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Sample records for fluorescent pseudomonads isolated

  1. Ice-nucleation negative fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from Hebridean cloud and rain water produce biosurfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, H. E.; Walsh, K. A.; Hill, T. C. J.; Moffett, B. F.

    2006-10-01

    Microorganisms were discovered in clouds over 100 years ago but information on bacterial community structure and function is limited. Clouds may not only be a niche within which bacteria could thrive but they might also influence dynamic processes using ice nucleating and cloud condensing abilities. Cloud and rain samples were collected from two mountains in the Outer Hebrides, NW Scotland, UK. Community composition was determined using a combination of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and sequencing. 256 clones yielded 100 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of which half were related to bacteria from terrestrial psychrophilic environments. Cloud samples were dominated by a mixture of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., some of which have been reported to be ice nucleators. It was therefore possible that these bacteria were using the ice nucleation (IN) gene to trigger the Bergeron-Findeisen process of raindrop formation as a mechanism for dispersal. In this study the IN gene was not detected in any of the isolates using both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Instead 55% of the total isolates from both cloud and rain samples displayed significant biosurfactant activity when analyzed using the drop-collapse technique. All were characterised as fluorescent pseudomonads. Surfactants have been found to be very important in lowering atmospheric critical supersaturations required for the activation of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is also known that surfactants influence cloud droplet size and increase cloud lifetime and albedo. Some bacteria are known to act as CCN and so it is conceivable that these fluorescent pseudomonads are using surfactants to facilitate their activation from aerosols into CCN. This would allow water scavenging, countering desiccation, and assist in their widespread dispersal.

  2. Fluorescent pseudomonads isolated from Hebridean cloud and rain water produce biosurfactants but do not cause ice nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahern, H. E.; Walsh, K. A.; Hill, T. C. J.; Moffett, B. F.

    2007-02-01

    Microorganisms were discovered in clouds over 100 years ago but information on bacterial community structure and function is limited. Clouds may not only be a niche within which bacteria could thrive but they might also influence dynamic processes using ice nucleating and cloud condensing abilities. Cloud and rain samples were collected from two mountains in the Outer Hebrides, NW Scotland, UK. Community composition was determined using a combination of amplified 16S ribosomal DNA restriction analysis and sequencing. 256 clones yielded 100 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of which half were related to bacteria from terrestrial psychrophilic environments. Cloud samples were dominated by a mixture of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp., some of which have been reported to be ice nucleators. It was therefore possible that these bacteria were using the ice nucleation (IN) gene to trigger the Bergeron-Findeisen process of raindrop formation as a mechanism for dispersal. In this study the IN gene was not detected in any of the isolates using both polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Instead 55% of the total isolates from both cloud and rain samples displayed significant biosurfactant activity when analyzed using the drop-collapse technique. All isolates were characterised as fluorescent pseudomonads. Surfactants have been found to be very important in lowering atmospheric critical supersaturations required for the activation of aerosols into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is also known that surfactants influence cloud droplet size and increase cloud lifetime and albedo. Some bacteria are known to act as CCN and so it is conceivable that these fluorescent pseudomonads are using surfactants to facilitate their activation from aerosols into CCN. This would allow water scavenging,~countering desiccation, and assist in their widespread dispersal.

  3. The Addition of Several Mineral Sources on Growing Media of Fluorescent Pseudomonad for the Biosynthesis of Hydrogen Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advinda, L.; Fifendy, M.; Anhar, A.

    2018-04-01

    All Fluorescent pseudomonad is a group of rhyzobacteria which these days often utilized on plant disease control. The growing media is an absolute requirement which needs to be considered for the growth and cultivation of bacteria. The mineral source contained in growing media of bacteria may affect the production of hydrogen cyanide compound. The objectives of the research were to obtain the best source of minerals for biosynthesis of cyanide acid compounds by fluorescent pseudomonad isolates PfPj1, PfPb1, PfPj2, Kd7, Cas, Cas3, and LAHp2. This research is a qualitative experimental research including observation of hydrogen cyanide compound produced after the growing media of fluorescent pseudomonad bacteria added with several mineral sources. The treatments were given: A = ZnSO4.7H2O 0.5 mM addition, B = CoCl2.6H2O 0.5 mM addition, and C = Fe2SO4.7H2O 0.5 mM addition. From the result of the research, it was concluded that the addition of ZnSO4.7H2O mineral resources on the growing media of fluorescent pseudomonad isolate Cas and Cas3 produced the best hydrogen cyanide. Whereas addition of CoCl2.6H2O mineral source on the growing media showed poor hydrogen cyanide production for all fluorescent pseudomonad isolates

  4. The Effect of Fluorescent Pseudomonads Application on the Resistance of Chili Plants Against the Attack of Ralstonia Solanacearum and Fusarium Oxysporum in the Field

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    Wuryandari Yenny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chili (Capsicum annuum L. is one of the vegetable commodities with high economic value. Until now, the necessity rate of chili is still high but the production is still low. One of the obstacles, which highly influence chili production, is wilt disease due to Ralstonia solanacearum and Fusarium oxysporum. This study aims at identifying the best fluorescent pseudomonads isolate in suppressing the development of the primary wilt disease due to Ralstonia solanacearum and F. oxysprorum in the field. This study employs Completely Randomized Design that comprises 3 treatments. The three treatments are the type of fluorescent pseudomonads which is Pf-122 isolate, Pf-160 isolate, and Pf-B isolate. The observation parameter on suppressing the disease development is perceived from incubation period of the initial appearance of symptoms, disease index and the change of stem tissue color. The result of the study shows that the longest incubation period is treatment with fluorescent pseudomonads of Pf-122 isolate and Pf-160 isolate. The chili is treated with fluorescent pseudomonads of Pf-122 isolate and Pf-160 isolate, the initial appearance of symptoms at the 8th day after inoculation. In the treatment with fluorescent pseudomonads of Pf-122 isolate and Pf-160 isolate compared to control, is able to delay the appearance of symptom for 3 days. The disease development starts from 10th to 30th day, the treatment with Pf-122 isolate shows the slowest development compared to other treatment and control. In the last observation, the disease index with treatment of Pf-122 isolate is the lowest which is 37%, then it is followed by Pf-B and Pf-160 which are 39% and 40% respectively, whereas in the control it reaches 67%. For the color change on stem tissue, there is no real difference of the three treatments of fluorescent pseudomonads application but it differs and smaller from the control.

  5. Catalase and Superoxide Dismutase of Root-Colonizing Saprophytic Fluorescent Pseudomonads

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    Katsuwon, Jirasak; Anderson, Anne J.

    1990-01-01

    Root-colonizing, saprophytic fluorescent pseudomonads of the Pseudomonas putida-P. fluorescens group express similar levels of catalase and superoxide dismutase activities during growth on a sucrose- and amino acid-rich medium. Increased specific activities of catalase but not superoxide dismutase were observed during growth of these bacteria on components washed from root surfaces. The specific activities of both enzymes were also regulated during contact of these bacteria with intact bean r...

  6. Artificial Citrate Operon Confers Mineral Phosphate Solubilization Ability to Diverse Fluorescent Pseudomonads

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    Adhikary, Hemanta; Sanghavi, Paulomi B.; Macwan, Silviya R.; Archana, Gattupalli; Naresh Kumar, G.

    2014-01-01

    Citric acid is a strong acid with good cation chelating ability and can be very efficient in solubilizing mineral phosphates. Only a few phosphate solubilizing bacteria and fungi are known to secrete citric acids. In this work, we incorporated artificial citrate operon containing NADH insensitive citrate synthase (gltA1) and citrate transporter (citC) genes into the genome of six-plant growth promoting P. fluorescens strains viz., PfO-1, Pf5, CHAO1, P109, ATCC13525 and Fp315 using MiniTn7 transposon gene delivery system. Comprehensive biochemical characterization of the genomic integrants and their comparison with plasmid transformants of the same operon in M9 minimal medium reveals the highest amount of ∼7.6±0.41 mM citric and 29.95±2.8 mM gluconic acid secretion along with ∼43.2±3.24 mM intracellular citrate without affecting the growth of these P. fluorescens strains. All genomic integrants showed enhanced citric and gluconic acid secretion on Tris-Cl rock phosphate (TRP) buffered medium, which was sufficient to release 200–1000 µM Pi in TRP medium. This study demonstrates that MPS ability could be achieved in natural fluorescent pseudomonads by incorporation of artificial citrate operon not only as plasmid but also by genomic integration. PMID:25259527

  7. Composts containing fluorescent pseudomonads suppress fusarium root and stem rot development on greenhouse cucumber.

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    Bradley, Geoffrey G; Punja, Zamir K

    2010-11-01

    Three composts (Ball, dairy, and greenhouse) were tested for the ability to suppress the development of Fusarium root and stem rot (caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-cucumerinum) on greenhouse cucumber. Dairy and greenhouse composts significantly reduced disease severity (P = 0.05), while Ball compost had no effect. Assessment of total culturable microbes in the composts showed a positive relationship between disease suppressive ability and total population levels of pseudomonads. In vitro antagonism assays between compost-isolated bacterial strains and the pathogen showed that strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibited the greatest antagonism. In growth room trials, strains of P. aeruginosa and nonantagonistic Pseudomonas maculicola, plus 2 biocontrol strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, were tested for their ability to reduce (i) survival of F. oxysporum, (ii) colonization of plants by the pathogen, and (iii) disease severity. Cucumber seedlings grown in compost receiving P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens had reduced disease severity index scores after 8 weeks compared with control plants without bacteria. Internal stem colonization by F. oxysporum was significantly reduced by P. aeruginosa. The bacteria colonized plant roots at 1.9 × 10(6) ± 0.73 × 10(6) CFU·(g root tissue)-1 and survival was >107 CFU·(g compost)-1 after 6 weeks. The locus for 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol production was detected by Southern blot analysis and confirmed by PCR. The production of the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in liquid culture by P. aeruginosa was confirmed by thin layer chromatography. These results demonstrate that composts containing antibiotic-producing P. aeruginosa have the potential to suppress diseases caused by Fusarium species.

  8. Occurrence and antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric rods and pseudomonads isolated from the dental prostheses biofilm

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    Sanrrangers Sales Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aspiration of oral bacteria leads to cardiac and respiratory infectious diseases and dentures can act as a reservoir for pathogenic microorganisms. Objective: To determine the occurrence and the in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of enteric rods and pseudomonads from the denture biofilm of 52 subjects at the Center for Dental Specialties of Sobral/ Ceara, Brazil. Material and Methods: Denture biofilm was collected and samples plated on MacConkey agar. The isolated bacterial colonies were identified using the BBL Crystal enteric/non-fermenter system. Antibiotic bacterial susceptibility was assessed by the disc diffusion method of amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, doxycycline, tetracycline, tobramycin, imipenem, cefotaxime, and ciprofloxacin. The Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of cefotaxime, tobramycin, doxycycline, imipenem, and ciprofloxacin was determined for 40 species by E-test. Results: 34 subjects (65.4% harbored enteric rods in their prostheses. Klebsiella pneumoniae (26.5%, Escherichia coli (23.5%, and Enterobacter aerogenes (23.5% were the most prevalent species. All organisms were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and most species were resistant to amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, demonstrating variable sensitivity patterns to other antimicrobials. However, the MIC showed the emergence of strains with reduced sensitivity to ciprofloxacin (MIC90≥3 μg/ mL and cefotaxime (MIC90≥2 μg/mL. Conclusion: The findings show high prevalence of nosocomial diseases-related bacterial species and low susceptibility to antimicrobial drugs. Therefore, these results imply caution against the indiscriminate use of broad spectrum antibiotics in dental practice.

  9. Rapid detection of rRNA group I pseudomonads in contaminated metalworking fluids and biofilm formation by fluorescent in situ hybridization.

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    Saha, Ratul; Donofrio, Robert S; Goeres, Darla M; Bagley, Susan T

    2012-05-01

    Metalworking fluids (MWFs), used in different machining operations, are highly prone to microbial degradation. Microbial communities present in MWFs lead to biofilm formation in the MWF systems, which act as a continuous source of contamination. Species of rRNA group I Pseudomonas dominate in contaminated MWFs. However, their actual distribution is typically underestimated when using standard culturing techniques as most fail to grow on the commonly used Pseudomonas Isolation Agar. To overcome this, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was used to study their abundance along with biofilm formation by two species recovered from MWFs, Pseudomonas fluorescens MWF-1 and the newly described Pseudomonas oleovorans subsp. lubricantis. Based on 16S rRNA sequences, a unique fluorescent molecular probe (Pseudo120) was designed targeting a conserved signature sequence common to all rRNA group I Pseudomonas. The specificity of the probe was evaluated using hybridization experiments with whole cells of different Pseudomonas species. The probe's sensitivity was determined to be 10(3) cells/ml. It successfully detected and enumerated the abundance and distribution of Pseudomonas indicating levels between 3.2 (± 1.1) × 10(6) and 5.0 (± 2.3) × 10(6) cells/ml in four different industrial MWF samples collected from three different locations. Biofilm formation was visualized under stagnant conditions using high and low concentrations of cells for both P. fluorescens MWF-1 and P. oleovorans subsp. lubricantis stained with methylene blue and Pseudo120. On the basis of these observations, this molecular probe can be successfully be used in the management of MWF systems to monitor the levels and biofilm formation of rRNA group I pseudomonads.

  10. A new disease of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) in California caused by a fluorescent pseudomonad related to Pseudomonas viridiflava.

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    In 2008 fluorescent bacteria were isolated from bacterial leaf spot symptoms on Italian parsley (Petroselinum crispum) in Ceres, California. These isolates were different from the known bacterial pathogens of parsley in California. To determine the etiology of this disease pathogenicity was evaluate...

  11. Pseudomonads Isolated from Pristine Background Groundwater Proliferate More Effectively in Co-culture than in Monoculture Under Denitrifying Conditions

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    Aaring, A. B.; Lancaster, A.; Novichkov, P.; Adams, M. W. W.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Chakraborty, R.

    2016-12-01

    As part of the Ecosystems and Networks Integrated with Genes and Molecular Assemblies (ENIGMA) consortium, we study the microbial community at the U.S. Department of Energy's Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge. The groundwater at this site contains plumes of nitrate with concentrations up to 14,000mg/L among other contaminants, though molybdenum concentrations are low. Because molybdenum is essential to nitrate reduction, this can be inhibitory to growth. Several strains of Pseudomonas were isolated from the same background groundwater sample. These isolates utilized diverse carbon sources ranging from acetate to glucose while growing under denitrifying conditions. The strains were also screened for nitrate tolerance and a couple of them were shown to be tolerant to 300-400 mM nitrate under anaerobic conditions. In the field site the bacteria live in consortia rather than in isolation, therefore we hypothesized that growth of these strains will be more robust in co-culture, as the denitrification pathway was segmented between the species. Three of the isolates (Pseudomonas fluorescens strains N1B4, N2E2, N2E3) were selected for in-depth analysis based on growth in pairwise co-cultures relative to monocultures, and the availability of the relevant genetic tools, such as transposon mutant libraries. Full genome sequencing showed that strain N2E3 has a truncated dentrification pathway: it lacks nitrous oxide reductase. Our results show strain N2E2 grow to maximum cell density an average of 45 hours more quickly when grown with strain N2E3 than in monoculture. Utilizing RB-TnSeq libraries of our strains, it was also found that some genes involved in nitrate reduction, sulfate permeability, molybdenum utilization, and anaerobic reduction are important for growth under these conditions. In addition, a few unexpected genes were also shown to be positively correlated to growth, such as genes homologous to genes for DNA proofreading or antibiotic production. These

  12. Rhizosphere pseudomonads as probiotics improving plant health.

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    Kim, Young Cheol; Anderson, Anne J

    2018-04-20

    Many root-colonizing microbes are multifaceted in traits that improve plant health. Although isolates designated as biological control agents directly reduce pathogen growth, many exert additional beneficial features that parallel changes induced in animal and other hosts by health-promoting microbes termed probiotics. Both animal and plant probiotics cause direct antagonism of pathogens and induce systemic immunity in the host to pathogens and other stresses. They also alter host development, and improve host nutrition. The probiotic root-colonizing pseudomonads are generalists in terms of plant hosts, soil habitats and the array of stress responses that are ameliorated in the plant. This review illustrates how the probiotic pseudomonads, nurtured by the C and N sources released by the plant in root exudates, form protective biofilms on the root surface and produce the metabolites or enzymes to boost plant health. The findings reveal the multifunctional nature of many of the microbial metabolites in the plant-probiotic interplay. The beneficial effects of probiotics on plant function can contribute to sustainable yield and quality in agricultural production. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effect of fluorescent pseudomonades and Trichoderma sp. and their combination with two chemicals on Penicillium digitatum caused agent of citrus green mold.

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    Zamani, M; Tehrani, A Sharifi; Ahmadzadeh, M; Abadi, A Alizadeh Ali

    2006-01-01

    Citrus green mold (Penicillium digitatum) causes economic losses. Chemical fungicides such as imazalil provide the primary means for controlling green mold decay of citrus fruits. Continuous use of fungicides has faced two major obstacles- increasing public concern regarding contamination of perishables with fungicidal residues, and proliferation of resistance in the pathogen populations. The aim of this research was to determine if the attacks of green mold on orange could be reduced by usage of biocontrol agent alone or in combination with low dosage of imazalil or sodium bicarbonate. Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate PN, P. fluorescens isolate PS and Trichoderma virens isolate TE were evaluated as potential biological agents for control of green mold of oranges caused by P. digitatum. Increasing concentration of SB decreased spore germination of P. digitatum. In laboratory tests, a cell suspension (10(8) cells per ml.) of bacterial strains reduced the incidence of green mold. On fruits surface biocontrol activity of antagonistic isolates was significantly increased when combined with low dosage of imazalil (500ppm) or sodium carbonate (5%). Effect of Trichoderma virens on controlling P. digitatum was better than others with or without these chemicals.

  14. FORMULA BERBAHAN AKTIF PSEUDOMONAD FLUORESEN DAN PENGARUHNYA TERHADAP PERKEMBANGAN PENYAKIT LAYU PADA CABAI

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    Yenny Wuryandari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Formula with active ingridient of fluorescent pseudomonads and its influence on wilt disease development of pepper. The purpose of this study was to synergize organic fertilizer with biopesticides of fluorescent pseudomonads 122 to be the best formula to increase the resistance of pepper plants to wilt disease. The study used a completely randomized design (CRD, which consisted of four treatments. The treatments were forms of active ingredient formula of fluorescent pseudomonads (powder, pellet, granule, and liquid. The effectiveness of the formula in suppressing development of the disease was measured by observing the incubation period, index of the disease and discoloration of vascular tissue of pepper. The results showed that the disease incubation period of plant treated with liquid and powder formula was longer than formula with granule and pellet. Plants treated with powder formula showed the lowest disease index compared to control, liquid, pellet and granule formula. Disease index and discoloration in vascular tissue was also of the lowest value when the plants were treated with powder formula. This result indicate that active ingredient of fluorescent pseudomonads formulated in powder was the most effective to inhibit the development of wilt disease on pepper caused by Fusarium sp. and Ralstonia solanacearum.

  15. Multilocus sequence analysis of nectar pseudomonads reveals high genetic diversity and contrasting recombination patterns.

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    Alvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas 'sensu stricto' isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria.

  16. Multilocus Sequence Analysis of Nectar Pseudomonads Reveals High Genetic Diversity and Contrasting Recombination Patterns

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    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; de Vega, Clara; Herrera, Carlos M.

    2013-01-01

    The genetic and evolutionary relationships among floral nectar-dwelling Pseudomonas ‘sensu stricto’ isolates associated to South African and Mediterranean plants were investigated by multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) of four core housekeeping genes (rrs, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD). A total of 35 different sequence types were found for the 38 nectar bacterial isolates characterised. Phylogenetic analyses resulted in the identification of three main clades [nectar groups (NGs) 1, 2 and 3] of nectar pseudomonads, which were closely related to five intrageneric groups: Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (NG 1); P. fluorescens, P. lutea and P. syringae (NG 2); and P. rhizosphaerae (NG 3). Linkage disequilibrium analysis pointed to a mostly clonal population structure, even when the analysis was restricted to isolates from the same floristic region or belonging to the same NG. Nevertheless, signatures of recombination were observed for NG 3, which exclusively included isolates retrieved from the floral nectar of insect-pollinated Mediterranean plants. In contrast, the other two NGs comprised both South African and Mediterranean isolates. Analyses relating diversification to floristic region and pollinator type revealed that there has been more unique evolution of the nectar pseudomonads within the Mediterranean region than would be expected by chance. This is the first work analysing the sequence of multiple loci to reveal geno- and ecotypes of nectar bacteria. PMID:24116076

  17. Type III secretion system and virulence markers highlight similarities and differences between human- and plant-associated pseudomonads related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida.

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    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crépin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Plésiat, Patrick; Lemanceau, Philippe; Latour, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this secretion system in plant-associated P. fluorescens raise the question of whether clinical isolates may also harbor T3SSs. In this study, isolates associated with clinical infections and identified in hospitals as belonging to P. fluorescens were compared with fluorescent pseudomonads harboring T3SSs isolated from plants. Bacterial isolates were tested for (i) their genetic relationships based on their 16S rRNA phylogeny, (ii) the presence of T3SS genes by PCR, and (iii) their infectious potential on animals and plants under environmental or physiological temperature conditions. Two groups of bacteria were delineated among the clinical isolates. The first group encompassed thermotolerant (41°C) isolates from patients suffering from blood infections; these isolates were finally found to not belong to P. fluorescens but were closely related and harbored highly conserved T3SS genes belonging to the Ysc-T3SS family, like the T3SSs from P. aeruginosa. The second group encompassed isolates from patients suffering from cystic fibrosis; these isolates belonged to P. fluorescens and harbored T3SS genes belonging to the Hrp1-T3SS family found commonly in plant-associated P. fluorescens. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Characterization of a fluorescent compound isolated from Legionella pneumophila

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    Swanson, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the presence of amino acids for growth and utilizes them for energy. Along with other amino acids, either phenylalanine or tyrosine is essential for the growth of the organism and tyrosine has been identified as an energy source. When L. pneumophila is grown in the presence of tyrosine, a brown melanin-like pigment is produced. A green fluorescent pigment, fg2, was isolated from centrifuged culture fluid after the organism was grown in the presence of tyrosine. Fg2 is water soluble with a molecular weight of 152 as determined by mass spectral analysis. A mutant of L. pneumophila unable to produce fg2 was isolated to assist in elucidation of the biosynthesis of fg2. Radiolabeling experiments were utilized to conclude that neither tyrosine nor any other amino acid was a precursor in the biosynthesis of fg2. Shikimic acid, an intermediate in tyrosine biosynthesis, was found to also be an intermediate in the biosynthesis of fg2. A series of experiments in which L. pneumophila was grown in a chemically defined medium containing various combinations of aromatic amino acids determined that fg2 and the brown pigment always occur in tandem

  19. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

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    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  20. Novel Phl-producing genotypes of finger millet rhizosphere associated pseudomonads and assessment of their functional and genetic diversity.

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    Sekar, Jegan; Prabavathy, Vaiyapuri Ramalingam

    2014-07-01

    Genetic diversity of phlD gene, an essential gene in the biosynthesis of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, was studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 20 Phl-producing pseudomonads isolated from finger millet rhizosphere. RFLP analysis of phlD gene displayed three patterns with HaeIII and TaqI enzymes. phlD gene sequence closely correlated with RFLP results and revealed the existence of three new genotypes G, H and I. Further, the phylogenetic and concatenated sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, gyrB, rpoD genes supported the hypothesis that these genotypes G, H and I were different from reported genotypes A-F. In all phylogenetic studies, the genotype G formed a distant clade from the groups of Pseudomonas putida and P. aeruginosa (sensu strictu), but the groups H and I were closely related to P. aeruginosa/P. stutzeri group. The Phl-producing pseudomonads exhibited antagonistic activity against Pyricularia grisea (TN508), Gaeumannomyces graminis (DSM1463), Fusarium oxysporum (DSM62297), Xanthomonas campestris (DSM3586) and Erwinia persicina (HMGU155). In addition, these strains exhibited various plant growth-promoting traits. In conclusion, this study displays the existence of novel Phl-producing pseudomonads genotypes G, H and I from finger millet rhizosphere, which formed taxonomically outward phylogenetic lineage from the groups of P. putida and P. aeruginosa (sensu strictu). © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

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    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic. They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in the field but becomes a threat to fresh vegetables stored at low-temperature. Analysis of cellulosolytic and pectic enzymes revealed that pectic lyases, but not polygalacturonases, pectin methyl esterases and cellulases were produced in culture by each isolate.

  2. Litter-forager termite mounds enhance the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between Acacia holosericea A. Cunn. Ex G. Don and Scleroderma dictyosporum isolates.

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    Duponnois, Robin; Assikbetse, Komi; Ramanankierana, Heriniaina; Kisa, Marija; Thioulouse, Jean; Lepage, Michel

    2006-05-01

    The hypothesis of the present study was that the termite mounds of Macrotermes subhyalinus (MS) (a litter-forager termite) were inhabited by a specific microflora that could enhance with the ectomycorrhizal fungal development. We tested the effect of this feeding group mound material on (i) the ectomycorrhization symbiosis between Acacia holosericea (an Australian Acacia introduced in the sahelian areas) and two ectomycorrhizal fungal isolates of Scleroderma dictyosporum (IR408 and IR412) in greenhouse conditions, (ii) the functional diversity of soil microflora and (iii) the diversity of fluorescent pseudomonads. The results showed that the termite mound amendment significantly increased the ectomycorrhizal expansion. MS mound amendment and ectomycorrhizal inoculation induced strong modifications of the soil functional microbial diversity by promoting the multiplication of carboxylic acid catabolizing microorganisms. The phylogenetic analysis showed that fluorescent pseudomonads mostly belong to the Pseudomonads monteillii species. One of these, P. monteillii isolate KR9, increased the ectomycorrhizal development between S. dictyosporum IR412 and A. holosericea. The occurrence of MS termite mounds could be involved in the expansion of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis and could be implicated in nutrient flow and local diversity.

  3. Antibiotic Multiresistance Analysis of Mesophilic and Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Goat and Lamb Slaughterhouse Surfaces throughout the Meat Production Process

    OpenAIRE

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and cefta...

  4. Evolutionary patchwork of an insecticidal toxin shared between plant-associated pseudomonads and the insect pathogens Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffner, Beat; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Höfte, Monica; Bloemberg, Guido; Grunder, Jürg; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2015-08-16

    Root-colonizing fluorescent pseudomonads are known for their excellent abilities to protect plants against soil-borne fungal pathogens. Some of these bacteria produce an insecticidal toxin (Fit) suggesting that they may exploit insect hosts as a secondary niche. However, the ecological relevance of insect toxicity and the mechanisms driving the evolution of toxin production remain puzzling. Screening a large collection of plant-associated pseudomonads for insecticidal activity and presence of the Fit toxin revealed that Fit is highly indicative of insecticidal activity and predicts that Pseudomonas protegens and P. chlororaphis are exclusive Fit producers. A comparative evolutionary analysis of Fit toxin-producing Pseudomonas including the insect-pathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus and Xenorhadus, which produce the Fit related Mcf toxin, showed that fit genes are part of a dynamic genomic region with substantial presence/absence polymorphism and local variation in GC base composition. The patchy distribution and phylogenetic incongruence of fit genes indicate that the Fit cluster evolved via horizontal transfer, followed by functional integration of vertically transmitted genes, generating a unique Pseudomonas-specific insect toxin cluster. Our findings suggest that multiple independent evolutionary events led to formation of at least three versions of the Mcf/Fit toxin highlighting the dynamic nature of insect toxin evolution.

  5. Plasmon enhanced fluorescence with aggregated shell-isolated nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Román, Igor O; Guerrero, Ariel R; Albella, Pablo; Aroca, Ricardo F

    2014-10-21

    Shell-isolated nanoparticles (SHINs) nanostructures provide a versatile substrate where the localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) are well-defined. For SHINEF, the silver (or gold) metal core is protected by the SiO2 coating, which is thicker than the critical distance for minimum quenching by the metal. In the present work, it is shown that an increase in the SHINEF enhancement factor may be achieved by inducing SHIN aggregation with electrolytes in solution. The proof of concept is demonstrated using NaCl as aggregating agent, although other inorganic salts will also aggregate SHIN nanoparticles. As much as a 10-fold enhancement in the SHINEF enhancement factor (EF) may be achieved by tuning the electrolyte concentrations in solution. The SHINEF experiments include the study of the aggregation effect controlling gold SHIN's surface concentration via spraying. Au-SHINs are sprayed onto layer-by-layer (LbL) and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films, and samples are fabricated using fluorophores with low and also high quantum yield.

  6. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Joana Beatrice; Song-Wilson, Yi; Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denatu...

  7. Iodine susceptibility of pseudomonads grown attached to stainless steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, B. H.; McFeters, G. A.

    1990-01-01

    Pseudomonads were adapted to grow in phosphate-buffered water and on stainless steel surfaces to study the iodine sensitivity of attached and planktonic cells. Cultures adapted to low nutrient growth were incubated at room temperature in a circulating reactor system with stainless steel coupons to allow biofilm formation on the metal surfaces. In some experiments, the reactor was partially emptied and refilled with buffer at each sampling time to simulate a "fill-and-draw" water system. Biofilms of attached bacteria, resuspended biofilm bacteria, and reactor suspension, were exposed to 1 mg l-1 iodine for 2 min. Attached bacterial populations which established on coupons within 3 to 5 days displayed a significant increase in resistance to iodine. Increased resistance was also observed for resuspended cells from the biofilm and planktonic bacteria in the system suspension. Generally, intact biofilms and resuspended biofilm cells were most resistant, followed by planktonic bacteria and phosphate buffer cultures. Thus, biofilm formation on stainless steel surfaces within water systems can result in significantly increased disinfection resistance of commonly-occurring water-borne bacteria that may enhance their ability to colonise water treatment and distribution systems.

  8. A Method to Identify and Isolate Pluripotent Human Stem Cells and Mouse Epiblast Stem Cells Using Lipid Body-Associated Retinyl Ester Fluorescence

    OpenAIRE

    Thangaselvam Muthusamy; Odity Mukherjee; Radhika Menon; Megha Prakash Bangalore; Mitradas M. Panicker

    2014-01-01

    Summary We describe the use of a characteristic blue fluorescence to identify and isolate pluripotent human embryonic stem cells and human-induced pluripotent stem cells. The blue fluorescence emission (450–500 nm) is readily observed by fluorescence microscopy and correlates with the expression of pluripotency markers (OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG). It allows easy identification and isolation of undifferentiated human pluripotent stem cells, high-throughput fluorescence sorting and subsequent propa...

  9. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Gkogka, Elissavet

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and in cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth ...

  10. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand

    Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth mod...

  11. Modelling and predicting growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in milk and cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Rosshaug, Per Sand

    .43. The acceptable simulation zone method showed the new model for cottage cheese to successfully predict growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads at both constant and dynamic temperature storage conditions. The new models can be used together with the Food Spoilage and Safety Predictor (FSSP) software to predict......Mathematical models were developed and evaluated for growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in chilled milk and cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. The mathematical models include the effect of temperature, pH, NaCl, lactic acid and sorbic acid. A simplified cardinal parameter growth model...... was developed based on growth in broth. Subsequently, the reference growth rate parameter (μref at 25 °C) was fitted to a total of 35 growth rates from cottage cheese with cultured cream dressing. Growth rate models for milk and cottage cheese were evaluated by comparison with data from literature and new...

  12. Rapid isolation of antibody from a synthetic human antibody library by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Sun Yim

    Full Text Available Antibodies and their derivatives are the most important agents in therapeutics and diagnostics. Even after the significant progress in the technology for antibody screening from huge libraries, it takes a long time to isolate an antibody, which prevents a prompt action against the spread of a disease. Here, we report a new strategy for isolating desired antibodies from a combinatorial library in one day by repeated fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. First, we constructed a library of synthetic human antibody in which single-chain variable fragment (scFv was expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. After labeling the cells with fluorescent antigen probes, the highly fluorescent cells were sorted by using a high-speed cell sorter, and these cells were reused without regeneration in the next round of sorting. After repeating this sorting, the positive clones were completely enriched in several hours. Thus, we screened the library against three viral antigens, including the H1N1 influenza virus, Hepatitis B virus, and Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Finally, the potential antibody candidates, which show K(D values between 10 and 100 nM against the target antigens, could be successfully isolated even though the library was relatively small (∼ 10(6. These results show that repeated FACS screening without regeneration of the sorted cells can be a powerful method when a rapid response to a spreading disease is required.

  13. Characterization of Diazotrophs Containing Mo-Independent Nitrogenases, Isolated from Diverse Natural Environments▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Doris A.; Loveless, Telisa M.; Brown, James W.; Bishop, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    Molybdenum-independent nitrogenases were first described in the nitrogen-fixing bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii and have since been described in other diazotrophic bacteria. Previously, we reported the isolation of seven diazotrophs with Mo-independent nitrogenases from aquatic environments. In the present study, we extend these results to include diazotrophs isolated from wood chip mulch, soil, “paraffin dirt,” and sediments from mangrove swamps. Mo-deficient, N-free media under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions were used for the isolations. A total of 26 isolates were genetically and physiologically characterized. Their phylogenetic placement was determined using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Most of the isolates are members of the gamma subdivision of the class Proteobacteria and appear to be specifically related to fluorescent pseudomonads and azotobacteria. Two other isolates, AN1 and LPF4, are closely related to Enterobacter spp. and Paenibacillus spp., respectively. PCR and/or Southern hybridization were used to detect the presence of nitrogenase genes in the isolates. PCR amplification of vnfG and anfG was used to detect the genetic potential for the expression of the vanadium-containing nitrogenase and the iron-only nitrogenase in the isolates. This study demonstrates that diazotrophs with Mo-independent nitrogenases can be readily isolated from diverse natural environments. PMID:18378646

  14. Combining electrophoresis with detection under ultraviolet light and multiple ultrafiltration for isolation of humic fluorescence fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubetskaya, Olga E; Shaloiko, Lubov A; Demin, Dmitrii V; Marchenkov, Victor V; Proskuryakov, Ivan I; Coelho, Christian; Trubetskoj, Oleg A

    2011-04-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of chernozem soil humic acids (HAs) followed by observation under UV (312 nm) excitation light reveals new low molecular weight (MW) fluorescent fractions. Ultrafiltration of HAs sample in 7 M urea on a membrane of low nominal MW retention (NMWR, 5 kDa) was repetitively used for separation of fluorescent and non-fluorescent species. Thirty ultrafiltrates and the final retentate R were obtained. Fluorescence maxima of separate ultrafiltrates were different and non-monotonously changed in the range of 475-505 nm. Fluorescence maxima of less than 490 nm were detected only in the four first utrafiltrates. For further physical-chemical analyses all utrafiltrates were combined into a fraction called UFchernozem soil HAs complex. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A simple, rapid method to isolate salt glands for three-dimensional visualization, fluorescence imaging and cytological studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Tit-Meng

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some plants inhabiting saline environment remove salts via the salt glands embedded in the epidermal tissues. Cytological studies of salt glands will provide valuable information to our understanding of the secretory process. Previous studies on salt gland histology relied mainly on two-dimensional microscopic observations of microtome sections. Optical sectioning properties of confocal laser scanning microscope offer alternative approach for obtaining three-dimensional structural information of salt glands. Difficulty in light penetration through intact leaves and interference from neighbouring leaf cells, however, impede the acquiring of good optical salt gland sections and limit its applications in salt gland imaging. Freeing the glands from adjacent leaf tissues will allow better manipulations for three-dimensional imaging through confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Here, we present a simple and fast method for the isolation of individual salt glands released from the interference of neighbouring cells. About 100-200 salt glands could be isolated from just one cm2 of Avicennia officinalis leaf within hours and microscopic visualization of isolated salt glands was made possible within a day. Using these isolated glands, confocal laser scanning microscopic techniques could be applied and better resolution salt gland images could be achieved. By making use of their intrinsic fluorescent properties, optical sections of the gland cells could be acquired without the use of fluorescent probes and the corresponding three-dimensional images constructed. Useful cytological information of the salt gland cells could also be obtained through the applications of fluorescent dyes (e.g., LysoTracker® Red, FM®4-64, Texas Red®. Conclusions The study of salt glands directly at the glandular level are made possible with the successful isolation of these specialized structures. Preparation of materials for subsequent microscopic

  16. Candidate nematicidal proteins in a new Pseudomonas veronii isolate identified by its antagonistic properties against Xiphinema index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canchignia, Hayron; Altimira, Fabiola; Montes, Christian; Sánchez, Evelyn; Tapia, Eduardo; Miccono, María; Espinoza, Daniel; Aguirre, Carlos; Seeger, Michael; Prieto, Humberto

    2017-03-17

    The nematode Xiphinema index affects grape vines and transmits important viruses associated with fanleaf degeneration. Pseudomonas spp. are an extensive bacterial group in which important biodegradation and/or biocontrol properties can occur for several strains in the group. The aim of this study was to identify new Pseudomonas isolates with antagonist activity against X. index. Forty bacterial isolates were obtained from soil and root samples from Chilean vineyards. Thirteen new fluorescent pseudomonads were found and assessed for their antagonistic capability. The nematicide Pseudomonas protegens CHA0 was used as a control. Challenges of nematode individuals in King's B semi-solid agar Petri dishes facilitated the identification of the Pseudomonas veronii isolate R4, as determined by a 16S rRNA sequence comparison. This isolate was as effective as CHA0 as an antagonist of X. index, although it had a different lethality kinetic. Milk-induced R4 cultures exhibited protease and lipase activities in cell supernatants using both gelatin/tributyrin Petri dish assays and zymograms. Three proteins with these activities were isolated and subjected to mass spectrometry. Amino acid partial sequences enabled the identification of a 49-kDa protease similar to metalloprotease AprA and two lipases of 50 kDa and 69 kDa similar to LipA and ExoU, respectively. Electron microscopy analyses of challenged nematodes revealed degraded cuticle after R4 supernatant treatment. These results represent a new and unexplored property in this species associated with the presence of secretable lipases and protease, similar to characterized enzymes present in biocontrol pseudomonads.

  17. Plant-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas from red lateritic soil: Beneficial characteristics and their impact on lettuce growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroniche, Guillermo A; Rubio, Esteban J; Consiglio, Adrián; Perticari, Alejandro

    2016-11-25

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas are ubiquitous soil bacteria that usually establish mutualistic associations with plants, promoting their growth and health by several mechanisms. This makes them interesting candidates for the development of crop bio-inoculants. In this work, we isolated phosphate-solubilizing fluorescent Pseudomonas from the rhizosphere and inner tissues of different plant species growing in red soil from Misiones, Argentina. Seven isolates displaying strong phosphate solubilization were selected for further studies. Molecular identification by rpoD genotyping indicated that they belong to different species within the P. fluorescens and P. putida phylogenetic groups. Screening for in vitro traits such as phosphate solubilization, growth regulators synthesis or degradation, motility and antagonism against phytopathogens or other bacteria, revealed a unique profile of characteristics for each strain. Their plant growth-promoting potential was assayed using lettuce as a model for inoculation under controlled and greenhouse conditions. Five of the strains increased the growth of lettuce plants. Overall, the strongest lettuce growth promoter under both conditions was strain ZME4, isolated from inner tissues of maize. No clear association between lettuce growth promotion and in vitro beneficial traits was detected. In conclusion, several phosphate solubilizing pseudomonads from red soil were isolated that display a rich array of plant growth promotion traits, thus showing a potential for the development of new inoculants.

  18. Fluorescence spectra of bithiophene and terthiophene single crystals and of their isolated molecules in cyclodextrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombojav, Bold; Namsrai, Nasanbat; Yoshinari, Takehisa; Nagasaka, Shin-ichiro; Itoh, Hiroki; Koyama, Kiyohito

    2004-01-01

    In order to examine the effect of subsumption space of β- and γ-cyclodextrin (CyD) on the photophysics of oligothiophenes, 2, 2'-bithiophene (BT) and 2, 2': 5', 2''-terthiophene (TT), the fluorescence spectra were compared with those of the single crystals (SC) at 15, 77 K and room temperature (RT). Both the numbers of BT included in β- and γ-CyD are twin (BT 2 ). The numbers of TT included in β- and γ-CyD are unit (TT 1 ) and twin (TT 2 ), respectively. Electronic excitation of BT encapsulated in β- and γ-CyD gives similar fluorescence spectra, showing bathochromic shift compared with that of BT single crystal, (BT) SC . The observation that the fluorescence spectra of encapsulated BT 2 are similar to the spectra of its THF solution suggests the configuration of BT 2 in β- and γ-CyD should be face-to-face configuration (BT 2 ) parrallel . On the contrary, TT in β- and in γ-CyD afford quite different fluorescence spectra. Encapsulated TT in β-CyD exhibits the hypsochromic shift of fluorescence maxima compared to that of TT single crystal, (TT) SC . While the bathochromically shifted fluorescence spectra of TT 2 in γ-CyD is also ascribed to the face-to-face configuration (TT 2 ) parallel as in the case of BT 2 in γ-CyD. Fluorescence spectra show the excited ground state complex of BT 2 and TT 2 in γ-CyD

  19. High-throughput isolation of giant viruses in liquid medium using automated flow cytometry and fluorescence staining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Yaacoub Bou Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of giant viruses using amoeba co-culture is tedious and fastidious. Recently, the procedure was successfully associated with a method that detects amoebal lysis on agar plates. However, the procedure remains time-consuming and is limited to protozoa growing on agar. We present here advances for the isolation of giant viruses. A high-throughput automated method based on flow cytometry and fluorescent staining was used to detect the presence of giant viruses in liquid medium. Development was carried out with the Acanthamoeba polyphaga strain widely used in past and current co-culture experiments. The proof of concept was validated with virus suspensions: artificially contaminated samples but also environmental samples from which viruses were previously isolated. After validating the technique, and fortuitously isolating a new Mimivirus, we automated the technique on 96-well plates and tested it on clinical and environmental samples using other protozoa. This allowed us to detect more than ten strains of previously known species of giant viruses and 7 new strains of a new virus lineage. This automated high-throughput method demonstrated significant time saving, and higher sensitivity than older techniques. It thus creates the means to isolate giant viruses at high speed.

  20. A comparison of the effect of 5-bromodeoxyuridine substitution on 33258 Hoechst- and DAPI-fluorescence of isolated chromosomes by bivariate flow karyotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, C. H.; Mesa, J.; van der Veen, A. Y.; Aten, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Application of the fluorescent DNA-intercalator propidium iodide for stabilization of the mitotic chromosome structure during isolation of chromosomes from V79 Chinese hamster cells and subsequent staining with the fluorochromes 33258 Hoechst or DAPI allowed bivariate flow karyotyping of isolated

  1. Development and validation of extensive growth and growth boundary models for psychrotolerant pseudomonads in seafood, meat and vegetable products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    Extensive growth and growth boundary models were developed and validated for psychrotolerant pseudomonads growing in seafood, meat and vegetable products. The new models were developed by expanding anexisting cardinal parameter-type model for growth of pseudomonads in milk (Martinez-Rios et al......, when observed and predicted μmax -values were compared. Thus, on average μmax -values for seafood and meat products were overestimated by 14%. Additionally, the reference growth rate parameter μref25˚C was calibrated by fitting the model to 21 μmax -values in vegetable products. This resulted in a μref......25˚C -value of 0.54 1/h. The calibrated vegetable model wassuccessfully validated using 51 μmax -values for psychrotolerant pseudomonads in vegetables. Average bias and accuracy factor values of 1.24 and 1.38 were obtained, respectively. Lag time models were developed by using relative lag times from...

  2. A fluorescence detected magnetic resonance investigation of the carotenoid triplet states associated with Photosystem II of isolated spinach thylakoid membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Santabarbara, S; Carbonera, D; Heathcote, P

    2005-01-01

    The carotenoid triplet populations associated with the fluorescence emission chlorophyll forms of Photosystem II have been investigated in isolated spinach thylakoid membranes by means of fluorescence detected magnetic resonance in zero field (FDMR). The spectra collected in the 680-690 nm emission range, have been fitted by a global analysis procedure. At least five different carotenoid triplet states coupled to the terminal emitting chlorophyll forms of PS II, peaking at 682 nm, 687 nm and 692 nm, have been characterised. The triplets associated with the outer antenna emission forms, at 682 nm, have zero field splitting parameters D = 0.0385 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00367 cm/sup -1/; D = 0.0404 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00379 cm/sup -1/ and D = 0.0386 cm/sup -1/, E = 0.00406 cm/sup -1/ which are very similar to those previously reported for the xanthophylls of the isolated LHC II complex. Therefore the FDMR spectra recorded in this work provide insights into the organisation of the LHC II complex in the unperturbed enviro...

  3. Isolation of intact RNA from murine CD4+ T cells after intracellular cytokine staining and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Porcelli, Steven A

    2018-05-01

    Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) is a powerful method for identifying functionally distinct lymphocyte subsets, and for isolating these by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Although transcriptomic analysis of cells sorted on the basis of ICS has many potential applications, this is rarely performed because of the difficulty in isolating intact RNA from cells processed using standard fixation and permeabilization buffers for ICS. To address this issue, we compared three buffers shown previously to preserve RNA in nonhematopoietic cells subjected to intracellular staining for their effects on RNA isolated from T lymphocytes processed for ICS. Our results showed that buffers containing the recombinant ribonuclease inhibitor RNasin or high molar concentrations of salt yielded intact RNA from fixed and permeabilized T cells. As proof of principle, we successfully used the buffer containing RNasin to isolate intact RNA from CD4 + T cells that were sorted by FACS on the basis of specific cytokine production, thus demonstrating the potential of this approach for coupling ICS with transcriptomic analysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonads and Fusarium spp. were assessed from root...

  5. Different visible colors and green fluorescence were obtained from the mutated purple chromoprotein isolated from sea anemone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Cheng-Yi; Chen, Yi-Lin; Tsai, Huai-Jen

    2014-08-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like proteins have been studied with the aim of developing fluorescent proteins. Since the property of color variation is understudied, we isolated a novel GFP-like chromoprotein from the carpet anemone Stichodactyla haddoni, termed shCP. Its maximum absorption wavelength peak (λ(max)) is located at 574 nm, resulting in a purple color. The shCP protein consists of 227 amino acids (aa), sharing 96 % identity with the GFP-like chromoprotein of Heteractis crispa. We mutated aa residues to examine any alteration in color. When E63, the first aa of the chromophore, was replaced by serine (E63S), the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-E63S was shifted to 560 nm and exhibited a pink color. When Q39, T194, and I196, which reside in the surrounding 5 Å of the chromophore's microenvironment, were mutated, we found that (1) the λ(max) of the mutated protein shCP-Q39S was shifted to 518 nm and exhibited a red color, (2) shCP-T194I exhibited a purple-blue color, and (3) an additional mutation at I196H of the mutated protein shCP-E63L exhibited green fluorescence. In contrast, when the aa located neither at the chromophore nor within its microenvironment were mutated, the resultant proteins shCP-L122H, -E138G, -S137D, -T95I, -D129N, -T194V, -E138Q, -G75E, -I183V, and -I70V never altered their purple color, suggesting that mutations at the shCP chromophore and the surrounding 5 Å microenvironment mostly control changes in color expression or cause fluorescence to develop. Additionally, we found that the cDNAs of shCP and its mutated varieties are faithfully and stably expressed both in Escherichia coli and zebrafish embryos.

  6. Conformational study of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) by tryptophan fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shou-Wei; Tang, Chuan-He; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Wen, Qi-Biao

    2011-01-12

    Fluorescence and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to study changes in the conformation of red kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein isolate (KPI) under various environmental conditions. The possible relationship between fluorescence data and DSC characteristics was also discussed. Tryptophan fluorescence and fluorescence quenching analyses indicated that the tryptophan residues in KPI, exhibiting multiple fluorophores with different accessibilities to acrylamide, are largely buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein matrix, with positively charged side chains close to at least some of the tryptophan residues. GdnHCl was more effective than urea and SDS in denaturing KPI. SDS and urea caused variable red shifts, 2-5 nm, in the emission λ(max), suggesting the conformational compactness of KPI. The result was further supported by DSC characteristics that a discernible endothermic peak was still detected up to 8 M urea or 30 mM SDS, also evidenced by the absence of any shift in emission maximum (λ(max)) at different pH conditions. Marked decreases in T(d) and enthalpy (ΔH) were observed at extreme alkaline and/or acidic pH, whereas the presence of NaCl resulted in higher T(d) and ΔH, along with greater cooperativity of the transition. Decreases in T(d) and ΔH were observed in the presence of protein perturbants, for example, SDS and urea, indicating partial denaturation and decrease in thermal stability. Dithiothreitol and N-ethylmaleimide have a slight effect on the thermal properties of KPI. Interestingly, a close linear relationship between the T(d) (or ΔH) and the λ(max) was observed for KPI in the presence of 0-6 M urea.

  7. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fusarium and Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-Grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonad and Fusarium numbers were assessed from ro...

  8. Soil and Root Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Seedlings and Field-grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Aims: Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Methods: Culturable pseudomonads were enumerated...

  9. Extensive cardinal parameter model to predict growth of pseudomonads in salt-reduced lightly preserved seafood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez Rios, Veronica; Dalgaard, Paw

    Interest in and demand for preserved seafood with reduced salt/sodium content is increasing. As a consequence of the reduced salt content potential growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads to unacceptable high concentration where they cause product spoilage is an increasing challenge. Innovation...... include the effect of temperatures and salt. However, these simple secondary models do not include the effect of a broader range of product characteristics and therefore they cannot be used to predict how the inhibiting effect of salt can be replaced by changes in other environmental factors The objective...... and including terms for temperature, pH, aw/NaCl, lactic- and sorbic acids (Martinez-Rios et al., Int. J. Food Microbiol. 216. 110-120, 2016). MIC-values for acetic-, benzoic- and citric acids were determined in broth and terms modelling their antimicrobial effect were added to the model. The new and expanded...

  10. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joana Beatrice; Song-Wilson, Yi; Foetzki, Andrea; Luginbühl, Carolin; Winzeler, Michael; Kneubühler, Yvan; Matasci, Caterina; Mascher-Frutschi, Fabio; Kalinina, Olena; Boller, Thomas; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM) wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  11. Does wheat genetically modified for disease resistance affect root-colonizing pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Beatrice Meyer

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the impact of genetically modified (GM wheat with introduced pm3b mildew resistance transgene, on two types of root-colonizing microorganisms, namely pseudomonads and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Our investigations were carried out in field trials over three field seasons and at two locations. Serial dilution in selective King's B medium and microscopy were used to assess the abundance of cultivable pseudomonads and AMF, respectively. We developed a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method to characterize the diversity of the pqqC gene, which is involved in Pseudomonas phosphate solubilization. A major result was that in the first field season Pseudomonas abundances and diversity on roots of GM pm3b lines, but also on non-GM sister lines were different from those of the parental lines and conventional wheat cultivars. This indicates a strong effect of the procedures by which these plants were created, as GM and sister lines were generated via tissue cultures and propagated in the greenhouse. Moreover, Pseudomonas population sizes and DGGE profiles varied considerably between individual GM lines with different genomic locations of the pm3b transgene. At individual time points, differences in Pseudomonas and AMF accumulation between GM and control lines were detected, but they were not consistent and much less pronounced than differences detected between young and old plants, different conventional wheat cultivars or at different locations and field seasons. Thus, we conclude that impacts of GM wheat on plant-beneficial root-colonizing microorganisms are minor and not of ecological importance. The cultivation-independent pqqC-DGGE approach proved to be a useful tool for monitoring the dynamics of Pseudomonas populations in a wheat field and even sensitive enough for detecting population responses to altered plant physiology.

  12. Characterization of CMR5c and CMR12a, novel fluorescent Pseudomonas strains from the cocoyam rhizosphere with biocontrol activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perneel, M.; Heyrman, J.; Adiobo, A.; Maeyer, de K.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Vos, de P.; Höfte, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To screen for novel antagonistic Pseudomonas strains producing both phenazines and biosurfactants that are as effective as Pseudomonas aeruginosa PNA1 in the biocontrol of cocoyam root rot caused by Pythium myriotylum. Material and Results: Forty pseudomonads were isolated from the rhizosphere

  13. Culture of somatic cells isolated from frozen-thawed equine semen using fluorescence-assisted cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom-de-Luna, Joao Gatto; Canesin, Heloísa Siqueira; Wright, Gus; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear transfer using somatic cells from frozen semen (FzSC) would allow cloning of animals for which no other genetic material is available. Horses are one of the few species for which cloning is commercially feasible; despite this, there is no information available on the culture of equine FzSC. After preliminary trials on equine FzSC, recovered by density-gradient centrifugation, resulted in no growth, we hypothesized that sperm in the culture system negatively affected cell proliferation. Therefore, we evaluated culture of FzSC isolated using fluorescence-assisted cell sorting. In Exp. 1, sperm were labeled using antibodies to a sperm-specific antigen, SP17, and unlabeled cells were collected. This resulted in high sperm contamination. In Exp. 2, FzSC were labeled using an anti-MHC class I antibody. This resulted in an essentially pure population of FzSC, 13-25% of which were nucleated. Culture yielded no proliferation in any of nine replicates. In Exp. 3, 5 × 10 3 viable fresh, cultured horse fibroblasts were added to the frozen-thawed, washed semen, then this suspension was labeled and sorted as for Exp. 2. The enriched population had a mean of five sperm per recovered somatic cell; culture yielded formation of monolayers. In conclusion, an essentially pure population of equine FzSC could be obtained using sorting for presence of MHC class I antigens. No equine FzSC grew in culture; however, the proliferation of fibroblasts subjected to the same processing demonstrated that the labeling and sorting methods, and the presence of few sperm in culture, were compatible with cell viability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Correlation between antibiotic and biocide resistance in mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from slaughterhouse surfaces throughout meat chain production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate biocide susceptibility in mesophilic and psychrotrophic pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which was representative of the region. To determine biocide resistance in pseudomonads, we determined for the first time the epidemiological cut-off values (ECOFFs) of benzalkonium, cetrimide, chlorhexidine, hexachlorophene, P3 oxonia, polyhexamethylene guanidine hydrochloride (PHMG), topax 66 and triclosan being generally very similar in different Pseudomonas spp. with some exceptions. Thus, resistance of pseudomonads was mainly shown to triclosan, and in lesser extent to cetrimide and benzalkonium chloride depending on the species, however they were highly susceptible to industrial formulations of biocides. By means of statistical analysis, positive correlations between antibiotics, biocides and both antimicrobials in pseudomonads were detected suggesting a co- or cross resistance between different antimicrobials in goat and lamb slaughterhouse environment. Cross-resistance between biocides and antibiotics in pseudomonads were especially detected between PHMG or triclosan and different antibiotics depending on the biocide and the population type. Thus, the use of those biocides as disinfectant in slaughterhouse zones must be carefully evaluated because of the selection pressure effect of antimicrobials on the emergence of resistant bacteria which could be spread to the consumer. It is noteworthy that specific industrial formulations such as topax 66 and oxonia P3 showed few correlations with antibiotics (none or 1-2 antibiotics) which should be taken into consideration for disinfection practices in goat and lamb slaughterhouse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The reported human NADsyn2 is ammonia-dependent NAD synthetase from a pseudomonad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2003-08-29

    Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) synthetases catalyze the last step in NAD+ metabolism in the de novo, import, and salvage pathways that originate from tryptophan (or aspartic acid), nicotinic acid, and nicotinamide, respectively, and converge on nicotinic acid mononucleotide. NAD+ synthetase converts nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide to NAD+ via an adenylylated intermediate. All of the known eukaryotic NAD+ synthetases are glutamine-dependent, hydrolyzing glutamine to glutamic acid to provide the attacking ammonia. In the prokaryotic world, some NAD+ synthetases are glutamine-dependent, whereas others can only use ammonia. Earlier, we noted a perfect correlation between presence of a domain related to nitrilase and glutamine dependence and then proved in the accompanying paper (Bieganowski, P., Pace, H. C., and Brenner, C. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 33049-33055) that the nitrilase-related domain is an essential, obligate intramolecular, thiol-dependent glutamine amidotransferase in the yeast NAD+ synthetase, Qns1. Independently, human NAD+ synthetase was cloned and shown to depend on Cys-175 for glutamine-dependent but not ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase activity. Additionally, it was claimed that a 275 amino acid open reading frame putatively amplified from human glioma cell line LN229 encodes a human ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase and this was speculated largely to mediate NAD+ synthesis in human muscle tissues. Here we establish that the so-called NADsyn2 is simply ammonia-dependent NAD+ synthetase from Pseudomonas, which is encoded on an operon with nicotinic acid phosphoribosyltransferase and, in some Pseudomonads, with nicotinamidase.

  16. SCREENING OF FLUORESCENT RHIZOBACTERIA FOR THE BIOCONTROL OF SOILBORNE PLANT PATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANELISE DIAS

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The biocontrol of soilborne plant pathogens represents a promising approach from the environ- mental and practical points of view. Fluorescent pseudomonad rhizobacteria are well known by their antagonis- tic capacity towards several plant pathogens due to a diversity of antimicrobial metabolites they produce. This study was conceived to select and characterize rhizobacteria having antagonistic potential towards the patho- genic fungi Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii. A total of 94 bacterial strains isolated from the rhizospheres of four vegetable species under organic cultivation were evaluated. Twenty-two strains which predominate in lettuce and rudbeckia rhizospheres showed identical biochemical profiles to Pseudomonas fluo- rescens, while in kale and parsley rhizospheres identical profiles to Pseudomonas putida (subgroups A and B strains prevailed. Two types of antagonism were verified in vitro and defined as competition and inhibition of mycelial growth. Sixty percent of the evaluated strains showed antagonistic potential and, among those, 24 strains expressed antagonism to both target fungi, with P. fluorescens being the most representative bacterial species. This work clearly identified a number of strains with potential for use as plant growth-promoting and biocontrol of the two soilborne fungal pathogens in vegetable crops production systems.

  17. Construction of Various γ34.5 Deleted Fluorescent-Expressing Oncolytic herpes Simplex type 1 (oHSV) for Generation and Isolation of HSV-Based Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, Shahriyar; Roohvand, Farzin; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bahrololoumi, Mina; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2017-07-01

    Oncolytic herpes simplex virus (oHSV)-based vectors lacking γ34.5 gene, are considered as ideal templates to construct efficient vectors for (targeted) cancer gene therapy. Herein, we reported the construction of three single/dually-flourescence labeled and γ34.5-deleted, recombinant HSV-1 vectors for rapid generation and easy selection/isolation of different HSV-Based vectors. Generation of recombinant viruses was performed with conventional homologous recombination methods using green fluorescent protein (GFP) and BleCherry harboring shuttle vectors. Viruses were isolated by direct fluorescence observation and standard plaque purifying methods and confirmed by PCR and sequencing and flow cytometry. XTT and plaque assay titration were performed on Vero, U87MG, and T98 GBM cell lines. We generated three recombinant viruses, HSV-GFP, HSV-GR (Green-Red), and HSV-Red. The HSV-GFP showed two log higher titer (1010 PFU) than wild type (108 PFU). In contrast, HSV-GR and HSV-Red showed one log lower titer (107 PFU) than parental HSV. Cytotoxicity analysis showed that HSV-GR and HSV-Red can lyse target tumor cells at multiplicity of infection of 10 and 1 (Pidentification via fluorescence activated cell sorting. These vectors can also be used for tracing the efficacy of therapeutic agents on target cells, imaging of neural or tumoral cells in vitro/in vivo and as oncolytic agents in cancer therapy.

  18. In vitro culture and characterization of human lung cancer circulating tumor cells isolated by size exclusion from an orthotopic nude-mouse model expressing fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolostova, Katarina; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M; Bobek, Vladimir

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we demonstrate an animal model and recently introduced size-based exclusion method for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolation. The methodology enables subsequent in vitro CTC-culture and characterization. Human lung cancer cell line H460, expressing red fluorescent protein (H460-RFP), was orthotopically implanted in nude mice. CTCs were isolated by a size-based filtration method and successfully cultured in vitro on the separating membrane (MetaCell®), analyzed by means of time-lapse imaging. The cultured CTCs were heterogeneous in size and morphology even though they originated from a single tumor. The outer CTC-membranes were blebbing in general. Abnormal mitosis resulting in three daughter cells was frequently observed. The expression of RFP ensured that the CTCs originated from lung tumor. These readily isolatable, identifiable and cultivable CTCs can be used to characterize individual patient cancers and for screening of more effective treatment.

  19. A Reliable and Non-destructive Method for Monitoring the Stromal pH in Isolated Chloroplasts Using a Fluorescent pH Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai-Hsiang Su

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The proton gradient established by the pH difference across a biological membrane is essential for many physiological processes, including ATP synthesis and ion and metabolite transport. Currently, ionophores are used to study proton gradients, and determine their importance to biological functions of interest. Because of the lack of an easy method for monitoring the proton gradient across the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts (ΔpHenv, whether the concentration of ionophores used can effectively abolish the ΔpHenv is not proven for most experiments. To overcome this hindrance, we tried to setup an easy method for real-time monitoring of the stromal pH in buffered, isolated chloroplasts by using fluorescent pH probes; using this method the ΔpHenv can be calculated by subtracting the buffer pH from the measured stromal pH. When three fluorescent dyes, BCECF-AM [2′,7′-bis-(2-carboxyethyl-5-(and-6-carboxyfluorescein acetoxymethyl ester], CFDA-SE [5(6-Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester] and SNARF-1 carboxylic acid acetate succinimidyl ester were incubated with isolated chloroplasts, BCECF-AM and CFDA-SE, but not the ester-formed SNARF-1 were taken up by chloroplasts and digested with esterase to release high levels of fluorescence. According to its relatively higher pKa value (6.98, near the physiological pH of the stroma, BCECF was chosen for further development. Due to shielding of the excitation and emission lights by chloroplast pigments, the ratiometric fluorescence of BCECF was highly dependent on the concentration of chloroplasts. By using a fixed concentration of chloroplasts, a highly correlated standard curve of pH to the BCECF ratiometric fluorescence with an r-square value of 0.98 was obtained, indicating the reliability of this method. Consistent with previous reports, the light-dependent formation of ΔpHenv can be detected ranging from 0.15 to 0.33 pH units upon illumination. The concentration of the ionophore

  20. Pseudomonas floridensis sp. nov., a bacterial pathogen isolated from tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Sujan; Minsavage, Gerald V; Preston, James; Newberry, Eric A; Paret, Matthews L; Goss, Erica M; Jones, Jeffrey B; Vallad, Gary E

    2018-01-01

    An unusual fluorescent pseudomonad was isolated from tomato exhibiting leaf spot symptoms similar to bacterial speck. Strains were fluorescent, oxidase- and arginine-dihydrolase-negative, elicited a hypersensitive reaction on tobacco and produced a soft rot on potato slices. However, the strains produced an unusual yellow, mucoid growth on media containing 5 % sucrose that is not typical of levan. Based on multilocus sequence analysis using 16S rRNA, gap1, gltA, gyrB and rpoD, these strains formed a distinct phylogenetic group in the genus Pseudomonas and were most closely related to Pseudomonas viridiflava within the Pseudomonassyringae complex. Whole-genome comparisons, using average nucleotide identity based on blast, of representative strain GEV388 T and publicly available genomes representing the genus Pseudomonas revealed phylogroup 7 P. viridiflava strain UASW0038 and P. viridiflava type strain ICMP 2848 T as the closest relatives with 86.59 and 86.56 % nucleotide identity, respectively. In silico DNA-DNA hybridization using the genome-to-genome distance calculation method estimated 31.1 % DNA relatedness between GEV388 T and P. viridiflava ATCC 13223 T , strongly suggesting the strains are representatives of different species. These results together with Biolog GEN III tests, fatty acid methyl ester profiles and phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA and multiple housekeeping gene sequences demonstrated that this group represents a novel species member of the genus Pseudomonas. The name Pseudomonas floridensis sp. nov. is proposed with GEV388 T (=LMG 30013 T =ATCC TSD-90 T ) as the type strain.

  1. Application of fluorescent amplified fragment length polymorphism for comparison of human and animal isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fearnley, C.; On, S.L.W.; Kokotovic, Branko

    2005-01-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method, developed to genotype Yersinia enterocolitica, has been used to investigate 70 representative strains isolated from humans, pigs, sheep, and cattle in the United Kingdom. AFLP primarily distinguished Y enterocolitica strains according...

  2. Fluorescent antibody test, quantitative polymerase chain reaction pattern and clinical aspects of rabies virus strains isolated from main reservoirs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Appolinário

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV isolated from different mammals seems to have unique characteristics that influence the outcome of infection. RABV circulates in nature and is maintained by reservoirs that are responsible for the persistence of the disease for almost 4000 years. Considering the different pattern of pathogenicity of RABV strains in naturally and experimentally infected animals, the aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of RABV variants isolated from the main Brazilian reservoirs, being related to a dog (variant 2, Desmodus rotundus (variant 3, crab eating fox, marmoset, and Myotis spp. Viral replication in brain tissue of experimentally infected mouse was evaluated by two laboratory techniques and the results were compared to clinical evolution from five RABV variants. The presence of the RABV was investigated in brain samples by fluorescent antibody test (FAT and real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR for quantification of rabies virus nucleoprotein gene (N gene. Virus replication is not correlated with clinical signs and evolution. The pattern of FAT is associated with RABV replication levels. Virus isolates from crab eating fox and marmoset had a longer evolution period and higher survival rate suggesting that the evolution period may contribute to the outcome. RABV virus variants had independent characteristics that determine the clinical evolution and survival of the infected mice.

  3. Application of Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism for Comparison of Human and Animal Isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearnley, Catherine; On, Stephen L. W.; Kokotovic, Branko; Manning, Georgina; Cheasty, Tom; Newell, Diane G.

    2005-01-01

    An amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) method, developed to genotype Yersinia enterocolitica, has been used to investigate 70 representative strains isolated from humans, pigs, sheep, and cattle in the United Kingdom. AFLP primarily distinguished Y. enterocolitica strains according to their biotype, with strains dividing into two distinct clusters: cluster A, comprising largely the putatively pathogenic biotypes (BT2 to -4), and cluster B, comprising the putatively nonpathogenic biotype 1A strains and a single BT1B isolate. Within these two clusters, subclusters formed largely on the basis of serotype. However, AFLP profiles also allowed differentiation of strains within these serotype-related subclusters, indicating the high discriminatory power of the technique for Y. enterocolitica. Investigation of the relationship between strain AFLP profile and host confirmed that pigs are, and provides further proof that sheep may be, potential sources of human infection with putatively pathogenic strains. However, the results suggest that some strains causing human disease do not come from veterinary sources identifiable at this time. The distribution of some BT1A isolates within cluster A raises questions about the relationship between virulence potential and biotype. PMID:16151073

  4. The role of fluorescent pseudo monad's siderophore on Zn absorption in wheat by using 65Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasouli Sadaghiani, M. H.; Malakouti, M. J.; Khavazi, K.; Ghannadi Maragheh, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the potentials of some indigenous fluorescent Pseudomonads for siderophore production and their effects on 65Z n absorption in 2005. For this purpose, 201 strains of Pseudomonas putida, P. fluorescence, and P. aeruginosa were isolated from different locations representing rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). The potentials of these strains for siderophore production were evaluated by chrome azo rel-S assay (CAS blue agar) through color change. High siderophore producing super-strains were selected for the extraction of siderophores. These isolates were grown in standard succinate medium for 72 hours at 28 d eg C . The bacterial cells were removed by centrifugation (10000 g for 20 minutes) and the supernatant was filtered through filter membrane (0.22 μ) and used as the source of siderophore source. The evaluations of Zn uptake and translocation were carried out with the complexes of bacterial siderophores and 65Z n compared with the standard siderophore Desferrioxamine in a randomized complete block design with three replications. This experiment was conducted on two wheat genotypes different in Zn-efficiency under hydroponic condition. The results revealed that among the three most effective siderophores producing strains considered, the P. putida produced a siderophore complex that showed efficiencies of 83% compared with the standard siderophore (DFOB) in the uptake of Zn and was statistically in the same group as the control. The effect of bacterial siderophores in the uptake of labeled 65Z n by wheat was significant, indicating that the chemical structures of the siderophores from different strains were different. The effects of wheat variety on 65Z n translocation to shoots was also significant, where the efficient Tabasi variety contained 46% more Zn in shoots than the inefficient Yavarous variety. It was concluded that the siderophore complex from P. putida was the most effective in translocation

  5. Enhanced Emission from Single Isolated Gold Quantum Dots Investigated Using Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeyasinghe, Neranga; Kumar, Santosh; Sun, Kai; Mansfield, John F; Jin, Rongchao; Goodson, Theodore

    2016-12-21

    New approaches in molecular nanoscopy are greatly desired for interrogation of biological, organic, and inorganic objects with sizes below the diffraction limit. Our current work investigates emergent monolayer-protected gold quantum dots (nanoclusters, NCs) composed of 25 Au atoms by utilizing two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) at single NC concentrations. Here, we demonstrate an approach to synthesize and isolate single NCs on solid glass substrates. Subsequent investigation of the NCs using TPEF NSOM reveals that, even when they are separated by distances of several tens of nanometers, we can excite and interrogate single NCs individually. Interestingly, we observe an enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section for single Au 25 NCs that can be attributed to few-atom local field effects and to local field-induced microscopic cascading, indicating their potential for use in ultrasensitive sensing, disease diagnostics, cancer cell therapy, and molecular computers. Finally, we report room-temperature aperture-based TPEF NSOM imaging of these NCs for the first time at 30 nm point resolution, which is a ∼5-fold improvement compared to the previous best result for the same technique. This report unveils the unique combination of an unusually large TPA cross section and the high photostability of Au NCs to (non-destructively) investigate stable isolated single NCs using TPEF NSOM. This is the first reported optical study of monolayer-protected single quantum clusters, opening some very promising opportunities in spectroscopy of nanosized objects, bioimaging, ultrasensitive sensing, molecular computers, and high-density data storage.

  6. Cow dung extract: a medium for the growth of pseudomonads enhancing their efficiency as biofertilizer and biocontrol agent in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Rashmi; Aragno, Michel; Sharma, A K

    2010-09-01

    Some pseudomands are being utilized as biofertilizers and biopesticides because of their role in plant growth promotion and plant protection against root parasites, respectively. Two strains of Pseudomonas, P. jessenii LHRE62 and P. synxantha HHRE81, recovered from wheat rhizosphere, have shown their potential in field bioinoculation tests under rice-wheat and pulse-wheat rotation systems. Normally, pseudomonads are cultivated on synthetic media-like King's B and used for inoculation on seeds/soil drench with talcum or charcoal as carrier material. Cow dung is being used for different purposes from the ancient time and has a significant role in crop growth because of the content in humic compounds and fertilizing bioelements available in it. Here, cow dung extract was tested as a growth medium for strains LHRE62 and HHRE81, in comparison with growth in King's B medium. The log phase was delayed by 2 h as compared to growth in King's B medium. The bacterial growth yield, lower in plain cow dung extract as compared to King's B medium, was improved upon addition of different carbon substrates. Growth of rice var. Pant Dhan 4 in pot cultures was increased using liquid formulation of cow dung extract and bacteria as foliar spray, compared to their respective controls. Biocontrol efficacy of the bioagents was assessed by challenging rice crop with Rhizoctonia solani, a sheath blight pathogen. The growth promotion and biocontrol efficiencies were more pronounced in the case of mixed inocula of strains LHRE62 and HHRE81.

  7. Occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing head and neck radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elerson Gaetti-Jardim Júnior

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of yeasts, pseudomonads and enteric bacteria in the oral cavity of patients undergoing radiotherapy (RT for treatment of head and neck cancer. Fifty patients receiving RT were examined before, during and 30 days after RT. Saliva, mucosa, and biofilm samples were collected and microorganisms were detected by culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The most prevalent yeasts in patients submitted to RT were Candida albicans, C. tropicalis, C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. parapsilosis. Citrobacter, Enterobacter, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Proteus, and Pseudomonas were the most frequently cultivated bacteria. Before RT, targeted bacteria were cultivated from 22.2% of edentulous patients and 16.6% of dentate patients; 30 days after RT, these microorganisms were recovered from 77.8% edentulous and 46.8% dentate patients. By PCR, these microorganisms were detected from all edentulous patients, 78.1% of dentate patients. The presence of Gram-negative enteric roads and fungi was particularly frequent in patients presenting mucositis level III or IV. Modifications in the oral environment due to RT treatment seem to facilitate the colonization of oral cavity by members of family Enterobacteriaceae, genera Enterococcus and Candida.

  8. Distribution and Biocontrol Potential of phlD(+) Pseudomonads in Corn and Soybean Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSpadden Gardener, Brian B; Gutierrez, Laura J; Joshi, Raghavendra; Edema, Richard; Lutton, Elizabeth

    2005-06-01

    ABSTRACT The abundance and diversity of phlD(+) Pseudomonas spp. colonizing the rhizospheres of young, field-grown corn and soybean plants were assayed over a 3-year period. Populations of these bacteria were detected on the large majority of plants sampled in the state of Ohio, but colonization was greater on corn. Although significant variation in the incidence of rhizosphere colonization was observed from site to site and year to year on both crops, the magnitude of the variation was greatest for soybean. The D genotype was detected on plants collected from all 15 counties examined, and it represented the most abundant subpopulation on both crops. Additionally, six other genotypes (A, C, F, I, R, and S) were found to predominate in the rhizosphere of some plants. The most frequently observed of these were the A genotype and a newly discovered S genotype, both of which were found on corn and soybean roots obtained from multiple locations. Multiple isolates of the most abundant genotypes were recovered and characterized. The S genotype was found to be phylogenetically and phenotypically similar to the D genotype. In addition, the novel R genotype was found to be most similar to the A genotype. All of the isolates displayed significant capacities to inhibit the growth of an oomycete pathogen in vitro, but such phenotypes were highly dependent on media used. When tested against multiple oomycete pathogens isolated from soybean, the A genotype was significantly more inhibitory than the D genotype when incubated on 1/10x tryptic soy agar and 1/5x corn meal agar. Seed inoculation with different isolates of the A, D, and S genotypes indicated that significant root colonization, generally in excess of log 5 cells per gram of root, could be attained on both crops. Field trials of the A genotype isolate Wayne1R indicated the capacity of inoculant populations to supplement the activities of native populations so as to increase soybean stands and yields. The relevance of

  9. Comparing the Spectroscopic and Molecular Characteristics of Different Dissolved Organic Matter Fractions Isolated by Hydrophobic and Anionic Exchange Resins Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy and FT-ICR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgane Derrien

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the environmental significance of dissolved organic matter (DOM, characterizing DOM is still challenging due to its structural complexity and heterogeneity. In this study, three different chemical fractions, including hydrophobic acid (HPOA, transphilic acid (TPIA, and hydrophilic neutral and base (HPIN/B fractions, were separated from bulk aquatic DOM samples, and their spectral features and the chemical composition at the molecular level were compared using both fluorescence excitation emission matrix-parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS. The HPIN/B fraction was distinguished from the two acidic fractions (i.e., HPOA and TPIA by the EEM-PARAFAC, while the TPIA fraction was discriminated by using the molecular parameters derived from the FT-ICR MS analyses. Statistical comparison suggests that the spectral dissimilarity among the three chemical fractions might result from the acido-basic properties of DOM samples, while the differences in molecular composition were more likely to be affected by the hydrophobicity of the DOM fractions. The non-metric multidimensional scaling map further revealed that the HPOA was the most heterogeneous among the three fractions. The number of overlapping formulas among the three chemical fractions constituted only <5% of all identified formulas, and those between two different fractions ranged from 2.0% to 24.1%, implying relatively homogeneous properties of the individual chemical fractions with respect to molecular composition. Although employing chemical fractionation achieved a lowering of the DOM heterogeneity, prevalent signatures of either acido-basic property or the hydrophobic nature of DOM on the characteristics of three chemical isolated fractions were not found for this study.

  10. Predicting the minimum liquid surface tension activity of pseudomonads expressing biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, I U; Deeni, Y; Hapca, S M; McLaughlin, K; Spiers, A J

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria produce a variety of biosurfactants capable of significantly reducing liquid (aqueous) surface tension (γ) with a range of biological roles and biotechnological uses. To determine the lowest achievable surface tension (γMin ), we tested a diverse collection of Pseudomonas-like isolates from contaminated soil and activated sludge and identified those expressing biosurfactants by drop-collapse assay. Liquid surface tension-reducing ability was quantitatively determined by tensiometry, with 57 isolates found to significantly lower culture supernatant surface tensions to 24·5-49·1 mN m(-1) . Differences in biosurfactant behaviour determined by foaming, emulsion and oil-displacement assays were also observed amongst isolates producing surface tensions of 25-27 mN m(-1) , suggesting that a range of structurally diverse biosurfactants were being expressed. Individual distribution identification (IDI) analysis was used to identify the theoretical probability distribution that best fitted the surface tension data, which predicted a γMin of 24·24 mN m(-1) . This was in agreement with predictions based on earlier work of published mixed bacterial spp. data, suggesting a fundamental limit to the ability of bacterial biosurfactants to reduce surface tensions in aqueous systems. This implies a biological restriction on the synthesis and export of these agents or a physical-chemical restriction on their functioning once produced. Numerous surveys of biosurfactant-producing bacteria have been conducted, but only recently has an attempt been made to predict the minimum liquid surface tension these surface-active agents can achieve. Here, we determine a theoretical minimum of 24 mN m(-1) by statistical analysis of tensiometry data, suggesting a fundamental limit for biosurfactant activity in bacterial cultures incubated under standard growth conditions. This raises a challenge to our understanding of biosurfactant expression, secretion and function, as well as

  11. Molecular basis and regulation of insect pathogenicity in plant-beneficial pseudomonads

    OpenAIRE

    Kupferschmied, P.

    2015-01-01

    Les bactéries du genre Pseudomonas ont la capacité étonnante de s'adapter à différents habitats et d'y survivre, ce qui leur a permis de conquérir un large éventail de niches écologiques et d'interagir avec différents organismes hôte. Les espèces du groupe Pseudomonas fluorescens peuvent être facilement isolées de la rhizosphère et sont communément connues comme des Pseudomonas bénéfiques pour les plantes. Elles sont capables d'induire la résistance systémique des plantes, d'induire leur croi...

  12. Slit scan flow cytometry of isolated chromosomes following fluorescence hybridization: an approach of online screening for specific chromosomes and chromosome translocations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hausmann, M.; Dudin, G.; Aten, J. A.; Heilig, R.; Diaz, E.; Cremer, C.

    1991-01-01

    The recently developed methods of non radioactive in situ hybridization of chromosomes offer new aspects for chromosome analysis. Fluorescent labelling of hybridized chromosomes or chromosomal subregions allows to facilitate considerably the detection of specific chromosomal abnormalities. For many

  13. Laser induced fluorescence and phosphorescence of matrix isolated glyoxal - Evidence for exciplex formation in the A 1Au and a 3Au states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ijzendoorn, L. J.; Baas, F.; Koernig, S.; Greenberg, J. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and phosphorescence as well as infrared and visible absorption spectra of glyoxal in Ar, N2, and CO matrices are presented and analyzed. Glyoxal in its first excited electronic state is shown to form an exciplex with its nearest neighbors in all three matrices, and transitions normally forbidden dominate the emission spectra. The spectral characteristics of these complexes are similar to those of the Ar-glyoxal complex found in supersonic beam experiments. Due to the matrix cage effect, no vibrational predissociation is observed. The phosphorescence lifetime is determined and an upper limit is given for the fluorescence lifetime. This, in combination with the relative intensities of fluorescence and phosphorescence, can be used to place limits on the quantum yields of the various relaxation processes.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  15. Different Ancestries of R Tailocins in Rhizospheric Pseudomonas Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghequire, Maarten G.K.; Dillen, Yörg; Lambrichts, Ivo; Proost, Paul; Wattiez, Ruddy; De Mot, René

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial genomes accommodate a variety of mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophage-related clusters that encode phage tail-like protein complexes playing a role in interactions with eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells. Such tailocins are unable to replicate inside target cells due to the lack of a phage head with associated DNA. A subset of tailocins mediate antagonistic activities with bacteriocin-like specificity. Functional characterization of bactericidal tailocins of two Pseudomonas putida rhizosphere isolates revealed not only extensive similarity with the tail assembly module of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa R-type pyocins but also differences in genomic integration site, regulatory genes, and lytic release modules. Conversely, these three features are quite similar between strains of the P. putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens clades, although phylogenetic analysis of tail genes suggests them to have evolved separately. Unlike P. aeruginosa R pyocin elements, the tailocin gene clusters of other pseudomonads frequently carry cargo genes, including bacteriocins. Compared with P. aeruginosa, the tailocin tail fiber sequences that act as specificity determinants have diverged much more extensively among the other pseudomonad species, mostly isolates from soil and plant environments. Activity of the P. putida antibacterial particles requires a functional lipopolysaccharide layer on target cells, but contrary to R pyocins from P. aeruginosa, strain susceptibilities surpass species boundaries. PMID:26412856

  16. Laser induced fluorescence and phosphorescence of matrix isolated glyoxal: Evidence for exciplex formation in the  1Au and  3Au states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Allamandola, L.J.; Baas, F.; Koernig, S.; Greenberg, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (¿1Au¿¿1Ag) and phosphorescence (¿3Au¿¿1Ag) as well as absorption and excitation spectra of glyoxal in Ar, N2, and CO matrices have been measured at 12 K. Supplementary infrared absorption spectra have also been taken. Although the dominant band in the absorption and

  17. Zinc and glycerol enhance the production of nematicidal compounds in vitro and improve the biocontrol of Meloidogyne javanica in tomato by fluorescent pseudomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, I A; Shaukat, S S

    2002-01-01

    To assess the effects of various carbon and mineral sources on the nematicidal potential of biocontrol inoculants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa IE-6S+ and Ps. fluorescens CHA0 under laboratory and glasshouse conditions. Culture filtrates of strains IE-6S+ and CHA0, cultured in nutrient yeast extract broth, caused substantial mortality of the juveniles of Meloidogyne javanica. The nematicidal activities of the culture filtrates were altered after amendment with various carbon and mineral sources. Soil amendment with zinc alone or in combination with glycerol improved the biocontrol efficacy against root-knot nematode, promoted tomato plant growth and enhanced bacterial rhizosphere and endophytic colonization. Appropriate quantities of glycerol and zinc alone or in combination enhance the nematicidal activity of Ps. aeruginosa and Ps. fluorescens. Glucose reduces the activity of these bacteria against nematodes. Minerals and carbon sources are appealing because they are easy and economical to provide during liquid fermentation of inoculants or as fertilizer amendments to improve the biocontrol activity of indigenous and introduced bacteria.

  18. The effect of detergents on trimeric G-protein activity in isolated plasma membranes from rat brain cortex: Correlation with studies of DPH and Laurdan fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, Jan; Bouřová, Lenka; Hof, Martin; Svoboda, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 1788, č. 2 (2009), s. 324-332 ISSN 0005-2736 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/0121; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110606 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : detergent * fluorescence * stready-state * time -resolved Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.998, year: 2009

  19. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Belgacem, Z; Bijttebier, S; Verreth, C; Voorspoels, S; Van de Voorde, I; Aerts, G; Willems, K A; Jacquemyn, H; Ruyters, S; Lievens, B

    2015-06-01

    To screen and identify biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas strains isolated from floral nectar; to characterize the produced biosurfactants; and to investigate the effect of different carbon sources on biosurfactant production. Four of eight nectar Pseudomonas isolates were found to produce biosurfactants. Phylogenetic analysis based on three housekeeping genes (16S rRNA gene, rpoB and gyrB) classified the isolates into two groups, including one group closely related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and another group closely related to Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas jessenii. Although our nectar pseudomonads were able to grow on a variety of water-soluble and water-immiscible carbon sources, surface active agents were only produced when using vegetable oil as sole carbon source, including olive oil, sunflower oil or waste frying sunflower oil. Structural characterization based on thin layer chromatography (TLC) and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-accurate mass mass spectrometry (UHPLC-amMS) revealed that biosurfactant activity was most probably due to the production of fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof. Four biosurfactant-producing nectar pseudomonads were identified. The active compounds were identified as fatty acids (C16:0; C18:0; C18:1 and C18:2), and mono- and diglycerides thereof, produced by hydrolysis of triglycerides of the feedstock. Studies on biosurfactant-producing micro-organisms have mainly focused on microbes isolated from soils and aquatic environments. Here, for the first time, nectar environments were screened as a novel source for biosurfactant producers. As nectars represent harsh environments with high osmotic pressure and varying pH levels, further screening of nectar habitats for biosurfactant-producing microbes may lead to the discovery of novel biosurfactants with broad tolerance towards different environmental conditions. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Identification of cultured isolates of clinically important yeast species using fluorescent fragment length analysis of the amplified internally transcribed rRNA spacer 2 region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muylaert An

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patients with yeast infection has increased during the last years. Also the variety of species of clinical importance has increased. Correct species identification is often important for efficient therapy, but is currently mostly based on phenotypic features and is sometimes time-consuming and depends largely on the expertise of technicians. Therefore, we evaluated the feasibility of PCR-based amplification of the internally transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2, followed by fragment size analysis on the ABI Prism 310 for the identification of clinically important yeasts. Results A rapid DNA-extraction method, based on simple boiling-freezing was introduced. Of the 26 species tested, 22 could be identified unambiguously by scoring the length of the ITS2-region. No distinction could be made between the species Trichosporon asteroides and T. inkin or between T. mucoides and T. ovoides. The two varieties of Cryptococcus neoformans (var. neoformans and var. gattii could be differentiated from each other due to a one bp length difference of the ITS2 fragment. The three Cryptococcus laurentii isolates were split into two groups according to their ITS2-fragment lengths, in correspondence with the phylogenetic groups described previously. Since the obtained fragment lengths compare well to those described previously and could be exchanged between two laboratories, an internationally usable library of ITS2 fragment lengths can be constructed. Conclusions The existing ITS2 size based library enables identification of most of the clinically important yeast species within 6 hours starting from a single colony and can be easily updated when new species are described. Data can be exchanged between laboratories.

  2. An Evaluation of Quantitative PCR Assays (TaqMan® and SYBR Green for the Detection of Babesia bigemina and Babesia bovis, and a Novel Fluorescent-ITS1-PCR Capillary Electrophoresis Method for Genotyping B. bovis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Babesia spp. are tick-transmitted haemoparasites causing tick fever in cattle. In Australia, economic losses to the cattle industry from tick fever are estimated at AUD$26 Million per annum. If animals recover from these infections, they become immune carriers. Here we describe a novel multiplex TaqMan qPCR targeting cytochrome b genes for the identification of Babesia spp. The assay shows high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility, and allows quantification of parasite DNA from Babesia bovis and B. bigemina compared to standard PCR assays. A previously published cytochrome b SYBR Green qPCR was also tested in this study, showing slightly higher sensitivity than the Taqman qPCRs but requires melting curve analysis post-PCR to confirm specificity. The SYBR Green assays were further evaluated using both diagnostic submissions and vaccinated cattle (at 7, 9, 11 and 14 days post-inoculation showed that B. bigemina can be detected more frequently than B. bovis. Due to fewer circulating parasites, B. bovis detection in carrier animals requires higher DNA input. Preliminary data for a novel fluorescent PCR genotyping based on the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 region to detect vaccine and field alleles of B. bovis are described. This assay is capable of detecting vaccine and novel field isolate alleles in a single sample.

  3. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of smectite by fluorescent Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferret, Claire; Sterckeman, Thibault; Cornu, Jean-Yves; Gangloff, Sophie; Schalk, Isabelle J; Geoffroy, Valérie A

    2014-10-01

    Siderophores are organic chelators produced by microorganisms to fulfil their iron requirements. Siderophore-promoted dissolution of iron-bearing minerals has been clearly documented for some siderophores, but few studies have addressed metabolizing siderophore-producing bacteria. We investigated iron acquisition from clays by fluorescent Pseudomonads, bacteria that are ubiquitous in the environment. We focused on the interactions between smectite and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a bacterium producing two structurally different siderophores: pyoverdine and pyochelin. The presence of smectite in iron-limited growth media promoted planktonic growth of P. aeruginosa and biofilm surrounding the smectite aggregates. Chemical analysis of the culture media indicated increases in the dissolved silicon, iron and aluminium concentrations following smectite supplementation. The use of P. aeruginosa mutants unable to produce either one or both of the two siderophores indicated that pyoverdine, the siderophore with the higher affinity for iron, was involved in iron and aluminium solubilization by the wild-type strain. However, in the absence of pyoverdine, pyochelin was also able to solubilize iron but with a twofold lower efficiency. In conclusion, pyoverdine and pyochelin, two structurally different siderophores, can solubilize structural iron from smectite and thereby make it available for bacterial growth.

  4. Disease protection and allelopathic interactions of seed-transmitted endophytic pseudomonads of invasive reed grass (Phragmites australis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James F.; Kingsley, Katheryn I; Kowalski, Kurt P.; Irizarry, Ivelisse; Micci, April; Soares, Marcos Antonio; Bergen, Marshall S.

    2018-01-01

    Background and aimsNon-native Phragmites australis (haplotype M) is an invasive grass that decreases biodiversity and produces dense stands. We hypothesized that seeds of Phragmites carry microbes that improve seedling growth, defend against pathogens and maximize capacity of seedlings to compete with other plants.MethodsWe isolated bacteria from seeds of Phragmites, then evaluated representatives for their capacities to become intracellular in root cells, and their effects on: 1.) germination rates and seedling growth, 2.) susceptibility to damping-off disease, and 3.) mortality and growth of competitor plant seedlings (dandelion (Taraxacum officionale F. H. Wigg) and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.)).ResultsTen strains (of 23 total) were identified and characterized; seven were identified as Pseudomonas spp. Strains Sandy LB4 (Pseudomonas fluorescens) and West 9 (Pseudomonas sp.) entered root meristems and became intracellular. These bacteria improved seed germination in Phragmites and increased seedling root branching in Poa annua. They increased plant growth and protected plants from damping off disease. Sandy LB4 increased mortality and reduced growth rates in seedlings of dandelion and curly dock.ConclusionsPhragmites plants associate with endophytes to increase growth and disease resistance, and release bacteria into the soil to create an environment that is favorable to their seedlings and less favorable to competitor plants.

  5. Isolation of imidacloprid degrading bacteria from industrial sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.N.; Jabeen, F.

    2009-01-01

    Immidacloprid is a cyclodiene organochlorine used as an insecticide all over the world and possessing a serous environmental threat. It is mostly used for cotton insects (bollworm, aphid and white fly). For isolation of imidacloprid degrading bacteria, two soil samples were collected from industrial contaminated sites of Kala Shah Kahu district sheikupura, having ten year history of use. Soil samples were analyzed by measuring pH and electric conductivity. The isolation of imidacroprid degrading bacteria was performed by enrichment technique. Eight bacterial strains, S/sub 1-a/ S/2-2-b/ S/2-c/ S/2-d/ S/2-e/ S/sub 2-f/ and S/sub 2-g/ and S/sub e-a/ were isolated on the basis of their colony morphologies. The purified colonies were characterized morphologically, physiologically and biochemically. Gram staining was done and Gram negative strain were confirmed on MacConkey agar and Eosin Methylene Blue. Bacterial strains were also checked for different minimal media in which only carbon source was the imidcloprid. For this purpose. FTW, FTW without N/sub 2/ NSM, M/sub 9/ and MM/sub 2/ media were used and their optical densities were taken on spectrophotometer isolates were checked for resistance to antibiotics and heavy metals. On these characteristics, S/sub 2-d/ and S/sub c-a/ were assigned to Enterobacteriaceae, S/sub 2-b/ to Pseudomonad and rest of the bacterial isolates were affiliated to bacillaceae. (author)

  6. Diversity and activity of biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of black pepper in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.; Kruijt, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: Phytophthora capsici is a major pathogen of black pepper and zoospores play an important role in the infection process. Fluorescent pseudomonads that produce biosurfactants with zoosporicidal activities were isolated from the black pepper rhizosphere in Vietnam, and their genotypic diversity

  7. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  8. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  9. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  10. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  11. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I [Berkeley, CA; Fergenson, David P [Alamo, CA; Srivastava, Abneesh [Santa Clara, CA; Bogan, Michael J [Dublin, CA; Riot, Vincent J [Oakland, CA; Frank, Matthias [Oakland, CA

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  12. Optimization of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bindels, D.S.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; van Weeren, L.; Joosen, L.; Gadella (jr.), T.W.J.; Engelborghs, Y.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, fluorescent protein (FP) variants have been engineered to fluoresce in all different colors; to display photoswitchable, or photochromic, behavior; or to show yet other beneficial properties that enable or enhance a still growing set of new fluorescence spectroscopy and microcopy

  13. Fluorescence enhancement of modified silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meicen; Zhang, Zhenglong; Liu, Gaining; Dong, Jun; Sun, Yu; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Guian

    2011-11-01

    Surface enhanced fluorescence (SEF) effect of acridine orange fluorophore in the proximity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) has been investigated experimentally in the aqueous solution system. It was found that the SEF effect could be influenced by the distribution of the NPs and the separation between the fluorophore molecule and metal surface. The fluorescence enhancement was improved significantly when Ag NPs was capped with 4-Aminothiophenol (PATP) that was acted as an isolating layer between the metal surface and fluorophore molecules. The results suggest that a proper distribution of metallic NPs and proper separation between fluorophore molecule and the particle surface are important for obtaining an optimal SEF effect.

  14. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  15. Fluorescence of irradiated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulis, I.G.; Evdokimenko, V.M.; Lapkovskij, M.P.; Petrov, P.T.; Gulis, I.M.; Markevich, S.V.

    1977-01-01

    A visible fluorescence has been found out in γ-irradiated aqueous of carbohydrates. Two bands have been distinguished in fluorescence spectra of the irradiated solution of dextran: a short-wave band lambdasub(max)=140 nm (where lambda is a wave length) at lambdasub(β)=380 nm and a long-wave band with lambdasub(max)=540 nm at lambdasub(β)=430 nm. A similar form of the spectrum has been obtained for irradiated solutions of starch, amylopectin, lowmolecular glucose. It has been concluded that a macromolecule of polysaccharides includes fluorescent centres. A relation between fluorescence and α-oxiketon groups formed under irradiation has been pointed out

  16. Type III secretion system and virulence markers highlight similarities and differences between human- and plant-associated Pseudomonads related to Pseudomonas fluorescens and P-putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mazurier, Sylvie; Merieau, Annabelle; Bergeau, Dorian; Decoin, Victorien; Sperandio, Daniel; Crepin, Alexandre; Barbey, Corinne; Jeannot, Katy; Vicre-Gibouin, Maité; Plesiat, Patrick; Lemanceau, Philippe; Latour, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is commonly considered a saprophytic rhizobacterium devoid of pathogenic potential. Nevertheless, the recurrent isolation of strains from clinical human cases could indicate the emergence of novel strains originating from the rhizosphere reservoir, which could be particularly resistant to the immune system and clinical treatment. The importance of type three secretion systems (T3SSs) in the related Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial species and the occurrence of this se...

  17. Direct Comparison of the Histidine-rich Protein-2 Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay (HRP-2 ELISA) and Malaria SYBR Green I Fluorescence (MSF) Drug Sensitivity Tests in Plasmodium falciparum Reference Clones and Fresh ex vivo Field Isolates from Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-12

    assessment of antimalarial activity in vitro by a semiautomated microdilution technique. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1979, 16:710–718. 3. Noedl H, Attlmayr B...40:685–691. 32. Hawley SR, Bray PG, Mungthin M, Atkinson JD, O’Neill PM, Ward SA: Relationship between antimalarial drug activity , accumulation, and...success rate when testing DHA, AS, MQ, QN, CQ, and PPQ activities . A “successful” IC50 assay result for each P. falciparum clinical isolate was defined as

  18. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...

  19. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  20. Isolated galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einasto, Maret

    1990-01-01

    To test for the possible presence of really isolated galaxies, which form a randomly distributed population in voids, we compare the distribution of most isolated galaxies in an observed sample with distributions of the same number of random points using the nearest neighbour test. The results show that the random population of really isolated galaxies does not exist - even the most isolated galaxies are connected with systems of galaxies, forming their outlying parts. (author)

  1. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  2. Photobleaching and Fluorescence Recovery of RPE Bisretinoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Liu

    Full Text Available The autofluorescence of the retina that originates primarily from lipofuscin fluorophores in retinal pigment epithelial cells, is observed to undergo photobleaching during the acquisition of fundus autofluorescence images. Bisretinoid fluorophores isolated from retinal pigment epithelial cells have the spectral characteristics consistent with their being the source of fundus autofluorescence. Clinically relevant experiments were designed to better understand conditions in the micromilieu of bisretinoid fluorophores that can influence fluorescence efficiencies, photobleaching, and subsequent fluorescence recovery of this fluorophore. The consumption of the bisretinoid A2E due to photooxidation-induced degradation was quantified in solvent systems of variable relative permittivity (formerly called dielectric constant, in micelles, and in phospholipid vesicles of varying composition. Reorganization within biphasic systems was also examined. A2E content was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and fluorescence intensity was quantified spectroscopically. As solvent polarity was increased, A2E fluorescent spectra exhibited red-shifted maxima and reduced intensity. A2E was depleted by light irradiation and the loss was more pronounced in less polar solvents, lower concentrations of anionic surfactant, and in gel- versus fluid-ordered phospholipid liposomes. Conditions that permit A2E aggregation promoted photooxidation/photodegradation, while movement of A2E between bisphasic systems was associated with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The fluorescence characteristics of A2E are subject to environmental modulation. Photooxidation and photodegradation of bisretinoid can account for fundus autofluorescence photobleaching. Return of fluorescence intensity after photobleaching likely occurs due to redistribution of A2E fractions amongst co-existing heterogeneous microdomains of the lysosomal compartment.

  3. Fluorescent discharge lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, E.; Otsuka, H.; Nomi, K.; Honmo, I.

    1982-01-01

    A rapidly illuminating fluorescent lamp 1,200 mm long and 32.5 mm in diameter with an interior conducting strip which is compatible with conventional fixtures and ballasts is described. The fluorescent lamp is composed of a linear glass tube, electrodes sealed at both ends, mercury and raregas sealed in the glass tube, a fluorescent substance clad on the inner walls of the glass tube, and a clad conducting strip extending the entire length of the glass tube in the axial direction on the inner surface of the tube.

  4. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  5. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  6. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  7. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  8. Fluorescence (Multiwave) Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welzel, J; Kästle, Raphaela; Sattler, Elke C

    2016-10-01

    In addition to reflectance confocal microscopy, multiwave confocal microscopes with different laser wavelengths in combination with exogenous fluorophores allow fluorescence mode confocal microscopy in vivo and ex vivo. Fluorescence mode confocal microscopy improves the contrast between the epithelium and the surrounding soft tissue and allows the depiction of certain structures, like epithelial tumors, nerves, and glands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Fluorescence Image Segmentation by using Digitally Reconstructed Fluorescence Images

    OpenAIRE

    Blumer, Clemens; Vivien, Cyprien; Oertner, Thomas G; Vetter, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In biological experiments fluorescence imaging is used to image living and stimulated neurons. But the analysis of fluorescence images is a difficult task. It is not possible to conclude the shape of an object from fluorescence images alone. Therefore, it is not feasible to get good manual segmented nor ground truth data from fluorescence images. Supervised learning approaches are not possible without training data. To overcome this issues we propose to synthesize fluorescence images and call...

  10. Diversity and activity of biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of black pepper in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H; Kruijt, M; Raaijmakers, J M

    2008-03-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major pathogen of black pepper and zoospores play an important role in the infection process. Fluorescent pseudomonads that produce biosurfactants with zoosporicidal activities were isolated from the black pepper rhizosphere in Vietnam, and their genotypic diversity and potential to control Phy. capsici root rot was determined. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads were genotypically and biochemically characterized by BOX-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 16S-rDNA sequencing, reverse-phase-high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Biosurfactant-producing fluorescent pseudomonads make up c. 1.3% of the culturable Pseudomonas population in the rhizosphere of black pepper. Although BOX-PCR revealed substantial genotypic diversity, the isolates were shown to produce the same biosurfactants and were all identified as Pseudomonas putida. When applied to black pepper stem cuttings, several of the biosurfactant-producing strains provided significant disease control. In absence of the disease, several of the bacterial strains promoted shoot and root growth of black pepper stem cuttings. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads indigenous to the rhizosphere of black pepper plants are genotypically diverse and provide a novel resource for the control of Phy. capsici root rot and growth promotion of black pepper stem cuttings. The results of this study provide a strong basis for further development of supplementary strategies with antagonistic bacteria to control foot and root rot of black pepper and to promote plant growth.

  11. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  12. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs

  13. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  14. Evaluation of furocoumarins as photosynthetic inhibitor by chlorophyll a fluorescence assay

    OpenAIRE

    Sampaio, Olívia Moreira; Silva, Maria Fátima das Graças Fernandes da; Veiga, Thiago Andre Moura [UNIFESP; King-Díaz, Beatriz; Lotina-Hennsen, Blas

    2012-01-01

    The evaluations of Chorophyll a fluorescence emitted by superior plants carry structural information and photosynthetic apparatus function. Quantitative analysis apparatus of fluorescence kinetic were measured by energy flows (ABS), (TR), (ET) and (DI), known as phenomenological phenomena of OJIP test. Four furocoumarins were isolated from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae), and chorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence assays were performed with these compounds to evaluate the photosynthesis inhibition pote...

  15. Quenching of bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence in chlorosomes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus by exogenous quinones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tokita, S; Frigaard, N-U; Hirota, M

    2000-01-01

    The quenching of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c fluorescence in chlorosomes isolated from Chloroflexus aurantiacus was examined by the addition of various benzoquinones, naphthoquinones (NQ), and anthraquinones (AQ). Many quinones showed strong quenching in the micromolar or submicromolar range. Th...

  16. Monitoring by fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malcolme-Lawes, D.J.; Gifford, L.A.

    1981-01-01

    A fluorimetric detector is described in which the fluorescence excitation source may be 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 147 Pm or 63 Ni. Such a detector can be adapted for use with flowing liquid systems especially liquid chromatography systems. (U.K.)

  17. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  18. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    not be cited for purposes of advertisement. DISPOSITION INSTRUCTIONS: Destroy this document when no longer needed. Do not return to the... recycling , and can be disposed safely in a landfill. (2) LEDs offer reduced maintenance costs and fewer bulb replacements, significantly reducing... recycling . Several fixtures, ballasts and energy efficient fluorescent bulbs that were determined to be in pristine condition were returned to ATC

  19. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  20. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  1. Transformation of Sclerotinia Sclerotiorum with the Green Fluorescent Protein Gene and Fluorescence of Hyphae in Four Inoculated Hosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum is an important pathogen of a wide variety of crops. To obtain a genetic marker to observe and study the interaction of the pathogen with its hosts, isolates ND30 and ND21 were transformed using pCT74 and gGFP constructs both containing genes for the green fluorescent protei...

  2. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhmutov, D.; Gonchukov, S.; Sukhinina, A.

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined.

  5. Fluorescence Imaging Reveals Surface Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirato, Richard; Polichar, Raulf

    1992-01-01

    In technique to detect surface contamination, object inspected illuminated by ultraviolet light to make contaminants fluoresce; low-light-level video camera views fluorescence. Image-processing techniques quantify distribution of contaminants. If fluorescence of material expected to contaminate surface is not intense, tagged with low concentration of dye.

  6. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  7. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS)

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy and includes chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells. Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the field Covers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy Contains chapters on such topics as Förster resonance energy transfer (fret) with fluctuation algorithms, protein corona on nanoparticles by FCS, and FFS approaches to the study of receptors in live cells.

  8. Fluorescent quantification of melanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Bruno; Matamá, Teresa; Guimarães, Diana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-11-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is the best method for melanin quantification as it proved to be highly specific and accurate, detecting even small variations in the synthesis of melanin. This method can also be applied to the quantification of melanin in more complex biological matrices like zebrafish embryos and human hair. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fluorescent nanodiamond for biomedicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milos Nesladek

    2014-01-01

    NV centers in diamond have gained strong interest as a novel tool for quantum information processing, quantum computing and quantum photonics. These applications are based on fluorescent and spin properties of NV-centres. However, in some conditions NV- can lose an electron and turn to NV0. The occupation of NV0 and NV- charge states depend on the position of their ground states with respect to the Fermi level and the mechanism of the charge transfer. Interestingly, that the charge switch has important implications on applications of fluorescent nanodiamond (fND) to nano-biology and nano-medicine. fND can be used for bio-marking and bio-tracking but also for the monitoring of targeted delivery to the cells. In this presentation we review the current state-of-the art for using fND particles for fluorescent bio imaging in cells and discuss the charge transfer and its luminescence stability by using ultra high sensitive spectroscopy methods to study the NV0 and NV- state occupation. (author)

  10. Hyperspectral small animal fluorescence imaging: spectral selection imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas; Jiang, Yanan; Patsekin, Valery; Hall, Heidi; Vizard, Douglas; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    Molecular imaging is a rapidly growing area of research, fueled by needs in pharmaceutical drug-development for methods for high-throughput screening, pre-clinical and clinical screening for visualizing tumor growth and drug targeting, and a growing number of applications in the molecular biology fields. Small animal fluorescence imaging employs fluorescent probes to target molecular events in vivo, with a large number of molecular targeting probes readily available. The ease at which new targeting compounds can be developed, the short acquisition times, and the low cost (compared to microCT, MRI, or PET) makes fluorescence imaging attractive. However, small animal fluorescence imaging suffers from high optical scattering, absorption, and autofluorescence. Much of these problems can be overcome through multispectral imaging techniques, which collect images at different fluorescence emission wavelengths, followed by analysis, classification, and spectral deconvolution methods to isolate signals from fluorescence emission. We present an alternative to the current method, using hyperspectral excitation scanning (spectral selection imaging), a technique that allows excitation at any wavelength in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. In many cases, excitation imaging may be more effective at identifying specific fluorescence signals because of the higher complexity of the fluorophore excitation spectrum. Because the excitation is filtered and not the emission, the resolution limit and image shift imposed by acousto-optic tunable filters have no effect on imager performance. We will discuss design of the imager, optimizing the imager for use in small animal fluorescence imaging, and application of spectral analysis and classification methods for identifying specific fluorescence signals.

  11. Antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from aquaculture and abattoir environments in urban communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isoken Henrietta Igbinosa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize multiple antibiotic resistance profile of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from aquaculture and abattoir environments. Methods: Wastewater samples were obtained from the abattoir and aquaculture environments between May 2016 and July 2016 and analysed using standard phenotypic, biochemical and PCR-based methods. Results: The mean pseudomonads count ranged from (4 × 102 ± 1.01 to (2 × 104 ± 0.10 colony-forming unit/mL in the aquaculture environment and (3 × 103 ± 0.00 to (1 × 105 ± 1.00 colony-forming unit/mL in the abattoir environment. A total of 96 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa confirmed by PCR were thereafter selected from both aquaculture and abattoir environments and further characterized for their antimicrobial susceptibility profile by adopting the disc diffusion method. High level of resistance was observed against the aminoglycosides [gentamycin 64/96 (66.67% and kanamycin 52/96 (54.17%], monobactams [aztreonam 76/96 (79.17%], carbapenems [meropenem 52/96 (54.17%], tetracyclines [tetracycline 72/96 (75.00%] and cephems [ceftazidime 72/96 (75.00% and cefuroxime 48/96 (50.00%]. Multiple antibiotic resistant index of the respective isolates ranged from 0.4 to 0.8 while multidrug resistant profile of the isolates revealed that 28 of the respective isolates were resistant to ceftazidime, cefuroxime, gentamycin, kanamycin, aztreonam which belongs to cephems, aminoglycosides and monobactam class of antimicrobials. Conclusions: Findings from the present study therefore underscores the need for effective monitoring of the abattoir and aquaculture environments as they could be the significant source for spreading antibiotic resistant bacteria within the environment.

  12. Impurity monitoring by laser-induced fluorescence techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbwachs, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy can provide a highly sensitive and selective means of detecting atomic and ionic impurities. Because the photodetector can be physically isolated from the laser-excited region, these techniques can be applied to monitoring in hostile environments. The basic concepts behind fluorescence detection are reviewed. Saturated optical excitation is shown to maximize impurity atom emission yield while mitigating effects of laser intensity fluctuations upon absolute density calibration. Monitoring in high- and low-pressure monitoring environments is compared. Methods to improve detection sensitivity by luminescence background suppression are presented

  13. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  14. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanemaru, Takaaki; Hirata, Kazuho; Takasu, Shin-ichi; Isobe, Shin-ichiro; Mizuki, Keiji; Mataka, Shuntaro; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM) and an electron microscope (EM). In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) (JEOL JXA8600 M) was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM). In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  15. Isolation World

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Martín, Eugeni

    2012-01-01

    El trabajo de fin de grado tiene como nombre “Isolation World”, que en su traducción literal significa “Aislamiento del mundo”, un videojuego diseñado y creado desde cero en su totalidad, utilizando herramientas y conocimiento de lógica en programación que se han ido aprendiendo y desarrollando a lo largo de la carrera.

  16. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  17. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F.; Nield, Kathryn M.; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600 nm and emitted above 700 nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  18. Fluorescence enhancement by Au nanostructures: nanoshells and nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Grady, Nathaniel K; Cole, Joseph R; Joshi, Amit; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-03-24

    Metallic nanoparticles influence the quantum yield and lifetime of adjacent fluorophores in a manner dependent on the properties of the nanostructure. Here we directly compare the fluorescence enhancement of the near-infrared fluorophore IR800 by Au nanoshells (NSs) and Au nanorods (NRs), where human serum albumin (HSA) serves as a spacer layer between the nanoparticle and the fluorophore. Our measurements reveal that the quantum yield of IR800 is enhanced from approximately 7% as an isolated fluorophore to 86% in a NSs-HSA-IR800 complex and 74% in a NRs-HSA-IR800 complex. This dramatic increase in fluorescence shows tremendous potential for contrast enhancement in fluorescence-based bioimaging.

  19. Fluorescing macerals from wood precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stout, S A; Bensley, D F

    1987-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the origin of wood-derived macerals has established the existence of autofluorescent maceral precursors in the secondary xylem of swamp-inhabiting plant species. The optical character and fluorescent properties of microtomed thin-sections of modern woods from the Florida Everglades and Okefenokee Swamp, Georgia are compared to the character and properties of their peatified equivalents from various Everglades and Okefenokee peat horizons and their lignitic equivalents from the Brandon lignite of Vermont and the Trail Ridge lignitic peat from northern Florida. The inherent fluorescence of woody cell walls is believed to be caused by lignin though other cell wall components may contribute. The fluorescence spectra for several wood and cell types had a ..gamma../sub m//sub a//sub x/ of 452 nm and Q value of 0.00. The color as observed in blue light and the spectral geometry as measured in UV light of peatified and lignitic woody cell walls (potential textinites) may change progressively during early coalification. Cell wall-derived maceral material is shown to maintain its fluorescing properties after being converted to a structureless material, perhaps a corpohuminite or humodetrinite precursor. Fluorescing xylem cell contents, such as condensed tannins or essential oils, can maintain the fluorescent character through early coalification. Xylem cell walls and xylem cell contents are shown to provide fluorescing progenitor materials which would not require subsequent infusion with 'lipid' materials to account for their fluorescence as phytoclast material or as macerals in coal. 35 references.

  20. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  1. Isolation of hair follicle bulge stem cells from YFP-expressing reporter mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakrieko, Kerry-Ann; Irvine, Timothy S; Dagnino, Lina

    2013-01-01

    In this article we provide a method to isolate hair follicle stem cells that have undergone targeted gene inactivation. The mice from which these cells are isolated are bred into a Rosa26-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter background, which results in YFP expression in the targeted stem cell population. These cells are isolated and purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, using epidermal stem cell-specific markers in conjunction with YFP fluorescence. The purified cells can be used for gene expression studies, clonogenic experiments, and biological assays, such as viability and capacity for directional migration.

  2. A study of fluorescence properties of citrinin in β-cyclodextrin aqueous solution and different solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Youxiang; Chen Jianbiao; Dong Lina; Lu Liang; Chen Fusheng; Hu Dingjin; Wang Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin initially isolated from filamentous fungus Penicilliu citrinum. It was later isolated from several other species, such as Aspergillus and Monascus. It has a conjugated, planar structure that gives it a natural fluorescence ability, which can be used to develop sensitive methods for detecting CIT in food. In this paper, we used the spectrofluorescence technique to study the effects of pH value, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and organic solvents on the CIT fluorescence intensity. The results show that lower pH value, aceitc acid, β-CD and acetonitrile can induce a higher fluorescence intensity of CIT, but methanol or H 2 O has a decreasing effect on the fluorescence intensity of CIT. Findings in this study provide a theoretical basis for development of a high sensitivity fluorescence-based trace analysis for CIT detection. - Highlights: ► The effects of pH, solvents and β-CD on the fluorescence of citrinin are analyzed. ► [H] + , acetic acid, β-CD and acetonitrile can induce CIT fluorescence enhancement. ► Methanol and H 2 O can induce CIT fluorescence reduction. ► The 1:1 inclusion complex of CIT/β-CD can form in acidic phosphate solution.

  3. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  4. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  5. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen; Abuelela, Ayman F.; Mohammad, Amal Jehad

    2017-01-01

    scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least

  6. Fluorescent standards for photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belko, N.; Kavalenka, S.; Samtsov, M.

    2016-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy is an evolving technique for treatment of various oncological diseases. This method employs photosensitizers - species that lead to death of tumor cells after the photoactivation. For further development and novel applications of photodynamic therapy new photosensitizers are required. After synthesis of a new photosensitizer it is important to know its concentration in different biological tissues after its administration and distribution. The concentration is frequently measured by the extraction method, which has some disadvantages, e.g. it requires many biological test subjects that are euthanized during the measurement. We propose to measure the photosensitizer concentration in tissue by its fluorescence. For this purpose fluorescent standards were developed. The standards are robust and simple to produce; their fluorescence signal does not change with time. The fluorescence intensity of fluorescent standards seems to depend linearly on the dye concentration. A set of standards thus allow the calibration of a spectrometer. Finally, the photosensitizer concentration can be determined by the fluorescence intensity after comparing the corresponding spectrum with spectra of the set of fluorescent standards. A biological test subject is not euthanized during this kind of experiment. We hope this more humane technique can be used in future instead of the extraction method.

  7. Fluorescence molecular tomography in the presence of background fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soubret, Antoine; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography is an emerging imaging technique that resolves the bio-distribution of engineered fluorescent probes developed for in vivo reporting of specific cellular and sub-cellular targets. The method can detect fluorochromes in picomole amounts or less, imaged through entire animals, but the detection sensitivity and imaging performance drop in the presence of background, non-specific fluorescence. In this study, we carried out a theoretical and an experimental investigation on the effect of background fluorescence on the measured signal and on the tomographic reconstruction. We further examined the performance of three subtraction methods based on physical models of photon propagation, using experimental data on phantoms and small animals. We show that the data pre-processing with subtraction schemes can improve image quality and quantification when non-specific background florescence is present

  8. Instructive for disposal of fluorescent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar Vargas, Gerlin

    2014-01-01

    An instructive is established for the management system of waste fluorescent lamps, ensuring the storage, collection, transportation, and final disposal. The lamp is changed by an official of the Seccion de Matenimiento Construccion of the Oficina de Servicios Generales or is produced with the support of an official of the unit. The fluorescent should be deposited in stock of materials of the building maintenance section or unit specified with the help of a staff and in appropriate conditions. The fluorescent lamp is transported according to the guidelines in the manual. A responsible company is contracted by la Vicerrectoria de Administracion of the Universidad de Costa Rica dedicated to the transport and proper handling of fluorescent lamps [es

  9. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    GROWTH OF TOMATO CHALLENGED WITH PHTOPATHOGENS ... This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth .... the 5 days old culture in starch agar with Lugol's.

  10. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  11. Fluorescent Nanodiamonds in Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitura, Katarzyna Anna; Włodarczyk, Elżbieta

    2018-04-18

    Nanoparticles have an extended surface and a large surface area, which is the ratio of the size of the surfacearea to the volume. A functionalized surface can give rise to more modifications and therefore allows this nanomaterial to have new properties. Fluorescent molecules contain fluorophore, which is capable of being excited via the absorption of light energy at a specific wavelength and subsequently emitting radiation energy of a longer wavelength. A chemically modified surface of nanodiamond (ND; by carboxylation) demonstrated biocompatibility with DNA, cytochrome C, and antigens. In turn, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) belong to a group of new nanomaterials. Their surface can be modified by joining functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, or amino, after which they can be employed as a fluorescence agent. Their fluorescent properties result from defects in the crystal lattice. FNDs reach dimensions of 4-100 nm, have attributes such as photostability, long fluorescence lifetimes (10 ns), and fluorescence emission between 600 and 700 nm. They are also nontoxic, chemically inert, biocompatible, and environmentally harmless. The main purpose of this article was to present the medical applications of various types of modified NDs.

  12. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  13. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of matrix isolated transient species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lue, Christopher J.

    Part I describes the electronic spectra of various actinide containing compounds isolated in solid Ar using laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy. The IR spectra for many of the same molecules were also recorded to aid in the identification of the fluorescing species in the LIF spectra. LIF spectra of UO2 isolated in solid Ar were recorded to investigate the interactions between actinide compounds and the rare gas matrix host. At the time of the experiments, it had been proposed that for UO2 and CUO, the interactions between the actinide containing molecule and Ar were strong enough to reorder the low-lying electronic states of the molecule. The experiments presented here showed no evidence of a reordering of low-lying electronic states based on comparison of the matrix spectra with theoretical predictions and gas phase spectra. An attempt to observe fluorescence from higher order uranium oxides was undertaken. A matrix was made by ablating U metal in a 1.0% O2/Ar mixture. UO3 was a probable molecule formed in the experiment. And, while absorptions belonging to UO3 were observed in IR spectra, LIF from the same matrix provided evidence that another molecule was fluorescing. Two different vibrational frequencies observed in the U-O symmetric stretching region were indicative of at least two low-lying electronic states in fluorescing molecule. UO3 is a closed shell molecule, and it is unlikely that it has any low-lying electronic states. Instead, the fluorescence was attributed to the open shell species (UO2)+(O2) -. LIF and IR spectra of thermally vaporized UCl4 isolated in solid Ar were recorded. UCl4 contains U(IV), which is the most stable oxidation state other than U(VI). Before these experiments, no fluorescence had been recorded that could be attributed to UCl4. Based on the observed vibrational frequencies in the fluorescence bands and the lifetime of the fluorescence, it was determine that there was at least two different fluorescing species. The

  15. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan; Acuna, Guillermo; Kim, Seungkyeum; Vietz, Carolin; Tseng, Derek; Chae, Jongjae; Shir, Daniel; Luo, Wei; Tinnefeld, Philip; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-01-01

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  16. Fluorescence and phosphorescence of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondarev, Stanislav L., E-mail: bondarev@imaph.bas-net.by [Minsk State Higher Radioengineering College, 220005 Minsk (Belarus); Knyukshto, Valeri N. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2013-10-15

    Rutin is one of the most promising flavonoid from a pharmacological and biochemical point of view. Here we have explored its spectroscopic and photophysical properties at room temperature and 77 K using steady-state absorption-luminescence methods and pulse spectroscopy equipment. By excitation into the absorption band 1 of rutin in methanol at room temperature the normal Stokes' shifted fluorescence with a maximum at 415 nm and quantum yield of 2×10{sup −4} was revealed. However, by excitation into the bands 2 and 3 any emission wasn’t observed. At 77 K in ethanol glass we have observed fluorescence at 410 nm and phosphorescence at 540 nm for the first time. As a result the adequate energetic scheme including the lowest electronic excited singlet at 26000 cm{sup −1} and triplet at 19600 cm{sup −1} states was proposed. -- Highlights: • Rutin fluorescence and phosphorescence at 77 K were revealed for the first time. • Room temperature fluorescence is determined by maximum at 415 nm and yield of 2×10{sup −4}. • Violation of Vavilov–Kasha rule by excitation into the absorption bands 2 and 3. • Fluorescence and phosphorescence in rutin are caused by the allowed π, π{sup (⁎)} transitions.

  17. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  18. ENTRAPMENT OF FLUORESCENT E. COLI CELLS IN ALGINATE GEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. VINTILA

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available By this experiment we will demonstrate the possibility to obtain genetically modified microbial strains that can be used as markers in different studies. The trait transferred in this study is the fluorescence in UV light expressed by a gene isolated from jellyfish. This gene was insered into a plasmid carrying ampiciline resistance and in the operon for arabinose fermentation. The plasmid was called pGLO. E coli HB101 K-12, ampicillin resistant colonies has been obtained. The colonies on the LB/amp/ara plate fluoresce green under UV light and the transformed colonies can grow on ampicillin. Transformation efficiency = 362 transformed colonies/ μg DNA. The cells where immobilized by entrapment in alginate gel to study the phenomenon involved in cells immobilization. After immobilization in alginate gel, 5x104 cells of E. coli pGLO / capsule and 1,4 x 105 cells of E. coli HB101/capsule has been found. Fluorescent microscopy revealed the presence of pGLO carrying cells into the capsules. After cultivation of alginate capsules containing E. coli in LB broth, and fluorescent microscopy of the capsule sections, several observations of the phenomenon involved in continuous fermentation using biocatalysts in has been made. These cells grow and migrate to the cortical part of the matrix where they are immobilized.

  19. Fluorescence confocal microscopy for pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Piana, Simonetta; Longo, Caterina; Castagnetti, Fabio; Foroni, Monica; Ferrari, Guglielmo; Gardini, Giorgio; Pellacani, Giovanni

    2014-03-01

    Confocal microscopy is a non-invasive method of optical imaging that may provide microscopic images of untreated tissue that correspond almost perfectly to hematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides. Nowadays, following two confocal imaging systems are available: (1) reflectance confocal microscopy, based on the natural differences in refractive indices of subcellular structures within the tissues; (2) fluorescence confocal microscopy, based on the use of fluorochromes, such as acridine orange, to increase the contrast epithelium-stroma. In clinical practice to date, confocal microscopy has been used with the goal of obviating the need for excision biopsies, thereby reducing the need for pathological examination. The aim of our study was to test fluorescence confocal microscopy on different types of surgical specimens, specifically breast, lymph node, thyroid, and colon. The confocal images were correlated to the corresponding histological sections in order to provide a morphologic parallel and to highlight current limitations and possible applications of this technology for surgical pathology practice. As a result, neoplastic tissues were easily distinguishable from normal structures and reactive processes such as fibrosis; the use of fluorescence enhanced contrast and image quality in confocal microscopy without compromising final histologic evaluation. Finally, the fluorescence confocal microscopy images of the adipose tissue were as accurate as those of conventional histology and were devoid of the frozen-section-related artefacts that can compromise intraoperative evaluation. Despite some limitations mainly related to black/white images, which require training in imaging interpretation, this study confirms that fluorescence confocal microscopy may represent an alternative to frozen sections in the assessment of margin status in selected settings or when the conservation of the specimen is crucial. This is the first study to employ fluorescent confocal microscopy on

  20. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S.; Biryukova, T.; Sukhinina, A.; Vdovin, Yu

    2010-11-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 - 645 nm and 340 - 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy.

  1. Review on recent advances in the analysis of isolated organelles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Satori, Ch. P.; Košťál, Vratislav; Arriaga, E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 753, NOV 13 (2012), s. 8-18 ISSN 0003-2670 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP206/12/G014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : organelle isolation * fluorescence * electrophoresis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.387, year: 2012

  2. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-01-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements. PMID:25071950

  3. Dynamic Evolution of Pathogenicity Revealed by Sequencing and Comparative Genomics of 19 Pseudomonas syringae Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, Artur; Chang, Jeff H.; Mukhtar, M. Shahid; Cherkis, Karen; Roach, Jeff; Grant, Sarah R.; Jones, Corbin D.; Dangl, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    Closely related pathogens may differ dramatically in host range, but the molecular, genetic, and evolutionary basis for these differences remains unclear. In many Gram- negative bacteria, including the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae, type III effectors (TTEs) are essential for pathogenicity, instrumental in structuring host range, and exhibit wide diversity between strains. To capture the dynamic nature of virulence gene repertoires across P. syringae, we screened 11 diverse strains for novel TTE families and coupled this nearly saturating screen with the sequencing and assembly of 14 phylogenetically diverse isolates from a broad collection of diseased host plants. TTE repertoires vary dramatically in size and content across all P. syringae clades; surprisingly few TTEs are conserved and present in all strains. Those that are likely provide basal requirements for pathogenicity. We demonstrate that functional divergence within one conserved locus, hopM1, leads to dramatic differences in pathogenicity, and we demonstrate that phylogenetics-informed mutagenesis can be used to identify functionally critical residues of TTEs. The dynamism of the TTE repertoire is mirrored by diversity in pathways affecting the synthesis of secreted phytotoxins, highlighting the likely role of both types of virulence factors in determination of host range. We used these 14 draft genome sequences, plus five additional genome sequences previously reported, to identify the core genome for P. syringae and we compared this core to that of two closely related non-pathogenic pseudomonad species. These data revealed the recent acquisition of a 1 Mb megaplasmid by a sub-clade of cucumber pathogens. This megaplasmid encodes a type IV secretion system and a diverse set of unknown proteins, which dramatically increases both the genomic content of these strains and the pan-genome of the species. PMID:21799664

  4. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of Literature on x-ray fluorescence spectrometry starts with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. It is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is subdivided according to spectra, equipment, applications and absorption analysis

  5. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, N.B.

    1977-01-01

    The principle, instrument and procedure of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry are described. It is a rapid, simple and sensitive method for the trace analysis of elements from sodium to uranium in powder, liquid or metal samples. (M.G.B.)

  6. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  7. Erythrocyte fluorescence and lead intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K G

    1976-01-01

    Blood samples from people exposed to inorganic lead were examined by fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin. With continued lead absorption, fluorescent erythrocytes appeared in the circulation of workers handling this metal or its compounds, and they progressively increased in number and brilliance. These changes ensued if the blood lead concentration was maintained above 2-42 mumol/l (50 mug/100 ml), and preceded any material fall in the haemoglobin value. At one factory, 62-5% of 81 symptomless workers showed erythrocyte fluorescence attributable to the toxic effects of lead. Excess fluorocytes were found in blood samples from a child with pica and three of her eight siblings. These four were subsequently shown to have slightly increased blood lead concentrations (2-03 to 2-32 mumol/l). Fluorescence microscopy for excess erythrocyte porphyrin is a sensitive method for the detection of chronic lead intoxication. A relatively slight increase in the blood lead is associated with demonstrabel changes in erythrocyte porphyrin content. The procedure requires little blood, and may be performed upon stored samples collected for lead estimation. The results are not readily influenced by contamination, and provide good confirmatory evidence for the absorption of biochemically active lead. PMID:963005

  8. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateu, Batirtze Prats; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L; Kainz, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins. (paper)

  9. Phenotypic charactheristics of fluorescent pseudomonss, biological control agent of lincat disease of temanggung tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NINING NURUL AZIZAH

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent pseudomonass isolated from local plants-rishosphere in temanggung controlled lincat disease of tobacco. This report describe phenotypic charactheristics of the bacteria in order to be used as a base for the development of the bacteria as a biological control agent of lincat disease. Phenotypic charactheristics of six isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonass which controlled lincat disease in the field were determined in the laboratory of Plant Bacteriology, Faculty of Agriculture, Gadjah Mada University. Plant pathogenicity tests were conducted by hypersensitive reaction into tobacco leaf and inoculation to tobacco plants. Antagonism test between fluorescent Pseudomonass and other candidate of biological control agents were also conducted. The results indicated that the bacteria were rod shape, Gram negative, positive reaction in catalase and oxidase tests. Nitrate reduce to nitrite, arginine was hydrolysed, fluorescent pigment were produced on King’s B medium, levan formation positive and all bacteria denitrifiy. The bacteria used urea, tween 80 and amylum were not hydrolised, poly--hydroxybutyrate was not accumulated in the cells. Negative reactions were observed for lysine decarboxylation, indol production, VP/MR reaction, and gelatn liquefation. Some compounds could be used as solely carbon sources. All isolates grew on the medium containing 2% NaCl. The best pH for growth was 6-7 and all isolates grew at 20-41C. Negative result were obtained for hypersensitive reaction and pathogenicity tests.

  10. Time-resolved fluorescence monitoring of cholesterol in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinakova, Z.; Horilova, J.; Lajdova, I.; Marcek Chorvatova, A.

    2014-12-01

    Precise evaluation of intracellular cholesterol distribution is crucial for improving diagnostics of diseased states associated with cholesterol alteration. Time-resolved fluorescence techniques are tested for non-invasive investigation of cholesterol in living cells. Fluorescent probe NBD attached to cholesterol was employed to evaluate cholesterol distribution in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from the human blood. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) was successfully applied to simultaneously monitor the spatial distribution and the timeresolved characteristics of the NBD-cholesterol fluorescence in PBMC. Gathered data are the first step in the development of a new perspective non-invasive diagnostic method for evaluation of cholesterol modifications in diseases associated with disorders of lipid metabolism.

  11. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  12. Diagnostic multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for the identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections and detection of antibiotic susceptibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mashouf, Rasoul Y.; Farahani, Hadi S.; Zamani, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) from the skin biopsy specimens in burn wound infections by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR) and detection of antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates from culture. We conducted the cross-sectional study in 140 patients with wound infections who admitted to referral burn center of Motahari, Tehran, Iran, during a 12-month period from 2005-2006. Skin biopsy specimens were aseptically taken from each patient, one for PCR and one for bacterial culture. A M-PCR test based on simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL, was used to directly detect fluorescent pseudomonades and P. aeruginosa in skin biopsy specimens. The susceptibility of P. aeruginosa isolates to 16 antibiotics was determined using the disc diffusion method. Out of 140 biopsy specimens, M-PCR detected 66 (47.2%) isolates, while culture detected 57 (40.7%) isolates as P. aeruginosa. Positive results for both genes which observed only for P. aeruginosa, while only one gene, oprI, was amplified from other fluorescent pseudomonades (n=12) and all other bacterial tested (n=62) were negative by the amplification test. The most effective antibiotics against isolate of P. aeruginosa were cefepime (79%), azetreonam (76%), ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (68%), tobramycin (62%) and amikacin (61%). Multiplex PCR assay appears promising for the rapid and sensitive detection of P. aeruginosa from the burned skin biopsy specimens. Simultaneous amplification of 2 lipoprotein genes: oprI and oprL could detect P. aeruginosa and oprI gene only for other fluorescent pseudomonades. (author)

  13. Structural design of intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J; Modzel, Maciej; Krishnan, Kathiresan

    2018-01-01

    Oxysterols are oxidized derivatives of cholesterol with many important biological functions. Trafficking of oxysterols in and between cells is not well studied, largely due to the lack of appropriate oxysterol analogs. Intrinsically fluorescent oxysterols present a new route towards direct...... observation of intracellular oxysterol trafficking by fluorescence microscopy. We characterize the fluorescence properties of the existing fluorescent 25-hydroxycholesterol analog 25-hydroxycholestatrienol, and propose a new probe with an extended conjugated system. The location of both probes inside...

  14. Plasmonic enhancement of ultraviolet fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaojin

    Plasmonics relates to the interaction between electromagnetic radiation and conduction electrons at metallic interfaces or in metallic nanostructures. Surface plasmons are collective electron oscillations at a metal surface, which can be manipulated by shape, texture and material composition. Plasmonic applications cover a broad spectrum from visible to near infrared, including biosensing, nanolithography, spectroscopy, optoelectronics, photovoltaics and so on. However, there remains a gap in this activity in the ultraviolet (UV, research. Motivating factors in the study of UV Plasmonics are the direct access to biomolecular resonances and native fluorescence, resonant Raman scattering interactions, and the potential for exerting control over photochemical reactions. This dissertation aims to fill in the gap of Plasmonics in the UV with efforts of design, fabrication and characterization of aluminium (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanostructures for the application of label-free bimolecular detection via native UV fluorescence. The first contribution of this dissertation addresses the design of Al nanostructures in the context of UV fluorescence enhancement. A design method that combines analytical analysis with numerical simulation has been developed. Performance of three canonical plasmonic structures---the dipole antenna, bullseye nanoaperture and nanoaperture array---has been compared. The optimal geometrical parameters have been determined. A novel design of a compound bullseye structure has been proposed and numerically analyzed for the purpose of compensating for the large Stokes shift typical of UV fluorescence. Second, UV lifetime modification of diffusing molecules by Al nanoapertures has been experimentally demonstrated for the first time. Lifetime reductions of ~3.5x have been observed for the high quantum yield (QY) laser dye p-terphenyl in a 60 nm diameter aperture with 50 nm undercut. Furthermore, quantum-yield-dependence of lifetime reduction has been

  15. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  16. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy Imaging-Guided Confocal Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Desheng; Kaldaras, Leonora; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-01

    We have developed an integrated spectroscopy system combining total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy imaging with confocal single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy for two-dimensional interfaces. This spectroscopy approach is capable of both multiple molecules simultaneously sampling and in situ confocal fluorescence dynamics analyses of individual molecules of interest. We have demonstrated the calibration with fluorescent microspheres, and carried out single-molecule spectroscop...

  17. Fluorescent scattering by molecules embedded in small particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Studies are reported in these areas: double resonance in fluorescent and Raman scattering; surface enhanced Raman scattering; fluorescence by molecules embedded in small particles; fluorescence by a liquid droplet; and fluorescence by conical pits in surfaces

  18. Fluorescence detection of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A; Vdovin, Yu; Biryukova, T

    2010-01-01

    This work is devoted to the optimization of fluorescence dental calculus diagnostics in optical spectrum. The optimal wavelengths for fluorescence excitation and registration are determined. Two spectral ranges 620 – 645 nm and 340 – 370 nm are the most convenient for supra- and subgingival calculus determination. The simple implementation of differential method free from the necessity of spectrometer using was investigated. Calculus detection reliability in the case of simple implementation is higher than in the case of spectra analysis at optimal wavelengths. The use of modulated excitation light and narrowband detection of informative signal allows us to decrease essentially its diagnostic intensity even in comparison with intensity of the low level laser dental therapy

  19. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  1. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  2. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  3. X-ray fluorescence holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu, Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-03-07

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy.

  4. X-ray fluorescence holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Kouichi; Happo, Naohisa; Hosokawa, Shinya; Hu Wen; Matsushita, Tomohiro

    2012-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method of atomic resolution holography which utilizes fluorescing atoms as a wave source or a monitor of the interference field within a crystal sample. It provides three-dimensional atomic images around a specified element and has a range of up to a few nm in real space. Because of this feature, XFH is expected to be used for medium-range local structural analysis, which cannot be performed by x-ray diffraction or x-ray absorption fine structure analysis. In this article, we explain the theory of XFH including solutions to the twin-image problem, an advanced measuring system, and data processing for the reconstruction of atomic images. Then, we briefly introduce our recent applications of this technique to the analysis of local lattice distortions in mixed crystals and nanometer-size clusters appearing in the low-temperature phase of a shape-memory alloy. (topical review)

  5. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of skin cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Alexandrov, Yuri; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) using two photon microscopy (TPM) have been used to study tissue autofluorescence in ex vivo skin cancer samples. A commercially available system (DermaInspect®) was modified to collect fluorescence intensity and lifetimes in two spectral channels using time correlated single photon counting and depth-resolved steady state measurements of the fluorescence emission spectrum. Uniquely, image segmentation has been used to allow fluorescence lifetimes to be calculated for each cell. An analysis of lifetime values obtained from a range of pigmented and non-pigmented lesions will be presented.

  6. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  7. Electrotransformation and clonal isolation of Rickettsia species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Sean P; Macaluso, Kevin R; Martinez, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    Genetic manipulation of obligate intracellular bacteria of the genus Rickettsia is currently undergoing a rapid period of change. The development of viable genetic tools, including replicative plasmids, transposons, homologous recombination, fluorescent protein-encoding genes, and antibiotic selectable markers has provided the impetus for future research development. This unit is designed to coalesce the basic methods pertaining to creation of genetically modified Rickettsia. The unit describes a series of methods, from inserting exogenous DNA into Rickettsia to the final isolation of genetically modified bacterial clones. Researchers working towards genetic manipulation of Rickettsia or similar obligate intracellular bacteria will find these protocols to be a valuable reference. PMID:26528784

  8. Optimum Shock Isolation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bolotnik, Nikolai

    2001-01-01

    .... Several types of performance criteria for isolation are considered, the most important of which are the peak force transmitted to the body to be isolated and the maximum displacement of the body relative to the base...

  9. Isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonbergen, J.P.W. van; Poolman, R.W.; Kampen, A. van

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The optimal treatment for isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis is unclear at present. We systematically reviewed the highest level of available evidence on the nonoperative and operative treatment of isolated patellofemoral osteoarthritis to develop an evidenced-based

  10. Electron-deficient tripodal amide based receptor: An exclusive turn-on fluorescent and colorimetric chemo sensor for cyanide ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Kumaresan; Jeyasingh, Vanthana; Lakshminarayanan, Sudha; Govindaraj, Tamil Selvan; Paulraj, Mosae Selvakumar; Narayanan, Selvapalam; Piramuthu, Lakshminarayanan

    2018-06-01

    Here in, we have designed, synthesized and isolated sensor L, as an exclusive selective turn-on fluorescent chemo sensor for cyanide ion. The acetonitrile solution contains L with tetrabutyl ammonium cyanide, results sudden color change from colorless to yellowish-brown. Chemosensor L produced a strong fluorescence response with an enhancement of very high fluorescence intensity while addition of CN- ion and the strength of the chemosensor L towards cyanide binding is found to be 3.9813 × 104 M-1. In order to use this sensor in practical application, we also prepared a cassette which is fabricated with sensor L and we succeeded to sense cyanide ion.

  11. A fluorescence-based rapid screening assay for cytotoxic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya, Jessica; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Estrada, Abril; Martinez, Luis E.; Garza, Kristine; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2004-01-01

    A simple fluorescence-based assay was developed for the rapid screening of potential cytotoxic compounds generated by combinatorial chemistry. The assay is based on detection of nuclear green fluorescent protein (GFP) staining of a human cervical cancer cell line (HeLa) carrying an integrated histone H2B-GFP fusion gene. Addition of a cytotoxic compound to the HeLa-GFP cells results in the eventual degradation of DNA and loss of the GFP nuclear fluorescence. Using this assay, we screened 11 distinct quinone derivatives and found that several of these compounds were cytotoxic. These compounds are structurally related to plumbagin an apoptosis-inducing naphthoquinone isolated from Black Walnut. In order to determine the mechanism by which cell death was induced, we performed additional experiments with the most cytotoxic quinones. These compounds were found to induce morphological changes (blebbing and nuclear condensation) consistent with induction of apoptosis. Additional tests revealed that the cytotoxic compounds induce both necrotic and apoptotic modes of death

  12. Single photon counting fluorescence lifetime detection of pericellular oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A; Lee, David A; Knight, Martin M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy offers a non-invasive method for quantifying local oxygen concentrations. However, existing methods are either invasive, require custom-made systems, or show limited spatial resolution. Therefore, these methods are unsuitable for investigation of pericellular oxygen concentrations. This study describes an adaptation of commercially available equipment which has been optimized for quantitative extracellular oxygen detection with high lifetime accuracy and spatial resolution while avoiding systematic photon pile-up. The oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye, tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)ruthenium(II) chloride hexahydrate [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+), was excited using a two-photon excitation laser. Lifetime was measured using a Becker & Hickl time-correlated single photon counting, which will be referred to as a TCSPC card. [Ru(bipy)(3)](2+) characterization studies quantified the influences of temperature, pH, cellular culture media and oxygen on the fluorescence lifetime measurements. This provided a precisely calibrated and accurate system for quantification of pericellular oxygen concentration based on measured lifetimes. Using this technique, quantification of oxygen concentrations around isolated viable chondrocytes, seeded in three-dimensional agarose gel, revealed a subpopulation of cells that exhibited significant spatial oxygen gradients such that oxygen concentration reduced with increasing proximity to the cell. This technique provides a powerful tool for quantifying spatial oxygen gradients within three-dimensional cellular models.

  13. Multidimensional fluorescence microscopy of multiple organelles in Arabidopsis seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The isolation of green fluorescent protein (GFP and the development of spectral variants over the past decade have begun to reveal the dynamic nature of protein trafficking and organelle motility. In planta analyses of this dynamic process have typically been limited to only two organelles or proteins at a time in only a few cell types. Results We generated a transgenic Arabidopsis plant that contains four spectrally different fluorescent proteins. Nuclei, plastids, mitochondria and plasma membranes were genetically tagged with cyan, red, yellow and green fluorescent proteins, respectively. In addition, methods to track nuclei, mitochondria and chloroplasts and quantify the interaction between these organelles at a submicron resolution were developed. These analyzes revealed that N-ethylmaleimide disrupts nuclear-mitochondrial but not nuclear-plastids interactions in root epidermal cells of live Arabidopsis seedlings. Conclusion We developed a tool and associated methods for analyzing the complex dynamic of organelle-organelle interactions in real time in planta. Homozygous transgenic Arabidopsis (Kaleidocell is available through Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center.

  14. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J.; Walters, Jamie D.; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. ► Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. ► Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  15. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  16. Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J.

    2005-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores

  17. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  18. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  19. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M C Volgenant

    Full Text Available Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation. Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  20. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. ► Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. ► Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. ► Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  1. Metal plasmon-coupled fluorescence imaging and label free coenzyme detection in cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jian, E-mail: jian@cfs.bioment.umaryland.edu [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Fu, Yi [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Li, Ge [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Zhao, Richard Y. [Division of Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Microbiology-Immunology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Metal nanoparticle for fluorescence cell imaging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non-invasive emission detection of coenzyme in cell on time-resolved confocal microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Near-field interaction of flavin adenine dinucleotide with silver substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolation of emissions by coenzymes from cellular autofluorescence on fluorescence cell imaging. -- Abstract: Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is a key metabolite in cellular energy conversion. Flavin can also bind with some enzymes in the metabolic pathway and the binding sites may be changed due to the disease progression. Thus, there is interest on studying its expression level, distribution, and redox state within the cells. FAD is naturally fluorescent, but it has a modest extinction coefficient and quantum yield. Hence the intrinsic emission from FAD is generally too weak to be isolated distinctly from the cellular backgrounds in fluorescence cell imaging. In this article, the metal nanostructures on the glass coverslips were used as substrates to measure FAD in cells. Particulate silver films were fabricated with an optical resonance near the absorption and the emission wavelengths of FAD which can lead to efficient coupling interactions. As a result, the emission intensity and quantum yield by FAD were greatly increased and the lifetime was dramatically shortened resulting in less interference from the longer lived cellular background. This feature may overcome the technical limits that hinder the direct observation of intrinsically fluorescent coenzymes in the cells by fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescence cell imaging on the metallic particle substrates may provide a non-invasive strategy for collecting the information of coenzymes in cells.

  2. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  3. Two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy. 2. Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kunihiko; Tahara, Tahei

    2013-10-03

    In the preceding article, we introduced the theoretical framework of two-dimensional fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy (2D FLCS). In this article, we report the experimental implementation of 2D FLCS. In this method, two-dimensional emission-delay correlation maps are constructed from the photon data obtained with the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), and then they are converted to 2D lifetime correlation maps by the inverse Laplace transform. We develop a numerical method to realize reliable transformation, employing the maximum entropy method (MEM). We apply the developed actual 2D FLCS to two real systems, a dye mixture and a DNA hairpin. For the dye mixture, we show that 2D FLCS is experimentally feasible and that it can identify different species in an inhomogeneous sample without any prior knowledge. The application to the DNA hairpin demonstrates that 2D FLCS can disclose microsecond spontaneous dynamics of biological molecules in a visually comprehensible manner, through identifying species as unique lifetime distributions. A FRET pair is attached to the both ends of the DNA hairpin, and the different structures of the DNA hairpin are distinguished as different fluorescence lifetimes in 2D FLCS. By constructing the 2D correlation maps of the fluorescence lifetime of the FRET donor, the equilibrium dynamics between the open and the closed forms of the DNA hairpin is clearly observed as the appearance of the cross peaks between the corresponding fluorescence lifetimes. This equilibrium dynamics of the DNA hairpin is clearly separated from the acceptor-missing DNA that appears as an isolated diagonal peak in the 2D maps. The present study clearly shows that newly developed 2D FLCS can disclose spontaneous structural dynamics of biological molecules with microsecond time resolution.

  4. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of the unidentified organic matter fraction in fogwater using fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsaraj, K.; Birdwell, J.

    2010-07-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in fogwaters from southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that fluorescence spectroscopy can be used to obtain a qualitative assessment of the large fraction of fogwater organic carbon (~40 - 80% by weight) that cannot be identified in terms of specific chemical compounds. The method has the principle advantage that it can be applied at natural abundance concentrations, thus eliminating the need for large sample volumes required to isolate DOM for characterization by other spectroscopic (NMR, FTIR) and chemical (elemental) analyses. It was anticipated that the fogwater organic matter fluorescence spectra would resemble those of surface and rain waters, containing peaks indicative of both humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices had values comparable to other natural waters. Biological character (intensity of tyrosine and tryptophan peaks) was found to increase with organic carbon concentration. Fogwater organic matter appears to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived material. The fluorescence results show that most of the unidentified fogwater organic carbon can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems.

  6. Detection of Counterfeit Tequila by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel de la Rosa Vázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultraviolet (UV light induced fluorescence study to discriminate fake tequila from genuine ones is presented. A portable homemade system based on four light emitting diodes (LEDs from 255 to 405 nm and a miniature spectrometer was used. It has been shown that unlike fake and silver tequila, which produce weak fluorescence signal, genuine mixed, rested, and aged tequilas show high fluorescence emission in the range from 400 to 750 nm. The fluorescence intensity grows with aging in 100% agave tequila. Such fluorescence differences can even be observed with naked eyes. The presented results demonstrate that the fluorescence measurement could be a good method to detect counterfeit tequila.

  7. Confocal fluorescence techniques in industrial application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggeling, Christian; Gall, Karsten; Palo, Kaupo; Kask, Peet; Brand, Leif

    2003-06-01

    The FCS+plus family of evaluation tools for confocal fluorescence spectroscopy, which was developed during recent years, offers a comprehensive view to a series of fluorescence properties. Originating in fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and using similar experimental equipment, a system of signal processing methods such as fluorescence intensity distribution analysis (FIDA) was created to analyze in detail the fluctuation behavior of fluorescent particles within a small area of detection. Giving simultaneous access to molecular parameters like concentration, translational and rotational diffusion, molecular brightness, and multicolor coincidence, this portfolio was enhanced by more traditional techniques of fluorescence lifetime as well as time-resolved anisotropy determination. The cornerstones of the FCS+plus methodology will be shortly described. The inhibition of a phosphatase enzyme activity gives a comprehensive industrial application that demonstrates FCS+plus' versatility and its potential for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  8. Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), part A

    CERN Document Server

    Tetin, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This new volume of Methods in Enzymology continues the legacy of this premier serial by containing quality chapters authored by leaders in the field. This volume covers Fluorescence Fluctuation SpectroscopyContains chapters on such topics as Time-integrated fluorescence cumulant analysis, Pulsed Interleaved Excitation, and raster image correlation spectroscopy and number and brightness analysis.Continues the legacy of this premier serial with quality chapters authored by leaders in the fieldCovers fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopyContains chapte

  9. Aorta Fluorescence Imaging by Using Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chun-Yang; Tsai, Jui-che; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The activated leukocyte attacked the vascular endothelium and the associated increase in VEcadherin number was observed in experiments. The confocal microscopic system with a prism-based wavelength filter was used for multiwavelength fluorescence measurement. Multiwavelength fluorescence imaging based on the VEcadherin within the aorta segment of a rat was achieved. The confocal microscopic system capable of fluorescence detection of cardiovascular tissue is a useful tool for measuring the bi...

  10. Integrated Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Kim, Chulhong; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality imaging system by integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and fluorescence confocal microscopy to provide optical absorption and fluorescence contrasts simultaneously. By sharing the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence images are acquired in a single scan. The micrometer resolution allows imaging of both blood and lymphatic vessels down to the capillary level. Simultaneous photoacoustic...

  11. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  12. Role of mungbean root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas and rhizobia in suppressing the root rotting fungi and root knot nematodes in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noreen, R.; Shafique, A.; Haque, S.E.; Ali, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Three isolates each of fluorescent Pseudomonas (NAFP-19, NAFP-31 and NAFP-32) and rhizobia (NFB- 103, NFB-107 and NFB-109) which were originally isolated from root nodules of mungbean (Vigna radiata) showed significant biocontrol activity in the screen house and under field condition, against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani evaluated on chickpea. Biocontrol potential of these isolates was also evaluated against Meloidogyne incognita, the root knot nematode. Application of Pseudomonas and rhizobial isolates as a soil drench, separately or mixed significantly reduced root rot disease under screen house and field conditions. Nematode penetration in roots was also found significantly less in rhizobia or Pseudomonas treatments used separately or mixed as compared to control. Fluorescent Pseudomonas treated plants produced greater number of nodules per plant than control plants and about equal to rhizobia treated plants, indicating that root nodule associated fluorescent Pseudomonas enhance root nodulation. (author)

  13. Radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cechak, T.

    1994-01-01

    The author's achievements in the title field are summarized and discussed. The following topics are dealt with: (i) principles of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis; (ii) mathematical methods in X-ray fluorescence analysis; (iii) Ross differential filters; (iv) application of radionuclide X-ray fluorescence analysis in the coal industry (with emphasis on the determination of the ash content, sulfur content, and arsenic content of coal); and (v) evaluation of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer from the radiological safety point of view. (P.A.)

  14. Laser induced fluorescence of some plant leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmi, M.S.; Mohamed, M.M.; Amer, R.; Elshazly, O.; Elraey, M.

    1992-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is successfully used as a technique for remote detection of spectral characteristics of some plants. A pulsed nitrogen laser at 337.1 nm is used to excite cotton, corn and rice leaves. The fluorescence spectrum is detected in the range from 340 nm to 820 nm. It is found that, these plant leaves have common fluorescence maxima at 440 nm, 685 nm and 740 nm. plant leaves are also found to be identifiable by the ratio of the fluorescence intensity at 440 nm to that at 685 nm. The present technique can be further used as a means of assessing, remotely, plant stresses. 5 fig

  15. Measuring fluorescence polarization with a dichrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John C

    2017-09-01

    A method for obtaining fluorescence polarization data from an instrument designed to measure circular and linear dichroism is compared with a previously reported approach. The new method places a polarizer between the sample and a detector mounted perpendicular to the direction of the incident beam and results in determination of the fluorescence polarization ratio, whereas the previous method does not use a polarizer and yields the fluorescence anisotropy. A similar analysis with the detector located axially with the excitation beam demonstrates that there is no frequency modulated signal due to fluorescence polarization in the absence of a polarizer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Exciton-controlled fluorescence: application to hybridization-sensitive fluorescent DNA probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Akimitsu; Ikeda, Shuji; Kubota, Takeshi; Yuki, Mizue; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    A hybridization-sensitive fluorescent probe has been designed for nucleic acid detection, using the concept of fluorescence quenching caused by the intramolecular excitonic interaction of fluorescence dyes. We synthesized a doubly thiazole orange-labeled nucleotide showing high fluorescence intensity for a hybrid with the target nucleic acid and effective quenching for the single-stranded state. This exciton-controlled fluorescent probe was applied to living HeLa cells using microinjection to visualize intracellular mRNA localization. Immediately after injection of the probe into the cell, fluorescence was observed from the probe hybridizing with the target RNA. This fluorescence rapidly decreased upon addition of a competitor DNA. Multicoloring of this probe resulted in the simple simultaneous detection of plural target nucleic acid sequences. This probe realized a large, rapid, reversible change in fluorescence intensity in sensitive response to the amount of target nucleic acid, and facilitated spatiotemporal monitoring of the behavior of intracellular RNA.

  17. Time variation of fluorescence lifetime in enhanced cyan fluorescence protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soonhyouk; Kim, Soo Yong; Park, Kyoungsook; Jeong, Jinyoung; Chung, Bong Hyun; Kim, Sok Won

    2010-01-01

    The lifetime variations of enhanced cyan fluorescence protein (ECFP) in relatively short integration time bins were studied via time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurement. We observed that minimum photon counts are necessary for the lifetime estimation to achieve a certain range of variance. The conditions to decrease the variance of lifetime were investigated and the channel width of the measurement of TCSPC data was found to be another important factor for the variance of lifetime. Though the lifetime of ECFP is best fit by a double exponential, a mono exponential fit for the same integration time is more stable. The results may be useful in the analysis of photophysical dynamics for ensemble molecules in short measurement time windows.

  18. Mutation and premating isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  19. Physics in isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    In late May, about 330 physicists made their way up to isolated and beautiful Lake Louise high in the Canadian Rockies about 100 miles west of Calgary in a second effort to increase interactions between particle and nuclear physicists. The conference series aims to foster exciting and diverse physics by bringing the different physicists together somewhere which is so isolated that they must interact with each other. The formula worked very well and isolated Lake Louise was a huge success

  20. Physics in isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-09-15

    In late May, about 330 physicists made their way up to isolated and beautiful Lake Louise high in the Canadian Rockies about 100 miles west of Calgary in a second effort to increase interactions between particle and nuclear physicists. The conference series aims to foster exciting and diverse physics by bringing the different physicists together somewhere which is so isolated that they must interact with each other. The formula worked very well and isolated Lake Louise was a huge success.

  1. Reporter-Based Isolation of Developmental Myogenic Progenitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyemen Kheir

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and activity of mammalian tissues entail finely regulated processes, involving the concerted organization and interaction of multiple cell types. In recent years the prospective isolation of distinct progenitor and stem cell populations has become a powerful tool in the hands of developmental biologists and has rendered the investigation of their intrinsic properties possible. In this protocol, we describe how to purify progenitors with different lineage history and degree of differentiation from embryonic and fetal skeletal muscle by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. The approach takes advantage of a panel of murine strains expressing fluorescent reporter genes specifically in the myogenic progenitors. We provide a detailed description of the dissection procedures and of the enzymatic dissociation required to maximize the yield of mononucleated cells for subsequent FACS-based purification. The procedure takes ~6–7 h to complete and allows for the isolation and the subsequent molecular and phenotypic characterization of developmental myogenic progenitors.

  2. Molecules for Fluorescence Detection of Specific Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedor, Steve

    2008-01-01

    A family of fluorescent dye molecules has been developed for use in on-off fluorescence detection of specific chemicals. By themselves, these molecules do not fluoresce. However, when exposed to certain chemical analytes in liquid or vapor forms, they do fluoresce (see figure). These compounds are amenable to fixation on or in a variety of substrates for use in fluorescence-based detection devices: they can be chemically modified to anchor them to porous or non-porous solid supports or can be incorporated into polymer films. Potential applications for these compounds include detection of chemical warfare agents, sensing of acidity or alkalinity, and fluorescent tagging of proteins in pharmaceutical research and development. These molecules could also be exploited for use as two-photon materials for photodynamic therapy in the treatment of certain cancers and other diseases. A molecule in this family consists of a fluorescent core (such as an anthracene or pyrene) attached to two end groups that, when the dye is excited by absorption of light, transfer an electron to the core, thereby quenching the fluorescence. The end groups can be engineered so that they react chemically with certain analytes. Upon reaction, electrons on the end groups are no longer available for transfer to the core and, consequently, the fluorescence from the core is no longer quenched. The chemoselectivity of these molecules can be changed by changing the end groups. For example, aniline end groups afford a capability for sensing acids or acid halides (including those contained in chemical warfare agents). Pyridine or bipyridyl end groups would enable sensing of metal ions. Other chemicals that can be selectively detected through suitable choice of end groups include glucose and proteins. Moreover, the fluorescent cores can be changed to alter light-absorption and -emission characteristics: anthracene cores fluoresce at wavelengths around 500 nm, whereas perylene cores absorb and emit at

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy for medical and environmental diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Jonas.

    1993-09-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy can be used for diagnostics in medical and environmental applications. The many aspects of fluorescence emission are utilized to enhance the accuracy of the diagnosis. A fluorescence detection system, based on nitrogen laser or dye laser excitation and optical multichannel detection, was constructed, and fluorescence spectra from human malignant tumours of various origins, were recorded. Tumour demarcation was observed using exogenous chromophores, as well as the endogenous tissue fluorescence. In particular, δ-amino levulinic acid was found to provide very good tumour demarcation. A multi-colour imaging system capable of simultaneous recording of four fluorescence images at selected wavelengths, was developed. Examples of processed images, based on the four sub-images, are shown for malignant tumours. In addition, data from photodynamic treatment of human malignant tumours are presented. Autofluorescence spectra from excised pieces of human atherosclerotic aorta and atherosclerotic coronary segment were found to be different from those of non-diseased vessels. Furthermore, fluorescence decay curves from atherosclerotic samples were found to differ from those of non-diseased samples. It is concluded that both spectral and temporal information should be utilized to enhance the demarcation. Methods for obtaining fluorescence data free from interference from blood, with applications to in vivo laser angioplasty of atherosclerosis, are discussed. The optical multichannel system and the multi-colour imaging system were integrated with a remote sensing system, originally used for environmental measurements, to obtain fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence images of plants at a distance of up to 100 m. The fluorescence data from plants subject to environmental stress or senescent plants were found to differ from those obtained from healthy vegetation. 359 refs

  4. Standard practice for fluorescent liquid penetrant testing using the Solvent-Removable process

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for fluorescent penetrant examination utilizing the solvent-removable process. It is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface, such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics and certain nonporous plastics and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a fluorescent penetrant examination solvent-removable process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the fluorescent solvent-removable liquid penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreement by th...

  5. Standard practice for fluorescent liquid penetrant testing using the hydrophilic Post-Emulsification process

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for fluorescent penetrant examination utilizing the hydrophilic post-emulsification process. It is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks, or lack of fusion and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics and certain nonporous plastics and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a fluorescent penetrant examination hydrophilic post-emulsification process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain their applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the fluorescent penetrant examination of materials and parts using the hy...

  6. Metal Enhanced Fluorescence on Super-Hydrophobic Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Battista, Edmondo; Coluccio, Maria Laura; Alabastri, Alessandro; Barberio, Marianna; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo Antonio; Di Fabrizio, Enzo M.; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We used optical lithography, electroless deposition and deep reactive ion etching techniques to realize arrays of super-hydrophobic gold nanoparticles arranged in a hierarchical structure. At the micro-scale, silicon-micro pillars in the chip permit to manipulate and concentrate biological solutions, at the nano-scale, gold nanoparticles enable metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effects, whereby fluorescence signal of fluorophores in close proximity to a rough metal surface is amplified by orders of magnitude. Here, we demonstrated the device in the analysis of fluorescein derived gold-binding peptides (GBP-FITC). While super-hydrophobic schemes and MEF effects have been heretofore used in isolation, their integration in a platform may advance the current state of fluorescence-based sensing technology in medical diagnostics and biotechnology. This scheme may be employed in protein microarrays where the increased sensitivity of the device may enable the early detection of cancer biomarkers or other proteins of biomedical interest.

  7. Standard practice for fluorescent liquid penetrant testing using the Water-Washable process

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for water-washable fluorescent penetrant examination of materials. It is a nondestructive testing method for detecting discontinuities that are open to the surface such as cracks, seams, laps, cold shuts, laminations, isolated porosity, through leaks, or lack of porosity and is applicable to in-process, final, and maintenance examination. It can be effectively used in the examination of nonporous, metallic materials, both ferrous and nonferrous, and of nonmetallic materials such as glazed or fully densified ceramics and certain nonporous plastics and glass. 1.2 This practice also provides a reference: 1.2.1 By which a fluorescent penetrant examination method using the water-washable process recommended or required by individual organizations can be reviewed to ascertain its applicability and completeness. 1.2.2 For use in the preparation of process specifications dealing with the water-washable fluorescent penetrant examination of materials and parts. Agreement by the purch...

  8. Metal Enhanced Fluorescence on Super-Hydrophobic Clusters of Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Battista, Edmondo

    2016-12-15

    We used optical lithography, electroless deposition and deep reactive ion etching techniques to realize arrays of super-hydrophobic gold nanoparticles arranged in a hierarchical structure. At the micro-scale, silicon-micro pillars in the chip permit to manipulate and concentrate biological solutions, at the nano-scale, gold nanoparticles enable metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF) effects, whereby fluorescence signal of fluorophores in close proximity to a rough metal surface is amplified by orders of magnitude. Here, we demonstrated the device in the analysis of fluorescein derived gold-binding peptides (GBP-FITC). While super-hydrophobic schemes and MEF effects have been heretofore used in isolation, their integration in a platform may advance the current state of fluorescence-based sensing technology in medical diagnostics and biotechnology. This scheme may be employed in protein microarrays where the increased sensitivity of the device may enable the early detection of cancer biomarkers or other proteins of biomedical interest.

  9. Single-cell-based evaluation of sperm progressive motility via fluorescent assessment of mitochondria membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatelli, Natalina; Spagnolo, Barbara; Pisanello, Marco; Lemma, Enrico Domenico; De Vittorio, Massimo; Zara, Vincenzo; Pisanello, Ferruccio; Ferramosca, Alessandra

    2017-12-20

    Sperm cells progressive motility is the most important parameter involved in the fertilization process. Sperm middle piece contains mitochondria, which play a critical role in energy production and whose proper operation ensures the reproductive success. Notably, sperm progressive motility is strictly related to mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and consequently to mitochondrial functionality. Although previous studies presented an evaluation of mitochondrial function through MMP assessment in entire sperm cells samples, a quantitative approach at single-cell level could provide more insights in the analysis of semen quality. Here we combine laser scanning confocal microscopy and functional fluorescent staining of mitochondrial membrane to assess MMP distribution among isolated spermatozoa. We found that the sperm fluorescence value increases as a function of growing progressive motility and that such fluorescence is influenced by MMP disruptors, potentially allowing for the discrimination of different quality classes of sperm cells in heterogeneous populations.

  10. Significance of isolated reactive treponemal chemiluminescence immunoassay results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Michael G; Robertson, Peter W; Post, Jeffrey J

    2013-05-01

    Isolated reactive serum treponemal chemiluminescence immunoassay (CIA) specimens cause clinical uncertainty. Sera were screened by CIA, and reactive samples underwent reflex testing with rapid plasma reagin (RPR), Treponema pallidum particle agglutination (TPPA), and fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption (FTA Abs) assays. Samples reactive only on the CIA were deemed "isolated" reactive CIA samples. We undertook detailed review of a subset of subjects with isolated reactive CIA specimens. Of 28 261 specimens, 1171 (4.1%) were reactive on CIA, of which 133 (11.3%) had isolated CIA reactivity. Most subjects (66 of 82 [80.5%]) with isolated reactive CIA specimens were from high-prevalence populations. We found evidence of CIA, TPPA, and FTA Abs seroreversion. The median chemiluminescent signal-to-cutoff ratio was similar for isolated reactive CIA sera and sera that were reactive on either FTA Abs or TPPA assays (2.19 vs 2.32; P = .15) but lower than for sera reactive on both FTA Abs and TPPA assays (12.37; P < .001) or for sera reactive on RPR assays (25.53; P < .001). A total of 11 of 20 patients (55%) with an isolated reactive CIA specimen who underwent medical record review had previous or subsequent evidence of syphilis infection. Isolated reactive CIA specimens may represent true T. pallidum infection and may be found after seroreversion of traditional treponemal assays.

  11. ULTRAFINE FLUORESCENT DIAMONDS IN NANOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanyuk M. I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to summarize the literature data concerning ultrafine diamonds, namely their industrial production, as well as considerable photostability and biocompatibility that promote their use in modern visualization techniques. It is shown that due to the unique physical properties, they are promising materials for using in nanotechnology in the near future. Possibility of diverse surface modification, small size and large absorption surface are the basis for their use in different approaches for drug and gene delivery into a cell. The changes in the properties of nanodiamond surface modification methods of their creation, stabilization and applications are described. It can be said that fluorescent surface-modified nanodiamonds are a promising target in various research methods that would be widely used for labeling of living cells, as well as in the processes of genes and drugs delivery into a cell.

  12. Rapid Isolation and Detection for RNA Biomarkers for TBI Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    isolation of glioblastoma exosomes from 50 µL of un-diluted plasma in fifteen to twenty minutes. We also showed tri- color fluorescent detection of the...serious short-term implications, but also may progress to chronic and debilitating long-term physiological and psychological problems for soldiers and...major impact on the patient’s long-term psychological health. This has significant negative effects on family members and is costly to society in

  13. Bridging fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    Development of new fluorescent probes and fluorescence microscopes has led to new ways to study cell biology. With the emergence of specialized microscopy units at most universities and research centers, the use of these techniques is well within reach for a broad research community. A major

  14. Enhanced localized fluorescence in plasmonic nanoantennae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R.M.; Yuan, H.-K.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    in fluorescence that reaches 100 times enhancement. Near-field excitation shows enhanced fluorescence from a single nanoantenna localized in a subwavelength area of similar to 0.15 mu m(2). The polarization of enhanced emission is along the main antenna axis. These observed experimental results are important...

  15. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  16. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Walters, Jamie D; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H

    2012-11-02

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Xanthines Studied via Femtosecond Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Changenet-Barret

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Xanthines represent a wide class of compounds closely related to the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Ubiquitous in the human body, they are capable of replacing natural bases in double helices and give rise to four-stranded structures. Although the use of their fluorescence for analytical purposes was proposed, their fluorescence properties have not been properly characterized so far. The present paper reports the first fluorescence study of xanthine solutions relying on femtosecond spectroscopy. Initially, we focus on 3-methylxanthine, showing that this compound exhibits non-exponential fluorescence decays with no significant dependence on the emission wavelength. The fluorescence quantum yield (3 × 10−4 and average decay time (0.9 ps are slightly larger than those found for the DNA bases. Subsequently, we compare the dynamical fluorescence properties of seven mono-, di- and tri-methylated derivatives. Both the fluorescence decays and fluorescence anisotropies vary only weakly with the site and the degree of methylation. These findings are in line with theoretical predictions suggesting the involvement of several conical intersections in the relaxation of the lowest singlet excited state.

  18. Absorbance and fluorescence studies on porphyrin Nanostructures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work was to study some photophysical properties of PNR for application as light harvester in dye sensitized solar cells. These properties included absorbance, fluorescence, and fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime. The results of Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) images showed the formation of ...

  19. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  20. Peptide-stabilized, fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon; Vosch, Tom André Jos; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Few-atom silver nanoclusters (AgNCs) can exhibit strong fluorescence; however, they require ligands to prevent aggregation into larger nanoparticles. Fluorescent AgNCs in biopolymer scaffolds have so far mainly been synthesized in solution, and peptides have only found limited use compared to DNA...

  1. Red and green fluorescence from oral biofilms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, C.M.C.; Hoogenkamp, M.A.; Krom, B.P.; Janus, M.M.; ten Cate, J.M.; de Soet, J.J.; Crielaard, W.; van der Veen, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Elson, Daniel S [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hares, Jonathan D [Kentech Instruments Ltd, Unit 9, Hall Farm Workshops, South Moreton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 9AG (United Kingdom)], E-mail: gordon.kennedy@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-05-07

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM.

  3. A sensitive fluorescent sensor of lanthanide ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bekiari, V; Lianos, P

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescent probe bearing a diazostilbene chromophore and a benzo-15-crown-5 ether moiety is a very efficient sensor of lanthanide ions. The ligand emits strong fluorescence only in the presence of specific ions, namely lanthanide ions, while the emission wavelength is associated with a particular ion providing high sensitivity and resolution.

  4. Fluorescent metal nanoshell and CK19 detection on single cell image

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jian; Fu, Yi; Li, Ge; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Novel metal nanoshell as fluorescence imaging agent. → Fluorescent mAb-metal complex with enhanced intensity and shortened lifetime. → Immuno-interactions of mAb-metal complexes with CK19 molecules on CNCAP and HeLa cell surfaces. → Isolation of conjugated mAb-metal complexes from cellular autofluorescence on cell image. -- Abstract: In this article, we report the synthesis strategy and optical properties of a novel type of fluorescence metal nanoshell when it was used as imaging agent for fluorescence cell imaging. The metal nanoshells were made with 40 nm silica cores and 10 nm silver shells. Unlike typical fluorescence metal nanoshells which contain the organic dyes in the cores, novel metal nanoshells were composed of Cy5-labelled monoclonal anti-CK19 antibodies (mAbs) on the external surfaces of shells. Optical measurements to the single nanoparticles showed that in comparison with the metal free labelled mAbs, the mAb-Ag complexes displayed significantly enhanced emission intensity and dramatically shortened lifetime due to near-field interactions of fluorophores with metal. These metal nanoshells were found to be able to immunoreact with target cytokeratin 19 (CK19) molecules on the surfaces of LNCAP and HeLa cells. Fluorescence cell images were recorded on a time-resolved confocal microscope. The emissions from the metal nanoprobes could be clearly isolated from the cellular autofluorescence backgrounds on the cell images as either individuals or small clusters due to their stronger emission intensities and shorter lifetimes. These emission signals could also be precisely counted on single cell images. The count number may provide an approach for quantifying the target molecules in the cells.

  5. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  6. Ultrafast proton shuttling in Psammocora cyan fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennis, John T M; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Peterson, Dayna S; Pandit, Anjali; Wachter, Rebekka M

    2013-09-26

    Cyan, green, yellow, and red fluorescent proteins (FPs) homologous to green fluorescent protein (GFP) are used extensively as model systems to study fundamental processes in photobiology, such as the capture of light energy by protein-embedded chromophores, color tuning by the protein matrix, energy conversion by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), and excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) reactions. Recently, a novel cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) termed psamFP488 was isolated from the genus Psammocora of reef building corals. Within the cyan color class, psamFP488 is unusual because it exhibits a significantly extended Stokes shift. Here, we applied ultrafast transient absorption and pump-dump-probe spectroscopy to investigate the mechanistic basis of psamFP488 fluorescence, complemented with fluorescence quantum yield and dynamic light scattering measurements. Transient absorption spectroscopy indicated that, upon excitation at 410 nm, the stimulated cyan emission rises in 170 fs. With pump-dump-probe spectroscopy, we observe a very short-lived (110 fs) ground-state intermediate that we assign to the deprotonated, anionic chromophore. In addition, a minor fraction (14%) decays with 3.5 ps to the ground state. Structural analysis of homologous proteins indicates that Glu-167 is likely positioned in sufficiently close vicinity to the chromophore to act as a proton acceptor. Our findings support a model where unusually fast ESPT from the neutral chromophore to Glu-167 with a time constant of 170 fs and resulting emission from the anionic chromophore forms the basis of the large psamFP488 Stokes shift. When dumped to the ground state, the proton on neutral Glu is very rapidly shuttled back to the anionic chromophore in 110 fs. Proton shuttling in excited and ground states is a factor of 20-4000 faster than in GFP, which probably results from a favorable hydrogen-bonding geometry between the chromophore phenolic oxygen and the glutamate acceptor, possibly

  7. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Apra, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  8. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  9. Multispectral system for medical fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.S.; Montan, S.; Svanberg, S.

    1987-01-01

    The principles of a powerful multicolor imaging system for tissue fluorescence diagnostics are discussed. Four individually spectrally filtered images are formed on a matrix detector by means of a split-mirror arrangement. The four images are processed in a computer, pixel by pixel, by means of mathematical operations, leading to an optimized contrast image, which enhances a selected feature. The system is being developed primarily for medical fluorescence imaging, but has wide applications in fluorescence, reflectance, and transmission monitoring related to a wide range of industrial and environmental problems. The system operation is described for the case of linear imaging on a diode array detector. Laser-induced fluorescence is used for cancer tumor and arteriosclerotic plaque demarcation using the contrast enhancement capabilities of this imaging system. Further examples of applications include fluorescing minerals and flames

  10. Holograms preparation using commercial fluorescent benzyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorantes-GarcIa, V; Olivares-Perez, A; Ordonez-Padilla, M J; Mejias-Brizuela, N Y, E-mail: valdoga@Hotmail.com, E-mail: olivares@inaoep.mx [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Coordinacion de Optica, Calle Luis Enrique Erro N0 1, Santa Maria Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    We have been able to make holograms with substances such as fluorescence thought of light blue laser to make transmissions holograms, using ammonium dichromate as photo-sensitizer and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as matrix. Ammonium dichromate inhibit the fluorescence properties of inks, both mixed in a (PVA) matrix, but we avoid this chemical reaction and we show the results to use the method of painting hologram with fluorescents ink and we describe how the diffraction efficiency parameter changes as a function of the ink absorbed by the emulsion recorded with the gratings, we got good results, making holographic gratings with a blue light from laser diode 470 nm. And we later were painting with fluorescent ink, integrating fluorescence characteristics to the hologram.

  11. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  12. Characterization of the alterations of the chlorophyll a fluorescence induction curve after addition of Photosystem II inhibiting herbicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiraki, M.; Rensen, van J.J.S.; Vredenberg, W.J.; Wakabayashi, K.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of Photosystem II inhibiting herbicides, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (diuron), atrazine and two novel 2-benzylamino-1,3,5-triazine compounds, on photosynthetic oxygen evolution and chlorophyll a fluorescence induction were measured in thylakoids isolated from Chenopodium

  13. Fluorescent Probes and Fluorescence (Microscopy Techniques — Illuminating Biological and Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor P. C. Drummen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  14. Dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy: fluorescence axial imaging without axial scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Kim, Young-Duk; Gweon, Dae-Gab; Yoo, Hongki

    2013-07-29

    We propose a new method for high-speed, three-dimensional (3-D) fluorescence imaging, which we refer to as dual-detection confocal fluorescence microscopy (DDCFM). In contrast to conventional beam-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy, where the focal spot must be scanned either optically or mechanically over a sample volume to reconstruct a 3-D image, DDCFM can obtain the depth of a fluorescent emitter without depth scanning. DDCFM comprises two photodetectors, each with a pinhole of different size, in the confocal detection system. Axial information on fluorescent emitters can be measured by the axial response curve through the ratio of intensity signals. DDCFM can rapidly acquire a 3-D fluorescent image from a single two-dimensional scan with less phototoxicity and photobleaching than confocal fluorescence microscopy because no mechanical depth scans are needed. We demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed method by phantom studies.

  15. Binding Assays Using Recombinant SH2 Domains: Far-Western, Pull-Down, and Fluorescence Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, Kazuya; Liu, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Recognition of phosphotyrosine-containing sequences by SH2 domains confers specificity in tyrosine kinase pathways. By assessing interactions between isolated SH2 domains and their binding proteins, it is possible to gain insight into otherwise inaccessible complex cellular systems. Far-Western, pull-down, and fluorescence polarization (FP) have been frequently used for characterization of phosphotyrosine signaling. Here, we outline standard protocols for these established assays using recombinant SH2 domain, emphasizing the importance of appropriate sample preparation and assay controls.

  16. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae osteomyelitis in pigs demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tim Kåre; Boye, Mette; Hagedorn-Olsen, T.

    1999-01-01

    Necrotizing osteomyelitis and fibrinopurulent arthritis with isolation of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 2 is reported in two pigs from a herd with lameness and mild coughing problems among 8 to 12-week-old pigs. Application of fluorescent in situ hybridization targeting 16S ribosomal R......, in joints with arthritis, and in bone necroses including lysis of growth plate and suppurative inflammation in the adjacent trabecular metaphysis, thus demonstrating that well-known infections manifest new, unusual lesions....

  17. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, van B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these

  18. Fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainz, B.

    2010-01-01

    This work describes the construction and characterisation of fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins used as building blocks for the fabrication of nanostructured monomolecular biocoatings on silica particles with defined fluorescence properties. The S-layer protein SgsE of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a was fused with the pH-dependant cyan, green and yellow variant of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins, acting as scaffold and optical sensing element simultaneously, were able to reassemble in solution and on silica particles forming 2D nanostructures with p2 lattice symmetry (a=11 ±0.5 nm, b=14 ±0.4 nm, g=80 ±1 o ). The pH-dependant fluorescence behaviour was studied with fluorimetry, confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. These fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins can be used as pH-sensor. 50% of the fluorescence intensity decreases at their calculated pKa values (pH6 - pH5). The fluorescence intensity of the GFP variants vanished completely between pH4 and pH3 whereas the chromophore of the red protein mRFP1 was only slightly affected in acidic conditions. At the isoelectric point of the S-layer coated silica particles (pH4.6 ±0.2) an increase in particle aggregation was detected by flow cytometry. The cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins were chosen to create a bi-fluorescent S-layer tandem fusion protein with the possibility for resonance energy transfer (FRET). A transfer efficiency of 20% and a molecular distance between the donor (ECFP) and acceptor (YFP) chromophores of around 6.2 nm could be shown. This bi-fluorescent ECFP-SgsE-YFP tandem fusion protein was able to reassemble on solid surfaces. The remarkable combination of fluorescence and self-assembly and the design of bi-functional S-layer tandem fusion protein matrices makes them to a promising tool in nanobiotechnology. (author) [de

  19. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  20. Comparison of LED and Conventional Fluorescence Microscopy for Detection of Acid Fast Bacilli in a Low-Incidence Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Jessica; Pai, Madhukar; Ramsay, Andrew; Menzies, Dick; Greenaway, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Light emitting diode fluorescence microscopes have many practical advantages over conventional mercury vapour fluorescence microscopes, which would make them the preferred choice for laboratories in both low- and high-resource settings, provided performance is equivalent. Methods In a nested case-control study, we compared diagnostic accuracy and time required to read slides with the Zeiss PrimoStar iLED, LW Scientific Lumin, and a conventional fluorescence microscope (Leica DMLS). Mycobacterial culture was used as the reference standard, and subgroup analysis by specimen source and organism isolated were performed. Results There was no difference in sensitivity or specificity between the three microscopes, and agreement was high for all comparisons and subgroups. The Lumin and the conventional fluorescence microscope were equivalent with respect to time required to read smears, but the Zeiss iLED was significantly time saving compared to both. Conclusions Light emitting diode microscopy should be considered by all tuberculosis diagnostic laboratories, including those in high income countries, as a replacement for conventional fluorescence microscopes. Our findings provide support to the recent World Health Organization policy recommending that conventional fluorescence microscopy be replaced by light emitting diode microscopy using auramine staining in all settings where fluorescence microscopy is currently used. PMID:21811622

  1. Comparison of LED and conventional fluorescence microscopy for detection of acid fast bacilli in a low-incidence setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Minion

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Light emitting diode fluorescence microscopes have many practical advantages over conventional mercury vapour fluorescence microscopes, which would make them the preferred choice for laboratories in both low- and high-resource settings, provided performance is equivalent. METHODS: In a nested case-control study, we compared diagnostic accuracy and time required to read slides with the Zeiss PrimoStar iLED, LW Scientific Lumin, and a conventional fluorescence microscope (Leica DMLS. Mycobacterial culture was used as the reference standard, and subgroup analysis by specimen source and organism isolated were performed. RESULTS: There was no difference in sensitivity or specificity between the three microscopes, and agreement was high for all comparisons and subgroups. The Lumin and the conventional fluorescence microscope were equivalent with respect to time required to read smears, but the Zeiss iLED was significantly time saving compared to both. CONCLUSIONS: Light emitting diode microscopy should be considered by all tuberculosis diagnostic laboratories, including those in high income countries, as a replacement for conventional fluorescence microscopes. Our findings provide support to the recent World Health Organization policy recommending that conventional fluorescence microscopy be replaced by light emitting diode microscopy using auramine staining in all settings where fluorescence microscopy is currently used.

  2. A green fluorescent protein with photoswitchable emission from the deep sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Vogt

    Full Text Available A colorful variety of fluorescent proteins (FPs from marine invertebrates are utilized as genetically encoded markers for live cell imaging. The increased demand for advanced imaging techniques drives a continuous search for FPs with new and improved properties. Many useful FPs have been isolated from species adapted to sun-flooded habitats such as tropical coral reefs. It has yet remained unknown if species expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP-like proteins also exist in the darkness of the deep sea. Using a submarine-based and -operated fluorescence detection system in the Gulf of Mexico, we discovered ceriantharians emitting bright green fluorescence in depths between 500 and 600 m and identified a GFP, named cerFP505, with bright fluorescence emission peaking at 505 nm. Spectroscopic studies showed that approximately 15% of the protein bulk feature reversible ON/OFF photoswitching that can be induced by alternating irradiation with blue und near-UV light. Despite being derived from an animal adapted to essentially complete darkness and low temperatures, cerFP505 maturation in living mammalian cells at 37 degrees C, its brightness and photostability are comparable to those of EGFP and cmFP512 from shallow water species. Therefore, our findings disclose the deep sea as a potential source of GFP-like molecular marker proteins.

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF SOIL HUMIC SUBSTANCES BY ULTRAVIOLET-VISIBLE AND SYNCHRONOUS FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADĚŽDA FASUROVÁ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We focused our study on ultraviolet-visible and synchronous fluorescence spectra and indexes of humic subctances isolated from five Czech soil samples: Haplic Chernozem, Luvic Chernozem, Gleyic Luvisol, Haplic Cambisol and Leptic Cambisol. Results indicated the following HS quality: Haplic Chernozem > Luvic Chernozem > Gleyic Luvisol > Haplic Cambisol > Leptic Cambisol. Humic acids and fulvic acids ratios (HA/FA were increasing together with decreasing values of Q4/6 measured in visible spectral range. Highest absorbance in visible spectral range was detected in Haplic Chernozem and Luvic Chernozem. Maximum relative fluorescence was found in Haplic Chernozem. SFS spectra (in emission mode at Δλ=20 nm showed five main fluorophore peaks at: 360, 470, 488, 502 and 512 nm. Fluorescence behaviour of studied samples was compared with Elliot soil humic acid standard (IHSS. Correlation between fluorescence indexes (F and humification degree (HD R2= 0.88 and between calculated humification degree (HD* and humic acids content (HA sum R2=0.84 and between fluorescence indexes F and HA/FA ratios (R2=0.88 were found.

  4. Biofilm biodiversity presented by fluorescent in situ hybridisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Mirela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerous microorganisms may be present in the water distribution system. This is associated with the imperfection of purification processes, or secondary water pollution. Not only it results in the deterioration of water quality parameters, but it also increases threat of epidemiological problems. The water that is biologically unstable creates ideal conditions for colonization of the microorganisms to the inner surface of pipelines which may form biofilm. The key issue, enabling prevention and control of the impact of the development of biofilms, is to assess the biodiversity of microbiocenosis. In order to obtain comprehensive characteristics of microorganisms communities on a particular substrate, it is necessary to combine several techniques. Further analysis using molecular biology methods are usually after traditional methods of assessing the microbiological quality of water. Standard methods do not reflect the actual species composition, because they are targeted at the bacteria that can be isolated and cultured in the laboratory. Conventional methods are capable of detecting less than 10% of the organisms in the sample. In order to study the biodiversity of organisms inhabiting a biofilm (apart from the conventional methods analyses of the diversity of nucleic acids should be used. The first method could be the polymerase chain reaction (PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE. Another way may be fluorescence in situ hybridization, which allows to detect determined DNA sequence using specially labeled oligonucleotide probes. Visualization of the material is performed using a fluorescence microscope. The main purpose of this article is to present rapid and precise identification groups of microorganisms in their natural habitat in biofilm using fluorescent in situ hybridization method (FISH . FISH method can be successfully used to visualize these microorganisms, which show difficulties in culturing, as well as to provide

  5. Nonclassical polarization effects in fluorescence emission spectra from microdroplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, S.; Goddard, N. L.; Hill, S. C.

    1999-12-01

    We report a pronounced nonclassical polarization effect on the shape of fluorescence emission spectra from isolated microdroplets containing a dilute solution of soluble fluors or a dilute layer of surfactant fluors. We see different spectral shapes for 90° scattering when comparing between IVV, IVH, IHH, IHV. However, we measure the largest difference in spectral shape in the surfactant case, with the incident polarization directed toward the detector (IHV vs IHH). Imaging reveals that the emission in this case principally arises from two distinct regions near the surface of the droplet, which are diametrically opposed and along the axis of the incident laser beam. The effect appears to be the direct result of coupling between molecular emission moments and electromagnetic modes of the droplet. It is not the molecule which radiates but the molecule microvessel. Directional emission is sensitive to the polarization of the electromagnetic mode which is stimulated by the coupling.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Novel Polymyxin Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Yun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Polymyxins (polymyxin B and colistin are cyclic lipopeptide antibiotics that serve as a last-line defence against Gram-negative “superbugs”. In the present study, two novel fluorescent polymyxin probes were designed through regio-selective modifications of the polymyxin B core structure at the N-terminus and the hydrophobic motif at positions 6 and 7. The resulting probes, FADDI-285 and FADDI-286 demonstrated comparable antibacterial activity (MICs 2–8 mg/L to polymyxin B and colistin (MICs 0.5–8 mg/L against a panel of gram-negative clinical isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These probes should prove to be of considerable utility for imaging cellular uptake and mechanistic investigations of these important last-line antibiotics.

  7. Synthesis, Structure, and Fluorescence of a Novel Cadmium Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhong-Liang; Chen, Wen-Tong

    2017-12-01

    A novel cadmium compound, [(CdI3)2(μ2-I)]2(Me2-4,4'-H2bipy)3 (1) (Me = methyl; 4,4'-bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine) with the Me2-4,4'-H2bipy moiety generated in situ, has been prepared through a solvothermal reaction and structurally characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. Compound 1 is characterized by an isolated structural motif, consisting of [(CdI3)2(μ2-I)]3- anions and Me2-4,4'-H2bipy2+ cations. The [(CdI3)2(μ2-I)]3- anions and Me2-4,4'-H2bipy2+ cations interconnect together via C-H···I hydrogen-bonding interactions to complete a three-dimensional (3D) supramolecular network. Solid state fluorescent spectrum reveals an emission band in the violet region.

  8. Antinuclear antibodies: clinical significance of fluorescence patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cordeiro, S.L.; Habermann, F.; Franco, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-four patients with 212 sera positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) were studied to: 1) determine the immunofluorescent nuclear staining patterns using Burnham's technique and simplified classification; 2) note the specificity of fluorescence patterns among the various connective tissue diseases; 3) study comparatively the fluorescence paterns employing 5 different antigen substrates; 4) correlate ANA titers and fluorescence patterns with renal involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It was observed: 1) most of the sera gave nonparticulate fluorescent patterns: peripheral, homogeneous, or peripheral-homogeneneous; 2) 55,5% of the patients had LE and most of those sera showed nonparticulate fluorescent patterns; 3) the sera displayed no specificity for any of the following antigen substrates: imprints of human normal spleen, frozen rat liver and kidney sections, frozen mouse kidney sections and perypheral human blood smears; 4) imprints of normal human spleen were the best substrate for accurate identification of fluorescent patterns; 5) sera from SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher ANA titers in relation to patients without renal involvement; both groups of sera gave similar ANA fluorescent patterns. (Author) [pt

  9. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  10. MOX Fabrication Isolation Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric L. Shaber; Bradley J Schrader

    2005-08-01

    This document provides a technical position on the preferred level of isolation to fabricate demonstration quantities of mixed oxide transmutation fuels. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative should design and construct automated glovebox fabrication lines for this purpose. This level of isolation adequately protects the health and safety of workers and the general public for all mixed oxide (and other transmutation fuel) manufacturing efforts while retaining flexibility, allowing parallel development and setup, and minimizing capital expense. The basis regulations, issues, and advantages/disadvantages of five potential forms of isolation are summarized here as justification for selection of the preferred technical position.

  11. L G-2 Scintrex manual.Fluorescence analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirelli, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Scintrex Fluorescence Analyzer LG-2 selectively detects the presence of certain fluorescent minerals through UV photoluminescence induced and provides quantitative information on its distribution.

  12. Differentiation of Cariogenic Streptococci by Fluorescent Antibody1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablon, James M.; Zinner, Doran D.

    1966-01-01

    Jablon, J. M. (University of Miami, Miami, Fla.), and D. D. Zinner. Differentiation of cariogenic streptococci by fluorescent antibody. J. Bacteriol. 92:1590–1596. 1966.—Eight strains of streptococci were isolated from human carious lesions by the fluorescent-antibody (FA) technique. Seven of these strains produced experimental caries in hamsters or rats maintained on a high sucrose diet. The eighth strain was noncariogenic in animals but possessed some antigenic components in common with the cariogenic strains. On the basis of antigen-antibody reactions by microprecipitin and agar-gel diffusion patterns, the strains were divided into four groups; these groups differed with regard to their cariogenic activity in hamsters. Fluorescein-conjugated antisera, prepared against the human strains, showed some cross-reactions which interfered with the efficacy of the FA technique in differentiating between the related streptococcal groups. To eliminate these cross-reactions, a small amount of related-strain antisera was added to the fluorescein-conjugated antisera to the cariogenic strains. This technique is effective in blocking cross-reactions and should be tried wherever cross-reactions are encountered in the FA technique. Images PMID:5334765

  13. Rapid diagnosis of aneuploidy using segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangdong Kong

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was use a simple and rapid procedure, called segmental duplication quantitative fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (SD-QF-PCR, for the prenatal diagnosis of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies. This method is based on the co-amplification of segmental duplications located on two different chromosomes using a single pair of fluorescent primers. The PCR products of different sizes were subsequently analyzed through capillary electrophoresis, and the aneuploidies were determined based on the relative dosage between the two chromosomes. Each primer set, containing five pairs of primers, was designed to simultaneously detect aneuploidies located on chromosomes 21, 18, 13, X and Y in a single reaction. We applied these two primer sets to DNA samples isolated from individuals with trisomy 21 (n = 36; trisomy 18 (n = 6; trisomy 13 (n = 4; 45, X (n = 5; 47, XXX (n = 3; 48, XXYY (n = 2; and unaffected controls (n = 40. We evaluated the performance of this method using the karyotyping results. A correct and unambiguous diagnosis with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity, was achieved for clinical samples examined. Thus, the present study demonstrates that SD-QF-PCR is a robust, rapid and sensitive method for the diagnosis of common aneuploidies, and these analyses can be performed in less than 4 hours for a single sample, providing a competitive alternative for routine use.

  14. The use of fluorescent indoline dyes for side population analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohara, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kohei; Shintou, Taichi; Nomoto, Tsuyoshi; Okano, Mie; Shirai, Tomoaki; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Dye efflux assay evaluated by flow cytometry is useful for stem cell studies. The side population (SP) cells, characterized by the capacity to efflux Hoechst 33342 dye, have been shown to be enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in bone marrow. In addition, SP cells are isolated from various tissues and cell lines, and are also potential candidates for cancer stem cells. However, ultra violet (UV) light, which is not common for every flow cytometer, is required to excite Hoechst 33342. Here we showed that a fluorescent indoline dye ZMB793 can be excited by 488-nm laser, equipped in almost all the modern flow cytometers, and ZMB793-excluding cells showed SP phenotype. HSCs were exclusively enriched in the ZMB793-excluding cells, while ZMB793 was localized in cytosol of bone marrow lineage cells. The efflux of ZMB793 dye was mediated by ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter Abcg2. Moreover, staining properties were affected by the side-chain structure of the dyes. These data indicate that the fluorescent dye ZMB793 could be used for the SP cell analysis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of uranyl fluorescence using trimesic acid: Ligand sensitization and co-fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maji, S. [Chemistry Group, Materials Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India); Viswanathan, K.S., E-mail: vish@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Materials Chemistry Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Trimesic acid (TMA) was shown to sensitize and enhance uranyl fluorescence in aqueous medium, with the enhancement being a maximum at pH 5.0. Fluorescence spectra and lifetime data together suggest that TMA complexes with uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The fluorescence of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} in its acid complex is further enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude following the addition of Y{sup 3+}; a process referred to as co-fluorescence, leading to the possibility of detecting uranium at sub ng/mL level. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, fluorescence enhancement of the uranyl species due to co-fluorescence. - Highlights: > Trimesic acid was shown to sensitize and enhance the fluorescence of uranium in aqueous medium. > This ligand also exhibited co-fluorescence of uranium with Y{sup 3+}. > To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of co-fluorescence in uranium. > The enhancement of uranium fluorescence, resulted in detection limits in the ng/mL regime.

  16. Effects of Depilation-Induced Skin Pigmentation and Diet-Induced Fluorescence on In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) and far-red fluorescence imaging (FRFI) were used to investigate effects of depilation-induced skin pigmentation and diet-induced background fluorescence on fluorescent signal amplitude and lymphatic contraction frequency in C57BL6 mice. Far-red fluorescent signal amplitude, but not frequency, was affected by diet-induced fluorescence, which was removed by feeding the mice an alfalfa-free diet, and skin pigmentation further impacted the amplitude mea...

  17. Fluorescence detection system for microfluidic droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binyu; Han, Xiaoming; Su, Zhen; Liu, Quanjun

    2018-05-01

    In microfluidic detection technology, because of the universality of optical methods in laboratory, optical detection is an attractive solution for microfluidic chip laboratory equipment. In addition, the equipment with high stability and low cost can be realized by integrating appropriate optical detection technology on the chip. This paper reports a detection system for microfluidic droplets. Photomultiplier tubes (PMT) is used as a detection device to improve the sensitivity of detection. This system improves the signal to noise ratio by software filtering and spatial filter. The fluorescence intensity is proportional to the concentration of the fluorescence and intensity of the laser. The fluorescence micro droplets of different concentrations can be distinguished by this system.

  18. Ratiometric fluorescent nanoparticles for sensing temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Hong-Shang, E-mail: hillphs@yahoo.com.cn; Huang, Shi-Hua [Beijing Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Optical Information, Ministry of Education, Institute of Optoelectronic Technology (China); Wolfbeis, Otto S. [University of Regensburg, Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Chemo- and Biosensors (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    A ratiometric type of fluorescent nanoparticle was prepared via an encapsulation-reprecipitation method. By introducing an alkoxysilanized dye as a reference, the nanoparticles (NPs) give both a green and a red fluorescence under one single-wavelength excitation. The resulted ratiometric fluorescence is found to be highly temperature-dependent in the physiological range (25-45 {sup o}C), with an intensity temperature sensitivity of -4.0%/{sup o}C. Given the small size (20-30 nm in diameter) and biocompatible nature (silica out layer), such kind of NPs were very promising as temperature nanosensors for cellular sensing and imaging.

  19. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A [Structure and Activity of Normal and Pathological Biomolecules-INSERM/UEVE U829, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf [3.Physikalisches Institut, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany); Aubert, Pascal [Nanometric Media Laboratory, Universite d' Evry-Val d' Essonne, Batiment Maupertuis, Rue du pere Andre Jarlan, F-91025 Evry (France); Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain [Centre des Materiaux, Mines Paris, ParisTech, BP 87, F-91000 Evry (France); Gaffet, Eric [Nanomaterials Research Group-UMR 5060, CNRS, UTBM, Site de Sevenans, F-90010 Belfort (France)], E-mail: jpb.cnrs@free.fr, E-mail: pcurmi@univ-evry.fr, E-mail: f.jelezko@physik.uni-stuttgart.de

    2009-06-10

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  20. High yield fabrication of fluorescent nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boudou, Jean-Paul; Curmi, Patrick A; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg; Balasubramanian, Gopalakrischnan; Reuter, Rolf; Aubert, Pascal; Sennour, Mohamed; Thorel, Alain; Gaffet, Eric

    2009-01-01

    A new fabrication method to produce homogeneously fluorescent nanodiamonds with high yields is described. The powder obtained by high energy ball milling of fluorescent high pressure, high temperature diamond microcrystals was converted in a pure concentrated aqueous colloidal dispersion of highly crystalline ultrasmall nanoparticles with a mean size less than or equal to 10 nm. The whole fabrication yield of colloidal quasi-spherical nanodiamonds was several orders of magnitude higher than those previously reported starting from microdiamonds. The results open up avenues for the industrial cost-effective production of fluorescent nanodiamonds with well-controlled properties.

  1. Experimental station for gas phase fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stankiewicz, M.; Garcia, E. Melero; Ruiz, J. Alvarez; Erman, P.; Hatherly, P.A.; Kivimaeki, A.; Rachlew, E.; Rius i Riu, J.

    2004-01-01

    The details of an experimental setup for gas phase atomic and molecular fluorescence measurements using synchrotron radiation are described in this article. The most significant part of the apparatus is an optical arrangement, which allows for simultaneous measurements of dispersed as well as total fluorescence intensity using an effusive gas jet and an inbuilt gas cell assembled in a convenient plug and measure configuration. The first measurements concerning fluorescence of the N 2 molecule around the N 1s edge obtained with this setup are presented

  2. isolated from Trichoderma harzianum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-21

    May 21, 2014 ... Chitinase gene from Trichoderma harzianum was cloned and hetrologously over expressed in ... used by Trichoderma to inhibit the growth of other fungi. ..... actinomycete isolates from niche habitats in Manipur for antibiotic.

  3. Simulating fluorescence light-canopy interaction in support of laser-induced fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosema, A.; Verhoef, W.; Schroote, J.; Snel, J.F.H.

    1991-01-01

    In the Netherlands an operational field instrument for the measurement of laser induced fluorescence of vegetation (LEAF) is developed. In addition, plant physiological and remote sensing research is done to support this new remote sensing instrument. This paper presents a general introduction on the subject of laser-induced fluorescence, including the relation between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis, spectral characteristics, and previous research. Also the LEAF system is briefly described. Subsequently, the development of a leaf fluorescence model (KMF) and a canopy fluorescence model (FLSAIL) are reported. With these simulation models a sensitivity study is carried out. Fluorescence of 685 nm appears to be most suitable to obtain information on photosynthesis and stress, but is also influenced by canopy structure. Separation of these two effects is studied

  4. Optimal Fluorescence Waveband Determination for Detecting Defective Cherry Tomatoes Using a Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In-Suck Baek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defective cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-way ANOVA revealed the optimal excitation wavelength for detecting defect areas was 410 nm. Principal component analysis (PCA was applied to the fluorescence emission spectra of all regions at 410 nm excitation to determine the emission wavelengths for defect detection. The major emission wavelengths were 688 nm and 506 nm for the detection. Fluorescence images combined with the determined emission wavebands demonstrated the feasibility of detecting defective cherry tomatoes with >98% accuracy. Multi-spectral fluorescence imaging has potential utility in non-destructive quality sorting of cherry tomatoes.

  5. Pseudomonads Rule Degradation of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons in Aerated Sediment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wald, J.; Hroudová, Miluše; Jansa, Jan; Vrchotová, B.; Macek, T.; Uhlík, O.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 1268 (2015) ISSN 1664-302X Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : biodegradation * polyaromatic hydrocarbons * stable isotope probing Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.165, year: 2015

  6. Pseudomonads and symbiotic micro-organisms as biocontrol agents ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEN

    2007-02-05

    Feb 5, 2007 ... Pythium aphanidermaturm. INTRODUCTION. Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) is one of the most important legumes in Cameroon (Mbouemboue, 1988). The importance of this plant is related to its leaves and seeds which are edible for their protein quality (Borget,. 1989). The cultivation of this plant is ...

  7. Flow cytometry, fluorescent probes, and flashing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.

    2002-01-01


    Key words: fluorescent probes, flow cytometry, CSLM, viability, survival, microbial physiology, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , cheese, milk,

  8. Collisional and radiative processes in fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, Graeme G.

    2003-01-01

    Since electrode life is the major limiting factor in operating fluorescent lamps, many lighting companies have introduced 'electrodeless' fluorescent lamps, using inductively coupled discharges. These lamps often operate at much higher power loadings than standard lamps and numerical models have not been successful in reproducing experimental measurements in the parameter ranges of interest. A comprehensive research program was undertaken to study the fundamental physical processes of these discharges, co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and OSRAM SYLVANIA under the name of ALITE. The program included experiments and modeling of radiation transport, computations of electron-atom and atom-atom cross sections and the first comprehensive power balance studies of a highly loaded fluorescent lamp. Results from the program and their importance to the understanding of the physics of fluorescent lamps are discussed, with particular emphasis on the important collisional and radiative processes. Comparisons between results of experimental measurements and numerical models are presented

  9. Fluorescent zinc–terpyridine complex containing coordinated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Keywords. Zinc peroxo complex; terpyridine complexes; fluorescence ... structure determination 3. Zinc is an essential element for normal function of most .... 63 179; (d) De Silva A P, Gunaratna H Q N, Gunnlaugsson T, Huxley A J M, Mcloy C.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of multicolour fluorescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of latent fingerprints. The optical and structural characterization of the nanoparticles was carried .... by absorption of phonons from the host matrix [13], the exchange of energy in ... impressions based on the fluorescent properties exhibited by.

  11. Fluorescence of berberine in microheterogeneous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colina, Ariel N.; Díaz, Marta S.; Gutiérrez, María Isela, E-mail: isela@unpata.edu.ar

    2013-12-15

    Spectral properties of the alkaloid berberine were studied in micellar solution and microemulsions based on anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were determined. For screening the influence of type and concentration of micelles on the fluorescence of berberine a 3{sup 2} full factorial design was used. Higher responses were obtained when berberine was dissolved in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles 0.01 M. Comparative results of fluorescence quantum yields (Φ{sub f}) reveal that the highest values (Φ{sub f}≥0.01) were observed in microemulsions. In the microheterogeneous systems investigated the most probable location of berberine is the micellar interfacial region. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic propereies of berberine in microheterogeneous media were investigated. • Berberine shows enhanced fluorescence in SDS micelles as compared to water • Berberine is probably located in the interface of the microheterogeneous systems.

  12. Fluorescence of irradiated hydrocarbons. [. gamma. rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulis, I G; Evdokimenko, V M; Lapkovskii, M P; Petrov, P T; Gulis, I M; Markevich, S V [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1977-01-01

    A visible fluorescence has been found out in ..gamma..-irradiated aqueous solutions of carbohydrates. Two bands have been distinguished in fluorescence spectra of the irradiated solution of dextran: a short-wave band lambdasub(max)=140 nm (where lambda is a wave length) at lambdasub(..beta..)=380 nm and a long-wave band with lambdasub(max)=540 nm at lambdasub(..beta..)=430 nm. A similar form of the spectrum has been obtained for irradiated solutions of starch, amylopectin, low molecular glucose. It has been concluded that a macromolecule of polysaccharides includes fluorescent centers. A relation between fluorescence and ..cap alpha..-oxiketon groups formed under irradiation has been pointed out.

  13. Excimer fluorescence of liquid crystalline systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhno, Tamara V.; Khakhel, Oleg A.; Barashkov, Nikolay N.; Korotkova, Irina V.

    1996-04-01

    The method of synchronous scanning fluorescence spectroscopy shows a presence of dimers of pyrene in a polymeric matrix. The results suggest that excimer formation takes place with dimers in liquid crystalline systems.

  14. Fluorescence of berberine in microheterogeneous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colina, Ariel N.; Díaz, Marta S.; Gutiérrez, María Isela

    2013-01-01

    Spectral properties of the alkaloid berberine were studied in micellar solution and microemulsions based on anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate, cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and nonionic Triton X-100 surfactants. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectra were determined. For screening the influence of type and concentration of micelles on the fluorescence of berberine a 3 2 full factorial design was used. Higher responses were obtained when berberine was dissolved in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles 0.01 M. Comparative results of fluorescence quantum yields (Φ f ) reveal that the highest values (Φ f ≥0.01) were observed in microemulsions. In the microheterogeneous systems investigated the most probable location of berberine is the micellar interfacial region. -- Highlights: • Spectroscopic propereies of berberine in microheterogeneous media were investigated. • Berberine shows enhanced fluorescence in SDS micelles as compared to water • Berberine is probably located in the interface of the microheterogeneous systems

  15. Isomerization and fluorescence depolarization of merocyanine 540 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , ... polymers resemble globular proteins and can encapsulate hydrophobic solutes. ... PAA opens up due to electrostatic repulsion, the fluorescent probe becomes exposed to ... conformational transition of such polymers have been studied by ...

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  17. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  18. Avaliação de furanocumarinas como inibidores da fotossíntese através de ensaios de fluorescência da clorofila a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olívia Moreira Sampaio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The evaluations of Chorophyll a fluorescence emitted by superior plants carry structural information and photosynthetic apparatus function. Quantitative analysis apparatus of fluorescence kinetic were measured by energy flows (ABS, (TR, (ET and (DI, known as phenomenological phenomena of OJIP test. Four furocoumarins were isolated from Ruta graveolens (Rutaceae, and chorophyll a (Chl a fluorescence assays were performed with these compounds to evaluate the photosynthesis inhibition potential. This test was realized in spinach`s leaf discs and in Lolium perenne leaves. The results indicated the herbicide potential mainly for bergapten and chalepin.

  19. Modified Hyperbranched Polymers for Fluorescence Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    sensors. The HBPs transported the fluorescent groups to the fiber mat surface where they interacted with mercury (Hg(II)) or cytochrome c as the analyte...coworkers (27, 28) have employed fluorescence quenching using a binol-based dendrimer sensor, which exhibited differential sensitivity to enantiomeric...based sensors using HBP-based fluorophores was demonstrated in this report. Low concentrations of fluorophore were transported to the surface of

  20. Rizobactérias e promoção do crescimento de plantas cítricas Rhizobacteria and growth promotion of citrus plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Freitas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Desenvolveram-se três experimentos em casa de vegetação para verificar a possibilidade de as rizobactérias atuarem como promotoras do crescimento de plantas cítricas. Ao todo, testaram-se 10 isolados de Pseudomonas do grupo fluorescente, 13 de Bacillus e sete de outras bactérias rizosféricas em porta-enxertos utilizados na citricultura: tangerineira 'Cleópatra' (Citrus reshni, limoeiro 'Cravo' (Citrus limonia e limoeiro 'Volcameriano' (Citrus volkameriana. Dependendo do porta-enxerto, sete isolados de Pseudomonas, um de Bacillus e um de outra bactéria rizosférica tiveram efeito benéfico sobre a matéria seca de raízes ou de parte aérea, indicando uma alta proporção de promotores de crescimento entre as bactérias do primeiro grupo. Procedeu-se também à contagem de bactérias fluorescentes do gênero Pseudomonas e de bactérias não-fluorescentes em raízes de tangerineira 'Cleópatra' e de limoeiro 'Cravo', procedentes de viveiro de mudas e do campo. Ambos os grupos bacterianos tiveram sua multiplicação favorecida na rizosfera de tangerineira 'Cleópatra', em condições de viveiro.Three greenhouse trials were carried out to verify if rhizobacteria can promote citrus plant growth. Ten isolates of fluorescent Pseudomonads, thirteen of Bacillus spp. and seven of other rhizospheric bacteria were tested in three rootstocks seedlings: 'Cleopatra' mandarin (Citrus reshni, rangpure lime (Citrus limonia and Volkamerian lemon (Citrus volkameriana. Depending on the rootstock, seven Pseudomonads, one isolate of Bacillus and one of other rhizospheric bacteria increased the root or shoot dry weight, indicating a high proportion of growth promoters among the fluorescent Pseudomonads. Also, fluorescent Pseudomonads and non fluorescent bacteria were counted in the roots of nursery seedlings and field plants of Citrus reshni and Citrus limonia. The growth of both bacterial groups was favored in the Citrus reshni rhizosphere under nursery

  1. Postabortal endometritis and isolation of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbacci, M B; Spence, M R; Kappus, E W; Burkman, R C; Rao, L; Quinn, T C

    1986-11-01

    A prospective study of 505 unselected women presenting for induced abortion was undertaken to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis and to determine if cervical isolation of C trachomatis before abortion increases the risk of postabortal endometritis. A comparison of direct fluorescent antibody (slide) test with tissue culture for diagnosing C trachomatis infection also was evaluated in this population. C trachomatis was identified by culture in 89 patients (17.6%) and by direct slide test in 85 patients (16.8%). Six of 17 patients with postabortal endometritis were culture positive for C trachomatis, with a significant correlation between C trachomatis infection and development of endometritis observed (P less than .05). These data suggest C trachomatis may play an important role in postabortal endometritis.

  2. Handheld Fluorescence Microscopy based Flow Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manish; Jayakumar, Nitin; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has the intrinsic advantages of favourable contrast characteristics and high degree of specificity. Consequently, it has been a mainstay in modern biological inquiry and clinical diagnostics. Despite its reliable nature, fluorescence based clinical microscopy and diagnostics is a manual, labour intensive and time consuming procedure. The article outlines a cost-effective, high throughput alternative to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques. With system level integration of custom-designed microfluidics and optics, we demonstrate fluorescence microscopy based imaging flow analyzer. Using this system we have imaged more than 2900 FITC labeled fluorescent beads per minute. This demonstrates high-throughput characteristics of our flow analyzer in comparison to conventional fluorescence microscopy. The issue of motion blur at high flow rates limits the achievable throughput in image based flow analyzers. Here we address the issue by computationally deblurring the images and show that this restores the morphological features otherwise affected by motion blur. By further optimizing concentration of the sample solution and flow speeds, along with imaging multiple channels simultaneously, the system is capable of providing throughput of about 480 beads per second.

  3. Magnetic field control of fluorescent polymer nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taehyung; He, Le; Bardeen, Christopher J; Morales, Jason R; Beyermann, W P

    2011-01-01

    Nanoscale objects that combine high luminescence output with a magnetic response may be useful for probing local environments or manipulating objects on small scales. Ideally, these two properties would not interfere with each other. In this paper, we show that a fluorescent polymer host material can be doped with high concentrations of 20–30 nm diameter magnetic γ-Fe 2 O 3 particles and then formed into 200 nm diameter nanorods using porous anodic alumina oxide templates. Two different polymer hosts are used: the conjugated polymer polydioctylfluorene and also polystyrene doped with the fluorescent dye Lumogen Red. Fluorescence decay measurements show that 14% by weight loading of the γ-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles quenches the fluorescence of the polydioctylfluorene by approximately 33%, but the polystyrene/Lumogen Red fluorescence is almost unaffected. The three-dimensional orientation of both types of nanorods can be precisely controlled by the application of a moderate strength (∼0.1 T) external field with sub-second response times. Transmission electron microscope images reveal that the nanoparticles cluster in the polymer matrix, and these clusters may serve both to prevent fluorescence quenching and to generate the magnetic moment that rotates in response to the applied magnetic field.

  4. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille; Rochel, Natacha; Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal; Weiss, Etienne

    2013-01-01

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ► Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ► Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ► GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ► GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ► This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins

  5. The use of fluorescent intrabodies to detect endogenous gankyrin in living cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinaldi, Anne-Sophie; Freund, Guillaume; Desplancq, Dominique; Sibler, Annie-Paule; Baltzinger, Mireille [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France); Rochel, Natacha [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR 7104, CNRS/INSERM/Université de Strasbourg, rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Mély, Yves; Didier, Pascal [Faculté de Pharmacie, UMR 7213, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, route du Rhin, 67401 Illkirch (France); Weiss, Etienne, E-mail: eweiss@unistra.fr [Ecole Supérieure de Biotechnologie de Strasbourg, UMR 7242, CNRS/Université de Strasbourg, boulevard Sébastien Brant, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2013-04-01

    Expression of antibody fragments in mammalian cells (intrabodies) is used to probe the target protein or interfere with its biological function. We previously described the in vitro characterisation of a single-chain Fv (scFv) antibody fragment (F5) isolated from an intrabody library that binds to the oncoprotein gankyrin (GK) in solution. Here, we have isolated several other scFvs that interact with GK in the presence of F5 and tested whether they allow, when fused to fluorescent proteins, to detect by FRET endogenous GK in living cells. The binding of pairs of scFvs to GK was analysed by gel filtration and the ability of each scFv to mediate nuclear import/export of GK was determined. Binding between scFv-EGFP and RFP-labelled GK in living cells was detected by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). After co-transfection of two scFvs fused to EGFP and RFP, respectively, which form a tri-molecular complex with GK in vitro, FRET signal was measured. This system allowed us to observe that GK is monomeric and distributed throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus of several cancer cell lines. Our results show that pairs of fluorescently labelled intrabodies can be monitored by FLIM–FRET microscopy and that this technique allows the detection of lowly expressed endogenous proteins in single living cells. Highlights: ► Endogenous GK in living cells was targeted with pairs of fluorescently-tagged scFvs. ► Tri-molecular complexes containing two scFvs and one molecule GK were formed. ► GK was detected using fluorescence lifetime-based FRET imaging. ► GK is monomeric and homogeneously distributed in several cancer cell lines. ► This technique may have many applications in live-cell imaging of endogenous proteins.

  6. Endophytic Colonization and In Planta Nitrogen Fixation by a Herbaspirillum sp. Isolated from Wild Rice Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeltagy, Adel; Nishioka, Kiyo; Sato, Tadashi; Suzuki, Hisa; Ye, Bin; Hamada, Toru; Isawa, Tsuyoshi; Mitsui, Hisayuki; Minamisawa, Kiwamu

    2001-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from the stems of wild and cultivated rice on a modified Rennie medium. Based on 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences, the diazotrophic isolates were phylogenetically close to four genera: Herbaspirillum, Ideonella, Enterobacter, and Azospirillum. Phenotypic properties and signature sequences of 16S rDNA indicated that three isolates (B65, B501, and B512) belong to the Herbaspirillum genus. To examine whether Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 isolated from wild rice, Oryza officinalis, endophytically colonizes rice plants, the gfp gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was introduced into the bacteria. Observations by fluorescence stereomicroscopy showed that the GFP-tagged bacteria colonized shoots and seeds of aseptically grown seedlings of the original wild rice after inoculation of the seeds. Conversely, for cultivated rice Oryza sativa, no GFP fluorescence was observed for shoots and only weak signals were observed for seeds. Observations by fluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 colonized mainly intercellular spaces in the leaves of wild rice. Colony counts of surface-sterilized rice seedlings inoculated with the GFP-tagged bacteria indicated significantly more bacterial populations inside the original wild rice than in cultivated rice varieties. Moreover, after bacterial inoculation, in planta nitrogen fixation in young seedlings of wild rice, O. officinalis, was detected by the acetylene reduction and 15N2 gas incorporation assays. Therefore, we conclude that Herbaspirillum sp. strain B501 is a diazotrophic endophyte compatible with wild rice, particularly O. officinalis. PMID:11679357

  7. Seismic isolation structure for pool-type LMFBR - isolation building with vertically isolated floor for NSSS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, A.; Shiojiri, H.; Aoyagi, S.; Matsuda, T.; Fujimoto, S.; Sasaki, Y.; Hirayama, H.

    1987-01-01

    The NSSS isolation floor vibration characteristics were made clear. Especially, the side support bearing (rubber bearing) is effective for horizontal floor motion restraint and rocking motion control. Seismic isolation effects for responses of the reactor components can be sufficiently expected, using the vertical seismic isolation floor. From the analytical and experimental studies, the following has been concluded: (1) Seismic isolation structure, which is suitable for large pool-type LMFBR, were proposed. (2) Seismic response characteristics of the seismic isolation structure were investigated. It was made clear that the proposed seismic isolation (Combination of the isolated building and the isolated NSSS floor) was effective. (orig./HP)

  8. Fluorescent halite from Bochnia salt mine, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waluś, Edyta; Głąbińska, Dobrochna; Puławska, Aleksandra; Flasza, Michał; Manecki, Maciej

    2016-04-01

    The photoluminescence of selected halite crystals from Bochnia Salt Mine (Bochnia, Poland) were discovered in 2014. This is a result of contemporary precipitation from percolating waters. In most cases the fluorescence is observed in whole crystals or in zones of crystals. Only clear parts of transparent crystals are orange-red fluorescent in short UV light (320 nm). Chemical microanalysis by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy SEM/EDS indicates that this is activated by Mn and Pb. The concentration of Mn is similar in fluorescent and inactive salt and equals to 0.13 - 0.27 wt.%. The concentration of Pb, however, averages to 3.8 wt.% in fluorescent parts reaching only 1.9 wt.% elsewhere. There is no difference in the unit cell parameters determined by powder X-ray diffraction. The percolating waters contain some Mn (ca. 3.9 ppm) but the concentration of Pb is below the detection limits. The experiments of precipitation of halite from the solutions containing various concentrations of Mn and Pb were performed to simulate this fenomenon using solutions containing: 1 mg Pb/L and 80 mg Mn/L; 1 mg Pb/L and 0.8 mg Mn/L; 1 mg Pb/L and 0.6 mg Mn/L; and 0 mg Pb/L and 80 mg Mn/L. The results indicate that fluorescence is apparent when halite forms from solutions containing more than 0.8 mg Mn/L and more than 1 mg Pb/L. The presence of lead as co-activator is necessary requirement: Mn alone does not activate the fluorescence of halite. This is in accordance with the results of previous work (Murata et al., 1946; Sidike et al., 2002). Rock salt in the mine does not show fluorescence at all. Fluorescence of contemporary salt in Bochnia salt mine is a result of mining activity and slight, sporadic contamination with traces of Mn and Pb. This work is partially funded by AGH research grant no 11.11.140.319. Murata K. J., Smith R. L., 1946. Manganese and lead as coactivators of red fluorescence in halite, American Mineralogist, Volume 31, pages 527

  9. New Approaches in Soil Organic Matter Fluorescence; A Solid Phase Fluorescence Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, M. M.; Sanclements, M.; McKnight, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a well-established technique to investigate the composition of organic matter in aquatic systems and is increasingly applied to soil organic matter (SOM). Current methods require that SOM be extracted into a liquid prior to analysis by fluorescence spectroscopy. Soil extractions introduce an additional layer of complexity as the composition of the organic matter dissolved into solution varies based upon the selected extractant. Water is one of the most commonly used extractant, but only extracts the water-soluble fraction of the SOM with the insoluble soil organic matter fluorescence remaining in the soil matrix. We propose the use of solid phase fluorescence on whole soils as a potential tool to look at the composition of organic matter without the extraction bias and gain a more complete understand of the potential for fluorescence as a tool in terrestrial studies. To date, the limited applications of solid phase fluorescence have ranged from food and agriculture to pharmaceutical with no clearly defined methods and limitations available. We are aware of no other studies that use solid phase fluorescence and thus no clear methods to look at SOM across a diverse set of soil types and ecosystems. With this new approach to fluorescence spectroscopy there are new challenges, such as blank correction, inner filter effect corrections, and sample preparation. This work outlines a novel method for analyzing soil organic matter using solid phase fluorescence across a wide range of soils collected from the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) eco-domains. This method has shown that organic matter content in soils must be diluted to 2% to reduce backscattering and oversaturation of the detector in forested soils. In mineral horizons (A) there is observed quenching of the humic-like organic matter, which is likely a result of organo-mineral complexation. Finally, we present preliminary comparisons between solid and liquid phase

  10. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  11. Novel nuclei isolation buffer for flow cytometric genome size estimation of Zingiberaceae: a comparison with common isolation buffers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Abhishek; Bhadra, Sreetama; Bandyopadhyay, Maumita

    2016-11-01

    Cytological parameters such as chromosome numbers and genome sizes of plants are used routinely for studying evolutionary aspects of polyploid plants. Members of Zingiberaceae show a wide range of inter- and intrageneric variation in their reproductive habits and ploidy levels. Conventional cytological study in this group of plants is severely hampered by the presence of diverse secondary metabolites, which also affect their genome size estimation using flow cytometry. None of the several nuclei isolation buffers used in flow cytometry could be used very successfully for members of Zingiberaceae to isolate good quality nuclei from both shoot and root tissues. The competency of eight nuclei isolation buffers was compared with a newly formulated buffer, MB01, in six different genera of Zingiberaceae based on the fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide-stained nuclei using flow cytometric parameters, namely coefficient of variation of the G 0 /G 1 peak, debris factor and nuclei yield factor. Isolated nuclei were studied using fluorescence microscopy and bio-scanning electron microscopy to analyse stain-nuclei interaction and nuclei topology, respectively. Genome contents of 21 species belonging to these six genera were determined using MB01. Flow cytometric parameters showed significant differences among the analysed buffers. MB01 exhibited the best combination of analysed parameters; photomicrographs obtained from fluorescence and electron microscopy supported the superiority of MB01 buffer over other buffers. Among the 21 species studied, nuclear DNA contents of 14 species are reported for the first time. Results of the present study substantiate the enhanced efficacy of MB01, compared to other buffers tested, in the generation of acceptable cytograms from all species of Zingiberaceae studied. Our study facilitates new ways of sample preparation for further flow cytometric analysis of genome size of other members belonging to this highly complex polyploid family

  12. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Uptake for Brain Tumor Visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Tréhin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delineation of tumor margins is vital to the successful surgical resection of brain tumors. We have previously developed a multimodal nanoparticle CLIO-Cy5.5, which is detectable by both magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence, to assist in intraoperatively visualizing tumor boundaries. Here we examined the accuracy of tumor margin determination of orthotopic tumors implanted in hosts with differing immune responses to the tumor. Using a nonuser-based signal intensity method applied to fluorescent micrographs of 9L gliosarcoma green fluorescent protein (GFP tumors, mean overestimations of 2 and 24 µm were obtained using Cy5.5 fluorescence, compared to the true tumor margin determined by GFP fluorescence, in nude mice and rats, respectively. To resolve which cells internalized the nanoparticle and to quantitate degree of uptake, tumors were disaggregated and cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Nanoparticle uptake was seen in both CD11b+ cells (representing activated microglia and macrophages and tumor cells in both animal models by both methods. CD11b+ cells were predominantly found at the tumor margin in both hosts, but were more pronounced at the margin in the rat model. Additional metastatic (CT26 colon and primary (Gli36 glioma brain tumor models likewise demonstrated that the nanoparticle was internalized both by tumor cells and by host cells. Together, these observations suggest that fluorescent nanoparticles provide an accurate method of tumor margin estimation based on a combination of tumor cell and host cell uptake for primary and metastatic tumors in animal model systems and offer potential for clinical translation.

  13. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal–dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle’s surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES, plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF. As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF. First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC and down-conversion (DC nanoparticles (NPs are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  14. Ultrafast fluorescence of photosynthetic crystals and light-harvesting complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Oort, van, B.F.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of photosynthetic pigment protein complexes using time resolved fluorescence techniques. Fluorescence spectroscopy often requires attaching fluorescent labels to the proteins under investigation. With photosynthetic proteins this is not necessary, because these proteins contain fluorescent pigments. Each pigment’s fluorescence is influenced by its environment, and thereby may provide information on structure and dynamics of pigment protein complexes in vitro a...

  15. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  16. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Ahmad M.; Tabbara, Khalid F.; Tabbarah, Zuhair

    2015-01-01

    We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation. PMID:26483675

  17. Isolated Optic Disc Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Mansour

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a healthy male subject who developed progressive visual loss in the left eye initially diagnosed as optic neuritis. Upon suspicion of infectious etiology, testing was positive for tuberculosis. There were no signs or symptoms of active systemic tuberculosis infection. The patient responded swiftly to antimycobacterial therapy with return of vision and resolution of disc swelling. Positive purified protein derivative skin test, negative chest radiograph, negative systemic workup, negative workup for other causes of unilateral optic neuritis and quick response to mycobacterial therapy reaffirm the entity of isolated optic disc tuberculosis similar to isolated choroidal tuberculosis without systemic manifestation.

  18. Primary isolated hepatic tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.S.F.; Qureshi, I.H.; Saba, K.; Bukhari, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    Isolated hepatic tuberculosis without pulmonary or bowel involvement is a diagnostic challenge and can cause considerable morbidity. A young lady from Lahore presented with fever, pain in right hypochondria, nausea and weight loss. CT scan of abdomen showed multiple small hypodense non-enhancing lesions and a heterogeneous texture of liver. Biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatic tuberculosis. It was concluded a case of isolated hepatic tuberculosis without evidence of other primary sites involvement. It is important to consider tuberculosis in the differential diagnosis when suspecting lymphoproliferative or metastatic diseases in a patient with vague symptoms and abnormal hepatic texture on CT. (author)

  19. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH

  20. Sensitive turn-on fluorescent detection of tartrazine based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sheng Tian; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2012-01-18

    We introduce a sensitive, rapid, label-free and general fluorescent method for the determination of tartrazine by competitive binding to reduced graphene oxide (rGO) against fluorescein, and the fluorescence recovery upon fluorescein desorption from rGO provides a quantitative readout for tartrazine, giving a detection limit of 0.53 ng mL(-1).

  1. Protocol for Evaluating the Permissiveness of Bacterial Communities Toward Conjugal Plasmids by Quantification and Isolation of Transconjugants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klümper, Uli; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2014-01-01

    may encode catabolic pathways, virulence factors, and antibiotic or metal resistances, it is of environmental, evolutionary, and medical relevance to track and monitor the fate of plasmids in mixed microbial community. When assessing the short-term and long-term implications of conjugal plasmid...... a gfp-tagged plasmid in a mCherry red fluorescently tagged donor strain repressing gfp expression. We take advantage of fluorescent marker genes to microscopically detect plasmid transfer events and use subsequent high-throughput fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) to isolate...

  2. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  3. Fabrication of fluorescent chitosan-containing microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang R.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intense emission peaks of Eu(DBM3Phen (DBM and Phen are dibenzoylmethane and 1,10-phenanthroline, respectively in the microcapsules containing molecules of quaternary ammonium chitosan (QACS and sodium alginate are observed. The microcapsules are assembled by using CaCO3 particles as template cores by the layer-by-layer (LbL technique. Observation of microcapsules by the fluorescence mode and the transmission mode in the confocal laser scanning microscopy shows that the microcapsules are intact after core decomposition. Fluorescence under ultraviolet irradiation comes directly from the Eu(DBM3Phen. Homogeneous assembly of Eu(DBM3Phen can be deduced due to the homogeneous fluorescence of the microcapsules in the fluorescence micrographs. The microcapsules show adherence to solid substrates due to large quantities of hydroxyl groups of QACS. AFM measurements of dried hollow microcapsules with only 4 bilayers of (CS/SA fabricated with Eu(DBM3Phen show the intact shell with a thickness of 3.0 nm. Regarding the biocompatible natural polysaccharides and the intense fluorescence emission, the microcapsules in this work might be of great importance in potential application in drug delivery and bioassay.

  4. Fluorescence optical imaging in anticancer drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etrych, Tomáš; Lucas, Henrike; Janoušková, Olga; Chytil, Petr; Mueller, Thomas; Mäder, Karsten

    2016-03-28

    In the past several decades, nanosized drug delivery systems with various targeting functions and controlled drug release capabilities inside targeted tissues or cells have been intensively studied. Understanding their pharmacokinetic properties is crucial for the successful transition of this research into clinical practice. Among others, fluorescence imaging has become one of the most commonly used imaging tools in pre-clinical research. The development of increasing numbers of suitable fluorescent dyes excitable in the visible to near-infrared wavelengths of the spectrum has significantly expanded the applicability of fluorescence imaging. This paper focuses on the potential applications and limitations of non-invasive imaging techniques in the field of drug delivery, especially in anticancer therapy. Fluorescent imaging at both the cellular and systemic levels is discussed in detail. Additionally, we explore the possibility for simultaneous treatment and imaging using theranostics and combinations of different imaging techniques, e.g., fluorescence imaging with computed tomography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Is the flower fluorescence relevant in biocommunication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriel, Analía; Lagorio, María Gabriela

    2010-10-01

    Flower fluorescence has been previously proposed as a potential visual signal to attract pollinators. In this work, this point was addressed by quantitatively measuring the fluorescence quantum yield ( Φ f) for flowers of Bellis perennis (white, yellow, pink, and purple), Ornithogalum thyrsoides (petals and ovaries), Limonium sinuatum (white and yellow), Lampranthus productus (yellow), Petunia nyctaginiflora (white), Bougainvillea spectabilis (white and yellow), Antirrhinum majus (white and yellow), Eustoma grandiflorum (white and blue), Citrus aurantium (petals and stigma), and Portulaca grandiflora (yellow). The highest values were obtained for the ovaries of O. thyrsoides ( Φ f = 0.030) and for Citrus aurantium petals ( Φ f = 0.014) and stigma ( Φ f = 0.013). Emitted photons as fluorescence were compared with reflected photons. It was concluded that the fluorescence emission is negligible compared to the reflected light, even for the most fluorescent samples, and it may not be considered as an optical signal in biocommunication. The work was complemented with the calculation of quantum catches for each studied flower species to describe the visual sensitization of eye photoreceptors.

  6. Multiwavelength FLIM: new concept for fluorescence diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Lorenz, S.; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, S.; Kalinina, S.

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescence guided tumor resection is very well accepted in the case of bladder cancer and brain tumor, respectively. However, false positive results are one of the major problems, which will make the discrimination between tumor tissue and inflammation difficult. In contrast fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and especially spectral resolved FLIM (SLIM) can significantly improve the analysis. The fluorescence decay of a fluorophore in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. A very complex situation arises, when more than one compound has to be analyzed. This could be the case when endogenous fluorophores of living cells and tissues have to be discriminated to identify oxidative metabolic changes. Other examples are PDT, when different photosensitizer metabolites are observed simultaneously. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. Within this presentation the principles of spectral and time-resolved fluorescence imaging will be discussed. Successful applications as autofluorescence and 5-ALA induced porphyrin fluorescence will be described in more detail.

  7. Fluorescent optical liquid-level sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2000-01-01

    An optical method of detecting a liquid level is presented that uses fluorescence radiation generated in an impurity-doped glass or plastic slab. In operation, the slab is inserted into the liquid and pump light is coupled into it so that the light is guided by the slab-air interface above the liquid and escapes into the liquid just below its surface. Since the fluorescence is generated only in that section of the slab above the liquid, the fluorescence power will monotonically decrease with increasing liquid level. Thus, a relationship can be established between any signal proportional to it and the liquid level. Because optical fibers link the pump source and the detector of fluorescence radiation to the sensor, no electrical connections are needed in or near the liquid. Their absence vastly decreases the hazard associated with placing a liquid-level sensor in a potentially explosive environment. A laboratory prototype, consisting of a methyl styrene slab doped with an organic dye, has been built and successfully tested in water. Its response to liquid level when pumped by a tunable argon-ion laser at 476, 488, and 496 nm, and by a blue LED, is presented and shown to be consistent with theory. The fluorescence spectra, optical efficiency, temperature, and other effects are also presented and discussed. (c) 2000 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

  8. Upconverting fluorescent nanoparticles for biodetection and photoactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai; Li, WenKai; Jayakumar, Muthu Kumara Gnanasammandhan; Zhang, Yong

    2013-03-01

    Fluorophores including fluorescent dyes/proteins and quantum dots (QDs) are used for fluorescence-based imaging and detection. These are based on `downconversion fluorescence' and have several drawbacks: photobleaching, autofluorescence, short tissue penetration depth and tissue photo-damage. Upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles (UCNs) emit detectable photons of higher energy in the short wavelength range upon irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) light based on a process termed `upconversion'. UCNs show absolute photostability, negligible autofluorescence, high penetration depth and minimum photodamage to biological tissues. Lanthanide doped nanocrystals with nearinfrared NIR-to-NIR and/or NIR-to-VIS and/or NIR-to-UV upconversion fluorescence emission have been synthesized. The nanocrystals with small size and tunable multi-color emission have been developed. The emission can be tuned by doping different upconverting lanthanide ions into the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals with core-shell structure have also been prepared to tune the emission color. The surfaces of these nanocrystals have been modified to render them water dispersible and biocompatible. They can be used for ultrasensitive interference-free biodetection because most biomolecules do not have upconversion properties. UCNs are also useful for light based therapy with enhanced efficiency, for example, photoactivation.

  9. A note on isolate domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sahul Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ such that $\\left\\langle S\\right\\rangle$ has an isolated vertex is called an \\emph{isolate set} of $G$. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate set are called the \\emph{isolate number} $i_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate number} $I_0(G$ respectively. An isolate set that is also a dominating set (an irredundant set is an $\\emph{isolate dominating set} \\ (\\emph{an isolate irredundant set}$. The \\emph{isolate domination number} $\\gamma_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate domination number} $\\Gamma_0(G$ are respectively the minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set while the \\emph{isolate irredundance number} $ir_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate irredundance number} $IR_0(G$ are the minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate irredundant set of $G$. The notion of isolate domination was introduced in \\cite{sb} and the remaining were introduced in \\cite{isrn}. This paper further extends a study of these parameters.   

  10. Emotion regulation during isolation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Poláčková Šolcová, Iva; Šolcová, Iva

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 47, Suppl. 1 (2012) ISSN 0020-7594. [International Congress of Psychology /30./. 22.07.2012-27.07.2012, Cape Town] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP407/11/2226 Institutional support: RVO:68081740 Keywords : emotion regulation * isolation * Mars500 Subject RIV: AN - Psychology

  11. Beyond insulation and isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie Koldkjær

    2016-01-01

    are insulation and isolation strategies to reduce measurable and perceptual noise levels. However, these strategies do not actively support the need to feel like an integral part of the shared hospital environment, which is a key element in creating healing environments, according to the paradigm of Evidence-Based...

  12. Fault isolation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, A.

    1981-01-01

    Three major areas that are considered in the development of an overall maintenance scheme of computer equipment are described. The areas of concern related to fault isolation techniques are: the programmer (or user), company and its policies, and the manufacturer of the equipment.

  13. Proteoglycan isolation and analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    2001-01-01

    Proteoglycans can be difficult molecules to isolate and analyze due to large mass, charge, and tendency to aggregate or form macromolecular complexes. This unit describes detailed methods for purification of matrix, cell surface, and cytoskeleton-linked proteoglycans. Methods for analysis...

  14. Isolated limb perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Rosalyn; Chantier, Nariane

    1994-12-08

    Growing concern over the rising incidence of malignant melanoma has brought about a need for information on this disorder and the treatment available. Isolated limb perfusion is a relatively new technique used in only a few hospitals. An increased knowledge base will lead to a better understanding of the nursing care required and to a more in-depth care plan.

  15. Broadband Faraday isolator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Michał; Rangelov, Andon A; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    Driving on an analogy with the technique of composite pulses in quantum physics, we theoretically propose a broadband Faraday rotator and thus a broadband optical isolator, which is composed of sequences of ordinary Faraday rotators and achromatic quarter-wave plates rotated at the predetermined angles.

  16. Phenotyping of Arabidopsis Drought Stress Response Using Kinetic Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Multicolor Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieni Yao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to drought stress are complex due to various mechanisms of drought avoidance and tolerance to maintain growth. Traditional plant phenotyping methods are labor-intensive, time-consuming, and subjective. Plant phenotyping by integrating kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence with multicolor fluorescence imaging can acquire plant morphological, physiological, and pathological traits related to photosynthesis as well as its secondary metabolites, which will provide a new means to promote the progress of breeding for drought tolerant accessions and gain economic benefit for global agriculture production. Combination of kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence and multicolor fluorescence imaging proved to be efficient for the early detection of drought stress responses in the Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0 and one of its most affected mutants called reduced hyperosmolality-induced [Ca2+]i increase 1. Kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence curves were useful for understanding the drought tolerance mechanism of Arabidopsis. Conventional fluorescence parameters provided qualitative information related to drought stress responses in different genotypes, and the corresponding images showed spatial heterogeneities of drought stress responses within the leaf and the canopy levels. Fluorescence parameters selected by sequential forward selection presented high correlations with physiological traits but not morphological traits. The optimal fluorescence traits combined with the support vector machine resulted in good classification accuracies of 93.3 and 99.1% for classifying the control plants from the drought-stressed ones with 3 and 7 days treatments, respectively. The results demonstrated that the combination of kinetic chlorophyll fluorescence and multicolor fluorescence imaging with the machine learning technique was capable of providing comprehensive information of drought stress effects on the photosynthesis and the secondary metabolisms. It is a promising

  17. Blood perfusion and pH monitoring in organs by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vari, Sandor G.; Papazoglou, Theodore G.; Pergadia, Vani R.; Stavridi, Marigo; Snyder, Wendy J.; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Duffy, J. T.; Weiss, Andrew B.; Thomas, Reem; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1994-01-01

    Sensitivity of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) in detecting a change in tissue pH, and blood perfusion was determined. Rabbits were anesthetized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The arterial and venous blood supplies of the kidney were isolated and ligated to alter the perfusion. The femoral artery was cannulated to extract samples for blood gas analysis. A 308-nm XeCl was used as an excitation source. A 600 micrometers core diameter fiber was used for fluorescence acquisition, and the spectra analyzed by an optical multichannel analyzer (EG & G, OMA III). the corresponding intensity ratio R equals INADH / ICOLL was used as an index for respiratory acidosis. Blood perfusion was assessed using the following algorithm: (IELAS minus ICOLL) divided by (INADH minus ICOLL). The intensity ratio linearly decreased with the reduction of blood perfusion. When we totally occluded the artery the ratio decreased tenfold when compared to the ratio of a fully perfused kidney. Results of monitoring blood acidosis by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy shows a significant trend between pH and intensity ratio. Since all the slopes were negative, there is an obvious significant correlation between the pH and NADH.COLLAGEN RATIO. Blue-light-induced fluorescence measurements and ratio fluorometry is a sensitive method for monitoring blood perfusion and acidity or alkalinity of an organ.

  18. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  19. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  20. Ratiometric Fluorescence Azide-Alkyne Cycloaddition for Live Mammalian Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hongxia; Li, Yanru; Sun, Lingbo; He, Pan; Duan, Xinrui

    2015-11-17

    Click chemistry with metabolic labeling has been widely used for selectively imaging biomacromolecules in cells. The first example of azide-alkyne cycloaddition for ratiometric fluorescent imaging of live cells is reported. The precursor of the azido fluorophore (cresyl violet) has a fluorescence emission peak at 620 nm. The electron-rich nitrogen of the azido group blue-shifts the emission peak to 566 nm. When the click reaction occurs, an emission peak appears at 620 nm due to the lower electronic density of the newly formed triazole ring, which allows us to ratiometrically record fluorescence signals. This emission shift was applied to ratiometric imaging of propargylcholine- and dibenzocyclooctyne-labeled human breast cancer cells MCF-7 under laser confocal microscopy. Two typical triazole compounds were isolated for photophysical parameter measurements. The emission spectra presented a fluorescence emission peak around 620 nm for both click products. The results further confirmed the emission wavelength change was the result of azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. Since nearly all biomolecules can be metabolically labeled by reported alkyne-functionalized derivatives of native metabolites, our method can be readily applied to image these biomacromolecules.

  1. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-07-24

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  2. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Andre; Schoendube, Jonas; Zimmermann, Stefan; Steeb, Maximilian; Zengerle, Roland; Koltay, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting) respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage), laser microdissection (17%), manual cell picking (17%), random seeding/dilution (15%), and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12%) are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field. PMID:26213926

  3. Technologies for Single-Cell Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Gross

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The handling of single cells is of great importance in applications such as cell line development or single-cell analysis, e.g., for cancer research or for emerging diagnostic methods. This review provides an overview of technologies that are currently used or in development to isolate single cells for subsequent single-cell analysis. Data from a dedicated online market survey conducted to identify the most relevant technologies, presented here for the first time, shows that FACS (fluorescence activated cell sorting respectively Flow cytometry (33% usage, laser microdissection (17%, manual cell picking (17%, random seeding/dilution (15%, and microfluidics/lab-on-a-chip devices (12% are currently the most frequently used technologies. These most prominent technologies are described in detail and key performance factors are discussed. The survey data indicates a further increasing interest in single-cell isolation tools for the coming years. Additionally, a worldwide patent search was performed to screen for emerging technologies that might become relevant in the future. In total 179 patents were found, out of which 25 were evaluated by screening the title and abstract to be relevant to the field.

  4. Antifungal Effect of (+-Pinoresinol Isolated from Sambucus williamsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomi Hwang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the antifungal activity and mechanism of action of (+-pinoresinol, a biphenolic compound isolated from the herb Sambucus williamsii,used in traditional medicine. (+-Pinoresinol displays potent antifungal properties without hemolytic effects on human erythrocytes. To understand the antifungal mechanism of (+-pinoresinol, we conducted fluorescence experiments on the human pathogen Candida albicans. Fluorescence analysis using 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH indicated that the (+-pinoresinol caused damage to the fungal plasma membrane. This result was confirmed by using rhodamine-labeled giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV experiments. Therefore, the present study indicates that (+-pinoresinol possesses fungicidal activities and therapeutic potential as an antifungal agent for the treatment of fungal infectious diseases in humans.

  5. Fluorescence energy transfer on erythrocyte membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, H.M.; Hof, M.; Lawaczeck, R.

    1995-08-01

    Stationary and time-dependent fluorescence have been measured for a donor/acceptor (DA) pair bound to membrane proteins of bovine erythrocyte ghosts. The donor N-(p-(2-benzoxazolyl)phenyl)-maleimid (BMI) and the acceptor fluram bind to SH- and NH 2 -residues, respectively. The fluorescence spectra and the time-dependent emission are consistent with a radiationless fluorescence energy transfer (RET). The density of RET-effective acceptor binding sites c=0.072 nm -2 was calculated on the basis of the two-dimensional Foerster-kinetic. Band3 protein is the only membrane spanning protein with accessible SH-groups, and therefore only effective binding sites on the band3 protein are counted for the RET measurements performed. (author). 23 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  6. Oligothiophenes as Fluorescent Markers for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Manetto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes some of our results on the application of oligothiophenes as fluorescent markers for biological studies. The oligomers of thiophene, widely known for their semiconductor properties in organic electronics, are also fluorescent compounds characterized by chemical and optical stability, high absorbance and quantum yield. Their fluorescent emission can be easily modulated via organic synthesis by changing the number of thiophene rings and the nature of side-chains. This review shows how oligothiophenes can be derivatized with active groups such as phosphoramidite, N-hydroxysuccinimidyl and 4-sulfotetrafluorophenyl esters, isothiocyanate and azide by which the (biomolecules of interest can be covalently bound. This paper also describes how molecules such as oligonucleotides, proteins and even nanoparticles, tagged with oligothiophenes, can be used in experiments ranging from hybridization studies to imaging of fixed and living cells. Finally, a few multilabeling experiments are described.

  7. Theory of fluorescence in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vats, Nipun; John, Sajeev; Busch, Kurt

    2002-01-01

    We present a formalism for the description of fluorescence from optically active materials embedded in a photonic crystal structure possessing a photonic band gap or pseudogap. An electromagnetic field expansion in terms of Bloch modes of the crystal is used to develop the equations for fluorescence in terms of the local density of photon modes available to the emitting atoms in either the high or low dielectric regions of the crystal. We then obtain expressions for fluorescence spectra and emission dynamics for luminescent materials in photonic crystals. The validity of our formalism is demonstrated through the calculation of relevant quantities for model photon densities of states. The connection of our calculations to the description of realistic systems is discussed. We also describe the consequences of these analyses on the accurate description of the interaction between radiative systems and the electromagnetic reservoir within photonic crystals

  8. Fluorescent multiplex cell flow systems and methods

    KAUST Repository

    Merzaban, Jasmeen

    2017-06-01

    Systems and methods are provided for simultaneously assaying cell adhesion or cell rolling for multiple cell specimens. One embodiment provides a system for assaying adhesion or cell rolling of multiple cell specimens that includes a confocal imaging system containing a parallel plate flow chamber, a pump in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber inlet line and a cell suspension in fluid communication with the parallel plate flow chamber via a flow chamber outlet line. The system also includes a laser scanning system in electronic communication with the confocal imaging system, and a computer in communication with the confocal imaging system and laser scanning system. In certain embodiments, the laser scanning system emits multiple electromagnetic wavelengths simultaneously it cause multiple fluorescent labels having different excitation wavelength maximums to fluoresce. The system can simultaneously capture real-time fluorescence images from at least seven cell specimens in the parallel plate flow chamber.

  9. Submicron, soft x-ray fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, B.; MacDowell, A.A.; Tan, Z.; White, D.L.; Taylor, G.N.; Wood, O.R. II; Bjorkholm, J.E.; Tennant, D.M.; Hulbert, S.L.

    1995-01-01

    Submicron fluorescence imaging of soft x-ray aerial images, using a high resolution fluorescent crystal is reported. Features as small as 0.1 μm were observed using a commercially available single-crystal phosphor, STI-F10G (Star Tech Instruments Inc. P. O. Box 2536, Danbury, CT 06813-2536), excited with 139 A light. Its quantum efficiency was estimated to be 5--10 times that of sodium salicylate and to be constant over a broad spectral range from 30 to 400 A. A comparison with a terbium-activated yttrium orthosilicate fluorescent crystal is also presented. Several applications, such as the characterization of the aerial images produced by deep ultraviolet or extreme ultraviolet lithographic exposure tools, are envisaged

  10. A Quantitative Fluorescence-Based Lipase Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Lomolino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An easy and fast gel diffusion assay for detecting and monitoring lipase activity by quantification of fluorescein is described. By measuring the intensity of fluorescein, it is possible to obtain a calibration curve with a regression coefficient better than by using the radius of fluorescent haloes. Through the quantification of fluorescence intensity of fluorescein released after the hydrolysis of a fluorescent ester, fluorescein dibutyrate, used as substrate in agar plates, commercial and skimmed milk lipase activity were studied. Moreover, with this method, lipase activity can be monitored in reaction medium that contains compounds which are affected by turbidity or cause measurement interference for UV-spectrophotometer and fluorimeter. In this experiment, boiled skimmed milk was dispersed in the agar gel with fluorescein dibutyrate, and it was used as a reaction medium to mimic natural conditions. The development of such an assay has a potential for applications in industries ranging from pharmaceuticals to food production and monitoring.

  11. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Roberts

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples.

  12. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H

    2007-01-01

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique

  13. Plasmonically amplified fluorescence bioassay with microarray format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogalic, S.; Hageneder, S.; Ctortecka, C.; Bauch, M.; Khan, I.; Preininger, Claudia; Sauer, U.; Dostalek, J.

    2015-05-01

    Plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal in bioassays with microarray detection format is reported. A crossed relief diffraction grating was designed to couple an excitation laser beam to surface plasmons at the wavelength overlapping with the absorption and emission bands of fluorophore Dy647 that was used as a label. The surface of periodically corrugated sensor chip was coated with surface plasmon-supporting gold layer and a thin SU8 polymer film carrying epoxy groups. These groups were employed for the covalent immobilization of capture antibodies at arrays of spots. The plasmonic amplification of fluorescence signal on the developed microarray chip was tested by using interleukin 8 sandwich immunoassay. The readout was performed ex situ after drying the chip by using a commercial scanner with high numerical aperture collecting lens. Obtained results reveal the enhancement of fluorescence signal by a factor of 5 when compared to a regular glass chip.

  14. Metal-enhanced fluorescence exciplex emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongxia; Mali, Buddha L; Geddes, Chris D

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, we report the first observation of metal-enhanced exciplex fluorescence, observed from anthracene in the presence of diethylaniline. Anthracene in the presence of diethylaniline in close proximity to Silver Island Films (SIFs) shows enhanced monomer and exciplex emission as compared to a non-silvered control sample containing no silver nanoparticles. Our findings suggest two complementary methods for the enhancement: (i) surface plasmons can radiate coupled monomer and exciplex fluorescence efficiently, and (ii) enhanced absorption (enhanced electric near-field) further facilitates enhanced emission. Our exciplex studies help us to further understand the complex photophysics of the metal-enhanced fluorescence technology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    -reactive rhodamine red derivatives. The resulting N-substituted (JHC 1-64) and 2-substituted (JHC 1-53) ligands showed high affinity binding to DAT expressed in HEK 293 cells (Ki= 6.4 and 29 nM, respectively). Their ability to selectively label the DAT was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy of HEK......To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...... in untransfected control cells. The possibility of using these ligands for direct labeling of the DAT in living cells represents a new and important approach for understanding cellular targeting and trafficking of the DAT. Moreover, these fluorescent ligands might also provide the molecular tools...

  16. A fluorescent and chemiluminescent difunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle as a label for the ultrasensitive detection of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Liang [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science of Shaanxi Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Song Chaojun; Sun Yuanjie [Department of Immunology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li Xiaohua; Li Yunyun [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science of Shaanxi Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Jin Boquan [Department of Immunology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Zhang Zhujun, E-mail: zhangzj@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science of Shaanxi Province, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Yang Kun, E-mail: yangkunkun@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Difunctional amino mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FCMSN) were synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence and chemiluminescence properties of the FCMSN were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NaIO{sub 4} oxidation method was used for modification of the FCMSN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Liver cancer 7721 cell was detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The specificity affected by FCMSN's amino groups was studied. - Abstract: A new kind of ultrabright fluorescent and chemiluminescent difunctional mesoporous silica nanoparticle (FCMSN) is reported. A luminescent dye, Rhodamine 6G or tris(2,2 Prime -bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II) hexahydrate (Rubpy), is doped inside nanochannels of a silica matrix. The hydrophobic groups in the silica matrix avoid the leakage of dye from open channels. The amines groups on the surface of the FCMSN improve the modification performance of the nanoparticle. Because the nanochannels are isolated by a network skeleton of silica, fluorescence quenching based on the inner filter effect of the fluorescent dyes immobilized in nanochannels is weakened effectively. The Quantum Yield of obtained 90 nm silica particles was about 61%. Compared with the fluorescent core-shell nanoparticle, the chemiluminescence reagents can freely enter the nanoparticles to react with fluorescent dyes to create chemiluminescence. The results show that the FCMSN are both fluorescent labels and chemiluminescent labels. In biological applications, the NaIO{sub 4} oxidation method was proven to be superior to the glutaraldehyde method. The amount of amino could affect the specificity of the FCMSN. The fluorescence microscopy imaging demonstrated that the FCMSN is viable for biological applications.

  17. A fluorescence switch based on a controllable photochromic naphthopyran group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lizhen; Wang Guang; Zhao Xiancai

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence switch based on photoisomerization of naphthopyran (NP) has been designed by employing 2-(pyridin-2-yl)-benzimidazole (BPI) and the naphthopyran containing two pyran rings (NP) as fluorescent dye and photochromic compound, respectively. The fluorescence switch of benzimidazole derivative can be modulated either by controlling the irradiation time of UV light or by adjusting the amount ratio of fluorescent benzimidazole derivative to photochromic naphthopyran in both solution and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) film. The experimental results indicated that the decrease of fluorescence intensity of benzimidazole derivative is attributed to the interaction of benzimidazole with naphthopyran. - Highlights: → Naphthopyran was first used to fabricate fluorescence switch with benzimidazole derivative. → Fluorescence intensity can be modulated by controlling the UV irradiation time. → Fluorescence intensity can be adjusted by changing the ratio of benzimidazole derivative to naphthopyran. → Decrease of fluorescence intensity is attributed to the interaction of benzimidazole derivative and naphthopyran.

  18. Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila O Alieva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available GFP-like fluorescent proteins (FPs are the key color determinants in reef-building corals (class Anthozoa, order Scleractinia and are of considerable interest as potential genetically encoded fluorescent labels. Here we report 40 additional members of the GFP family from corals. There are three major paralogous lineages of coral FPs. One of them is retained in all sampled coral families and is responsible for the non-fluorescent purple-blue color, while each of the other two evolved a full complement of typical coral fluorescent colors (cyan, green, and red and underwent sorting between coral groups. Among the newly cloned proteins are a "chromo-red" color type from Echinopora forskaliana (family Faviidae and pink chromoprotein from Stylophora pistillata (Pocilloporidae, both evolving independently from the rest of coral chromoproteins. There are several cyan FPs that possess a novel kind of excitation spectrum indicating a neutral chromophore ground state, for which the residue E167 is responsible (numeration according to GFP from A. victoria. The chromoprotein from Acropora millepora is an unusual blue instead of purple, which is due to two mutations: S64C and S183T. We applied a novel probabilistic sampling approach to recreate the common ancestor of all coral FPs as well as the more derived common ancestor of three main fluorescent colors of the Faviina suborder. Both proteins were green such as found elsewhere outside class Anthozoa. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the all-coral ancestral protein had a chromohore apparently locked in a non-fluorescent neutral state, which may reflect the transitional stage that enabled rapid color diversification early in the history of coral FPs. Our results highlight the extent of convergent or parallel evolution of the color diversity in corals, provide the foundation for experimental studies of evolutionary processes that led to color diversification, and enable a comparative analysis of

  19. Origins of fluorescence in evolved bacteriophytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shyamosree; Auldridge, Michele E; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ihalainen, Janne A; Forest, Katrina T

    2014-11-14

    Use of fluorescent proteins to study in vivo processes in mammals requires near-infrared (NIR) biomarkers that exploit the ability of light in this range to penetrate tissue. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are photoreceptors that couple absorbance of NIR light to photoisomerization, protein conformational changes, and signal transduction. BphPs have been engineered to form NIR fluorophores, including IFP1.4, Wi-Phy, and the iRFP series, initially by replacement of Asp-207 by His. This position was suggestive because its main chain carbonyl is within hydrogen-bonding distance to pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin chromophore, thus potentially functioning as a crucial transient proton sink during photoconversion. To explain the origin of fluorescence in these phytofluors, we solved the crystal structures of IFP1.4 and a comparison non-fluorescent monomeric phytochrome DrCBDmon. Met-186 and Val-288 in IFP1.4 are responsible for the formation of a tightly packed hydrophobic hub around the biliverdin D ring. Met-186 is also largely responsible for the blue-shifted IFP1.4 excitation maximum relative to the parent BphP. The structure of IFP1.4 revealed decreased structural heterogeneity and a contraction of two surface regions as direct consequences of side chain substitutions. Unexpectedly, IFP1.4 with Asp-207 reinstalled (IFPrev) has a higher fluorescence quantum yield (∼9%) than most NIR phytofluors published to date. In agreement, fluorescence lifetime measurements confirm the exceptionally long excited state lifetimes, up to 815 ps, in IFP1.4 and IFPrev. Our research helps delineate the origin of fluorescence in engineered BphPs and will facilitate the wide-spread adoption of phytofluors as biomarkers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence for medical diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson Engels, S.

    1989-12-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence as a tool for tissue diagnostics is discussed. Both spectrally and time-resolved fluorescence signals are studied to optimize the demarcation of diseased lesions from normal tissue. The presentation is focused on two fields of application: the identification of malignant tumours and atherosclerotic plaques. Tissue autofluorescence as well as fluorescence from administered drugs have been utilized in diseased tissue diagnosis. The fluorescence criterion for tissue diagnosis is, as far as possible, chosen to be independent of unknown fluorescence parameters, which are not correlated to the type of tissue investigated. Both a dependence on biological parameters, such as light absorption in blood, and instrumental characteristics, such as excitation pulse fluctuations and detection geometry, can be minimized. Several chemical compounds have been studied in animal experiments after intraveneous injection to verify their capacity as malignant tumour marking drugs under laser excitation and fluorescence detection. Another objective of these studies was to improve our understanding of the mechanism and chemistry behind the retention of the various drugs in tissue. The properties of a chemical which maximize its selective retention in tumours are discussed. In order to utilize this diagnostic modality, three different clinically adapted sets of instrumentation have been developed and are presented. Two of the systems are nitrogen-laser-based fluorosensors; one is a point-monitoring system with full spectral resolution and the other one is an imaging system with up to four simultaneously recorded images in different spectral bands. The third system is a low-cost point-monitoring mercury-lamp-based fluoroscence emission as well as reflection characteristics of tissue. (author)

  1. Analysis of Cholesterol Trafficking with Fluorescent Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maxfield, Frederick R.; Wustner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol plays an important role in determining the biophysical properties of biological membranes, and its concentration is tightly controlled by homeostatic processes. The intracellular transport of cholesterol among organelles is a key part of the homeostatic mechanism, but sterol transport...... that can bind to cholesterol to reveal its distribution in cells. We also discuss the use of intrinsically fluorescent sterols that closely mimic cholesterol, as well as some minimally modified fluorophore-labeled sterols. Methods for imaging these sterols by conventional fluorescence microscopy...... and by multiphoton microscopy are described. Some label-free methods for imaging cholesterol itself are also discussed briefly....

  2. Materials for incandescent and fluorescent lamps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Knud Aage

    1996-01-01

    The article gives an overview of the materials systems used for incandescent lamps as well as a brief introduction to the systems used for fluorescent lamps. The materials used for incandescent lamps are doped tungsten used for the filaments, metals and alloys used for terminal and support posts......, lead wires and internal reflectors and screens as well as glasses for the envelope. The physics of bulbs and changes in bulbs during use are elucidated. The cost and energy savings and environmental benefits by replacement of incandescent lamps by fluorescent lamps are presented....

  3. Robust, directed assembly of fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianinia, Mehran; Shimoni, Olga; Bendavid, Avi; Schell, Andreas W; Randolph, Steven J; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor; Lobo, Charlene J

    2016-10-27

    Arrays of fluorescent nanoparticles are highly sought after for applications in sensing, nanophotonics and quantum communications. Here we present a simple and robust method of assembling fluorescent nanodiamonds into macroscopic arrays. Remarkably, the yield of this directed assembly process is greater than 90% and the assembled patterns withstand ultra-sonication for more than three hours. The assembly process is based on covalent bonding of carboxyl to amine functional carbon seeds and is applicable to any material, and to non-planar surfaces. Our results pave the way to directed assembly of sensors and nanophotonics devices.

  4. Fluorescent determination of neptunium in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandruk, V.M.; Babaev, A.S.; Dem'yanova, T.A.; Stepanov, A.V.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new procedure for direct determination of Neptunium in Plutonium using laser induced time resolved fluorescence method. The procedure based on measurement of fluorescence intensity of Neptunium followed its concentration in effective layer of pellet of calcium fluoride. Detection limit of determination of Neptunium is 2 10 -12 g. At the level of Neptunium content in Plutonium more than 5 ppm relative standard deviation is equal 0.08-0.12. For carrying out of single measurement it is necessary neither more nor less 5 mkg Plutonium

  5. Design of Fluorescent Compounds for Scintillation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, Anna [Northern Illinois U.

    1990-01-01

    Plastic scintillation detectors for high energy physics applications require the development of new fluorescent compounds to meet the demands set by the future generation of particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Supercollider (SSe). Plastic scintillators are commonly based on a polymer matrix doped with two fluorescent compounds: the primary dopant and the wavelength shifter. Their main characteristics are fast response time and high quantum efficiency. The exposure to larger radiation doses and demands for larger light output questions their survivability in the future experiments. A new type of plastic scintillator - intrinsic scintillator - has been suggested. It uses a single dopant as primary and wavelength shifter, and should be less susceptible to radiation damage....

  6. X-ray fluorescence analyzer arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatai, Endre; Ando, Laszlo; Gal, Janos.

    1981-01-01

    An x-ray fluorescence analyzer for the quantitative determination of one or more elements of complex samples is reported. The novelties of the invention are the excitation of the samples by x-rays or γ-radiation, the application of a balanced filter pair as energy selector, and the measurement of the current or ion charge of ionization detectors used as sensors. Due to the increased sensitivity and accuracy, the novel design can extend the application fields of x-ray fluorescence analyzers. (A.L.)

  7. Scanning fluorescent microscopy is an alternative for quantitative fluorescent cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Viktor Sebestyén; Bocsi, József; Sipos, Ferenc; Csendes, Gábor; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2004-07-01

    Fluorescent measurements on cells are performed today with FCM and laser scanning cytometry. The scientific community dealing with quantitative cell analysis would benefit from the development of a new digital multichannel and virtual microscopy based scanning fluorescent microscopy technology and from its evaluation on routine standardized fluorescent beads and clinical specimens. We applied a commercial motorized fluorescent microscope system. The scanning was done at 20 x (0.5 NA) magnification, on three channels (Rhodamine, FITC, Hoechst). The SFM (scanning fluorescent microscopy) software included the following features: scanning area, exposure time, and channel definition, autofocused scanning, densitometric and morphometric cellular feature determination, gating on scatterplots and frequency histograms, and preparation of galleries of the gated cells. For the calibration and standardization Immuno-Brite beads were used. With application of shading compensation, the CV of fluorescence of the beads decreased from 24.3% to 3.9%. Standard JPEG image compression until 1:150 resulted in no significant change. The change of focus influenced the CV significantly only after +/-5 microm error. SFM is a valuable method for the evaluation of fluorescently labeled cells. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Azadioxatriangulenium: exploring the effect of a 20 ns fluorescence lifetime in fluorescence anisotropy measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogh, Sidsel A.; Bora, Ilkay; Rosenberg, Martin; Thyrhaug, Erling; Laursen, Bo W.; Just Sørensen, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Azaoxatriangulenium (ADOTA) has been shown to be highly emissive despite a moderate molar absorption coefficient of the primary electronic transition. As a result, the fluorescence lifetime is ~20 ns, longer than all commonly used red fluorescent organic probes. The electronic transitions in ADOTA are highly polarised (r 0  =  0.38), which in combination with the long fluorescence lifetime extents the size-range of biomolecular weights that can be detected in fluorescence polarisation-based experiments. Here, the rotational dynamics of bovine serum albumin (BSA) are monitored with three different ADOTA derivatives, differing only in constitution of the reactive linker. A detailed study of the degree of labelling, the steady-state anisotropy, and the time-resolved anisotropy of the three different ADOTA-BSA conjugates are reported. The fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ fl) of the free dyes in PBS solution are determined to be ~55%, which is reduced to ~20% in the ADOTA-BSA conjugates. Despite the reduction in ϕ fl, a ~20 ns intensity averaged lifetime is maintained, allowing for the rotational dynamics of BSA to be monitored for up to 100 ns. Thus, ADOTA can be used in fluorescence polarisation assays to fill the gap between commonly used organic dyes and the long luminescence lifetime transition metal complexes. This allows for efficient steady-state fluorescence polarisation assays for detecting binding of analytes with molecular weights of up to 100 kDa.

  9. Using Fluorescence Intensity of Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein to Quantify Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Wilson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A variety of direct and indirect methods have been used to quantify planktonic and biofilm bacterial cells. Direct counting methods to determine the total number of cells include plate counts, microscopic cell counts, Coulter cell counting, flow cytometry, and fluorescence microscopy. However, indirect methods are often used to supplement direct cell counting, as they are often more convenient, less time-consuming, and require less material, while providing a number that can be related to the direct cell count. Herein, an indirect method is presented that uses fluorescence emission intensity as a proxy marker for studying bacterial accumulation. A clinical strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was genetically modified to express a green fluorescent protein (PA14/EGFP. The fluorescence intensity of EGFP in live cells was used as an indirect measure of live cell density, and was compared with the traditional cell counting methods of optical density (OD600 and plate counting (colony-forming units (CFUs. While both OD600 and CFUs are well-established methods, the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to quantify bacteria is less common. This study demonstrates that EGFP intensity is a convenient reporter for bacterial quantification. In addition, we demonstrate the potential for fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to measure the quantity of PA14/EGFP biofilms, which have important human health implications due to their antimicrobial resistance. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy could serve as an alternative or complementary quick assay to quantify bacteria in planktonic cultures and biofilms.

  10. Fluorescence diffuse tomography of small animals with DsRed2 fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchin, I. V.; Plehanov, V. I.; Orlova, A. G.; Kamenskiy, V. A.; Kleshnin, M. S.; Shirmanova, M. V.; Shakhova, N. M.; Balalaeva, I. V.; Savitskiy, A. P.

    2006-05-01

    Fluorescent compounds are used as markers to diagnose oncological diseases, to study molecular processes typical for carcinogenesis, and to investigate metastasis formation and tumor regress under the influence of therapeutics. Different types of tomography, such as continuous wave (CW), frequency-domain (FD), and time-domain (TD) tomography, allow fluorescence imaging of tumors located deep in human or animal tissue. In this work, preliminary results of the frequency domain fluorescent diffuse tomography (FDT) method in application to DsRed2 protein as a fluorescent agent are presented. For the first step of our experiments, we utilized low-frequency amplitude modulation (1 kHz) of second harmonic of Nd: YAG (532 nm). The transilluminative configuration was used in the setup. The results of post mortem experiments with capsules containing DsRed2 inserted inside the esophagus of a 3-day-old hairless rat to simulate tumor are shown. An algorithm of processing fluorescent images based on calculating the zero of maximum curvature has been applied to detect fluorescent inclusion boundaries in the image. This work demonstrates the potential capability of the FDT method for imaging deep fluorescent tumors in human tissue or animal models of human cancer. Improvement of the setup can be accomplished by using high-frequency modulation (using a 110-MHz acoustooptical modulator).

  11. A correlative study of Papanicolaou smear, fluorescent antibody, and culture for the diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, M R; Barbacci, M; Kappus, E; Quinn, T

    1986-11-01

    A prospective study of 300 patients undergoing therapeutic termination of pregnancy was conducted. A Papanicolaou smear was obtained and a clinical evaluation of the cervix was made. Specimens from the cervix were examined by both direct fluorescent antibody and culture techniques for the presence of Chlamydia trachomatis. The presence of inflammation on Papanicolaou smear could be correlated with C trachomatis isolation. Papanicolaou smear findings consistent with C trachomatis lacked both sensitivity and specificity when compared with direct fluorescent antibody and/or culture techniques. A correlation was found between the clinical diagnosis of cervicitis and C trachomatis. This interrelationship was absent when the component findings of cervicitis (ectopy, friability, and purulent mucus) were examined independently.

  12. Use of green fluorescent protein to monitor Lactobacillus plantarum in the gastrointestinal tract of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xufeng; Wang, Lei; Li, Wei; Li, Bibo; Yang, Yuxin; Yan, Hailong; Qu, Lei; Chen, Yulin

    2015-01-01

    The experiment aimed to specifically monitor the passage of lactobacilli in vivo after oral administration. The green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was cloned downstream from the constitutive p32 promoter from L. lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2. The recombinant expression vector, pLEM415-gfp-p32, was electroporated into Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) isolated from goat. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was successfully expressed in L. plantarum. After 2 h post-administration, transformed Lactobacillus could be detectable in all luminal contents. In the rumen, bacteria concentration initially decreased, reached the minimum at 42 h post-oral administration and then increased. However, this concentration decreased constantly in the duodenum. This result indicated that L. plantarum could colonize in the rumen but not in the duodenum.

  13. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  14. Let's Exploit Available Knowledge on Vegetation Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, Federico; Raddi, Sabrina; Mohammed, Gina; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    The potential to measure vegetation fluorescence from space (1) and to derive from it direct information on the gross primary productivity (GPP) of terrestrial ecosystems is probably the most thrilling development in remote sensing and global ecology of recent years, as it moves Earth observation techniques from the detection of canopy biophysics (e.g., fraction of absorbed radiation) and biochemistry (chlorophyll and nitrogen content) to the realm of ecosystem function. The existence of a functional relationship between fluorescence and photosynthesis has been elucidated over the last decade by several laboratories, notably as part of the preliminary studies of the European Space Agency Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) Earth Explorer Mission. The empirical observation presented by Guanter et al. (2) of a linear relationship between fluorescence radiance and GPP, however, provides the first experimental confirmation of the feasibility of the approach— already thoroughly tested at leaf level—at the desired scale, despite the confounding effects associated with the satellite detection of such a faint signal. A word of clarification is needed here. The use of fluorescence as a probe of leaf photochemistry has been a staple of plant ecophysiology for decades, rooted in a sound understanding of photosynthetic energy dissipation. However, most past studies had to rely for the interpretation of results on active (pulse-saturated) techniques, making them unsuitable for remote-sensing applications. Over recent years, however, novel process based models have been developed for the interpretation of steady-state, solar-induced fluorescence at the leaf to canopy scale (3). We are therefore in a position to move beyond the mere empirical observation of an association between GPP and fluorescence radiance. In particular, Guanter et al. (2) base their analysis on the assumption of a constant ratio between photosynthetic and fluorescence light use efficiencies (equation 3 in ref

  15. High voltage isolation transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clatterbuck, C. H.; Ruitberg, A. P. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A high voltage isolation transformer is provided with primary and secondary coils separated by discrete electrostatic shields from the surfaces of insulating spools on which the coils are wound. The electrostatic shields are formed by coatings of a compound with a low electrical conductivity which completely encase the coils and adhere to the surfaces of the insulating spools adjacent to the coils. Coatings of the compound also line axial bores of the spools, thereby forming electrostatic shields separating the spools from legs of a ferromagnetic core extending through the bores. The transformer is able to isolate a high constant potential applied to one of its coils, without the occurrence of sparking or corona, by coupling the coatings, lining the axial bores to the ferromagnetic core and by coupling one terminal of each coil to the respective coating encasing the coil.

  16. Psychopathology of social isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Sang-Bin

    2014-01-01

    The most important defining factor of being human is the use of symbolic language. Language or communication problem occurs during the growth, the child will have a higher risk of social isolation and then the survival will be threatened constantly. Today, adolescents and youths are familiar with computer and smart-phone devices, and communication with others by these devices is easy than face-to-face communication. As adolescents and youths live in the comfortable and familiar cyber-world ra...

  17. Mechanical beam isolator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.; Vann, C.S.

    1996-10-01

    Back-reflections from a target, lenses, etc. can gain energy passing backwards through a laser just like the main beam gains energy passing forwards. Unless something blocks these back-reflections early in their path, they can seriously damage the laser. A Mechanical Beam Isolator is a device that blocks back-reflections early, relatively inexpensively, and without introducing aberrations to the laser beam

  18. Neglected isolated scaphoid dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Ryoon Baek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a case of isolated scaphoid dislocation in a 40-year-old male that was undiagnosed for 2 months. The patient was treated by open reduction, Kirschner wire fixation, interosseous ligament repair using a suture anchor and Blatt's dorsal capsulodesis. At 6 years followup, his radiographs of wrist showed a normal carpal alignment with a scapholunate gap of 3 mm and no evidence of avascular necrosis (AVN of the scaphoid.

  19. Developing DNA nanotechnology using single-molecule fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukanov, Roman; Tomov, Toma E; Liber, Miran; Berger, Yaron; Nir, Eyal

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: An important effort in the DNA nanotechnology field is focused on the rational design and manufacture of molecular structures and dynamic devices made of DNA. As is the case for other technologies that deal with manipulation of matter, rational development requires high quality and informative feedback on the building blocks and final products. For DNA nanotechnology such feedback is typically provided by gel electrophoresis, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). These analytical tools provide excellent structural information; however, usually they do not provide high-resolution dynamic information. For the development of DNA-made dynamic devices such as machines, motors, robots, and computers this constitutes a major problem. Bulk-fluorescence techniques are capable of providing dynamic information, but because only ensemble averaged information is obtained, the technique may not adequately describe the dynamics in the context of complex DNA devices. The single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) technique offers a unique combination of capabilities that make it an excellent tool for guiding the development of DNA-made devices. The technique has been increasingly used in DNA nanotechnology, especially for the analysis of structure, dynamics, integrity, and operation of DNA-made devices; however, its capabilities are not yet sufficiently familiar to the community. The purpose of this Account is to demonstrate how different SMF tools can be utilized for the development of DNA devices and for structural dynamic investigation of biomolecules in general and DNA molecules in particular. Single-molecule diffusion-based Förster resonance energy transfer and alternating laser excitation (sm-FRET/ALEX) and immobilization-based total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques are briefly described and demonstrated. To illustrate the many applications of SMF to DNA nanotechnology, examples of SMF studies of DNA hairpins and

  20. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies with predetermined conformational epitope specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M Sholukh

    Full Text Available Existing technologies allow isolating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from B cells. We devised a direct approach to isolate mAbs with predetermined conformational epitope specificity, using epitope mimetics (mimotopes that reflect the three-dimensional structure of given antigen subdomains. We performed differential biopanning using bacteriophages encoding random peptide libraries and polyclonal antibodies (Abs that had been affinity-purified with either native or denatured antigen. This strategy yielded conformational mimotopes. We then generated mimotope-fluorescent protein fusions, which were used as baits to isolate single memory B cells from rhesus monkeys (RMs. To amplify RM immunoglobulin variable regions, we developed RM-specific PCR primers and generated chimeric simian-human mAbs with predicted epitope specificity. We established proof-of-concept of our strategy by isolating mAbs targeting the conformational V3 loop crown of HIV Env; the new mAbs cross-neutralized viruses of different clades. The novel technology allows isolating mAbs from RMs or other hosts given experimental immunogens or infectious agents.

  1. Engineering a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein tag for a wide variety of protein research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kobayashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetically encoded tag is a powerful tool for protein research. Various kinds of tags have been developed: fluorescent proteins for live-cell imaging, affinity tags for protein isolation, and epitope tags for immunological detections. One of the major problems concerning the protein tagging is that many constructs with different tags have to be made for different applications, which is time- and resource-consuming. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report a novel multifunctional green fluorescent protein (mfGFP tag which was engineered by inserting multiple peptide tags, i.e., octa-histidine (8xHis, streptavidin-binding peptide (SBP, and c-Myc tag, in tandem into a loop of GFP. When fused to various proteins, mfGFP monitored their localization in living cells. Streptavidin agarose column chromatography with the SBP tag successfully isolated the protein complexes in a native form with a high purity. Tandem affinity purification (TAP with 8xHis and SBP tags in mfGFP further purified the protein complexes. mfGFP was clearly detected by c-Myc-specific antibody both in immunofluorescence and immuno-electron microscopy (EM. These findings indicate that mfGFP works well as a multifunctional tag in mammalian cells. The tag insertion was also successful in other fluorescent protein, mCherry. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The multifunctional fluorescent protein tag is a useful tool for a wide variety of protein research, and may have the advantage over other multiple tag systems in its higher expandability and compatibility with existing and future tag technologies.

  2. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  3. Detection of dengue group viruses by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquin Vincent

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF represent a global challenge in public health. It is estimated that 50 to 100 million infections occur each year causing approximately 20,000 deaths that are usually linked to severe cases like DHF and dengue shock syndrome. The causative agent of DF is dengue virus (genus Flavivirus that comprises four distinct serotypes (DENV-1 to DENV-4. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has been used successfully to detect pathogenic agents, but has not been implemented in detecting DENV. To improve our understanding of DENV infection and dissemination in host tissues, we designed specific probes to detect DENV in FISH assays. Methods Oligonucleotide probes were designed to hybridize with RNA from the broadest range of DENV isolates belonging to the four serotypes, but not to the closest Flavivirus genomes. Three probes that fit the criteria defined for FISH experiments were selected, targeting both coding and non-coding regions of the DENV genome. These probes were tested in FISH assays against the dengue vector Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae. The FISH experiments were led in vitro using the C6/36 cell line, and in vivo against dissected salivary glands, with epifluorescence and confocal microscopy. Results The three 60-nt oligonucleotides probes DENV-Probe A, B and C cover a broad range of DENV isolates from the four serotypes. When the three probes were used together, specific fluorescent signals were observed in C6/36 infected with each DENV serotypes. No signal was detected in either cells infected with close Flavivirus members West Nile virus or yellow fever virus. The same protocol was used on salivary glands of Ae. albopictus fed with a DENV-2 infectious blood-meal which showed positive signals in the lateral lobes of infected samples, with no significant signal in uninfected mosquitoes. Conclusion Based on the FISH technique, we propose a way to design and use

  4. Fluorescence correction in electron probe microanalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellano, Gustavo; Riveros, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    In this work, several expressions for characteristic fluorescence corrections are computed, for a compilation of experimental determinations on standard samples. Since this correction does not take significant values, the performance of the different models is nearly the same; this fact suggests the use of the simplest available expression. (Author) [es

  5. Lipophilic fluorescent products of free radicals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ivica, Josko; Wilhelm, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 3 (2014), s. 365-372 ISSN 1213-8118 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0298 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : lipofuscin-like pigments * lipid peroxidation * free radical s * fluorescence Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2014

  6. Automated x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    A fully automated x-ray fluorescence analytical system is described. The hardware is based on a Philips PW1220 sequential x-ray spectrometer. Software for on-line analysis of a wide range of sample types has been developed for the Hewlett-Packard 9810A programmable calculator. Routines to test the system hardware are also described. (Author)

  7. Fluorescent excitation of interstellar H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Black, J.H.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1987-01-01

    The infrared emission spectrum of H2 excited by ultraviolet absorption, followed by fluorescence, was investigated using comprehensive models of interstellar clouds for computing the spectrum and to assess the effects on the intensity to various cloud properties, such as density, size, temperature,

  8. [Fluorescence spectra analysis of the scrophularia soup].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li-hua; Song, Feng; Han, Juan; Su, Jing; Qu, Fei-fei; Song, Yi-zhan; Hu, Bo-lin; Tian, Jian-guo

    2008-08-01

    The cold-water and boiled-water soaked scrophularia soups have been prepared. The emission and excitation spectra of each scrophularia soup under different conditions have been measured at room temperature. The pH values of the different scrophularia soups have been also detected. There are obvious differences between the cold-water soaked scrophularia soup and the boiled-water soaked scrophularia. For both soups the emission wavelength increases with the wavelength of the excitation, but the peaks of the emission spectra for cold-water and boiled-water soaked scrophularia soup are different, which are 441 and 532 nm, respectively. Excitation spectrum has double peaks in the cold-water soaked scrophularia soup while only one peak with longer wavelength in the boiled-water soaked one. The pH value changes from 5.5 to 4.1. According to the organic admixture fluorescence mechanism we analyzed the reasons of the experimental results. Through heating, the interaction in different fluorescence molecular and the energy transfer process in the same fluorescence molecular become more active, and the conjugate structures and the generation of hydrogen bonds, increase. The fluorescence measurement is of value for the scrophularia pharmacology analysis and provides an analytical method for the quality identification of scrophularia soup.

  9. Fluorescent nanodiamonds embedded in biocompatible translucent shells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehor, Ivan; Slegerova, Jitka; Kucka, Jan; Proks, Vladimir; Petrakova, Vladimira; Adam, Marie-Pierre; Treussart, François; Turner, Stuart; Bals, Sara; Sacha, Pavel; Ledvina, Miroslav; Wen, Amy M; Steinmetz, Nicole F; Cigler, Petr

    2014-03-26

    High pressure high temperature (HPHT) nanodiamonds (NDs) represent extremely promising materials for construction of fluorescent nanoprobes and nanosensors. However, some properties of bare NDs limit their direct use in these applications: they precipitate in biological solutions, only a limited set of bio-orthogonal conjugation techniques is available and the accessible material is greatly polydisperse in shape. In this work, we encapsulate bright 30-nm fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in 10-20-nm thick translucent (i.e., not altering FND fluorescence) silica shells, yielding monodisperse near-spherical particles of mean diameter 66 nm. High yield modification of the shells with PEG chains stabilizes the particles in ionic solutions, making them applicable in biological environments. We further modify the opposite ends of PEG chains with fluorescent dyes or vectoring peptide using click chemistry. High conversion of this bio-orthogonal coupling yielded circa 2000 dye or peptide molecules on a single FND. We demonstrate the superior properties of these particles by in vitro interaction with human prostate cancer cells: while bare nanodiamonds strongly aggregate in the buffer and adsorb onto the cell membrane, the shell encapsulated NDs do not adsorb nonspecifically and they penetrate inside the cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a 60 C source have also been performed

  11. Genetically encoded fluorescent probe to visualize phosphatidylinositol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Eisenreichová, Andrea; Humpolíčková, Jana; Bouřa, Evžen

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 364-365 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] R&D Projects: GA ČR GJ15-21030Y; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphatidylinositol * fluorescent probe Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Water-soluble heterobifunctional fluorescent linkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartoň, Jan; Cígler, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2017), s. 4 ISSN 2336-7202. [Mezioborové setkání mladých biologů, biochemiků a chemiků /17./. 30.05.2017-01.06.2017, Milovy] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorescent probes * heterobifunctional linkers Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  13. Azaphthalocyanines: Red Fluorescent Probes for Cations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, V.; Lochman, L.; Zajícová, I.; Kopecký, K.; Miletin, M.; Lang, Kamil; Kirakci, Kaplan; Zimcik, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 16 (2013), s. 5025-5028 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/10/1678 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : crown compounds * fluorescent probes * phthalocyanine s * potassium * sodium Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.696, year: 2013

  14. Fluorescent magnetic hybrid nanoprobe for multimodal bioimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koktysh, Dmitry [Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Station B 351822, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bright, Vanessa; Pham, Wellington, E-mail: dmitry.koktysh@vanderbilt.edu, E-mail: wellington.pham@vanderbilt.edu [Institute of Imaging Science, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue South AA, 1105 MCN, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2011-07-08

    A fluorescent magnetic hybrid imaging nanoprobe (HINP) was fabricated by the conjugation of superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and visible light emitting ({approx}600 nm) fluorescent CdTe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). The assembly strategy used the covalent linking of the oxidized dextran shell of magnetic particles to the glutathione ligands of QDs. The synthesized HINP formed stable water-soluble colloidal dispersions. The structure and properties of the particles were characterized by transmission electron and atomic force microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering analysis, optical absorption and photoluminescence spectroscopy, and fluorescent imaging. The luminescence imaging region of the nanoprobe was extended to the near-infrared (NIR) ({approx}800 nm) by conjugation of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles with synthesized CdHgTe/CdS QDs. Cadmium, mercury based QDs in HINP can be easily replaced by novel water-soluble glutathione stabilized AgInS{sub 2}/ZnS QDs to present a new class of cadmium-free multimodal imaging agents. The observed NIR photoluminescence of fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites supports their use for bioimaging. The developed HINP provides dual-imaging channels for simultaneous optical and magnetic resonance imaging.

  15. Fluorescence optical imaging in anticancer drug delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Lucas, H.; Janoušková, Olga; Chytil, Petr; Mueller, T.; Mäder, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 226, 28 March (2016), s. 168-181 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescence imaging * drug delivery * theranostics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.786, year: 2016

  16. Recent developments in multimodality fluorescence imaging probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhong Zhao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Multimodality optical imaging probes have emerged as powerful tools that improve detection sensitivity and accuracy, important in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we focus on recent developments of optical fluorescence imaging (OFI probe integration with other imaging modalities such as X-ray computed tomography (CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, positron emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, and photoacoustic imaging (PAI. The imaging technologies are briefly described in order to introduce the strengths and limitations of each techniques and the need for further multimodality optical imaging probe development. The emphasis of this account is placed on how design strategies are currently implemented to afford physicochemically and biologically compatible multimodality optical fluorescence imaging probes. We also present studies that overcame intrinsic disadvantages of each imaging technique by multimodality approach with improved detection sensitivity and accuracy. KEY WORDS: Optical imaging, Fluorescence, Multimodality, Near-infrared fluorescence, Nanoprobe, Computed tomography, Magnetic resonance imaging, Positron emission tomography, Single-photon emission computed tomography, Photoacoustic imaging

  17. Fluorescence metrology of silica sol-gels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have developed a new method for measuring in-situ the growth of the nanometre-size silica particles which lead to the formation of sol-gel glasses. This technique is based on the decay of fluorescence polarisation anisotropy due to Brownian rotation of dye molecules bound to the particles. Results to date give near ...

  18. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. August 2003 physics pp. 373–384. Fluorescence confocal polarizing ... and focal conic domains in flat samples of lamellar LCs are practically indistinguishable. ... or less) LC layer confined between two transparent plates. ... in studies of electro-optic effects such as the Frederiks effect, defects, surface anchoring,.

  19. Miniature Optical Isolator, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA's need for compact optical isolators, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to continue the development of a new Miniature Optical Isolator...

  20. Isolation and Cultivation of Anaerobes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aragao Börner, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play important roles in different biotechnological processes. Their complex metabolism and special cultivation requirements have led to less isolated representatives in comparison to their aerobic counterparts.In view of that, the isolation and cultivation of anaerobic...

  1. The fate of Helicobacter pylori phagocytized by Acanthamoeba polyphaga demonstrated by fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative polymerization chain reaction tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helicobacter pylori able to express green fluorescent protein, as well as an ATCC strain, and a clinical isolate of this pathogen were evaluated for their ability to survive predation by Acanthamoeba polyphaga. Ingestion was evaluated by microscopic observation of the GFP-H. pyl...

  2. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  3. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  4. Quantitative fluorescence spectroscopy in turbid media using fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelink, Arjen; Kruijt, Bastiaan; Robinson, Dominic J.; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new technique, fluorescence differential path length spectroscopy (FDPS), that enables the quantitative investigation of fluorophores in turbid media. FDPS measurements are made with the same probe geometry as differential path length spectroscopy (DPS) measurements. Phantom

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Fluorescent SiO2 Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cui; Zhang, Hao; Guan, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent compound without typical fluorophores was synthesized with citric acid (CA) and aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) firstly, and then it was grafted to the surface of the prepared SiO2 microspheres by chemical reaction. The fluorescent SiO2 microspheres with good fluorescent properties were obtained by optimizing the reaction conditions. And the morphology and structure of the fluorescent SiO2 microspheres have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the preparation of fluorescent SiO2 microspheres have good monodispersity and narrow particle size distribution. Moreover, the fluorescent SiO2 microspheres can be applied to detect Fe3+ in aqueous solution, prepare fluorescent SiO2 rubber, and have potential to be applied in the fluorescent labeling and fingerprint appearing technique fields.

  6. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  7. Highly fluorescent benzofuran derivatives of the GFP chromophore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mikkel Andreas; Jennum, Karsten Stein; Abrahamsen, Peter Bæch

    2012-01-01

    Intramolecular cyclization reactions of Green Fluorescent Protein chromophores (GFPc) containing an arylethynyl ortho-substituent at the phenol ring provide new aryl-substituted benzofuran derivatives of the GFPc. Some of these heteroaromatic compounds exhibit significantly enhanced fluorescence...

  8. Generally Applicable Transformation Protocols for Fluorescent Nanodiamond Internalization into Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelaar, Simon R; van der Laan, Kiran J; Hinterding, Sophie R; Koot, Manon V; Ellermann, Else; Perona-Martinez, Felipe P; Roig, David; Hommelet, Severin; Novarina, Daniele; Takahashi, Hiroki; Chang, Michael; Schirhagl, Romana

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are promising nanoprobes, owing to their stable and magnetosensitive fluorescence. Therefore they can probe properties as magnetic resonances, pressure, temperature or strain. The unprecedented sensitivity of diamond defects can detect the faint magnetic resonance of

  9. A simple and sensitive fluorescent probe for specific detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yan-Fei Kang

    A fluorescent probe, with simplicity of structure and convenience of synthesis, is capable of detecting ... Yan-Fei Kang et al. .... Pastore A, Federici G, Bertini E and Ptemonte F 2003 ... Urano Y 2010 New Strategies for Fluorescent Probe.

  10. 21 CFR 866.2600 - Wood's fluorescent lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2600 Wood's fluorescent lamp. (a) Identification. A Wood's fluorescent lamp is a device intended for medical purposes to detect...

  11. Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2007-01-01

    .... We have successfully completed all goals and achieved the three major aims of the proposal, i.e. i) the development of appropriate fluorescence imaging methods for highly reliable and quantitative fluorescence imaging ii...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of colloidal fluorescent silver nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sherry; Pfeiffer, Christian; Hollmann, Jana; Friede, Sebastian; Chen, Justin Jin-Ching; Beyer, Andreas; Haas, Benedikt; Volz, Kerstin; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Montenegro Martos, Jose Maria; Chang, Walter; Parak, Wolfgang J

    2012-06-19

    Ultrasmall water-soluble silver nanoclusters are synthesized, and their properties are investigated. The silver nanoclusters have high colloidal stability and show fluorescence in the red. This demonstrates that like gold nanoclusters also silver nanoclusters can be fluorescent.

  13. Fluorescence spectroscopy and multi-way techniques. PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin A.; Graeber, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    PARAllel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC) is increasingly used to decompose fluorescence excitation emission matrices (EEMs) into their underlying chemical components. In the ideal case where fluorescence conforms to Beers Law, this process can lead to the mathematical identification and quantification...

  14. In Situ Live-Cell Nucleus Fluorescence Labeling with Bioinspired Fluorescent Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Pan; Wang, Houyu; Song, Bin; Ji, Xiaoyuan; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2017-08-01

    Fluorescent imaging techniques for visualization of nuclear structure and function in live cells are fundamentally important for exploring major cellular events. The ideal cellular labeling method is capable of realizing label-free, in situ, real-time, and long-term nucleus labeling in live cells, which can fully obtain the nucleus-relative information and effectively alleviate negative effects of alien probes on cellular metabolism. However, current established fluorescent probes-based strategies (e.g., fluorescent proteins-, organic dyes-, fluorescent organic/inorganic nanoparticles-based imaging techniques) are unable to simultaneously realize label-free, in situ, long-term, and real-time nucleus labeling, resulting in inevitable difficulties in fully visualizing nuclear structure and function in live cells. To this end, we present a type of bioinspired fluorescent probes, which are highly efficacious for in situ and label-free tracking of nucleus in long-term and real-time manners. Typically, the bioinspired polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles, served as fluorescent probes, can be readily synthesized in situ within live cell nucleus without any further modifications under physiological conditions (37 °C, pH ∼7.4). Compared with other conventional nuclear dyes (e.g., propidium iodide (PI), Hoechst), superior spectroscopic properties (e.g., quantum yield of ∼35.8% and high photostability) and low cytotoxicity of PDA-based probes enable long-term (e.g., 3 h) fluorescence tracking of nucleus. We also demonstrate the generality of this type of bioinspired fluorescent probes in different cell lines and complex biological samples.

  15. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  16. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence of fluorescein derivative for time-resolved and confocal fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xiaoqing; Song, Fengling; Wang, Jingyun; Zhang, Yukang; Xue, Yingying; Sun, Liangliang; Jiang, Na; Gao, Pan; Tian, Lu; Peng, Xiaojun

    2014-07-09

    Compared with fluorescence imaging utilizing fluorophores whose lifetimes are in the order of nanoseconds, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy has more advantages in monitoring target fluorescence. In this work, compound DCF-MPYM, which is based on a fluorescein derivative, showed long-lived luminescence (22.11 μs in deaerated ethanol) and was used in time-resolved fluorescence imaging in living cells. Both nanosecond time-resolved transient difference absorption spectra and time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) were employed to explain the long lifetime of the compound, which is rare in pure organic fluorophores without rare earth metals and heavy atoms. A mechanism of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) that considers the long wavelength fluorescence, large Stokes shift, and long-lived triplet state of DCF-MPYM was proposed. The energy gap (ΔEST) of DCF-MPYM between the singlet and triplet state was determined to be 28.36 meV by the decay rate of DF as a function of temperature. The ΔE(ST) was small enough to allow efficient intersystem crossing (ISC) and reverse ISC, leading to efficient TADF at room temperature. The straightforward synthesis of DCF-MPYM and wide availability of its starting materials contribute to the excellent potential of the compound to replace luminescent lanthanide complexes in future time-resolved imaging technologies.

  17. Two-photon fluorescence and fluorescence imaging of two styryl heterocyclic dyes combined with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chao; Liu, Shu-yao; Zhang, Xian; Liu, Ying-kai; Qiao, Cong-de; Liu, Zhao-e

    2016-03-05

    Two new styryl heterocyclic two-photon (TP) materials, 4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-imidazo [4,5-f][1,10] phenanthroline-benzene iodated salt (probe-1) and 4,4-[4-(N-methyl)styrene]-benzene iodated salt (probe-2) were successfully synthesized and studied as potential fluorescent probes of DNA detection. The linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of two compounds in different solvents were investigated. The absorption, one- and two-photon fluorescent spectra of the free dye and dye-DNA complex were also examined to evaluate their photophysical properties. The binding constants of dye-DNA were obtained according to Scatchard equation with good values. The results showed that two probes could be used as fluorescent DNA probes by two-photon excitation, and TP fluorescent properties of probe-1 are superior to that of probe-2. The fluorescent method date indicated that the mechanisms of dye-DNA complex interaction may be groove binding for probe-1 and electrostatic interaction for probe-2, respectively. The MTT assay experiments showed two probes are low toxicity. Moreover, the TP fluorescence imaging of DNA detection in living cells at 800 nm indicated that the ability to locate in cell nuclei of probe-1 is better than that of probe-2. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Fluorescent fingerprints of edible oils and biodiesel by means total synchronous fluorescence and Tucker3 modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insausti, Matías; de Araújo Gomes, Adriano; Camiña, José Manuel; de Araújo, Mario Cesar Ugulino; Band, Beatriz Susana Fernández

    2017-03-01

    The present work proposes the use of total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) as a discrimination methodology for fluorescent compounds in edible oils, which are preserved after the transesterification processes in the biodiesel production. In the same way, a similar study is presented to identify fluorophores that do not change in expired vegetal oils, to associate physicochemical parameters to fluorescent measures, as contribution to a fingerprint for increasing the chemical knowledge of these products. The fluorescent fingerprints were obtained by Tucker3 decomposition of a three-way array of the total synchronous fluorescence matrices. This chemometric method presents the ability for modeling non-bilinear data, as Total Synchronous Fluorescence Spectra data, and consists in the decomposition of the three way data arrays (samples × Δλ × λ excitation), into four new data matrices: A (scores), B (profile in Δλ mode), C (profile in spectra mode) and G (relationships between A, B and C). In this study, 50 samples of oil from soybean, corn and sunflower seeds before and after its expiration time, as well as 50 biodiesel samples obtained by transesterification of the same oils were measured by TSFS. This study represents an immediate application of chemical fingerprint for the discrimination of non-expired and expired edible oils and biodiesel. This method does not require the use of reagents or laborious procedures for the chemical characterization of samples.

  19. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence from urine. As this green fluorescence confounds the desired red fluorescence of the PDD, methods for avoiding this situation particularly in cystoscopy using flexible cystoscopes are desirable. In this paper we demonstrate how a tailor made high power LED light source at 525 nm can be used for fluorescence assisted tumour detection using both a flexible and rigid cystoscope used in the outpatient department (OPD) and operating room (OR) respectively. It is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo how this light source can significantly reduce the green fluorescence problem with urine. At the same time this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder.

  20. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization on formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laub Petersen, Bodil; Zeuthen, Mette Christa; Pedersen, Sanni

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is widely used to study numerical and structural genetic abnormalities in both metaphase and interphase cells. The technique is based on the hybridization of labeled probes to complementary sequences in the DNA or RNA of the cells. Interphase FISH is most...... in time lapse between removal of tissue and fixation, duration of fixation, enzymatic pretreatment, hybridization conditions, and posthybridization washing conditions are important factors in the hybridization. In this study, we have listed the results of a systematic approach to improve FISH on isolated...

  2. Single molecule tracking fluorescence microscopy in mitochondria reveals highly dynamic but confined movement of Tom40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Anton; Tankov, Stoyan; English, Brian P.; Tarassov, Ivan; Tenson, Tanel; Kamenski, Piotr; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2011-12-01

    Tom40 is an integral protein of the mitochondrial outer membrane, which as the central component of the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex forms a channel for protein import. We characterize the diffusion properties of individual Tom40 molecules fused to the photoconvertable fluorescent protein Dendra2 with millisecond temporal resolution. By imaging individual Tom40 molecules in intact isolated yeast mitochondria using photoactivated localization microscopy with sub-diffraction limited spatial precision, we demonstrate that Tom40 movement in the outer mitochondrial membrane is highly dynamic but confined in nature, suggesting anchoring of the TOM complex as a whole.

  3. Isolation, Characterization and Identification of Microalgae from the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Luque Alanís, Patricio

    2013-05-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae from the Red Sea were isolated, characterized and identified with the purpose of building a culture collection that will serve future research activities in the area of industrial microbiology. Seven sampling locations were surveyed using an in-house designed isolation protocol. Microalgae enrichment was carried out in vitro using the streak plate method and fluorescence activated cell sorting approaches. Colonial and cellular microscopy, growth media preference assays, as well as temperature, pH and salinity tolerance tests were carried out to describe the isolates. DNA extraction, PCR amplification, template sequencing and in silico analyses were carried out to identify the isolates and arrange them in a proper phylogenetic description. In total, 129 isolates were obtained. From these, only 39 were selected for characterization given their increased ability of accumulating large amounts of biomass in solid and liquid media in relatively short periods of time. All of these have a green color, are unicellular, non-motile, photosynthetic organisms and have a cell size ranging from 5 to 8 µm. More than half of them showed growth preference in Walne media, followed by F/2, MN and BG-11 SW. Maximum temperature tolerance of all organisms was around 38 ºC, while optimum growth was observed close to 25 ºC. pH preference was diverse and three groups were identified: acidic (6), intermediate (8 - 9) and alkaline (> 10) growing isolates. Salinity tests showed an overall growth preference at 25 PSU, approximately 10 units lower than that found at the sampling stations. Most isolates showed diminished growth at high salinity and high pH, except for OS3S1b which grew well in both cases, and could be an interesting strain to study further. Twenty four isolates were related to Ulvophyceae sp. MBIC10591 by BLAST approaches with a maximum identity of 96 - 97%. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree was created for these isolates, relative to the BLAST hits

  4. Fibro/Adipogenic Progenitors (FAPs): Isolation by FACS and Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Marcela; Eisner, Christine; Rossi, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Fibro/adipogenic progenitors (FAPs ) are tissue-resident mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Current literature supports a role for these cells in the homeostasis and repair of multiple tissues suggesting that FAPs may have extensive therapeutic potential in the treatment of numerous diseases. In this context, it is crucial to establish efficient and reproducible procedures to purify FAP populations from various tissues. Here, we describe a protocol for the isolation and cell culture of FAPs from murine skeletal muscle using fluorescence -activated cell sorting (FACS), which is particularly useful for experiments where high cell purity is an essential requirement. Identification, isolation, and cell culture of FAPs represent powerful tools that will help us to understand the role of these cells in different conditions and facilitate the development of safe and effective new treatments for diseases.

  5. Using silicon-coated gold nanoparticles to enhance the fluorescence of CdTe quantum dot and improve the sensing ability of mercury (II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Chang, Hui; Li, Jian-Jun; Li, Xin; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2018-01-01

    The effect of silicon-coated gold nanoparticles with different gold core diameter and silica shell thickness on the fluorescence emission of CdTe quantum dots (QDs) was investigated. For gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 15 nm, silica coating can only results in fluorescence recover of the bare gold nanoparticle-induced quenching of QDs. However, when the size of gold nanoparticle is increased to 60 nm, fluorescence enhancement of the QDs could be obtained by silica coating. Because of the isolation of the silica shell-reduced quenching effect and local electric field effect, the fluorescence of QDs gets intense firstly and then decreases. The maximum fluorescence enhancement takes place as the silica shell has a thickness of 30 nm. This enhanced fluorescence from silicon-coated gold nanoparticles is demonstrated for sensing of Hg2 +. Under optimal conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity decreases linearly with the concentration of Hg2 + ranging from 0 to 200 ng/mL. The limit of detection for Hg2 + is 1.25 ng/mL. Interference test and real samples detection indicate that the influence from other metal ions could be neglected, and the Hg2 + could be specifically detected.

  6. Diabetes in population isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grarup, Niels; Moltke, Ida; Albrechtsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is an increasing health problem worldwide with particularly high occurrence in specific subpopulations and ancestry groups. The high prevalence of T2D is caused both by changes in lifestyle and genetic predisposition. A large number of studies have sought to identify...... on glucose-stimulated plasma glucose, serum insulin levels, and T2D. The variant defines a specific subtype of non-autoimmune diabetes characterized by decreased post-prandial glucose uptake and muscular insulin resistance. These and other recent findings in population isolates illustrate the value...

  7. Journey from isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim A. Dreyer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the Ottawa Consultation in 1982, the relationship between the Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika (NHKA and the World Alliance of Reformed Churches (WARC was nonexistent. In the NHKA it became progressively clear that it would be impossible to travel the road of faith alone. This article examined the factors which contributed to the growing isolation of the NHKA, especially nationalism, a particularistic ecclesiology and the rejection of Apartheid by international ecumenical bodies. It also reflected on efforts of the NHKA to return to the international ecumenical movement.

  8. Waste isolation: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLaren, L.H.

    1982-12-01

    This bibliography contains information on waste isolation included in the Department of Energy's Energy Data Base from Janurary 1981 through November 1982. The abstracts are grouped by subject category as shown in the table of contents. Entries in the subject index also facilitate access by subject, e.g., Radioactive Waste Disposal/Salt Deposits. Within each category the arrangement is by report number for reports, followed by nonreports in reverse chronological order. These citations are to research reports, journal articles, books, patents, theses, and conference papers from worldwide sources. Five indexes, each preceded by a brief description, are provided: Corporate Author, Personal Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number

  9. Study of some physicochemical and functional properties of quinoa (chenopodium quinoa willd) protein isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugoch, Lilian E; Romero, Nalda; Tapia, Cristián A; Silva, Jorge; Rivera, Mónica

    2008-06-25

    The amino acid composition and the physicochemical and functional properties of quinoa protein isolates were evaluated. Protein isolates were prepared from quinoa seed by alkaline solubilization (at pH 9, called Q9, and at pH 11, called Q11) followed by isoelectric precipitation and spray drying. Q9 and Q11 had high levels of essential amino acids, with high levels of lysine. Both isolates showed similar patterns in native/SDS-PAGE and SEM. The pH effect on fluorescence measurements showed decreasing fluorescence intensity and a shift in the maximum of emission of both isolates. Q9 showed an endotherm with a denaturation temperature of 98.1 degrees C and a denaturation enthalpy of 12.7 J/g, while Q11 showed no endotherm. The protein solubility of Q11 was lower than that of Q9 at pH above 5.0 but similar at the pH range 3.0-4.0. The water holding capacity (WHC) was similar in both isolates and was not affected by pH. The water imbibing capacity (WIC) was double for Q11 (3.5 mL of water/g isolate). Analysis of DSC, fluorescence, and solubility data suggests that there is apparently denaturation due to pH. Some differences were found that could be attributed to the extreme pH treatments in protein isolates and the nature of quinoa proteins. Q9 and Q11 can be used as a valuable source of nutrition for infants and children. Q9 may be used as an ingredient in nutritive beverages, and Q11 may be used as an ingredient in sauces, sausages, and soups.

  10. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  11. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bac...

  12. Solvent isotope effect on the fluorescence of azoalkanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirbach, M.J.; Mirbach, M.F.; Cherry, W.R.; Turro, N.J.; Engel, P.

    1977-01-01

    A study of fluorescence quantum yields and fluorescence lifetimes of two cyclic azoalkanes reveal a striking dependence of phisub(F) and tausub(F) on solvent and on isotopic substitution (OH → OD). A mechanism involving specific deactivation of the fluorescent state from a hydrogen bonded complex is proposed to rationalize the data. (orig./HK) [de

  13. Contribution of glue layer into epidermis sample fluorescence dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomatina, Elena V.; Chernova, Svetlana P.; Pravdin, Alexander B.

    2000-04-01

    In this work, the temporal behavior of autofluorescence of epidermis samples under UV-irradiation has ben studied. The samples were prepared using surface epidermis stripping technique. Fluorescence spectra and kinetic curves of fluorescence intensity have been obtained. It has been concluded that the glue composition used allows the measurement of epidermis fluorescence dynamics with the first 60 min of experiment.

  14. 21 CFR 872.1745 - Laser fluorescence caries detection device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laser fluorescence caries detection device. 872... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 872.1745 Laser fluorescence caries detection device. (a) Identification. A laser fluorescence caries detection device is a laser, a...

  15. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of small animal organs, albeit at lower resolution (30,000 sampling points/image). In rodent models, imaging was performed using various fluorescent staining protocols including fluorescently labelled receptor ligands, labelled antibodies, FITC-dextrans, vital dyes and labelled cells administered topically or intravenously. Abdominal organs of large animals were accessed laparoscopically and contrasted using i.v. fluorescein-sodium. Articular cartilage of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and sub-cellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high

  16. Yeast Isolation for Bioethanol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EKA RURIANI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We have isolated 12 yeast isolates from five different rotten fruits by using a yeast glucose chloramphenicol agar (YGCA medium supplemented with tetracycline. From pre-screening assay, four isolates exhibited higher substrate (glucose-xylose consumption efficiency in the reaction tube fermentation compared to Saccharomyces cerevisiae dan Saccharomyces ellipsoids as the reference strains. Based on the fermentation process in gooseneck flasks, we observed that two isolates (K and SB showed high fermentation efficiency both in sole glucose and mixed glucose-xylose substrate. Moreover, isolates K and SB produced relatively identical level of ethanol concentration compared to the reference strains. Isolates H and MP could only produce high levels of ethanol in glucose fermentation, while only half of that amount of ethanol was detected in glucose-xylose fermentation. Isolate K and SB were identified as Pichia kudriavzeevii (100% based on large sub unit (LSU ribosomal DNA D1/D2 region.

  17. S - and N-alkylating agents diminish the fluorescence of fluorescent dye-stained DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesche, Robert; John, Harald; Kehe, Kai; Schmidt, Annette; Popp, Tanja; Balzuweit, Frank; Thiermann, Horst; Gudermann, Thomas; Steinritz, Dirk

    2017-01-25

    Sulfur mustard (SM), a chemical warfare agent, causes DNA alkylation, which is believed to be the main cause of its toxicity. SM DNA adducts are commonly used to verify exposure to this vesicant. However, the required analytical state-of-the-art mass-spectrometry methods are complex, use delicate instruments, are not mobile, and require laboratory infrastructure that is most likely not available in conflict zones. Attempts have thus been made to develop rapid detection methods that can be used in the field. The analysis of SM DNA adducts (HETE-G) by immunodetection is a convenient and suitable method. For a diagnostic assessment, HETE-G levels must be determined in relation to the total DNA in the sample. Total DNA can be easily visualized by the use of fluorescent DNA dyes. This study examines whether SM and related compounds affect total DNA staining, an issue that has not been investigated before. After pure DNA was extracted from human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), DNA was exposed to different S- and N-alkylating agents. Our experiments revealed a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the fluorescence signal of fluorescent dye-stained DNA after exposure to alkylating agents. After mass spectrometry and additional fluorescence measurements ruled out covalent modifications of ethidium bromide (EthBr) by SM, we assumed that DNA crosslinks caused DNA condensation and thereby impaired access of the fluorescent dyes to the DNA. DNA digestion by restriction enzymes restored fluorescence, a fact that strengthened our hypothesis. However, monofunctional agents, which are unable to crosslink DNA, also decreased the fluorescence signal. In subsequent experiments, we demonstrated that protons produced during DNA alkylation caused a pH decrease that was found responsible for the reduction in fluorescence. The use of an appropriate buffer system eliminated the adverse effect of alkylating agents on DNA staining with fluorescent dyes. An appropriate buffer system is thus

  18. Radionuclides migration or isolation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulhoat, P.; Grambow, B.; Simoni, E.

    2005-01-01

    After 20 years of research, the chemical behaviour of actinides and fission products in nuclear waste disposal environments is much better understood. Consistent thermodynamic data have been gathered and allow much more accurate previsions. Through the considerable development of analytical spectroscopy, including time resolved laser fluorescence and X ray absorption, a better understanding of the chemical reactivity (complexation, sorption) of actinides and fission products at a molecular scale has been possible. Chemically reducing conditions are found in most selected disposal host rock formations, generally chosen for their high sorption capacity (clays); such conditions favour the chemical confinement of most radionuclides through precipitation or sorption. Low permeability host rocks participate to this confinement, as convective fluxes are lower than diffusive fluxes. The most recent performance assessment exercises have taken into account the recent progress of knowledge in the chemical evolution of the near field. They show that the dose rates at the outlet are far lower than existing recommendations for normal and most altered evolution scenarios. (authors)

  19. Isolation and Identification of Active Compound Cause Light Emmitting of Bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum Isolated from the Indonesia Jepara Marine Squid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idam Arif

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This research carried out to study the bioluminescence process of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum isolated from Indonesia marine squid. The method used in the present study involved isolation, purification, electrophoresis, and the absorbance and light intensity measurement. This result show that the luciferace enzyme of bacterial Photobacterium phosphoreum or called LBPP catalyzes the emission of visible light from the reaction of reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2, molecular oxygen (O2, and an aldehyde (RCOH. The electrophoresis data show that LBPP comprised of two different subunits α and βwith 41kD and 38 kD molecular weights. The absorb pattern showed that the bioluminescence process centered around 516 nm and are consistent with the fluorescence data. This result concluded that the excitation state formed after LBPP bind subtracts and the ground state formed after LBPP releases product and visible light.

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool for quality assessment of humic substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boguta, Patrycja

    2016-04-01

    *The studies were partly carried out within the framework of a research project. The project was financed from funds of National Science Center on the base of decision number DEC-2013/11/D/NZ9/02545. Fluorescence spectroscopy belongs to modern, non-destructive, rapid and relatively cheap methods, as well as for many years it was successfully used in studies of organic compounds in the fields of medicine, biology and chemistry. On the other hand, soil organic matter is a group of compounds with a complex spatial structure showing a large number of groups with different kinds of fluorophores. This could suggest the possibility of application of fluorescence spectroscopy in assessing the quality of humic substances as well as in monitoring of their chemical transformations. The aim of study was chemical description of humic and fulvic acids based on fluorescence spectra, as well as an attempt of evaluation of changes occurring under the influence of different pH and during interactions with various concentrations of metal. The humic and fulvic acids were isolated from chemically different soils. The measurements were carried out on Hitachi fluorescence spectrometer in solutions with a concentration of humic acids 40mg dm-3, at pH from 3 to 7, and for the evaluation of the metal impact: with increasing Zn concentrations (0-50mg dm-3). The fluorescence spectra were recorded in the form of synchronous and emission-excitation matrices (EEM). Studies have shown the presence of different groups of fluorophores. Synchronous spectra were characterized by a well-separated bands showing fluorescence in the area of low, medium and high wavelengths, suggesting the presence of structures, both weakly and strongly humified. EEM spectra revealed map of fluorophores within wide ranges of emission and excitation. Fluorophores differed in both position and intensity. The highest intensity was observed for compounds with the lowest humification degree which might be due to high amount

  1. Isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupar, C A; Gillett, J; Gordon, B A; Ramsay, D A; Johnson, J L; Garrett, R M; Rajagopalan, K V; Jung, J H; Bacheyie, G S; Sellers, A R

    1996-12-01

    Isolated sulfite oxidase (SO) deficiency is an autosomal recessively inherited inborn error of sulfur metabolism. In this report of a ninth patient the clinical history, laboratory results, neuropathological findings and a mutation in the sulfite oxidase gene are described. The data from this patient and previously published patients with isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency and molybdenum cofactor deficiency are summarized to characterize this rare disorder. The patient presented neonatally with intractable seizures and did not progress developmentally beyond the neonatal stage. Dislocated lenses were apparent at 2 months. There was increased urine excretion of sulfite and S-sulfocysteine and a decreased concentration of plasma cystine. A lactic acidemia was present for 6 months. Liver sulfite oxidase activity was not detectable but xanthine dehydrogenase activity was normal. The boy died of respiratory failure at 32 months. Neuropathological findings of cortical necrosis and extensive cavitating leukoencephalopathy were reminiscent of those seen in severe perinatal asphyxia suggesting an etiology of energy deficiency. A point mutation that resulted in a truncated protein missing the molybdenum-binding site has been identified.

  2. Schizosaccharomyces isolation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito Santiago

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the optimization of a selective and differential medium which would facilitate the isolation of Schizosaccharomyces (a genus with a low incidence compared to other microorganisms to select individuals from this genus for industrial purposes, especially in light of the recent recommendation of the use of yeasts from this genus in the wine industry by the International Organisation of Vine and Wine, or to detect the presence of such yeasts, for those many authors who consider them food spoilers. To this end, we studied various selective differential agents based on the main physiological characteristics of these species, such as their high resistances to high concentrations of sugar, sulfur dioxide, sorbic acid, benzoic acid, acetic acid or malo ethanolic fermentation. This selective medium is based on the genus resistance to the antibiotic actidione and its high resistance to inhibitory agents such as benzoic acid. Malic acid was used as a differential factor due to the ability of this genus to metabolise it to ethanol, which allows detecting of the degradation of this compound. Lastly, the medium was successfully used to isolate strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe from honey and honeycombs.

  3. Fluorescent tagged episomals for stoichiometric induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christopher E; Morales, Blanca M; Schmitz, Ellen M H; Hawkins, John S; Lizama, Carlos O; Zape, Joan P; Hsiao, Edward C; Zovein, Ann C

    2017-06-05

    Non-integrating episomal vectors have become an important tool for induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming. The episomal vectors carrying the "Yamanaka reprogramming factors" (Oct4, Klf, Sox2, and L-Myc + Lin28) are critical tools for non-integrating reprogramming of cells to a pluripotent state. However, the reprogramming process remains highly stochastic, and is hampered by an inability to easily identify clones that carry the episomal vectors. We modified the original set of vectors to express spectrally separable fluorescent proteins to allow for enrichment of transfected cells. The vectors were then tested against the standard original vectors for reprogramming efficiency and for the ability to enrich for stoichiometric ratios of factors. The reengineered vectors allow for cell sorting based on reprogramming factor expression. We show that these vectors can assist in tracking episomal expression in individual cells and can select the reprogramming factor dosage. Together, these modified vectors are a useful tool for understanding the reprogramming process and improving induced pluripotent stem cell isolation efficiency.

  4. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  5. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  6. Optical radiation emissions from compact fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khazova, M.; O'Hagan, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    There is a drive to energy efficiency to mitigate climate change. To meet this challenge, the UK Government has proposed phasing out incandescent lamps by the end of 2011 and replacing them with energy efficient fluorescent lighting, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) with integrated ballasts. This paper presents a summary of an assessment conducted by the Health Protection Agency in March 2008 to evaluate the optical radiation emissions of CFLs currently available in the UK consumer market. The study concluded that the UV emissions from a significant percentage of the tested CFLs with single envelopes may result in foreseeable overexposure of the skin when these lamps are used in desk or task lighting applications. The optical output of all tested CFLs, in addition to high-frequency modulation, had a 100-Hz envelope with modulation in excess of 15%. This degree of modulation may be linked to a number of adverse effects. (authors)

  7. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  8. Active mask segmentation of fluorescence microscope images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D; Kovacević, Jelena

    2009-08-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the "contour" to that of "inside and outside," or masks, allowing for easy multidimensional segmentation. It adapts to the topology of the image through the use of multiple masks. The algorithm is almost invariant under initialization, allowing for random initialization, and uses a few easily tunable parameters. Experiments show that the active mask algorithm matches the ground truth well and outperforms the algorithm widely used in fluorescence microscopy, seeded watershed, both qualitatively, as well as quantitatively.

  9. Fluorescence Imaging/Agents in Tumor Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stummer, Walter; Suero Molina, Eric

    2017-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging allows real-time identification of diseased tissue during surgery without being influenced by brain shift and surgery interruption. 5-Aminolevulinic acid, useful for malignant gliomas and other tumors, is the most broadly explored compound approved for fluorescence-guided resection. Intravenous fluorescein sodium has recently received attention, highlighting tumor tissue based on extravasation at the blood-brain barrier (defective in many brain tumors). Fluorescein in perfused brain, unselective extravasation in brain perturbed by surgery, and propagation with edema are concerns. Fluorescein is not approved but targeted fluorochromes with affinity to brain tumor cells, in development, may offer future advantages. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescent holograms with albumin-acrylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2014-02-01

    We describe fluorescent holograms were made with photosensitive films of albumin (protein) quail, used as modified matrices. Albumin is mixed with acrylamide and eosin Y. Therefore, prepare a photosensitive emulsion and solid hydrated with the ability to phase transmission holograms and volume (VPH). Eosin Y is a fluorescent agent that acts as a photo-sensitizing dye which stimulates the polymerization of acrylamide. To record the interference pattern produced by two waves superimposed on the modified matrix, we use a He-Cd laser. To reconstruct the diffraction pattern is observed with He- Ne laser, λ = 632.8nm, the material is self-developing properties. Measure the diffraction efficiency of the diffracted orders (η[-1, +1]) as a function of exposure energy. We work with various thicknesses and measure the variation of the refractive index using the coupled wave theory of Kogelnik, the holographic gratings meet Bragg condition.

  11. Legionella clemsonensis sp. nov.: a green fluorescing Legionella strain from a patient with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Allison; Painter, Joseph; Hassler, Hayley; Richards, Vincent P; Bruce, Terri; Morrison, Shatavia; Brown, Ellen; Kozak-Muiznieks, Natalia A; Lucas, Claressa; McNealy, Tamara L

    2016-10-01

    A novel Legionella species was identified based on sequencing, cellular fatty acid analysis, biochemical reactions, and biofilm characterization. Strain D5610 was originally isolated from the bronchial wash of a patient in Ohio, USA. The bacteria were gram-negative, rod-shaped, and exhibited green fluorescence under long wave UV light. Phylogenetic analysis and fatty acid composition revealed a distinct separation within the genus. The strain grows between 26-45°C and forms biofilms equivalent to L. pneumophila Philadelphia 1. These characteristics suggest that this isolate is a novel Legionella species, for which the name Legionella clemsonensis sp nov. is proposed. © 2016 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Investigation of Nematode Diversity using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fluorescent Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacor, Taylor; Howell, Carina

    2013-03-01

    Nematode worms account for the vast majority of the animals in the biosphere. They are colossally important to global public health as parasites, and to agriculture both as pests and as beneficial inhabitants of healthy soil. Amphid neurons are the anterior chemosensory neurons in nematodes, mediating critical behaviors including chemotaxis and mating. We are examining the cellular morphology and external anatomy of amphid neurons, using fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, respectively, of a wide range of soil nematodes isolated in the wild. We use both classical systematics (e.g. diagnostic keys) and molecular markers (e.g. ribosomal RNA) to classify these wild isolates. Our ultimate aim is to build a detailed anatomical database in order to dissect genetic pathways of neuronal development and function across phylogeny and ecology. Research supported by NSF grants 092304, 0806660, 1058829 and Lock Haven University FPDC grants

  13. Study of the air fluorescence by AIRFLY

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháčová, Martina

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 190, May (2009), s. 266-271 ISSN 0920-5632. [Cosmic Ray International Seminar 2008. Malfa, 15.09.2008-19.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LA08016; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06002 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502; CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : air fluorescence * cosmic rays Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics

  14. Fluorescent Method for Observing Intravascular Bonghan Duct

    OpenAIRE

    Byung-Cheon Lee; Ku Youn Baik; Hyeon-Min Johng; Baekkyoung Sung; Kyung Soon Soh; Dae-In Kang; Kwang-Sup Soh

    2005-01-01

    Observation of intra-vascular threadlike structures in the blood vessels of rats is reported with the images by differential interference contrast microscope, and fluorescence inverted microscope of the acridine-orange stained samples. The confocal microscope image and the hematoxylin-eosin staining revealed the distinctive pattern of nuclei distribution that clearly discerned the threadlike structure from fibrin, capillary, small venule, arteriole, or lymph vessel. Physiological function of ...

  15. Digital communication through intermolecular fluorescence modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymo, F M; Giordani, S

    2001-06-14

    [see reaction]. Ultraminiaturized processors incorporating molecular components can be developed only after devising efficient strategies to communicate signals at the molecular level. We have demonstrated that a three-state molecular switch responds to ultraviolet light, visible light, and H+, attenuating the emission intensity of a fluorescent probe. Intermolecular communication is responsible for the transduction of three input signals into a single optical output. The behavior of the communicating ensemble of molecules corresponds to that of a logic circuit incorporating seven gates.

  16. X-ray microtome by fluorescence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Simionovici, A S; Guenzler, F; Schrör, C; Snigirev, A; Snigireva, I; Tümmler, J; Weitkamp, T

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray fluorescence microtomography method is presented, which is capable of virtually slicing samples to obtain cross-sections of their inner structure. High precision experimental results of fluo-tomography in 'pencil-beam' geometry with up to 1.2 mu m resolution are described. Image reconstructions are based on either a simplified algebraic reconstruction method (ART) or the filtered back-projection method (FBP). Phantoms of inhomogeneous test objects as well as biological samples are successfully analyzed.

  17. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  18. Delivery of Fluorescent Nanoparticles to the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoni, Olga; Shi, Bingyang; Adlard, Paul A; Bush, Ashley I

    2016-11-01

    Nanotechnology applications in neuroscience promises to deliver significant scientific and technological breakthroughs, providing answers to unresolved questions regarding the processes occurring in the brain. In this perspective, we provide a short background on two distinct fluorescent nanoparticles and summarize several studies focussed on achieving delivery of these into the brain and their interaction with brain tissue. Furthermore, we discuss challenges and opportunities for further development of nanoparticle-based therapies for targeting delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime measurement of radical ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichinose, Nobuyuki; Kinugasa, Jun-ichiro; Hagiri, Masahide; Nakayama, Toshihiro; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kishimoto, Maki; Daido, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    One-photonic excitation of a charge transfer complex of hexamethoxybenzene (HMB) and nitrosonium tetrafluoroborate (NO + BF 4 - ) in acetonitrile afforded fluorescences emission from excited radical cation of HMB (HMB + *). Lifetime of the excited radical ion species was measured to be 7 ps by the pump-probe transient absorption technique. The lifetime was much shorter than that of free radical ion (63 ps), indicating the presence of an interaction between HMB + * and NO in the excited complex. (author)

  20. Active Mask Segmentation of Fluorescence Microscope Images

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasa, Gowri; Fickus, Matthew C.; Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D.; Kovačević, Jelena

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new active mask algorithm for the segmentation of fluorescence microscope images of punctate patterns. It combines the (a) flexibility offered by active-contour methods, (b) speed offered by multiresolution methods, (c) smoothing offered by multiscale methods, and (d) statistical modeling offered by region-growing methods into a fast and accurate segmentation tool. The framework moves from the idea of the “contour” to that of “inside and outside”, or, masks, allowing for easy mul...

  1. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeres, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J.L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salome, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here

  2. Fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chekina, Nataliya; Horák, Daniel; Jendelová, Pavla; Trchová, Miroslava; Beneš, Milan J.; Hrubý, Martin; Herynek, V.; Turnovcová, Karolína; Syková, Eva

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 21 (2011), s. 7630-7639 ISSN 0959-9428 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 7E09109; GA ČR GA203/09/1242; GA AV ČR KAN201110651; GA AV ČR KAN200200651 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : magnetic * fluorescent * stem cells Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 5.968, year: 2011

  3. Estimating phytoplankton photosynthesis by active fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkowski, P.G.; Kolber, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthesis can be described by target theory, At low photon flux densities, photosynthesis is a linear function of irradiance (I), The number of reaction centers (n), their effective absorption capture cross section {sigma}, and a quantum yield {phi}. As photosynthesis becomes increasingly light saturated, an increased fraction of reaction centers close. At light saturation the maximum photosynthetic rate is given as the product of the number of reaction centers (n) and their maximum electron transport rate (I/{tau}). Using active fluorometry it is possible to measure non-destructively and in real time the fraction of open or closed reaction centers under ambient irradiance conditions in situ, as well as {sigma} and {phi} {tau} can be readily, calculated from knowledge of the light saturation parameter, I{sub k} (which can be deduced by in situ by active fluorescence measurements) and {sigma}. We built a pump and probe fluorometer, which is interfaced with a CTD. The instrument measures the fluorescence yield of a weak probe flash preceding (f{sub 0}) and succeeding (f{sub 0}) a saturating pump flash. Profiles of the these fluorescence yields are used to derive the instantaneous rate of gross photosynthesis in natural phytoplankton communities without any incubation. Correlations with short-term simulated in situ radiocarbon measurements are extremely high. The average slope between photosynthesis derived from fluorescence and that measured by radiocarbon is 1.15 and corresponds to the average photosynthetic quotient. The intercept is about 15% of the maximum radiocarbon uptake and corresponds to the average net community respiration. Profiles of photosynthesis and sections showing the variability in its composite parameters reveal a significant effect of nutrient availability on biomass specific rates of photosynthesis in the ocean.

  4. Estimating phytoplankton photosynthesis by active fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkowski, P.G.; Kolber, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Photosynthesis can be described by target theory, At low photon flux densities, photosynthesis is a linear function of irradiance (I), The number of reaction centers (n), their effective absorption capture cross section {sigma}, and a quantum yield {phi}. As photosynthesis becomes increasingly light saturated, an increased fraction of reaction centers close. At light saturation the maximum photosynthetic rate is given as the product of the number of reaction centers (n) and their maximum electron transport rate (I/{tau}). Using active fluorometry it is possible to measure non-destructively and in real time the fraction of open or closed reaction centers under ambient irradiance conditions in situ, as well as {sigma} and {phi} {tau} can be readily, calculated from knowledge of the light saturation parameter, I{sub k} (which can be deduced by in situ by active fluorescence measurements) and {sigma}. We built a pump and probe fluorometer, which is interfaced with a CTD. The instrument measures the fluorescence yield of a weak probe flash preceding (f{sub 0}) and succeeding (f{sub 0}) a saturating pump flash. Profiles of the these fluorescence yields are used to derive the instantaneous rate of gross photosynthesis in natural phytoplankton communities without any incubation. Correlations with short-term simulated in situ radiocarbon measurements are extremely high. The average slope between photosynthesis derived from fluorescence and that measured by radiocarbon is 1.15 and corresponds to the average photosynthetic quotient. The intercept is about 15% of the maximum radiocarbon uptake and corresponds to the average net community respiration. Profiles of photosynthesis and sections showing the variability in its composite parameters reveal a significant effect of nutrient availability on biomass specific rates of photosynthesis in the ocean.

  5. Study on the fluorescence characteristics of carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiao-Jiao; Zheng, Hu-Zhi; Long, Yi-Juan; Du, Juan; Hao, Jian-Yu; Wang, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Dong-Bo

    2010-02-01

    Herein, we prepared water-soluble fluorescent carbon dots with diameter about 1.5 nm from cheap commercial lampblack. These fluorescent carbon nanoparticles are stable toward photobleaching and stable in water for more than half a year without fluorescence decrease. In order to improve its fluorescence properties, we passivated these nanoparticles with bisamino-terminated polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500N). Therefore, both fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime increased after this progress. In addition, the passivated carbon dots were more inert to solvent than the bare one and showed different responses to pH change.

  6. Multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging for bacterial differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Babayants, Margarita V.; Korotkov, Oleg V.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Rimskaya, Elena N.; Shikunova, Irina A.; Kurlov, Vladimir N.; Cherkasova, Olga P.; Komandin, Gennady A.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence imaging was implemented for bacterial differentiation. The fluorescence imaging was performed using a digital camera equipped with a set of visual bandpass filters. Narrowband 365 nm ultraviolet radiation passed through a beam homogenizer was used to excite the sample fluorescence. In order to increase a signal-to-noise ratio and suppress a non-fluorescence background in images, the intensity of the UV excitation was modulated using a mechanical chopper. The principal components were introduced for differentiating the samples of bacteria based on the multi-spectral endogenous fluorescence images.

  7. Fluorescence of the 'fire-chaser' beetle Melanophila acuminata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israelowitz, Meir; Rizvi, Syed H.W.; Schroeder, Herbert P. von

    2007-01-01

    Melanophila acuminata beetles are attracted to forest fires over long distances by a pair of specialized infrared sensory organs. To date, there is no knowledge of their ability to detect or emit fluorescent radiation. We studied the Melanophila acuminata infrared sensory organs histologically and by using fluorescent microscopy, acoustic-optic tunable filter microscopy, and two-photon microscopy to identify fluorescence. We found fluorescent absorption at radiation wavelengths of 480 nm and emission at 570 nm. The functional role of this novel fluorescence is, as of yet, unknown but may be applied to species classification, identification and behavioral studies

  8. Riboflavin enhanced fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliut, Maria; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Leordean, Cosmin; Simon, Timea; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Astilean, Simion

    2013-10-01

    The improvement of graphene derivates' fluorescence properties is a challenging topic and very few ways were reported up to now. In this Letter we propose an easy method to enhance the fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through non-covalent binding to a molecular fluorophore, namely the riboflavin (Rb). While the fluorescence of Rb is quenched, the Rb - decorated rGO exhibits strong blue fluorescence and significantly increased fluorescence lifetime, as compared to its pristine form. The data reported here represent a promising start towards tailoring the optical properties of rGOs, having utmost importance in optical applications.

  9. NANODIAMONDS FOR FLUORESCENT CELL AND SENSOR NANOTECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. I. Nazarenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review addresses the analysis of properties and applications of fluorescent nanodiamonds. They are carbon nanostructures with atomic arrangement of a diamond and carry all its properties, including record — high density, rigidity and refraction index. They are of almost spherical shape, and their small size (~4–10 nm creates substantial surface area that can be used for absorption of different compounds including drugs. Their surface is formed by different chemical groups (hydroxyls, carboxyls, etc. exhibits also chemical reactivity that allows different types of modifications. This opens innumerable possibilities for constructing different functional nanomaterials. The technologies have been developed for making these nanodiamonds fluorescent. Particularly, these properties are achieved by radioactive treatment with the formation of N–V impurities. These particles absorb and emit light in convenient for observation visible range of spectrum. They do not photobleach, which is very attractive for fluorescent microscopy of the cell. And, finally, these nanoparticles do not display toxicity on the cellular or whole — body level, and because of their biocompatibility they can be used in vivo as contrast agents and drug carriers. It is expected that future biotechnological applications of these nanoparticles will be connected with the creation of nanocomposites that combine multiple useful functions.

  10. Quantitative fluorescence angiography for neurosurgical interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichelt, Claudia; Duscha, Philipp; Steinmeier, Ralf; Meyer, Tobias; Kuß, Julia; Cimalla, Peter; Kirsch, Matthias; Sobottka, Stephan B; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Morgenstern, Ute

    2013-06-01

    Present methods for quantitative measurement of cerebral perfusion during neurosurgical operations require additional technology for measurement, data acquisition, and processing. This study used conventional fluorescence video angiography--as an established method to visualize blood flow in brain vessels--enhanced by a quantifying perfusion software tool. For these purposes, the fluorescence dye indocyanine green is given intravenously, and after activation by a near-infrared light source the fluorescence signal is recorded. Video data are analyzed by software algorithms to allow quantification of the blood flow. Additionally, perfusion is measured intraoperatively by a reference system. Furthermore, comparing reference measurements using a flow phantom were performed to verify the quantitative blood flow results of the software and to validate the software algorithm. Analysis of intraoperative video data provides characteristic biological parameters. These parameters were implemented in the special flow phantom for experimental validation of the developed software algorithms. Furthermore, various factors that influence the determination of perfusion parameters were analyzed by means of mathematical simulation. Comparing patient measurement, phantom experiment, and computer simulation under certain conditions (variable frame rate, vessel diameter, etc.), the results of the software algorithms are within the range of parameter accuracy of the reference methods. Therefore, the software algorithm for calculating cortical perfusion parameters from video data presents a helpful intraoperative tool without complex additional measurement technology.

  11. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  12. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for FTU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, T.P.

    1995-07-01

    Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) is based on the absorption of a short pulse of tuned laser light by a group of atoms and the observation of the resulting fluorescence radiation from the excited state. Because the excitation is resonant it is very efficient, and the fluorescence can be many times brighter than the normal spontaneous emission, so low number densities of the selected atoms can be detected and measured. Good spatial resolution can be achieved by using a narrow laser beam. If the laser is sufficiently monochromatic, and it can be tuned over the absorption line profile of the selected atoms, information can also be obtained about the velocities of the atoms from the Doppler effect which can broaden and shift the line. In this report two topics are examined in detail. The first is the effect of high laser irradiance, which can cause 'power broadening' of the apparent absorption line profile. The second is the effect of the high magnetic field in FTU. Detailed calculations are given for LIFS of neutral iron and molybdenum atoms, including the Zeeman effect, and the implementation of LIFS for these atoms on FTU is discussed

  14. Escape probabilities for fluorescent x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dance, D.R.; Day, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Computation of the energy absorption efficiency of an x-ray photon detector involves consideration of the histories of the secondary particles produced in any initial or secondary interaction which may occur within the detector. In particular, the K or higher shell fluorescent x-rays which may be emitted following a photoelectric interaction can carry away a large fraction of the energy of the incident photon, especially if this energy is just above an absorption edge. The effects of such photons cannot be ignored and a correction term, depending upon the probability that the fluorescent x-rays will escape from the detector, must be applied to the energy absorption efficiency. For detectors such as x-ray intensifying screens, it has been usual to calculate this probability by numerical integration. In this note analytic expressions are derived for the escape probability of fluorescent photons from planar detectors in terms of exponential integral functions. Rational approximations for these functions are readily available and these analytic expressions therefore facilitate the computation of photon absorption efficiencies. A table is presented which should obviate the need for calculating the escape probability for most cases of interest. (author)

  15. Fluorescence monitoring of ultrasound degradation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassoon, Salah; Bulatov, Valery; Yasman, Yakov; Schechter, Israel

    2004-01-01

    Ultrasound-based water treatment is often applied for degradation of stable organic pollutants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated compounds. Monitoring the degradation process, during the application of ultrasound radiation, is of considerable economical interest. In this work, the possibility of performing on-line spectral analysis during sonication was examined and it was found that direct absorption or fluorescence readings are misleading. Optical monitoring is strongly affected by the absorption and scattering of light by cavitation micro-bubbles and ultrasound induced particulates. A model was developed to account for these effects and to allow for on-line fluorescence analysis. The model takes into account the absorption and scattering coefficients of the micro-bubbles and particulates, as well as their time dependent concentration. The model parameters are found from independent measurements where the pollutants are added to already sonicated pure water. Then, the model is tested for predicting the actual fluorescence behavior during the sonication process. It has been shown that the model allows for recovery of the true degradation data, as obtained by off-line HPLC measurements

  16. Novel fluorescence adjustable photonic crystal materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Cheng; Liu, Xiaoxia; Ni, Yaru; Fang, Jiaojiao; Fang, Liang; Lu, Chunhua; Xu, Zhongzi

    2017-11-01

    Novel photonic crystal materials (PCMs) with adjustable fluorescence were fabricated by distributing organic fluorescent powders of Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen into the opal structures of self-assembled silica photonic crystals (PCs). Via removing the silica solution in a constant speed, PCs with controllable thicknesses and different periodic sizes were obtained on glass slides. Yb0.2Er0.4Tm0.4(TTA)3Phen powders were subsequently distributed into the opal structures. The structures and optical properties of the prepared PCMs were investigated. Finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) calculation was used to further analyze the electric field distributions in PCs with different periodic sizes while the relation between periodic sizes and fluorescent spectra of PCMs was discussed. The results showed that the emission color of the PCMs under irradiation of 980 nm laser can be easily adjusted from green to blue by increasing the periodic size from 250 to 450 nm.

  17. Direct measurement of the fluorescence characteristics of aquatic humic substances by a three-dimensional fluorescence spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Seiya; Senoo, Muneaki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Hiraki, Keizo.

    1997-01-01

    Humic substances play an important role in the transport of trace metals and insoluble organic materials. They are also considered to be precursors of trihalomethane in aquatic environments. The direct measurement of humic substances was carried out with a three-dimensional fluorescence spectrophotometer after filtering natural-water samples through a GF/F glass fiber filter. Because the influence of the humic concentration, pH and ionic strength on the three-dimensional excitation emission matrix spectra is negligible, the proposed method can be directly applied to the characterization of humic substances in freshwater samples (humic concentration 0.5-10 mg 1 -1 , pH6-9 and ionic strength <0.04 M) and sea-water samples (ionic strength 0.75 M). Humic substances in river, lake and pore water samples exhibit 2-3 peaks at excitation 305-340 nm/emission 415-440 nm and excitation 250-270 nm/emission 440-450 nm. These peak positions correspond to those of fulvic acids isolated from soil. (author)

  18. Effect of Surface Chemistry on the Fluorescence of Detonation Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, Philipp; Lau, Desmond W M; Wilson, Emma R; Fox, Kate; Field, Matthew R; Deeleepojananan, Cholaphan; Mochalin, Vadym N; Gibson, Brant C

    2017-11-28

    Detonation nanodiamonds (DNDs) have unique physical and chemical properties that make them invaluable in many applications. However, DNDs are generally assumed to show weak fluorescence, if any, unless chemically modified with organic molecules. We demonstrate that detonation nanodiamonds exhibit significant and excitation-wavelength-dependent fluorescence from the visible to the near-infrared spectral region above 800 nm, even without the engraftment of organic molecules to their surfaces. We show that this fluorescence depends on the surface functionality of the DND particles. The investigated functionalized DNDs, produced from the same purified DND as well as the as-received polyfunctional starting material, are hydrogen, hydroxyl, carboxyl, ethylenediamine, and octadecylamine-terminated. All DNDs are investigated in solution and on a silicon wafer substrate and compared to fluorescent high-pressure high-temperature nanodiamonds. The brightest fluorescence is observed from octadecylamine-functionalized particles and is more than 100 times brighter than the least fluorescent particles, carboxylated DNDs. The majority of photons emitted by all particle types likely originates from non-diamond carbon. However, we locally find bright and photostable fluorescence from nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond in hydrogenated, hydroxylated, and carboxylated detonation nanodiamonds. Our results contribute to understanding the effects of surface chemistry on the fluorescence of DNDs and enable the exploration of the fluorescent properties of DNDs for applications in theranostics as nontoxic fluorescent labels, sensors, nanoscale tracers, and many others where chemically stable and brightly fluorescent nanoparticles with tailorable surface chemistry are needed.

  19. Development of ultrasound-assisted fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiroyasu; Toyota, Shin; Wada, Kenji; Uchida-Kobayashi, Sawako; Kawada, Norifumi; Horinaka, Hiromichi

    2017-01-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) accumulation in hepatocellular carcinoma means tumors can be located by fluorescence. However, because of light scattering, it is difficult to detect ICG fluorescence from outside the body. We propose a new fluorescence imaging method that detects changes in the intensity of ICG fluorescence by ultrasound-induced temperature changes. ICG fluorescence intensity decreases as the temperature rises. Therefore, it should theoretically be possible to detect tissue distribution of ICG using ultrasound to heat tissue, moving the point of ultrasound transmission, and monitoring changes in fluorescence intensity. A new probe was adapted for clinical application. It consisted of excitation light from a laser, fluorescence sensing through a light pipe, and heating by ultrasound. We applied the probe to bovine liver to image the accumulation of ICG. ICG emits fluorescence (820 nm) upon light irradiation (783 nm). With a rise in temperature, the fluorescence intensity of ICG decreased by 0.85 %/°C. The distribution of fluorescent ICG was detected using an ultrasonic warming method in a new integrated probe. Modulating fluorescence by changing the temperature using ultrasound can determine where ICG accumulates at a depth, highlighting its potential as a means to locate hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Experimental assessment of fluorescence microscopy signal enhancement by stimulated emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dake, Fumihiro; Yazawa, Hiroki

    2017-10-01

    The quantity of photons generated during fluorescence microscopy is principally determined by the quantum yield of the fluorescence dyes and the optical power of the excitation beam. However, even though low quantum yields can produce poor images, it is challenging to tune this parameter, while increasing the power of the excitation beam often results in photodamage. Here, we propose the use of stimulated emission (SE) as a means of enhancing both the signal intensity and signal-to-noise ratio during confocal fluorescence microscopy. This work experimentally confirmed that both these factors can be enhanced by SE radiation, through generating a greater number of photons than are associated with the standard fluorescence signal. We also propose the concept of stimulated emission enhancing fluorescence (SEEF) microscopy, which employs both the SE and fluorescence signals, and demonstrate that the intensity of an SEEF signal is greater than those of the individual SE and fluorescence signals.

  1. Isolated Cardiac Hydatid Cyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakil, U.; Rehman, A. U.; Shahid, R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydatid cyst disease is common in our part of the world. Cardiac hydatid cyst is its rare manifestation. We report this case of 48-year male having isolated cardiac hydatid cyst, incidentally found on computed tomography. This patient presented in medical OPD of Combined Military Hospital, Lahore with one month history of mild retrosternal discomfort. His general physical and systemic examinations as well as ECG were unremarkable. Chest X-ray showed an enlarged cardiac shadow with mildly irregular left heart border. Contrast enhanced CT scan of the chest showed a large well defined multiloculated non-enhancing cystic lesion with multiple daughter cysts involving wall of left ventricle and overlying pericardium. Serology for echinococcus confirmed the diagnosis of hydatid cyst. Patient was offered the surgical treatment but he opted for medical treatment only. Albendezol was prescribed. His follow-up echocardiography after one month showed no significant decrease in size of the cyst. (author)

  2. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isailovic, Dragan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion

  3. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  4. The enhanced cyan fluorescent protein: a sensitive pH sensor for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poëa-Guyon, Sandrine; Pasquier, Hélène; Mérola, Fabienne; Morel, Nicolas; Erard, Marie

    2013-05-01

    pH is an important parameter that affects many functions of live cells, from protein structure or function to several crucial steps of their metabolism. Genetically encoded pH sensors based on pH-sensitive fluorescent proteins have been developed and used to monitor the pH of intracellular compartments. The quantitative analysis of pH variations can be performed either by ratiometric or fluorescence lifetime detection. However, most available genetically encoded pH sensors are based on green and yellow fluorescent proteins and are not compatible with multicolor approaches. Taking advantage of the strong pH sensitivity of enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), we demonstrate here its suitability as a sensitive pH sensor using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The intracellular ECFP lifetime undergoes large changes (32 %) in the pH 5 to pH 7 range, which allows accurate pH measurements to better than 0.2 pH units. By fusion of ECFP with the granular chromogranin A, we successfully measured the pH in secretory granules of PC12 cells, and we performed a kinetic analysis of intragranular pH variations in living cells exposed to ammonium chloride.

  5. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of organic ligands by europium: Fluorescence quenching and lifetime properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhi, A.; Hajjoul, H.; Redon, R.; Gagné, J. P.; Mounier, S.

    2018-03-01

    Time-resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) has proved its usefulness in the fields of biophysics, life science and geochemistry to characterize the fluorescence probe molecule with its chemical environment. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the applicability of this powerful technique combined with Steady-State (S-S) measurements. A multi-mode factor analysis, in particular CP/PARAFAC, was used to analyze the interaction between Europium (Eu) and Humic substances (HSs) extracted from Saint Lawrence Estuary in Canada. The Saint Lawrence system is a semi-enclosed water stream with connections to the Atlantic Ocean and is an excellent natural laboratory. CP/PARAFAC applied to fluorescence S-S data allows introspecting ligands-metal interactions and the one-site 1:1 modeling gives information about the stability constants. From the spectral signatures and decay lifetimes data given by TRLFS, one can deduce the fluorescence quenching which modifies the fluorescence and discuss its mechanisms. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between europium and humic substances samples (Log K value varies from 3.38 to 5.08 at pH 7.00). Using the Stern-Volmer plot, it has been concluded that static and dynamic quenching takes places in the case of salicylic acid and europium interaction while for HSs interaction only a static quenching is observed.

  6. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence organic dots for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Tingchao; Ren, Can; Li, Zhuohua; Xiao, Shuyu; Li, Junzi; Lin, Xiaodong; Ye, Chuanxiang; Zhang, Junmin; Guo, Lihong; Hu, Wenbo; Chen, Rui

    2018-05-01

    Autofluorescence is a major challenge in complex tissue imaging when molecules present in the biological tissue compete with the fluorophore. This issue may be resolved by designing organic molecules with long fluorescence lifetimes. The present work reports the two-photon absorption (TPA) properties of a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) molecule with carbazole as the electron donor and dicyanobenzene as the electron acceptor (i.e., 4CzIPN). The results indicate that 4CzIPN exhibits a moderate TPA cross-section (˜9 × 10-50 cm4 s photon-1), high fluorescence quantum yield, and a long fluorescence lifetime (˜1.47 μs). 4CzIPN was compactly encapsulated into an amphiphilic copolymer via nanoprecipitation to achieve water-soluble organic dots. Interestingly, 4CzIPN organic dots have been utilized in applications involving two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Our work aptly demonstrates that TADF molecules are promising candidates of nonlinear optical probes for developing next-generation multiphoton FLIM applications.

  7. High-contrast fluorescence imaging based on the polarization dependence of the fluorescence enhancement using an optical interference mirror slide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2015-01-01

    High-contrast fluorescence imaging using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide that enhances the fluorescence from a fluorophore located on top of the OIM surface is reported. To enhance the fluorescence and reduce the background light of the OIM, transverse-electric-polarized excitation light was used as incident light, and the transverse-magnetic-polarized fluorescence signal was detected. As a result, an approximate 100-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio was achieved through a 13-fold enhancement of the fluorescence signal and an 8-fold reduction of the background light.

  8. The Neuroendocrinology of Social Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P.; Cole, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Accordingly, population-based longitudinal research indicates that perceived social isolation (loneliness) is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality independent of objective social isolation and health behavior. Human and animal investigations of neuroendocrine stress mechanisms that may be involved suggest that (a) chronic social isolation increases the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical axis, and (b) these effects are more dependent on the disruption of a social bond between a significant pair than objective isolation per se. The relational factors and neuroendocrine, neurobiological, and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the association between perceived isolation and mortality are reviewed. PMID:25148851

  9. The neuroendocrinology of social isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Capitanio, John P; Cole, Steven W

    2015-01-03

    Social isolation has been recognized as a major risk factor for morbidity and mortality in humans for more than a quarter of a century. Although the focus of research has been on objective social roles and health behavior, the brain is the key organ for forming, monitoring, maintaining, repairing, and replacing salutary connections with others. Accordingly, population-based longitudinal research indicates that perceived social isolation (loneliness) is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality independent of objective social isolation and health behavior. Human and animal investigations of neuroendocrine stress mechanisms that may be involved suggest that (a) chronic social isolation increases the activation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenocortical axis, and (b) these effects are more dependent on the disruption of a social bond between a significant pair than objective isolation per se. The relational factors and neuroendocrine, neurobiological, and genetic mechanisms that may contribute to the association between perceived isolation and mortality are reviewed.

  10. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengmei; Wei, Yaoguang; Chen, Yingyi; Li, Daoliang; Zhang, Xu

    2015-12-09

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  11. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  12. An Intelligent Optical Dissolved Oxygen Measurement Method Based on a Fluorescent Quenching Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengmei Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved oxygen (DO is a key factor that influences the healthy growth of fishes in aquaculture. The DO content changes with the aquatic environment and should therefore be monitored online. However, traditional measurement methods, such as iodometry and other chemical analysis methods, are not suitable for online monitoring. The Clark method is not stable enough for extended periods of monitoring. To solve these problems, this paper proposes an intelligent DO measurement method based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The measurement system is composed of fluorescent quenching detection, signal conditioning, intelligent processing, and power supply modules. The optical probe adopts the fluorescent quenching mechanism to detect the DO content and solves the problem, whereas traditional chemical methods are easily influenced by the environment. The optical probe contains a thermistor and dual excitation sources to isolate visible parasitic light and execute a compensation strategy. The intelligent processing module adopts the IEEE 1451.2 standard and realizes intelligent compensation. Experimental results show that the optical measurement method is stable, accurate, and suitable for online DO monitoring in aquaculture applications.

  13. Connecting active to passive fluorescence with photosynthesis: a method for evaluating remote sensing measurements of Chl fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magney, Troy S; Frankenberg, Christian; Fisher, Joshua B; Sun, Ying; North, Gretchen B; Davis, Thomas S; Kornfeld, Ari; Siebke, Katharina

    2017-09-01

    Recent advances in the retrieval of Chl fluorescence from space using passive methods (solar-induced Chl fluorescence, SIF) promise improved mapping of plant photosynthesis globally. However, unresolved issues related to the spatial, spectral, and temporal dynamics of vegetation fluorescence complicate our ability to interpret SIF measurements. We developed an instrument to measure leaf-level gas exchange simultaneously with pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) and spectrally resolved fluorescence over the same field of view - allowing us to investigate the relationships between active and passive fluorescence with photosynthesis. Strongly correlated, slope-dependent relationships were observed between measured spectra across all wavelengths (F λ , 670-850 nm) and PAM fluorescence parameters under a range of actinic light intensities (steady-state fluorescence yields, F t ) and saturation pulses (maximal fluorescence yields, F m ). Our results suggest that this method can accurately reproduce the full Chl emission spectra - capturing the spectral dynamics associated with changes in the yields of fluorescence, photochemical (ΦPSII), and nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). We discuss how this method may establish a link between photosynthetic capacity and the mechanistic drivers of wavelength-specific fluorescence emission during changes in environmental conditions (light, temperature, humidity). Our emphasis is on future research directions linking spectral fluorescence to photosynthesis, ΦPSII, and NPQ. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Problems of fluorescent imaging and its solution using nanofluorophores. Part I: Advantages of fluorescent nanoparticles over conventional organic fluorophores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhelev, Z.; Hadjidekov, G.; Zlateva, G.; Spasov, L.; Bakalova, R.

    2011-01-01

    The application of fluorescence in deep-tissue imaging is rapidly expanding in fast several years. The progress in fluorescent molecular probes and fluorescent imaging techniques gives an opportunity to detect single cells and even molecules in live organisms. The highly sensitive and high-speed fluorescent molecular sensors and detection devices allow the application of fluorescence in functional imaging. With development of novel bright fluorophores based on nano-technologies and fluorescence scanners with high spatial and temporal resolution, the fluorescent imaging has a potential to become an alternative of the other non-invasive imaging techniques as magnetic resonance imaging, positron-emission tomography, X-ray, computing tomography. This review outlines the current status and future trends of fluorescent nanoparticles - quantum dots (QDs), as a new generation of fluorophores in experimental and pre-clinical fluorescent imaging diagnostic. Part 1 focuses on the advantages of quantum dots over conventional organic fluorophores and defines the major requirements to the 'perfect' fluorophore for fluorescent deep-tissue imaging diagnostic. The analysis is based on the limitations of fluorescent imaging in vivo and overcome by using quantum dots

  15. Miniature Optical Isolator, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA's need for miniature optical isolators in atom interferometry applications, Physical Optics Corporation (POC) proposes to develop a miniature optical...

  16. Fluorescence spectral studies on interaction of fluorescent probes with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Kaushik, E-mail: ghoshfcy@iitr.ac.in; Rathi, Sweety; Arora, Deepshikha

    2016-07-15

    Interaction of 2-(1-(naphthale-1-ylimino)ethyl)phenol (1), 2-methoxy-4-(((4-methoxyphenyl)imino)methyl)phenol (2) and 2-methoxy-4-((naphthalene-1-ylimino)methyl)phenol (3) with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) was examined. Fluorescence spectral data were obtained from the probes by varying the concentration of BSA as well as from BSA by varying the concentration of probes. Synchronous fluorescence measurements were performed and binding constants of the probes were calculated. To understand mode of quenching, Stern–Volmer plot, absorption spectral studies and life time measurements were performed. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) was also scrutinized. - Highlights: • Schiff bases with pendant phenolato function and interaction with BSA. • Synchronous fluorescence studies and a preferred interaction with tryptophan. • Probable interaction of probes with Trp-213 residue in the hydrophobic cavity. • 1:1 binding stoichiometry of probes and BSA in Benesi–Hildebrand graph.

  17. Evaluation of biocontrol potential of epiphytic fluorescent pseudomonas as associated with healthy fruits and vegetables against root rot and root knot pathogens of mungbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habiba, A.; Noreen, R.; Ali, S. A.; Sultana, V.; Ara, J.

    2016-01-01

    Endophytic and rhizospheric fluorescent Pseudomonas have widely been used as biological control agents against soilborne plant pathogens. In this study, fifteen epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas isolated from the surfaces of citrus (grapefruit, orange and lemon) melon and tomato fruits were characterized for their in vitro activity against root rotting fungi viz., Macrophomina phaseolina, Fusarium solani, F. oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani and nematicidal activity against the second stage juveniles of Meloidogyne javanica. Out of fifteen Pseudomonas isolates HAB-16, HAB-1 and HAB-25 inhibited the growth of all the test fungi and showed maximum nematicidal activity against second stage juvenile of M. javanica. Based on their effective in vitro activity nine epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas were evaluated for their growth promoting ability and biocontrol activity in screen house on mungbean. Pseudomonas isolates (HAB-13, HAB-2, HAB-4, HAB-1, HAB-14, HAB-9, HAB-7 and HAB-25) used as soil drench greatly reduced the root rot-root knot infection and thereby enhanced plant growth, root nodulation and yield in mungbean. Besides, rhizospheric and endophytic, epiphytic fluorescent Pseudomonas associated with healthy fruits may be used as biocontrol agent against root rotting fungi, besides, using for the mangemnet of postharvest diseases. (author)

  18. Chemical sensing of Benzo[a]pyrene using Corchorus depressus fluorescent flavonoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Wajiha; Rana, Nosheen Fatima; Riaz, Sundus; Ahmad, Nasir Mehmood; Hameed, Maryam; Naeem, Ayesha; Tahir, Rabbiya

    2018-04-01

    Plant phytochemicals, such as flavonoids are in use for the development of optical biosensor. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), is a pervasive environmental and dietary carcinogen. A fluorescent assay is developed using plant isolated flavonoid for the detection of B[a]P. High content saponins are excluded from the flavonoid-containing methanolic extract of Corchorus depressus by implying reduction of silver ions by saponins resulting in formation of silver nanoparticles. Isolated plant flavonoids are used to develop a spectrofluorometric assay for the detection of B[a]P. Decrease in the flavonoid fluorescence intensity by B[a]P is found to be based on both static and dynamic quenching. Specificity of the assay for B[a]P was tested for other carcinogens belonging to different classes of compounds. Flavonoids-mediated sensing can be implied for the development of new generation of nanoparticle-based biosensors that can be more sensitive and less susceptible to external factors, such as temperature and humidity.

  19. Detoxification of mercury pollutant leached from spent fluorescent lamps using bacterial strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghouti, Mohammad A; Abuqaoud, Reem H; Abu-Dieyeh, Mohammed H

    2016-03-01

    The spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs) are being classified as a hazardous waste due to having mercury as one of its main components. Mercury is considered the second most toxic heavy metal (arsenic is the first) with harmful effects on animal nervous system as it causes different neurological disorders. In this research, the mercury from phosphor powder was leached, then bioremediated using bacterial strains isolated from Qatari environment. Leaching of mercury was carried out with nitric and hydrochloric acid solutions using two approaches: leaching at ambient conditions and microwave-assisted leaching. The results obtained from this research showed that microwave-assisted leaching method was significantly better in leaching mercury than the acid leaching where the mercury leaching efficiency reached 76.4%. For mercury bio-uptake, twenty bacterial strains (previously isolated and purified from petroleum oil contaminated soils) were sub-cultured on Luria Bertani (LB) plates with mercury chloride to check the bacterial tolerance to mercury. Seven of these twenty strains showed a degree of tolerance to mercury. The bio-uptake capacities of the promising strains were investigated using the mercury leached from the fluorescent lamps. Three of the strains (Enterobacter helveticus, Citrobacter amalonaticus, and Cronobacter muytjensii) showed bio-uptake efficiency ranged from 28.8% to 63.6%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fluorescent Photo-conversion: A second chance to label unique cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Adam J; Shinogle, Heather E; Moore, David S; Detamore, Michael S

    2015-03-01

    Not all cells behave uniformly after treatment in tissue engineering studies. In fact, some treated cells display no signs of treatment or show unique characteristics not consistent with other treated cells. What if the "unique" cells could be isolated from a treated population, and further studied? Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2 , allow for the ability to selectively identify unique cells with a secondary label within a primary labeled treated population. In the current study, select cells were identified and labeled through photo-conversion of Dendra2 -transfected human Wharton's Jelly cells (hWJCs) for the first time. Robust photo-conversion of green-to-red fluorescence was achieved consistently in arbitrarily selected cells, allowing for precise cell identification of select hWJCs. The current study demonstrates a method that offers investigators the opportunity to selectively label and identify unique cells within a treated population for further study or isolation from the treatment population. Photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as Dendra2 , offer the ability over non-photo-convertible reporter proteins, such as green fluorescent protein, to analyze unique individual cells within a treated population, which allows investigators to gain more meaningful information on how a treatment affects all cells within a target population.