum wheat genotypes with contrasting salt stress tolerance phenotypes. TdWRKY genes tended to react earlier with a down-regulation in sensitive genotype leaves and with an up-regulation in tolerant genotype leaves. The TdWRKY transcripts levels in roots increased

  7. Use of Molten Salt Fluxes and Cathodic Protection for Preventing the Oxidation of Titanium at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study demonstrates that it is possible to protect both solid and liquid titanium and titanium alloys from attack from air by cathodically polarizing the titanium component using an electro-active high-temperature molten salt flux and a moderate polarization potential. The electrolytic cell used comprises a cathode of either solid titanium or liquid titanium alloy, an electrolyte based on molten calcium chloride or fluoride salt, and an anode consisting of an inert oxygen-evolving material such as iridium metal. The new approach renders possible the processing of titanium at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen-containing atmospheres.

  8. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  9. The role of ions, heavy metals, fluoride, and agrochemicals: critical evaluation of potential aetiological factors of chronic kidney disease of multifactorial origin (CKDmfo/CKDu) and recommendations for its eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimalawansa, Sunil J

    2016-06-01

    The pollution of water and food through human waste and anthropogenic activities, including industrial waste and agricultural runoff, is a mounting problem worldwide. Water pollution from microbes causes identifiable diarrhoeal illnesses. The consumption of water contaminated with heavy metals, fluoride, and other toxins causes insidious illnesses that lead to protracted, non-communicable diseases and death. Chronic kidney disease of unusual/uncertain/unknown aetiology is one such example, began to manifest in the mid-1960s in several dry-zonal agricultural societies in developing economies that are located around the equator. In Sri Lanka, such a disease is affecting the North Central Province, the rice bowl of the country that first appeared in the mid-1990s. Several potential causes have been postulated, including heavy metals, fluoride, cyanobacterial and algae toxins, agrochemicals, and high salinity and ionicity in water, but no specific source or causative factor has been identified for CKD of multifactorial origin (CKDmfo). Three large studies conducted in the recent past failed to find any of the postulated components (heavy metals, cyanobacterial toxins, fluoride, salinity, or agrochemicals) at levels higher than those deemed safe by the World Health Organization and the US Environmental Protection Agency. At the reported low levels in water and with the heterogeneous geographical distribution, it is unrealistic to expect any of these components individually could cause this disease. However, the additive or synergistic effects of a combination of factors and components, even at lower exposure levels, together with malnutrition and harmful behaviours, and/or a yet-unidentified (or not investigated) toxin, can cause this epidemic. Because the cause is unknown, scientists need to work on broader hypotheses, so that key causative elements are not missed. Taken together the plausibility of multiple factors in the genesis of this disease, the appropriate

  10. Fluoride gels for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Valeria C C; Worthington, Helen V; Walsh, Tanya; Chong, Lee Yee

    2015-06-15

    Topically applied fluoride gels have been widely used as a caries-preventive intervention in dental surgeries and school-based programmes for over three decades. This updates the Cochrane review of fluoride gels for preventing dental caries in children and adolescents that was first published in 2002. The primary objective is to determine the effectiveness and safety of fluoride gels in preventing dental caries in the child and adolescent population.The secondary objectives are to examine whether the effect of fluoride gels is influenced by the following: initial level of caries severity; background exposure to fluoride in water (or salt), toothpastes, or reported fluoride sources other than the study option(s); mode of use (self applied under supervision or operator-applied), and whether there is a differential effect between the tray and toothbrush methods of application; frequency of use (times per year) or fluoride concentration (ppm F). We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register (to 5 November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 5 November 2014), EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 5 November 2014), CINAHL via EBSCO (1980 to 5 November 2014), LILACS and BBO via the BIREME Virtual Health Library (1980 to 5 November 2014), ProQuest Dissertations and Theses (1861 to 5 November 2014) and Web of Science Conference Proceedings (1945 to 5 November 2014). We undertook a search for ongoing trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform on 5 November 2014. We placed no restrictions on language or date of publication in the search of the electronic databases. We also searched reference lists of articles and contacted selected authors and manufacturers. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials where blind outcome assessment was stated or indicated, comparing topically applied fluoride gel with placebo or no treatment in

  11. Effects of oral doses of fluoride on nestling European starlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, W.J.; Grue, C.E.; Schuler, C.A.; Bunck, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Nestling European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), raised and fed by free-living adults, were given daily oral doses of either distilled water, 193 mg sodium as Na2CO3 per kg of body weight (sodium control group), or 6, 10, 13, 17,23, 30, 40, 80, 160 mg of the fluoride ion as NaF in distilled water per kg of body weight (mg/kg). Dosing began when nestlings were 24-48 hr old and continued for 16 days. The 24-hr LD50 of fluoride for day-old starlings was 50 mg/kg. The 16-day LD50 was 17 mg/kg. The sodium control group did not differ from the water control group with respect to any of the measured variables. Growth rates were significantly reduced in the 13 and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups; weights of birds given higher dose levels were omitted from growth comparisons because of high, fluoride-induced mortality. Although pre-fledging weights for the 10, 13, and 17 mg of fluoride/kg groups averaged 3.6 to 8.6% less than controls at 17 days, this difference was not significant. Feather and bone growth of the fluoride and control groups were not different, except for keel length measured at 17 days of age which averaged less in the fluoride groups. Liver and spleen weights were not affected by fluoride treatments. No histological damage related to fluoride treatments was found in liver, spleen, or kidney. The logarithm of bone fluoride and magnesium concentration increased with the logarithm of increasing fluoride treatment levels and were significantly correlated with each other. Fluoride treatments had no effect on percent calcium or phosphorus in bone or plasma alkaline phosphatase activity. Oral doses of fluoride appear to be more toxic than equivalent dietary levels. Most birds probably acquire fluoride through their diet. Therefore, the results of the study may overestimate the potential effects of fluorides on songbirds living in fluoride-contaminated environments.

  12. Quantitative measure for the "nakedness" of fluoride ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Karl O; Jenkins, H Donald Brooke

    2003-08-01

    A quantitative measure for the donor strength or "nakedness" of fluoride ion donors is presented. It is based on the free energy change associated with the transfer of a fluoride ion from the donor to a given acceptor molecule. Born-Haber cycle calculations were used to calculate both the free energy and the enthalpy change for this process. The enthalpy change is given by the sum of the fluoride ion affinity of the acceptor (as defined in strict thermodynamic convention) and the lattice energy difference (DeltaU(POT)) between the fluoride ion donor and the salt formed with the acceptor. Because, for a given acceptor, the fluoride affinity has a constant value, the relative enthalpy (and also the corresponding free energy) changes are governed exclusively by the lattice energy differences. In this study, BF(3), PF(5), AsF(5), and SbF(5) were used as the acceptors, and the following seven fluoride ion donors were evaluated: CsF, N(CH(3))(4)F (TMAF), N-methylurotropinium fluoride (MUF), hexamethylguanidinium fluoride (HMGF), hexamethylpiperidinium fluoride (HMPF), N,N,N-trimethyl-1-adamantylammonium fluoride (TMAAF), and hexakis(dimethylamino)phosphazenium fluoride (HDMAPF). Smooth relationships between the enthalpy changes and the molar volumes of the donor cations were found which asymptotically approach constant values for infinitely large cations. Whereas CsF is a relatively poor F(-) donor [(U(POT)(CsF) - U(POT)(CsSbF(6))) = 213 kJ mol(-)(1)], when compared to N(CH(3))(4)F [(U(POT)(TMAF) - U(POT)(TMASbF(6))) = 69 kJ mol(-)(1)], a 4 times larger cation (phosphazenium salt) and an infinitely large cation are required to decrease DeltaU(POT) to 17 and 0 kJ mol(-)(1), respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that very little is gained by increasing the cation size past a certain level and that secondary factors, such as chemical and physical properties, become overriding considerations.

  13. Salinity as a constraint on growth of oligohaline marsh macrophytes. II. Salt pulses and recovery potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R.J.; Mendelssohn, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    The ability of common oligohaline marsh macrophytes of the northern Gulf of Mexico coast to recover from pulses of increased salinity was investigated in a greenhouse experiment with Eleocharis palustris, Panicum hemitomon, Sagittaria lancifolia, and Scirpus americanus monocultures. Components of salinity pulses applied were final salinity reached (6 or 12 g/L), salinity influx rate (3 d or 3 wk), and duration of exposure (1, 2, or 3 mo). After each exposure period, we placed plants into freshwater until the end of the 120-d experiment to determine recovery potential. The four species varied in their ability to recover from the salinity pulses. Within a species, recovery varied with final salinity level and duration of exposure, and to a lesser extent with salinity influx rate. Scirpus americanus, growth of which was stimulated by salinity for 3 mo. Ability to recover decreased with increased salinity and increased duration of exposure for the remaining three species. Recovery of specific aspects of growth was also suppressed in these species by a rapid salinity influx rate compared to a slow influx rate. The complex variations in recovery patterns displayed by the different species may lead to changes in species dominance following the short-term salinity pulses that can occur during storm events, which in turn may affect marsh plant community composition and structure.

  14. 125 million Yuan has been In-vested in the Aluminium Fluoride Project in Mianchi County,He-nan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>In May this year,Orient Shaoxing Salt Fluoride Co.,Ltd.under China Nonferrous Metals Min- ing Co.,Ltd.launched its 60,000-ton dry- process aluminium fluoride project.Currently, a total of 125 million Yuan has been invested in this project.It is reported that the project,lo-

  15. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  16. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014 Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  17. Water Fluoridation Statistics - Percent of PWS population receiving fluoridated water

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2000-2014. Water Fluoridation Statistics is a biennial report of the percentage and number of people receiving fluoridated water from 2000 through 2014, originally...

  18. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-04-26

    The principal research effort for the first half of Year 3 of the project has been resource assessment. Emphasis has been on estimating the total volume of hydrocarbons generated and the potential amount of this resource that is classified as deep (>15,000 ft) gas in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, the Manila Subbasin and the Conecuh Subbasin. The amount of this resource that has been expelled, migrated and entrapped is also the focus of the first half of Year 3 of this study.

  19. Permeability and fluoride release of lining materials containing amine fluorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbö, H; Eriksen, H M

    1976-11-01

    The addition of amine fluorides to a copal recin (Copalite) and a chlorine caoutchouc varnish (Pergut S-40) has been studied. The permeability of Copalite films was only slightly increased whereas the excellent film-forming qualities of Pergut S-40 were destroyed by the addition of fluorides. A high fluoride release was found initially from test films of the materials but within 2-3 weeks a decrease to very low fluoride levels was observed.

  20. Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA derived Dietary Reference Values (DRVs for fluoride, which are provided as Adequate Intake (AI from all sources, including non-dietary sources. Fluoride is not an essential nutrient. Therefore, no Average Requirement for the performance of essential physiological functions can be defined. Nevertheless, the Panel considered that the setting of an AI is appropriate because of the beneficial effects of dietary fluoride on prevention of dental caries. The AI is based on epidemiological studies (performed before the 1970s showing an inverse relationship between the fluoride concentration of water and caries prevalence. As the basis for defining the AI, estimates of mean fluoride intakes of children via diet and drinking water with fluoride concentrations at which the caries preventive effect approached its maximum whilst the risk of dental fluorosis approached its minimum were chosen. Except for one confirmatory longitudinal study in US children, more recent studies were not taken into account as they did not provide information on total dietary fluoride intake, were potentially confounded by the use of fluoride-containing dental hygiene products, and did not permit a conclusion to be drawn on a dose-response relationship between fluoride intake and caries risk. The AI of fluoride from all sources (including non-dietary sources is 0.05 mg/kg body weight per day for both children and adults, including pregnant and lactating women. For pregnant and lactating women, the AI is based on the body weight before pregnancy and lactation. Reliable and representative data on the total fluoride intake of the European population are not available.

  1. Potential for water borne and invertebrate transmission of West Nile virus in the Great Salt Lake, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Melissa; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Dusek, Robert; Shivers, Jan; Hofmeister, Erik K.

    2017-01-01

    In November and December of 2013, a large mortality event involving 15,000 - 20,000 eared grebes (Podiceps nigricollis) occurred at the Great Salt Lake (GSL), UT. The onset of the outbreak in grebes was followed by a mortality event in > 86 bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus). During the die-off, West Nile virus (WNV) was detected by RT-PCR or viral culture in carcasses of grebes and eagles submitted to the National Wildlife Health Center. However, no mosquito activity, the primary vector of WNV, was detected by the State of Utah's WNV monitoring program. Transmission of WNV has rarely been reported during the winter in North America in the absence of known mosquito activity; however, the size of this die-off, the habitat in which it occurred, and the species involved are unique. We experimentally investigated whether WNV could survive in water with a high saline content, as found at the GSL, and whether brine shrimp, the primary food of migrating eared grebes on the GSL, could have played a role in transmission of WNV to feeding birds. We found that WNV can survive up to 72 h at 4°C in water containing 30 — 150 ppt NaCl and brine shrimp, incubated with WNV in 30 ppt NaCl, may adsorb WNV to their cuticle and, through feeding, may infect epithelial cells of their gut. Both mechanisms may have potentiated the WNV die-off in migrating eared grebes on the GSL.

  2. Potential for local adaptation in response to an anthropogenic agent of selection: effects of road deicing salts on amphibian embryonic survival and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Gareth R; French, Susannah S; Brodie, Edmund D

    2013-02-01

    The application of millions of tons of road deicing salts every winter in North America presents significant survival challenges to amphibians inhabiting roadside habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl on anuran tadpoles, less is known of effects on amphibian eggs, or any caudate life stage. In addition, little is known of the effects of MgCl2, which is now the 2nd most commonly used road deicer. Most studies have considered amphibians to be helpless victims of deicing salts, and ignore the possibility of the evolution of local adaptation to this stressor. We attempt to address these knowledge gaps and explore this evolutionary potential by examining the effects of NaCl and MgCl2 on the survival and development of eggs from different female rough-skinned newts (Taricha granulosa) from the same population. We demonstrate that both salts, at environmentally relevant concentrations, severely affect the embryonic survival and development of this amphibian, but that the effects of the salt are dependent on the identity of the mother. This female × treatment interaction results in substantial variation in tolerance to road deicing salts among newt families, providing the raw material necessary for natural selection and the evolution of local adaptation in this amphibian.

  3. Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

    1973-12-25

    A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

  4. Urinary fluoride excretion after application of fluoride varnish and use of fluoride toothpaste in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockner, Frida; Twetman, Svante; Stecksén-Blicks, Christina

    2017-01-20

    The efficacy and safety of combined use of topical fluoride products are essential issues that must be monitored. To assess urinary excretion of fluoride after application of two different dental varnishes containing 2.26% fluoride in 3- to 4-year-old children and to compare the levels with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste. Fifteen healthy children were enrolled to a randomized crossover trial that was performed in two parts: Part I with twice-daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and Part II with twice-daily brushing with a non-fluoride toothpaste. After a 1-week run-in period, 0.1 mL of the two fluoride varnishes (Duraphat and Profluorid Varnish) was topically applied in a randomized order. Baseline and experimental urine was collected during 6-h periods. The fluoride content was determined with an ion-sensitive electrode. There was a statistically significant increase in the 6-h fluoride excretion after application of both experimental varnishes, with and without parallel use of fluoride toothpaste (P fluoridated toothpaste was used, the mean fluoride excretion was 0.20 mg/6 h after application of Duraphat and 0.29 mg/6 h after application of Profluorid Varnish (P = 0.18). Topical applications of 0.1 mL of fluoride varnish significantly increased the 6-h fluoride excretion. As some individuals displayed excretion levels exceeding the optimal fluoride exposure, a restricted use of fluoride toothpaste in connection with the varnish applications would decrease fluoride exposure. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Comparison of the Biological Impacts of the Fluoride Compounds by Graphical Risk Visualization Map Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Kan; Kono, Rei; Ueno, Takaaki; Ito, Yuichi; Dote, Tomotaro; Yokoyama, Hirotaka; Kono, Koichi; Tamaki, Junko

    2015-09-01

    Various fluoride compounds are widely used in industry. The present risk assessment study was conducted using a series of inorganic binary fluorides of the type XFn, where X(n) = Na(+), K(+), Li(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Al(3+), Nd(3+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Sm(3+), Gd(3+), Y(3+), Yb(2+), and Zn(2+). The aqueous solutions of these salts were orally administrated to 16 experimental groups (one for each of the salts tested). The levels of fluoride, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase in cumulative 24-h urine samples and creatinine clearance were measured to assess possible acute renal damages. The levels of fluoride, alanine aminotransferase, and aspartate aminotransferase were also determined in serum samples to assess possible acute hepatic damages. The results reveal that sodium fluoride (NaF), potassium fluoride (KF), and zinc fluoride tetrahydrate (ZnF2 (.)4H2O) can carry the fluoride ion into the bloodstream and that it is excreted via urine more readily than the other compounds tested. These fluorides were assigned the highest risk impact factor. Most of the rare earth fluorides are insoluble in water while those groups 2 and 13 of the periodic table are slightly soluble, so that they do not have a significant negative risk. These findings suggest that the biological impact of fluoride depends on the accompanying counter ion and its solubility. The risk map obtained in the present study shows that the graphical visualization map technique employed is a valuable new tool to assess the toxicological risk of chemical compounds.

  6. An investigation of the catalytic potential of potassium cyanide and imidazolium salts for ultrasound-assisted synthesis of benzoin derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Safari; Zohre Zarnegar; Masoume Ahmadi; Susan Seyyedi

    2015-01-01

    A rapid, highly efficient and mild green synthesis of benzoin was performed using substituted benzaldehyde catalyzed by KCN and imidazolium salts in EtOH/H2O under ultrasonic activation. The products were obtained in good yields within short reaction times with N,N′-dialkylimidazolium salts, which were found to be more effective pre-catalysts at room temperature for benzoin condensation in comparison to corresponding cyanide ion in heating method. This simple method affords benzoin derivative...

  7. Renal (tissue) kallikrein-kinin system in the kidney and novel potential drugs for salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katori, Makoto; Majima, Masataka

    2014-01-01

    A large variety of antihypertensive drugs, such as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, and others, are prescribed to hypertensive patients, with good control of the condition. In addition, all individuals are generally believed to be salt sensitive and, thus, severe restriction of salt intake is recommended to all. Nevertheless, the physiological defense mechanisms in the kidney against excess salt intake have not been well clarified. The present review article demonstrated that the renal (tissue) kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) is ideally situated within the nephrons of the kidney, where it functions to inhibit the reabsorption of NaCl through the activation of bradykinin (BK)-B2 receptors localized along the epithelial cells of the collecting ducts (CD). Kinins generated in the CD are immediately inactivated by two kidney-specific kinin-inactivating enzymes (kininases), carboxypeptidase Y-like exopeptidase (CPY), and neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Our work demonstrated that ebelactone B and poststatin are selective inhibitors of these kininases. The reduced secretion of the urinary kallikrein is linked to the development of salt-sensitive hypertension, whereas potassium ions and ATP-sensitive potassium channel blockers ameliorate salt-sensitive hypertension by accelerating the release of renal kallikrein. On the other hand, ebelactone B and poststatin prolong the life of kinins in the CD after excess salt intake, thereby leading to the augmentation of natriuresis and diuresis, and the ensuing suppression of salt-sensitive hypertension. In conclusion, accelerators of the renal kallikrein release and selective renal kininase inhibitors are both novel types of antihypertensive agents that may be useful for treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  8. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after an el...... brushing with fluoride toothpaste....

  9. Fluoride resistance in Streptococcus mutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liao, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Fluoride has been used as the most effective anti-caries agent for over five decades. It functions not only on the dental hard tissues, but also as an antimicrobial agent. It is known that oral bacteria are able to develop resistance to fluoride, which may affect the effectiveness of fluoride in

  10. Fluoride caused thyroid endocrine disruption in male zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianjie, Chen; Wenjuan, Xue; Jinling, Cao; Jie, Song; Ruhui, Jia; Meiyan, Li

    2016-02-01

    Excessive fluoride in natural water ecosystem has the potential to detrimentally affect thyroid endocrine system, but little is known of such effects or underlying mechanisms in fish. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of fluoride on growth performance, thyroid histopathology, thyroid hormone levels, and gene expressions in the HPT axis in male zebrafish (Danio rerio) exposed to different determined concentrations of 0.1, 0.9, 2.0 and 4.1 M of fluoride to investigate the effects of fluoride on thyroid endocrine system and the potential toxic mechanisms caused by fluoride. The results indicated that the growth of the male zebrafish used in the experiments was significantly inhibited, the thyroid microtrastructure was changed, and the levels of T3 and T4 were disturbed in fluoride-exposed male fish. In addition, the expressional profiles of genes in HPT axis displayed alteration. The expressions of all studied genes were significantly increased in all fluoride-exposed male fish after exposure for 45 days. The transcriptional levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroglobulin (TG), sodium iodide symporter (NIS), iodothyronine I (DIO1), and thyroid hormone receptor alpha (TRα) were also elevated in all fluoride-exposed male fish after 90 days of exposure, while the inconsistent expressions were found in the mRNA of iodothyronineⅡ (DIO2), UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family a, b (UGT1ab), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroid hormone receptor beta (TRβ). These results demonstrated that fluoride could notably inhibit the growth of zebrafish, and significantly affect thyroid endocrine system by changing the microtrastructure of thyroid, altering thyroid hormone levels and endocrine-related gene expressions in male zebrafish. All above indicated that fluoride could pose a great threat to thyroid endocrine system, thus detrimentally affected the normal function of thyroid of male zebrafish. Copyright © 2015

  11. Discovery of a novel series of phenyl pyrazole inner salts based on fipronil as potential dual-target insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dingxin; Zheng, Xiaohua; Shao, Guang; Ling, Zhang; Xu, Hanhong

    2014-04-23

    A series of novel phenyl pyrazole inner salt derivatives based on fipronil were designed and synthesized in the search for dual-target insecticides. These compounds were designed to target two families of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and γ-aminobutyric acid receptors. The insecticidal activities of the new compounds against diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) were evaluated. The results of bioassays indicated that most of the inner salts showed moderate to high activities, of which the phenyl pyrazole inner salts containing quinoline had excellent biological activity. Previous structure-activity relationship studies revealed that a suitable structure of the quaternary ammonium salts was critical for the bioactivity of phenyl pyrazole inner salts, which contribute to exposing the cationic nitrogen to bind to the receptor (for instance, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors) and possibly interact with the receptor via hydrogen bonding and cooperative π-π interaction. The present work demonstrates that the insecticidal potency of phenyl pyrazole inner salts holds promise for the development new dual-target phenyl pyrazole insecticides.

  12. Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-01

    i 2N E ihhhhh1112h MEmhhhhEEEohhhhE I.’....momo 111111111’-20 LA ’Ll2. AFWL-TR-86-37 AFWL-TR- 86-37 oT C ,l C ’-’ N HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 0nI...Secwrit CkasmfcationJ HEAVY METAL FLUORIDE GLASSES 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Reisfield, Renata; and Eyal, Mrek 13. TYPE OF REPORT 113b. TIME COVERED 114...glasses containing about 50 mole% of ZrF4 [which can be replaced by HfF 4 or TIF 4 (Refs. 1-3) or heavy metal fluorides based on PbF2 and on 3d-group

  13. Relationships of human plasma fluoride and bone fluoride to age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, F.M.; Tinanoff, N.; Moutinho, M.; Anstey, M.B.; Waziri, M.H.

    1976-04-01

    There is evidence that fluoride levels in plasma correlate with the fluoride content in bones. The authors determined whether or not fluoride in plasma and bones might correlate with age. In 41 in-patients at the University Hospital, Iowa City, 36 of whom had been residing in fluoridated communities plasma fluoride was determined in the fasting stage by the fluoride ion selective electrode. The teeth of these children were compared with those of a neighboring city where the natural fluoride content in drinking water was 0.1 ppm. For the second sampling 42 months following the beginning of the program only 10 and 11 year old children - who had been 6 and 7 years old at the beginning of the experiment - were selected. Twenty-five boys and girls in each group were compared with a similar group of children as controls. After 28 months (approximately 33 rinsing with sodium fluoride solution) the DMF index in the fluoride-treated children was 18.4% less than in the controls. In the second group among 10 and 11 year old children after 42 months with 55 rinsings the difference was 35.0%. The author acknowledged that factors other than applications of sodium fluoride may have contributed to the prevention of caries in the fluoride-treated groups.

  14. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the in vitro fluoride release from fluoride varnishes under acidic conditions. Poly(methyl methacrylate) blocks (Perspex, n=3 per group) were painted with 80 ± 5 mg fluoride varnish (n=10) and placed into artificial saliva for 30 min. Then, blocks were placed into either 1% citric acid (pH 2.27) or 0.3% citric acid (pH 3.75) solutions (n=3 per solution and varnish) for 30 min with the solutions being replaced every 5 min. Saliva and acid solutions were analyzed for fluoride content. Data were analyzed using three-way ANOVA (varnish, solution, time). The three-way interaction was significant (p>0.0001). Fluoride release and release patterns varied considerably between varnishes. Fluoride release in saliva varied by a factor of more than 10 between varnishes. Some varnishes (CavityShield, Nupro, ProFluorid, Vanish) showed higher fluoride release in saliva than during the first 5 min of acid exposure, whereas other varnishes (Acclean, Enamel-Pro, MI Varnish, Vella) showed the opposite behavior. There was little difference between acidic solutions. Fluoride release from fluoride varnishes varies considerably and also depends on the dissolution medium. Bearing in mind the limitations of laboratory research, the consumption of acidic drinks after fluoride varnish application should be avoided to optimize the benefit/risk ratio.

  15. Fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode capacitive deionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wangwang; Kovalsky, Peter; He, Di; Waite, T David

    2015-11-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is an emerging water desalination technology in which pairs of porous electrodes are electrically charged to remove ionic species from water. In this work, the feasibility of fluoride and nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters by batch-mode CDI was investigated. Initially, the effects of flow rate, initial fluoride concentration, and initial coexisting NaCl concentration on fluoride removal were studied. The steady-state fluoride concentration declined as the initial fluoride concentration decreased while initial NaCl concentration remained constant. Due to the competitive electrosorption between fluoride and chloride for limited pore surface sites, a higher initial chloride concentration resulted in a higher equilibrium dissolved fluoride concentration. A simplified one-dimensional transport model for dual anions was developed and found to reliably describe the dynamic process of removal of both fluoride and chloride ions in CDI cells over a range of well-defined operating conditions. Based on the ability of the model to describe fluoride removal, it was extended to description of nitrate removal from brackish groundwaters and also found to perform well. Thus, the approach to description of ion removal, at least in batch studies, appears robust and should assist in optimization of design and operating conditions such that optimal removal of trace ionic species is achieved even when high background concentrations of salt are present.

  16. Comparative estimation of use potentialities of salt-accumulating and salt-eliminating halophytes for inclusion of NaCl contained in human mineralized urine in BLSS's mass exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Natalia; Ushakova, Sofya; Kudenko, Yurii; Griboskaya, Illiada; Shklavtsova, Ekaterina; Balnokin, Yurii; Popova, Larissa; Myasoedov, Nikolay; Gros, Jean-Bernard; Lasseur, Christophe

    Comparative potentialities of different halophytes' cultivation on a human mineralized urine containing NaCl with the aim of this salt inclusion into the intrasystem BLSS mass exchange were investigated. Two halophyte species were studied namely, salt-accumulating (Salicornia europaea) and salt-eliminating (Limonium gmelinii). During the first two vegetation weeks the plants had been grown on the Knop solution; then a daily norm of the human mineralized urine was gradually added in the experiment solutions. During vegetation the model solutions simulating the urine mineral composition were gradually added in the control solutions. The NaCl concentration in the experiment and control solutions of the first treatment was 9 g/l and that of the second treatment was 20 g/l. The mineralized human urine exposed some inhibitory action on Salicornia europaea and Limonium gmelinii plants. The experiment plants' productivity was lower in comparison with the control. As far as Limonium gmelinii appears to be a perennial plant the growth rate and productivity of this halophyte species was signifi- cantly lower in comparison with Salicornia europaea. Na content in Salicornia europaea plants was higher in comparison with sodium amount emitted by Limonium gmelinii. Consequently Salicornia europaea appears to be a more perspective halophyte for its further use in BLSS aiming at involvement of sodium chloride contained in human liquid wastes in intrasystem mass exchange.

  17. Microcratering in Polyvinylidene Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Anthony John

    Dust is defined as macroparticles as small as a few molecules up to several micrometers in diameter. In the context of space exploration, it was originally seen only as a technical obstacle to applications; dust can damage instrument surfaces, coat mating surfaces preventing proper seals, and impair or obstruct measurements. Because of the ubiquity of dust in the solar system and its role in the origin of planets and other bodies, the study of dust and related phenomena has evolved to a scientific subdiscipline which can provide us insight into the origins and evolution of our solar system. In order to facilitate this, a hypervelocity dust accelerator has been built at the University of Colorado at Boulder and is being used to probe impact phenomena, dust mitigation techniques, dust detection techniques, and more. One such dust detector is a Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) dust detector. The PVDF dust detector is very lightweight and consumes little power. Due to these properties, PVDF detectors can potentially be used on any spacecraft to gain information on the local dust environment. It is not fully understood how this PVDF dust detector signal is generated, so at present can only be used as a dust counter. In this thesis I discuss the importance of the study of dust phenomena, describe the accelerator experiment, and describe a study conducted to determine the underlying physical principles of PVDF dust detectors. This included measuring crater size scaling laws, measuring the detailed shape of craters, and applying this data to simulations of the signals being generated by PVDF detectors.

  18. Fluoride in weathered rock aquifers of southern India: Managed Aquifer Recharge for mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindha, K; Jagadeshan, G; Kalpana, L; Elango, L

    2016-05-01

    Climatic condition, geology, and geochemical processes in an area play a major role on groundwater quality. Impact of these on the fluoride content of groundwater was studied in three regions-part of Nalgonda district in Telangana, Pambar River basin, and Vaniyar River basin in Tamil Nadu, southern India, which experience semi-arid climate and are predominantly made of Precambrian rocks. High concentration of fluoride in groundwater above 4 mg/l was recorded. Human exposure dose for fluoride through groundwater was higher in Nalgonda than the other areas. With evaporation and rainfall being one of the major contributors for high fluoride apart from the weathering of fluoride rich minerals from rocks, the effect of increase in groundwater level on fluoride concentration was studied. This study reveals that groundwater in shallow environment of all three regions shows dilution effect due to rainfall recharge. Suitable managed aquifer recharge (MAR) methods can be adopted to dilute the fluoride rich groundwater in such regions which is explained with two case studies. However, in deep groundwater, increase in fluoride concentration with increase in groundwater level due to leaching of fluoride rich salts from the unsaturated zone was observed. Occurrence of fluoride above 1.5 mg/l was more in areas with deeper groundwater environment. Hence, practicing MAR in these regions will increase the fluoride content in groundwater and so physical or chemical treatment has to be adopted. This study brought out the fact that MAR cannot be practiced in all regions for dilution of ions in groundwater and that it is essential to analyze the fluctuation in groundwater level and the fluoride content before suggesting it as a suitable solution. Also, this study emphasizes that long-term monitoring of these factors is an important criterion for choosing the recharge areas.

  19. Small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, James W; Plummer, Mark S; Blount, Kenneth F; Ames, Tyler D; Breaker, Ronald R

    2015-04-23

    Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here, we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluoride Rinses, Gels and Foams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Twetman, Svante; Keller, Mette K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this conference paper was to systematically review the quality of evidence and summarize the findings of clinical trials published after 2002 using fluoride mouth rinses, fluoride gels or foams for the prevention of dental caries. METHODS: Relevant papers were selected after...... an electronic search for literature published in English between 2003 and 2014. The included papers were assessed for their risk of bias and the results were narratively synthesized due to study heterogeneity. The quality of evidence was expressed according to GRADE. RESULTS: A total of 19 papers were included...... (6 on fluoride mouth rinse, 10 on fluoride gel and 3 on fluoride foam); 6 had a low risk of bias while 2 had a moderate risk. All fluoride measures appeared to be beneficial in preventing crown caries and reversing root caries, but the quality of evidence was graded as low for fluoride mouth rinse...

  1. Small Molecule Fluoride Toxicity Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson1, James W.; Plummer, Mark S.; Blount, Kenneth F.; Ames, Tyler D.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Fluoride is a ubiquitous anion that inhibits a wide variety of metabolic processes. Here we report the identification of a series of compounds that enhance fluoride toxicity in Escherichia coli and Streptococcus mutans. These molecules were isolated by using a high-throughput screen (HTS) for compounds that increase intracellular fluoride levels as determined via a fluoride riboswitch-reporter fusion construct. A series of derivatives were synthesized to examine structure-activity relationships, leading to the identification of compounds with improved activity. Thus, we demonstrate that small molecule fluoride toxicity agonists can be identified by HTS from existing chemical libraries by exploiting a natural fluoride riboswitch. In addition, our findings suggest that some molecules might be further optimized to function as binary antibacterial agents when combined with fluoride. PMID:25910244

  2. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2004-10-28

    The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification.

  3. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    and strategies is noteworthy. This updated version of ‘Fluoride and Oral Health’ has adopted an evidence-based approach to its commentary on the different fl uoride vehicles and strategies and also to its recommendations. In this regard, full account is taken of the many recent systematic reviews published...

  4. How Does Fluoride Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading 7 Videos: Kids Talk About ... There's fluoride in your toothpaste and even in your water. But how does it work to keep teeth ...

  5. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Jacinto-Alemán

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods. DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results. Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96 and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97. Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF. Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F. Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 µg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 µg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions. Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found.

  6. Fluoride Consumption and Its Impact on Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Farfán, María Dolores; Hernández-Guerrero, Juan Carlos; Juárez-López, Lilia Adriana; Jacinto-Alemán, Luis Fernando; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate caries and dental fluorosis among Mexican preschoolers and school-aged children in a non-endemic zone for fluorosis and to measure its biological indicators. Methods DMFT, DMFS, dmft, dmfs, and CDI indexes were applied. Fluoride urinary excretion and fluoride concentrations in home water, table salt, bottled water, bottled drinks, and toothpaste were determined. Results Schoolchildren presented fluorosis (CDI = 0.96) and dental caries (DMFT = 2.64 and DMFS = 3.97). Preschoolers presented dmft = 4.85 and dmfs = 8.80. DMFT and DMFS were lower in children with mild to moderate dental fluorosis (DF). Variable fluoride concentrations were found in the analyzed products (home water = 0.18–0.44 ppm F, table salt = 0–485 ppm F, bottled water = 0.18–0.47 ppm F, juices = 0.08–1.42 ppm F, nectars = 0.07–1.30 ppm F, bottled drinks = 0.10–1.70 ppm F, toothpaste = 0–2,053 ppm F). Mean daily fluoride excretion was 422 ± 176 μg/24 h for schoolchildren and 367 ± 150 μg/24 h for preschoolers. Conclusions Data from our study show that, despite values of excretion within an optimal fluoride intake range, the prevalence of caries was significant in both groups, and 60% of the 11- to 12-year-old children presented with dental fluorosis. In addition, variable fluoride concentrations in products frequently consumed by children were found. PMID:21318021

  7. Removal of fluoride ion by bone char produced from animal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Naohito; Ogata, Fumihiko; Tominaga, Hisato; Yamaguchi, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Bone char (BC) was prepared by carbonizing four types of animal biomass, and the adsorption of fluoride ions and elution of phosphate ions were investigated. It was found that the BC yield decreased as carbonization temperature increased, and that carbonization temperature had no significant effect on surface pH, base or acid consumptions. Fluoride ion adsorption was increased in BC produced at a low carbonization temperature. The adsorption mechanism of fluoride ion on BCs might be monolayer adsorption. BC can potentially be used to remove fluoride ions in drinking water. However, it was found that phosphate ions from BC are eluted due to adsorption of fluoride ions, and that ingestion of large amounts of phosphate ions inhibits reabsorption of calcium in the human body. Thus there is a need to study the elution behavior of phosphate ions. The adsorption mechanisms of fluoride ions onto BC would be a physical adsorption onto BC and phosphate ion in BC is exchanged to fluoride ion.

  8. An investigation of the catalytic potential of potassium cyanide and imidazolium salts for ultrasound-assisted synthesis of benzoin derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Safari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, highly efficient and mild green synthesis of benzoin was performed using substituted benzaldehyde catalyzed by KCN and imidazolium salts in EtOH/H2O under ultrasonic activation. The products were obtained in good yields within short reaction times with N,N′-dialkylimidazolium salts, which were found to be more effective pre-catalysts at room temperature for benzoin condensation in comparison to corresponding cyanide ion in heating method. This simple method affords benzoin derivatives at room temperature in short reaction times with high yield and purity.

  9. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  10. Revised results for geomechanical testing of MRIG-9 core for the potential SPR siting at the Richton Salt Dome.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-02-01

    This report is a revision of SAND2009-0852. SAND2009-0852 was revised because it was discovered that a gage used in the original testing was mis-calibrated. Following the recalibration, all affected raw data were recalculated and re-presented. Most revised data is similar to, but slightly different than, the original data. Following the data re-analysis, none of the inferences or conclusions about the data or site relative to the SAND2009-0852 data have been changed. A laboratory testing program was developed to examine the mechanical behavior of salt from the Richton salt dome. The resulting information is intended for use in design and evaluation of a proposed Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facility in that dome. Core obtained from the drill hole MRIG-9 was obtained from the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. Mechanical properties testing included: (1) acoustic velocity wave measurements; (2) indirect tensile strength tests; (3) unconfined compressive strength tests; (4) ambient temperature quasi-static triaxial compression tests to evaluate dilational stress states at confining pressures of 725, 1450, 2175, and 2900 psi; and (5) confined triaxial creep experiments to evaluate the time-dependent behavior of the salt at axial stress differences of 4000 psi, 3500 psi, 3000 psi, 2175 psi and 2000 psi at 55 C and 4000 psi at 35 C, all at a constant confining pressure of 4000 psi. All comments, inferences, discussions of the Richton characterization and analysis are caveated by the small number of tests. Additional core and testing from a deeper well located at the proposed site is planned. The Richton rock salt is generally inhomogeneous as expressed by the density and velocity measurements with depth. In fact, we treated the salt as two populations, one clean and relatively pure (> 98% halite), the other salt with abundant (at times) anhydrite. The density has been related to the insoluble content. The limited mechanical testing completed has allowed us to

  11. Health Effects Associated with Water Fluoridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Virginia L.

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is presented concerning fluoridation of water supplies. Correlation between fluoride in drinking water and improved dental health is reviewed. Relationship is expressed between fluoridation and reduced tooth decay. Use of fluoride in treating skeletal disorders is discussed. Author advocates fluoridating water supplies. (SA)

  12. Reliable Quantification of the Potential for Equations Based on Spot Urine Samples to Estimate Population Salt Intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Crino, Michelle; Wu, Jason Hy

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Methods based on spot urine samples (a single sample at one time-point) have been identified as a possible alternative approach to 24-hour urine samples for determining mean population salt intake. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to identify a reliable method for estimating mean p...

  13. Actual and potential salt-related soil degradation in an irrigated rice scheme in the Sahelian zone of Mauritania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asten, van P.J.A.; Barbi'ro, L.; Wopereis, M.C.S.; Maeght, J.L.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Salt-related soil degradation due to irrigation activities is considered a major threat to the sustainability of rice cropping under semi-arid conditions in West Africa. Rice productivity problems related to soil salinity, alkalinity and topographic position were observed in an irrigated rice scheme

  14. Regional applicability and potential of salt-gradient solar ponds in the United States. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, E. I. H.

    1982-01-01

    Findings of a survey concerning salt ponds are summarized. The residential, commercial, and institutional buildings sector is discussed. The industrial process heat sector is considered. The agricultural process heat sector is examined. The electrical power sector is reviewed. The desalinization sector is considered.

  15. Minimizing the fissile inventory of the molten salt fast reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Heuer, D.; Allibert, M.; Doligez, X.; Ghetta, V.

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Molten salt reactors in the configurations presented here, called Molten Salt Fast Reactors (MSFR), have been selected for further studies by the Generation IV International Forum. These reactors may be operated in simplified and safe conditions in the Th/233U fuel cycle with fluoride salts. We present here the concept, before focusing on a possible optimization in term of minimization of the initial fissile inventory. Our studies demonstrate that an inventory of 233U ...

  16. Role of Spirulina in mitigating hemato-toxicity in Swiss albino mice exposed to aluminum and aluminum fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shweta; Sharma, K P; Sharma, Subhasini

    2016-12-01

    Aluminum is ingested through foods, water, air, and even drugs. Its intake is potentiated further through foods and tea prepared in aluminum utensils and Al salt added in the drinking water for removal of suspended impurities and also fluoride in the affected areas. The ameliorating role of a blue green alga Spirulina is well documented to various pollutants in the animal models. We, therefore, examined its protective role (230 mg/kg body weight) on the hematology of male Swiss albino mice treated with aluminum (sub-acute = 78.4 mg/kg body weight for 7 days, sub-chronic = 7.8 mg/kg body weight for 90 days) and aluminum fluoride (sub-acute = 103 mg/kg body weight, sub-chronic = 21 mg/kg body weight), along with their recovery after 90 days of sub-chronic exposure. This study revealed significant reduction in the values of RBC (5-18 %), Hb (15-17 %), PCV (8-14 %), and platelets (26-36 %), and increase in WBC (54-124 %) in the treated mice, particularly after sub-acute exposure. Aluminum fluoride was comparatively more toxic than aluminum. Further, Spirulina supplement not only alleviated toxicity of test chemicals in Swiss albino mice but also led to their better recovery after withdrawal.

  17. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of molten salt fast reactor fuel from first-principles

    OpenAIRE

    Gheribi, Aimen; Corradini, D; Dewan, L. (Lawrence); Chartrand, P; Simon, C.; Madden, Paul,; M. Salanne

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Molten fluorides are known to show favorable thermophysical properties which make them good candidate coolants for nuclear fission reactors. Here we investigate the special case of mixtures of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride, which act both as coolant and fuel in the molten salt fast reactor concept. By using ab initio parameterized polarizable force fields, we show that it is possible to calculate the whole set of properties (density, thermal expansion, heat cap...

  18. Imidazolium salts with antifungal potential for the control of head blight of wheat caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, A D; Del Ponte, E M; Dalbem, A M; Dalla-Lana, D; Bündchen, C; Donato, R K; Schrekker, H S; Fuentefria, A M

    2016-08-01

    Evaluate the in vitro effect of imidazolium salts (IMS) on the conidia germination and mycelial growth of Fusarium graminearum and their in vivo efficacy for suppressing the symptoms of the disease and infection of kernels in wheat plants. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of three IMS (C16 MImCl, C16 MImMeS and C16 MImNTf2 ) were determined for four F. graminearum isolates using serial broth dilution method. The MICs found for all IMS were either 3·12 or 6·25 μg ml(-1) across the isolates, with the former as the most frequent. In the mycelial growth assay on potato dextrose agar media, only the C16 MImCl among the IMS reduced 50% of mycelial growth of one isolate at an estimated concentration of 0·32 mg ml(-1) . The time-kill curves showed a strong fungicidal effect starting 1 h after incubation at a concentration of 12·5 μg ml(-1) , representing a fourfold increase in the most frequent MIC. The C16 MImCl sprayed onto the spikes of potted wheat plants during the flowering stage reduced disease intensity at levels comparable to the commercial fungicide when applied preventatively (1 h prior to fungal inoculation), rather than curatively, and at the higher dosage (2 mg ml(-1) ) rather than lower dosage (0·5 mg ml(-1) ). C16 MImCl proved to be a potent inhibitor of F. graminearum growth and provided good levels of control of the disease at levels comparable to a commercial fungicide, in wheat plants treated prior to fungal infection during flowering stages. This study suggests the potential of using IMS as alternative to the hazardous standard fungicides in the management of Fusarium head blight of wheat. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Fluoride removal from brackish groundwater by direct contact membrane distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, D Y; Wang, J; Wang, B Q; Luan, Z K; Sun, X C; Ren, X J

    2010-01-01

    The direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) applied for fluoride removal from brackish groundwater is presented. The self-prepared polyvinylidene fluoride membrane exhibited high rejection of inorganic salt solutes and a maximum permeate flux 35.6 kgm(-2) h(-1) was obtained. The feed concentration had no marked impact on the permeate flux and the rejection of fluoride. The precipitation of CaCO3 would clog the hollow fiber inlets and foul the membrane surface with the increase of concentration factor when natural groundwater was used directly as the feed, which resulted in a rapid decline of the module efficiency. This phenomenon was diminished by acidification of the feed. The experimental results showed that the permeate flux and the quality of obtained distillate kept stable before concentration factor reached 5.0 with the acidified groundwater as feed. The membrane module efficiency began to decline gradually when the feed continued to be concentrated, which can be mainly attributed to the formation of CaF2 deposits on the membrane surface. Finally, a 300 h continuous fluoride removal experiment on acidified groundwater was carried out with concentration factor at 4.0, the permeate flux kept stable and the permeate fluoride was not detected.

  20. Industrial fluoride pollution: chronic fluoride poisoning in Cornwall Island cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krook, L.; Maylin, G.A.

    1979-04-01

    An aluminum plant on the south bank of the St. Lawrence River, southwest of Cornwall Island, Ontario, Canada, has emitted 0.816 metric tons of fluoride daily since 1973. Considerably higher amounts were emitted from 1959 to 1973. The plant was designated as the major source of fluoride emissions impacting on Cornwall Island. Cattle located on this island showed signs of chronic fluoride poisoning. This poisoning was manifested clinically by stunted growth and dental fluorosis to a degree of severe interference with drinking and mastication. This Cornwall Island herds study indicates that the established tolerance level of fluoride for performance of dairy and beef cattle is not valid since the tolerance level was set based on experiments with healthy calves which were exposed to dietary fluoride from 3 to 4 months of age and not on cattle which were chronically exposed to fluoride from conception to death. 56 references.

  1. Studies on fluoride complexing of hexavalent actinides using a fluoride ion selective electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, R.M.; Chaudhuri, N.K.; Rizvi, G.H.; Patil, S.K.

    1985-08-01

    Complex formation between actinide(VI) and fluoride ions in aqueous solutions was investigated using a fluoride ion selective electrode (F-ISE). As fairly high acidity used to suppress hydrolysis of the actinide(VI) ions, significant liquid junction potentials (Esub(j)) existed in the system. An iterative procedure was developed for computing free hydrogen ion concentration (Hsup(+)) as it could not be measured directly, using data obtained with F-ISE. Esub(j) values were estimated from known (Hsup(+)) and the stability constants of fluoride complexes of actinide(VI) ions were calculated following King and Gallagher's method using a computer program. The stability constants were found to follow the order U(VI) > Np(VI) > Pu(VI). (author). 18 refs.; 3 figs.; 9 tables.

  2. Determination of thermodynamic potentials and the aggregation number for micelles with the mass-action model by isothermal titration calorimetry: A case study on bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Westh, Peter; Holm, René

    2015-09-01

    The aggregation number (n), thermodynamic potentials (ΔG, ΔH, ΔS) and critical micelle concentration (CMC) for 6 natural bile salts were determined on the basis of both original and previously published isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) data. Different procedures to estimate parameters of micelles with ITC were compared to a mass-action model (MAM) of reaction type: n⋅S⇌Mn. This analysis can provide guidelines for future ITC studies of systems behaving in accordance with this model such as micelles and proteins that undergo self-association to oligomers. Micelles with small aggregation numbers, as those of bile salts, are interesting because such small aggregates cannot be characterized as a separate macroscopic phase and the widely applied pseudo-phase model (PPM) is inaccurate. In the present work it was demonstrated that the aggregation number of micelles was constant at low concentrations enabling determination of the thermodynamic potentials by the MAM. A correlation between the aggregation number and the heat capacity was found, which implies that the dehydrated surface area of bile salts increases with the aggregation number. This is in accordance with Tanford's principles of opposing forces where neighbouring molecules in the aggregate are better able to shield from the surrounding hydrophilic environment when the aggregation number increases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spatial distribution mapping of drinking water fluoride levels in Karnataka, India: fluoride-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Chitta R; Shahnawaz, Khijmatgar; Kumari, Divya; Chowdhury, Avidyuti; Bedi, Raman; Lynch, Edward; Harding, Stewart; Grootveld, Martin

    2016-11-01

    (1) To estimate the concentrations of fluoride in drinking water throughout different zones and districts of the state of Karnataka. (2) To investigate the variation of fluoride concentration in drinking water from different sources, and its relationships to daily temperature and rainfall status in the regional districts. (3) To develop an updated fluoride concentration intensity map of the state of Karnataka, and to evaluate these data in the context of fluoride-related health effects such as fluorosis and their prevalence. Aqueous standard solutions of 10, 100 and 1,000 ppm fluoride (F(-)) were prepared with analytical grade Na(+)/F(-) and a buffer; TISAB II was incorporated in both calibration standard and analysis solutions in order to remove the potentially interfering effects of trace metal ions. This analysis was performed using an ion-selective electrode (ISE), and mean determination readings for n = 5 samples collected at each Karnataka water source were recorded. The F(-) concentration in drinking water in Karnataka state was found to vary substantially, with the highest mean values recorded being in the north-eastern zone (1.61 ppm), and the lowest in the south-western one (only 0.41 ppm). Analysis of variance (ANOVA) demonstrated that there were very highly significant 'between-zone' and 'between-districts-within-zones' sources of variation (p water source F(-) levels within this state. The southern part of Karnataka has low levels of F(-) in its drinking water, and may require fluoridation treatment in order to mitigate for dental caries and further ailments related to fluoride deficiency. However, districts within the north-eastern region have contrastingly high levels of fluoride, an observation which has been linked to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This highlights a major requirement for interventional actions in order to ensure maintenance of the recommended range of fluoride concentrations (0.8-1.5 ppm) in Karnataka's drinking water

  4. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  5. Engineering Evaluation of Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiement for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlberg, Jon A.; Roberts, Kenneth T.; Kollie, Thomas G.; Little, Leslie E.; Brady, Sherman D.

    2009-09-30

    This evaluation was performed by Pro2Serve in accordance with the Technical Specification for an Engineering Evaluation of the Proposed Alternative Salt Transfer Method for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (BJC 2009b). The evaluators reviewed the Engineering Evaluation Work Plan for Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Residual Salt Removal, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (DOE 2008). The Work Plan (DOE 2008) involves installing a salt transfer probe and new drain line into the Fuel Drain Tanks and Fuel Flush Tank and connecting them to the new salt transfer line at the drain tank cell shield. The probe is to be inserted through the tank ball valve and the molten salt to the bottom of the tank. The tank would then be pressurized through the Reactive Gas Removal System to force the salt into the salt canisters. The Evaluation Team reviewed the work plan, interviewed site personnel, reviewed numerous documents on the Molten Salt Reactor (Sects. 7 and 8), and inspected the probes planned to be used for the transfer. Based on several concerns identified during this review, the team recommends not proceeding with the salt transfer via the proposed alternate salt transfer method. The major concerns identified during this evaluation are: (1) Structural integrity of the tanks - The main concern is with the corrosion that occurred during the fluorination phase of the uranium removal process. This may also apply to the salt transfer line for the Fuel Flush Tank. Corrosion Associated with Fluorination in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Fluoride Volatility Process (Litman 1961) shows that this problem is significant. (2) Continued generation of Fluorine - Although the generation of Fluorine will be at a lower rate than experienced before the uranium removal, it will continue to be generated. This needs to be taken into consideration regardless of what actions are taken with the salt. (3) More than one phase of material

  6. Mineralogy, petrology and bromine geochemistry of selected samples of the Salado Salt, Lea and Eddy Counties, New Mexico: a potential horizon for the disposal of radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, D.W.

    1975-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the mineralogy, petrology and dehydration characteristics of the Salado Salt near Carlsbad, New Mexico (a potential radioactive waste repository). Bedded evaporite deposits were selected by the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council because of their general lack of water, self-healing property when fractured, thermal conductivity and stopping power of high energy radiation. The Salado Salt was chosen using these guidelines. It is a bedded evaporite sequence (about two-thousand feet thick) of late Permian age located in southeastern New Mexico and west Texas. The Salado is composed primarily of halite with lesser amounts of anhydrite, polyhalite and with a zone of economic potash minerals. The results of this study show that: (1) halite is the dominant mineral in all but a few samples with anhydrite being next most abundant in the lower portions of the Salado Salt and polyhalite being second most abundant in the upper part of the unit, (2) thin section analyses reveal several shallow-water features such as hopper crystals, halite embedded in clay and nodular anhydrite, (3) polyhalite commonly occurs as a secondary mineral at the expense of anhydrite, (4) both anhydrite and polyhalite exist in various habits and associations, (5) spectroscopic analyses reveal low bromine concentrations for the Salado (and the Hutchinson Salt, Lyons, Kansas), suggesting that both are second generation deposits, (6) dehydration studies show the Salado to lose 0.0 to 3.5 percent water upon heating to 102 +- 5/sup 0/C. Most of the higher weight losses (greater than 0.5 percent) can be related to zones rich in clays and/or polyhalite. The Salado is a potential site for a radwaste repository if clay- and polyhalite-rich zones are avoided.

  7. Salt Potentiates Methylamine Counteraction System to Offset the Deleterious Effects of Urea on Protein Stability and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Laishram R.; Warepam, Marina; Ahmad, Faizan; Dar, Tanveer Ali

    2015-01-01

    Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds) believed to offset the urea’s harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea’s effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction. PMID:25793733

  8. Salt potentiates methylamine counteraction system to offset the deleterious effects of urea on protein stability and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safikur Rahman

    Full Text Available Cellular methylamines are osmolytes (low molecular weight organic compounds believed to offset the urea's harmful effects on the stability and function of proteins in mammalian kidney and marine invertebrates. Although urea and methylamines are found at 2:1 molar ratio in tissues, their opposing effects on protein structure and function have been questioned on several grounds including failure to counteraction or partial counteraction. Here we investigated the possible involvement of cellular salt, NaCl, in urea-methylamine counteraction on protein stability and function. We found that NaCl mediates methylamine counteracting system from no or partial counteraction to complete counteraction of urea's effect on protein stability and function. These conclusions were drawn from the systematic thermodynamic stability and functional activity measurements of lysozyme and RNase-A. Our results revealed that salts might be involved in protein interaction with charged osmolytes and hence in the urea-methylamine counteraction.

  9. Fluoride ion release and solubility of fluoride enriched interim cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, Israel; Block, Jonathan; Melamed, Guy; Dolev, Eran; Matalon, Shlomo; Ormianer, Zeev

    2014-08-01

    Interim and definitive restorations cemented with interim cements for a prolonged interval are susceptible to bacterial infiltration and caries formation. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term fluoride release and solubility of aged ZnO-based interim cements enriched separately with 0.4% NaF and SnF2. Four different brands of cements (Tempbond, Tempbond NE, Procem, and Freegenol) were tested for fluoride release and solubility. For every test, 6 disk specimens of each cement with NaF and SnF2, and 6 with no fluoride enrichment (control) were fabricated, for a total of 72 specimens. The disks were incubated in deionized water. Fluoride ion release was recorded at 1, 7, 14, 21, 63, 91, and 182 days. Solubility was calculated as weight percent after 90 days of incubation. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance with repeated measures and the Tukey honestly significant difference post hoc test (Pfluorides released fluoride ions for at least 182 days. Cements mixed with NaF released more fluoride ions than those mixed with SnF2 (P.97), indicating a diffusion-controlled fluoride release. Cement and fluoride types were the main affecting factors in fluoride ion release. The addition of fluorides slightly increased the solubility of the cements. Given their long-term sustained and diffusive controlled release, these fluorides, particularly NaF when mixed with ZnO-based interim cements, may be useful for caries prevention under provisionally cemented restorations. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. High Efficiency Nuclear Power Plants Using Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Rarick, Richard A.; Rangarajan, Rajmohan

    2009-01-01

    An overall system analysis approach is used to propose potential conceptual designs of advanced terrestrial nuclear power plants based on Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) experience and utilizing Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) thermal-to-electric energy conversion technology. In particular conceptual designs for an advanced 1 GWe power plant with turbine reheat and compressor intercooling at a 950 K turbine inlet temperature (TIT), as well as near term 100 MWe demonstration plants with TITs of 950 and 1200 K are presented. Power plant performance data were obtained for TITs ranging from 650 to 1300 K by use of a Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems code which considered the interaction between major sub-systems, including the Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR), heat source and heat sink heat exchangers, turbo-generator machinery, and an electric power generation and transmission system. Optional off-shore submarine installation of the power plant is a major consideration.

  11. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  12. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF3), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  13. The potential of incorporation of binary salts and ionic liquid in P(VP-co-VAc) gel polymer electrolyte in electrochemical and photovoltaic performances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Ng Hon; Ramesh, S.; Ramesh, K.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) has been assembled with poly(1-vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (P(VP-co-VAc)) gel polymer electrolytes (GPEs) which have been incorporated with binary salt and an ionic liquid. The potential of this combination was studied and reported. The binary salt system GPEs was having ionic conductivity and power conversion efficiency (PCE) that could reach up to 1.90 × 10‑3 S cm‑1 and 5.53%, respectively. Interestingly, upon the addition of the ionic liquid, MPII into the binary salt system the ionic conductivity and PCE had risen steadily up to 4.09 × 10‑3 S cm‑1 and 5.94%, respectively. In order to know more about this phenomenon, the electrochemical impedance studies (EIS) of the GPE samples have been done and reported. Fourier transform infrared studies (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) have also been studied to understand more on the structural and thermal properties of the GPEs. The Nyquist plot and Bodes plot studies have been done in order to understand the electrochemical properties of the GPE based DSSCs and Tafel polarization studies were done to determine the electrocatalytic activity of the GPE samples.

  14. Fluoride removal by Al, Ti, and Fe hydroxides and coexisting ion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Brutus, Timothy E; Cheng, Jiemin; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2017-07-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate fluoride removal by Al, Fe, and Ti-based coagulants and adsorbents, as well as the effects of coexisting ions and formation of aluminum-fluoride complexes on fluoride removal by co-precipitation with alum (Al2(SO4)3·18H2O). Aluminum sulfate was more efficient than the other coagulants for fluoride removal in the pH range between 6 and 8. Nano-crystalline TiO2 was more effective for fluoride removal than Al and Fe hydroxides in a pH range of 3-5. Coexisting anions in water decreased the removal of fluoride in the order: phosphate (2.5mg/L)>arsenate (0.1mg/L)>bicarbonate (200mg/L)>sulfate (100mg/L)=nitrate (100mg/L)>silicate (10mg/L) at a pH of 6.0. The effect of silicate became more significant at pH>7.0. Calcium and magnesium improved the removal of fluoride. Zeta-potential measurements determined that the adsorption of fluoride shifted the PZC of Al(OH)3 precipitates from 8.9 to 8.4, indicating the chemical adsorption of fluoride at the surface. The presence of fluoride in solution significantly increased the soluble aluminum concentration at pHfluoride during co-precipitation with aluminum sulfate. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Materials and Methods: Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva ® , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Results: The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva ® showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Interpretation and Conclusion: Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  16. The effect of water purification systems on fluoride content of drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, A R; Raju, O S; Kurthukoti, A J; Vishwas, T D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of different water purification systems on the fluoride content of drinking water and to compare the efficacy of these water purification systems in reducing the fluoride content. Five different water purification systems were tested in this study. They were reverse osmosis, distillation, activated carbon, Reviva , and candle filter. The water samples in the study were of two types, viz, borewell water and tap water, these being commonly used by the people of Davangere City, Karnataka. The samples were collected before and after purification, and fluoride analysis was done using fluoride ion-specific electrode. The results showed that the systems based on reverse osmosis, viz, reverse osmosis system and Reviva showed maximum reduction in fluoride levels, the former proving to be more effective than the latter; followed by distillation and the activated carbon system, with the least reduction being brought about by candle filter. The amount of fluoride removed by the purification system varied between the system and from one source of water to the other. Considering the beneficial effects of fluoride on caries prevention; when drinking water is subjected to water purification systems that reduce fluoride significantly below the optimal level, fluoride supplementation may be necessary. The efficacy of systems based on reverse osmosis in reducing the fluoride content of water indicates their potential for use as defluoridation devices.

  17. Sustainable approach for recycling waste lamb and chicken bones for fluoride removal from water followed by reusing fluoride-bearing waste in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zainab Z; AbdelKareem, Hala N

    2015-11-01

    Sustainable management of waste materials is an attractive approach for modern societies. In this study, recycling of raw waste lamb and chicken bones for defluoridation of water has been estimated. The effects of several experimental parameters including contact time, pH, bone dose, fluoride initial concentration, bone grains size, agitation rate, and the effect of co-existing anions in actual samples of wastewater were studied for fluoride removal from aqueous solutions. Results indicated excellent fluoride removal efficiency up to 99.4% and 99.8% using lamb and chicken bones, respectively at fluoride initial concentration of 10 mg F/L and 120 min contact time. Maximum fluoride uptake was obtained at neutral pH range 6-7. Fluoride removal kinetic was well described by the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models could fit the experimental data well with correlation coefficient values >0.99 suggesting favorable conditions of the process. Furthermore, for complete sustainable management of waste bones, the resulted fluoride-bearing sludge was reused in concrete mixes to partially replace sand. Tests of the mechanical properties of fluoride sludge-modified concrete mixes indicated a potential environmentally friendly approach to dispose fluoride sludge in concrete and simultaneously enhance concrete properties.

  18. Part II: crystalline fluorapatite-coated hydroxyapatite implant material: a dog study with histologic comparison of osteogenesis seen with FA-coated HA grafting material versus HA controls: potential bacteriostatic effect of fluoridated HA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordquist, William D; Okudera, Hajima; Kitamura, Yutaka; Kimoto, Kazunari; Okudera, Toshimitsu; Krutchkoff, David J

    2011-01-01

    Success of osteogenesis in bone graft procedures can be enhanced by inhibiting oral bacterial infections through the use of prophylactic bacteriostatic fluoride within the grafting environment. Ideally, the fluoride ion should be chemically sequestered and thus unavailable unless needed at times during the process of early infection. As fluoride within fluorapatite is tightly bound at neutral pH and becomes available only during acidic conditions, fluorapatite is an ideal store for the fluoride ion which becomes released for bacteriostasis only during an acidic environment found with incipient bacterial infection. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the histologic properties of new bone formed surrounding fluorapatite (FA)-coated microcrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) grafting material with comparable bone formed following the use of control HA material (OsteoGen, Impladent, Ltd, Holliswood, NY). The results of histologic analysis within dog studies here showed no detectable difference in new bone following therapeutic grafting procedures using each of the above 2 mineral coatings.

  19. Development of an empirical model for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater by electrocoagulation process

    KAUST Repository

    Drouiche, Nadjib

    2011-05-01

    Electrocoagulation experiments were conducted with bipolar aluminium electrodes to determine the optimum conditions for the fluoride removal from synthetic photovoltaic wastewater. A high fluoride concentration in community water supplies can cause fluorosis which has a detrimental effect on human health in particular on teeth and bones. A full 23 factorial design of experiments was used to obtain the best conditions of fluoride removal from water solutions. The three factors considered were initial fluoride concentration, applied potential, and supporting electrolyte dosage. Two levels for each factor were used; supporting electrolyte (0 and 100), applied potential (10 and 30 V), and initial fluoride concentration (20 and 25 mg/L). Results showed that the optimum conditions for fluoride removal from photovoltaic wastewater containing an initial fluoride concentration of 20 mg/L were a supporting electrolyte dose of 100 mg/L and an applied potential of 30 V. These gave a residual fluoride concentration of 8.6 mg/L which was below the standard discharge limit. A mathematical equation showing the relation between residual fluoride concentration and the effective variables was also developed. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of ion binding and ion specific potentials on the double layer pressure between charged bilayers at low salt concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostrom, M.; Lima, E. R. A.; Tavares, F. W.; Ninham, B. W.

    2008-04-01

    Measurements of surface forces between double-chained cationic bilayers adsorbed onto molecularly smooth mica surfaces across different millimolar salt solutions have revealed a large degree of ion specificity [Pashley et al., J. Phys. Chem. 90, 1637 (1986)]. This has been interpreted in terms of highly specific anion binding to the adsorbed bilayers. We show here that inclusion in the double layer theory of nonspecific ion binding and ion specific nonelectrostatic potentials acting between ions and the two surfaces can account for the phenomenon. It also gives the right Hofmeister series for the double layer pressure.

  1. RESOURCE ASSESSMENT OF THE IN-PLACE AND POTENTIALLY RECOVERABLE DEEP NATURAL GAS RESOURCE OF THE ONSHORE INTERIOR SALT BASINS, NORTH CENTRAL AND NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-16

    The University of Alabama and Louisiana State University have undertaken a cooperative 3-year, advanced subsurface methodology resource assessment project, involving petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling, to facilitate exploration for a potential major source of natural gas that is deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas. The project is designed to assist in the formulation of advanced exploration strategies for funding and maximizing the recovery from deep natural gas domestic resources at reduced costs and risks and with minimum impact. The results of the project should serve to enhance exploration efforts by domestic companies in their search for new petroleum resources, especially those deeply buried (below 15,000 feet) natural gas resources, and should support the domestic industry's endeavor to provide an increase in reliable and affordable supplies of fossil fuels. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and petroleum system identification. The research focus for the first nine (9) months of Year 1 is on data compilation and for the remainder of the year the emphasis is on petroleum system identification. The objectives of the study are: to perform resource assessment of the in-place deep (>15,000 ft) natural gas resource of the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling and to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the in-place deep gas resource that is potentially recoverable and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential to recover commercial quantities of the deep gas resource. The project objectives will be achieved through a 3-year effort. First, emphasis is on petroleum system identification and characterization in the

  2. Performance of novel hydroxyapatite nanowires in treatment of fluoride contaminated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Junyong; Zhang, Kaisheng [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Wu, Shibiao [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Cai, Xingguo; Chen, Kai; Li, Yulian [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Sun, Bai; Jia, Yong; Meng, Fanli; Jin, Zhen [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Kong, Lingtao, E-mail: ltkong@iim.ac.cn [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Jinhuai [Nano-Materials and Environmental Detection Laboratory, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were developed for effective defluoridation. • High fluoride adsorption capacity, 40.65 mg/g at neutral pH. • The HAP nanowire membrane efficiently removed fluoride by dynamic adsorption. • The membrane could remove more than 98% fluoride, and filtered water amount reached 350 L/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: Novel ultralong hydroxyapatite (HAP) nanowires were successfully prepared for fluoride removal for the first time. The fluoride adsorption on the HAP nanowires was studied on a batch mode. The results revealed that the adsorption data could be well described by the Freundlich model, and the adsorption kinetic followed the pseudo-second-order model. The maximum of adsorption capacity was 40.65 mg/g at pH 7.0 when the fluoride concentration is 200 mg/L. The thermodynamic parameters suggested that the adsorption of fluoride was a spontaneous endothermic process. The FT-IR, XPS and Zeta potential analysis revealed that both anion exchange and electrostatic interactions were involved in the adsorption of fluoride. Furthermore, the HAP nanowires were made into HAP membrane through a simple process of suction filtration. Membrane filtration experiments revealed that the fluoride removal capabilities depended on the membrane thickness, flow rate and initial concentration of fluoride. The as-prepared membrane could remove fluoride efficiently through continues filtration. The filtered water amount could reach 350, 192, and 64 L/m{sup 2} when the fluoride concentrations were 4, 5 and 8 ppm, respectively, using the HAP membrane with only 150 μm thickness. The as-synthesized ultralong HAP nanowires were thus demonstrated to be very effective and biocompatible adsorbents for fluoride removal from contaminated water.

  3. Effect of impurities in industrial salts on aluminum scrap melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, J.; Sahai, Y. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Revet, A. [Kalium Canada, ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum scrap such as Used Beverage Containers (UBC) is melted under a protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of molten droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. Generally, the salt compositions for aluminum scrap recycling are based on equimolar mixtures of NaCl and KCl. A small amount of fluoride is also added in the salt. In the past, laboratory research at universities and industrial laboratories have been limited to pure salts. However, the industrial salts have impurities such as sulfates and other insoluble materials. These impurities have a pronounced effect on the efficiency of the scrap remelting process. In this paper, the role of impurities in industrial salts in terms of their chemical interactions with the metal are summarized. The efficiency of different industrial grade salts containing varying amounts of sulfates and other insoluble impurities for scrap recycling is compared.

  4. Fluoride removal performance of a novel Fe-Al-Ce trimetal oxide adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Yu; Dou, Xiaomin; Yang, Min

    2007-11-01

    A trimetal oxide was developed as a fluoride adsorbent by coprecipitation of Fe(II), Al(III) and Ce(IV) salt solutions with a molar ratio of 1:4:1 under alkaline condition. The material retained amorphous structure and maintained relatively stable fluoride adsorption performance at calcination temperatures lower than 600 degrees C. The optimum pH range for fluoride adsorption was 6.0-6.5 and the adsorbent also showed high defluoridation ability around pH 5.5-7.0, which is preferable for actual application. A high fluoride adsorption capacity of 178 mg g(-1) was acquired under an equilibrium fluoride concentration of 84.5 mg l(-1), adsorbent dose of 150 mg l(-1) and pH 7.0. The adsorption isotherm could be better described by the two-site Langmuir model than the one-site model, suggesting the existence of two types of active sites on the adsorbent surface. Coexistence of high concentrations of phosphate or arsenate only led to partial inhibition of fluoride adsorption, which further suggests the existence of heterogeneous adsorption sites. Sulfate and chloride did not affect fluoride adsorption, and nitrate influenced it only when the concentration of NO(3)(-)-N exceeded 50 mg l(-1). A high desorption efficiency of 97% was achieved by treating fluoride loaded Fe-Al-Ce oxide with NaOH solution at pH 12.2. A column experiment using the adsorbent fabricated into 1mm pellets was performed at an initial fluoride concentration of 5.5 mg l(-1), space velocity of 5h(-1) and pH of 5.8, and 2240 bed volumes were treated with the effluent fluoride under 1.0 mg l(-1).

  5. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for futur nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytical extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarisation phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  6. Actinides-lanthanides (neodymium) separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media; Separation actinides-lanthanides (neodyne) par extraction electrolytique en milieux fluorures fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamel, C

    2005-02-15

    The aim of this thesis is to assess the potentialities of pyrochemical processes for future nuclear fuels and Generation IV reactors (more particularly molten salt reactors). This study concerns the Actinides-Lanthanides and Lanthanides-Solvent separation by electrolytic extraction in molten fluoride media at high temperature. Three elements are selected for this study: neodymium (NdF{sub 3}), uranium (UF{sub 4}) and plutonium (PuF{sub 3}). Firstly, the electrochemical study of these three compounds in molten fluoride media is performed to evaluate the separations. Electrodeposition processes are studied and the values of formal potentials of U(III)/U(0), Pu(III)/Pu(0) and Nd(III)/Nd(0) are obtained in LiF-CaF{sub 2} eutectic mixture. Thermodynamically, the values of potentials differences are enough to separate U-Nd and Pu-Nd with a yield of extraction of 99.99%; this value is just sufficient for the Pu-Nd separation. Concerning the Nd-solvent separation this potential difference is too small. Next, the electrodeposition of solid metals on inert electrodes is performed. This study showed that the uranium and neodymium deposits are unstable in several fluoride media. In addition, the presence of salts in the dendritic metal is observed for the U solid deposits. Finally, a reactive cathode is used to improve these separation results and the shape of the deposits. The experimental results on nickel electrodes showed an improvement of the Pu-Nd separation and the Nd-solvent separation with the depolarization phenomenon of the metal deposit on the nickel. Moreover, U and Nd metal are stabilized in the alloy which allows the elimination of reactions with the solvent as observed for the solid deposit. The formation of liquids alloys makes also easier the recovery of these three. (author)

  7. [Study on ecological risk assessment technology of fluoride pollution from arid oasis soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Su-Yin; Li, Ping; Wang, Sheng-Li; Nan, Zhong-Ren

    2014-03-01

    According to translocation regulation of fluoride in the typical oasis soil-plant system under field, an ecological risk assessment model of fluoride was established, and this model was used to assess ecological risk to fluoride pollution from suburban oasis soils in Baiyin City, which was specifically expressed with the potential ecological risk of bioavailability (ER(bc)) model to assess ecological risk of fluoride pollution in oasis regions. Results showed that the ecological risk indices of fluoride pollution from this region were 1.37-24.81, the level of risk at most sites was high to very high, the average ecological risk index was 11.28, belonged to very high risk. This indicated that in the suburb soil of Baiyin City needs to be concerned about the remediation of fluoride pollution.

  8. Topical fluoride for caries prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyant, Robert J.; Tracy, Sharon L.; Anselmo, Theresa (Tracy); Beltrán-Aguilar, Eugenio D.; Donly, Kevin J.; Frese, William A.; Hujoel, Philippe P.; Iafolla, Timothy; Kohn, William; Kumar, Jayanth; Levy, Steven M.; Tinanoff, Norman; Wright, J. Timothy; Zero, Domenick; Aravamudhan, Krishna; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Meyer, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A panel of experts convened by the American Dental Association (ADA) Council on Scientific Affairs presents evidence-based clinical recommendations regarding professionally applied and prescription-strength, home-use topical fluoride agents for caries prevention. These recommendations are an update of the 2006 ADA recommendations regarding professionally applied topical fluoride and were developed by using a new process that includes conducting a systematic review of primary studies. Types of Studies Reviewed The authors conducted a search of MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library for clinical trials of professionally applied and prescription-strength topical fluoride agents—including mouthrinses, varnishes, gels, foams and pastes—with caries increment outcomes published in English through October 2012. Results The panel included 71 trials from 82 articles in its review and assessed the efficacy of various topical fluoride caries-preventive agents. The panel makes recommendations for further research. Practical Implications The panel recommends the following for people at risk of developing dental caries: 2.26 percent fluoride varnish or 1.23 percent fluoride (acidulated phosphate fluoride) gel, or a prescription-strength, home-use 0.5 percent fluoride gel or paste or 0.09 percent fluoride mouthrinse for patients 6 years or older. Only 2.26 percent fluoride varnish is recommended for children younger than 6 years. The strengths of the recommendations for the recommended products varied from “in favor” to “expert opinion for.” As part of the evidence-based approach to care, these clinical recommendations should be integrated with the practitioner's professional judgment and the patient's needs and preferences. PMID:24177407

  9. Fluoride rechargability of a non-resin auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a fluoridated dentifrice: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In addition to their fluoride-releasing properties, glass ionomer cement (GICs have the ability to reuptake and release fluorides from commonly used sources like fluoridated dentifrices. This property has the potential to provide a continuous low concentration of fluoride in the saliva aiding in caries prevention. The superior fluoride-recharging abilities of resin-modified GICs over conventional GICs have been documented. The manufacturer of a non-resin, auto-cured GIC (GC Fuji VII claims fluoride release from the product to be about six times that of conventional GIC. It was hypothesized that perhaps this high fluoride release could translate into a high reuptake and release, when exposed to a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice every day, thus providing increased fluoride levels in saliva. Aims: This study therefore examined fluoride-recharging abilities of the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement from a 1 000 ppm fluoridated dentifrice and compared it with resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Materials and Methods: Twelve glass ionomer discs each of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II L C, Group 1 and the non-resin, auto-cured glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji VII, Group 2 were prepared with precise dimensions of 9 x 2 mm. The 12 specimens in each group were further subdivided into two subgroups of six each. Subgroup A involved no fluoride treatment (Control. Subgroup B involved application of a 1 000 ppm dentifrice for 2 minutes twice daily with a soft toothbrush. The disc-specimens were then suspended in airtight plastic bottles containing exactly 20 ml double distilled water. The fluoride concentration of the water in which the specimen discs were immersed was measured by means of a fluoride ion selective electrode connected to an ion selective electrode meter/digital ion analyzer at 1, 2, 7, 15, and 30 days. Statistical Analysis: It was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Results and Conclusion: Fuji VII

  10. Potential application of microporous structured poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) composite nonwoven separators to high-voltage and high-power lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Eun-Sun [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Kangwondo, 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Hun [Batteries R and D, LG Chem, Yusong-gu, Daejon, 305-380 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Young, E-mail: syleek@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon, Kangwondo, 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > Microporous-structured PVdF-HFP/PET composite nonwoven separators for Li-batteries. > Well-developed microporous structure and liquid electrolyte wettability. > Provision of facile ion transport and suppressed growth of cell impedance. > Superior cell performance at high-voltages/high-current densities. - Abstract: We demonstrate potential application of a new composite non-woven separator, which is comprised of a phase inversion-controlled, microporous polyvinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP) gel polymer electrolyte and a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) non-woven support, to high-voltage and high-power lithium-ion batteries. In comparison to a commercialized polyethylene (PE) separator, the composite non-woven separator exhibits distinct improvements in microporous structure and liquid electrolyte wettability. Based on the understanding of the composite non-woven separator, cell performances of the separator at challenging charge/discharge conditions are investigated and discussed in terms of ion transport of the separator and AC impedance of the cell. The aforementioned advantageous features of the composite non-woven separator play a key role in providing facile ion transport and suppressing growth of cell impedance during cycling, which in turn contribute to superior cell performances at harsh charge/discharge conditions such as high voltages and high current densities.

  11. Urinary Fluoride Concentration in Children with Disabilities Following Long-Term Fluoride Tablet Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsiu-Yueh; Chen, Jung-Ren; Hung, Hsin-Chia; Hsiao, Szu-Yu; Huang, Shun-Te; Chen, Hong-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Urine is the most commonly utilized biomarker for fluoride excretion in public health and epidemiological studies. Approximately 30-50% of fluoride is excreted from urine in children. Urinary fluoride excretion reflects the total fluoride intake from multiple sources. After administering fluoride tablets to children with disabilities, urinary…

  12. Biological effects data: Fluoride and sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMechan, K.J. (ed.); Holton, R.L.; Ulbricht, R.J.; Morgan , J.B.

    1975-04-01

    The Alumax Pacific Aluminum Corporation has proposed construction of an aluminum reduction facility near Youngs Bay at Warrenton, Oregon. This report comprises one part of the final report to Alumax on a research project entitled, Physical, Chemical and Biological Studies of Youngs Bay.'' It presents data pertaining to the potential biological effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide, two potentially hazardous plant-stack emissions, on selected aquatic species of the area. Companion volumes provide a description of the physical characteristics the geochemistry, and the aquatic animals present in Youngs Bay and adjacent ecosystems. An introductory volume provides general information and maps of the area, and summarizes the conclusions of all four studies. The data from the two phases of the experimental program are included in this report: lethal studies on the effects of selected levels of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the survival rate of eleven Youngs Bay faunal species from four phyla, and sublethal studies on the effects of fluoride and sulfur dioxide on the rate of primary production of phytoplankton. 44 refs., 18 figs., 38 tabs.

  13. Risk assessment of fluoride exposure in drinking water of Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guissouma, Wiem; Hakami, Othman; Al-Rajab, Abdul Jabbar; Tarhouni, Jamila

    2017-06-01

    The presence of fluoride in drinking water is known to reduce dental cavities among consumers, but an excessive intake of this anion might leads to dental and skeletal fluorosis. This study reports a complete survey of the fluoridated tap water taken from 100 water consumption points in Tunisia. The fluoride concentrations in tap water were between 0 and 2.4 mg L(-1). Risk assessment of Fluoride exposure was assessed depending on the age of consumers using a four-step method: hazard identification, toxicity reference values selection (TRVs), daily exposure assessment, and risk characterization. Our findings suggest that approximately 75% of the Tunisian population is at risk for dental decay, 25% have a potential dental fluorosis risk, and 20% might have a skeletal fluorosis risk according to the limits of fluoride in drinking water recommended by WHO. More investigations are recommended to assess the exposure risk of fluoride in other sources of drinking water such as bottled water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Community Water Fluoridation and Intelligence: Prospective Study in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Jonathan M; Thomson, W Murray; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Moffitt, Terrie E; Zeng, Jiaxu; Foster Page, Lyndie A; Poulton, Richie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between community water fluoridation (CWF) and IQ. Methods. We conducted a prospective study of a general population sample of those born in Dunedin, New Zealand, between April 1, 1972, and March 30, 1973 (95.4% retention of cohort after 38 years of prospective follow-up). Residence in a CWF area, use of fluoride dentifrice and intake of 0.5-milligram fluoride tablets were assessed in early life (prior to age 5 years); we assessed IQ repeatedly between ages 7 to 13 years and at age 38 years. Results. No clear differences in IQ because of fluoride exposure were noted. These findings held after adjusting for potential confounding variables, including sex, socioeconomic status, breastfeeding, and birth weight (as well as educational attainment for adult IQ outcomes). Conclusions. These findings do not support the assertion that fluoride in the context of CWF programs is neurotoxic. Associations between very high fluoride exposure and low IQ reported in previous studies may have been affected by confounding, particularly by urban or rural status.

  15. Response of grapevines to fluoride under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, F.

    1983-07-01

    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Shiraz) were fumigated in open-top chambers with hydrogen fluoride for 64 days at mean atmospheric fluoride concentrations of 0.17 or 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/. Other grapevines grown under ambient conditions in the vineyard or maintained in control chambers were exposed to 0.13 or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, respectively. Leaves of grapevines exposed to 0.28, 0.17, 0.13, or 0.05 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ accumulated up to 85, 55, 20, or 11 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/, respectively. Foliar necrosis was observed on plants exposed to 0.28 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/, but no injury symptoms were observed at 0.17 ..mu..gHFm/sup -3/ or in control plants. Grapevines growing under ambient conditions had significantly greater mean bunch weight, peduncle weight, number of grapes per bunch, and leaf protein levels than the fumigated treatments. However, these differences may be associated with a chamber effect rather than with an effect of fluoride on grapevines. No significant differences were found between treatments for grape potential alcohol content, fruit acids, number of bunches or grapes per vine, fresh weight of grapes, or leaf chlorophyll content, despite foliar fluoride concentrations in the highest fluoride fumigation level reaching 85 ..mu..gFg/sup -1/. No evidence was found of significant fluoride accumulation in berries or canes. 26 references, 4 tables.

  16. Phosphate reduction in a hydroxyapatite fluoride removal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egner, A.

    2012-12-01

    Fluorosis is a widespread disease that occurs as a result of excess fluoride consumption and can cause severe tooth and bone deformations. To combat fluorosis, several previous studies have examined the potential to replace traditional bone char filters with synthetic hydroxyapatite. Calcite particles with a synthetic hydroxyapatite coating have been shown to effectively removed fluoride, yet the low-cost method for forming these particles leaves high amounts of phosphate both in synthesis waste-water and in filter effluent. High phosphate in filter effluent is problematic because consumption of extremely high phosphate can leach calcium from bones, further exacerbating the fluoride effect. This study examines ways of reducing and reusing waste. In particular, a method of fluoride removal is explored in which fluorapatite coatings may be formed directly. In preliminary studies, batches of 4.1g of Florida limestone (<710 μm) were equilibrated with 100 mL of 10ppm fluoride. In a control batch containing lime but no added phosphate, 14% treatment was achieved, but with added phosphate, 100% treatment was achieved in all batches. Batches with lower levels of phosphate took longer to reach 100% treatment, ranging from less than 24 hours in the highest phosphate batches to approximately 42 hours in the lowest batches. The lower levels tested were well within reasonable levels for drinking water and reached 0ppm fluoride in 42 hours or less.

  17. Salt Reduction in a Model High-Salt Akawi Cheese: Effects on Bacterial Activity, pH, Moisture, Potential Bioactive Peptides, Amino Acids, and Growth of Human Colon Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Akanksha; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the effects of sodium chloride reduction and its substitution with potassium chloride on Akawi cheese during storage for 30 d at 4 °C. Survival of probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, and Bifidobacterium longum) and starter bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), angiotensin-converting enzyme-inhibitory and antioxidant activities, and concentrations of standard amino acids as affected by storage in different brine solutions (10% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl, 7.5% NaCl+KCl [1:1], 5% NaCl, and 5% NaCl+KCl [1:1]) were investigated. Furthermore, viability of human colon cells and human colon cancer cells as affected by the extract showing improved peptide profiles, highest release of amino acids and antioxidant activity (that is, from cheese brined in 7.5% NaCl+KCl) was evaluated. Significant increase was observed in survival of probiotic bacteria in cheeses with low salt after 30 d. Calcium content decreased slightly during storage in all cheeses brined in various solutions. Further, no significant changes were observed in ACE-inhibitory activity and antioxidant activity of cheeses during storage. Interestingly, concentrations of 4 essential amino acids (phenylalanine, tryptophan, valine, and leucine) increased significantly during storage in brine solutions containing 7.5% total salt. Low concentration of cheese extract (100 μg/mL) significantly improved the growth of normal human colon cells, and reduced the growth of human colon cancer cells. Overall, the study revealed that cheese extracts from reduced-NaCl brine improved the growth of human colon cells, and the release of essential amino acids, but did not affect the activities of potential bioactive peptides.

  18. 49 CFR 173.163 - Hydrogen fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen fluoride. 173.163 Section 173.163... Hydrogen fluoride. (a) Hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid, anhydrous) must be packaged as follows: (1) In... filling ratio of 0.84. (b) A cylinder removed from hydrogen fluoride service must be condemned in...

  19. Growth of fluoride treated Kalanchoe pinnata plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H.N.; Applegate, H.G.

    1962-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata plants can absorb fluoride through roots. The absorption is related to the amount of fluoride applied to the soil. There appeared to be a relationship between the amount of fluoride adsorbed and the subsequent growth of the plants. Plants which adsorbed the largest amounts of fluoride had the greatest increase in growth.

  20. Feasibility and costs of water fluoridation in remote Australian Aboriginal communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsani Jonathon P

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoridation of public water supplies remains the key potential strategy for prevention of dental caries. The water supplies of many remote Indigenous communities do not contain adequate levels of natural fluoride. The small and dispersed nature of communities presents challenges for the provision of fluoridation infrastructure and until recently smaller settlements were considered unfavourable for cost-effective water fluoridation. Technological advances in water treatment and fluoridation are resulting in new and more cost-effective water fluoridation options and recent cost analyses support water fluoridation for communities of less than 1,000 people. Methods Small scale fluoridation plants were installed in two remote Northern Territory communities in early 2004. Fluoride levels in community water supplies were expected to be monitored by local staff and by a remote electronic system. Site visits were undertaken by project investigators at commissioning and approximately two years later. Interviews were conducted with key informants and documentation pertaining to costs of the plants and operational reports were reviewed. Results The fluoridation plants were operational for about 80% of the trial period. A number of technical features that interfered with plant operation were identified and addressed though redesign. Management systems and the attitudes and capacity of operational staff also impacted on the effective functioning of the plants. Capital costs for the wider implementation of these plants in remote communities is estimated at about $US94,000 with recurrent annual costs of $US11,800 per unit. Conclusion Operational issues during the trial indicate the need for effective management systems, including policy and funding responsibility. Reliable manufacturers and suppliers of equipment should be identified and contractual agreements should provide for ongoing technical assistance. Water fluoridation units should

  1. Potential of the salt-tolerant laccase-producing strain Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 from an estuary in the bioremediation of phenol-polluted environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, L M; Prasanth, G K; Sadasivan, C

    2014-06-01

    Industrialization causes the generation of phenolic pollutants in the environment. The ability of laccases to oxidize phenolic compounds and reduce molecular oxygen to water has led to intensive studies on these enzymes. Although salt-tolerant fungi are potential sources of enzymes for industrial applications, they have been inadequately explored for laccase production. This study describes the isolation of a salt- and phenol-tolerant strain of Trichoderma sp. with the ability to produce laccase, and thus with the potential for industrial applications. The coconut husk retting ground in the estuaries of Kerala, India, a saline environment highly polluted with phenolic compounds, was selected for isolating the fungus. Enhanced laccase production was observed at 5-10 ppt salinity. The organism could grow even at 30 ppt salinity with reduced biomass production and laccase secretion. The optimum concentration of different phenolic compounds for enhanced laccase secretion ranged between 20 and 80 mg L(-1) . As the concentration of phenolic compounds increased beyond 200 mg L(-1) , the enzyme activity decreased and was completely inhibited at 800 mg L(-1) . The tolerance of Trichoderma viride Pers. NFCCI-2745 to salinity and various phenolic compounds can be utilized in the bioremediation of highly saline and phenolic compound-rich industrial effluents.

  2. Effects of encapsulation on the viability of potential probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum exposed to high acidity condition and presence of bile salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, W F; Nazaruddin, R; Tan, Y N; Ayob, M K

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the survival of encapsulated potential probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum which isolated from fermented cocoa beans. κ-Carrageenan was used to encapsulate the probiotic. Encapsulation techniques such as emulsification, freeze-drying or extrusion were adopted to encapsulate the probiotic. Freeze-drying and extrusion methods showed higher (p encapsulating the probiotic compared to the emulsification method (82.19 ± 0.71% efficiency). Freeze-dried encapsulated probiotic L. plantarum was selected for further survival analysis as greater amount of beads were produced compared to the extrusion method. Freeze-dried probiotic was found to have significantly (p encapsulated probiotic. However, freeze-drying encapsulation was proven not to enhance the resistance of the probiotic to bile salt as evidenced by the one log colony reduction as for the non-encapsulated probiotic. Further modification of freeze-drying encapsulation technique is needed to enhance the survival of the encapsulated potential probiotic L. plantarum toward bile salt in the future. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. Observations of the freeze/thaw performance of lithium fluoride by motion picture photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1991-01-01

    To gain direct observation of the molten salt phase change, a novel containerless technique was developed where the high surface tension of lithium fluoride was used to suspend a bead of the molten salt inside a specially designed wire cage. By varying the current passing through the wire, the cage also served as a variable heat source. In this way, the freeze/thaw performance of the lithium fluoride could be photographed by motion picture photography without the influence of container walls. The motion picture photography of the lithium fluoride sample revealed several zones during the phase change, a solid zone and a liquid zone, as expected, and a slush zone that was predicted by thermal analysis modeling.

  4. Fluoride-induced chronic renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantz, O; Jouvin, M H; De Vernejoul, M C; Druet, P

    1987-08-01

    Renal fluoride toxicity in human beings is difficult to assess in the literature. Although experimental studies and research on methoxyflurane toxicity have shown frank renal damage, observations of renal insufficiency related to chronic fluoride exposure are scarce. We report a case of fluoride intoxication related to potomania of Vichy water, a highly mineralized water containing 8.5 mg/L of fluoride. Features of fluoride osteosclerosis were prominent and end-stage renal failure was present. The young age of the patient, the long duration of high fluoride intake, and the absence of other cause of renal insufficiency suggest a causal relationship between fluoride intoxication and renal failure.

  5. Topical fluoride as a cause of dental fluorosis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, May Cm; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Tsang, Boyd Wk; Lo, Edward Cm; Worthington, Helen V; Marinho, Valeria Cc

    2010-01-20

    associations were found between starting using fluoride toothpaste/toothbrushing before or after the age of 24 months and fluorosis (data from observational studies). From the RCTs, use of higher level of fluoride was associated with an increased risk of fluorosis. No significant association between the frequency of toothbrushing or the amount of fluoride toothpaste used and fluorosis was found. There should be a balanced consideration between the benefits of topical fluorides in caries prevention and the risk of the development of fluorosis. Most of the available evidence focuses on mild fluorosis. There is weak unreliable evidence that starting the use of fluoride toothpaste in children under 12 months of age may be associated with an increased risk of fluorosis. The evidence for its use between the age of 12 and 24 months is equivocal. If the risk of fluorosis is of concern, the fluoride level of toothpaste for young children (under 6 years of age) is recommended to be lower than 1000 parts per million (ppm).More evidence with low risk of bias is needed. Future trials assessing the effectiveness of different types of topical fluorides (including toothpastes, gels, varnishes and mouthrinses) or different concentrations or both should ensure that they include an adequate follow-up period in order to collect data on potential fluorosis. As it is unethical to propose RCTs to assess fluorosis itself, it is acknowledged that further observational studies will be undertaken in this area. However, attention needs to be given to the choice of study design, bearing in mind that prospective, controlled studies will be less susceptible to bias than retrospective and/or uncontrolled studies.

  6. Portland Water Fluoridation: A Newspaper Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Allison; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Lewis, Patricia Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Portland, Oregon is the largest city in the United States without community water fluoridation (CWF). A newspaper analysis was conducted of the failed 2013 CWF campaign to evaluate anti-fluoridation and pro-fluoridation messaging provided by newspapers during the campaign. News content was categorized by type and slant (pro-fluoridation, anti-fluoridation, or neutral) and 34 variables were tabulated (23 anti-fluoridation, 11 pro-fluoridation). Results showed overall messaging was slightly pro-fluoridation, as compared to anti-fluoridation or neutral content (35%, 32%, and 33% respectively). Editorial content was 85% pro-fluoridation and 15% anti-fluoridation. The most frequent anti-fluoridation variables were alternatives to water fluoridation, mass/forced medication and concerns about the political process. Conversely, tooth decay and social justice were the most commonly cited pro-fluoridation variables. Newspapers can be influential in shaping public policy opinions in the fight for community water fluoridation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The objectives of the study were: (1) to perform resource assessment of the thermogenic gas resources in deeply buried (>15,000 ft) natural gas reservoirs of the onshore interior salt basins of the north central and northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas through petroleum system identification, characterization and modeling; and (2) to use the petroleum system based resource assessment to estimate the volume of the deep thermogenic gas resource that is available for potential recovery and to identify those areas in the interior salt basins with high potential for this thermogenic gas resource. Petroleum source rock analysis and petroleum system characterization and modeling, including thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling, have shown that the Upper Jurassic Smackover Formation served as the regional petroleum source rock in the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Thus, the estimates of the total hydrocarbons, oil, and gas generated and expelled are based on the assumption that the Smackover Formation is the main petroleum source rock in these basins and subbasins. The estimate of the total hydrocarbons generated for the North Louisiana Salt Basin in this study using a petroleum system approach compares favorably with the total volume of hydrocarbons generated published by Zimmermann (1999). In this study, the estimate is 2,870 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the method of Schmoker (1994), and the estimate is 2,640 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated using the Platte River software application. The estimate of Zimmermann (1999) is 2,000 to 2,500 billion barrels of total hydrocarbons generated. The estimate of gas generated for this basin is 6,400 TCF using the Platte River software application, and 12,800 TCF using the method of Schmoker (1994). Barnaby (2006) estimated that the total gas volume generated for this basin ranges from 4,000 to 8,000 TCF. Seventy

  8. Estimated Fluoride Doses from Toothpastes Should be Based on Total Soluble Fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Cury,Jaime A.; Saul M Paiva; Tenuta,Livia M.A; Oliveira,Maria José L.; Martins, Carolina C.

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride dose ingested by young children may be overestimated if based on levels of total fluoride (TF) rather than levels of bioavailable fluoride (total soluble fluoride-TSF) in toothpaste. The aim of the present study was to compare doses of fluoride intake based on TF and TSF. Fluoride intake in 158 Brazilian children aged three and four years was determined after tooth brushing with their usual toothpaste (either family toothpaste (n = 80) or children's toothpaste (n = 78)). The esti...

  9. In vivo efficacy of tamarind (Tamarindus indica) fruit extract on experimental fluoride exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, S; Swarup, D; Saxena, Anju; Dan, Ananya

    2011-12-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of hydro-methanolic (1:1) extract of tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.) fruit pulp in removing body fluoride burden. Thirty rats were divided into five groups. Keeping no fluoride group as the control, rats of no treatment, low dose, middle dose and high dose groups received sodium fluoride orally at the rate of 200mg per kg body weight daily for 14 weeks. Rats of low dose, middle dose and high dose group simultaneously received tamarind fruit pulp extract at three doses, viz. 25 (low), 50 (medium) and 100mg (high) per kg body weight orally, respectively. Fluoride concentration in blood, urine and long bone of experimental rats was monitored to assess the efficacy of the extract. Mean serum fluoride concentration in fluoride exposed rats was 0.145 ± 0.009 and 0.783 ± 0.042 μg/ml on days 0 and 98. In comparison, fluoride concentrations in tamarind treated rats were 0.179 ± 0.021 and 0.633 ± 0.015; 0.179 ± 0.021 and 0.502 ± 0.025 and 0.176 ± 0.021 and 0.498 ± 0.030 μg/ml in low, medium and high dose groups, respectively on day 0 and day 98 of the experiment. There was a significant (p ≤ 0.01) increase in urinary fluoride excretion from day 28 onwards. The mean fluoride concentration in long bones of treated rats was significantly lower than the values recorded in fluoride exposed rats. These findings suggest that concomitant use of tamarind fruit pulp extract can reduce fluoride concentration in blood and bone and enhanced urinary excretion, indicating the ameliorative potential of fruits of tamarind in fluoride toxicity.

  10. A hybrid approach for treating fluorided water and biogeophysical monitoring of treatment processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    A laboratory experiment has been conducted for investigating the possibility of development of novel techniques for treating fluoride contamination and monitoring of physico-chemical alterations caused by biogeochemical processes in the media. In the present study, high adsorption capacity and ion-exchange property of natural zeolites have been utilized in treating fluoride contamination. The preset goals are achieved by designing and constructing experimental setup consisting of three columns, first one is filled with 450 ppm fluorided water prepared by dissolving sodium fluoride in deionized water, the second is filled with zeolite and fluorided water, and the third is filled with zeolite, fluorided water, sodium lactate and the bacterial seed. The first and the second columns were poisoned with sodium azide for preventing the growth of microorganisms. The self-potential (SP) signals associated with physico-chemical alterations in natural zeolite induced by biogeochemical processes are measured by using Cu-CuSO4 gel electrodes. Liquid-phase analysis of samples from column two and three show the reduced concentrations of fluoride and aluminum and it indicates the possibility of precipitation of insoluble aluminum fluoride. This is further confirmed by the presence of fluoride and aluminum in the solid samples as detected by energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The distinct SP of the order of -50 mV and 200 mV have been associated with biostimulated fluoride remediation and geochemical fluoride remediation processes respectively. Thus, there is a possibility of non-invasive monitoring of fluoride remediation processes driven by both microbes and chemical processes. It is found that after thirty-day nitrate and sulfate is introduced in column two due chemical interaction between water and natural zeolite. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that a hybrid approach, a combination of ion exchange and adsorption properties of natural zeolite and the bioremediation is more

  11. Estimating Fluoride Exposure in Rural Communities: A Case Study in Western Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janessa M.; Daniell, William; James, Frank; Milgrom, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Efforts to achieve national objectives for fluoridation, such as Healthy People 2010, and water quality monitoring regulations focus on public water systems and generally overlook the 15% of U.S. households with private wells. Mandated testing of public water systems and new building sites on San Juan Island, Washington revealed naturally occurring fluoride levels up to several times the EPA Maximum Contaminant Level. This study evaluated fluoride concentrations in private wells and estimated the prevalence of dental fluorosis among children to inform local stakeholders. Methods Primary school children were examined by a dentist for dental fluorosis, parents were surveyed about fluoride exposures, and household drinking water samples were collected to measure and map fluoride concentrations. De-identified data were analyzed using chi-square and Fisher’s exact tests. Results 18.8% of examined children exhibited mild dental fluorosis, a prevalence similar to national averages. Fluoride concentrations in drinking water were 0.08 to 1.30 mg/L, below levels for health concerns, and generally (94%) below levels recommended for caries prevention. Supplemental sources of fluoride (e.g. tablets) did not account for observed fluorosis. Conclusions Results provided community stakeholders with valuable information to support decision-making regarding fluoride levels in drinking water. Previously available information suggested potential for excessive fluoride exposure, however, these study results indicated low fluoride levels were more common. The approach used in this case study suggests a simple method of assessing the scope of fluoridation needs in communities where private water sources are common, allowing for better informed decision-making with regard to future fluoridation efforts. PMID:20617156

  12. Lack of DNA damage induced by fluoride on mouse lymphoma and human fibroblast cells by single cell gel (comet) assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro,Daniel Araki; Alves de Lima, Patrícia Lepage; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Salvadori,Daisy Maria Favero

    2006-01-01

    Fluoride has widely been used in Dentistry because it is a specific and effective caries prophylactic agent. However, excess fluoride may represent a hazard to human health, especially by causing injury on genetic apparatus. Genotoxicity tests constitute an important part of cancer research for risk assessment of potential carcinogens. In this study, the potential DNA damage associated with exposure to fluoride was assessed by the single cell gel (comet) assay in vitro. Mouse lymphoma and hum...

  13. Penicillium chrysogenum var. halophenolicum, a new halotolerant strain with potential in the remediation of aromatic compounds in high salt environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Ana Lúcia; García-Estrada, Carlos; Ullán, Ricardo Vicente; Guedes, Sumaya Ferreira; Martín-Jiménez, Patricia; Mendes, Benilde; Martín, Juan Francisco

    2012-01-20

    A halotolerant phenylacetate-degrading fungus Penicillium CLONA2, previously isolated from a salt mine at Algarve (Portugal), was identified as a variant of P. chrysogenum using the ITS-5,8S rDNA and the D1/D2 domain of 28S rDNA sequences. The metabolic features and genetic characteristics suggest that this strain belongs to a subgroup of P. chrysogenum, named var. halophenolicum. The presence of the penicillin biosynthetic cluster was proven by Southern hybridizations using probes internal to the pcbAB and penDE genes and sequencing of the pcbAB-pcbC intergenic region. However the pcbAB-pcbC divergent promoter region contained 20 point modifications with respect to that of the wild type P. chrysogenum NRRL1951. The CLONA2 strain produced non-aromatic natural penicillins rather than benzylpenicillin in a medium containing potassium phenylacetate (the precursor of benzylpenicillin) and was able to grow well on phenylacetatic acid using it as sole carbon source. Due to the ability of P. chrysogenum CLONA2 to degrade aromatic compounds, this strain may be an interesting organism for aromatic compounds remediation in high salinity environments.

  14. Caries-­preventive Effect of 1300ppm Fluoride and Carrageenan Containing Toothpaste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Rahardjo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 72 1024x768 Various studies stated that the increase concentration of fluoride in toothpastes leads to the reduction of calcium loss in enamel. Objective: The purpose of this study was to test the difference between the effect of 1300ppm fluoride with carrageenan toothpaste and 1000ppm fluoride only toothpaste on roughness and hardness of enamel surface. Methods: Enamel specimens were obtained from 30 extracted human premolars. The enamel specimens were randomly assigned to one of the three groups, 1300ppm fluoride with carrageenan toothpaste, 1000ppm fluoride only toothpaste and toothpaste with no fluoride as a negative control. The samples were immersed in 1% citric acid with pH 4 for 150 seconds for demineralization, afterwards exposed to each toothpaste for 6 minutes. Results: The results demonstrated that toothpaste with 1300ppm fluoride with carregeenan has two times greater efficacy in triggering remineralization than toothpaste with 1000ppm fluoride only, with regards to surface roughness and hardness recovery in an in vitro caries model. Conclusion: The results suggested that treatment of enamel with toothpaste containing 1300ppm fluoride with carrageenan has high potential in inducing remineralization on enamel.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v20i1.125

  15. Fluoride stability in dentifrices stored in schools in a town of northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéssica Bandeira MATIAS

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze fluoride stability in dentifrices stored during nine months in schools from Careiro da Várzea, State of Amazonas, Brazil. Analysis of total fluoride concentration, total soluble fluoride, and ionic fluoride in the dentifrice samples was performed in four different time periods: at the time of purchase (baseline; after three months, after six months, and after nine months of storage. Fluoride concentration was determined using a specific electrode (Orion 96-09 connected to an ion analyzer (Orion A-720 and calibrated with fluoride standard solutions containing 2.0 to 32.0 ppm F. The results obtained during the measurements were analyzed by analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey’s test for comparison of the means. After nine months of storage, total soluble fluoride, the active form of fluoride, decreased by 21.9%. As total soluble fluoride was below the minimum required for anticaries efficacy (1,000 ppm F in the fourth analysis, it may be concluded that anticaries potential decreased with storage time.

  16. Fluoride removal from groundwater by limestone treatment in presence of phosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Sweety; Nath, Suresh K; Bordoloi, Shreemoyee; Dutta, Robin K

    2015-04-01

    Fluoride removal from groundwater has been studied by addition of dilute phosphoric acid (PA) to the influent water before limestone treatment through laboratory plug-flow column experiments and bench-scale plug-flow pilot tests. In this PA-enhanced limestone defluoridation (PAELD) technique, fluoride is removed from 0.526 mM to 0.50-52.60 μM in 3 h with near neutral final pH. The presence of PA increases the fluoride removal capacity of limestone to 1.10 mg/g compared to 0.39 mg/g reported in its absence. The changes in fluoride removal with variation in initial PA concentration, initial fluoride concentration and the final pH have been found to be statistically significant with p fluoride by calcium phosphates produced in situ in the reactor is the dominant mechanism of fluoride removal in the PAELD. Precipitation of CaF2 and sorption of fluoride by the limestone also contribute to the fluoride removal. High efficiency, capacity, safety, environment-friendliness, low cost and simplicity of operation make the PAELD a potential technique for rural application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.K.

    1996-08-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

  18. Preparation and characterization of porous granular ceramic containing dispersed aluminum and iron oxides as adsorbents for fluoride removal from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nan; Zhang, Zhenya; Feng, Chuanping; Zhu, Dirui; Yang, Yingnan; Sugiura, Norio

    2011-02-15

    Porous granular ceramic adsorbents containing dispersed aluminum and iron oxides were synthesized by impregnating with salt solutions followed by precipitation at 600°C. In the present work detailed studies were carried out to investigate the effect of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial solution pH and co-existing anions. Characterization studies on the adsorbent by SEM, XRD, EDS, and BET analysis were carried out to clarify the adsorption mechanism. The adsorbents were sphere in shape, 2-3mm in particle size, highly porous and showed specific surface area of 50.69 sq m/g. The fluoride adsorption capacity of prepared adsorbent was 1.79 mg/g, and the maximum fluoride removal was obtained at pH 6. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models were found to represent the measured adsorption data well. The experimental data were well explained with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Results from this study demonstrated potential utility of Al/Fe dispersed in porous granular ceramics that could be developed into a viable technology for fluoride removal from aqueous solution. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Numerical modeling of the effects of Hurricane Sandy and potential future hurricanes on spatial patterns of salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay, New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongqing; Chen, Qin; Hu, Kelin; Snedden, Gregg A.; Hartig, Ellen K.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Johnson, Cody L.; Orton, Philip M.

    2017-03-29

    The salt marshes of Jamaica Bay, managed by the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation and the Gateway National Recreation Area of the National Park Service, serve as a recreational outlet for New York City residents, mitigate flooding, and provide habitat for critical wildlife species. Hurricanes and extra-tropical storms have been recognized as one of the critical drivers of coastal wetland morphology due to their effects on hydrodynamics and sediment transport, deposition, and erosion processes. However, the magnitude and mechanisms of hurricane effects on sediment dynamics and associated coastal wetland morphology in the northeastern United States are poorly understood. In this study, the depth-averaged version of the Delft3D modeling suite, integrated with field measurements, was utilized to examine the effects of Hurricane Sandy and future potential hurricanes on salt marsh morphology in Jamaica Bay, New York City. Hurricane Sandy-induced wind, waves, storm surge, water circulation, sediment transport, deposition, and erosion were simulated by using the modeling system in which vegetation effects on flow resistance, surge reduction, wave attenuation, and sedimentation were also incorporated. Observed marsh elevation change and accretion from a rod surface elevation table and feldspar marker horizons and cesium-137- and lead-210-derived long-term accretion rates were used to calibrate and validate the wind-waves-surge-sediment transport-morphology coupled model.The model results (storm surge, waves, and marsh deposition and erosion) agreed well with field measurements. The validated modeling system was then used to detect salt marsh morphological change due to Hurricane Sandy across the entire Jamaica Bay over the short-term (for example, 4 days and 1 year) and long-term (for example, 5 and 10 years). Because Hurricanes Sandy (2012) and Irene (2011) were two large and destructive tropical cyclones which hit the northeast coast, the validated coupled

  20. Viscosity of molten lithium, thorium and beryllium fluorides mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlyakov, Alexander V.; Ignatiev, Victor V.; Abalin, Sergei S.

    2011-12-01

    Considering development of Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) concept, following Molten Salt fluorides mixtures have been chosen as an object for viscosity studies in this work (in mol%): 78LiF-22ThF 4; 71LiF-27ThF 4-2BeF 2 and 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2. Additionally, the effect of the 3 mol% CeF 3 additives on viscosity of the molten 75LiF-20ThF 4-5BeF 2 (mol%) salt mixture has been investigated experimentally. The method of torsional oscillations of cylindrical crucible filled by molten fluorides mixture has been chosen for kinematic viscosity measurement at temperatures up to 800-850 °C. In temperature ranges, where melts behave as normal liquids, dependences on viscosity vs. temperature are received: ν = А exp [B/T(K)], where ν - kinematic viscosity, m 2/s; T - temperature, K. The kinematic viscosity Rout mean squares (RMS) estimated in the assumption about dispersion homoscedasticity is (0.04-0.12) × 10 -6 (m 2/s). Discrepancies left in the data of viscosity for molten mixtures of LiF, BeF 2 and ThF 4 received by different researchers need further investigations in this area to be continued.

  1. An in vitro assessment of fluoride uptake by tooth enamel from four different fluoride dentifrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, V H; Anegundi, R T

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate fluoride uptake by tooth enamel with four different fluoride dentifrices. Sixty human premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were selected for the study. The teeth were covered with nail varnish leaving a window of 4 × 4 mm on the enamel surface of the buccal and lingual sides. The teeth were demineralised and were divided into four groups with 15 teeth in each group. The buccal window served as experimental and the lingual as control. The teeth were immersed in toothpaste slurry containing: sodium fluoride (Group A); sodium monofluorophosphate (Group B); stannous fluoride (Group C) and amine fluoride (Group D). The fluoride content in the etched superficial enamel layer in the windows was analysed using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. Within the parameters of this study, the uptake of fluoride was statistically significant in Group D (p fluoride by tooth enamel in an increasing order was Group A fluoride had the highest fluoride uptake.

  2. Environmental monitoring to the sources of atmospheric emission by the Trad-MCN bioassay and analysis of the accumulative potential for uranium and fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Alessandra C.F.E., E-mail: alessandra@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Monitoracao Ambiental; Ramos, Monique M.B., E-mail: monique@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Div. de Analise de Seguranca; Alves, Edenise S., E-mail: ealves@ibot.sp.gov.b [Instituto de Botanica de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Secao de Anatomia

    2009-07-01

    The biomonitoring of the atmospheric contamination constitutes important procedure for adoption of environmental control measures. Biological assays have been employed to evaluate genotoxic agents in the atmosphere. The Tradescantia-micronucleus (Trad-MCN) assay has been extensively used in environmental monitoring owing to its efficiency in the detection of chromosomic damages in cytological preparations of easy execution. In this study we tested the viability of use of Trad-MCN with Tradescantia pallida cv. Purpurea for environmental monitoring in the Experimental Center Aramar (CEA), in Ipero - SP and its leaf accumulation capacity. The plants were exposed in situ, in flower-beds or flowerpots, established close to the sources of atmospheric emission. The bioassay was accomplished according to the usual protocol. The micronucleus frequencies were compared using the variance Kruskal-Wallis test. The obtained results indicated that the biomonitoring model adopted was not the ideal for the CEA, considering that the plant suffered the influence of climatic condition. However the plant showed to have accumulative potential for uranium. (author)

  3. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from semiconductor wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warmadewanthi, B; Liu, J C

    2009-01-01

    Hydrofluoric acid (HF) and phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) are widely used in semiconductor industry for etching and rinsing purposes. Consequently, significant amount of wastewater containing phosphate and fluoride is generated. Selective separation of phosphate and fluoride from the semiconductor wastewater, containing 936 mg/L of fluoride, 118 mg/L of phosphate, 640 mg/L of sulfate, and 26.7 mg/L of ammonia, was studied. Chemical precipitation and flotation reactions were utilized in the two-stage treatment processes. The first-stage reaction involved the addition of magnesium chloride (MgCl(2)) to induce selective precipitation of magnesium phosphate. The optimal condition was pH 10 and molar ratio, [Mg(2 + )]/[(PO(4) (3-))], of 3:1, and 66.2% of phosphate was removed and recovered as bobierrite (Mg(3)(PO(4))(2).8H(2)O). No reaction was found between MgCl(2) and fluoride. Calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) was used in the second-stage reaction to induce precipitation of calcium fluoride and calcium phosphate. The optimum molar ratio, [Ca(2 + )]/[F(-)], was 0.7 at pH 10, and residual fluoride concentration of 10.7 mg/L and phosphate concentration of lower than 0.5 mg/L was obtained. Thermodynamic equilibrium was modeled with PHREEQC and compared with experimental results. Sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) was an effective collector for subsequent solid-liquid removal via dispersed air flotation (DiAF). The study demonstrated that phosphate can be selectively recovered from the wastewater. Potential benefits include recovery of phosphate for reuse, lower required dosage of calcium for fluoride removal, and less amount of CaF(2) sludge.

  4. Nanofiltration membranes based on polyvinylidene fluoride nanofibrous scaffolds and crosslinked polyethyleneimine networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Jik; Cheedrala, Ravi Kumar; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Kim, Changmin; Kim, In S.; Goddard, William A.

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we describe the synthesis of new and ion-selective nanofiltration (NF) membranes using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers and hyperbranched polyethylenimine (PEI) as building blocks. These new nanofibrous composite (NFC) membranes consist of crosslinked hyperbranched PEI networks supported by PVDF nanofibrous scaffolds that are electrospun onto commercial PVDF microfiltration (MF) membranes. A major objective of our study was to fabricate positively charged NF membranes that can be operated at low pressure with high water flux and improved rejection for monovalent cations. To achieve this, we investigated the effects of crosslinker chemistry on membrane properties (morphology, composition, hydrophobicity, and zeta potential) and membrane performance (salt rejection and permeate flux) in aqueous solutions (2,000 mg/L) of four salts (NaCl, MgCl2, Na2SO4, and MgSO4) at pH 4, 6, and 8. We found that an NFC-PVDF membrane with a network of PEI macromolecules crosslinked with trimesoyl chloride has a high water flux ( 30 L m-2 h-1) and high rejections for MgCl2 ( 88 %) and NaCl ( 65 %) at pH 6 using a pressure of 7 bar. The overall results of our study suggest that PVDF nanofibers and hyperbranched PEI are promising building blocks for the fabrication of high performance NF membranes for water purification.

  5. Nanofiltration membranes based on polyvinylidene fluoride nanofibrous scaffolds and crosslinked polyethyleneimine networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong-Jik [Hankyong National University, Department of Bioresources and Rural Systems Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Cheedrala, Ravi Kumar; Diallo, Mamadou S., E-mail: mdiallo@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water and Sustainability (EEWS) (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Changmin; Kim, In S. [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), Department of Environmental Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Goddard, William A. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Graduate School of Energy, Environment, Water and Sustainability (EEWS) (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    In this article, we describe the synthesis of new and ion-selective nanofiltration (NF) membranes using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) nanofibers and hyperbranched polyethylenimine (PEI) as building blocks. These new nanofibrous composite (NFC) membranes consist of crosslinked hyperbranched PEI networks supported by PVDF nanofibrous scaffolds that are electrospun onto commercial PVDF microfiltration (MF) membranes. A major objective of our study was to fabricate positively charged NF membranes that can be operated at low pressure with high water flux and improved rejection for monovalent cations. To achieve this, we investigated the effects of crosslinker chemistry on membrane properties (morphology, composition, hydrophobicity, and zeta potential) and membrane performance (salt rejection and permeate flux) in aqueous solutions (2,000 mg/L) of four salts (NaCl, MgCl{sub 2}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, and MgSO{sub 4}) at pH 4, 6, and 8. We found that an NFC-PVDF membrane with a network of PEI macromolecules crosslinked with trimesoyl chloride has a high water flux ({approx}30 L m{sup -2} h{sup -1}) and high rejections for MgCl{sub 2} ({approx}88 %) and NaCl ({approx}65 %) at pH 6 using a pressure of 7 bar. The overall results of our study suggest that PVDF nanofibers and hyperbranched PEI are promising building blocks for the fabrication of high performance NF membranes for water purification.

  6. FLUORIDE TOXICITY – A HARSH REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandlapalli Pavani

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There are many incidents of fluoride toxicity whether it is acute or chronic. Fluoride toxicity is an environmental hazard which arises from the upper layers of geological crust and is dissolved in water. Prolonged drinking of such water causes chronic fluoride toxicity. Use of fluoride containing compounds for various purposes such as dental products, metal, glass, refrigerator and chemical industries act as a source of fluoride poisoning and increase the risk of toxicity. This review reflects the deleterious effects of fluorides on various organs in the physiological system.

  7. Role of the monocyte chemoattractant protein-1/C-C chemokine receptor 2 signaling pathway in transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ablation-induced renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youping; Zhu, Mingjun; Xu, Hui; Cui, Lin; Liu, Weihong; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Shen, Si; Wang, Donna H

    2015-09-01

    Our recent studies indicate that the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channel may act as a potential regulator of monocyte/macrophage recruitment to reduce renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension. This study tests the hypothesis that deletion of TRPV1 exaggerates salt-sensitive hypertension-induced renal injury due to enhanced inflammatory responses via monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1)/C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2)-dependent pathways. Wild type (WT) and TRPV1-null mutant (TRPV1(-/-)) mice were subjected to uninephrectomy and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt treatment for four weeks with or without the selective CCR2 antagonist, RS504393. DOCA-salt treatment increased systolic blood pressure (SBP) to the same degree in both strains, but increased urinary excretion of albumin and 8-isoprostane and decreased creatinine clearance with greater magnitude in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. DOCA-salt treatment also caused renal glomerulosclerosis, tubulointerstitial injury, collagen deposition, monocyte/macrophage infiltration, proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and NF-κB activation in greater degree in TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Blockade of the CCR2 with RS504393 (4 mg/kg/day) had no effect on SBP in DOCA-salt-treated WT or TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to their respective controls. However, treatment with RS504393 ameliorated renal dysfunction and morphological damage, and prevented the increase in monocyte/macrophage infiltration, cytokine/chemokine production, and NF-κB activity in both DOCA-salt hypertensive strains with a greater effect in DOCA-salt-treated TRPV1(-/-) mice compared to DOCA-salt-treated WT mice. No differences in CCR2 protein expression in kidney were found between DOCA-salt-treated WT and TRPV1(-/-) mice with or without RS504393 treatment. Our studies for the first time indicate that deletion of TRPV1 aggravated renal injury in salt-sensitive hypertension via enhancing MCP-1

  8. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels that are too high, and for preventing kidney stones. They are also taken for treating osteomalacia (often ... But intravenous phosphate salts should not be used. Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Taking potassium phosphate by mouth might help ...

  9. Salt cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Anirban

    2015-01-01

    If you are a professional associated with system and infrastructure management, looking at automated infrastructure and deployments, then this book is for you. No prior experience of Salt is required.

  10. Fluoride bioavailability in saliva and plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Different fluoride formulations may have different effects on caries prevention. It was the aim of this clinical study to assess the fluoride content, provided by NaF compared to amine fluoride, in saliva and plaque. Methods Eight trained volunteers brushed their teeth in the morning for 3 minutes with either NaF or amine fluoride, and saliva and 3-day-plaque-regrowth was collected at 5 time intervals during 6 hours after tooth brushing. The amount of collected saliva and plaque was measured, and the fluoride content was analysed using a fluoride sensitive electrode. All subjects repeated all study cycles 5 times, and 3 cycles per subject underwent statistical analysis using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results Immediately after brushing the fluoride concentration in saliva increased rapidly and dropped to the baseline level after 360 minutes. No difference was found between NaF and amine fluoride. All plaque fluoride levels were elevated after 30 minutes until 120 minutes after tooth brushing, and decreasing after 360 minutes to baseline. According to the highly individual profile of fluoride in saliva and plaque, both levels of bioavailability correlated for the first 30 minutes, and the fluoride content of saliva and plaque was back to baseline after 6 hours. Conclusions Fluoride levels in saliva and plaque are interindividually highly variable. However, no significant difference in bioavailability between NaF and amine fluoride, in saliva, or in plaque was found. PMID:22230722

  11. Studies of fluoride varnishes in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppä, L

    1991-01-01

    Despite the artificial fluoridation of drinking water in Kuopio, part of the children have high caries incidence. We therefore started our studies on fluoride varnishes in 1977 in an attempt to find a feasible means of applying fluoride topically in children at high risk of caries. In our first trial, the sodium fluoride varnish Duraphat was found to be effective in preventing caries, but the effectiveness of the silane fluoride varnish Fluor Protector could not be unequivocally established, despite the fact that Fluor Protector deposited markedly more fluoride in enamel than Duraphat. In a second study in children in a low-fluoride area, use of Duraphat was found to be more effective than fortnightly fluoride rinses or Fluor Protector. Increasing the frequency of application from two to four times a year did not increase the effectiveness of Duraphat even in highly caries-prone children in a 2-year trial. On the basis of peak values of fluoride in parotid saliva after application, use of either fluoride varnishes was considered safe. Although the fluoride content of the enamel remained elevated for at least two years after discontinuation of treatment with both varnishes, the caries preventive effect did not continue after the applications were stopped. This shows that increasing the fluoride content of enamel is not the main mechanism by which fluoride varnishes prevent caries, and that the applications need to be continued as long as caries is a problem.

  12. Screening biological traits and fluoride contents of native vegetations in arid environments to select efficiently fluoride-tolerant native plant species for in-situ phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhris, Asma; Laffont-Schwob, Isabelle; Mezghani, Imed; El Kadri, Lefi; Prudent, Pascale; Pricop, Anca; Tatoni, Thierry; Chaieb, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    High fluoride pollution has been detected in the surrounding soils of the coastal superphosphate industries in the Gulf of Gabes (Southeast of Tunisia). A study was conducted in vicinity of factories analysing plant functional traits combined with plant fluoride accumulation and soil metal concentrations aiming to screen more efficiently native plant species tolerant to this pollution. Aerial parts of 18 plant species out of the 10 most abundant species per site were harvested on two polluted sites of Gabes and Skhira at the vicinity of the factories and on the less polluted site of Smara. Native plant species accumulated fluoride following the gradient of soil pollution. Fluoride contents of plant aerial parts ranged from 37 mg kg(-1) to 360 mg kg(-1) and five plant species were only found in the most polluted site. However these latter had low biomass and soil cover. Crossing biological traits and fluoride contents, a selection grid for potentially restorative plant species enabled the selection of three native perennials i.e. Rhanterium suaveolens, Atractylis serratuloides and, Erodium glaucophyllum as potential candidates for an in-situ phytoremediation program on arid fluoride-polluted sites. This approach may be used in other fluoride-polluted Mediterranean environments.

  13. Novel wireless health monitor with acupuncture bio-potentials obtained by using a replaceable salt-water-wetted foam-rubber cushions on RFID-tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jium-Ming; Lu, Hung-Han; Lin, Cheng-Hung

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a bio-potential measurement apparatus including a wireless device for transmitting acupuncture bio-potential information to a remote control station for health conditions analysis and monitor. The key technology of this system is to make replaceable foam-rubber cushions, double-side conducting tapes, chip and antenna on the radio frequency identification (RFID) tag. The foam-rubber cushions can be wetted with salt-water and contact with the acupuncture points to reduce contact resistance. Besides, the double-side conducting tapes are applied to fix foam-rubber cushions. Thus, one can peel the used cushions or tapes away and supply new ones quickly. Since the tag is a flexible plastic substrate, it is easy to deploy on the skin. Besides, the amplifier made by CMOS technology on RFID chip could amplify the signals to improve S/N ratio and impedance matching. Thus, cloud server can wirelessly monitor the health conditions. An example shows that the proposed system can be used as a wireless health condition monitor, the numerical method and the criteria are given to analyze eleven bio-potentials for the important acupunctures of eleven meridians on a person's hands and legs. Then a professional doctor can know the performance of an individual and the cross-linking effects of the organs.

  14. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This interim report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for coating large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for coating inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. The final project report will feature an experimental evaluation of the performance of the two selected cladding techniques.

  15. Reduction Mechanism of Scandium Ion in Fluoride Salt Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙本良; 李成威; 翟玉春; 田彦文

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Sc3+ in LiF-NaF system was investigated. The cyclic voltammetry and chronopotentiometry were used to investigate the reduction mechanism of the electrochemical deposition of Sc3+ to Sc on Ag electrode in LiF-NaF system at 1043 K. Experimental results indicate that the electroreduction of Sc3+ to Sc is a reversible process with simple 3-electron transfer in one step controlled by diffusion.

  16. A Review on Adsorption of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habuda-Stanić, Mirna; Ergović Ravančić, Maja; Flanagan, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is one of the anionic contaminants which is found in excess in surface or groundwater because of geochemical reactions or anthropogenic activities such as the disposal of industrial wastewaters. Among various methods used for defluoridation of water such as coagulation, precipitation, membrane processes, electrolytic treatment, ion-exchange, the adsorption process is widely used. It offers satisfactory results and seems to be a more attractive method for the removal of fluoride in terms of cost, simplicity of design and operation. Various conventional and non-conventional adsorbents have been assessed for the removal of fluoride from water. In this review, a list of various adsorbents (oxides and hydroxides, biosorbents, geomaterials, carbonaceous materials and industrial products and by-products) and its modifications from literature are surveyed and their adsorption capacities under various conditions are compared. The effect of other impurities on fluoride removal has also been discussed. This survey showed that various adsorbents, especially binary and trimetal oxides and hydroxides, have good potential for the fluoride removal from aquatic environments. PMID:28788194

  17. Dental fluorosis: concentration of fluoride in drinking water and consumption of bottled beverages in school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Pérez, N; Torres-Mendoza, N; Borges-Yáñez, A; Irigoyen-Camacho, M E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify dental fluorosis prevalence and to analyze its association with tap water fluoride concentration and beverage consumption in school children from the city of Oaxaca, who were receiving fluoridated salt. A cross-sectional study was performed on elementary public school children. Dean's Index was applied to assess dental fluorosis. The parents of the children who were studied completed a questionnaire about socio-demographic characteristics and type of beverages consumed by their children. A total of 917 school children participated in this study. Dental fluorosis prevalence was 80.8%. The most frequent fluorosis category was very mild (41.0%), and 16.4% of the children were in the mild category. The mean water fluoride concentration was 0.43 ppm (±0.12). No association was detected between tap water fluoride concentration and fluorosis severity. The multinomial regression model showed an association among the mild fluorosis category and age (OR = 1.25, [95% CI 1.04, 1.50]) and better socio-economic status (OR = 1.78, [95% CI 1.21, 2.60]), controlling for fluoride concentration in water. Moderate and severe fluorosis were associated with soft drink consumption (OR = 2.26, [95% IC 1.01, 5.09]), controlling for age, socio-economic status, and water fluoride concentration. The prevalence of fluorosis was high. Mild fluorosis was associated with higher socio-economic status, while higher fluorosis severity was associated with soft drink consumption.

  18. Crystal Structures of Diaryliodonium Fluorides and their Implications for Fluorination Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Sok; Chun, Joong-Hyun; Hodošček, Milan; Pike, Victor

    2017-01-31

    The radiofluorination of diaryliodonium salts is of value for producing radiotracers for positron emission tomography. We report crystal structures for two diaryliodonium fluorides. Whereas diphenyliodon um fluoride (1a) exists as a tetramer bridged by four fluoride ions, 2-methylphenyl(phenyl)iodonium fluoride (2a) forms a fluoride-bridged dimer that is further halogen-bonded to two other monomers. We discuss the topological relationships between the two and their implications for fluorination in solution. Both radiofluorination and NMR spectroscopy show that thermolysis of 2a gives 2-fluorotoluene and fluorobenzene in a 2 to 1 ratio that is in good agreement with the ratio observed from the radiofluorination of 2-methylphenyl(phenyl)iodonium chloride (2b). The constancy of the product ratio affirms that the fluorinations occur via the same two rapidly interconverting transition states whose energy difference dictates chemoselectivity. The quantum chemical studies with density functional theory at the level of B3LYP/DGDZVP provide deeper insight into the role of 'ortho effect' in the mechanism of fluorination. By utilizing the crystal structures of 1a and 2a, the mechanisms of fluoroarene formation from diaryliodonium fluorides in their monomeric, homodimeric, heterodimeric, and tetrameric states were also investigated. According to this analysis, we propose that oligomerization energy dictates whether the fluorination occurs through a monomeric or an oligomeric pathway.

  19. Dynamics of Fluoride Bioavailability in the Biofilms of Different Oral Surfaces after Amine Fluoride and Sodium Fluoride Application

    OpenAIRE

    Ella A. Naumova; Christoph Dickten; Rico Jung; Florian Krauss; Henrik Rübesamen; Katharina Schmütsch; Tudor Sandulescu; Stefan Zimmer; Wolfgang H. Arnold

    2016-01-01

    It was the aim of this study to investigate differences in fluoride bioavailability in different oral areas after the application of amine fluoride (AmF) and sodium fluoride (NaF). The null hypothesis suggested no differences in the fluoride bioavailability. The tongue coating was removed and biofilm samples from the palate, oral floor and cheeks were collected. All subjects brushed their teeth with toothpaste containing AmF or NaF. Specimens were collected before, as well as immediately afte...

  20. CFD analysis of a Sphere-Packed Pipe for potential application in the molten salt blanket system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazififard, Mohammad [Kashan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Energy Systems; Suh, Kune Y. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and PHILOSOPHIA

    2016-08-15

    This computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis aims to evaluate the flow structures and heat transfer characteristics in Sphere Packed Pipe (SPP) for potential application in fusion reactors. The SPP consists of metal spheres which are packed in a pipe and disturb the flow inside of the pipe to boost the heat transfer. One of the potential applications of SPP is using it at the first wall of Force Free Helical Reactors (FFHR). The numerical model has improved on the numerical model, gaps between pebbles and channel wall, and turbulent model compared to previous numerical studies. The standard κε- model, Omega Reynolds stress model, the Shear Stress Transport (SST) model and κε EARSM/BSL have been applied as turbulence model to examine the effect of turbulence model on validation of numerical results. The present numerical model can be used in the design of the blanket of fusion reactor.

  1. Exposure potential of salt marsh units in Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge to environmental health stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defne, Zafer; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Jones, Daniel K.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Aquino, Kimberly C.; Carbo, Chelsea L.; Kaufhold, Erika E.; Benzel, William M.; Fisher, Shawn C.; Griffin, Dale W.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Loftin, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic contaminants, pathogens, and viruses are found in soils and sediments throughout the United States. Enhanced dispersion and concentration of these environmental health stressors in coastal regions can result from sea level rise and storm-derived disturbances. The combination of existing environmental health stressors and those mobilized by natural or anthropogenic disasters could adversely impact the health and resilience of coastal communities and ecosystems. This dataset displays the exposure potential to environmental health stressors in the Edwin B. Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge (EBFNWR), which spans over Great Bay, Little Egg Harbor, and Barnegat Bay in New Jersey, USA. Exposure potential is calculated with the Sediment-bound Contaminant Resiliency and Response (SCoRR) ranking system (Reilly and others, 2015) designed to define baseline and post-event sediment-bound environmental health stressors. Facilities obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) and Facility Registry Service (FRS) databases were ranked based on their potential contaminant hazard. Ranks were based in part on previous work by Olsen and others (2013), literature reviews, and an expert review panel. A 2000 meter search radius was used to identify nearby ranked facility locations. As part of the Hurricane Sandy Science Plan, the U.S. Geological Survey has started a Wetland Synthesis Project to expand National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards and forecast products to coastal wetlands. The intent is to provide federal, state, and local managers with tools to estimate their vulnerability and ecosystem service potential. For this purpose, the response and resilience of coastal wetlands to physical factors need to be assessed in terms of the ensuing change to their vulnerability and ecosystem services. EBFNWR was selected as a pilot study area.

  2. [Prevalence of dental fluorosis and additional sources of exposure to fluoride as risk factors to dental fluorosis in schoolchildren of Campeche, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán-Valladares, Perla Rubí; Cocom-Tun, Héctor; Casanova-Rosado, Juan Fernando; Vallejos-Sánchez, Ana Alicia; Medina-Solís, Carlo Eduardo; Maupomé, Gerardo

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis, and to evaluate supplementary fluoride sources as potential risk factors to fluorosis in school children aged 6-9. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 320 children attending elementary schools protected by a public preventive dental program in the city of Campeche, Mexico. A self-administered questionnaire directed to the mothers was delivered through the schools and collected in the same way. The examiners were trained and calibrated (kappa > 0.90) in modified Dean's Index. The fluorosis community index (FCI) was calculated. Bivariate analyses were made with Chi2 test; odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Logistic regression was used in the final model. Fluorosis prevalence was 56.3%, with very mild fluorosis present in 45% of children, mild in 10%, and severe in just 1.3%. The FCI was 0.7. The multivariate model showed that the effect of the supplementary fluoride sources was different between children that started brushing with toothpaste before two years of age (OR = 6.15; IC 95% = 2.03-18.67) and after (OR = 2.14; IC 95% = 1.16-3.94). Fluorosis prevalence was high for mild modalities, and low for more severe levels. According to FCI the dental fluorosis constitute a public health problem in the studied sample. Exposure to diverse fluoride sources -above and beyond the fluoridated salt program- was a risk factor for dental fluorosis in this community. Results suggest that toothpaste use in children two years of age and younger should be cautious, limited to follow current guidelines, and supervised by parents to minimize the risk of dental fluorosis.

  3. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    1997-01-01

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was me

  4. Fluoride level in saliva after bonding orthodontic brackets with a fluoride containing adhesive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogaard, B; Arends, J; Helseth, H; Dijkman, G; vanderKuijl, M

    The fluoride level in saliva is considered an important parameter in caries prevention. Elevation of the salivary fluoride level by a fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding adhesive would most likely be beneficial in the prevention of enamel caries. In this study, the fluoride level in saliva was

  5. Behavioral and neural responses of toads to salt solutions correlate with basolateral membrane potential of epidermal cells of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Baula, Victor; Tuttle, Wendy; Willumsen, Niels J; Larsen, Erik H

    2007-10-01

    Dehydrated toads initiated water absorption response (WR) behavior and absorbed water from dilute NaCl solutions. With 200-250 mM NaCl, WR behavior and water absorption were both suppressed. With 200-250 mM Na-gluconate, WR initiation was significantly greater than with NaCl but water loss was greater. Neural recordings from spinal nerve #6 showed a greater integrated response to 250 mM NaCl than to 250 mM Na-gluconate, whereas a larger rinse response was seen with Na-gluconate. Studies with isolated epithelium showed a large increase in conductance (G(t)) when 250 mM NaCl replaced NaCl Ringer's as the apical bathing solution that was accompanied by depolarization of the transepithelial potential (V(t)) and basolateral membrane potential (V(b)). Depolarization of V(b) corresponded with the neural response to 250 mM NaCl. When 250 mM Na-gluconate replaced Ringer's as the apical solution G(t) remained low, V(b) transiently hyperpolarized to values near the equilibrium potential for K(+) and corresponded with the reduced neural response. These results support the hypothesis that chemosensory function of the skin is analogous to that of mammalian taste cells but utilizes paracellular ion transport to a greater degree.

  6. Fluoridated milk for preventing dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C Albert; Chong, Lee Yee; Glenny, Anne-Marie

    2015-09-03

    , this is a substantial reduction, equivalent to a prevented fraction of 31%. For permanent teeth, the disease level was very low in the study, resulting in a small absolute effect size. The included study did not report any other outcomes of interest for this review (adverse events, dental pain, antibiotic use or requirement for general anaesthesia due to dental procedures). There is low quality evidence to suggest fluoridated milk may be beneficial to schoolchildren, contributing to a substantial reduction in dental caries in primary teeth. Due to the low quality of the evidence, further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate. There was only one relatively small study, which had important methodological limitations on the data for the effectiveness in reducing caries. Furthermore, there was no information about the potential harms of the intervention. Additional RCTs of high quality are needed before we can draw definitive conclusions about the benefits of milk fluoridation.

  7. Estimación de la exposición a fluoruros en Los Altos de Jalisco, México Estimation of exposure to fluoride in "Los Altos de Jalisco", México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Hurtado-Jiménez

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar la exposición a fluoruros y riesgos potenciales a la salud humana en Los Altos de Jalisco, México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se midió electroquímicamente la concentración de fluoruros en 105 pozos y seis tomas de agua potable, en los Altos de Jalisco, de mayo a julio de 2002. Se estimó la dosis de exposición y la ingestión total de fluoruros para: bebés de 10 kg, niños de 20 kg y adultos de 70 kg. RESULTADOS: La concentración de fluoruros en las muestras de agua varió entre 0.1 y 17.7 mg/l. El 45% de las muestras excede el límite permitido por la normatividad (1.5 mg/l. La ingestión total y dosis de exposición a fluoruros estimados están en los rangos de 0.5-18.4 mg/d y 0.04-1.8 mg/kg/d, respectivamente. CONCLUSIONES: Una parte importante de la población está expuesta a fluorosis dental, fluorosis esquelética y fracturas óseas. Para reducir los riesgos se debe evitar el consumo de sal fluorada, pastas dentales con flúor y agua potable cuya concentración de fluoruros sea mayor de 0.7 mg/l.OBJECTIVE: To estimate the level of fluoride exposure and human health risks in Los Altos de Jalisco (Jalisco State Heights region. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study was conducted between May and July 2002. The fluoride concentrations of 105 water wells and six tap water samples were electrochemically measured. Exposure doses to fluoride and total intake of fluoride were estimated for babies (10 kg, children (20 kg, and adults (70 kg. RESULTS: The fluoride concentration of the water samples ranged from 0.1 to 17.7 mg/l. More than 45% of the water samples exceeded the national guideline value for fluoride of 1.5 mg/l. The estimated values of the exposure doses to fluoride and total intake of fluoride were in the range of 0.04-1.8 mg/kg/d and 0.5-18.4 mg/d, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Dental fluorosis, skeletal fluorosis, and bone fractures are some of the potential health risks due to the intake of high doses of fluoride for the

  8. Antimicrobial and fluoride release capacity of orthodontic bonding materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Machado Caldeira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial and fluoride releasing capacity of 3 bonding materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty nine specimens with standardized surface smoothness and dimensions were prepared. The antimicrobial capacity of the materials against S. mutans, L. casei and C. albicans was evaluated by determining the percentage of growth inhibition of these microorganisms in an inoculated medium, obtained by optical density readouts on a spectrophotometer. The potential to interfere in microbial growth on the surface of the studied materials was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The fluoride release capacity in ultrapure water for 14 days was analyzed by means of ion chromatography. RESULTS: The PLUS group presented the highest percentage of microbial inhibition and the most contamination-free surface. The FUJI group presented the best fluoride release capacity. CONCLUSIONS: The TransbondTM Plus Color Change was the one that presented the best general behavior considering the evaluated aspects.

  9. Water Fluoridation Reporting System (Public Water Systems)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Water Fluoridation Reporting System (WFRS) has been developed to provide tools to assist states in managing fluoridation programs. WFRS is designed to track all...

  10. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF GREEN TEA POLYPHENOL AND FLUORIDE ON STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李鸣宇; 刘正

    2000-01-01

    Objective To disclose the mechanism of green tea polyphenol in the prevention of dental caries.Methods Using sodium fluoride (highly effective anticaries agent) as control and Streptococcus mutans (carigenous microbe) as target, green tea polyphenol (potential bacterial inhibitor) was used to testify its action on the change of microbial morphology, extramicrobial sucrase, glucosyltransferase (GTF), lactate hydrogenase (LDH),protein and pH values of the culture media. Results GTF activities were inhibited both by green tea polyphenol and sodium fluoride, the inhibitory efficacy was stronger in green tea polyphenol. Morphologic changes consisted of membrane disruption in tea polyphenol treated microbes, and cytoplasmic vacuolization in fluoride treated bacteria.High protein level in fluoride treated culture media means cytoplasmic decomposition, intracellular protein leakage into media. Conclusion The inhibition of GTF activity was stronger in green tea polyphenol treated microbes.The target of action was cell membrane disruption in green tea polyphenol treated cell and cytoplasmic in fluoride treated microbes.

  11. Fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Spliid, Henrik; Bruvo, M.;

    2010-01-01

    Første gang sammenhængen mellem caries (huller i tænderne) og fluoridindholdet i drikkevand blev diskuteret i vandværkskredse i Danmark var ved årsmødet i 1958. Her blev det oplyst, at fluorid i drikkevand beskytter mod caries, men man konstaterede også, at der nok ikke var stemning for fluorid......-tilsætning til drikkevandet (fluoridering). Siden da er emnet ikke taget op. Formålet med dette indlæg er at besvare spørgsmålene: 1. Er der behov for fluoridering af drikkevandet i Danmark? 2. Er der alternativer? Hvordan påvirker blødgøring af vand og andre vandbehandlingsmetoder dental caries hos børn og unge......? Som baggrund herfor vil vi redegøre for resultaterne af et netop afsluttet studium af sammenhængen mellem caries og drikkevandets sammensætning, specielt m.h.t. luoridindholdet og vandets calciumindhold (hårdhed). Undersøgelsen bekræfter, at fluorid i drikkevand i væsentlig grad beskytter mod caries...

  12. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Influence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites on bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X; Barbieri, D; Passanisi, G; Yuan, H; de Bruijn, J D

    2015-05-01

    The influence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites on ectopic bone formation was evaluated in sheep. Nano-apatite powders with different replacement levels of OH groups by fluoride (F) (0% (F0), 50% (F50), 100% (F100), and excessive (F200)) were co-extruded with poly (d,l-lactide) at a weight ratio of 1:1. Fluoride release from the composites (CF0, CF50, CF100, and CF200) was evaluated in vitro and bone formation was assessed after intramuscular implantation in sheep. After 24 weeks in simulated physiological solution, CF0 and CF50 showed negligible fluoride release, whereas it was considerable from the CF100 and CF200 composites. Histology showed that the incidence of de novo bone formation decreased in implants with increasing fluoride content indicating a negative influence of fluoride on ectopic bone formation. Furthermore, a significant decrease in resorption of the high fluoride-content composites and a reduction in the number of multinucleated giant cells were seen. These results show that instead of promoting, the presence of fluoride in poly(d,l-lactide)/apatite composites seemed to suppresses their resorption and osteoinductive potential in non-osseous sites. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Exposure to fluorides from drinking water in the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trejo-Vázquez, R; Bonilla-Petriciolet, A

    2001-08-01

    Determine the fluoride content in all the wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes, Mexico, in order to establish the population's degree of exposure. The fluoride content of the 126 wells that supply drinking water to the city of Aguascalientes was determined, using the SPADNS method, in accordance with two Mexican regulations, NMX-AA-77-1982 and NMX-014-SSAI-1993. Using that data, we created fluoride isopleth maps showing the distribution of fluoride concentrations in the water supplies for the city of Aguascalientes. We also estimated exposure doses for the city's inhabitants. The mean analysis uncertainty was 3.9%. Seventy-three wells had a fluoride concentration of" 1.5 mg/L, which was the maximum permissible value set by the Mexican standards then in effect. All the maximum exposure doses surpassed the minimum risk level set by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) of the Department of Health and Human Services of the United States of America. In the children under 1 year of age, even the minimum does was slightly higher than the ATSDR risk level. From estimating the fluoride exposure doses caused by water consumption in the city of Aguascalientes and comparing those doses with ones from other states in Mexico, we concluded that the fluoride intake in Aguascalientes represents a potential risk for inhabitants' health. The fluoride content of the city's drinking water should be reduced to 0.69 mg/L.

  15. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in two different diameter channels (0.083 and 0.370Ã). In the 0

  16. The Effect of Fluoride in Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, L. R.; Gallagher, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    This article discusses the effect of fluoride on bone tissue and the possible role of fluoride in the treatment of osteoporosis. At present, fluoride treatment should be restricted to clinical trials until its risks and benefits have been further evaluated. (Author/MT)

  17. Fluoride in African groundwater: Occurrence and mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasak, S.; Griffioen, J.; Feenstra, L.

    2010-01-01

    Fluoride in groundwater has both natural and anthropogenic sources. Fluoride bearing minerals, volcanic gases and various industrial and agricultural activities can contribute to high concentrations. High intake of fluoride from drinking water is the main cause of fluorosis and may lead to many othe

  18. Fluoride: its role in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló Tenuta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of decades of research on fluoride and the recognition of its role as the cornerstone of dental caries reduction in the last fifty years, questions still arise on its use at community, self-applied and professional application levels. Which method of fluoride delivery should be used? How and when should it be used? How can its benefits be maximized and still reduce the risks associated with its use? These are only some of the challenging questions facing us daily. The aim of this paper is to present scientific background to understand the importance of each method of fluoride use considering the current caries epidemiological scenario, and to discuss how individual or combined methods can be used based on the best evidence available.

  19. Organic-rich shales from internal Betic basins (SE Spain): potential source rocks analogs for the pre-Messinian Salt play in the western Mediterranean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Permanyer, A.; Jorge, R.; Baudino, R.; Gilbert, L.

    2016-07-01

    Southeastern Spain has a large number of Late Neogene basins with substantial evaporitic deposits that developed under an overall NNW-SSE compressional regime related to the African-European tectonic plates collision. Located in the Betic Cordillera, they can be considered as marginal Mediterranean basins that became gradually isolated during the Tortonian and Early Messinian due to tectonic uplift. Different evaporitic units accumulated in these basins during isolation and, in several cases, evaporitic conditions were associated to episodes of important organic matter accumulation. Results obtained from Late Tortonian to Early Messinian shales collected from boreholes, mines and outcrops in the internal Betic basins of Las Minas de Hellín, Cenajo and Socovos are presented. The organic matter was studied under fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the main geochemical characteristics defined. They show a relation between organic-rich intervals with high potential of hydrocarbon generation, native sulfur, bio-induced dolomite and evaporitic deposits. These organicrich shales can be found before, during and after the evaporitic episodes. Results from the present study are compared with those previously obtained in the pre-evaporitic deposits of the Lorca Basin that showed high oil generation potential, a restricted-marine origin of the organic matter and a low degree of maturity. The occurrence of such potential source rocks in several basins points to a broad regional distribution. At a larger scale, in the Mediterranean Basin, organic-rich sediments were deposited before and during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. The studied examples could represent analogs for potential source rocks of the pre-Messinian salt play in the Western Mediterranean. (Author)

  20. High-fluoride groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N Subba

    2011-05-01

    Fluoride (F(-)) is essential for normal bone growth, but its higher concentration in the drinking water poses great health problems and fluorosis is common in many parts of India. The present paper deals with the aim of establishment of facts of the chemical characteristics responsible for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater, after understanding the chemical behavior of F(-) in relation to pH, total alkalinity (TA), total hardness (TH), carbonate hardness (CH), non-carbonate hardness (NCH), and excess alkalinity (EA) in the groundwater observed from the known areas of endemic fluorosis zones of Andhra Pradesh that have abundant sources of F(-)-bearing minerals of the Precambrians. The chemical data of the groundwater shows that the pH increases with increase F(-); the concentration of TH is more than the concentration of TA at low F(-) groundwater, the resulting water is represented by NCH; the TH has less concentration compared to TA at high F(-) groundwater, causing the water that is characterized by EA; and the water of both low and high concentrations of F(-) has CH. As a result, the F(-) has a positive relation with pH and TA, and a negative relation with TH. The operating mechanism derived from these observations is that the F(-) is released from the source into the groundwater by geochemical reactions and that the groundwater in its flowpath is subjected to evapotranspiration due to the influence of dry climate, which accelerates a precipitation of CaCO(3) and a reduction of TH, and thereby a dissolution of F(-). Furthermore, the EA in the water activates the alkalinity in the areas of alkaline soils, leading to enrichment of F(-). Therefore, the alkaline condition, with high pH and EA, and low TH, is a more conducive environment for the higher concentration of F(-) in the groundwater.

  1. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-04-15

    The principal research effort for the first six months of Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization. Understanding the burial and thermal maturation histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in petroleum system characterization. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicate that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was the Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The Upper Cretaceous Tuscaloosa shale was an effective local petroleum source rock in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and a possible local source bed in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion was initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Reservoir rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata. Seal rocks include Jurassic, Cretaceous and Tertiary anhydrite and shale beds. Petroleum traps include structural and combination traps.

  2. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation.

  3. Synthesis, structure, and reactivity of high oxidation state silver fluorides and related compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucier, George Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This thesis has been largely concerned with defining the oxidizing power of Ag(III) and Ag(II) in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) solution. Emphasis was on cationic species, since in a cation the electronegativity of a given oxidation state is greatest. Cationic Ag(III) solv has a short half life at ordinary temperatures, oxidizing the solvent to elemental fluorine with formation of Ag(II). Salts of such a cation have not yet been preparable, but solutions which must contain such a species have proved to be effective and powerful oxidizers. In presence of PtF6-, RuF6-, or RhF6-, Ag(III) solv effectively oxidizes the anions to release the neutral hexafluorides. Such reactivity ranks cationic Ag(III) as the most powerfully oxidizing chemical agent known as far. Unlike its trivalent relative Ag (II) solv is thermodynamically stable in acid aHF. Nevertheless, it oxidizes IrF6- to IrF6 at room temperature, placing its oxidizing potential not more than 2 eV below that of cationic Ag(III). Range of Ag2+ (MF6-2 salts attainable in aHF has been explored. An anion must be stable with respect to electron loss to Ag2+. The anion must also be a poor F- donor; otherwise, either AgF+ salts or AgF2 are generated.

  4. Computational Studies of Structures and Dynamics of 1, 3-Dimethylimidazolim Salt Liquid and their Interfaces Using Polarizable Potential Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Tsun-Mei; Dang, Liem X.

    2009-03-12

    The structures, thermodynamics, dynamical properties of bulk and air/liquid interfaces of three ionic liquids, 1,3-dimethylimidazolium [dmim]+, Cl-, Br-, and I- are studied using molecular dynamics techniques. In bulk melts, the radial distribution functions reveal a significant long-range structural correlation in these ionic liquids. From the angular distribution analysis, the imidazolium rings are found to lie parallel to each other at short distances, consistent with the structures observed in the crystal state. The single-ion dynamics are studied via mean-square-displacements, velocity and orientational correlation functions. The diffusion coefficients and reorientational times are found to be much smaller than H2O. We also observe that anion size plays an important role in the dynamics of ionic liquids. The computed density profiles of the ionic liquid/vapor interface exhibit oscillatory behavior, indicative of surface layering at the interface. Further analysis reveals that the [dmim]+ ions show preferred orientation at the interface with the ring parallel to the surface and methyl group attached to the ring pointing into the vapor phase. The computed surface tensions indicated small differences between these ionic liquids and are inline with recent experimental measurements. The calculated potential drops of these ionic liquids are found to be small and negative. These results could imply that the cation dipoles are likely to orient in the plane that parallel to the surface normal axis. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  5. Fluoride and Oral Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Mullane, D M; Baez, R J; Jones, S

    2016-01-01

    of the original 1994 document, again using the expertise of researchers from the extensive fi elds of knowledge required to successfully implement complex interventions such as the use of fl uorides to improve dental and oral health. Financial support for research into the development of these new fl uoride......The discovery during the fi rst half of the 20th century of the link between natural fl uoride, adjusted fl uoride levels in drinking water and reduced dental caries prevalence proved to be a stimulus for worldwide on-going research into the role of fl uoride in improving oral health...... including salt, milk, tablets, toothpaste, gels and varnishes. In 1993, the World Health Organization convened an Expert Committee to provide authoritative information on the role of fl uorides in the promotion of oral health throughout the world (WHO TRS 846, 1994). This present publication is a revision...

  6. Fluoride concentrations in three types of commercially packed tea drinks in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, Shih-Chun Candice; Hsiao, Pao-Kuei; Chiang, Kuang-Mao

    2003-01-01

    Tea is a popular drink around the world. It is also one of the major sources of fluoride intake. The objectives of this study were to assess fluoride concentrations in popular non-, semi-, and full-fermented tea drinks sold on the Taiwan market. Concentration differences among three types of commercially available tea drinks (tea leaf, tea bag, and packaged tea beverage) were explored. Several influential factors in intake concentrations were evaluated. The acute threshold intake (ATI) and allowable daily intake (ADI) of those tea drinks were also estimated. For each commercial type, samples from the most popular tea in one particular fermentation degree (non, semi, and full) were randomly purchased and analyzed for fluoride concentrations. Fluoride levels in different rounds of tea, in different containers, and with different ratios of water and tea leaf were also assessed. In total, 132 tea samples were analyzed. The mean fluoride concentrations in leaf tea without the first round, leaf tea with the first round, bagged tea, and packaged tea were 7.04, 7.79, 5.37, and 25.7 mg/l, respectively. Most of the intake concentrations in those samples exceeded 4 mg/l F, the lower bound of fluoride levels reported in the literatures to be associated with a lower IQ in children and a higher risk of bone fracture. Fluoride concentrations in packaged tea were the highest among the three types of commercially available tea. For studied leaf and bagged tea, almost a constant amount of fluoride was infused from the same amount of tea leaf regardless of the water volume. Besides this, making tea with glass or pottery tea makers would not affect fluoride intake concentrations. Acute intoxication is unlikely to occur. However, tea lovers in high fluoride content areas shall consider limit their consumption of tea drinks to avoid potential chronic effects.

  7. Are topical fluorides effective for treating incipient carious lesions?: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Montagner, Anelise Fernandes; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; de Oliveira Rocha, Rachel

    2016-02-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the effectiveness of professional topical fluoride application (gels or varnishes) on the reversal treatment of incipient enamel carious lesions in primary or permanent dentition. Literature searching was carried out by the authors in PubMed (MEDLINE), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Turning Research Into Practice, and ClinicalTrials.gov to verify the clinical trials available about the outcome. From 754 potentially eligible studies, 21 were selected for full-text analysis, 5 were included for review, and 3 for meta-analysis. The statistical analysis was performed only for studies assessing fluoride varnish; there were insufficient data to perform it for fluoride gel studies. Two reviewers independently selected the studies, extracted the data, and assessed the risk of bias. Pooled-effect estimates were expressed as the weighted mean difference between groups. The therapeutic methods ranged considerably regarding the fluoride application protocols. There was a significant trend of effectiveness of fluoride varnish on the reversal of incipient enamel carious lesions (P Fluoride varnish seems to be an effective treatment for the reversal of incipient carious lesions in primary and permanent dentition; however, further clinical trials concerning efficacy of topical fluorides for treating those lesions are still required, mainly regarding the fluoride gel. Considering the scientific evidence on topical fluorides, pediatric dentists can use fluoride varnishes as an adjuvant for the treatment of active white-spot lesions in primary or permanent dentition. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Total and soluble fluoride content in commercial dentifrices in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Carola A; Giacaman, Rodrigo A; Muñoz-Sandoval, Cecilia; Cury, Jaime A

    2012-12-01

    Regardless of the total amount of fluoride (F) in a dentifrice, only the soluble fraction presents anti-caries activity and its concentration must be above 1000 ppm. No information regarding the quality of F in Chilean toothpastes is available. The aim of this study, therefore, was to determine the F concentration present in commercially-available toothpastes in Chile. Eighteen toothpastes of five different brands were tested, each purchased from three different chain drugstores in Chile. For each toothpaste, total, total soluble and ionic F concentrations were assessed and expressed as ppm of F (μg F/g). Among the dentifrices evaluated, 77.8% contained NaF (sodium fluoride), 16.7% MFP (monofluorphosphate) and 5.6% both types of F salts; 77.2% of the dentifrices showed similar total F content to that declared by the manufacturer in the labeling with only five with lower concentration than expected, beyond a 5% disagreement tolerance range. Total soluble F ranged from 958.8-1496.3 ppm (mean ± SD: 1270.5 ± 183.7). Five toothpastes showed lower total soluble F than total F. Only one toothpaste showed soluble salt levels below the recommended dose for this type of dentifrice. Most Chilean dentifrices evaluated contained soluble F within the range of 1000-1500 ppm and, therefore, may have anti-caries activity.

  9. The role of fluoride in erosion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte; Young, Alix; Ganss, Carolina

    2014-01-01

    The role of fluoride in erosion therapy has long been questioned. However, recent research has yielded positive results. In this chapter, an overview of the literature is provided regarding the application of fluorides in the prevention and treatment of erosion and erosive wear. The results are presented and discussed for different fluoride sources such as monovalent and polyvalent fluorides, and for different vehicles such as toothpastes, solutions and rinses, as well as varnishes and gels. It is concluded that fluoride applications are very likely to be of use in the preventive treatment of erosive wear. Most promising are high-concentration, acidic formulations and the polyvalent fluoride sources, with the best evidence available for stannous fluoride. However, the evidence base for clinical effectiveness is still small. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Resource Assessment of the In-Place and Potentially Recoverable Deep Natural Gas Resource of the Onshore Interior Salt Basins, North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2005-10-28

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been petroleum system characterization and modeling. Understanding the burial, thermal maturation, and hydrocarbon expulsion histories of the strata in the onshore interior salt basins of the North Central and Northeastern Gulf of Mexico areas is important in hydrocarbon resource assessment. The underburden and overburden rocks in these basins and subbasins are a product of their rift-related geohistory. Petroleum source rock analysis and initial thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling indicated that an effective regional petroleum source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins, the North Louisiana Salt Basin, Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin, was Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. The initial modeling also indicated that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and that hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary in the Manila Subbasin and Conecuh Subbasin. Refined thermal maturation and hydrocarbon expulsion modeling and additional petroleum source rock analysis have confirmed that the major source rock in the onshore interior salt basins and subbasins is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone. Hydrocarbon generation and expulsion were initiated in the Early to Late Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary.

  11. Comparison of salivary fluoride levels following use of dentifrices containing different concentrations of fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagpal D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Many industrialized countries have reported a decline in caries prevalence over the past few decades. These reductions have been related to the regular use of fluoride dentifrices. Fluoride dentifrices are the most cost-effective and efficient means of caries prevention. However, there have been concerns regarding the risk of fluorosis in children due to the ingestion of dentifrices. This has led to the use of dentifrices with low concentration of fluoride. Salivary fluoride levels after tooth-brushing have been shown to be related to the anticaries efficacy of fluoride dentifrices. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of the concentration of fluoride in the dentifrice, on the salivary fluoride level in children. Twenty children in the age group of five to six years were randomly selected and divided into two groups using, either 500ppm or 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice (sodium monofluorophosphate. Salivary fluoride levels at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, minutes after brushing were estimated. The data collected was statistically evaluated using the unpaired t-test. The results showed that salivary fluoride levels following use of 500ppm fluoride dentifrice were significantly lower than 1000ppm fluoride dentifrice. The low salivary fluoride levels may thereby reduce the anticaries efficacy. Hence, the pros and cons of recommending a low fluoride concentration dentifrice must be judiciously considered.

  12. Cholesterol-Lowering Potentials of Lactic Acid Bacteria Based on Bile-Salt Hydrolase Activity and Effect of Potent Strains on Cholesterol Metabolism In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study collected different probiotic isolates from animal and plant sources to evaluate the bile-salt hydrolase activity of probiotics in vitro. The deconjugation potential of bile acid was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. HepG2 cells were cultured with probiotic strains with high BSH activity. The triglyceride (TG and apolipoprotein B (apo B secretion by HepG2 cells were evaluated. Our results show that the BSH activity and bile-acid deconjugation abilities of Pediococcus acidilactici NBHK002, Bifidobacterium adolescentis NBHK006, Lactobacillus rhamnosus NBHK007, and Lactobacillus acidophilus NBHK008 were higher than those of the other probiotic strains. The cholesterol concentration in cholesterol micelles was reduced within 24 h. NBHK007 reduced the TG secretion by 100% after 48 h of incubation. NBHK002, NBHK006, and NBHK007 could reduce apo B secretion by 33%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, after 24 h of incubation. The product PROBIO S-23 produced a greater decrease in the total concentration of cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, TG, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance in the serum or livers of hamsters with hypercholesterolemia compared with that of hamsters fed with a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet. These results show that the three probiotic strains of lactic acid bacteria are better candidates for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Preliminary Safeguards Assessment for the Pebble-Bed Fluoride High-Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR) Concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Disser, Jay; Arthur, Edward; Lambert, Janine

    2016-09-01

    This report examines a preliminary design for a pebble bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (PB-FHR) concept, assessing it from an international safeguards perspective. Safeguards features are defined, in a preliminary fashion, and suggestions are made for addressing further nuclear materials accountancy needs.

  14. Fluoride remediation using floating macrophytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Six aquatic macrophytes, such as Pistia stratiotes, Ceratophyllum demersum, Nymphoides indica, Lemna major, Azolla pinnata,and Eichhornia crassipes were considered for remove fluoride from aqueous solution. Five different concentrations (10, 30, 50, and 100 ppm of fluoride solution were taken in 1 L plastic container. Fixed weight (20 g of macrophytes along with 500 ml fluoride solution was taken in each plastic container for 72 hours observation. Results demonstrated all the macrophytes show highest fluoride removal during 24 h to 48 h, but after 72 h their efficiency reduced drastically. The species N. indica showed better removal efficiency than other experimental macrophytes. In general, pigment measurement data indicated higher concentration at 72 h. However, Pistia sp. showed higher concentration of pigmentation at intermediate time interval (48 h. Higher level of dry weight to fresh weight ratio was recorded for L. major and A. pinnata at all concentrations, excepting at 10 ppm. In addition, all macrophytes showed lower RGR at higher concentration. Isotherm study indicated that macrophyte C. demersum is a good fitted with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm whereas L. major with Langmuir isotherm during 24 hours.

  15. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  16. Special Report: Fluoridation of Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hileman, Bette

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the controversy regarding water fluoridation in the United States during the last 50 years. Discusses the current status; benefits; and health risks including skeletal fluorosis, kidney disease, hypersensitivity, mutagenic effects, birth defects, and cancer. Presents statistics and anecdotal accounts. (CW)

  17. Investigating the Intercalation Chemistry of Alkali Ions in Fluoride Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Tanghong; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Lei; Bayliss, Ryan D.; Lin, Feng; Plews, Michael R.; Nordlund, Dennis; Doeff, Marca M.; Persson, Kristin A.; Cabana, Jordi

    2017-02-07

    Reversible intercalation reactions provide the basis for modern battery electrodes. Despite decades of exploration of electrode materials, the potential for materials in the nonoxide chemical space with regards to intercalation chemistry is vast and rather untested. Transition metal fluorides stand out as an obvious target. To this end, we report herein a new family of iron fluoride-based perovskite cathode materials AxK1–xFeF3 (A = Li, Na). By starting with KFeF3, approximately 75% of K+ ions were subsequently replaced by Li+ and Na+ through electrochemical means. X-ray diffraction and Fe X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirmed the existence of intercalation of alkali metal ions in the perovskite structure, which is associated with the Fe2+/3+ redox couple. A computational study by density functional theory showed agreement with the structural and electrochemical data obtained experimentally, which suggested the possibility of fluoride-based materials as potential intercalation electrodes. This study increases our understanding of the intercalation chemistry of ternary fluorides, which could inform efforts toward the exploration of new electrode materials.

  18. Salting of dry-cured meat – A potential cause of contamination with the ochratoxin A-producing species Penicillium nordicum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonjak, Silva; Ličen, Mia; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2011-01-01

    different dry-cured meat products from one of the Slovenian meat-processing plants. Since we have isolated P. nordicum in high counts also from Artic habitats, such as sea water and sea ice and due to its ability to grow well at low temperatures and at increased salinity, sea salt was suspected...... medium incubated at 15 °C, while a salt sample from an open vessel in the meat-processing area developed high, uncountable number of colonies. Amplified fragment length polymorphism analyses of P. nordicum isolates from different sources showed that contamination of meat products via salt was possible...

  19. The influence of different fluoride compounds and treatment conditions on dental enamel: a descriptive in vitro study of the CaF(2) precipitation and microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, M

    2001-01-01

    Electron and atomic force microscopy techniques have been applied to characterize both the in vitro deposition intensity and the microstructure of the KOH-soluble fluoride precipitates on human dental enamel. The study was focused on the effects of amine fluoride, sodium fluoride and sodium monofluorophosphate having a fluoride concentration of 0.1% F in acidulated and aqueous solutions. Under certain conditions, fluoride globules were formed within an initiation time of less than 20 s. This result supports the potential significance of this process for the cariostatic action of fluorides during dentifrice use. The deposition intensity seems to be dependent on the availability of Ca and F ions on the dental surface. A nanocrystalline calcium fluoride-like microstructure was revealed, with an additional phosphorus and oxygen incorporation as a function of the treatment time. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Fissure seal or fluoride varnish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deery, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Data sourcesCochrane Oral Health Group Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the US National Institutes of Health Trials Register and the World Health Organization (WHO) Clinical Trials Registry PlatformStudy selectionRandomised controlled trials (RCTs) with at least 12 months follow-up, in which fissure sealants, or fissure sealants together with fluoride varnishes, were compared with fluoride varnishes alone for preventing caries in occlusal surfaces of permanent teeth of children and adolescents.Data extraction and synthesisTwo reviewers independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. Studies were grouped and analysed on the basis of sealant material type (resin-based sealant and glass ionomer-based sealant, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer) and different follow-up periods. Odds ratio were calculated for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. Mean differences were calculated for continuous outcomes and data. Evidence quality was assessed using GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) methods.ResultsEight RCTs involving a total of 1747 children aged five to ten years of age were included. Three trials compared resin-based fissure sealant versus fluoride varnish. Results from two studies (358 children) after two years were combined. Sealants prevented more caries, pooled odds ratio (OR) = 0.69 (95%CI; 0.50 to 0.94). One trial with follow-up at four and nine years found that the caries-preventive benefit for sealants was maintained, with 26% of sealed teeth and 55.8% of varnished teeth having developed caries at nine years. Evidence for glass-ionomer sealants was of low quality. One split-mouth trial analysing 92 children at two-year follow-up found a significant difference in favour of resin-based fissure sealant together with fluoride varnish compared with fluoride varnish only (OR

  1. Urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after intake of fluoridated milk and use of fluoride-containing toothpaste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norman, M; Twetman, S; Hultgren Talvilahti, A

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the urinary fluoride excretion in preschool children after drinking fluoridated milk with 0.185 mg F and 0.375 mg F and to study the impact of use of fluoride toothpaste. Basic research design: Double-blind cross-over study. Participants: Nine healthy children, 2.5-4.5 years...... of age. Intervention: In a randomized order, participants drank 1.5 dl milk once daily for 7 days with no fluoride added (control), 0.185 mg fluoride added and 0.375 mg fluoride added. The experiment was performed twice with (Part I) and without (Part II) parental tooth brushing with 1,000 ppm fluoride...... toothpaste. The fluoride content in the piped drinking water was 0.5 mg F/L. Main outcome measure: Urinary fluoride excretion. Results: The 24-hour urinary fl uoride excretion/kg body weight varied from 0.014 mg F for the placebo intervention and non-fluoride toothpaste to 0.027 mg F for the 0.375 mg...

  2. Global affordability of fluoride toothpaste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmgren Christopher J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Dental caries remains the most common disease worldwide and the use of fluoride toothpaste is a most effective preventive public health measure to prevent it. Changes in diets following globalization contribute to the development of dental caries in emerging economies. The aim of this paper is to compare the cost and relative affordability of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries. The hypothesis is that fluoride toothpaste is not equally affordable in high-, middle- and low-income countries. Methods Data on consumer prices of fluoride toothpastes were obtained from a self-completion questionnaire from 48 countries. The cost of fluoride toothpaste in high-, middle- and low-income countries was compared and related to annual household expenditure as well as to days of work needed to purchase the average annual usage of toothpaste per head. Results The general trend seems to be that the proportion of household expenditure required to purchase the annual dosage of toothpaste increases as the country's per capita household expenditure decreases. While in the UK for the poorest 30% of the population only 0.037 days of household expenditure is needed to purchase the annual average dosage (182.5 g of the lowest cost toothpaste, 10.75 days are needed in Kenya. The proportion of annual household expenditure ranged from 0.02% in the UK to 4% in Zambia to buy the annual average amount of lowest cost toothpaste per head. Conclusion Significant inequalities in the affordability of this essential preventive care product indicate the necessity for action to make it more affordable. Various measures to improve affordability based on experiences from essential pharmaceuticals are proposed.

  3. REAKTOR INNOVATIVE MOLTEN SALT (IMSR DENGAN SISTEM KESELAMATAN PASIF MENYELURUH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andang Widiharto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pengembangan Teknologi Reaktor Nuklir pada masa mendatang mengarah pada peningkatan aspek keselamatan, peningkatan pendayagunaan bahan bakar, reduksi limbah radioaktif, ketahanan terhadap proliferasi bahan-bakar nuklir dan peningkatan aspek ekonomi. reaktor Innovative Molten Salt (IMSR adalah reaktor nuklir yang menggunakan bahan bakar cair berupa garam lebur fluoride (7LiF-ThF4-UF4-MaFx. Reaktor IMSR didesain sebagai reaktor pembiak termal, yaitu membiakkan U-233 dari Th-232. Hal ini untuk menjawab permasalahan sustainabilitas ketersedian sumber daya bahan bakar nuklir dan reduksi limbah radioaktif. Dalam aspek keselamatan, desain reaktor IMSR memiliki sifat inherent safe, yaitu koefisien umpan balik daya yang negatif serta memiliki fitur-fitur keselamatan pasif. Fitur-fitur keselamatan pasif terdiri dari sistem shutdown pasif, sistem pendinginan pasif pasca shutdown serta sistem pendinginan pasif untuk produk fisi. Kecelakaan yang berpotensi terjadi pada IMSR, yaitu kecelakaan kehilangan aliran bahan bakar, kecelakaan kehilangan aliran pendingin, kecelakaan kehilangan kemampuan pengambilan kalor serta kecelakaan kerusakan integritas sistem reaktor, dapat ditangani sepenuhnya secara pasif hingga mencapai kondisi shutdown selamat. Kata kunci: keselamatan pasif, inherent safe, IMSR   The next Nuclear Reactor Technology developments are directed to the increasing of the aspects of safety, fuel utility, radioactive waste reduction, proliferation retention and economy. Innovative Molten Salt Reactor (IMSR is a nuclear reactor design that uses fluoride molten salt (7LiF-ThF4-UF4-MaFx. IMSR is designed as a thermal breeder reactor, i.e. to produce U-233 from Th-232. This is the answer of natural nuclear fuel sustainability and radioactive waste problems. In term of safety aspect, IMSR design has inherent safe characteristics, i.e. negative power feedback coefficient, and passive safety features. The passive safety features are passive shutdown

  4. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Brun, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  5. Molten salts and nuclear energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Brun, Christian [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble cedex (France)]. E-mail: christian.lebrun@lpsc.in2p3.fr

    2007-01-15

    Molten salts (fluorides or chlorides) were considered near the beginning of research into nuclear energy production. This was initially due to their advantageous physical and chemical properties: good heat transfer capacity, radiation insensitivity, high boiling point, wide range solubility for actinides. In addition it was realised that molten salts could be used in numerous situations: high temperature heat transfer, core coolants with solid fuels, liquid fuel in a molten salt reactor, solvents for spent nuclear solid fuel in the case of pyro-reprocessing and coolant and tritium production in the case of fusion. Molten salt reactors, one of the six innovative concepts chosen by the Generation IV international forum, are particularly interesting for use as either waste incinerators or thorium cycle systems. As the neutron balance in the thorium cycle is very tight, the possibility to perform online extraction of some fission product poisons from the salt is very attractive. In this article the most important questions that must be addressed to demonstrate the feasibility of molten salt reactor will be reviewed.

  6. Reliable Quantification of the Potential for Equations Based on Spot Urine Samples to Estimate Population Salt Intake: Protocol for a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Liping; Crino, Michelle; Wu, Jason HY; Woodward, Mark; Land, Mary-Anne; McLean, Rachael; Webster, Jacqui; Enkhtungalag, Batsaikhan; Nowson, Caryl A; Elliott, Paul; Cogswell, Mary; Toft, Ulla; MILL, Jose G.; Furlanetto,Tania W.; Ilich, Jasminka Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background Methods based on spot urine samples (a single sample at one time-point) have been identified as a possible alternative approach to 24-hour urine samples for determining mean population salt intake. Objective The aim of this study is to identify a reliable method for estimating mean population salt intake from spot urine samples. This will be done by comparing the performance of existing equations against one other and against estimates derived from 24-hour urine samples. The effect...

  7. Aluminium fumarate metal-organic framework: A super adsorbent for fluoride from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmakar, Sankha [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Dechnik, Janina [Institut fur Anorganische Chemie und Strukturchemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, 40204 Düsseldorf (Germany); Janiak, Christoph, E-mail: janiak@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut fur Anorganische Chemie und Strukturchemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf, 40204 Düsseldorf (Germany); De, Sirshendu, E-mail: sde@che.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2016-02-13

    Highlights: • Maximum adsorption of fluoride on AlFu MOF occurred at 293 K. • Maximum adsorption capacity for fluoride was 600 mg/g at 293 K. • The MOF exhibited adequate charge characteristic and high surface area (1156 m{sup 2}/g). • Second order reaction and intra particle diffusion (first 1.5 h) was prevalent. • AlFu MOF exhibited high potential for fluoride removal from water. - Abstract: Potential of aluminium fumarate metal organic framework (MOF) for fluoride removal from groundwater has been explored in this work. The laboratory produced MOF exhibited characteristics similar to the commercial version. MOF was found to be micro-porous with surface area of 1156 m{sup 2}/g and average pore size 17 Å. Scanning electron micrograph of the AlFu MOF showed minute pores and texture was completely different from either of the parent materials. Change in the composition of AlFu MOF after fluoride adsorption was evident from powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermal stability of the AlFu MOF up to 700 K was established by thermo-gravimetric analysis. Incorporation of fluoride phase after adsorption was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence analysis. As observed from FTIR study, hydroxyl ions in AlFu MOF were substituted by fluoride. 0.75 g/l AlFu MOF was good enough for complete removal of 30 mg/l fluoride concentration in feed solution. The maximum adsorption capacity for fluoride was 600, 550, 504 and 431 mg/g, respectively, at 293, 303, 313 and 333 K.

  8. Focus on fluorides: update on the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M

    2014-06-01

    Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluoride Varnishes--Is There a Correlation Between Fluoride Release and Deposition on Enamel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolis, Carlo; Härtli, Gian Peider; Lendenmann, Urs

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride uptake of enamel after application of fluoride varnishes was compared with fluoride release into artificial saliva. The hypothesis was that fluoride uptake is higher for products exhibiting faster fluoride release. Fluoride varnishes, i.e. Fluor Protector S, Duraphat, MI Varnish, Clinpro White Varnish, Profluorid Varnish and Enamel Pro Varnish were applied on bovine enamel specimens. Subsequently, specimens were incubated in artificial saliva. After removal of the varnishes, surface bound fluoride was extracted with potassium hydroxide and measured with an ion-selective electrode. Structurally bound fluoride was etched from the same specimens with perchloric acid. Fluoride release of varnish films into artificial saliva was measured for comparison. After 4 h in artificial saliva, the highest total enamel fluoride uptake of 47.9 μg F·cm-² was found with Fluor Protector S, followed by Enamel Pro Varnish with 22.1 μg F·cm-². The other products ranged between 12-16 μg F·cm-². This was several times higher than the negative control. Fluoride uptake did not correlate with release into artificial saliva. During the first 4 h, Duraphat released the lowest and MI Varnish the highest amount of fluoride with 7.7 and 249 μg F·cm-², respectively. The fluoride uptake of these two products was not statistically different. Enamel fluoride uptake cannot be predicted from the fluoride release rate of a product. Hence, based on the results of this study, fluoride release into artificial saliva is no measure for the efficacy of a fluoride varnish.

  10. Focus on Fluorides: Update on the Use of Fluoride for the Prevention of Dental Caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Clifton M.

    2014-01-01

    Declarative Title: Improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies reduces dental caries and lowers fluoride exposure. Background Fluoride is delivered to the teeth systemically or topically to aid in the prevention of dental caries. Systemic fluoride from ingested sources is in blood serum and can be deposited only in teeth that are forming in children. Topical fluoride is from sources such as community water, processed foods, beverages, toothpastes, mouthrinses, gels, foams, and varnishes. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Dental Association (ADA) have proposed changes in their long standing recommendations for the amount of fluoride in community drinking water in response to concerns about an increasing incidence of dental fluorosis in children. Current research is focused on the development of strategies to improve fluoride efficacy. The purpose of this update is to inform the reader about new research and policies related to the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Methods Reviews of the current research and recent evidence based systematic reviews on the topics of fluoride are presented. Topics discussed include: updates on community water fluoridation research and policies; available fluoride in dentifrices; fluoride varnish compositions, use, and recommendations; and other fluoride containing dental products. This update provides insights into current research and discusses proposed policy changes for the use of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries. Conclusions The dental profession is adjusting their recommendations for fluoride use based on current observations of the halo effect and subsequent outcomes. The research community is focused on improving the efficacy of fluoride therapies thus reducing dental caries and lowering the amount of fluoride required for efficacy. PMID:24929594

  11. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Correia Cavalcante SOUZA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38 were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  12. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  13. Fluoride retention in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Daniela Correia Cavalcante; Maltz, Marisa; Hashizume, Lina Naomi

    2014-01-01

    This single-blind, randomized, crossover study aimed at assessing the long-term fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm after different home-use fluoride treatments. The study volunteers (n = 38) were residents of an area with fluoridated drinking water. They were administered four treatments, each of which lasted for one week: twice-daily placebo dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice, twice-daily fluoride dentifrice and once-daily fluoride mouthrinse, and thrice-daily fluoride dentifrice. At the end of each treatment period, samples of unstimulated saliva and dental biofilm were collected 8 h after the last oral hygiene procedure. Fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm were analyzed using a specific electrode. The fluoride concentrations in saliva and dental biofilm 8 h after the last use of fluoride products did not differ among treatments. The results of this study suggest that treatments with home-use fluoride products have no long-term effect on fluoride concentrations in saliva and in dental biofilm of residents of an area with a fluoridated water supply.

  14. SITUATION OF FLUORIDES RATE IN WATERS AND MAJOR CONSUMED FOOD IN WILAYA EL-OUED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zobeidi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mineral salts in the drinking water, beneficial or harmful depending on their concentration, are known for many years and thus the problem posed                     by fluoride ions in the waters of the region (Fluorosis Dental and skeletal. This                  study proposes, the estimated daily intake of fluoride from its water distribution and           the main food consumed per capita in the region of El-Oued (dates, tea,                          couscous, lentils, carrots, potatoes, pumpkin ..., which has a significant content of fluoride in their composition. In addition to the arid climatic conditions, the air temperature is very high in summer, leads to a strong human perspiration. This preliminary result leads us to propose a standard fluoride-specific region of El-Oued. The results showed that the majority of water samples and analyzed the main foods of the region of El-Oued is charged fluoride ions and exceed the maximum dose recommended for adults from 0.05 to 0.07 mg / kg / day.

  15. SITUATION OF FLUORIDES RATE IN WATERS AND MAJOR CONSUMED FOOD IN WILAYA EL-OUED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zobeidi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of mineral salts in the drinking water, beneficial or harmful depending on their concentration, are known for many years and thus the problem posed by fluoride ions in the waters of the region (Fluorosis Dental and skeletal. This study proposes, the estimated daily intake of fluoride from its water distribution and the main food consumed per capita in the region of El-Oued (dates, tea, couscous, lentils, carrots, potatoes, pumpkin ..., which has a significant content of fluoride in their composition. In addition to the arid climatic conditions, the air temperature is very high in summer, leads to a strong human perspiration. This preliminary result leads us to propose a standard fluoride-specific region of El-Oued. The results showed that the majority of water samples and analyzed the main foods of the region of El-Oued is charged fluoride ions and exceed the maximum dose recommended for adults from 0.05 to 0.07 mg / kg / day.

  16. Sodium fluoride induces apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells through ROS-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Ngoc, Tam Dan [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Young-Ok [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lim, Shin-Saeng [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin [Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Kim, Jong-Ghee [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Jung Sun [Department of Maxillofacial Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Oral Biology, School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choe, Youngji [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Young-Mi, E-mail: young@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jeong-Chae, E-mail: leejc88@jbnu.ac.kr [Institute of Oral Biosciences and School of Dentistry (BK21 Program), Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate Center for Toxicology, School of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Department of Bioactive Material Sciences and Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) is used as a source of fluoride ions in diverse applications. Fluoride salt is an effective prophylactic for dental caries and is an essential element required for bone health. However, fluoride is known to cause cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. Further, no information is available on the effects of NaF on mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We investigated the mode of cell death induced by NaF and the mechanisms involved. NaF treatment greater than 1 mM reduced viability and DNA synthesis in mESCs and induced cell cycle arrest in the G{sub 2}/M phase. The addition of NaF induced cell death mainly by apoptosis rather than necrosis. Catalase (CAT) treatment significantly inhibited the NaF-mediated cell death and also suppressed the NaF-mediated increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) levels. Pre-treatment with SP600125 or z-VAD-fmk significantly attenuated the NaF-mediated reduction in cell viability. In contrast, intracellular free calcium chelator, but not of sodium or calcium ion channel blockers, facilitated NaF-induced toxicity in the cells. A JNK specific inhibitor (SP600125) prevented the NaF-induced increase in growth arrest and the DNA damage-inducible protein 45α. Further, NaF-mediated loss of mitochondrial membrane potential was apparently inhibited by pifithrin-α or CAT inhibitor. These findings suggest that NaF affects viability of mESCs in a concentration-dependent manner, where more than 1 mM NaF causes apoptosis through hydroxyl radical-dependent and caspase- and JNK-mediated pathways. -- Highlights: ► The mode of NaF-induced cell death and the mechanisms involved were examined. ► NaF induced mainly apoptotic death of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). ► NaF induced mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis. ► JNK- and p53-mediated pathways are involved in NaF-mediated apoptosis in the cells. ► ROS are the up-stream effector in NaF-mediated activation of JNK and p53 in mESCs.

  17. 76 FR 37129 - Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F-18) Injection, 10 to 200 Millicuries...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Determination That SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (Sodium Fluoride F... Drug Administration (FDA) has determined that SODIUM FLUORIDE F 18 (sodium fluoride F-18) injection, 10... FLUORIDE F 18 injection, 10 to 200 mCi/mL, if all other legal and regulatory requirements are met. FOR...

  18. Removal of Fluoride from Drinking Water Using Modified Immobilized Activated Alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneeza Rafique

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the removal of fluoride from drinking water using modified immobilized activated alumina (MIAA prepared by sol-gel method. The modification was done by adding a specific amount of alum during the sol formation step. The fluoride removal efficiency of MIAA was 1.35 times higher as compared to normal immobilized activated alumina. A batch adsorption study was performed as a function of adsorbent dose, contact time, stirring rate, and initial fluoride concentration. More than 90% removal of fluoride was achieved within 60 minutes of contact time. The adsorption potential of MIAA was compared with activated charcoal which showed that the removal efficiency was about 10% more than the activated charcoal. Both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms fitted well for the fluoride adsorption on MIAA with the regression coefficient R2 of 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. MIAA can both be regenerated thermally and chemically. Adsorption experiments using MIAA were employed on real drinking water samples from a fluoride affected area. The study showed that modified immobilized activated alumina is an effective adsorbent for fluoride removal.

  19. Lanthanides extraction processes in molten fluoride media. Application to nuclear spent fuel reprocessing

    OpenAIRE

    Taxil, Pierre; Massot, Laurent; Nourry, Christophe; Gibilaro, Mathieu; Chamelot, Pierre; Cassayre, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes four techniques of extraction of lanthanides elements (Ln) from molten salts in the general frame of reprocessing nuclear wastes; One of them is chemical: the precipitation of Ln ions in insoluble compounds (oxides or oxifluorides); the others use electrochemical methodology in molten fluorides for extraction and measurement of the progress of the processes: first electrodeposition of pure Ln metals on an inert cathode material was proved to be incomplete and cause probl...

  20. Removal of fluoride contamination in water by three aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Sukalpa; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Phytoremediation, popularly known as 'green technology' has been employed in the present investigation to examine the potential of fluoride removal from water by some aquatic plants. Fluoride contamination in drinking water is very much prevalent in different parts of the world including India. Batch studies were conducted using some aquatic plants e.g., Pistia stratiotes, Eichhornia crassipes, and Spirodela polyrhiza which profusely grow in natural water bodies. The experimental data exhibited that all the above three aquatic floating macrophytes could remove fluoride to some relative degree of efficiency corresponding to initial concentration of fluoride 3, 5, 10, 20 mg/l after 10 days exposure time. Result showed that at lower concentration level i.e., 3 mg/L removal efficiency of Pistia stratiotes (19.87%) and Spirodela polyrhiza (19.23%) was found to be better as compared to Eichhornia crassipes (12.71%). Some of the physiological stress induced parameters such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, total chlorophyll, carotenoid, total protein, catalase, and peroxidase were also studied to explore relative damage within the cell. A marginal stress was imparted among all the plants for lower concentration values (3 mg/L), whereas at 20 mg/l, maximum damage was observed.

  1. Slow-release fluoride devices: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Pelim Pessan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of caries has decreased dramatically over the past decades, it has become a polarised disease, with most of subjects presenting low caries levels and few individuals accounting for most of the caries affected surfaces. Thus it become evident for the need of clinical approaches directed at these high-risk patients, in order to overcome problems related to compliance and low attendance at dental care centres. Slow-release fluoride devices were developed based on the inverse relationship existing between intra-oral fluoride levels and dental caries experience. The two main types of slow-release devices - copolymer membrane type and glass bead - are addressed in the present review. A substantial number of studies have demonstrated that these devices are effective in raising intra-oral F concentrations at levels able to reduce enamel solubility, resulting in a caries-protective effect. Studies in animals and humans demonstrated that the use of these devices was able to also protect the occlusal surfaces, not normally protected by conventional fluoride regimens. However, retention rates have been shown to be the main problem related to these devices and still requires further improvements. Although the results of these studies are very promising, further randomised clinical trials are needed in order to validate the use of these devices in clinical practice. The concept of continuously providing low levels of intra-oral fluoride has great potential for caries prevention in high caries-risk groups.

  2. Fluoride and lead adsorption on carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuguang; LI Yanhui

    2004-01-01

    The properties and applications of CNT have been studied extensively since Iijima discovered them in 1991[1,2]. They have exceptional mechanical properties and unique electrical property, highly chemical stability and large specific surface area. Thus far, they have widely potential applications in many fields. They can be used as reinforcing materials in composites[3], field emissions[4], hydrogen storage[5], nanoelectronic components[6], catalyst supports[7], adsorption material and so on. However, the study on the potential application of CNT, environmental protection field in particular, was hardly begun.Long[8] et al. reported that CNT had a significantly higher dioxin removal efficiency than that of activated carbon. The Langmuir adsorption constant is 2.7 × 1052, 1.3 × 1018 respectively. The results indicated that CNT is potential candidate for the removal of micro-organic pollutants. However, the reports on the CNT used as fluoride and heavy metal adsorbent are seldom.In this paper, A novel material, alumina supported on carbon nanotubes (Al2O3/CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and Al(NO3)3. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra demonstrate that alumina is amorphous, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images show that CNT and alumina are homogeneously mixed. Furthermore, the fluoride adsorption behavior on the surface of Al2O3/CNT has been investigated and compared with other adsorbents. The results indicate that Al2O3/CNT has a high adsorption capacity, with a saturation adsorption capacity of 39.4 mg/g. It is also found that the adsorption capacity of Al2O3/CNT is 3.0~4.5 times that of γ-Al2O3while almost equal to that of IRA-410 polymeric resin at 25 ℃. The adsorption isotherms of fluoride on Al2O3/CNT is fit the Freundlich equation well, optimal pH ranging from 5.0 to 9.0.Also in this paper, a novel material, modified carbon nanotubes (CNT), was prepared from carbon nanotubes and HNO3 under boiling condition. Infrared spectroscopy (IR

  3. Salivary fluoride levels after use of high-fluoride dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Glauber Campos; Cruz, Priscila Figueiredo; Bohn, Ana Clarissa Cavalcante Elvas; de Moura, Marcoeli Silva

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate salivary fluoride (F) availability after toothbrushing with a high-F dentifrice. Twelve adult volunteers took part in this crossover and blind study. F concentration in saliva was determined after brushing with a high-F dentifrice (5000 µg F/g) or with a conventional F concentration dentifrice (1100 µg F/g) followed by a 15 mL distilled water rinse. Samples of nonstimulated saliva were collected on the following times: before (baseline), and immediately after spit (time = 0) and after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. F analysis was performed with a fluoride-sensitive electrode and the area under curve of F salivary concentration × time (µg F/mL × min(-1)) was calculated. At baseline, no significant difference was found among dentifrices (P > 0.05). After brushing, both dentifrices caused an elevated fluoride level in saliva; however salivary F concentration was significantly higher at all times, when high-F dentifrice was used (P dentifrices (P dentifrice enhanced the bioavailability of salivary F, being an option for caries management in patients with high caries risk.

  4. Renal fluoride excretion in children following topical application of fluoride varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hoyos, F; Barbería, E; García-Camba, P; Varela, M

    2012-12-01

    To demonstrate that the application of dental fluoride varnishes in children increases urinary fluoride excretion. From a randomly assembled group of 42 children aged between 5 and 8 years, residing in a community with non-fluoridated water, spot urinary samples were taken before the topical application of dental fluoride varnish and 2 hours afterwards. In an age-matched control group of 16 children from the same community, who received no treatment, samples were taken the same way. The urinary excretion of fluoride was analysed by determining fluoride ion (F-) level and fluoride/creatinine (F/Cr) ratio in the urine. In the study group, the average pre- and post-treatment F/Cr ratios were 0.42 and 1.38 mg/g, respectively (p fluoride varnish leads to a significant increase in urine F-, which is attributable to the application of the product.

  5. Selective Colorimetric Fluoride Sensor: A Heteroditopic Re-ceptor Combining Pyrrolic Amide with Urea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Zhenming; LIU Shangyuan

    2009-01-01

    A heteroditopic anion receptor, beating one pyrrolic amide site and a urea site, has been synthesized. UV-Vis spectrum studies in CH3CN solution revealed that the receptor had higher anion binding ability than the homoditopic one. A naked-eye detectable color change, from colorless to yellow, of the receptor solution took place when fluoride was added, which indicates that the receptor has potential application to selective colorimetric fluo-ride sensing.

  6. Fluoride intake from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by young children in Kuwait: a non-fluoridated community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpata, Enosakhare S; Behbehani, Jawad; Akbar, Jaber; Thalib, Lukman; Mojiminiyi, Olusegun

    2014-06-01

    To determine the pattern of fluid consumption, fluoride intake from the fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by children aged 1-9 years in Kuwait, a nonfluoridated community. Using the cluster sampling technique, children aged 1-9 years were chosen from 2000 randomly selected households in Kuwait. Questionnaires were then administered to their mothers to determine the children's daily fluid intake. Fluoride concentrations in tap water as well as all brands of bottled water and beverages consumed by the children were measured, using the fluoride ion-specific electrode. Fluoride excretion was determined in 400 randomly selected children, based on fluoride/creatinine ratio. The mean daily fluid consumption by the children was high, being 1115-1545 ml. About 40% of the fluid intake was plain (tap and bottled) water and approximately 10% of the children drank bottled water exclusively. Fluoride concentration in tap water was low (0.04±SD 0.02 ppm), but was higher in bottled water (0.28±SD 0.40 ppm). Mean daily fluoride ingestion from fluids was 0.013-0.018 mg/kg body weight (bw). Even after allowing for fluoride ingestion from other sources, mean daily fluoride ingestion was still below 0.1 mg/kg bw set by the United States of America Institute of Medicine as the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level for moderate enamel fluorosis in children aged up to 8 years. Furthermore, the mean daily urinary fluoride excretion of 128-220 μg was below the provisional standard of 360-480 μg for optimal fluoride usage by children aged 3-5 years. Fluoride ingestion from fluids and urinary fluoride excretion by the children were below the recommendations for optimal fluoride usage. Thus, there is room for an upward adjustment of fluoride level in public drinking water supplies in Kuwait, as a caries preventive measure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Determination of Fluoride in Various Samples and Some Infusions Using a Fluoride Selective Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    TOKALIOĞLU, Şerife; Kartal, Şenol; ŞAHİN, Uğur

    2004-01-01

    The determination of fluoride in some environmental samples was performed using a fluoride ion-selective electrode. Fluoride concentrations were determined in drinking waters (from different provinces, districts and villages in Turkey), fruit juices, bottled water samples, toothpastes and tooth powders, liquors of Turkish coffee, coffee, linden, rose hip, and various brand tea infusions, and dust samples collected from the Erciyes University campus car park. The average fluoride conc...

  8. Estuarine response of fluoride - Investigations in Azhikode Estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Balachandran, K.K.; Joseph, T.; Sankaranarayanan, V.N.

    Concentrations of fluoride in Azhikode estuarine region (Kerala, India) were measured as a function of chlorinity during the different seasons. The type of behaviour indicated that fluoride was regulated by sea water incursion alone. Fluoride...

  9. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  10. Assessment of fluoride concentration and daily intake by human from tea and herbal infusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowska, E; Inkielewicz, I; Czarnowski, W; Szefer, P

    2008-03-01

    The fluoride content in infusions of commercially available black, green, oolong, pu-erh and white teas was determined by ion-selective electrode. Herbal infusions as well as instant tea and ready-to-drink tea beverages were also examined. It is found that brewing time (5, 10 and 30 min) does increase the fluoride content, which in infusions of black tea (5 min brewing) was higher than that in the other types of tea, with contents ranging between 0.32 and 4.54 mg/l for black tea to 0.37-0.54 mg/l for white tea and with even lower values for herbal tea infusions of 0.02-0.09 mg/l. On the basis of the results obtained, the daily intake of fluoride provided from tea and herbal beverages was estimated for an adult person and for children in comparison with the Polish SAI (Safe and Adequate Daily Intake) of fluoride which is strictly attributable to ADI (Acceptable Daily Intake). The fluoride intake resulted from the regular consumption of black tea infusions was raised as compared to the other types of teas as well as herbal teas. For adult and children tea drinkers consuming five cups of black tea per day the intake of fluoride will be in the range of 8.0-303% and 12-303% of the SAI, respectively. People are often exposed to multiple sources of fluoride, such as in food, water, air and excessive use of toothpaste. The control of tea quality is important to protect human against too high uptake of this element from black tea, which is the most popular beverage. Excessive intake of fluoride with black tea, especially in the regions with its high level in the drinking water, increases the risk of dental fluorosis in children during the years of tooth development. The long-term exposure to large amounts of fluoride can lead to potentially skeletal fluorosis (WHO, 1984).

  11. High yield combustion synthesis of nanomagnesia and its application for fluoride removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliyekkal, Shihabudheen M; Anshup; Antony, K R; Pradeep, T

    2010-04-15

    We describe a novel combustion synthesis for the preparation of Nanomagnesia (NM) and its application in water purification. The synthesis is based on the self-propagated combustion of the magnesium nitrate trapped in cellulose fibers. Various characterization studies confirmed that NM formed is crystalline with high phase purity, and the particle size varied in the range of 3-7nm. The fluoride scavenging potential of this material was tested as a function of pH, contact time and adsorbent dose. The result showed that fluoride adsorption by NM is highly favorable and the capacity does not vary in the pH range usually encountered in groundwater. The effects of various co-existing ions usually found in drinking water, on fluoride removal were also investigated. Phosphate was the greatest competitor for fluoride followed by bicarbonate. The presence of other ions studied did not affect the fluoride adsorption capacity of NM significantly. The adsorption kinetics followed pseudo-second-order equation and the equilibrium data are well predicted by Frendlich equation. Our experimental evidence shows that fluoride removal happened through isomorphic substitution of fluoride in brucite. A batch household defluoridation unit was developed using precipitation-sedimentation-filtration techniques, addressing the problems of high fluoride concentration as well as the problem of alkaline pH of the magnesia treated water. The method of synthesis reported here is advantageous from the perspectives of small size of the nanoparticle, cost-effective recovery of the material and improvement in the fluoride adsorption capacity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Magnesium Fluoride Reduction Vessel Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-26

    Carolina Metals, the fluoride is reduced to power by means of a Mikro #2 hemmer mill (Figure 5). The material is then separated into the different...The jolter table previously referred to in the liner pro - ceasing operation, is the knockout station. As shown in Figure 36, the vessel is inverted...was much more extensive than normally performed to establish the quality of thý metal pro - duced using the MgF2 liners. There are no indications of

  13. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  14. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-01-01

    The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, se...

  15. Effect of titanium tetrafluoride, amine fluoride and fluoride varnish on enamel erosion in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A; Ruben, JL; Huysmans, MCDNJM

    2005-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effect of 1 and 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) gels, amine fluoride (AmF) 1 and 0.25% and a fluoride varnish (FP) on the prevention of dental erosion. Two experimental groups served as controls, one with no pretreatment and another one pre-treated with a fluoride

  16. Effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of giomer and compomer: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K S Dhull

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objective: To determine the effect of low-concentration daily topical fluoride application on fluoride release of Giomer and Compomer and to compare the amount of fluoride release from Giomer to that of Compomer. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight specimens of each Giomer and Compomer were divided into four treatment groups, namely, control group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily group, fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm twice-daily group and fluoridated dentifrice (500 ppm once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash (225 ppm group. Each specimen was suspended in demineralising solution for 6 h and remineralising solution for 18 h. Fluoride release was measured in both the demineralising solution and the remineralising solution daily for 21 days. Total daily fluoride release for each specimen was calculated by adding the amount released in the demineralising solution to that released in the remineralising solution. Results and Conclusion: The fluoride release (ppm was found to be higher in Giomer when compared with Compomer. The fluoride released from Giomer and Compomer was significantly higher in the acidic demineralising solution than in the neutral remineralising solution. It was found that increasing fluoride exposure significantly increased fluoride release from Giomer and Compomer. It was found that the fluoride release from the subgroups of Giomer and Compomer was in the following order: fluoridated dentifrice twice-daily > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily + fluoridated mouthwash > fluoridated dentifrice once-daily > control group. It was found that Giomer showed a greater fluoride uptake Compomer.

  17. Gramicidin D enhances the antibacterial activity of fluoride

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, James W.; ZHOU, ZHIYUAN; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2014-01-01

    Fluoride is a toxic anion found in many natural environments. One of the major bacterial defenses against fluoride is the cell envelope, which limits passage of the membrane-impermeant fluoride anion. Accordingly, compounds that enhance the permeability of bacterial membranes to fluoride should also enhance fluoride toxicity. In this study, we demonstrate that the pore-forming antibiotic gramicidin D increases fluoride uptake in B. subtilis and that the antibacterial activity of this compound...

  18. Fluoride assay methodology for carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilman, Judith R; Levy, Steven M; Wefel, James S; Patterson, Kristine Y; Cutrufelli, Rena; Pehrsson, Pamela R; Holden, Joanne M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review different methodological techniques used for the assessment of fluoride in carbonated beverages, and compare results using a fluoride ion electrode direct read method with and without a prior decarbonation treatment. The carbonated beverages in this study were either purchased locally at grocery stores in Iowa City, Iowa, or purchased as part of a national representative sampling approach included in the National Fluoride Database and Intake Assessment Study (NFDIAS). The samples were compared with and without a decarbonating process. Soda pop and beer samples were analyzed by removing a 1-ml sample and adding a 1-ml buffer solution. The fluoride concentration of the sample and buffer combination was then determined using a fluoride ion specific electrode. There was no significant difference in the fluoride concentration of the samples with or without prior decarbonation. The mean absolute difference between the soda pop group with and without decarbonation was 0.01 ppm F, while results from the beer samples showed variation of 0.00 to 0.02 parts per million fluoride (ppm F). These differences were not statistically significant for the soda pop or beer groups (P=.50 and P=.74, respectively). Whether or not decarbonation was conducted prior to analysis, the fluoride assay results were the same. Therefore, decarbonation of soda pop and beer was deemed unnecessary prior to fluoride analysis.

  19. High fluoride exposure in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, V A; Gitelman, H J

    1990-04-01

    The observation of higher plasma flouride levels in our hemodialysis (HD) patients than our continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) patients (4.0 +/- 0.5 mumol/L [n = 17] v 2.5 +/- 0.3 mumol/L [n = 17], P less than 0.005) prompted an evaluation of fluoride metabolism during HD. We found that serum fluoride was completely ultrafiltrable across cuprophane membranes (99% +/- 4%) and that HD produced acute changes in plasma fluoride levels that correlated well with the fluoride gradient between plasma and dialysis fluid at the start of dialysis. Our HD fluids contained significantly higher fluoride concentrations than were present in commercially prepared peritoneal dialysis fluid. Our fluids are prepared from fluoridated tap water that is purified by reverse osmosis (RO). We conclude that the different concentrations of fluoride in our dialysis fluids account for the differences in the plasma flouride concentrations between our dialysis groups. Since many HD units rely on RO systems to purify fluoridated tap water, it is likely that many HD patients are being exposed inadvertently to increased concentrations of fluoride.

  20. Application of fluoride iontophoresis to improve remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H E; Kwon, H K; Kim, B I

    2009-10-01

    Iontophoresis is generally used to maximize the therapeutic action of drugs in medicine. This technique can be used to improve the remineralization effect of topical fluoride applications in dentistry. The aim of this study was to compare the remineralization effect of fluoride iontophoresis (FI) with the conventional fluoride application (CFA) method in vitro. Sixty bovine enamel specimens were divided into three groups: no fluoride treatment, CFA and FI. Fluoride was applied to the demineralized specimens for 4 min in each experimental group. The types of fluoride system used for application were 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride gel (12 300 p.p.m. F, pH 3.5) and 2% sodium fluoride solution (9050 p.p.m. F, pH 7) in the experimental groups. All the specimens were then placed in a remineralizing solution for 24 h. This cycle was repeated five times. An iontophoresis device (0.4 mA, 12 V) was used in the FI groups. The efficacy of this technique was evaluated by measuring changes in the surface microhardness and lesion depth of the specimens using confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Data were analysed using anova and Tukey's post hoc test (P fluoride application methods (P > 0.05). When the lesion depth was measured using CLSM imaging, there was also no significant difference between the FI and CFA groups (P > 0.05). In conclusion, FI was not significantly superior to CFA in terms of the remineralization effect.

  1. Study of total dry matter and protein extraction from canola meal as affected by the pH, salt addition and use of zeta-potential/turbidimetry analysis to optimize the extraction conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerzhova, Alina; Mondor, Martin; Benali, Marzouk; Aider, Mohammed

    2016-06-15

    Total dry matter and proteins were differentially and preferentially extracted from canola meal (CM) under different conditions. The effect of the extraction medium pH, CM concentration and salt concentrations were found to have different influences on the extractability of total dry matter and proteins from CM. The pH of the extracting medium had the most significant effect. The maximal total dry matter (42.8±1.18%) extractability was obtained with 5% CM at pH 12 without salt addition, whereas the maximal for total protein (58.12±1.47%) was obtained with 15% CM under the same conditions. The minimal extractability for the dry matter (26.63±0.67%) was obtained with 5% CM at pH 10 without salt added and the minimal protein extractability was observed in a 10% CM at pH 10, in 0.01 NaCl. Turbidity and ζ-potential measurements indicated that pH 5 was the optimum condition for the highest protein extraction yield. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that salt addition contributes to higher solubility of canola proteins specifically cruciferin fraction, although it reduces napin extraction.

  2. Potential for local adaptation in response to an anthropogenic agent of selection: effects of road deicing salts on amphibian embryonic survival and development

    OpenAIRE

    Hopkins, Gareth R; Susannah S French; Brodie, Edmund D.

    2012-01-01

    The application of millions of tons of road deicing salts every winter in North America presents significant survival challenges to amphibians inhabiting roadside habitats. While much is known of the effects of NaCl on anuran tadpoles, less is known of effects on amphibian eggs, or any caudate life stage. In addition, little is known of the effects of MgCl2, which is now the 2nd most commonly used road deicer. Most studies have considered amphibians to be helpless victims of deicing salts, an...

  3. Substantial reduction in caries from regular fluoride varnish application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek

    2013-09-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS and BBO, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, Web of Science Conference Proceedings and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched. Reference lists of identified articles were also scanned for relevant papers. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials using or indicating blind outcome assessment that compared fluoride varnish to placebo or no treatment for at least one year were included. Risk of bias assessment was undertaken. Study assessment and data extraction was carried out independently by at least two reviewers. The primary measure of effect was the prevented fraction, that is the difference in mean caries increments between the treatment and control groups expressed as a percentage of the mean increment in the control group. The caries increments nearest to three years were used from each included study. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed where data could be pooled. Potential sources of heterogeneity were examined in random-effects meta-regression analyses. Adverse effects information was collected from the included trials. Twenty-two trials (12,455 participants) were included. Thirteen trials were included in the permanent tooth surfaces meta-analysis, the pooled D(M)FS prevented fraction estimate comparing fluoride varnish with placebo or no treatment was 43% (95% confidence interval (CI) 30% to 57%; P fluorides, application features such as prior prophylaxis, concentration of fluoride or frequency of application. There was little information concerning possible adverse effects or acceptability of treatment. The conclusions of this updated review remain the same as when it was first published. The review suggests a substantial caries inhibiting effect of fluoride varnish in both permanent and primary teeth; however the quality of the evidence

  4. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR w

  5. Effects of different kinds of fluorides on enolase and ATPase activity of a fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-resistant Streptococcus mutans strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loveren, C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Deng, D.M.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Enolase and ATPase are sensitive to fluoride. It is unclear whether this sensitivity differs for F-sensitive and F-resistant cells or for different types of fluoride. Permeabilized cells of the fluoride-sensitive strain Streptococcus mutans C180-2 and its fluoride-resistant mutant strain C180-2 FR

  6. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in two different diameter channels (0.083 and 0.370Ã). In the 0

  7. Urinary fluoride output in children following the use of a dual-fluoride varnish formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Polido Kaneshiro Olympio

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the bioavailability of fluoride after topical application of a dual-fluoride varnish commercially available in Brazil, when compared to DuraphatTM. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The urinary fluoride output was evaluated in seven 5-year-old children after application of the fluoride varnishes, in two different phases. In the first phase (I, children received topical application of the fluoride varnish Duofluorid XII (2.92% fluorine, calcium fluoride + 2.71% fluorine, sodium fluoride, FGM TM. After 1-month interval (phase II, the same amount (0.2 mL of the fluoride varnish Duraphat (2.26% fluorine, sodium fluoride, ColgateTM was applied. Before each application all the volunteers brushed their teeth with placebo dentifrice for 7 days. Urinary collections were carried out 24 h prior up to 48 h after the applications. Fluoride intake from the diet was also estimated. Fluoride concentration in diet samples and urine was analyzed with the fluoride ion-specific electrode and a miniature calomel reference electrode coupled to a potentiometer. Data were tested by ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test (p<0.05. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the urinary fluoride output between phases I and II. The use of Duofluorid XII did not significantly increase the urinary fluoride output, when compared to baseline levels. The application of Duraphat caused a transitory increase in the urinary fluoride output, returning to baseline levels 48 h after its use. CONCLUSIONS: The tested varnish formulation, which has been shown to be effective in in vitro studies, also can be considered safe.

  8. "Borderline" fluorotic region in Serbia: correlations among fluoride in drinking water, biomarkers of exposure and dental fluorosis in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonijevic, Evica; Mandinic, Zoran; Curcic, Marijana; Djukic-Cosic, Danijela; Milicevic, Nemanja; Ivanovic, Mirjana; Carevic, Momir; Antonijevic, Biljana

    2016-06-01

    This study explores relation between dental fluorosis occurrence in schoolchildren, residents of Ritopek, a small local community near Belgrade, and fluoride exposure via drinking water. Additionally, fluoride levels were determined in children's urine and hair samples, and efforts were made to correlate them with dental fluorosis. Dental fluorosis and caries prevalence were examined in a total of 52 schoolchildren aged 7-15 years (29 boys and 23 girls). Fluoride levels in three types of samples were analyzed using composite fluoride ion-selective electrode. Results showed high prevalence of dental fluorosis (34.6 %) and low prevalence of dental caries (23.1 %, mean DMFT 0.96) among children exposed to wide range of water fluoride levels (0.11-4.14 mg/L, n = 27). About 11 % of water samples exceeded 1.5 mg/L, a drinking-water quality guideline value for fluoride given by the World Health Organization (2006). Fluoride levels in urine and hair samples ranged between 0.07-2.59 (n = 48) and 1.07-19.83 mg/L (n = 33), respectively. Severity of dental fluorosis was positively and linearly correlated with fluoride levels in drinking water (r = 0.79). Fluoride levels in urine and hair were strongly and positively correlated with levels in drinking water (r = 0.92 and 0.94, respectively). Fluoride levels in hair samples appeared to be a potentially promising biomarker of fluoride intake via drinking water on one hand, and severity of dental fluorosis on the other hand. Based on community fluorosis index value of 0.58, dental fluorosis revealed in Ritopek can be considered as "borderline" public health issue.

  9. Chromogenic and fluorogenic Schiff base chemosensor for nano scale level fluoride detection with logical interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pritam; Banerjee, Priyabrata

    2016-10-01

    Schiff base Organic Frameworks (SOFs) based chemosensor have been synthesized and utilized for recognization of biologically relevant fluoride anion. The chemosensor is selective for fluoride (F-) and exhibits reversible UV-Vis response with alternate addition of aluminum (Al3+). Interestingly a fluorescence 'turn on' response has been noticed with concomitant addition of fluoride. TICT, PTTS and restricted Cdbnd N isomerization has been taken into account in order to explain the florescence 'turn on' phenomenon. Significantly, the limit of fluoride detection is nano molar level (∼10 nM). The reversible UV-Vis phenomena have been used for designing AND-NAND-NOT-NOR-OR-XOR-XNOR based complex logic circuit to prepare potential feedstock as 'Lab-on a-Molecule'.

  10. Decomposition of formyl fluoride on the lowest triplet state surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumathi, R.; Chandra, A. K.

    1992-09-01

    Decomposition of formyl fluoride on the lowest triplet potential energy hypersurface is studied using ab initio quantum chemical methods. Dissociation energies and the barrier to dissociation from the lowest triplet HFCO into H( 2S) and FCO( 2A') are reported. Results reveal that the barrier to dissociation into F( 2P) + HCO( 2A') is very high. The triatomic radical, FCO( 2A') decomposes into F( 2P) + CO( 1Σ) from the high vibrational levels of the C-F stretch.

  11. A Low T, High RH, and Potentially Life-Friendly Environment Within the Martian Salt-Rich Subsurface in Equatorial Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, A.; Zheng, M. P.; Kong, F. J.; Ling, Z. C.; Kong, W. G.; Sobron, P.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2011-03-01

    Hydrated sulfates found in the subsurface at Gusev and at saline playa on the Tibet Plateau imply a high RH environment, supported by lab studies. A high-RH, salt-rich subsurface can accommodate organisms, e.g., halophiles in the Tibet saline playa.

  12. Characterizing exposure and potential impacts of contaminants on seabirds nesting at South San Diego Bay Unit of the San Diego National Wildlife Refuge (Salt Works, San Diego Bay)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2005, a two-year USFWS study (1261-1N74) was initiated to characterize contaminant exposure by seabirds that nest in colonies at the South Bay Salt Works, within...

  13. Fluorescent Sensing of Fluoride in Cellular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Zhu, Baocun; Chen, Jihua; Duan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Fluoride ions have the important roles in a lot of physiological activities related with biological and medical system, such as water fluoridation, caries treatment, and bone disease treatment. Great efforts have been made to develop new methods and strategies for F- detection in the past decades. Traditional methods for the detection of F- including ion chromatography, ion-selective electrodes, and spectroscopic techniques have the limitations in the biomedicine research. The fluorescent probes for F- are very promising that overcome some drawbacks of traditional fluoride detection methods. These probes exhibit high selectivity, high sensitivity as well as quick response to the detection of fluoride anions. The review commences with a brief description of photophysical mechanisms for fluorescent probes for fluoride, including photo induced electron transfer (PET), intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Followed by a discussion about common dyes for fluorescent fluoride probes, such as anthracene, naphalimide, pyrene, BODIPY, fluorescein, rhodamine, resorufin, coumarin, cyanine, and near-infrared (NIR) dyes. We divide the fluorescent probes for fluoride in cellular application systems into nine groups, for example, type of hydrogen bonds, type of cleavage of Si-O bonds, type of Si-O bond cleavage and cylization reactions, etc. We also review the recent reported carriers in the delivery of fluorescent fluoride probes. Seventy-four typical fluorescent fluoride probes are listed and compared in detail, including quantum yield, reaction medium, excitation and emission wavelengths, linear detection range, selectivity for F-, mechanism, and analytical applications. Finally, we discuss the future challenges of the application of fluorescent fluoride probes in cellular system and in vivo. We wish that more and more excellent fluorescent fluoride probes will be developed

  14. Corrosion characteristics of reduced activation ferritic steel, JLF-1 (8.92Cr-2W) in molten salts Flibe and Flinak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Masatoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan)], E-mail: kondo.masatoshi@nifs.ac.jp; Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Xu Qi [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Noda, Nobuaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi, Gifu (Japan); Ninomiya, Daisuke; Nagura, Masaru; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Fujii, Naoki [Biko Chemical Company, Koube (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Static corrosion tests were performed in molten salts, LiF-BeF{sub 2} (Flibe) and LiF-NaF-KF (Flinak), at 500 deg. C and 600 deg. C for 1000 h. The purpose is to investigate the corrosion characteristics of reduced activation ferritic steels, JLF-1 (8.92Cr-2W) in the fluids. The concentration of hydrogen fluoride (HF) in the fluids was measured by slurry pH titration method before and after the exposure. The HF concentration determined the fluoridation potential. The corrosion was mainly caused by dissolution of Fe and Cr into the fluids due to fluoridation and/or electrochemical corrosion. Carbon on the surface might be dissolved into the fluids due to the corrosion, and this resulted to the decrease of carbide on the surface. The corrosion depth of the JLF-1 specimen, which was obtained from the weight losses, was 0.637 {mu}m in Flibe at 600 deg. C and 6.73 {mu}m in Flinak at 600 deg. C.

  15. A preliminary fast may potentiate response to a subsequent low-salt, low-fat vegan diet in the management of hypertension - fasting as a strategy for breaking metabolic vicious cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M F

    2003-05-01

    Although a salted diet appears to be a sine qua non for the development of essential hypertension, low-salt diets often have a modest or even negligible impact on the blood pressure of hypertensives; this suggests that salt, perhaps often acting in concert with other aspects of a modern, rich diet, may set in place certain metabolic vicious cycles that sustain blood pressure elevation even when dietary salt is eliminated. Therapeutic fasting is known to lower elevated blood pressure - presumably in large part because it minimizes insulin secretion - and may have the potential to break some of these vicious cycles. Goldhamer has recently reported that a regimen comprised of a water-only fast of moderate duration, followed by a transition to a low-fat, low-salt, whole-food vegan diet, achieves dramatic reductions in the blood pressure of hypertensives, such that the large majority of patients can be restored to normotensive status, in the absence of any drug therapy. Although long-term follow-up of these subjects has been sporadic, the available data suggest that these large reductions is blood pressure can be conserved in patients who remain compliant with the follow-up diet - in other words, a 'cure' for hypertension may be feasible. If a protein-sparing modified fast can be shown to be virtually as effective as a total fast for achieving these benefits, it may be possible to implement this regimen safely on an outpatient basis. The ability of therapeutic fasts to break metabolic vicious cycles may also contribute to the efficacy of fasting in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and autoimmune disorders. As a general principle, if a metabolic disorder is susceptible to prevention - but not reversal - by a specific diet, and therapeutic fasting has a temporary favorable impact on this disorder, then a more definitive therapy may consist of a therapeutic fast, followed up by the protective diet as a maintenance regimen.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Longevity of Fluoride Release From three Different Fluoride Varnishes – An Invitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, NM; Poornima, P; Nagaveni, NB; Neena, IE; Bharath, KP

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluoride varnishes play a pivotal role in inhibition of dental caries by increasing remineralization. Aim To determine the longevity of fluoride release from 3 different fluoride varnishes over a period of time through salivary fluoride estimation. Materials and Methods Twenty four extracted human deciduous anterior teeth were divided into four groups, i.e., ClinproTM XT, Flouritop SR, Flourprotector and Control group. Fluoride varnishes were applied on 3mm x 3mm window on labial surface of the teeth and then the teeth were immersed and stored in artificial saliva. The concentration of fluoride in ppm was measured after 1 week, 1 month, 3 months and 6 months. Fluoride release at each time interval for different groups was statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Post Hoc Tukey’s test. Results Although all the fluoride varnishes released fluoride, with greatest release observed during 1st week by Fluoritop SR (66.92±16.30ppm), ClinproTM XT Varnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than Fluoritop SR and Fluorprotector during 6 months analysis (pVarnish released consistently and substantially more fluoride than other tested products. PMID:27656559

  17. Fluoride intake and its safety among heavy tea drinkers in a British fluoridated city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, G N

    1991-01-01

    Tea-drinking in very young children has been studied in a British city. The results suggested that the fluoride in tea would, in some cases, be sufficient to influence caries. Clinical findings to some extent supported this. The main purpose of the investigation reported here was to determine maximum possible fluoride intake in adults who were heavy tea drinkers in a fluoridated city and relate it to toxic thresholds. Heavy tea drinkers were traced through Health Visitors and voluntary organizations and the volumes and fluoride concentrations of their drinks were measured. Even the highest intake found (9 mg) is below the probable intake in Bartlett, Texas (8 ppm of fluoride), in relation to which no undesirable symptoms have been reported (Leone et al. 1954). This confirms the safety of fluoridation. The effects on fluoride concentration of evaporating soft and hard fluoride-containing waters to small bulk were compared. The results showed ceilings of 3 ppm of fluoride in hard water and about 14 ppm in soft water, much higher than the levels expected on the basis of the usually stated solubility of CaF2 (16 or 8 ppm of fluoride). However, under normal household conditions, it is most unlikely that dangerous levels of fluoride would be ingested from boiled water.

  18. Review on fluoride, with special emphasis on calcium fluoride mechanisms in caries prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M

    1997-10-01

    Low concentrations of fluoride have a beneficial effect on enamel and dentin de- and remineralization. After fluoride treatments, such as topical applications, rinses or dentifrices, salivary fluoride concentrations decrease exponentially in a biphasic manner to very low concentrations within a few hours. For treatments to be effective over periods longer than the brushing and the following salivary clearance, fluoride needs to be deposited and slowly released. Calcium fluoride (or like) deposits act in such a way, owing to a surface covering of phosphate and/or proteins, which makes the CaF2 less soluble under in vivo conditions than in a pure form in inorganic solutions. Moreover, due to the phosphate groups on the surface of the calcium fluoride globules, fluoride is assumed to be released with decreasing pH when the phosphate groups are protonated in the dental plaque.

  19. Reconsolidated Salt as a Geotechnical Barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Francis D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gadbury, Casey [USDOE Carlsbad Field Office, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Salt as a geologic medium has several attributes favorable to long-term isolation of waste placed in mined openings. Salt formations are largely impermeable and induced fractures heal as stress returns to equilibrium. Permanent isolation also depends upon the ability to construct geotechnical barriers that achieve nearly the same high-performance characteristics attributed to the native salt formation. Salt repository seal concepts often include elements of reconstituted granular salt. As a specific case in point, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant recently received regulatory approval to change the disposal panel closure design from an engineered barrier constructed of a salt-based concrete to one that employs simple run-of-mine salt and temporary bulkheads for isolation from ventilation. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is a radioactive waste disposal repository for defense-related transuranic elements mined from the Permian evaporite salt beds in southeast New Mexico. Its approved shaft seal design incorporates barrier components comprising salt-based concrete, bentonite, and substantial depths of crushed salt compacted to enhance reconsolidation. This paper will focus on crushed salt behavior when applied as drift closures to isolate disposal rooms during operations. Scientific aspects of salt reconsolidation have been studied extensively. The technical basis for geotechnical barrier performance has been strengthened by recent experimental findings and analogue comparisons. The panel closure change was accompanied by recognition that granular salt will return to a physical state similar to the halite surrounding it. Use of run-of-mine salt ensures physical and chemical compatibility with the repository environment and simplifies ongoing disposal operations. Our current knowledge and expected outcome of research can be assimilated with lessons learned to put forward designs and operational concepts for the next generation of salt repositories. Mined salt

  20. A Rapid Method to Detect Milk Adulteration Using Selective Fluoride-electrode%氟离子选择电极法快速检测鲜奶掺假

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫瑞霞; 李胜利; 何玲; 李彦国; 田印荣

    2012-01-01

    采用氟离子选择电极法测定鲜奶中氟含量的变化,判断鲜奶是否掺假,进而探讨快速检验鲜牛奶掺假的一种新型方法.具体做法是按一定比例在纯鲜奶中分别兑入掺假物:奶牛场水、纯净水、食盐及淀粉,配成掺假奶.用氟离子选择电极法分别测量样品奶的电位值,观察掺假奶样品与纯鲜奶之间电位值差的变化,用以判断鲜奶是否掺假.%A novel and easy way, selective fluoride-electrode, was introduced in this paper to milk adulteration. Raw milk was proportionally adulterated with dairy effluent, purified water, salt and starch, thus the adulterated milk was grouped into Group 1 , Group 2, Group 3 and Group 4. By using selective fluoride-electrode method, the potential value of the sample milk was measured to observe the variation of its difference between the adulterated milk and the raw milk.

  1. Environmental evaluation of fluoride in drinking water at "Los Altos de Jalisco," in the central Mexico region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado, Roberto; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    Naturally occurring fluoride has been detected and quantified in drinking water in several cities of the "Los Altos de Jalisco" (LAJ) region. LAJ is located in the northeastern part of the state of Jalisco-Mexico, covering an area of 16,410 km2 with a population of 696,318 in 20 municipalities. Drinking water comes mainly from groundwater aquifers, located in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, which is a volcanic region characterized by hydrothermal activity. Results indicated that water supply from 42% of the municipalities had a fluoride concentration over the Mexican standards of 1.5 mg/L. It is important to notice that there are three cities, Lagos de Moreno (1.66-5.88 mg/L F(-)), Teocaltiche (3.82-18.58 mg/L F(-)), and Encarnación de Díaz (2.58-4.40 mg/L F(-)) where all water samples resulted in fluoride concentration over the maximum contaminant level. The total population from these three cities is over 122,000 inhabitants. Another important city with high levels of fluoride in the water supply was Tepatitlán de Morelos (2 wells with 6.54 and 13.47 mg/L F(-)). In addition to water supply, 30 samples of brand-name bottled water were tested. Surprisingly, 8 samples (27%) demonstrated fluoride level over the standards, mainly Agua de Lagos with 5.27 mg/L. Fluoridated table salt (200-300 mg/kg F(-)) is another important source of fluoride. A large number of people living in the region, mainly school children, might be under adverse health risk because they are consuming contaminated drinking water. It is well known that long-term exposure to water with high levels of fluoride produces severe health problems.

  2. Determination of fluoride content in drinking water and tea infusions using fluoride ion selective electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric analysis of fluoride content (as F- ion in solutions by using fluoride ion-selective electrode is simple, reliable and cheap. Very small concentrations of fluoride-ions (to 10-6 mol/dm3 can be determined by fluoride selective electrode, with regulation of ion strength of a solution and control of concentration of hydroxide ions and interfering ions of metals. The influence of pH and complexing ions of metals can be successfully regulated by the TISAB solution and by preserving pH value in the range from 5.00 to 7.00. The content of fluorides in the samples can be determined by the method of direct potentiometer, and in the case of very low concentration by standard addition method. In this paper it was analyzed the determination of fluoride ions concentration in bottled mineral waters and water from Belgrade plumbing in two Belgrade districts (Palilula and Novi Beograd and in tea, by using the fluoride selective electrode. It was determined that the content of fluoride ions in bottled mineral water significantly differs from values given on declaration, and that content of fluoride ions varies over a period of time. The content of fluoride ions in water from plumbing in two Belgrade districts at the time of analysis was significantly increased and exceeded values given in Regulation for drinking water quality. The received results from the analysis of fluorides in teas show that fluorides exist in teas in different concentrations. There are also differences between the same kinds of tea, which is noted with mint (Mentha piperitae folium, as a consequence of differences between soils where it was planted. As taking of fluorides, according to World Health Organisation recommendation (WHO, is limited in the range from 2 to 4 mg per day, it is necessary to give the content of fluorides on all products that are used in human consumption.

  3. FLUORIDE LEVELS IN COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE RICE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    2013-05-05

    May 5, 2013 ... There are several studies reporting the dietary intake of fluoride from water, ..... fluoride in rice samples showed the trend BR > ERR > NERICA > JR > RR > EWR. .... in cooked rice in Iran ranged from 0.2-1.6 mg F/kg [2].

  4. HOUSEHOLD PURIFICATION OF FLUORIDE CONTAMINATED MAGADI (TRONA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    Purification of fluoride contaminated magadi is studied using bone char sorption and calcium precipitation. The bone char treatment is found to be workable both in columns and in batches where the magadi is dissolved in water prior to treatment. The concentrations in the solutions were 89 g magadi...... treatment method. A procedure for purification of fluoride contaminated magadi at household level is described....

  5. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush abras

  6. Potentiometric Determination of Fluoride Concentration in Beers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaudenes, Juan Ramón; Hardisson, Arturo; Paz, Soraya; Rubio, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Angel José; Burgos, Antonio; Revert, Consuelo

    2017-04-26

    Beer is a widely consumed drink throughout the world, and because its manufacture involves the use of water, beer can be, in some cases, a source of fluorides. For this reason, the objective of this study was to determine the concentration of fluorides in 50 samples of beers from different sources sold in two different types of container (aluminum can and glass bottle). The possible significant differences between the different types of packaging and the intake of fluoride from the consumption of these beers were evaluated. The concentration of fluoride in beers has been determined using the potentiometric method of fluoride determination by standard addition. The concentration of fluoride ranged between 0.06 and 1.77 mg/L. In general, the concentration was below 1 mg/L, except for three beer samples from Ireland and the USA, whose concentration was over 1.5 mg/L. No significant differences were found between the types of packaging. The contribution of fluoride to the diet from beer consumption is not high (fluoride in the water supply.

  7. Inhibition of erosive wear by fluoride varnish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieira, A.; Jager, D. H. J.; Ruben, J. L.; Huysmans, M. C. D. N. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    It has been suggested that fluoride products with a protective mechanical component are advantageous in the prevention of erosive wear. The aim of this study was to evaluate in situ the effect of fluoride varnish (FV) in the prevention of wear due to erosion and combined erosion and toothbrush

  8. CORRELATION AMONG FLUORIDE AND METALS IN IRRIGATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    For comparative analysis of fluoride and metals in soil and water, water samples were ..... one is from rapidly soluble fluoride complex like cryolite (Na3AlF6) found in water ..... Atlabachew, M.; Chandravanshi, B.S.; Zewge, F.; Redi, M. Toxicol.

  9. Characterization of nanoscopic calcium fluoride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmer, A.; Kemnitz, E.

    2016-09-01

    Nano metal fluorides are appropriate materials for different applications e.g. heterogeneous catalysis, ceramic materials for laser applications and antireflective layers on glass, respectively. An easy way to synthesize such nano metal fluorides is the fluorolytic sol-gel synthesis which was developed some few years ago for HS-AlF3 [1] and MgF2.[2] CaF2 exhibits similar optical properties as MgF2, and thus, is a promising candidate for antireflective (AR) coatings. That means, CaF2 exhibits a lower refractive index (n500 = 1.44) as compared to common soda lime glass (n500 = 1.53). Hence, we present an easy synthesis approach toward nanoscaled CaF2 sols to fabricate finally AR-CaF2 films by dip coating. Irrespective of the choice of the calcium precursor, the CaF2 films are porous in comparison to thin dense CaF2 films which are generated by physical vapor deposition. The characterization of CaF2 films was performed by different analytical methods like HR-SEM, XPS, EDX, EP (ellipsometric porosimetry), DLS (dynamic light scattering) and CA (contact angle measurement). Beside the good optical and mechanical properties, we have investigated the surface properties of CaF2 films on glass and silicon wafer e.g. surface morphology with elemental composition, open porosity, zeta potentials at the surfaces as well as the free energy of interaction between water and the CaF2 film.

  10. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  11. Differential Toxicities of Nickel Salts to the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dean; Birdsey, Jennifer M; Wendolowski, Mark A; Dobbin, Kevin K; Williams, Phillip L

    2016-08-01

    This study focused on assessing whether nickel (Ni) toxicity to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was affected by the molecular structure of the Ni salt used. Nematodes were exposed to seven Ni salts [Ni sulfate hexahydrate (NiSO4·6H2O), Ni chloride hexahydrate (NiCl2·6H2O), Ni acetate tetrahydrate (Ni(OCOCH3)2·4H2O), Ni nitrate hexahydrate (N2NiO6·6H2O), anhydrous Ni iodide (NiI2), Ni sulfamate hydrate (Ni(SO3NH2)2·H2O), and Ni fluoride tetrahydrate (NiF2·4H2O)] in an aquatic medium for 24 h, and lethality curves were generated and analyzed. Ni fluoride, Ni iodide, and Ni chloride were most toxic to C. elegans, followed by Ni nitrate, Ni sulfamate, Ni acetate, and Ni sulfate. The LC50 values of the halogen-containing salts were statistically different from the corresponding value of the least toxic salt, Ni sulfate. This finding is consistent with the expected high bioavailability of free Ni ions in halide solutions. We recommend that the halide salts be used in future Ni testing involving aquatic invertebrates.

  12. Fluoride Importance in Controlling Caries and Fluorosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Solanki

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of fluorides for oral health has always involved a balance between the protective benefit against dental caries and the risk of developing fluorosis. The link between fluoride and dental health was established to determining the causes of dental fluorosis or enamel mottling. Fluorosis in Indian children was highly prevalent in the early 1990s. Policy were introduced to control fluoride exposure and to reduce the prevalence of fluorosis. The study aimed of describing the prevalence, severity and risk factors for fluorosis, and to describe the trend of fluorosis among Indian children. The study also aimed of exploring the effect of the change in fluoride exposure on dental fluorosis and caries. Establishing an appropriate use of fluoride toothpaste could be successful in reducing fluorosis without a significant increase in caries experience.

  13. Corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anie Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The corrosion behavior of zirconia in acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF representing acidic environments and fluoride treatments was studied. Material and Methods Zirconia rods were immersed in 1.23% and 0.123% APF solutions and maintained at 37°C for determined periods of time. Surfaces of all specimens were imaged using digital microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Sample mass and dimensions were measured for mass loss determination. Samples were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD to detect changes in crystallinity. A biosensor based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to detect ion dissolution of material into the immersion media. Results Digital microscopy revealed diminishing luster of the materials and SEM showed increased superficial corrosion of zirconia submerged in 1.23% APF. Although no structural change was found, the absorption of salts (sodium phosphate onto the surface of the materials bathed in 0.123% APF was significant. EIS indicated a greater change of impedance for the immersion solutions with increasing bathing time. Conclusion Immersion of zirconia in APF solutions showed deterioration limited to the surface, not extending to the bulk of the material. Inferences on zirconia performance in acidic oral environment can be elucidated from the study.

  14. Diethylenetriaminium hexafluoridotitanate(IV fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lhoste

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C6H21N4[TiF6]F, was synthesized by the reaction of TiO2, tris(2-aminoethylamine, HF and ethanol at 463 K in a microwave oven. The crystal structure consists of two crystallographically independent [TiF6]2− anions, two fluoride anions and two triply-protonated tris(2-aminoethylamine cations. The Ti atoms are coordinated by six F atoms within slightly distorted octahedra. The anions and cations are connected by intermolecular N—H...F hydrogen bonds.

  15. The dissolution of kaolin by acidic fluoride wastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    The potential use of kaolin as a lining material for the storage of acidic and acidic fluoride wastes is investigated, No significant changes are observed gravimetrically or structurally for kaolin soaked under acidic conditions down to pH 2 for periods up to 90 days, Some release of aluminium...... was noted with decreasing pH, Severe kaolin dissolution was apparent, however, when soaked in solutions less than pH 3 to 4 with a fluoride concentration of 0.05 M. Aluminium-oxygen bonding in kaolin appears to be substantially more prone to hydrofluoric acid attack than does silicon-oxygen bonding......, resulting in a preferential release of aluminium over silicon into solution. The solution pH was found to decrease with the dissolution reaction as fluorosilicic acid was produced during the kaolin breakdown....

  16. Prediction of the thermophysical properties of molten salt fast reactor fuel from first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheribi, A. E.; Corradini, D.; Dewan, L.; Chartrand, P.; Simon, C.; Madden, P. A.; Salanne, M.

    2014-05-01

    Molten fluorides are known to show favourable thermophysical properties which make them good candidate coolants for nuclear fission reactors. Here we investigate the special case of mixtures of lithium fluoride and thorium fluoride, which act both as coolant and as fuel in the molten salt fast reactor concept. By using ab initio parameterised polarisable force fields, we show that it is possible to calculate the whole set of properties (density, thermal expansion, heat capacity, viscosity and thermal conductivity) which are necessary for assessing the heat transfer performance of the melt over the whole range of compositions and temperatures. We then deduce from our calculations several figures of merit which are important in helping the optimisation of the design of molten salt fast reactors.

  17. Inclusion of mPRISM potential for polymer-induced protein interactions enables modeling of second osmotic virial coefficients in aqueous polymer-salt solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herhut, Marcel; Brandenbusch, Christoph; Sadowski, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The downstream processing of therapeutic proteins is a challenging task. Key information needed to estimate applicable workup strategies (e.g. crystallization) are the interactions of the proteins with other components in solution. This information can be deduced from the second osmotic virial coefficient B22 , measurable by static light scattering. Thermodynamic models are very valuable for predicting B22 data for different process conditions and thus decrease the experimental effort. Available B22 models consider aqueous salt solutions but fail for the prediction of B22 if an additional polymer is present in solution. This is due to the fact that depending on the polymer concentration protein-protein interactions are not rectified as assumed within these models. In this work, we developed an extension of the xDLVO model to predict B22 data of proteins in aqueous polymer-salt solutions. To show the broad applicability of the model, lysozyme, γ-globulin and D-xylose ketol isomerase in aqueous salt solution containing polyethylene glycol were considered. For all proteins considered, the modified xDLVO model was able to predict the experimentally observed non-monotonical course in B22 data with high accuracy. When used in an early stage in process development, the model will contribute to an efficient and cost effective downstream processing development.

  18. Factors Governing the Performance of Bauxite for Fluoride Remediation of Groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukumilli, Katya; Delaire, Caroline; Amrose, Susan; Gadgil, Ashok J

    2017-02-21

    Globally, 200 million people drink groundwater contaminated with fluoride concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended level (WHO-MCL = 1.5 mg F(-)/L). This study investigates the use of minimally processed (dried/milled) bauxite ore as an inexpensive adsorbent for remediating fluoride-contaminated groundwater in resource-constrained areas. Adsorption experiments in synthetic groundwater using bauxites from Guinea, Ghana, U.S., and India as single-use batch dispersive media demonstrated that doses of ∼10-23 g/L could effectively remediate 10 mg F(-)/L. To elucidate factors governing fluoride removal, bauxites were characterized using X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, gas-sorption analysis, and adsorption isotherms/envelopes. All ores contained gibbsite, had comparable surface areas (∼14-17 m(2)/g), had similar intrinsic affinities and capacities for fluoride, and did not leach harmful ions into product water. Fluoride uptake on bauxite -primarily through ion-exchange- was strongly pH-dependent, with highest removal occurring at pH 5.0-6.0. Dissolution of CaCO3, present in trace amounts in India bauxite, significantly hindered fluoride removal by increasing solution pH. We also showed that fluoride remediation with the best-performing Guinea bauxite was ∼23-33 times less expensive than with activated alumina. Overall, our results suggest that bauxite could be an affordable fluoride-remediation adsorbent with the potential to improve access to drinking water for millions living in developing countries.

  19. Thermal-hydraulics of internally heated molten salts and application to the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorina, Carlo; Cammi, Antonio; Luzzi, Lelio; Mikityuk, Konstantin; Ninokata, Hisashi; Ricotti, Marco E.

    2014-04-01

    The Molten Salt Reactors (MSR) are an innovative kind of nuclear reactors and are presently considered in the framework of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF-IV) for their promising performances in terms of low resource utilization, waste minimization and enhanced safety. A unique feature of MSRs is that molten fluoride salts play the distinctive role of both fuel (heat source) and coolant. The presence of an internal heat generation perturbs the temperature field and consequences are to be expected on the heat transfer characteristics of the molten salts. In this paper, the problem of heat transfer for internally heated fluids in a straight circular channel is first faced on a theoretical ground. The effect of internal heat generation is demonstrated to be described by a corrective factor applied to traditional correlations for the Nusselt number. It is shown that the corrective factor can be fully characterized by making explicit the dependency on Reynolds and Prandtl numbers. On this basis, a preliminary correlation is proposed for the case of molten fluoride salts by interpolating the results provided by an analytic approach previously developed at the Politecnico di Milano. The experimental facility and the related measuring procedure for testing the proposed correlation are then presented. Finally, the developed correlation is used to carry out a parametric investigation on the effect of internal heat generation on the main out-of-core components of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR), the reference circulating-fuel MSR design in the GIF-IV. The volumetric power determines higher temperatures at the channel wall, but the effect is significant only in case of large diameters and/or low velocities.

  20. Cell cycle arrest and gene expression profiling of testis in mice exposed to fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Kai; Sun, Zilong; Niu, Ruiyan; Lei, Ying; Cheng, Jing; Wang, Jundong

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to fluoride results in low reproductive capacity; however, the mechanism underlying the impact of fluoride on male productive system still remains obscure. To assess the potential toxicity in testis of mice administrated with fluoride, global genome microarray and real-time PCR were performed to detect and identify the altered transcriptions. The results revealed that 763 differentially expressed genes were identified, including 330 up-regulated and 433 down-regulated genes, which were involved in spermatogenesis, apoptosis, DNA damage, DNA replication, and cell differentiation. Twelve differential expressed genes were selected to confirm the microarray results using real-time PCR, and the result kept the same tendency with that of microarray. Furthermore, compared with the control group, more apoptotic spermatogenic cells were observed in the fluoride group, and the spermatogonium were markedly increased in S phase and decreased in G2/M phase by fluoride. Our findings suggested global genome microarray provides an insight into the reproductive toxicity induced by fluoride, and several important biological clues for further investigations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 1558-1565, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.