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Sample records for fluorescens strain cb

  1. Lethality and Developmental Delay of Drosophila melanogaster Following Ingestion of Selected Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens secretes antimicrobial compounds that promote plant health and provide protection from pathogens. We used a non-invasive feeding assay to study the toxicity of P. fluorescens strains Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains of P. fluorescens varie...

  2. 76 FR 52871 - Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain CL145A; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain CL145A; Exemption From the Requirement of a... establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain... eliminates the need to establish a maximum permissible level for residues of Pseudomonas fluorescens...

  3. Draft genome sequences of the Pseudomonas fluorescens biocontrol strains Wayne1R and Wood1R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Xiaoqing; Gurel, Fulya Baysal; Meulia, Tea; McSpadden Gardener, Brian B

    2012-02-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains Wayne1R and Wood1R have proven capacities to improve plant health. Here we report the draft genome sequences and automatic annotations of both strains. Genome comparisons reveal similarities with P. fluorescens strain Pf-5, reveal the novelty of Wood1R, and indicate some genes that may be related to biocontrol.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1200 - Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1200 Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25; temporary... established for residues of the microbial pesticide, pseudomonas fluorescens strain PRA-25 when used on...

  5. Three Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens Exhibit Differential Toxicity Against Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were tested for toxicity to Drosophila melanogaster in an insect feeding assay. Insect eggs were placed on the surface of a non-nutritive agar plate supplemented with a food source that was non-inoculated or inoculated with P. fluorescens Pf0-1, SBW25, or Pf-...

  6. ANOMALOUS BLUE COLOURING OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE INTENTIONALLY CONTAMINATED WITH PIGMENT PRODUCING STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

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    P. Sechi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 a large outbreak of anomalous blue coloration of mozzarella cheese was recorded in Italy and some northern European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities linked the outbreak to the contamination of processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several expert raised the question of how to unequivocally link the blue coloring to the presence of the micro-organism. In an attempt to set-up a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible of the defect, an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue colouring of mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. was developed The system is aimed to ascertain whether P. fluorescens strains, isolated from mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, are able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental condition. 96 trials of experimental inoculation of mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids, were conducted using various suspension of Pseudomonas spp. (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens CFBP 3150, one P. fluorescens field strain isolated from blue-colored mozzarella cheese and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as positive control at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curve of all Pseudomonas spp. strains tested demonstrated that after three days of incubation the concentration was generally higher than 106 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, and higher than 105 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which is often associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens contamination of water used during mozzarella cheesemaking. With the proposed system, which enabled a considerable amount of samples to be analysed under controlled experimental

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Phenazine-Producing Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain 2-79.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesemann, Kai; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Thuermer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Thomashow, Linda S; Weller, David M; Braus, Gerhard H

    2015-03-26

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 2-79, a natural isolate of the rhizosphere of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), possesses antagonistic potential toward several fungal pathogens. We report the draft genome sequence of strain 2-79, which comprises 5,674 protein-coding sequences.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Seven Pseudomonas fluorescens Subclade III Strains Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Brittan S; Erb-Downward, John R; Huffnagle, Ian M; LiPuma, John J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2015-01-29

    We report here the first draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that have been isolated from humans. The seven assembled draft genomes contained an average of 60.1% G+C content, were an average genomic size of 6.3 Mbp, and mapped by multilocus sequence analysis to subclade III.

  9. Draft Genome Sequences of Five Pseudomonas fluorescens Subclade I and II Strains, Isolated from Human Respiratory Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scales, Brittan S; Erb-Downward, John R; LiPuma, John J; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2015-07-30

    We report the draft genomes of five Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from clinical samples. Phylogenetic analysis places three in subclade I and two in subclade II of the P. fluorescens species complex. The average G+C content and genomic size are 63% and 7.1 Mbp (subclade I) and 59.6% and 6.14 Mbp (subclade II), respectively.

  10. Draft Genome Sequence of the Cyanide-Utilizing Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain NCIMB 11764

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We report here the 6.97-Mb draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764, which is capable of growth on cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. The draft genome sequence allowed the discovery of several genes implicated in enzymatic cyanide turnover and provided additional information contributing to a better understanding of this organism's unique cyanotrophic ability. This is the first sequenced genome of a cyanide-assimilating bacterium.

  11. Draft genome sequence of the cyanide-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilo, Claudia A; Benedik, Michael J; Kunz, Daniel A; Dong, Qunfeng

    2012-12-01

    We report here the 6.97-Mb draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain NCIMB 11764, which is capable of growth on cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. The draft genome sequence allowed the discovery of several genes implicated in enzymatic cyanide turnover and provided additional information contributing to a better understanding of this organism's unique cyanotrophic ability. This is the first sequenced genome of a cyanide-assimilating bacterium.

  12. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Lu, Tse-Yuan S [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  13. Lethality and developmental delay in Drosophila melanogaster larvae after ingestion of selected Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika H Olcott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is a well-established model organism for probing the molecular and cellular basis of physiological and immune system responses of adults or late stage larvae to bacterial challenge. However, very little is known about the consequences of bacterial infections that occur in earlier stages of development. We have infected mid-second instar larvae with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens to determine how infection alters the ability of larvae to survive and complete development. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We mimicked natural routes of infection using a non-invasive feeding procedure to study the toxicity of the three sequenced P. fluorescens strains (Pf0-1, SBW25, and Pf-5 to Drosophila melanogaster. Larvae fed with the three strains of P. fluorescens showed distinct differences in developmental trajectory and survival. Treatment with SBW25 caused a subset of insects to die concomitant with a systemic melanization reaction at larval, pupal or adult stages. Larvae fed with Pf-5 died in a dose-dependent manner with adult survivors showing eye and wing morphological defects. In addition, larvae in the Pf-5 treatment groups showed a dose-dependent delay in the onset of metamorphosis relative to control-, Pf0-1-, and SBW25-treated larvae. A functional gacA gene is required for the toxic properties of wild-type Pf-5 bacteria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These experiments are the first to demonstrate that ingestion of P. fluorescens bacteria by D. melanogaster larvae causes both lethal and non-lethal phenotypes, including delay in the onset of metamorphosis and morphological defects in surviving adult flies, which can be decoupled.

  14. Response to gaseous NO2 air pollutant of P. fluorescens airborne strain MFAF76a and clinical strain MFN1032

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana eKondakova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Human exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2, an air pollutant of increasing interest in biology, results in several toxic effects to human health and also to the air microbiota. The aim of this study was to investigate the bacterial response to gaseous NO2. Two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, namely the airborne strain MFAF76a and the clinical strain MFN1032 were exposed to 0.1, 5 or 45 ppm concentrations of NO2, and their effects on bacteria were evaluated in terms of motility, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, as well as expression of several chosen target genes. While 0.1 and 5 ppm of NO2 did not lead to any detectable modification in the studied phenotypes of the two bacteria, several alterations were observed when the bacteria were exposed to 45 ppm of gaseous NO2. We thus chose to focus on this high concentration. NO2-exposed P. fluorescens strains showed reduced swimming motility, and decreased swarming in case of the strain MFN1032. Biofilm formed by NO2-treated airborne strain MFAF76a showed increased maximum thickness compared to non-treated cells, while NO2 had no apparent effect on the clinical MFN1032 biofilm structure. It is well known that biofilm and motility are inversely regulated by intracellular c-di-GMP level. The c-di-GMP level was however not affected in response to NO2 treatment. Finally, NO2-exposed P. fluorescens strains were found to be more resistant to ciprofloxacin and chloramphenicol. Accordingly, the resistance nodulation cell division (RND MexEF-OprN efflux pump encoding genes were highly upregulated in the two P. fluorescens strains. Noticeably, similar phenotypes had been previously observed following a NO treatment. Interestingly, an hmp-homologue gene in P. fluorescens strains MFAF76a and MFN1032 encodes a NO dioxygenase that is involved in NO detoxification into nitrites. Its expression was upregulated in response to NO2, suggesting a possible common pathway between NO and NO2 detoxification. Taken

  15. Metabolic functions of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from Populus deltoides depend on rhizosphere or endosphere isolation compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin M Timm

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial microbiota of plants is diverse, with 1,000s of operational taxonomic units (OTUs associated with any individual plant. In this work we investigate the differences between 19 sequenced Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from Populus deltoides rhizosphere and endosphere and which represent a single OTU, using phenotypic analysis, comparative genomics, and metabolic models. While no traits were exclusive to either endosphere or rhizosphere P. fluorescens isolates, multiple pathways relevant for plant-bacterial interactions are enriched in endosphere isolate genomes. Further, growth phenotypes such as phosphate solubilization, protease activity, denitrification and root growth promotion are biased towards endosphere isolates. Endosphere isolates have significantly more metabolic pathways for plant signaling compounds and an increased metabolic range that includes utilization of energy rich nucleotides and sugars, consistent with endosphere colonization. Rhizosphere P. fluorescens have fewer pathways representative of plant-bacterial interactions but show metabolic bias towards chemical substrates often found in root exudates. This work reveals the diverse functions that may contribute to colonization of the endosphere by bacteria and are enriched among closely related isolates.

  16. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

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    Gerasimos F Kremmydas

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ, and two genes (sup5 and sup6 which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  17. Characterization of the biocontrol activity of pseudomonas fluorescens strain X reveals novel genes regulated by glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremmydas, Gerasimos F; Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Georgakopoulos, Dimitrios G

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain X, a bacterial isolate from the rhizosphere of bean seedlings, has the ability to suppress damping-off caused by the oomycete Pythium ultimum. To determine the genes controlling the biocontrol activity of strain X, transposon mutagenesis, sequencing and complementation was performed. Results indicate that, biocontrol ability of this isolate is attributed to gcd gene encoding glucose dehydrogenase, genes encoding its co-enzyme pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), and two genes (sup5 and sup6) which seem to be organized in a putative operon. This operon (named supX) consists of five genes, one of which encodes a non-ribosomal peptide synthase. A unique binding site for a GntR-type transcriptional factor is localized upstream of the supX putative operon. Synteny comparison of the genes in supX revealed that they are common in the genus Pseudomonas, but with a low degree of similarity. supX shows high similarity only to the mangotoxin operon of Ps. syringae pv. syringae UMAF0158. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicated that transcription of supX is strongly reduced in the gcd and PQQ-minus mutants of Ps. fluorescens strain X. On the contrary, transcription of supX in the wild type is enhanced by glucose and transcription levels that appear to be higher during the stationary phase. Gcd, which uses PQQ as a cofactor, catalyses the oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid, which controls the activity of the GntR family of transcriptional factors. The genes in the supX putative operon have not been implicated before in the biocontrol of plant pathogens by pseudomonads. They are involved in the biosynthesis of an antimicrobial compound by Ps. fluorescens strain X and their transcription is controlled by glucose, possibly through the activity of a GntR-type transcriptional factor binding upstream of this putative operon.

  18. Foliar spraying of different strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens on quantitative characteristics, yield and yield components of two rice cultivars under greenhouse conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.R. Ehteshami

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effects of foliar spraying of Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria on quantitative characteristics, yield and yield components of two rice cultivars, a factorial experiment, based on completely randomized design with three replications, was conducted in Rice Research Institute of Rasht, Guilan province, Iran. In this experiment, two rice cultivars (Khazar and Hashemi were sprayed with eight levels (strains of P. fluorescens bacteria. The control treatment was not sprayed. Studied characteristics consisted of: stem diameter, plant height, length of panicle, length and width of flag leaf, number of fertile tillers, 100-seed weight, number of seeds per panicle, number of seeds per plant and yield per plant. The results indicated that foliar spraying by different strains of Pseudomonas had significant effect on stem diameter. The highest length of flag leaf and plant height was observed in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 136 and the lowest of these characteristics was caused by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 177. The highest and least number of seeds per panicle was observed in treatments sprayed by Pseudomonas fluorescens strains 4 and 177. The highest and lowest number of seeds per plant was related to strains 4 and 168 and 169, respectively. At the end of the experiment, it was found that P. fluorescens strain 4, P. fluorescens strain 136 and P. fluorescens strain 168 increased yield and yield components more than other strains. In general, foliar spraying of growth promoting bacteria had positive effects and enhanced plant growth.

  19. Diversity of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins in plant-associated strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic sequences of ten strains of plant-associated Pseudomonas spp. were surveyed for the presence of TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins (TBDPs), which function in the uptake of substrates from the environment by many Gram-negative bacteria. The ten strains, representing P. fluorescens, P. ch...

  20. LETHALITY OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS STRAIN CLO145A TO THE 2 ZEBRA MUSSEL SPECIES PRESENT IN NORTH AMERICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2001-10-28

    These experiments indicated that bacterial strain CL0145A of Pseudomonas fluorescens is equally lethal to the 2 zebra mussel species present in North America, Dreissena polymorpha and Dreissena bugensis. Thus, this bacterial strain should be equally effective at killing zebra mussels in power plant pipes, irrespective of which species is present.

  1. Survival of a Rifampicin-Resistant Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain in Nine Mollisols

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    Tami L. Stubbs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7 (P.f. D7 is a naturally occurring soil bacterium that shows promise as a biological herbicide to inhibit growth of annual grass weeds, including downy brome (Bromus tectorum L., in crop- and rangelands. Pseudomonas fluorescens strain D7rif (P.f. D7rif is a rifampicin-resistant strain of P.f. D7. One of the greatest obstacles to successful biological weed control is survival of the organism under field conditions. Nine soils in the taxonomic order of Mollisols, collected from downy brome-infested areas of the Western and Central United States, were inoculated with P.f. D7rif and incubated in the laboratory to determine the effects of soil type, soil properties, incubation temperature, and soil water potential on survival of P.f. D7rif over 63 days. Silt loam soils from Lind, Washington, and Moro, Oregon, sustained the highest P.f. D7rif populations, and recovery was the lowest from Pendleton, Oregon soil. Survival and recovery of P.f. D7rif varied with soil type and temperature but not with the two soil water potentials tested. After 63 days, P.f. D7rif was recovered at levels greater than log 5.5 colony forming units (CFU g−1 soil from five of the nine test soils, a level adequate to suppress downy brome under field or range conditions.

  2. The Genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain R124 Demonstrates Phenotypic Adaptation to the Mineral Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael D.; Petronio, Michael; Giarrizzo, Juan G.; Bowling, Bethany V.

    2013-01-01

    Microbial adaptation to environmental conditions is a complex process, including acquisition of positive traits through horizontal gene transfer or the modification of existing genes through duplication and/or mutation. In this study, we examined the adaptation of a Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate (R124) from the nutrient-limited mineral environment of a silica cave in comparison with P. fluorescens isolates from surface soil and the rhizosphere. Examination of metal homeostasis gene pathways demonstrated a high degree of conservation, suggesting that such systems remain functionally similar across chemical environments. The examination of genomic islands unique to our strain revealed the presence of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism, aromatic carbon metabolism, and carbon turnover, confirmed through phenotypic assays, suggesting the acquisition of potentially novel mechanisms for energy metabolism in this strain. We also identified a twitching motility phenotype active at low-nutrient concentrations that may allow alternative exploratory mechanisms for this organism in a geochemical environment. Two sets of candidate twitching motility genes are present within the genome, one on the chromosome and one on a plasmid; however, a plasmid knockout identified the functional gene as being present on the chromosome. This work highlights the plasticity of the Pseudomonas genome, allowing the acquisition of novel nutrient-scavenging pathways across diverse geochemical environments while maintaining a core of functional stress response genes. PMID:23995634

  3. Antagonist capacity of Newly Isolated Strains of Pseudomonas Fluorescens against Three Important Phytopathogenic Bacteria

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    Reynaldo D.L. Cruz-Quiroz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Phytopatogenic bacteria cause several damages to plants with important economical consequences. They provoke losses of product quality affecting all commercial chain of crops, for this reason, their control is a priority. Approach: We evaluated antagonist capacity of newly isolated Pseudonomas fluorescens strains against three important phytopatogenic bacteria (Clavibacter michiganensis, Xanthomonas axonopodis and Erwinia carotovora. Soils from commercial cropping of Capsicum annum L of several Mexican regions were used to isolate P. fluorescens strains. Results: Isolates producing flourescein were purified on King B agar and biochemically identified. Crude extracts with and without cells were produced in King B broths and their antagonist capacities were evaluated by the plate diffusion procedure on nutritive agar. Conclusion: Obtained results demonstrated that cell free extracts exhibited a limited antagonist capacity in comparison of those extracts with cells, which showed an excellent capacity to inhibit the growth of C. michiganensis, X. axonopodis and E. carotovora, demonstrating the intracellular nature of the bioactive metabolites associated to bacterial growth inhibition.

  4. Strain Diversity of Pseudomonas fluorescens Group with Potential Blue Pigment Phenotype Isolated from Dairy Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chierici, Margherita; Picozzi, Claudia; La Spina, Marisa Grazia; Orsi, Carla; Vigentini, Ileana; Zambrini, Vittorio; Foschino, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    The blue discoloration in Mozzarella cheese comes from bacterial spoilage due to contamination with Pseudomonas. Fourteen Pseudomonas fluorescens strains from international collections and 55 new isolates of dominant bacterial populations from spoiled fresh cheese samples were examined to assess genotypic and phenotypic strain diversity. Isolates were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and tested for the production of the blue pigment at various temperatures on Mascarpone agar and in Mozzarella preserving fluid (the salty water in which the cheese is conserved, which becomes enriched by cheese minerals and peptides during storage). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis after treatment with the endonuclease SpeI separated the isolates into 42 genotypes at a similarity level of 80%. Based on the pulsotype clustering, 12 representative strains producing the blue discoloration were chosen for the multilocus sequence typing targeting the gyrB, glnS, ileS, nuoD, recA, rpoB, and rpoD genes. Four new sequence typing profiles were discovered, and the concatenated sequences of the investigated loci grouped the tested strains into the so-called ''blue branch'' of the P. fluorescens phylogenetic tree, confirming the linkage between pigment production and a specific genomic cluster. Growth temperature affected pigment production; the blue discoloration appeared at 4 and 14°C but not at 30°C. Similarly, the carbon source influenced the phenomenon; the blue phenotype was generated in the presence of glucose but not in the presence of galactose, sodium succinate, sodium citrate, or sodium lactate.

  5. Variation in the TonB-dependent Outer-Membrane Proteins in Plant-Associated Strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient acquisition is key to the ecological fitness of environmental bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens and TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins are important components of the cellular machinery for the uptake of substrates from the environment. Genomic sequences of ten strains of plant-a...

  6. Exposure-related effects of formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A to glochidia from seven unionid mussel species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.; Eckert, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The study was completed to evaluate the exposure-related effects of a biopesticide for dreissenid mussel (Dreissena polymorpha, zebra mussel and Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, quagga mussel) control on glochidia from unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. The commercially prepared biopesticide was either a spray-dried powder (SDP) or freeze-dried powder (FDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A. Glochidia of the unionid mussel species Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea,Lampsilis higginsii, Ligumia recta, Obovaria olivaria, and Actinonaias ligamentina were exposed to SDP-formulated P. fluorescens andLampsilis cardium and Megalonaias nervosa were exposed to FDP-formulated P. fluorescens.

  7. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that...

  8. Strain Identification of Burkholderia cepacia Palleroni and Holmes and Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula Associated to Maize Crop by Polyphasic Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Annia Hernández Rodríguez; María Esther González Vega; Alberto Caballero Núñez; Ariel Medina Concepción; Madelaine Quiñónez Pantoja; Mayra Heydrich Pérez; Ana Niurka Hernández Lauzardo; Monica Höfte

    2004-01-01

    A polyphasic taxonomic study, which included phenotypic characterization, the indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was conducted for the identification of Burkholderia cepacia and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains previously isolated from maize rhizosphere. Conventional methods were used (API 20 NE, BioMeuriux), specific hyper-immune antiserum against the species under study, and specific primers were designed out of subunits 16S of the ribosomal RNA of B....

  9. Characterization of a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain from tomato rhizosphere and its use for integrated management of tomato damping-off

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaraj, J; Parthasarathi, T.; Radhakrishnan, N.V. [Annamalai University, Annamalainagar (India). Faculty of Agriculture

    2007-10-15

    A highly antagonistic Pseudomonas fluorescens strain was isolated from tomato rhizosphere and characterized for its in vitro and in vivo biocontrol potential against Pythium aphanidermatum. The identified Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (PfT-8) was capable of producing high levels of chitinase, beta-1,3-glucanase, cellulase, fungitoxic metabolites and siderophores. Seven different carrier formulations including a talc-based powder, lignite-based powder, peat-based powder, lignite + fly ash-based powder, wettable powder, bentonite-paste and polyethylene glycol (PEG) paste were prepared utilizing PfT-8. Shelf life was evaluated for up to 6 months of storage at ambient room temperature (28{sup o}C). Biocontrol efficacy of formulations was studied under greenhouse and field conditions. Among the formulations, peat, lignite, lignite+fly-ash and bentonite paste based formulations maintained higher propagule number than others and also showed greater biocontrol potential. However, propagule number gradually decreased with time. Soil incorporation of organic amendments and specifically poultry manure and FYM, significantly reduced damping-off incidence and also augmented the rhizosphere population of the marked P. fluorescens strain that was resistant to streptomycin and rifampicin.

  10. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens

  11. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism, photosynthesis, and fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David J; Pelletier, Dale A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Jawdy, Sara S; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Allen, Sara M; Melton, Sarah J; Martin, Madhavi Z; Schadt, Christopher W; Karve, Abhijit A; Chen, Jin-Gui; Yang, Xiaohan; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2012-06-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  12. Evolution under different storage conditions of anomalous blue coloration of Mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with a pigment-producing strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci-Goga, B T; Karama, M; Sechi, P; Iulietto, M F; Novelli, S; Mattei, S

    2014-11-01

    Several widespread occurrences of anomalous blue coloration of Mozzarella cheese have been recorded in the United States and some European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities have linked the occurrences to contamination of the processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several experts questioned how to unequivocally link the blue color to the presence of the microorganism. To establish a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible for the defect and study the evolution of the coloration under different storage conditions, we developed an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue coloration of Mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of P. fluorescens. The purpose of the system was to determine whether P.fluorescens strains, isolated from Mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, were able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental conditions. Thirty-six trials of experimental inoculation of Mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids were conducted using various suspensions of P.fluorescens (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P.fluorescens CFBP 3150, and P. fluorescens 349 field strain isolated from blue-colored Mozzarella cheese) at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curves of all tested P.fluorescens strains demonstrated that after 3 d of incubation the concentration was generally >10(6) cfu/g of Mozzarella cheese incubated in either tryptic soy broth (control) or conditioning brine. Prolonged incubation for 5 d at either 20 °C or 8 °C led to concentrations up to 10(9) cfu/g of Mozzarella cheese incubated in tryptic soy broth and up to 10(8) cfu/g of Mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All Mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of P. fluorescens, except those opened 1h after packaging and stored at 8 °C, showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which

  13. Effects of phosphorus fertilizer rate and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain on field pea (Pisum sativum subsp. arvense (L. Asch. growth and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram SALEHI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted at Rezvanshahr, Guilan province, Iran, to evaluate the effects of phosphorus fertilizer rate and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains on growth and yield of field pea (Pisum sativum L.. The experimental design was a randomized complete block in a factorial arrangement with three replicates. Factors were phosphorus fertilizer rates (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 kg P2O5 ha-1 as triple superphosphate, and seed inoculation with P. florescens strains [control (non-inoculated, inoculated with strain R41, and strain R187. Analysis of variance showed that plant height, seed yield, pod number per m2, 100-seed weight, biological yield, harvest index, and leaf P concentration were significantly influenced by phosphorus fertilizer rate and P. florescens strain. At the same time, phosphorus fertilizer rate × P. fluorescens strain interaction was significant only for 100-seed weight. On the other hand, seed number per pod was significantly affected neither by phosphorus fertilizer rate nor by pseudomonas strains. Result showed that seed yield was significantly increased from 1099 ± 67 to 1898 ± 118 kg ha-1 as P2O5 application rate increased from 0 to 75 kg ha-1, and thereafter relatively remained constant. There was no significant difference in seed yield between plants raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens, strain R187 (1664 ± 97 kg ha-1 and those raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens, strain R41 (1669 ± 104 kg ha-1. At the same time, plants raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens (both strains produced greater grain yield compared to those raised from uninoculated seeds (1370 ± 80 kg ha-1. Based on the results of this study, P2O5 application at the rate of 75 kg ha-1 and inoculation with pseudomonas bacteria are recommended for obtaining the greatest seed yield in field pea.

  14. Characterization of an antibiotic produced by a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens inhibitory to Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and Pythium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusiddaiah, S; Weller, D M; Sarkar, A; Cook, R J

    1986-03-01

    The production, isolation, and characterization of an antibiotic substance from cultures of Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 (NRRL B-15132) is described. P. fluorescens 2-79 originally was isolated from the roots of wheat and is suppressive to the wheat root disease take-all caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. The antibiotic was isolated from potato glucose broth cultures of strain 2-79 by solvent extraction. It was purified by silica gel column chromatography and was a greenish yellow, needle-shaped crystal with a melting point of 242 degrees C (decomposition). It was soluble in methylene chloride, chloroform, acetone, 2 N sodium hydroxide, and 2 N hydrochloric acid and was insoluble in water, methanol, ethyl acetate, tetrahydrofuran, diethyl ether, carbon tetrachloride, hexane, and petroleum ether. On the basis of UV, infrared, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectral analysis, and elemental analysis, the structure of the antibiotic is proposed to be a dimer of phenazine carboxylic acid. Lithium aluminum hydride reduction of the antibiotic yielded hydroxymethyl phenazine as a major product which retained most of the biological characteristics of the parent molecule. There were no toxic symptoms when mice received this antibiotic by oral doses up to 464 mg/kg. The antibiotic showed excellent activity against several species of fungi, including the wheat pathogens Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, Rhizoctonia solani, and Pythium aristosporum; and it may have a role in suppression of take-all in vivo by strain 2-79.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain ET76, Isolated from Rice Rhizosphere in Northwestern Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarab, Saida; Arakrak, Abdelhay; Ollero, Francisco Javier; Megías, Manuel; Gomes, Douglas Fabiano; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Hungria, Mariangela

    2016-05-19

    Pseudomonas fluorescens ET76 was isolated from rice rhizosphere in northwestern Morocco. Its draft genome was estimated to be 6,681,652 bp with 5,789 coding sequences (CDSs). Genes encoding for type I to VI secretion systems, PvdQ, proteases, siderophores, hydrogen cyanide synthase, ACC-deaminase, among others, highlight its potential use in biological control of plant pathogens.

  16. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains SF39a and SF4c, Potential Plant Growth Promotion and Biocontrol Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Lindsey K; Underwood, Grace E; McCully, Lucy M; Bitzer, Adam S; Godino, Agustina; Bucci, Vanni; Brigham, Christopher J; Príncipe, Analía; Fischer, Sonia E; Silby, Mark W

    2015-03-26

    Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c and SF39a, strains isolated from wheat rhizosphere, have potential applications in plant growth promotion and biocontrol of fungal diseases of crop plants. We report the draft genome sequences of SF4c and SF39a with estimated sizes of 6.5 Mb and 5.9 Mb, respectively.

  17. Characterization and structure of the polysaccharide produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain TF7 isolated from an arid region of Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguett, Farida; Boisset, Claire; Heyraud, Alain; Buon, Laurine; Kaci, Yahia

    2015-05-01

    Many bacteria possess a natural ability to synthesize and excrete exopolysaccharides which are widely varied in structure and function. These bacteria have the ability to solubilize inorganic phosphorus, which is important to promote growth and increase crop yields. The objective of this study is to select an adaptive strain to the constraints of erratic rainfall and large temperature variations and to determine the possible synergistic effects of its EPS and organic acid on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) solubilization. The strain TF7 isolated from an arid region of Algeria was characterized on the basis of its morphological and physiological traits. Polysaccharide production and the phosphate-solubilizing activity of the strain were evaluated using sucrose and tricalcium phosphate. This EPS was studied by sugar analysis as well as proton NMR spectra. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this strain shared a similarity of more than 96% with Pseudomonas fluorescens. The maximum polysaccharide productivity was estimated at 4.5g·L(-1) after 5 days. The analyzed sugar was comprised of fructose, glucose, and mannose in a ratio of 4:1:0.6. NMR spectra indicated that the polysaccharide produced by the strain was levan with β-(2→6)-linked fructose units in accordance with the generally accepted structure. The strain TF7 solubilizes phosphate and forms a clear halo around the colony. The phosphate-solubilizing index is 2.33.

  18. Biological control of wheat root diseases by the CLP-producing strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Ming; Wen, Shan-Shan; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; Mavrodi, Olga V; von Wettstein, Diter; Thomashow, Linda S; Guo, Jian-Hua; Weller, David M

    2014-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07, previously isolated from the phyllosphere of wheat grown in Hebei province, China, suppresses the soilborne disease of wheat take-all, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. We report here that strain HC1-07 also suppresses Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat caused by Rhizoctonia solani AG-8. Strain HC1-07 produced a cyclic lipopeptide (CLP) with a molecular weight of 1,126.42 based on analysis by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Extracted CLP inhibited the growth of G. graminis var. tritici and R. solani in vitro. To determine the role of this CLP in biological control, plasposon mutagenesis was used to generate two nonproducing mutants, HC1-07viscB and HC1-07prtR2. Analysis of regions flanking plasposon insertions in HC1-07prtR2 and HC1-07viscB revealed that the inactivated genes were similar to prtR and viscB, respectively, of the well-described biocontrol strain P. fluorescens SBW25 that produces the CLP viscosin. Both genes in HC1-07 were required for the production of the viscosin-like CLP. The two mutants were less inhibitory to G. graminis var. tritici and R. solani in vitro and reduced in ability to suppress take-all. HC1-07viscB but not HC-07prtR2 was reduced in ability to suppress Rhizoctonia root rot. In addition to CLP production, prtR also played a role in protease production.

  19. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Denise A. Mayer,

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A, were evaluated on coldwater, coolwater, and warmwater fish endemic to the Great Lakes and Upper Mississippi River Basins. Nine species of young-of-the-year fish were exposed to SDP for 24 hours by using continuous-flow, serial-dilution exposure systems at temperatures of 12 degrees Celsius (°C; 2 species; Oncorhynchus mykiss [rainbow trout] and Salvelinus fontinalis [brook trout]), 17 °C (3 species; Perca flavescens [yellow perch], Sander vitreus [walleye], and Acipenser fulvescens [lake sturgeon]), or 22 °C (4 species; Micropterus salmoides [largemouth bass], Micropterus dolomieu [smallmouth bass], Lepomis macrochirus [bluegill sunfish], and Ictalurus punctatus [channel catfish]).

  20. Identification of differences in genome content among phlD-positive Pseudomonas fluorescens strains by using PCR-based subtractive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrodi, D V; Mavrodi, O V; McSpadden-Gardener, B B; Landa, B B; Weller, D M; Thomashow, L S

    2002-10-01

    Certain 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens colonize roots and suppress soilborne diseases more effectively than others from which they are otherwise phenotypically almost indistinguishable. We recovered DNA fragments present in the superior colonizer P. fluorescens Q8r1-96 but not in the less rhizosphere-competent strain Q2-87. Of the open reading frames in 32 independent Q8r1-96-specific clones, 1 was similar to colicin M from Escherichia coli, 3 resembled known regulatory proteins, and 28 had no significant match with sequences of known function. Seven clones hybridized preferentially to DNA from strains with superior rhizosphere competence, and sequences in two others were highly expressed in vitro and in the rhizosphere.

  1. Intragenomic heterogeneity of the 16S rRNA-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer among Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, Irina A; Bobrova, Vera K; Matveeva, Eugenia V; Schaad, Norman W; Troitsky, Alexey V

    2004-10-01

    The 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1) from 14 strains of Pseudomonas syringae and P. fluorescens were sequenced. ITS1 exhibited significant sequence variability among different operons within a single genome. From 1 to 4 types of ITS1 were found in individual genomes of the P. syringae and P. fluorescens strains. A total of eight ITS1 types were identified among strains studied. The ITS1 nucleotide sequences consisted of conserved blocks including, among others, a stem-forming region of box B, tRNAIle and tRNAAla genes and several variable blocks. The differences in the variable regions were mostly due to insertions and/or deletions of nucleotide blocks. The intragenomic heterogeneity of ITS1 was brought about by different combinations of variable blocks, which possibly have resulted from recombination and horizontal transfer.

  2. Virulence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens clinical strain MFN1032 towards Dictyostelium discoideum and macrophages in relation with type III secretion system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sperandio Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens biovar I MFN1032 is a clinical isolate able to grow at 37°C. This strain displays secretion-mediated hemolytic activity involving phospholipase C and cyclolipopeptides, and a cell-associated hemolytic activity distinct from the secreted hemolytic activity. Cell-associated hemolysis is independent of biosurfactant production and remains in a gacA mutant. Disruption of the hrpU-like operon (the basal part of type III secretion system from rhizospheric strains suppresses this activity. We hypothesized that this phenotype could reflect evolution of an ancestral mechanism involved in the survival of this species in its natural niche. In this study, we evaluated the hrpU-like operon’s contribution to other virulence mechanisms using a panel of Pseudomonas strains from various sources. Results We found that MFN1032 inhibited the growth of the amoebae Dictyostelium discoideum and that this inhibition involved the hrpU-like operon and was absent in a gacA mutant. MFN1032 was capable of causing macrophage lysis, if the hrpU-like operon was intact, and this cytotoxicity remained in a gacA mutant. Cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage necrosis were found in other P. fluorescens clinical isolates, but not in biocontrol P. fluorescens strains harbouring hrpU-like operon. The growth of Dictyostelium discoideum was inhibited to a different extent by P. fluorescens strains without correlation between this inhibition and hrpU-like operon sequences. Conclusions In P. fluorescens MFN1032, the basal part of type III secretion system plays a role in D. discoideum growth inhibition and macrophage necrosis. The inhibition of D. discoideum growth is dependent on the GacS/GacA system, while cell-associated hemolytic activity and macrophage lysis are not. Virulence against eukaryotic cells based on the hrpU-like operon may be more than just a stochastic evolution of a conserved system dedicated to survival in

  3. Transcriptomic profiling of microbe-microbe interactions reveals the specific response of the biocontrol strain P. fluorescens In5 to the phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Glaring, Mikkel Andreas; Olsson, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies to date report the transcriptional response of biocontrol bacteria toward phytopathogens. In order to gain insights into the potential mechanism underlying the antagonism of the antimicrobial producing strain P. fluorescens In5 against the phytopathogens Rhizoctonia solani...

  4. Complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7, an indigenous root endophyte from olive (Olea europaea L.) and effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Pedro Manuel; Ruano-Rosa, David; Schilirò, Elisabetta; Prieto, Pilar; Ramos, Cayo; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 is a native endophyte of olive roots. Previous studies have shown this motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacterium is an effective biocontrol agent against the soil-borne fungus Verticillium dahliae, the causal agent of one of the most devastating diseases for olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivation. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PICF7 consisting of a circular chromosome of 6,136,735 bp that encodes 5,567 protein-coding genes and 88 RNA-only encoding genes. Genome analysis revealed genes predicting factors such as secretion systems, siderophores, detoxifying compounds or volatile components. Further analysis of the genome sequence of PICF7 will help in gaining insights into biocontrol and endophytism.

  5. Detection and analysis of chromosomal arsenic resistance in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain MSP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prithivirajsingh, S; Mishra, S K; Mahadevan, A

    2001-02-09

    Pseudomonas fluorescens MSP3 isolated from sea water was resistant to arsenate. This bacterium harbored no plasmids, indicating that arsenic resistance was chromosomally encoded. The chromosomal DNA from MSP3 when transformed onto Escherichia coli DH5alpha using pBluescript exhibited resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite. Three clones MSA1, MSA2, and MSI3 containing the ars genes were obtained and further subcloning resulted in three fragments of size 2.2, 2.6, and 2.1 kb for pMSA11, pMSA12, and pMSI13, respectively, which contained the genes arsRBC of the arsenic operon. An efflux mechanism of detoxification was observed which was ATP dependent. The resistance mechanism was encoded from a single operon which consisted of an arsenite inducible repressor that regulates the expression of arsenate reductase (ars C) and inner membrane associated arsenite export system encoded by ars B. The chromosomal operon was cloned, sequenced, and found to consist of three cistrons, named as ars R, ars B, and ars C. Southern hybridization and mating experiments confirmed the functioning of the ars genes in the operon, thereby conferring increased resistance to sodium arsenate and sodium arsenite.

  6. Enzymes involved in vinyl acetate decomposition by Pseudomonas fluorescens PCM 2123 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczyrba, Elżbieta; Greń, Izabela; Bartelmus, Grażyna

    2014-03-01

    Esterases are widely used in food processing industry, but there is little information concerning enzymes involved in decompositions of esters contributing to pollution of environment. Vinyl acetate (an ester of vinyl alcohol and acetic acid) is a representative of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in decomposition, of which hydrolyses and oxidoreductases are mainly involved. Their activities under periodically changing conditions of environment are essential for the removal of dangerous VOCs. Esterase and alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were determined in crude cell extract from Pseudomonas fluorescens PMC 2123 after vinyl acetate induction. All examined enzymes exhibit their highest activity at 30-35 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. Esterase preferably hydrolyzed ester bonds with short fatty chains without plain differences for C2 or C4. Comparison of Km values for alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases for acetaldehyde suggested that this metabolite was preferentially oxidized than reduced. Activity of alcohol dehydrogenase reducing acetaldehyde to ethanol suggested that one mechanism of defense against the elevated concentration of toxic acetaldehyde could be its temporary reduction to ethanol. Esterase activity was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, while β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no inhibitor effect. From among metal ions, only Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) stimulated the cleavage of ester bond.

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain CREA-C16 Isolated from Pea (Pisum sativum L.) Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Roberto; Scotti, Riccardo; Salzano, Melania; Aurilia, Vincenzo

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Herein, we report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CREA-C16, a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that was isolated from the rhizosphere of Pisum sativum L. plants. The genome sequence is ~6 Mb in size, with a G+C content of 60.1%, and includes 4,457 candidate protein-encoding genes. PMID:28126933

  8. Highly stretchable strain sensor based on SWCNTs/CB synergistic conductive network for wearable human-activity monitoring and recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaohui; Huang, Ying; Zhao, Yunong; Mao, Leidong; Gao, Le; Pan, Weidong; Zhang, Yugang; Liu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Flexible, stretchable, and wearable strain sensors have attracted significant attention for their potential applications in human movement detection and recognition. Here, we report a highly stretchable and flexible strain sensor based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs)/carbon black (CB) synergistic conductive network. The fabrication, synergistic conductive mechanism, and characterization of the sandwich-structured strain sensor were investigated. The experimental results show that the device exhibits high stretchability (120%), excellent flexibility, fast response (∼60 ms), temperature independence, and superior stability and reproducibility during ∼1100 stretching/releasing cycles. Furthermore, human activities such as the bending of a finger or elbow and gestures were monitored and recognized based on the strain sensor, indicating that the stretchable strain sensor based on the SWCNTs/CB synergistic conductive network could have promising applications in flexible and wearable devices for human motion monitoring.

  9. Combined Toxic Effects of Heavy Metals and Antibiotics on a Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain ZY2 Isolated from Swine Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ZY2, isolated from swine wastewater, was used to investigate the synergistic effects of five heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr(VI and Hg on bacterial resistance to antibiotics. Results indicate that the combined effects of antibiotic type, heavy metal type and concentration were significant (p < 0.01. Cross-resistance to Hg and antibiotics was the most noticeable. Moreover, the resistance to Hg and cefradine or amoxicillin, and Cr and amoxicillin were synergistic for low heavy metal concentrations, and turned antagonistic with increasing concentrations, while the resistances to Cr or Cu and cefradine, Pb or Cu and amoxicillin, Cu and norfloxacin showed reverse effects. In addition, resistance to Zn and amoxicillin were always synergetic, while resistance to Pb and cefradine or norfloxacin, Cr or Hg and norfloxacin as well as all the heavy metals and tetracycline were antagonistic. These results indicate that bacterial resistance to antibiotics can be affected by the type and concentration of co-exposed heavy metals and may further threaten people’s health and ecological security severely via horizontal gene transfer.

  10. Plant growth promotion by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium that has a versatile metabolism and is widely spread in soil and water. P. fluorescens strain SBW25 (Pf.SBW25) is a well-known model strain to study bacterial evolution, plant colonization and biocontrol of plant diseases. It produces t

  11. Characterisation of the Thermostable Protease AprX in Strains of Pseudomonas Fluorescens and Impact on the Shelf-life of Dairy Products: Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Balzan, Stefania; Lucchini, Rosaria; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2016-09-20

    Bacterial proteases are involved in food spoilage and shelf-life reduction. Among the bacterial proteases, a predominant role in spoilage of dairy products seems to be played by the thermostable metallo-protease AprX, which is produced by various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Differences in AprX enzyme activity among different strains were highlighted, but the most proteolytic strains were not identified. In this study, the presence of the aprX gene was evaluated in 69 strains isolated from food matrices and 18 reference strains belonging to the P. fluorescens group, which had been previously typed by the multi locus sequence typing method. Subsequently, a subset of reference strains was inoculated in ultra-high temperature milk, and the expression of the aprX gene was evaluated at 22 and 6°C. On the same milk samples, the proteolytic activity was then evaluated through Azocasein and trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid solution assays. Finally, to assess the applicability of the former assay directly on dairy products the proteolityc activity was tested on industrial ricotta samples using the Azocasein assay. These results demonstrate the spread of aprX gene in most strains tested and the applicability of Azocasein assay to monitor the proteolytic activity in dairy products.

  12. Interaction between the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CHA0, its genetic derivatives and vermiculite: Effects on chemical, mineralogical and mechanical properties of vermiculite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Using bacteria of the strain Pseudomonas fluorescens wild type CHA0 and its genetic derivative strains CHA77, CHA89, CHA400, CHA631 and CHA661 (which differ in one gene only) the changes in chemical, mineralogical and rheological properties of the clay mineral vermiculite affected by microbial activity were studied in order to test whether the individually different production of metabolites by the genetically engineered strains may alter the clay mineral vermiculite in distinct ways. With the novel strategy of working with living wild type bacteria, their genetic derivatives and clay, the following properties of the mineral altered by the various strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were determined: grain size, X-Ray diffraction pattern, intercrystalline swelling with glycerol, layer charge, CEC, BET surface and uptake of trace elements. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to determine the changes in major, minor and trace elements of the clay vermiculite affected by microbial activity. Among all analyzed trace elements, Fe, Mn and Cu are the most interesting. Fe and Mn are taken up from the clay mineral by all bacterial strains whereas Cu is only removed from vermiculite by strains CHA0, CHA77, CHA400 and CHA661. The latter mentioned strains all produce the antibiotics 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol and monoacetylphloroglucinol which can complex Cu efficiently. Therefore the alteration of only one gene of the bacteria is causing significant effects on the clay mineral.

  13. Genomic analysis of the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp with evidence of T3SS and T6SS gene expression on plant roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Muriel; Boutin, Morgane; Gazengel, Kévin; Rispe, Claude; Gauthier, Jean-Pierre; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Lebreton, Lionel; Barret, Matthieu; Daval, Stéphanie; Sarniguet, Alain

    2013-06-01

    Several bacterial strains of the Pseudomonas genus provide plant growth stimulation, plant protection against pests or bioremediation. Among these bacteria, P. fluorescens Pf29Arp reduces the severity of take-all, a disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In this study, we obtained a draft genome of Pf29Arp and subsequent comparative genomic analyses have revealed that this bacterial strain is closely related to strains of the 'P. brassicacearum-like' subgroup including P. brassicacearum ssp. brassicacearum NFM421 and P. fluorescens F113. Despite an overall chromosomal organization similar to these strains, a number of features including antibiotic synthesis gene clusters from secondary metabolism are not found in the Pf29Arp genome. But Pf29Arp possesses different protein secretion systems including type III (T3SS) and type VI (T6SS) secretion systems. Pf29Arp is the first Pseudomonas sp. strain described with four T6SS clusters (cluster I, II, III and IV). In addition, some protein-coding genes involved in the assembly of these secretion systems are basally expressed during Pf29Arp colonization of healthy wheat roots and display different expression patterns on necrotized roots caused by Ggt. These data suggest a role of T3SS and T6SS in the Pf29Arp adaptation to different root environments.

  14. Biogenic Strain of Silver and Selenium Nanoparticles by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Cladosporium sp. JAPSK3 Isolated from Coal Mine Samples and Their Antimicrobial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Saha, Prasenjit; Rajkumar, Karthik; Abraham, Jayanthi

    2014-08-01

    Selenium and silver have unique properties and great potential in the field of physics, chemistry and biology. The bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens was isolated by using Kings'B media and Cladosporium sp. was isolated by using potato dextrose agar for soil sample collected from Andhra Pradesh coal field of Singareni. Rapid formation of stable silver and selenium nanoparticles (AgNPs; SeNPs) were observed on exposure of the microbial culture with solution of silver nitrate and sodium selenite. The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Further, the biologically synthesized nanoparticles were found to have efficient antimicrobial activity against pathogenic bacteria, thus implying significance of the present study in production of biomedical products. AgNPs synthesized by P. fluorescens showed more antimicrobial activity than Cladosporium sp. As the AgNPs are much smaller in size, they showed effective antimicrobial activity when compared to that of SeNPs which showed less effective antimicrobial activity in both P. fluorescens and Cladosporium sp. The microbes are capable of reducing both AgNPs and SeNPs. The biological synthesis of nanoparticles is useful when compared with other physical and chemical methods as they are eco-friendly.

  15. Identification of copper-induced genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens and use of a reporter strain to monitor bioavailable copper in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tom-Petersen, Andreas; Hosbond, Carsten; Nybroe, Ole

    2001-01-01

    negatively affect the bacterial soil community. In this study, our goal was to develop a specific and stable Cu reporter construction harboured by an indigenous soil bacterium to measure bioavailability of Cu in soil. Following mutagenesis of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain DF57 with a Tn5::luxAB promoter...... probe transposon, we identified four mutants with elevated luxAB expression in response to Cu. Two of the mutated loci encoded proteins homologous to Cop proteins conferring Cu resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, while a third displayed homology to metal-transporting ATPases. In the fourth mutant, DF57...

  16. Safety of spray-dried powder formulated Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A exposure to subadult/adult unionid mussels during simulated open-water treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Waller, Diane L.; Wise, Jeremy K.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure effects of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation ofPseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of unionid mussels endemic to the Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins was evaluated in this study. The study exposures were completed within replicated 350-liter test tanks contained within a mobile bioassay laboratory sited on the shores of the Black River near La Crosse, Wisconsin. The test tanks were supplied with flowing, filtered river water which was interrupted during the exposure period.

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida PA14H7, Three Biocontrol Bacteria against Dickeya Phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigna, Jérémy; Raoul des Essarts, Yannick; Mondy, Samuel; Hélias, Valérie; Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-29

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains PA4C2 and PA3G8 and Pseudomonas putida strain PA14H7 were isolated from potato rhizosphere and show an ability to inhibit the growth of Dickeya phytopathogens. Here, we report their draft genome sequences, which provide a basis for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in antibiosis against Dickeya.

  18. Transcriptomic profiling of microbe-microbe interactions reveals the specific response of the biocontrol strain P. fluorescens In5 to the phytopathogen Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Rosanna C; Glaring, Mikkel A; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    2017-08-10

    Few studies to date report the transcriptional response of biocontrol bacteria toward phytopathogens. In order to gain insights into the potential mechanism underlying the antagonism of the antimicrobial producing strain P. fluorescens In5 against the phytopathogens Rhizoctonia solani and Pythium aphanidermatum, global RNA sequencing was performed. Differential gene expression profiling of P. fluorescens In5 in response to either R. solani or P. aphanidermatum was investigated using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). Total RNA was isolated from single bacterial cultures of P. fluorescens In5 or bacterial cultures in dual-culture for 48 h with each pathogen in biological triplicates. RNA-seq libraries were constructed following a default Illumina stranded RNA protocol including rRNA depletion and were sequenced 2 × 100 bases on Illumina HiSeq generating approximately 10 million reads per sample. No significant changes in global gene expression were recorded during dual-culture of P. fluorescens In5 with any of the two pathogens but rather each pathogen appeared to induce expression of a specific set of genes. A particularly strong transcriptional response to R. solani was observed and notably several genes possibly associated with secondary metabolite detoxification and metabolism were highly upregulated in response to the fungus. A total of 23 genes were significantly upregulated and seven genes were significantly downregulated with at least respectively a threefold change in expression level in response to R. solani compared to the no fungus control. In contrast, only one gene was significantly upregulated over threefold and three transcripts were significantly downregulated over threefold in response to P. aphanidermatum. Genes known to be involved in synthesis of secondary metabolites, e.g. non-ribosomal synthetases and hydrogen cyanide were not differentially expressed at the time points studied. This study demonstrates that genes possibly involved in

  19. Quantification of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153 in the rhizosphere of maize by strain-specific real-time PCR unaffected by the variability of DNA extraction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Felten, Andreas; Défago, Geneviève; Maurhofer, Monika

    2010-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains F113 and CHA0 are well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) often used as model strains in biocontrol experiments. To monitor their persistence in large scale field experiments, culture-independent methods are needed. In this study, a strain-specific real-time PCR quantification tool was developed based on sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCAR) for P. fluorescens strains F113, CHA0 and Pf153. Differences in DNA extraction efficiencies from rhizosphere samples were circumvented using plasmid APA9 as internal standard to normalize C(T) values after real-time amplification. The detection limits of the real-time PCR assays for all three strains were approximately 10 cells for genomic DNA and 10(4)cells/g rhizosphere for maize samples grown in different natural soils. Population sizes of the three strains in the rhizosphere of maize measured by the new real-time PCR approaches were similar to those measured by most probable number (MPN)-PCR. A persistence study of the three strains indicated that the strains persisted differently over a period of 5weeks. In conclusion the newly developed real-time PCR approach is a fast and resource efficient method for monitoring individual biocontrol strains in natural soil, which makes it an apt quantification tool for future large-scale field experiments.

  20. Effect of inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain FY32 on some traits in canola cultivars under salt stress in hydroponic system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria are known as an alternative to chemical fertilizers, which are able to reduce the harmful effects of non-biological stresses such as salinity and increase soil fertility and crop production. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain FY32 on a number of morphological characters in canola cultivars under salt stress. Thereby, a split split-plot design with three replications was applied in hydroponic cultivation system. Six bacterial inoculated (Pseudomonas flourescens FY32 and non-inoculated canola cultivars were subjected to sodium chloride salt stress at three levels (0, 150 and 300 mM. Based on the ANOVA results, inoculation effects under different salinity levels on canola cultivars, compared to non-inoculated treatments, were statistically significant on plant fresh weight, dry weight of leaf, stem and total plant, leaf area and root length. Also, three-way interaction effects of salinity, bacteria and cultivar on plant height and root volume were significant (P<0.01. Sodium, potassium and proline concentration in leaves and roots of inoculated plants had significant difference with non-inoculated plants at different levels of salinity. The highest rate of proline and potassium ion was observed in canola cultivars inoculated with Pseudomonas fluorescens under both salinity levels. It can be concluded that inoculation of canola plants with Pseudomonas flourescense (containing ACC- deaminase gene could improve their growth and development in case of salinity stress.

  1. Non-target trials with Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A, a lethal control agent of dreissenid mussels (Bivalvia: Dreissenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to develop an efficacious and environmentally safe method for managing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and quaggamussels (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis, we initiated a research project investigating the potential use of bacteria and their naturalmetabolic products as biocontrol agents. This project resulted in the discovery of an environmental isolate lethal to dreissenid mussels,Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A (Pf-CL145A. In previous published reports we have demonstrated that: 1 Pf-CL145A’s mode ofaction is intoxication (not infection; 2 natural product within ingested bacterial cells lyse digestive tract epithelial cells leading to dreisseniddeath; and 3 high dreissenid kill rates (>90% are achievable following treatment with Pf-CL145A cells, irrespective of whether thebacterial cells are dead or alive. Investigating the environmental safety of Pf-CL145A was also a key element in our research efforts, andherein, we report the results of non-target trials demonstrating Pf-CL145A’s high specificity to dreissenids. These acute toxicity trials weretypically single-dose, short-term (24-72 h exposures to Pf-CL145A cells under aerated conditions at concentrations highly lethal todreissenids (100 or 200 mg/L. These trials produced no evidence of mortality among the ciliate Colpidium colpoda, the cladoceran Daphniamagna, three fish species (Pimephales promelas, Salmo trutta, and Lepomis macrochirus, and seven bivalve species (Mytilus edulis,Pyganodon grandis, Pyganodon cataracta, Lasmigona compressa, Strophitus undulatus, Lampsilis radiata, and Elliptio complanata. Lowmortality (3-27% was recorded in the amphipod Hyalella azteca, but additional trials suggested that most, if not all, of the mortality couldbe attributed to some other unidentified factor (e.g., possibly particle load or a water quality issue rather than Pf-CL145A’s dreissenidkillingnatural product. In terms of potential environmental safety, the results of

  2. Isomalt production by cloning, purifying and expressing of the MDH gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 50106 in different strains of E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghighatian, M; Mofid, M R; Nekouei, M K; Yaghmaei, P; Tafreshi, A H

    2008-08-15

    A NADH-dependent mannitol dehydrogenase gene (mtlD) was cloned from Pseudomonas fluorescens, subcloned into an expression vector (pDEST110) and entered into different strains of E. coli to compare their protein expression and the enzyme specific activity. Purifications were accomplished by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. Using this approach, the efficiency of purification process significantly increased (up to 90%) so that the purified enzyme gave a sharp single band (55 kDa) in SDS-PAGE. The results showed that among the strains, BL21 (DE3) plysS exhibited the maximum expression level of MDH(mannitol dehydrogenase) (11 mg L(-1)). Results from activity assay with fructose as substrate also showed that in this strain the specific activity of 63 U mg(-1) protein monitored for the enzyme, the record not reported before. Resazurin staining also indicated that the enzyme reduced fructose, whereas oxidized other substrates including mannitol, sorbitol and arabitol under optimal assay condition. From HPLC analysis it was showed for the first time that the enzyme could convert substrate isomaltulose to the specific products, GPM and GPS. Interestingly, because of the high specificity of the enzyme for substrate, the method can be used as an alternative approach to substitute nonspecific conventional method of isomalt production.

  3. Genomic Analysis of Secondary Metabolite Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and its production of secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity displayed among strains. Certain st...

  4. The plant pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici improves bacterial growth and triggers early gene regulations in the biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, M; Frey-Klett, P; Boutin, M; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, A-Y; Martin, F; Guillot, L; Sarniguet, A

    2009-01-01

    In soil, some antagonistic rhizobacteria contribute to reduce root diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi. Direct modes of action of these bacteria have been largely explored; however, commensal interaction also takes place between these microorganisms and little is known about the influence of filamentous fungi on bacteria. An in vitro confrontation bioassay between the pathogenic fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) and the biocontrol bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp was set up to analyse bacterial transcriptional changes induced by the fungal mycelium at three time-points of the interaction before cell contact and up until contact. For this, a Pf29Arp shotgun DNA microarray was constructed. Specifity of Ggt effect was assessed in comparison with one of two other filamentous fungi, Laccaria bicolor and Magnaporthe grisea. During a commensal interaction, Ggt increased the growth rate of Pf29Arp. Before contact, Ggt induced bacterial genes involved in mycelium colonization. At contact, genes encoding protein of stress response and a patatin-like protein were up-regulated. Among all the bacterial genes identified, xseB was specifically up-regulated at contact by Ggt but down-regulated by the other fungi. Data showed that the bacterium sensed the presence of the fungus early, but the main gene alteration occurred during bacterial-fungal cell contact.

  5. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CL145A spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to native unionid mussels within field enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Weber, Kerry L.; Severson, Todd J.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a commercially prepared spray dried powder (SDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) was evaluated for removing zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) adhering to a population of unionid mussels in Lake Darling (Alexandria, Minnesota). Two groups of unionid mussels were used in the study. Unionid mussels were collected near the test area, weighed, photographed, individually tagged, and randomly allocated to one of nine test enclosures in equal proportions and then divided into two groups. The first group of unionid mussels (Group 1, n = 5 per test enclosure) were indiscriminately selected from each test enclosure and used to estimate the number of zebra mussels adhering to unionid mussels prior to exposure. The second group of unionid mussels (Group 2, n = 22 per test enclosure) were used to evaluate the efficacy of SDP for removal of adhering zebra mussels. Both Group 1 and Group 2 mussels were used to evaluate the effects of SDP exposure on unionid mussel survival.

  6. Prokaryotic Homologs of the Eukaryotic 3-Hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-Dioxygenase and 2-Amino-3-Carboxymuconate-6-Semialdehyde Decarboxylase in the 2-Nitrobenzoate Degradation Pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain KU-7†

    OpenAIRE

    Muraki, Takamichi; Taki, Masami; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2003-01-01

    The 2-nitrobenzoic acid degradation pathway of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KU-7 proceeds via a novel 3-hydroxyanthranilate intermediate. In this study, we cloned and sequenced a 19-kb DNA locus of strain KU-7 that encompasses the 3-hydroxyanthranilate meta-cleavage pathway genes. The gene cluster, designated nbaEXHJIGFCDR, is organized tightly and in the same direction. The nbaC and nbaD gene products were found to be novel homologs of the eukaryotic 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase a...

  7. Colonization strategy of the endophytic plant growth-promoting strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Klebsiella oxytoca on the seeds, seedlings and roots of the epiphytic orchid, Dendrobium nobile Lindl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, A S; Leontieva, M R; Smirnova, T A; Kolomeitseva, G L; Netrusov, A I; Tsavkelova, E A

    2017-04-29

    Orchids form strong mycorrhizal associations, but their interactions with bacteria are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate the distribution of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) at different stages of orchid development and to study if there is any selective specificity in choosing PGPR partners. Colonization patterns of gfp-tagged Pseudomonas fluorescens and Klebsiella oxytoca were studied on roots, seeds, and seedlings of Dendrobium nobile. Endophytic rhizobacteria rapidly colonized velamen and core parenchyma entering through exodermis and the passage cells, whereas at the early stages, they stayed restricted to the surface and the outer layers of the protocorms and rhizoids. The highest amounts of auxin (indole-3-acetic acid) were produced by K. oxytoca and P. fluorescens in the nitrogen-limiting and NO3 -containing media respectively. Bacterization of D. nobile seeds resulted in promotion of their in vitro germination. The plant showed no selective specificity to the tested strains. Klebsiella oxytoca demonstrated more intense colonization activity and more efficient growth promoting impact under tryptophan supplementation, while P. fluorescens revealed its growth-promoting capacity without tryptophan. Both strategies are regarded as complementary, improving adaptive potentials of the orchid when different microbial populations colonize the plant. This study enlarges our knowledge on orchid-microbial interactions, and provides new features on application of the nonorchid PGPR in orchid seed germination and conservation. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Biological control of take-all and Rhizoctonia root rot of wheat by the cyclic lipopeptide-producing strain Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens HC1-07, isolated from the phyllosphere of wheat grown in Hebei province, China, inhibited a broad range of plant pathogens, including Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and Rhizoctonia solani AG-8, and suppressed the soilborne diseases of wheat, take-all and Rhizoctonia roo...

  9. Analysis of the pmsCEAB Gene Cluster Involved in Biosynthesis of Salicylic Acid and the Siderophore Pseudomonine in the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mercado-Blanco, J.; Drift, K.M.G.M. van der; Olsson, P.E.; Thomas-Oates, J.E.; Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    Mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 defective in biosynthesis of the fluorescent siderophore pseudobactin still display siderophore activity, indicating the production of a second siderophore. A recombinant cosmid clone (pMB374-07) of a WCS374 gene library harboring loci necessary for the bios

  10. Control of fire blight by Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 and Pantoea vagans C9-1 applied as single strains and mixed inocula

    Science.gov (United States)

    The biological control agents Pseudomonas fluorescens A506 and Pantoea vagans C9-1 were evaluated individually and in combination for the suppression of fire blight of pear or apple in ten field trials inoculated with the pathogen Erwinia amylovora. The formulation of pathogen inoculum applied to b...

  11. Efficacy of spray –Dried Pseudomonas fluorescens, strain CL145A (Zequanox®), for controlling Zebra Mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within Lake Minnetonka, MN enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of whole water column and subsurface applications of the biopesticide Zequanox®, a commercially prepared spray-dried powder formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A), were evaluated for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) within 27-m2 enclosures in Lake Minnetonka (Deephaven, Minnesota). Five treatments consisting of (1) two whole water column Zequanox applications, (2) two subsurface Zequanox applications, and (3) an untreated control were completed on each of three independent treatment days during September 2014. The two types of samplers used in the study were (1) type 1 samplers, which were custom built multi-plate samplers (wood, perforated aluminum, and tile substrates) that were placed into Robinson’s Bay in June of 2013 to allow for natural colonization by zebra mussels, and (2) type 2 samplers, which consisted of zebra mussels adhering to perforated aluminum trays that were placed into mesh containment bags. One day prior to treatment, three individual samplers of each type were distributed to test enclosures and exposed to a randomly assigned treatment. Sampling to determine the zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival assessments for zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were completed ~40 days after exposure. The zebra mussel biomass adhering to type 1 samplers and the survival of zebra mussels contained in type 2 samplers were significantly less in groups treated with the highest Zequanox concentrations and in groups that received whole water column applications than comparable groups treated with lower Zequanox concentrations and subsurface applications. However, standardization of biomass and survival results to the amount of Zequanox applied showed that the lower concentrations and subsurface applications were more cost efficient, with respect to product used, at reducing zebra mussel biomass and for inducing zebra mussel mortality. Although the subsurface application methods

  12. Effect of cannabinoid receptor CB2 on mechanical tensile strain-stimulated osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells%大麻素受体CB2在机械牵张力介导的人牙周膜细胞成骨分化中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱红; 赵亚; 胡静; 闫英剑

    2012-01-01

    目的:研究大麻素Ⅱ型受体(cannabinoid receptor Ⅱ,CB2)在机械牵张力介导的人牙周膜细胞中的表达以及成骨分化中的作用.方法:体外培养人牙周膜细胞,构建细胞-机械牵张力加载模型,施加不同大小的机械牵张力,采用Real-time PCR和细胞免疫荧光化学技术检测CB2在人牙周膜细胞中mRNA和蛋白的表达.周碱性磷酸酶(ALP)试剂盒检测机械牵张力介导的细胞ALP活性.结果:对人牙周膜细胞施加不同大小的机械牵张力24h,CB2 mRNA的表达随机械牵张力的力值增大而显著性增加(P<0.05),在18%拉伸应变率作用下表达量最高(P<0.05),此时CB2蛋白的表达显著增加.加入CB2激动剂HU-308后,施加18%拉伸应变率的机械牵张力作用于人牙周膜细胞24h,ALP活性显著性增加(P<0.05).结论:CB2在人牙周膜细胞中的表达与机械牵张力的力值具有相关性.在机械牵张力作用下,大麻素受体CB2与其配体结合能够促进人牙周膜细胞的成骨分化,从而在正畸牙槽骨改建中发挥重要作用.%Objective To investigate the expression and effect of cannabinoid receptor CB2 on mechanical tensile strain-stimulated osteogenic differentiation of human periodonta! ligament cells (HPDLCs). Methods HPDLCs were cultured in vitro and the cells were stretched by mechanical tensile strain of different magnitudes.Real-time PCR and immunofluorescence assay were used to examine CB2 expression from mRNA to protein levels following mechanical tensile strain, respectively. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in HPDLCs was further studied. Results There was a magnitude-dependent increase in CB2 mRNA expression following mechanical tensile strain for 24h (P<0.05), with the highest level at 18% elongation. CB2 protein expression was also found to enhance at 18% elongation for 24h. After addition of CB2 agonist HU-308, the activity of ALP was up-regulated at 18% elongation for 24h (P<0.05). Conclusion CB2

  13. Effect of GABA, a Bacterial Metabolite, on Pseudomonas fluorescens Surface Properties and Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc G. J. Feuilloley

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Different bacterial species and, particularly Pseudomonas fluorescens, can produce gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and express GABA-binding proteins. In this study, we investigated the effect of GABA on the virulence and biofilm formation activity of different strains of P. fluorescens. Exposure of a psychotropic strain of P. fluorescens (MF37 to GABA (10−5 M increased its necrotic-like activity on eukaryotic (glial cells, but reduced its apoptotic effect. Conversely, muscimol and bicuculline, the selective agonist and antagonist of eukaryote GABAA receptors, respectively, were ineffective. P. fluorescens MF37 did not produce biosurfactants, and its caseinase, esterase, amylase, hemolytic activity or pyoverdine productions were unchanged. In contrast, the effect of GABA was associated to rearrangements of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS structure, particularly in the lipid A region. The surface hydrophobicity of MF37 was marginally modified, and GABA reduced its biofilm formation activity on PVC, but not on glass, although the initial adhesion was increased. Five other P. fluorescens strains were studied, and only one, MFP05, a strain isolated from human skin, showed structural differences of biofilm maturation after exposure to GABA. These results reveal that GABA can regulate the LPS structure and cytotoxicity of P. fluorescens, but that this property is specific to some strains.

  14. The biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp strain affects the pathogenesis-related gene expression of the take-all fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici on wheat roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daval, Stéphanie; Lebreton, Lionel; Gazengel, Kévin; Boutin, Morgane; Guillerm-Erckelboudt, Anne-Yvonne; Sarniguet, Alain

    2011-12-01

    The main effects of antagonistic rhizobacteria on plant pathogenic fungi are antibiosis, fungistasis or an indirect constraint through the induction of a plant defence response. To explore different biocontrol mechanisms, an in vitro confrontation assay was conducted with the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf29Arp as a biocontrol agent of the fungus Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt) on wheat roots. In parallel with the assessment of disease extension, together with the bacterial and fungal root colonization rates, the transcript levels of candidate fungal pathogenicity and plant-induced genes were monitored during the 10-day infection process. The bacterial inoculation of wheat roots with the Pf29Arp strain reduced the development of Ggt-induced disease expressed as attack frequency and necrosis length. The growth rates of Ggt and Pf29Arp, monitored through quantitative polymerase chain reaction of DNA amounts with a part of the Ggt 18S rDNA gene and a specific Pf29Arp strain detection probe, respectively, increased throughout the interactions. Bacterial antagonism and colonization had no significant effect on root colonization by Ggt. The expression of fungal and plant genes was quantified in planta by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction during the interactions thanks to the design of specific primers and an innovative universal reference system. During the early stages of the tripartite interaction, several of the fungal genes assayed were down-regulated by Pf29Arp, including two laccases, a β-1,3-exoglucanase and a mitogen-activated protein kinase. The plant host glutathione-S-transferase gene was induced by Ggt alone and up-regulated by Pf29Arp bacteria in interaction with the pathogen. We conclude that Pf29Arp antagonism acts through the alteration of fungal pathogenesis and probably through the activation of host defences.

  15. Evaluation of economically feasible, natural plant extract-based microbiological media for producing biomass of the dry rot biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens P22Y05 in liquid culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Sadia; Ali, Tasneem Adam; Skory, Chris; Slininger, Patricia J; Schisler, David A

    2016-02-01

    The production of microbial biomass in liquid media often represents an indispensable step in the research and development of bacterial and fungal strains. Costs of commercially prepared nutrient media or purified media components, however, can represent a significant hurdle to conducting research in locations where obtaining these products is difficult. A less expensive option for providing components essential to microbial growth in liquid culture is the use of extracts of fresh or dried plant products obtained by using hot water extraction techniques. A total of 13 plant extract-based media were prepared from a variety of plant fruits, pods or seeds of plant species including Allium cepa (red onion bulb), Phaseolus vulgaris (green bean pods), and Lens culinaris (lentil seeds). In shake flask tests, cell production by potato dry rot antagonist Pseudomonas fluorescens P22Y05 in plant extract-based media was generally statistically indistinguishable from that in commercially produced tryptic soy broth and nutrient broth as measured by optical density and colony forming units/ml produced (P ≤ 0.05, Fisher's protected LSD). The efficacy of biomass produced in the best plant extract-based media or commercial media was equivalent in reducing Fusarium dry rot by 50-96% compared to controls. In studies using a high-throughput microbioreactor, logarithmic growth of P22Y05 in plant extract-based media initiated in 3-5 h in most cases but specific growth rate and the time of maximum OD varied as did the maximum pH obtained in media. Nutrient analysis of selected media before and after cell growth indicated that nitrogen in the form of NH4 accumulated in culture supernatants, possibly due to unbalanced growth conditions brought on by a scarcity of simple sugars in the media tested. The potential of plant extract-based media to economically produce biomass of microbes active in reducing plant disease is considerable and deserves further research.

  16. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  17. Cyanide production by Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askeland, R A; Morrison, S M

    1983-06-01

    Of 200 water isolates screened, five strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens and one strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cyanogenic. Maximum cyanogenesis by two strains of P. fluorescens in a defined growth medium occurred at 25 to 30 degrees C over a pH range of 6.6 to 8.9. Cyanide production per cell was optimum at 300 mM phosphate. A linear relationship was observed between cyanogenesis and the log of iron concentration over a range of 3 to 300 microM. The maximum rate of cyanide production occurred during the transition from exponential to stationary growth phase. Radioactive tracer experiments with [1-14C]glycine and [2-14C]glycine demonstrated that the cyanide carbon originates from the number 2 carbon of glycine for both P. fluorescens and P. aeruginosa. Cyanide production was not observed in raw industrial wastewater or in sterile wastewater inoculated with pure cultures of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains. Cyanide was produced when wastewater was amended by the addition of components of the defined growth medium.

  18. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurilio L. Martins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs, which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains.

  19. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maurilio L.; Pinto, Uelinton M.; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C.D.; Mantovani, Hilário C.; de Araújo, Elza F.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains. PMID:25477941

  20. Phylogenetic Analysis and Detection on the Major Ligninolytic Enzymes of Hericium erinaceum Strain CB1%猴头菌菌株CB1的系统发育分析与木质素降解酶的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹立伟; 池玉杰

    2013-01-01

    首先对猴头菌菌株CBI进行培养特性观察,表明菌株能产生较多的厚垣孢子;对其ITS序列进行扩增(GenBank登录号为GU584100),并与猴头菌属5个种的17个不同地域菌株进行基于ITS序列的系统发育分析,结果表明菌株CB1与猴头菌同种其他菌株遗传距离较近并聚类在一起.明确该菌株的分类地位后,对其进行木质素降解酶系统的检测,结果表明猴头菌可产生锰过氧化物酶(MnP)和漆酶(laccase),但不产生木质素过氧化物酶(LiP).MnP和漆酶的酶活性变化是有规律的,Mn2是猴头菌产生MnP的必要因子,而漆酶的产生则不受该条件的制约.在含Mn2+的LNAS培养基中加入木屑为底物的条件下,猴头菌MnP最大酶活性为45.56 U·L-1,漆酶最大酶活性为61.85 U·L-1.%Researches on ligninolytic enzymes of white-rot fungi could lay a foundation for exploring their degrading mechanism and expression and regulation mechanism of genes encoding for them.The study firstly observed and described the cultural characteristic of Hericium erinaceum strain CB1,result showed that CB1could produce some chlamydospores.Then,its ITS sequence was amplified (GenBank accession number:GU584100),and phylogenetic analyses was made based on the ITS sequences for 5 species including 17 different regional strains from Hericium,results showed that H.erinaceum strain CB1 and other strains from H.erinaceum were nearer in genetic distance and clustered together with them.After the classification status of H.erinaceum strain CB1 was fixed,its major ligninolytic enzymes were detected.The results indicated that H.erinaceum could produce MnP and laccase simultaneously,but no LiP excreted.The activities of MnP and laccase are regular.Mn2 + was proved to be the essential factor for H.erinaceum to produce MnP,but not for laccase.The highest MnP and laccase activity were reached when sawdust was added to LNAS culture solution with Mn2+ substrate which were 45.56 U·L-1 and 61

  1. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido-Sanz

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as

  2. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR.

  3. Contribution of the Pseudomonas fluorescens MFE01 Type VI Secretion System to Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallique, Mathias; Decoin, Victorien; Barbey, Corinne; Rosay, Thibaut; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.; Orange, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    Type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are widespread in Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas. These macromolecular machineries inject toxins directly into prokaryotic or eukaryotic prey cells. Hcp proteins are structural components of the extracellular part of this machinery. We recently reported that MFE01, an avirulent strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens, possesses at least two hcp genes, hcp1 and hcp2, encoding proteins playing important roles in interbacterial interactions. Indeed, P. fluorescens MFE01 can immobilise and kill diverse bacteria of various origins through the action of the Hcp1 or Hcp2 proteins of the T6SS. We show here that another Hcp protein, Hcp3, is involved in killing prey cells during co-culture on solid medium. Even after the mutation of hcp1, hcp2, or hcp3, MFE01 impaired biofilm formation by MFP05, a P. fluorescens strain isolated from human skin. These mutations did not reduce P. fluorescens MFE01 biofilm formation, but the three Hcp proteins were required for the completion of biofilm maturation. Moreover, a mutant with a disruption of one of the unique core component genes, MFE01ΔtssC, was unable to produce its own biofilm or inhibit MFP05 biofilm formation. Finally, MFE01 did not produce detectable N-acyl-homoserine lactones for quorum sensing, a phenomenon reported for many other P. fluorescens strains. Our results suggest a role for the T6SS in communication between bacterial cells, in this strain, under biofilm conditions. PMID:28114423

  4. Biocontrol of collar rot disease of betelvine (Piper betle L.) caused by Sclerotium rolfsii by using rhizosphere-competent Pseudomonas fluorescens NBRI-N6 and P. fluorescens NBRI-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anand; Mehta, Sangeeta; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2003-08-01

    Collar rot disease of betelvine (Piper betle L.) caused by Sclerotium rolfsii is difficult to control by conventional means by use of chemicals; therefore, use of biocontrol agents is desirable. In the present study, 186 bacterial strains of different morphological types were screened for their biocontrol activity against S. rolfsii under in vitro conditions. Two strains, Pseudomonas fluorescens NBRI-N6 and P. fluorescens NBRI-N, were selected for further studies because of their ability to inhibit the mycelial growth of the pathogen significantly. Spontaneous rifampicin-resistant (Rif) derivatives of P. fluorescens NBRI-N6 and P. fluorescens NBRI-N showing growth rate and membrane protein composition comparable to the wild type were selected to facilitate their monitoring in the rhizosphere. Field trials demonstrated that strain P. fluorescens NBRI-N6 was better than P. fluorescens NBRI-N in increasing the yield of betelvine significantly, whereas a consortium of the two strains controlled the disease more than either of the strains. The screening method should prove useful in identifying rhizosphere bacteria with the greatest potential for controlling diseases caused by phytopathogenic fungi.

  5. Genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Grob, Harald [University of Bonn, Germany; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; Mehnaz, Samina [University of the Punjab, Pakistan; Kurz, Sven [University of Bonn, Germany; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France; Frey-Klett, Pascale [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8 . Several traits which could be involved in the mycorrhiza helper ability of the bacterial strain such as multiple secretion systems, auxin metabolism and phosphate mobilization were evidenced in the genome.

  6. Initial characterization of a bolA homologue from Pseudomonas fluorescens indicates different roles for BolA-like proteins in em>P. fluorescens and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Nybroe, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The RpoS-regulated bolA gene in Escherichia coli is important for the decrease in cell size during stationary phase or sudden carbon starvation. A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain mutated in a gene with homology to bolA reduced its cell size upon carbon starvation, and RpoS had little effect on bol...

  7. Isolation and characterization of a T7-like lytic phage for Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neubauer Peter

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the proven relevance of Pseudomonas fluorescens as a spoilage microorganism in milk, fresh meats and refrigerated food products and the recognized potential of bacteriophages as sanitation agents, so far no phages specific for P. fluorescens isolates from dairy industry have been closely characterized in view of their lytic efficiency. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of a lytic phage capable to infect a variety of P. fluorescens strains isolated from Portuguese and United States dairy industries. Results Several phages were isolated which showed a different host spectrum and efficiency of lysis. One of the phages, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, was studied in detail due to its efficient lysis of a wide spectrum of P. fluorescens strains and ribotypes. Phage ϕIBB-PF7A with a head diameter of about 63 nm and a tail size of about 13 × 8 nm belongs morphologically to the Podoviridae family and resembles a typical T7-like phage, as analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The phage growth cycle with a detected latent period of 15 min, an eclipse period of 10 min, a burst size of 153 plaque forming units per infected cell, its genome size of approximately 42 kbp, and the size and N-terminal sequence of one of the protein bands, which gave similarity to the major capsid protein 10A, are consistent with this classification. Conclusion The isolated T7-like phage, phage ϕIBB-PF7A, is fast and efficient in lysing different P. fluorescens strains and may be a good candidate to be used as a sanitation agent to control the prevalence of spoilage causing P. fluorescens strains in dairy and food related environments.

  8. 40 CFR 180.1114 - Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas syringae 742RS; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance... Tolerances § 180.1114 Pseudomonas fluorescens A506, Pseudomonas fluorescens 1629RS, and Pseudomonas...

  9. Motility and chemotactic response of Pseudomonas fluorescens toward chemoattractants present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, T; Arora, D K

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains (LAM1-hydrophilic) and (LAM2-hydrophobic) showed positive chemotaxis towards attractants (sugars, amino acids, polyols and organic acids) present in the exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina (a soil-borne plant pathogenic fungus). The varied response of motility traits such as speed, rate of change in direction (RCDI) and net to gross displacement ratio (NGDR) was observed for different chemoattractants. Swimming speed of the strains was highest in 10-fold diluted exudate or 100-1000 microM strength of different attractants, but further dilutions significantly decreased the swimming speed (P = 0.05). Chemotactic response of P fluorescens was positively correlated with swimming speed (P = 0.05; r = 0.76). Relative to control, the RCDI values decreased 1.5-fold in amino acids or sugars, and 1.2-fold in polyols or organic acids. With increase in swimming speed, the NGDR of both strains also increased, but the RCDI decreased. Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic strains did not show significant differences in their motility traits. The results demonstrate that M. phaseolina exudate contains chemical attractants that serve as signal for flagellar motility of P. fluorescens. Motile P fluorescens strains thus may consume fungal exudate as nutrients, and thus spores could offer a niche for these bacteria in soil.

  10. Getting the ecology into interactions between plants and the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. H. Gera eHol

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR are increasingly appreciated for their contributions to primary productivity through promotion of growth and triggering of induced systemic resistance in plants. Here we focus on the beneficial effects of one particular species of PGPR (Pseudomonas fluorescens on plants through induced plant defence. This model organism has provided much understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of PGPR-induced plant defence. However, this knowledge can only be appreciated at full value once we know to what extent these mechanisms also occur under more realistic, species-diverse conditions as are occurring in the plant rhizosphere. To provide the necessary ecological context, we review the literature to compare the effect of P. fluorescens on induced plant defence when it is present as a single species or in combination with other soil dwelling species. Specifically, we discuss combinations with other plant mutualists (bacterial or fungal, plant pathogens (bacterial or fungal, bacterivores (nematode or protozoa and decomposers. Synergistic interactions between P. fluorescens and other plant mutualists are much more commonly reported than antagonistic interactions. Recent developments have enabled screenings of P. fluorescens genomes for defence traits and this could help with selection of strains with likely positive interactions on biocontrol. However, studies that examine the effects of multiple herbivores, pathogens, or herbivores and pathogens together on the effectiveness of PGPR to induce plant defences are underrepresented and we are not aware of any study that has examined interactions between P. fluorescens and bacterivores or decomposers. As co-occurring soil organisms can enhance but also reduce the effectiveness of PGPR, a better understanding of the biotic factors modulating P. fluorescens -plant interactions will improve the effectiveness of introducing P. fluorescens to enhance plant production

  11. The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Tyc

    Full Text Available In most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important strategy in complex habitats such as soils, with great implications for shaping the microbial community structure. Here, we used a sand microcosm approach to investigate how Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 responds to the presence of monocultures or mixtures of two phylogenetically different bacteria, a Gram-negative (Pedobacter sp. V48 and a Gram-positive (Bacillus sp. V102 under two nutrient conditions. Results revealed that under both nutrient poor and nutrient rich conditions confrontation with the Gram-positive Bacillus sp. V102 strain led to significant lower cell numbers of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, whereas confrontation with the Gram-negative Pedobacter sp. V48 strain did not affect the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. However, when Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was confronted with the mixture of both strains, no significant effect on the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was observed. Quantitative real-time PCR data showed up-regulation of genes involved in the production of a broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 when confronted with Pedobacter sp. V48, but not in the presence of Bacillus sp. V102. The results provide evidence that the performance of bacteria in soil depends strongly on the identity of neighbouring bacteria and that inter-specific interactions are an important factor in determining microbial community structure.

  12. The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyc, Olaf; Wolf, Alexandra B; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    In most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important strategy in complex habitats such as soils, with great implications for shaping the microbial community structure. Here, we used a sand microcosm approach to investigate how Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 responds to the presence of monocultures or mixtures of two phylogenetically different bacteria, a Gram-negative (Pedobacter sp. V48) and a Gram-positive (Bacillus sp. V102) under two nutrient conditions. Results revealed that under both nutrient poor and nutrient rich conditions confrontation with the Gram-positive Bacillus sp. V102 strain led to significant lower cell numbers of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, whereas confrontation with the Gram-negative Pedobacter sp. V48 strain did not affect the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. However, when Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was confronted with the mixture of both strains, no significant effect on the growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 was observed. Quantitative real-time PCR data showed up-regulation of genes involved in the production of a broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 when confronted with Pedobacter sp. V48, but not in the presence of Bacillus sp. V102. The results provide evidence that the performance of bacteria in soil depends strongly on the identity of neighbouring bacteria and that inter-specific interactions are an important factor in determining microbial community structure.

  13. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbeva, P.; Silby, M.W.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; Levy, S.B.; Boer, de W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain

  14. TonB-Dependent Receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 and Siderophore Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins with essential roles in iron uptake by Gram-negative bacteria. The biological control strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has 45 predicted TBDRs in its genome, which far exceeds the number of TBDRs in most published bacterial proteomes. ...

  15. TonB Dependent Receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5: Roles in Siderophore and Iron Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins with essential roles in iron uptake by Gram-negative bacteria. The biological control strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has 45 predicted TBDRs in its genome, which far exceeds the number of TBDRs in most published bacterial proteomes. Ei...

  16. Bioinformatic Analysis of TonB-Dependent Receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins that play essential roles in iron uptake by Gram-negative bacteria. The biological control strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has 45 predicted TBDRs, which far exceeds the number of TBDRs in most published bacterial proteomes. From a phyl...

  17. TonB Dependent Receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 and Siderophore Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs) are outer membrane proteins with essential roles in iron uptake by Gram-negative bacteria. The biological control strain Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 has 45 predicted TBDRs in its genome, which far exceeds the number of TBDRs in most published bacterial proteomes. B...

  18. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  19. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Gross, H; Morin, E; Karpinets, T; Utturkar, S; Mehnaz, S; Martin, F; Frey-Klett, P; Labbé, J

    2014-01-09

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  20. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids. PMID:21742869

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chauhan, Archana [ORNL; Layton, Alice [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Williams, Daniel W [ORNL; Smart, Abby E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ripp, Steven Anthony [ORNL; Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Sayler, Gary Steven [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of {approx}6.1 Mb sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over 5 genomic islands, a prophage and two plasmids.

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading, Genetically Engineered Bioluminescent Bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C.; Williams, Daniel E.; Smartt, Abby E.; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Brown, Steven D.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids.

  3. Draft genome sequence of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading, genetically engineered bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Archana; Layton, Alice C; Williams, Daniel E; Smartt, Abby E; Ripp, Steven; Karpinets, Tatiana V; Brown, Steven D; Sayler, Gary S

    2011-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (DSM 6700) is a genetically engineered lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter. Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain HK44. Annotation of ∼6.1 Mb of sequence indicates that 30% of the traits are unique and distributed over five genomic islands, a prophage, and two plasmids.

  4. Characterization of Toxin Complex Gene Clusters and Insect Toxicity of Bacteria Representing Four Subgroups of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten strains representing four lineages of Pseudomonas (P. chlororaphis, P. corrugata, P. koreensis, and P. fluorescens subgroups) were evaluated for toxicity to the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta and the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The three strains within the P. chlororaphis subgroup exhibi...

  5. Boolean models of biosurfactants production in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Richard

    Full Text Available Cyclolipopeptides (CLPs are biosurfactants produced by numerous Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. CLP production is known to be regulated at least by the GacA/GacS two-component pathway, but the full regulatory network is yet largely unknown. In the clinical strain MFN1032, CLP production is abolished by a mutation in the phospholipase C gene (plcC and not restored by plcC complementation. Their production is also subject to phenotypic variation. We used a modelling approach with Boolean networks, which takes into account all these observations concerning CLP production without any assumption on the topology of the considered network. Intensive computation yielded numerous models that satisfy these properties. All models minimizing the number of components point to a bistability in CLP production, which requires the presence of a yet unknown key self-inducible regulator. Furthermore, all suggest that a set of yet unexplained phenotypic variants might also be due to this epigenetic switch. The simplest of these Boolean networks was used to propose a biological regulatory network for CLP production. This modelling approach has allowed a possible regulation to be unravelled and an unusual behaviour of CLP production in P. fluorescens to be explained.

  6. Identification and analysis of three virulence-associated TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shu-ren; Zhang, Lu; Sun, Li

    2014-08-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium that can infect a wide range of farmed fish. However, very little is known about the virulence mechanism of P. fluorescens as a fish pathogen. In this study, we identified and analyzed 3 TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors (TDRs) from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain isolated from fish. In silico analysis revealed that all 3 proteins (named Tdr1 to 3) possess structural domains typical of TDRs. Quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis showed that tdr1, tdr2, and tdr3 expressions were upregulated under iron-depleted conditions. Compared to the wild type, mutants defective in tdr1, tdr2, and tdr3 were retarded in growth to different extents. Infection in a turbot Scophthalmus maximus model showed that all 3 mutants were impaired in their ability to desseminate into and colonize host tissues. In addition, the tdr1 and tdr3 mutants exhibited significantly reduced virulence. When used as subunit vaccines, purified recombinant proteins of Tdr1, Tdr2, and, in particular, Tdr3 elicited significant protection in turbot against lethal P. fluorescens challenge. The vaccinated fish produced specific serum antibodies, which, when incubated with P. fluorescens, blocked infection of P. fluorescens in fish cells. Together these results indicate that Tdr1, Tdr2, and Tdr3 are iron-regulated factors that participate in bacterial virulence and induce protective immunity as subunit vaccines.

  7. Inhibition of Vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Spanggaard, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish- pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect....... fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1,000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested...... by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic...

  8. Inhibition of Vibrio anguillarum by Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, a possible probiotic treatment of fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette; Spanggaard, Bettina;

    1999-01-01

    To study the possible use of probiotics in fish farming, we evaluated the in vitro and in vivo antagonism of antibacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2 against the fish- pathogenic bacterium Vibrio anguillarum. As iron is important in virulence and bacterial interactions, the effect....... fluorescens AH2 inhibited the growth of V. anguillarum during coculture, independently of the iron concentration, when the initial count of the antagonist was 100 to 1,000 times greater that of the fish pathogen. These in vitro results were successfully repeated in vivo. A probiotic effect in vivo was tested...... by exposing rainbow trout (Oncorynchus mykiss Walbaum) to P. fluorescens AH2 at a density of 10(5) CFU/ml for 5 days before a challenge with V. anguillarum at 10(4) to 10(5) CFU/ml for 1 h. Some fish were also exposed to P. fluorescens AH2 at 10(7) CFU/ml during the 1-h infection. The combined probiotic...

  9. A phosphate-starvation-inducible outermembrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1 as an immunological phosphate-starvation marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Kristine; Jacobsen, Susanne; Nybroe, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A phosphate-starvation-inducible outer-membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1, expressed at phosphate concentrations below0.08-0.13 mM, was purified and characterized. The purification method involved separation of outer-membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE andextraction of the protein from...... by solubilization temperature. An antiserum against Psi1 recognized a protein of M,55,000 in four other P. fluorescens strains among 24 tested strains representing Pseudomonas rRNA homology group I, showing antigenicheterogeneity within this group. A method for immunofluorescence microscopy involving cell...

  10. A genomic and transcriptomic approach to investigate the blue pigment phenotype in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Carraro, Lisa; Martino, Maria Elena; Fondi, Marco; Fasolato, Luca; Miotto, Giovanni; Magro, Massimiliano; Vianello, Fabio; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2015-11-20

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known food spoiler, able to cause serious economic losses in the food industry due to its ability to produce many extracellular, and often thermostable, compounds. The most outstanding spoilage events involving P. fluorescens were blue discoloration of several food stuffs, mainly dairy products. The bacteria involved in such high-profile cases have been identified as belonging to a clearly distinct phylogenetic cluster of the P. fluorescens group. Although the blue pigment has recently been investigated in several studies, the biosynthetic pathway leading to the pigment formation, as well as its chemical nature, remain challenging and unsolved points. In the present paper, genomic and transcriptomic data of 4 P. fluorescens strains (2 blue-pigmenting strains and 2 non-pigmenting strains) were analyzed to evaluate the presence and the expression of blue strain-specific genes. In particular, the pangenome analysis showed the presence in the blue-pigmenting strains of two copies of genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway (including trpABCDF). The global expression profiling of blue-pigmenting strains versus non-pigmenting strains showed a general up-regulation of genes involved in iron uptake and a down-regulation of genes involved in primary metabolism. Chromogenic reaction of the blue-pigmenting bacterial cells with Kovac's reagent indicated an indole-derivative as the precursor of the blue pigment. Finally, solubility tests and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the isolated pigment suggested that its molecular structure is very probably a hydrophobic indigo analog.

  11. Production and properties of biosurfactants from a newly isolated Pseudomonas fluorescens HW-6 growing on hexandecane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasileva-Tonkova, E.; Galabova, D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Dept. of Microbial Biochemistry, Sofia (Bulgaria); Stoimenova, E.; Lalchev, Z. [Dept. of Biochemistry, Sofia Univ. ' ' St. Kliment Ohridski' ' , Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2006-07-15

    The newly isolated from industrial wastewater Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HW-6 produced glycolipid biosurfactants at high concentrations (1.4-2.0 g 1{sup -1}) when grown on hexadecane as a sole carbon source. Biosurfactants decreased the surface tension of the air/water interface by 35 mN m{sup -1} and possessed a low critical micelle concentration value of 20 mg 1{sup -1}, which indicated high surface activity. They efficiently emulsified aromatic hydrocarbons, kerosene, n-paraffins and mineral oils. Biosurfactant production contributed to a significant increase in cell hydrophobicity correlated with an increased growth of the strain on hexadecane. The results suggested that the newly isolated strain of Ps. fluorescens and produced glycolipid biosurfactants with effective surface and emulsifying properties are very promising and could find application for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of algG encoding C5-epimerase in the alginate biosynthetic gene cluster of Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morea, A; Mathee, K; Franklin, M J; Giacomini, A; O'Regan, M; Ohman, D E

    2001-10-31

    The organization of the alginate gene cluster in Pseudomonas fluorescens was characterized. A bank of genomic DNA from P. fluorescens was mobilized to a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with a transposon insertion (algJ::Tn501) in the alginate biosynthetic operon that rendered it non-mucoid. Phenotypic complementation in this heterologous host was observed, and a complementing clone containing 32 kb of P. fluorescens DNA was obtained. Southern hybridization studies showed that genes involved in alginate biosynthesis (e.g. algD, algG, and algA) were approximately in the same order and position as in P. aeruginosa. When the clone was mobilized to a P. aeruginosa algG mutant that produced alginate as polymannuronate due to its C5-epimerase defect, complementation was observed and the alginate from the recombinant strain contained L-guluronate as determined by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A sequence analysis of the P. fluorescens DNA containing algG revealed sequences similar to P. aeruginosa algG that were also flanked by algE- and algX-like sequences. The predicted AlgG amino acid sequence of P. fluorescens was 67% identical (80% similar) to P. aeruginosa AlgG and 60% identical (76% similar) to Azotobacter vinelandii AlgG. As in P. aeruginosa, AlgG from P. fluorescens appeared to have a signal sequence that would localize it to the periplasm where AlgG presumably acts as a C5-epimerase at the polymer level. Non-polar algG knockout mutants of P. fluorescens were defective in alginate production, suggesting a potential role for this protein in polymer formation.

  13. Cadmium-regulated gene fusions in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossbach, S; Kukuk, M L; Wilson, T L; Feng, S F; Pearson, M M; Fisher, M A

    2000-08-01

    To study the mechanisms soil bacteria use to cope with elevated concentrations of heavy metals in the environment, a mutagenesis with the lacZ-based reporter gene transposon Tn5B20 was performed. Random gene fusions in the genome of the common soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain ATCC 13525 were used to create a bank of 5,000 P. fluorescens mutants. This mutant bank was screened for differential gene expression in the presence of the toxic metal cadmium. Fourteen mutants were identified that responded with increased or reduced gene expression to the presence of cadmium. The mutants were characterized with respect to their metal-dependent gene expression and their metal tolerance. Half the identified mutants reacted with differential gene expression specifically to the metal cadmium, whereas some of the other mutants also responded to elevated concentrations of copper and zinc ions. One of the mutants, strain C8, also showed increased gene expression in the presence of the solvent ethanol, but otherwise no overlap between cadmium-induced gene expression and general stress response was detected. Molecular analysis of the corresponding genetic loci was performed using arbitrary polymerase chain reaction (PCR), DNA sequencing and comparison of the deduced protein products with sequences deposited in genetic databases. Some of the genetic loci targeted by the transposon did not show any similarities to any known genes; thus, they may represent 'novel' loci. The hypothesis that genes that are differentially expressed in the presence of heavy metals play a role in metal tolerance was verified for one of the mutants. This mutant, strain C11, was hypersensitive to cadmium and zinc ions. In mutant C11, the transposon had inserted into a genetic region displaying similarity to genes encoding the sensor/regulator protein pairs of two-component systems that regulate gene expression in metal-resistant bacteria, including czcRS of Ralstonia eutropha, czrRS of Pseudomonas

  14. Recent development of CB2 selective and peripheral CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Tapio

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoids have potential therapeutic value e.g. in pain relief, cancer therapy, control of nausea and vomiting, and appetite stimulation, but their therapeutic benefits are limited by unwanted central nervous system (CNS) side-effects. Separating the therapeutic effects of cannabinoid agonists from their undesired CNS effects can be achieved by either increasing the selectivity of the ligands for the CB2 receptor or by developing peripherally restricted CB1/CB2 ligands. A vast number of structurally diverse CB2 ligands have been developed during the past 3 years, stemming from the screening hits, which are further optimized towards lead compounds and drug candidates. Some of CB2 ligands may ultimately enter into clinical use as pain relief, anticancer, or antipruritic agents. This review focuses on the recent literature dealing with selective CB2 receptor ligands, with a particular emphasis on the CB2 agonists developed from 2009 onwards.

  15. Reprint of 'Tracking the blue: a MLST approach to characterise the Pseudomonas fluorescens group'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, N A; Martino, M E; Fasolato, L; Carraro, L; Montemurro, F; Mioni, R; Bordin, P; Cardazzo, B

    2015-02-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens group comprises several closely related species that are involved in food contamination and spoilage. Specifically, the interest in P. fluorescens as a spoiler of dairy products increased after the cases of "blue mozzarella" that occurred in Italy in 2010. A Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme was developed and applied to characterise 136 isolates (reference strains and food borne isolates) at strain level, to reveal the genetic relationships among them and to disclose any possible genetic clustering of phenotypic markers involved in food spoilage (protease, lipase, lecithinase activities and pigmented or fluorescent molecule production). The production of dark blue diffusible pigment was evaluated on several bacterial culture media and directly on mozzarella cheese. The MLST scheme provided precise genotyping at the strain level, and the population analyses of the concatenated sequences allowed major taxa to be defined. This approach was revealed to be suitable for tracking the strains according to their origin, such as dairy plants or food matrices. The genetic analysis revealed the presence of a connection between the blue pigment production and a specific phylogenetic cluster. The development of the online database specific to the P. fluorescens group (http://pubmlst.org/pfluorescens) will facilitate the application of the scheme and the sharing of the data.

  16. Tracking the blue: a MLST approach to characterise the Pseudomonas fluorescens group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, N A; Martino, M E; Fasolato, L; Carraro, L; Montemurro, F; Mioni, R; Bordin, P; Cardazzo, B

    2014-05-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens group comprises several closely related species that are involved in food contamination and spoilage. Specifically, the interest in P. fluorescens as a spoiler of dairy products increased after the cases of "blue mozzarella" that occurred in Italy in 2010. A Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) scheme was developed and applied to characterise 136 isolates (reference strains and food borne isolates) at strain level, to reveal the genetic relationships among them and to disclose any possible genetic clustering of phenotypic markers involved in food spoilage (protease, lipase, lecithinase activities and pigmented or fluorescent molecule production). The production of dark blue diffusible pigment was evaluated on several bacterial culture media and directly on mozzarella cheese. The MLST scheme provided precise genotyping at the strain level, and the population analyses of the concatenated sequences allowed major taxa to be defined. This approach was revealed to be suitable for tracking the strains according to their origin, such as dairy plants or food matrices. The genetic analysis revealed the presence of a connection between the blue pigment production and a specific phylogenetic cluster. The development of the online database specific to the P. fluorescens group (http://pubmlst.org/pfluorescens) will facilitate the application of the scheme and the sharing of the data.

  17. Induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, D.M.; Mavrodi, D.V.; Van Pelt, J.A. van; Pieterse, C.M.J.; Van Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that produce the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are among the most effective rhizobacteria that suppress root and crown rots, wilts, and damping-off diseases of a variety of crops, and they play a key role in the natural suppressiveness of

  18. Transcriptional and antagonistic responses of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 to phylogenetically different bacterial competitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbeva, Paolina; Silby, Mark W; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Levy, Stuart B; Boer, Wietse de

    2011-06-01

    The ability of soil bacteria to successfully compete with a range of other microbial species is crucial for their growth and survival in the nutrient-limited soil environment. In the present work, we studied the behavior and transcriptional responses of soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas fluorescens strain Pf0-1 on nutrient-poor agar to confrontation with strains of three phylogenetically different bacterial genera, that is, Bacillus, Brevundimonas and Pedobacter. Competition for nutrients was apparent as all three bacterial genera had a negative effect on the density of P. fluorescens Pf0-1; this effect was most strong during the interaction with Bacillus. Microarray-based analyses indicated strong differences in the transcriptional responses of Pf0-1 to the different competitors. There was higher similarity in the gene expression response of P. fluorescens Pf0-1 to the Gram-negative bacteria as compared with the Gram-positive strain. The Gram-negative strains did also trigger the production of an unknown broad-spectrum antibiotic in Pf0-1. More detailed analysis indicated that expression of specific Pf0-1 genes involved in signal transduction and secondary metabolite production was strongly affected by the competitors' identity, suggesting that Pf0-1 can distinguish among different competitors and fine-tune its competitive strategies. The results presented here demonstrate that P. fluorescens Pf0-1 shows a species-specific transcriptional and metabolic response to bacterial competitors and provide new leads in the identification of specific cues in bacteria-bacteria interactions and of novel competitive strategies, antimicrobial traits and genes.

  19. Mobile genetic elements in the genome of the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant-associated bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere of a wide variety of plant species and and produces secondary metabolites suppressive of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The Pf-5 genome is rich in features consistent with its commensal lifestyle, and its sequence has revealed attributes associated with the strain's ability to compete and survive in the dynamic and microbiologically complex rhizosphere habitat. In this study, w...

  20. Characterization of the SPI-1 and Rsp type three secretion systems in Pseudomonas fluorescens F113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Matthieu; Egan, Frank; Moynihan, Jennifer; Morrissey, John P; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; O'Gara, Fergal

    2013-06-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar beet rhizosphere. The recent annotation of the F113 genome sequence has revealed that this strain encodes a wide array of secretion systems, including two complete type three secretion systems (T3SSs) belonging to the Hrp1 and SPI-1 families. While Hrp1 T3SSs are frequently encoded in other P. fluorescens strains, the presence of a SPI-1 T3SS in a plant-beneficial bacterial strain was unexpected. In this work, the genetic organization and expression of these two T3SS loci have been analysed by a combination of transcriptional reporter fusions and transcriptome analyses. Overexpression of two transcriptional activators has shown a number of genes encoding putative T3 effectors. In addition, the influence of these two T3SSs during the interaction of P. fluorescens F113 with some bacterial predators was also assessed. Our data revealed that the transcriptional activator hilA is induced by amoeba and that the SPI-1 T3SS could potentially be involved in resistance to amoeboid grazing.

  1. Antigen 43 from Escherichia coli induces inter- and intraspecies cell aggregation and changes in colony morphology of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Kristian; Schembri, Mark; Hasman, Henrik;

    2000-01-01

    Antigen 43 (Ag43) is a surface-displayed autotransporter protein of Escherichia coli. By virtue of its self-association characteristics, this protein is able to mediate autoaggregation and flocculation off. coli cells in static cultures. Additionally, surface display of Ag43 is associated...... with a distinct frizzy colony morphology in E. coli. Here we show that Ag43 can be expressed in a functional form on the surface of the environmentally important Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SBW25 with ensuing cell aggregation and frizzy colony types. Using green fluorescence protein-tagged cells, we...... demonstrate that Ag43 can be used as a tool to provide interspecies cell aggregation between E. coli and P. fluorescens. Furthermore, Ag43 expression enhances biofilm formation in P. fluorescens to glass surfaces. The versatility of this protein was also reflected in Ag43 surface display in a variety of other...

  2. Imidazopyridine CB2 agonists: optimization of CB2/CB1 selectivity and implications for in vivo analgesic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, B Wesley; Nanda, Kausik K; Burgey, Christopher S; Potteiger, Craig M; Deng, James Z; Green, Ahren I; Hartnett, John C; Kett, Nathan R; Wu, Zhicai; Henze, Darrell A; Della Penna, Kimberly; Desai, Reshma; Leitl, Michael D; Lemaire, Wei; White, Rebecca B; Yeh, Suzie; Urban, Mark O; Kane, Stefanie A; Hartman, George D; Bilodeau, Mark T

    2011-04-15

    A new series of imidazopyridine CB2 agonists is described. Structural optimization improved CB2/CB1 selectivity in this series and conferred physical properties that facilitated high in vivo exposure, both centrally and peripherally. Administration of a highly selective CB2 agonist in a rat model of analgesia was ineffective despite substantial CNS exposure, while administration of a moderately selective CB2/CB1 agonist exhibited significant analgesic effects.

  3. Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor ligand specificity and the development of CB2-selective agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, John C; Wright, Jason L; McPartland, John M; Tyndall, Joel D A

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids in current use such as nabilone activate both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Selective CB2 activation may provide some of the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids, such as their immuno-modulatory properties, without the psychoactive effects of CB1 activation. Therefore, cannabinoid CB2 receptors represent an attractive target for drug development. However, selective and potent CB2 agonists remain in development. CB1 and CB2 differ considerably in their amino acid sequence and tertiary structures. Therefore, clinical development of potent and selective CB2 agonists is probable. Mutational and ligand binding studies, functional mapping, and computer modelling have revealed key residues and domains in cannabinoid receptors that are involved in agonist and antagonist binding to CB1 and CB2. In addition, CB2 has undergone more rapid evolution, and results for ligand binding and efficacy cannot be automatically extrapolated from rat or mouse CB2 to human. Furthermore, loss of CB1 affinity is a crucial property for CB2-selective ligands, and although rat CB1 is 97% homologous with human CB1, critical differences do exist, with potential for further exploitation in drug design. In this paper we briefly review previous cannabinoid receptor models and mutation/binding studies. We also review binding affinity ratios with respect to CB1 and CB2. We then employ our own models to illustrate key cannabinoid receptor residues and binding subdomains that are involved in these differences in binding affinities and discuss how these might be exploited in the development of CB2 specific ligands. Published reports for species specific binding affinities for CB2 are scarce, and we argue that this needs to be corrected prior to the progression of CB2 agonists from pre-clinical to clinical research.

  4. Identification of CB1/CB2 ligands from Zanthoxylum bungeanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou, Katina S S; Devkota, Krishna P; Morton, Cynthia; Egan, Josephine M; Lu, Guanghua; Beutler, John A; Moaddel, Ruin

    2013-11-22

    In order to study cannabinoid receptor ligands, a novel plate-based assay was developed previously to measure internalization of CB1/CB2 receptors by determining the change in the intracellular levels of the radiolabeled agonists. This plate-based assay was also used for screening against complex matrices, specifically, in the present study screening for CB1/CB2 receptor activity of extracts for several species of the plant genus Zanthoxylum. The objective of this screen was to identify novel antagonists of the CB1 receptor, which simultaneously displayed agonist activity against the CB2 receptor, since compounds matching this criterion could be potential candidates for the treatment of type-1 diabetes. As a result, two Z. bungeanum extracts were deemed active, leading to the identification of eight compounds, of which compound 7 [(2E,4E,8E,10E,12E)-N-isobutyl-2,4,8,10,12-tetradecapentaenamide, γ-sanshool] was obtained as a promising lead compound.

  5. Mice lacking cannabinoid CB1-, CB2-receptors or both receptors show increased susceptibility to trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, M A; Kellermann, C A; Burnat, G; Hahn, E G; Rau, T; Konturek, P C

    2010-02-01

    This study was performed to assess whether mice lacking the cannabinoid receptor CB1, CB2 or both receptors show increased susceptibility to TNBS colitis in comparison to wildtype mice. Previously, activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors showed attenuation of TNBS colitis in mice. The aim of the study was to investigate the susceptibility of three mouse strains CB1-, CB2- and CB1+2 double knockout mice in the model of TNBS colitis. The different knockout mice were given each a single enema with TNBS 7 mg, volume 150 microl (in 50% ethanol solution) on day 1. Control group (C57BL/6 mice) received the same concentration of TNBS enema and each strain received vehicle application of 150 microl 50% ethanol solution. After a 3-day period, the animals were sacrificed and their colon excised. A scoring system was used to describe macroscopical and histological changes. Messenger RNA-expression of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta as pro-inflammatory markers was measured by RT-PCR. All three knockout strains showed increased susceptibility to TNBS colitis quantified by macroscopical and histological scoring systems and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in comparison to the TNBS control group (wild type C57BL/6 animals). Mice lacking the CB1-, CB2-receptor or both receptors showed aggravation of inflammation in the model of TNBS colitis. Lacking of both cannabinoid receptors did not result in potentiation of colitis severity compared to lacking of each CB1 or CB2, respectively. These results suggest that the endocannabinoid system may have tonic inhibitory effects on inflammatory responses in the colon.

  6. Evaluation of economically feasible, natural plant extract-based microbiological media for producing biomass of the dry rot biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens P22Y05 in liquid culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The production of microbial biomass in liquid media often represents an indispensable step in the research and development of bacterial and fungal strains. Costs of commercially prepared nutrient media or purified media components, however, can represent a significant hurdle to conducting research i...

  7. Understanding the molecular basis of plant growth promotional effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on rice through protein profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruvengadam Raguchander

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KH-1 was found to exhibit plant growth promotional activity in rice under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. But the mechanism underlying such promotional activity of P. fluorescens is not yet understood clearly. In this study, efforts were made to elucidate the molecular responses of rice plants to P. fluorescens treatment through protein profiling. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis strategy was adopted to identify the PGPR responsive proteins and the differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Results Priming of P. fluorescens, 23 different proteins found to be differentially expressed in rice leaf sheaths and MS analysis revealed the differential expression of some important proteins namely putative p23 co-chaperone, Thioredoxin h- rice, Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large chain precursor, Nucleotide diPhosphate kinase, Proteosome sub unit protein and putative glutathione S-transferase protein. Conclusion Functional analyses of the differential proteins were reported to be directly or indirectly involved in growth promotion in plants. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of PGPR strain KH-1 in rice plant growth promotion.

  8. Isolation, Identiifcation, and Herbicidal Activity of Metabolites Produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa CB-4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Juan; CAO Hong-zhe; WANG Wei; ZHANG Li-hui; DONG Jin-gao

    2014-01-01

    CB-4, a bacterial strain with highly effective herbicidal activity, was isolated from infected corn leaves. Through morphology, physiological and biochemical tests, and 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequencing methods, CB-4 was identiifed as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We conducted activity-evaluation experiments in the laboratory to assess the herbicidal potential of metabolites produced by strain CB-4. Crude extracts of strain CB-4 have high inhibition activity on Digitaria sanguinalis. In general, the root and shoot growth parameters of D. sanguinalis were signiifcantly reduced by metabolites of strain CB-4. The IC50 of the culture ifltrate extracts for the radicula and coleoptile of D. sanguinalis were 0.299 and 0.210 mg mL-1, respectively. Component 2 of the herbicidal activity of the crude toxin from strain CB-4 was successfully puriifed for the ifrst time by using high-speed counter current chromatography with a two-phase solvent system composed of petroleum ether-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (4:5:4:5, v/v) and high-performance liquid chromatography. We concluded that the metabolites of strain CB-4 have the potential to be developed as a microbe-based herbicide.

  9. A TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor of Pseudomonas fluorescens: virulence and vaccine potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong-hua; Dang, Wei; Sun, Li

    2012-09-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative bacterium and a common aquaculture pathogen. In this study, we identified from a pathogenic P. fluorescens strain a TonB-dependent outer membrane receptor, TdrA, as a secreted protein and examined its function and vaccine potential. TdrA is composed of 746 residues and possesses conserved structural domains of TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that expression of tdrA was upregulated under conditions of iron starvation and during infection of host cells. Consistently, iron depletion induced increased production of TdrA protein in the outer membrane. Compared to the wild type, a tdrA-knock out mutant (1) was unable to grow in the absence of iron, (2) exhibited drastically attenuated overall bacterial virulence, and (3) was impaired in the ability to establish lethal infection in host tissues. Purified recombinant TdrA (rTdrA), when used as a subunit vaccine to immunize flounder, was able to induce strong protective immunity, including production of serum-specific antibodies that resulted in effective protection against lethal-dose P. fluorescens challenge. Together, these results indicate that TdrA is an outer membrane receptor and a protective immunogen that is likely to be involved in iron acquisition and, as a result, required for optimal bacterial virulence.

  10. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Gi Kong

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  11. Impact of a Recombinant Biocontrol Bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78, on Microbial Community in Tomato Rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hyun Gi; Kim, Nam Hee; Lee, Seung Yeup; Lee, Seon-Woo

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens pc78 is an effective biocontrol agent for soil-borne fungal diseases. We previously constructed a P43-gfp tagged biocontrol bacteria P. fluorescens pc78-48 to investigate bacterial traits in natural ecosystem and the environmental risk of genetically modified biocontrol bacteria in tomato rhizosphere. Fluctuation of culturable bacteria profile, microbial community structure, and potential horizontal gene transfer was investigated over time after the bacteria treatment to the tomato rhizosphere. Tagged gene transfer to other organisms such as tomato plants and bacteria cultured on various media was examined by polymerase chain reaction, using gene specific primers. Transfer of chromosomally integrated P43-gfp from pc78 to other organisms was not apparent. Population and colony types of culturable bacteria were not significantly affected by the introduction of P. fluorescens pc78 or pc78-48 into tomato rhizosphere. Additionally, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles were investigated to estimate the influence on the microbial community structure in tomato rhizosphere between non-treated and pc78-48-treated samples. Interestingly, rhizosphere soil treated with strain pc78-48 exhibited a significantly different bacterial community structure compared to that of non-treated rhizosphere soil. Our results suggest that biocontrol bacteria treatment influences microbial community in tomato rhizosphere, while the chromosomally modified biocontrol bacteria may not pose any specific environmental risk in terms of gene transfer.

  12. 荧光假单胞菌拮抗菌株对烟草疫霉的抑菌机制及控病效果%Antagonistic mechanism of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains against Phytophthora nicotianae and biocontrol effect on tobacco black shank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董国菊; 马冠华; 肖崇刚

    2012-01-01

    To explore the antagonistic mechanism of rhizospheric bacteria against Phytophthora nicotianae van Breda de Haan,five antagonistic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains were isolated from rhizospheric soils of tobacco fields in Chongqing.Efficient antagonistic strain against P.nicotianae was screened using dual culture technique and metabolites inhibitory test.Among these strains,P-72-10 showed the highest suppressive effect;it produced an inhibition zone of 13.0mm(radius) and an inhibitory rate at 68.57%.Furthermore,the growth of pathogen's hypha was also suppressed by the extracellular metabolites of strain P-72-10 from 25.39% to 46.03%.P.nicotianae was observed microscopically excessive branching of mycelia and malformation of mycelia tips;thick-walled cells with concentrated plasmas and chlamydospore-like cells.When tested on the tobacco plants grown in greenhouse,strain P-72-10 got a good biocontrol effect on tobacco black shank infection and effects on the resistant and susceptible varieties of tobacco were 53.57% and 66.37% respectively.%为探讨烟草根际生防细菌对烟草疫霉Phytophthora nicotianae的抑菌机制,从重庆地区连作烟田健康烟株根际土壤分离获得5株荧光假单胞菌Pseudomonas fluorescens拮抗菌株。通过平板对峙及代谢产物抑菌试验筛选对烟草疫霉具有高效拮抗作用的菌株,其中,P-72-10菌株抑菌效果最强,抑菌带半径达13.0 mm,相对抑制率为68.57%,且该菌株代谢产物对烟草疫霉菌丝生长有明显的抑制作用,相对抑制率达25.39%~46.03%;显微观察发现该菌株可引起烟草疫霉菌丝的分支增多,菌丝顶端膨大呈畸形,多数菌丝中间或顶端细胞的细胞壁加厚、原生质浓缩和产生类似厚壁孢子的细胞。在温室盆栽条件下P-72-10菌株对烟草黑胫病也表现出良好的控病效果,对抗病和感病品种的相对防效分别为53.57%和66.37%。

  13. Improving biocontrol activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens through chromosomal integration of 2,4-diacetylphloro- glucinol biosynthesis genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hongyou; WEI Hailei; LIU Xili; WANG Ye; ZHANG Liqun; TANG Wenhua

    2005-01-01

    Antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4- DAPG) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens CPF-10 and 2P24 is a principal factor enabling bacteria to suppress plant diseases caused by soilborne pathogens. In this study, a 2,4-DAPG biosynthesis locus phlACBDE cloned from strain CPF-10 was assembled into a mini-Tn5 transposon and introduced into the chromosome of P. fluorescens P32 (2,4- DAPG-), CPF-10 and 2P24 to construct the 2,4-DAPG overproducing derivatives P32-38, CPF10-9 and 2P24-48, respectively. All the transgenic strains showed an enhanced antibiosis capacity against plant microbial pathogens in vitro and two strains, P32-38 and CPF10-9, provided significantly better protection against wheat take-all disease caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici and tomato bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum in greenhouse. Compared to their parental strains, the 2,4-DAPG overproducing derivatives colonized to the same extent on the wheat tips in the autoclaved soil, but developed larger populations in natural soil. These results indicated that production of antibiotics 2,4- DAPG by biological control pseudomonads can contribute not only to their disease suppression capacities but also to the ecological competence in the resident microflora. Our research also suggests that it is a realistic approach to improve biocontrol capacity of P. fluorescens through the genetic modification of its antibiotic 2,4-DAPG production.

  14. Role of secondary metabolites in the interaction between Pseudomonas fluorescens and soil microorganisms under iron-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, Aurélie; Gross, Harald; Palin, Béatrice; Mehnaz, Samina; Schnepf, Max; Leblond, Pierre; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Aigle, Bertrand

    2016-08-01

    Microorganisms can be versatile in their interactions with each other, being variously beneficial, neutral or antagonistic in their effect. Although this versatility has been observed among many microorganisms and in many environments, little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to these changes in behavior. In the present work, we analyzed the mechanism by which the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 shifts from stimulating the growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N to killing the fungus. We show that among the three secondary metabolites produced by the bacterial strain-the siderophores enantio-pyochelin and pyoverdine, and the biosurfactant viscosin-the siderophores are mainly responsible for the antagonistic activity of the bacterium under iron-limited conditions. While the bacterial strain continues to produce beneficial factors, their effects are overridden by the action of their siderophores. This antagonistic activity of the strain P. fluorescens BBC6R8 in iron-depleted environments is not restricted to its influence on L. bicolor, since it was also seen to inhibit the growth of the actinomycete Streptomyces ambofaciens ATCC23877. We show that the strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 uses different strategies to acquire iron, depending on certain biotic and abiotic factors. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that produce the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are among the most effective rhizobacteria that suppress root and crown rots, wilts and damping-off diseases of a variety of crops, and they play a key role in the natural suppressiveness of ...

  16. Structure Revision of N-Mercapto-4-formylcarbostyril Produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens G308 to 2-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)thiazole-4-carbaldehyde [aeruginaldehyde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guillemyn, Karel; Ballet, Steven; Ye, Lumeng

    2014-01-01

    An antibiotic substance isolated from Pseudomonas fluorescens strain G308 was earlier assigned the structure of N-mercapto-4-formylcarbostyril, but computational predictions of the H-1 and C-13 NMR magnetic shielding tensors show this structure to be incompatible with the published spectroscopic ...

  17. Role of the cyclic lipopeptide massetolide A in biological control of Phytophthora infestans and in colonization of tomato plants by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.; Ficke, A.; Asiimwe, T.; Höfte, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas strains have shown promising results in biological control of late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans. However, the mechanism(s) and metabolites involved are in many cases poorly understood. Here, the role of the cyclic lipopeptide massetolide A of Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 in b

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8, Soil Bacteria That Cooperate To Degrade the Poly-γ-d-Glutamic Acid Anthrax Capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabler, Richard A; Negus, David; Pain, Arnab; Taylor, Peter W

    2013-01-01

    A mixed culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8 degraded poly-γ-d-glutamic acid; when the 2 strains were cultured separately, no hydrolytic activity was apparent. Here we report the draft genome sequences of both soil isolates.

  19. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beneficial Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 8569, a Natural Isolate of Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesemann, Kai; Braus-Stromeyer, Susanna A; Thuermer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Braus, Gerhard H

    2015-03-26

    Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 8569 represents a natural isolate of the rhizosphere of oilseed rape (Brassica napus) in Germany and possesses antagonistic potential toward the fungal pathogen Verticillium. We report here the draft genome sequence of strain DSM 8569, which comprises 5,914 protein-coding sequences.

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8, Soil Bacteria That Cooperate To Degrade the Poly- -D-Glutamic Acid Anthrax Capsule

    KAUST Repository

    Stabler, R. A.

    2013-01-24

    A mixed culture of Pseudomonas fluorescens BS2 and Pusillimonas noertemannii BS8 degraded poly-γ-d-glutamic acid; when the 2 strains were cultured separately, no hydrolytic activity was apparent. Here we report the draft genome sequences of both soil isolates.

  1. Cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 form functional heteromers in brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callén, Lucía; Moreno, Estefanía; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moreno-Delgado, David; Cortés, Antoni; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José Luis; Franco, Rafael; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I; McCormick, Peter J

    2012-06-15

    Exploring the role of cannabinoid CB(2) receptors in the brain, we present evidence of CB(2) receptor molecular and functional interaction with cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Using biophysical and biochemical approaches, we discovered that CB(2) receptors can form heteromers with CB(1) receptors in transfected neuronal cells and in rat brain pineal gland, nucleus accumbens, and globus pallidus. Within CB(1)-CB(2) receptor heteromers expressed in a neuronal cell model, agonist co-activation of CB(1) and CB(2) receptors resulted in a negative cross-talk in Akt phosphorylation and neurite outgrowth. Moreover, one specific characteristic of CB(1)-CB(2) receptor heteromers consists of both the ability of CB(1) receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB(2) receptor agonists and, conversely, the ability of CB(2) receptor antagonists to block the effect of CB(1) receptor agonists, showing a bidirectional cross-antagonism phenomenon. Taken together, these data illuminate the mechanism by which CB(2) receptors can negatively modulate CB(1) receptor function.

  2. Exposure-related effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) on juvenile unionid mussels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kerry L.; Luoma, James A.; Mayer, Denise A.; Aloisi, Douglas B.; Eckert, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    The exposure-related effects of a commercially prepared spray-dried powder (SDP) or freeze-dried powder (FDP) formulation of Pseudomonas fluorescens (strain CL145A) on the survival of seven species of newly metamorphosed (<72 hours old) freshwater unionid mussels was evaluated. Forty unionid mussels of each species were randomly distributed to test chambers and each species independently exposed for 24 hours to a static dose of either SDP (four species: Lampsilis cardium, Lampsilis siliquoidea, Lampsilis higginsii, andLigumia recta) or FDP (three species: Obovaria olivaria, Actinonaias ligamentina, andMegalonaias nervosa).

  3. Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens RB4 and Bacillus subtilis 189 on the phytoremediation potential of Catharanthus roseus (L.) in Cu and Pb-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Waheed Ullah; Ahmad, Sajid Rashid; Yasin, Nasim Ahmad; Ali, Aamir; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2017-06-03

    The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils has become a critical issue due to toxic effects of these metals on living organisms. The current research was conducted to study the effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens RB4 and Bacillus subtilis 189 on the growth and phytoremediation potential of Catharanthus roseus in Cu- and Pb-contaminated soils. The bacterial strains exhibited significantly higher level of water-extractable Pb and Cu in Pb, Cu, and Cu+Pb-contaminated. The P. fluorescens RB4 inoculated plants, produced 102%, 48%, and 45% higher fresh weight (FW) in soils contaminated with Cu, Pb, and both elements, respectively, as compared to un-inoculated control plants. Similarly, B. subtilis 189 inoculated plants produced 108%, 43%, and 114% more FW in the presence of Cu, Pb, and both elements. The plants co-cultivated with both bacteria exhibited 121%, 102%, and 177% higher FW, in Cu, Pb, and both elements contaminated soils, as compared to respective un-inoculated control. Co-cultivation of P. fluorescens RB4, B. subtilis 189, and P. fluorescens RB4 + B. subtilis 189 resulted in higher accumulation of Cu and Pb in shoots of the C. roseus grown in contaminated soils as compared to un-inoculated control. Bacterial treatments also improved the translocation and metal bioconcentration factors. The growth and phytoextraction capability of C. roseus was improved by inoculation of P. fluorescens RB4 and B. subtilis 189.

  4. Nonribosomal peptides, key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from a Greenlandic suppressive soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Charlotte F; Watrous, Jeramie; Glaring, Mikkel A; Kersten, Roland; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Stougaard, Peter

    2015-03-17

    Potatoes are cultivated in southwest Greenland without the use of pesticides and with limited crop rotation. Despite the fact that plant-pathogenic fungi are present, no severe-disease outbreaks have yet been observed. In this report, we document that a potato soil at Inneruulalik in southern Greenland is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani Ag3 and uncover the suppressive antifungal mechanism of a highly potent biocontrol bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, isolated from the suppressive potato soil. A combination of molecular genetics, genomics, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) revealed an antifungal genomic island in P. fluorescens In5 encoding two nonribosomal peptides, nunamycin and nunapeptin, which are key components for the biocontrol activity by strain In5 in vitro and in soil microcosm experiments. Furthermore, complex microbial behaviors were highlighted. Whereas nunamycin was demonstrated to inhibit the mycelial growth of R. solani Ag3, but not that of Pythium aphanidermatum, nunapeptin instead inhibited P. aphanidermatum but not R. solani Ag3. Moreover, the synthesis of nunamycin by P. fluorescens In5 was inhibited in the presence of P. aphanidermatum. Further characterization of the two peptides revealed nunamycin to be a monochlorinated 9-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to members of the syringomycin group, whereas nunapeptin was a 22-amino-acid cyclic lipopeptide with similarity to corpeptin and syringopeptin. Crop rotation and systematic pest management are used to only a limited extent in Greenlandic potato farming. Nonetheless, although plant-pathogenic fungi are present in the soil, the farmers do not experience major plant disease outbreaks. Here, we show that a Greenlandic potato soil is suppressive against Rhizoctonia solani, and we unravel the key biocontrol components for Pseudomonas fluorescens In5, one of the potent biocontrol bacteria

  5. Listeria monocytogenes impact on mature or old Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms during growth at 4 and 20ºC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puga eCH

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Changes in spatial organization, as observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM, viable cell content, biovolume and substratum surface coverage of the biofilms formed on glass by Pseudomonas fluorescens resulting from co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes, were examined. Two strains of L. monocytogenes, two culture temperatures and two biofilm developmental stages were investigated. Both L. monocytogenes strains, a persistently sampled isolate (collected repeatedly along 3 years from a meat factory and Scott A, induced shrinkage in matrix volume, both at 20ºC and 4ºC, in mature or old biofilms, without loss of P. fluorescens cell count per surface unit. The nearly homogeneous pattern of surface coverage shown by mono-species P. fluorescens biofilms, turned into more irregular layouts in co-culture with L. monocytogenes. The upper layer of both mono and dual-species biofilms turned to predominantly consist of matrix, with plenty of viable cells underneath, in old biofilms cultured at 20ºC, but not in those grown at 4ºC. Between 15 and 56% of the substratum area was covered by biofilm, the extent depending on temperature, time and L. monocytogenes strain. Real biofilms in food-related surfaces may thus be very heterogeneous regarding their superficial components, i.e. those more accessible to disinfectants. It is therefore a hygienic challenge to choose an adequate agent to disrupt them.

  6. Pseudomonas fluorescens strains selectively suppress annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual bluegrass (Poa annua L.) is a cool-season annual grass that is a major weed species in turf, turfgrass-seed production, sod production, and golf courses of the western United States. There are few selective herbicides available for the management of annual bluegrass. While the life cycles o...

  7. Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44: Lessons Learned from a Model Whole-Cell Bioreporter with a Broad Application History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Sayler

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Initially described in 1990, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 served as the first whole-cell bioreporter genetically endowed with a bioluminescent (luxCDABE phenotype directly linked to a catabolic (naphthalene degradative pathway. HK44 was the first genetically engineered microorganism to be released in the field to monitor bioremediation potential. Subsequent to that release, strain HK44 had been introduced into other solids (soils, sands, liquid (water, wastewater, and volatile environments. In these matrices, it has functioned as one of the best characterized chemically-responsive environmental bioreporters and as a model organism for understanding bacterial colonization and transport, cell immobilization strategies, and the kinetics of cellular bioluminescent emission. This review summarizes the characteristics of P. fluorescens HK44 and the extensive range of its applications with special focus on the monitoring of bioremediation processes and biosensing of environmental pollution.

  8. Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44: Lessons Learned from a Model Whole-Cell Bioreporter with a Broad Application History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trögl, Josef; Chauhan, Archana; Ripp, Steven; Layton, Alice C.; Kuncová, Gabriela; Sayler, Gary S.

    2012-01-01

    Initially described in 1990, Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 served as the first whole-cell bioreporter genetically endowed with a bioluminescent (luxCDABE) phenotype directly linked to a catabolic (naphthalene degradative) pathway. HK44 was the first genetically engineered microorganism to be released in the field to monitor bioremediation potential. Subsequent to that release, strain HK44 had been introduced into other solids (soils, sands), liquid (water, wastewater), and volatile environments. In these matrices, it has functioned as one of the best characterized chemically-responsive environmental bioreporters and as a model organism for understanding bacterial colonization and transport, cell immobilization strategies, and the kinetics of cellular bioluminescent emission. This review summarizes the characteristics of P. fluorescens HK44 and the extensive range of its applications with special focus on the monitoring of bioremediation processes and biosensing of environmental pollution. PMID:22438725

  9. Critical aspects of analysis of Micrococcus luteus, Neisseria cinerea, and Pseudomonas fluorescens by means of capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, Verena; Stich, August; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2004-10-01

    Within the frame of our study we investigated Microccocus luteus, Neisseria cinerea, and Pseudomonas fluorescens by means of capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). They form chains and clusters on a different scale, which can be reflected in the electropherograms. A low buffer concentration of Tris-borate and Na2EDTA containing a polymeric matrix of 0.0125% poly(ethylene) oxide (PEO) was used. Key factors were the standardization and optimization of CE conditions, buffer solution, and pretreatment of bacterial samples, which are not transferable to different bacterial strains, in general. The different compositions of the cell wall of on the one hand Gram-positive (M. luteus) and Gram-negative (N. cinerea) cocci and on the other hand Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria (P. fluorescens), are probably responsible for the different pretreatment conditions.

  10. Compatibility of Azospirillum brasilense and Pseudomonas fluorescens in growth promotion of groundnut ( Arachis hypogea L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDHARE A. PRASAD

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We attempted to study the compatibility among plant beneficial bacteria in the culture level by growing them near in the nutrient agar plates. Among all the bacteria tested, Rhizobium was found to inhibit the growth of other bacteria. From the compatible group of PGPR, we have selected one biofertilizer (Azospirillum brasilense strain TNAU and one biocontrol agent (Pseudomonas fluorescens strain PF1 for further studies in the pot culture. We have also developed a bioformulation which is talc powder based, for individual bacteria and mixed culture. This formulation was used as seed treatment, soil application, seedling root dip and foliar spray in groundnut crop in vitro germination conditions. A. brasilense was found to enhance the tap root growth and P. fluorescens, the lateral root growth. The other growth parameters like shoot growth, number of leaves were enhanced by the combination of both of the bacteria than their individual formulations. Among the method of application tested in our study, soil application was found to be the best in yielding better results of plant growth promotion.

  11. Supervivencia de Pseudomonas fluorescens en suelos con diferente contenido de materia orgánica Pseudomonas fluorescens survival in soils with different contents of organic matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.B.R. Perotti

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens es una bacteria PGPR (plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, heterótrofa, capaz de combatir fitopatógenos edáficos. Su supervivencia podría estar favorecida por el elevado contenido de materia orgánica del suelo (MOS. Para probarlo, se inocularon, en condiciones de laboratorio, tres cepas de P. fluorescens: UP61, C7R12, y P190 (nativa de Balcarce, Buenos Aires en suelos rizosféricos de tomate representativos de diferentes zonas de Argentina: suelo Argiudol (Balcarce, y Zavalla, Santa Fe y suelo Torrifluvens (Cipolletti, Río Negro (MOS %: 7,2; 4,3 y 2,6 respectivamente. Los resultados indicaron que la supervivencia de P. fluorescens en los suelos Argiudoles fue similar; aunque las pendientes de las curvas de supervivencia en el suelo de Zavalla fueron menores que las observadas en el suelo de Balcarce. La producción de CO2 fue superior en el suelo de Balcarce que en el suelo de Zavalla (4,3 y 2,8 mmol.g-1suelo, esta diferencia podría ser explicada por la existencia de una mayor presión competitiva por parte de la microflora nativa. La supervivencia en el suelo Torrifluvens resultó mínima, lo que sería atribuible a su elevada conductividad eléctrica más que al menor contenido de MOS. La cepa UP61 presentó en todos los casos la mejor supervivencia.Pseudomonas fluorescens are plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. The survival of this inoculated heterotrophic bacterium may be affected by soil organic matter content (SOM. To confirm this hypothesis, three strains of P. fluorescens: UP61, C7R12 y P190 (native of Balcarce, Buenos Aires were inoculated, in laboratory conditions, into three argentine rhizospheric soils: two Argiudolls (Balcarce, and Zavalla, Santa Fe and a Torrifluvens (Cipolletti, Río Negro with different SOM: 7,2; 4,3; and 2,6%, respectibily. The results indicated that the all three isolates survival in general was not different. The slopes of the regression curves in Zavalla soil were very

  12. Giant Flexoelectro-optic Effect with Liquid Crystal Dimer CB7CB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varanytsia, Andrii; Chien, Liang-Chy

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a giant flexoelectro-optic behavior of liquid crystal dimer CB7CB. Flexoelectric properties of CB7CB experimentally characterized by measured angle of an in-plane rotation of helical axis (HA) in polymer stabilized uniform lying helix cholesteric liquid crystal. The 45° rotation of HA providing full intensity modulation of transmitted through a pair of crossed polarizers light, is achieved with 4.5 V/μm with a sub-millisecond electro-optic switching time. Reported properties enable application of CB7CB in applications of the flexoelectric effect in fast switching photonic and electro-optic devices. PMID:28117429

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 can produce a second flagellar apparatus, which is important for root colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Barahona

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization.

  14. Analysis of cumene (isopropylbenzene) degradation genes from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habe, H; Kasuga, K; Nojiri, H; Yamane, H; Omori, T

    1996-12-01

    We obtained the DNA fragments encoding 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-7-methylocta-2,4-dienoic acid (HOMODA) hydrolase in the cumene (isopropylbenzene) degrader Pseudomonas fluorescens strain IP01 via PCR using two synthesized oligonucleotides corresponding to the conserved regions within known meta-cleavage compound hydrolases. Following colony hybridization using the amplified DNA as a probe, a 4.5-kb HindIII fragment was isolated from P. fluorescens IP01. After determining the nucleotide sequence of this fragment, three open reading frames (ORF11 [cumH], ORF12 [cumD], and ORF13) were identified. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF12 showed homology with meta-cleavage compound hydrolases encoded by the tod, dmp, xyl, and bph operons. Although the product of ORF12 was found to exhibit HOMODA and 2-hydroxy-6-oxohepta-2,4-dienoic acid (HOHDA) hydrolase activities, it did not exhibit 2-hydroxy-6-oxo-6-phenylhexa-2,4-dienoic acid (HOPDA) hydrolase activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of ORF11 showed 40.4% homology with the sequence of todX in Pseudomonas putida F1 (Y. Wang, M. Ralings, D. T. Gibson, D. Labbé, H. Bergeron, R. Brousseau, and P. C. K. Lau, Mol. Gen. Genet. 246:570-579, 1995). The nucleotide sequence of ORF13 and its flanking region showed strong homology (91.0%) with IS52 from Pseudomonas savastanoi (Y. Yamada, P.-D. Lee, and T. Kosuge, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83:8263-8267, 1982). By characterization of cumH and cumD, the entire cum gene cluster from the cumene-degrader P. fluorescens IP01 (cumA1A2A3A4BCEGFHD) has been identified.

  15. CB receptor ligands from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelkart, Karin; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Bauer, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Advances in understanding the physiology and pharmacology of the endogenous cannabinoid system have potentiated the interest of cannabinoid receptors as potential therapeutic targets. Cannabinoids have been shown to modulate a variety of immune cell functions and have therapeutic implications on central nervous system (CNS) inflammation, chronic inflammatory conditions such as arthritis, and may be therapeutically useful in treating autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis. Many of these drug effects occur through cannabinoid receptor signalling mechanisms and the modulation of cytokines and other gene products. Further, endocannabinoids have been found to have many physiological and patho-physiological functions, including mood alteration and analgesia, control of energy balance, gut motility, motor and co-ordination activities, as well as alleviation of neurological, psychiatric and eating disorders. Plants offer a wide range of chemical diversity and have been a growing domain in the search for effective cannabinoid ligands. Cannabis sativa L. with the known plant cannabinoid, Delta(9-)tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and Echinacea species with the cannabinoid (CB) receptor-binding lipophilic alkamides are the best known herbal cannabimimetics. This review focuses on the state of the art in CB ligands from plants, as well their possible therapeutic and immunomodulatory effects.

  16. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha

    2016-01-01

    The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells......) and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells). However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB......-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function....

  17. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas fluorescens for the production of vanillin from ferulic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gioia, Diana; Luziatelli, Francesca; Negroni, Andrea; Ficca, Anna Grazia; Fava, Fabio; Ruzzi, Maurizio

    2011-12-20

    Vanillin is one of the most important flavors in the food industry and there is great interest in its production through biotechnological processes starting from natural substrates such as ferulic acid. Among bacteria, recombinant Escherichia coli strains are the most efficient vanillin producers, whereas Pseudomonas spp. strains, although possessing a broader metabolic versatility, rapidly metabolize various phenolic compounds including vanillin. In order to develop a robust Pseudomonas strain that can produce vanillin in high yields and at high productivity, the vanillin dehydrogenase (vdh)-encoding gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens BF13 strain was inactivated via targeted mutagenesis. The results demonstrated that engineered derivatives of strain BF13 accumulate vanillin if inactivation of vdh is associated with concurrent expression of structural genes for feruloyl-CoA synthetase (fcs) and hydratase/aldolase (ech) from a low-copy plasmid. The conversion of ferulic acid to vanillin was enhanced by optimization of growth conditions, growth phase and parameters of the bioconversion process. The developed strain produced up to 8.41 mM vanillin, which is the highest final titer of vanillin produced by a Pseudomonas strain to date and opens new perspectives in the use of bacterial biocatalysts for biotechnological production of vanillin from agro-industrial wastes which contain ferulic acid.

  18. Characterization and lytic activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananthi Radhakrishnan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens phages from sewage were tested against P. fluorescens isolates of soil and sewage. The phages were characterized as to host range, morphology, structural proteins and genome fingerprint. Of the seven phages isolated, one was found to be abundant in sewage (5.9×10(7 pfu/mL, having broad host range, and distinct protein and DNA profile when compared to the other six phages. DNA restriction and protein profiles of the phages and their morphology indicate the diversity in the sewage environment. None of the isolates from the rhizosphere regions of various cultivated soils were susceptible to phages isolated from sewage.

  19. Pseudomonas fluorescens' view of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    Growth in a biofilm modulates microbial metal susceptibility, sometimes increasing the ability of microorganisms to withstand toxic metal species by several orders of magnitude. In this study, a high-throughput metal toxicity screen was initiated with the aim of correlating biological toxicity data in planktonic and biofilm cells to the physiochemical properties of metal ions. To this end, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 was grown in the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) and biofilms and planktonic cells of this microorganism were exposed to gradient arrays of different metal ions. These arrays included 44 different metals with representative compounds that spanned every group of the periodic table (except for the halogens and noble gases). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values were obtained after exposing the biofilms to metal ions for 4 h. Using these values, metal ion toxicity was correlated to the following ion-specific physicochemical parameters: standard reduction-oxidation potential, electronegativity, the solubility product of the corresponding metal-sulfide complex, the Pearson softness index, electron density and the covalent index. When the ions were grouped according to outer shell electron structure, we found that heavy metal ions gave the strongest correlations to these parameters and were more toxic on average than the other classes of the ions. Correlations were different for biofilms than for planktonic cells, indicating that chemical mechanisms of metal ion toxicity differ between the two modes of growth. We suggest that biofilms can specifically counter the toxic effects of certain physicochemical parameters, which may contribute to the increased ability of biofilms to withstand metal toxicity.

  20. Presence of the cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, in human omental and subcutaneous adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Régis; Hoareau, Laurence; Bes-Houtmann, Sandrine; Gonthier, Marie-Paule; Laborde, Christine; Baron, Jean-François; Haffaf, Yacine; Cesari, Maya; Festy, Franck

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the expression of the endocannabinoid 1 and 2 receptors by human adipocyte cells of omental and subcutaneous fat tissue, as well as to determine whether these receptors are functional. The expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors on human adipocytes was analyzed by western blotting, immunohistology and immunocytology. We also investigated intracytoplasmic cyclic AMP level modulation following CB1 and CB2 receptor stimulation by an enzymatic immuno assay. All mature adipocytes, from visceral (epiploon) and subcutaneous fat tissue, express CB1 and CB2 on their plasma membranes. We also demonstrate in this study that adipocyte precursors (pre-adipocytes) express CB1 and CB2 on their plasma membranes and that both receptors are functional. Activation of CB1 increases intracytoplasmic cyclic AMP whilst CB2 activation leads to a cyclic AMP decrease. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, that adipocytes of human adipose tissue (mature adipocytes and pre-adipocytes) express functional plasma membrane CB1 and CB2 receptors. Their physiological role on the adipose tissue is not known. However, their major involvement in the physiology of other tissues leads us to suppose that they could play a significant role in the homeostasis of the energy balance and/or in the regulation of adipose tissue inflammation.

  1. Effect of retS gene on antibiotics production in Pseudomonas fluorescens FD6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingxia; Xiao, Qi; Xu, Jingyou; Tong, Yunhui; Wen, Jia; Chen, Xijun; Wei, Lihui

    2015-11-01

    A hybrid sensor kinase termed RetS (regulator of exopolysaccharide and Type III secretion) controls expression of numerous genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. To investigate the function of RetS in P. fluorescens FD6, the retS gene was disrupted. Genetic inactivation of retS resulted in enhanced production of 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, and pyoluteorin. The retS mutant also exhibited significant increase in phlA-lacZ, prnA-lacZ, and pltA-lacZ transcription levels, influencing expression levels of the small regulatory RNAs RsmX and RsmZ. In the gacSretS double mutant, all the phenotypic changes caused by the retS deletion were reversed to the level of gacS single mutant. Furthermore, the retS mutation drastically elevated biofilm formation and improved the colonization ability of strain FD6 on wheat rhizospheres. Based on these results, we proposed that RetS negatively controlled the production of antibiotics through the Gac/Rsm pathway in P. fluorescens FD6.

  2. Cloning and expression of a toxin gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingying; Guo, Daosen; Zhou, Shiyi; Yu, Xinlei; Hou, Guixue; Li, Ronggui; Zhao, Boguang

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens GcM5-1A was isolated from the pine wood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, obtained from wilted Japanese black pine, Pinus thumbergii, in China. In this paper, a genomic library of the GcM5-1A strain was constructed and a toxin-producing clone was isolated by bioassay. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame of 1,290 bp encoding a protein of 429 amino acids with N-terminal putative signal peptide of 36 amino acids, which shared a similarity of 83, 82 and 80% identity with hypothetical protein PFLU2919 from P. fluorescens SBW25, Dyp-type peroxidase family protein from P. fluorescens Pf-5 and Tat-translocated enzyme from P. fluorescens Pf0-1, respectively. The gene encoding a full-length protein or without the putative signal peptide was cloned and expressed as a soluble protein in E. coli. The recombinant protein was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by affinity chromatography using a Ni2+ matrix column. Its relative molecular weight was estimated to be 48.5 kDa by SDS-PAGE for full-length protein, and 45.0 kDa for the recombinant protein without putative signal peptide. Bioassay results showed that the recombinant protein with or without the putative signal peptide was toxic to both suspension cells and P. thunbergii seedlings. HPLC analysis demonstrated that components in branch extracts of P. thunbergii were significantly changed after addition of the recombinant full-length protein and hydrogen peroxide, which indicated that it is probably a peroxidase. This study offers information that can be used to determine the mechanism of pine wilt disease caused by the PWN.

  3. Genome sequence reveals that Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 possesses a large and diverse array of systems for rhizosphere function and host interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redondo-Nieto Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR isolated from the sugar-beet rhizosphere. This bacterium has been extensively studied as a model strain for genetic regulation of secondary metabolite production in P. fluorescens, as a candidate biocontrol agent against phytopathogens, and as a heterologous host for expression of genes with biotechnological application. The F113 genome sequence and annotation has been recently reported. Results Comparative analysis of 50 genome sequences of strains belonging to the P. fluorescens group has revealed the existence of five distinct subgroups. F113 belongs to subgroup I, which is mostly composed of strains classified as P. brassicacearum. The core genome of these five strains is highly conserved and represents approximately 76% of the protein-coding genes in any given genome. Despite this strong conservation, F113 also contains a large number of unique protein-coding genes that encode traits potentially involved in the rhizocompetence of this strain. These features include protein coding genes required for denitrification, diterpenoids catabolism, motility and chemotaxis, protein secretion and production of antimicrobial compounds and insect toxins. Conclusions The genome of P. fluorescens F113 is composed of numerous protein-coding genes, not usually found together in previously sequenced genomes, which are potentially decisive during the colonisation of the rhizosphere and/or interaction with other soil organisms. This includes genes encoding proteins involved in the production of a second flagellar apparatus, the use of abietic acid as a growth substrate, the complete denitrification pathway, the possible production of a macrolide antibiotic and the assembly of multiple protein secretion systems.

  4. 47 CFR 95.419 - (CB Rule 19) May I operate my CB station transmitter by remote control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter by remote control? 95.419 Section 95.419 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION... Operate A Cb Station § 95.419 (CB Rule 19) May I operate my CB station transmitter by remote control? (a) You may not operate a CB station transmitter by radio remote control. (b) You may operate a CB...

  5. Identification of genes affecting alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens by screening a transposon insertion library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertesvåg, Helga; Sletta, Håvard; Senneset, Mona; Sun, Yi-Qian; Klinkenberg, Geir; Konradsen, Therese Aursand; Ellingsen, Trond E; Valla, Svein

    2017-01-03

    Polysaccharides often are necessary components of bacterial biofilms and capsules. Production of these biopolymers constitutes a drain on key components in the central carbon metabolism, but so far little is known concerning if and how the cells divide their resources between cell growth and production of exopolysaccharides. Alginate is an industrially important linear polysaccharide synthesized from fructose 6-phosphate by several bacterial species. The aim of this study was to identify genes that are necessary for obtaining a normal level of alginate production in alginate-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens. Polysaccharide biosynthesis is costly, since it utilizes nucleotide sugars and sequesters carbon. Consequently, transcription of the genes necessary for polysaccharide biosynthesis is usually tightly regulated. In this study we used an engineered P. fluorescens SBW25 derivative where all genes encoding the proteins needed for biosynthesis of alginate from fructose 6-phosphate and export of the polymer are expressed from inducible Pm promoters. In this way we would avoid identification of genes merely involved in regulating the expression of the alginate biosynthetic genes. The engineered strain was subjected to random transposon mutagenesis and a library of about 11500 mutants was screened for strains with altered alginate production. Identified inactivated genes were mainly found to encode proteins involved in metabolic pathways related to uptake and utilization of carbon, nitrogen and phosphor sources, biosynthesis of purine and tryptophan and peptidoglycan recycling. The majority of the identified mutants resulted in diminished alginate biosynthesis while cell yield in most cases were less affected. In some cases, however, a higher final cell yield were measured. The data indicate that when the supplies of fructose 6-phosphate or GTP are diminished, less alginate is produced. This should be taken into account when bacterial strains are designed for

  6. Induced systemic resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato by 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, David M; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; van Pelt, Johan A; Pieterse, Corné M J; van Loon, Leendert C; Bakker, Peter A H M

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains that produce the polyketide antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are among the most effective rhizobacteria that suppress root and crown rots, wilts, and damping-off diseases of a variety of crops, and they play a key role in the natural suppressiveness of some soils to certain soilborne pathogens. Root colonization by 2,4-DAPG-producing P. fluorescens strains Pf-5 (genotype A), Q2-87 (genotype B), Q8r1-96 (genotype D), and HT5-1 (genotype N) produced induced systemic resistance (ISR) in Arabidopsis thaliana accession Col-0 against bacterial speck caused by P. syringae pv. tomato. The ISR-eliciting activity of the four bacterial genotypes was similar, and all genotypes were equivalent in activity to the well-characterized strain P. fluorescens WCS417r. The 2,4-DAPG biosynthetic locus consists of the genes phlHGF and phlACBDE. phlD or phlBC mutants of Q2-87 (2,4-DAPG minus) were significantly reduced in ISR activity, and genetic complementation of the mutants restored ISR activity back to wild-type levels. A phlF regulatory mutant (overproducer of 2,4-DAPG) had ISR activity equivalent to the wild-type Q2-87. Introduction of DAPG into soil at concentrations of 10 to 250 μM 4 days before challenge inoculation induced resistance equivalent to or better than the bacteria. Strain Q2-87 induced resistance on transgenic NahG plants but not on npr1-1, jar1, and etr1 Arabidopsis mutants. These results indicate that the antibiotic 2,4-DAPG is a major determinant of ISR in 2,4-DAPG-producing P. fluorescens, that the genotype of the strain does not affect its ISR activity, and that the activity induced by these bacteria operates through the ethylene- and jasmonic acid-dependent signal transduction pathway.

  7. Adaptive synonymous mutations in an experimentally evolved Pseudomonas fluorescens population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Susan; Hinz, Aaron; Kassen, Rees

    2014-01-01

    in an experimentally evolved population of Pseudomonas fluorescens. We show experimentally that these mutations increase fitness by an amount comparable to non-synonymous mutations and that the fitness increases stem from increased gene expression. These results provide unequivocal evidence that synonymous mutations...

  8. Control biológico de Rhizoctonia solani en plantas de papa criollaSolanum phureja usando cepas nativas de Pseudomonas fluorescens BIOCONTROL OF Rhizoctonia solani IN NATIVE POTATO (Solanum phureja PLANTS USING NATIVE Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GLORIA BAUTISTA

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani es un hongo fitopatógeno del suelo, el cual produce una reducción significativa del vigor de las plantas y de la producción de tubérculos en cultivos de papa. Es de gran interés la búsqueda de alternativas de manejo de esta enfermedad, especialmente desde la perspectiva de control biológico ya que los cultivos de papa son los mayores consumidores de plaguicidas de origen químicos en Colombia. Con el objeto de obtener una cepa del grupo de las Pseudomonas fluorescentes con la capacidad para reducir los síntomas de la enfermedad producidos por R. solani, se realizó en un estudio previo el aislamiento y caracterización de una colección de aislamientos de Pseudomonas fluorescentes provenientes de diferentes cultivos de la región papera más productiva del país. Seis cepas nativas de P. fluorescens con buena, moderada o ninguna capacidad para inhibir el crecimiento fúngico in vitro fueron seleccionadas. A pesar de las diferencias encontradas en términos de la dinámica y capacidad de colonización, todas las cepas evaluadas indujeron el crecimiento en las plantas de S. phureja y redujeron los síntomas de la enfermedad producidos por R. solani a nivel de invernadero. Nuestros resultados sustentan la conclusión que la asociación de cepas de P. fluorescens con la rizosfera de S. phureja es una alternativa para el manejo de R. solani en papa.Rhizoctonia solani is a soil borne phytopathogen associated with reduced plant vigor and tuber production in potato crops. There is a huge interest to search alternatives of biological control management of this disease, because the potato crops in Colombia are the highest consumers of chemical pesticides in Colombia. In order to obtain a fluorescent Pseudomonas strain with the capacity to reduce the disease symptoms produced by R. solani, determination and isolation of the predominant fluorescent Pseudomonas in several potato crops of the main Colombian producing region was done

  9. New insights into Pseudomonas fluorescens alginate biosynthesis relevant for the establishment of an efficient production process for microbial alginates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Hrudikova, Radka; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2017-07-25

    Alginate denotes a family of linear polysaccharides with a wide range of industrial and pharmaceutical applications. Presently, all commercially available alginates are manufactured from brown algae. However, bacterial alginates have advantages with regard to compositional homogeneity and reproducibility. In order to be able to design bacterial strains that are better suited for industrial alginate production, defining limiting factors for alginate biosynthesis is of vital importance. Our group has been studying alginate biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens using several complementary approaches. Alginate is synthesised and transported out of the cell by a multiprotein complex spanning from the inner to the outer membrane. We have developed an immunogold labelling procedure in which the porin AlgE, as a part of this alginate factory, could be detected by transmission electron microscopy. No time-dependent correlation between the number of such factories on the cell surface and alginate production level was found in alginate-producing strains. Alginate biosynthesis competes with the central carbon metabolism for the key metabolite fructose 6-phosphate. In P. fluorescens, glucose, fructose and glycerol, are metabolised via the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways. Mutational analysis revealed that disruption of the glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as carbon source. Furthermore, alginate-producing P. fluorescens strains cultivated on glucose experience acid stress due to the simultaneous production of alginate and gluconate. The combined results from our studies strongly indicate that the availability of fructose 6-phosphate and energy requires more attention in further research aimed at the development of an optimised alginate production process.

  10. 荧光假单胞菌7-14flhA基因的克隆与功能的初步分析%Cloning and primary analysis of flhA gene function of Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 7-14

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康越景; 钱国良; 丁运昭; 范加勤; 胡白石; 刘凤权

    2011-01-01

    为了探索flhA基因在荧光假单胞菌7-14(Pf7-14)鞭毛合成的作用,以铜绿假单胞菌UCBPP-PA14的鞭毛蛋白FlhA(NC_008463.1)为诱饵,在荧光假单胞菌Pf-5(NC_004129)、Pf0-1(NC_007492)和SBW25(NC_012660)的伞基因组中进行BLASTP比对分析,结果在Pf-5、Pf0-1和SBW25的全基因组搜索到flhA的同系物,分别命名为flhAPf-5、flhAPf0-1,和flhASBW25.根据三者的核酸序列,设计简并引物flhA-F/flhA-R,以荧光假单胞菌7-14(Pf7-14)基凶组DNA为模板进行PCR扩增,并对得到的片段测序比对,发现该片段2 130 bp为一完整的开放阅读框,命名为flhAPf7-14.flhAPf7-14在氨基酸水平上与flhAPf-5和flhAPf0-1的同源性分别达到93%和94%.Southern杂交证明flhA 在Pf7-14基因组中为单一拷贝.通过同源重组单交换的方式构建了Pf7-14flhA基因插入失活突变株,结果表明flhA突变体缺失了鞭毛装置并丧失了游动性,而互补菌株则恢复了鞭毛合成能力和游动能力.本研究为今后进一步研究Pf7-14鞭毛合成、菌体游动性与该菌定殖能力及生防能力的关系奠定基础.%Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to Pseudomonas spp.. The flhA mutant and motility of P. aeruginosa was shown to be nonmotile. To explore the role of flhA in P. aeruginosa 7-14 (Pf7-14) flagella synthesis, a BLASTP search was performed in the genome of P. fluorescens strains Pf-5 ( NC_004129 ) , Pf0-1 (NC_007492) and SBW25 ( NC012660) usingflhA protein from P. aeruginosa UCBPP-PA14 (NC_008463.1) as a bait. The flhA homologs, named flhApf-5, flhApfo-1 and flhAsbw25, were obtained from their genomes, respectively. According to the nucleic acid sequences of flhApf-5, flhpf0-1, and flhASBW25, a pair of degenerate primers flhA-F/flhA-R, were designed and used to amplify the flhA gene from Pf7-14. By PCR amplification and sequencing, a 2 130 bp DNA fragment, a complete ORF, named flhAsBW25 was obtained from Pf7-14. The result of sequence analysis revealed that flhApf7-14 shared 93

  11. The sigma factor AlgU (AlgT) controls exopolysaccharide production and tolerance towards desiccation and osmotic stress in the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider-Keel, U; Lejbølle, K B; Baehler, E; Haas, D; Keel, C

    2001-12-01

    A variety of stress situations may affect the activity and survival of plant-beneficial pseudomonads added to soil to control root diseases. This study focused on the roles of the sigma factor AlgU (synonyms, AlgT, RpoE, and sigma(22)) and the anti-sigma factor MucA in stress adaptation of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. The algU-mucA-mucB gene cluster of strain CHA0 was similar to that of the pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas syringae. Strain CHA0 is naturally nonmucoid, whereas a mucA deletion mutant or algU-overexpressing strains were highly mucoid due to exopolysaccharide overproduction. Mucoidy strictly depended on the global regulator GacA. An algU deletion mutant was significantly more sensitive to osmotic stress than the wild-type CHA0 strain and the mucA mutant were. Expression of an algU'-'lacZ reporter fusion was induced severalfold in the wild type and in the mucA mutant upon exposure to osmotic stress, whereas a lower, noninducible level of expression was observed in the algU mutant. Overexpression of algU did not enhance tolerance towards osmotic stress. AlgU was found to be essential for tolerance of P. fluorescens towards desiccation stress in a sterile vermiculite-sand mixture and in a natural sandy loam soil. The size of the population of the algU mutant declined much more rapidly than the size of the wild-type population at soil water contents below 5%. In contrast to its role in pathogenic pseudomonads, AlgU did not contribute to tolerance of P. fluorescens towards oxidative and heat stress. In conclusion, AlgU is a crucial determinant in the adaptation of P. fluorescens to dry conditions and hyperosmolarity, two major stress factors that limit bacterial survival in the environment.

  12. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface.

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens associated with Bacterial Disease in Catla catla in Marathwada Region of Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1Omprakash Darak

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study a detailed analysis was carried out to evaluate the association of various bacterial pathogens with Catla catla from Marathwada region of Maharashtra. The freshwater fishes were collected from different water bodies and fish culturing centre of eight districts of Marathwada region viz. Aurangabad, Jalna, Parbhani, Nanded, Hingoli, Latur, Beed and Osmanabad. The analysis could yield thirteen pathogenic bacteria from the fish samples that included Micrococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus sp., Vibrio sp., Aeromonas sp., Streptococcussp., Flavobacterium sp., Vibrio sp., Proteus sp., Staphylococcus sp., Enterobacteria sp., E.coli , Pseudomonas sp. The bacterial strains were identified based on colony morphology, cell morphology and biochemical chemical characters. The dominant bacterial pathogen was Pseudomonas sp. The Pseudomonas sp associated with Catla catla could survive on host as well as in water. Pseudomonas fluorescens was very sensitive to Kanamycin, Nalidixic acid, Gentamicin and Neomycin, less sensitive to tetracycline, amikacin and Chlorophenicol and very less sensitive to Oxytetracycline, Erythromycin and Penicillin.

  14. Modulation of The Balance Between Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 Receptor Activation During Cerebral Ischemic/Reperfusion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, Ming; Martin, Billy R.; Adler, Martin W.; Razdan, Raj K.; Ganea, Doina; Tuma, Ronald F.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoid receptor activation has been shown to modulate both neurotransmission (CB1) and neuroinflammatory (CB2) responses. There are conflicting reports in the literature describing the influence of cannabinoid receptor activation on ischemic/reperfusion injury. The goal of this study was to evaluate how changing the balance between CB1 and CB2 activation following cerebral ischemia influences outcome. CB1 and CB2 expression were tested at different times after transient middle cerebral a...

  15. Inhibition of biofilm development and spoilage potential of Shewanella baltica by quorum sensing signal in cell-free supernatant from Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Aifei; Zhu, Junli; Ye, Xiaofeng; Ge, Yangyang; Li, Jianrong

    2016-08-02

    The objective of this study was to in vitro evaluate the effect of a cell-free supernatant (CFS) containing quorum sensing (QS) signal of Pseudomonas fluorescens on the growth, biofilm development and spoilage potential of Shewanella baltica, and preliminarily assess the interactive influences of various chemically synthesized autoinducers on spoilage phenotypes of S. baltica. PF01 strain isolated from spoiled Pseudosciaen crocea was identified P. fluorescens. The addition of 25% and 50% CFS to S. baltica culture had no effect on the growth rate during the lag and exponential phase, however, caused cell decline during the stationary phase. The presence of CFS from P. fluorescens significantly inhibited biofilm development, and greatly decreased the production of trimethylamine (TMA) and biogenic amino in S. baltica. Various signal molecules of QS in the CFS of P. fluorescens culture were detected, including seven N-acyl-l-homoserine lactones (AHLs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and two diketopiperazines (DKPs). Exogenous supplement of synthesized seven AHLs containing in the CFS decreased biofilm formation and TMA production in S. baltica, while exposure to exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) was showed to promote spoilage potential, which revealed that S. baltica also sense the two QS molecules. Furthermore, the stimulating effect of cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) was affected when AHL was simultaneously added, suggesting that the inhibitory activity of spoilage phenotypes in S. baltica might be attributed to a competitive effect of these QS compounds in the CFS of P. fluorescens. The present studies provide a good basis for future research on the role of QS in the regulation of spoilage microbial flora.

  16. The role of the antimicrobial compound 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in the impact of biocontrol Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 on Azospirillum brasilense phytostimulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couillerot, Olivier; Combes-Meynet, Emeline; Pothier, Joël F; Bellvert, Floriant; Challita, Elita; Poirier, Marie-Andrée; Rohr, René; Comte, Gilles; Moënne-Loccoz, Yvan; Prigent-Combaret, Claire

    2011-06-01

    Pseudomonads producing the antimicrobial metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (Phl) can control soil-borne phytopathogens, but their impact on other plant-beneficial bacteria remains poorly documented. Here, the effects of synthetic Phl and Phl(+) Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 on Azospirillum brasilense phytostimulators were investigated. Most A. brasilense strains were moderately sensitive to Phl. In vitro, Phl induced accumulation of carotenoids and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate-like granules, cytoplasmic membrane damage and growth inhibition in A. brasilense Cd. Experiments with P. fluorescens F113 and a Phl(-) mutant indicated that Phl production ability contributed to in vitro growth inhibition of A. brasilense Cd and Sp245. Under gnotobiotic conditions, each of the three strains, P. fluorescens F113 and A. brasilense Cd and Sp245, stimulated wheat growth. Co-inoculation of A. brasilense Sp245 and Pseudomonas resulted in the same level of phytostimulation as in single inoculations, whereas it abolished phytostimulation when A. brasilense Cd was used. Pseudomonas Phl production ability resulted in lower Azospirillum cell numbers per root system (based on colony counts) and restricted microscale root colonization of neighbouring Azospirillum cells (based on confocal microscopy), regardless of the A. brasilense strain used. Therefore, this work establishes that Phl(+) pseudomonads have the potential to interfere with A. brasilense phytostimulators on roots and with their plant growth promotion capacity.

  17. Role of gluconic acid production in the regulation of biocontrol traits of Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Werra, Patrice; Péchy-Tarr, Maria; Keel, Christoph; Maurhofer, Monika

    2009-06-01

    The rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 promotes the growth of various crop plants and protects them against root diseases caused by pathogenic fungi. The main mechanism of disease suppression by this strain is the production of the antifungal compounds 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG) and pyoluteorin (PLT). Direct plant growth promotion can be achieved through solubilization of inorganic phosphates by the production of organic acids, mainly gluconic acid, which is one of the principal acids produced by Pseudomonas spp. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of gluconic acid production in CHA0. Therefore, mutants were created with deletions in the genes encoding glucose dehydrogenase (gcd) and gluconate dehydrogenase (gad), required for the conversion of glucose to gluconic acid and gluconic acid to 2-ketogluconate, respectively. These enzymes should be of predominant importance for rhizosphere-colonizing biocontrol bacteria, as major carbon sources provided by plant root exudates are made up of glucose. Our results show that the ability of strain CHA0 to acidify its environment and to solubilize mineral phosphate is strongly dependent on its ability to produce gluconic acid. Moreover, we provide evidence that the formation of gluconic acid by CHA0 completely inhibits the production of PLT and partially inhibits that of DAPG. In the Deltagcd mutant, which does not produce gluconic acid, the enhanced production of antifungal compounds was associated with improved biocontrol activity against take-all disease of wheat, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. This study provides new evidence for a close association of gluconic acid metabolism with antifungal compound production and biocontrol activity in P. fluorescens CHA0.

  18. Rhizosphere selection of highly motile phenotypic variants of Pseudomonas fluorescens with enhanced competitive colonization ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2006-05-01

    Phenotypic variants of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 showing a translucent and diffuse colony morphology show enhanced colonization of the alfalfa rhizosphere. We have previously shown that in the biocontrol agent P. fluorescens F113, phenotypic variation is mediated by the activity of two site-specific recombinases, Sss and XerD. By overexpressing the genes encoding either of the recombinases, we have now generated a large number of variants (mutants) after selection either by prolonged laboratory cultivation or by rhizosphere passage. All the isolated variants were more motile than the wild-type strain and appear to contain mutations in the gacA and/or gacS gene. By disrupting these genes and complementation analysis, we have observed that the Gac system regulates swimming motility by a repression pathway. Variants isolated after selection by prolonged cultivation formed a single population with a swimming motility that was equal to the motility of gac mutants, being 150% more motile than the wild type. The motility phenotype of these variants was complemented by the cloned gac genes. Variants isolated after rhizosphere selection belonged to two different populations: one identical to the population isolated after prolonged cultivation and the other comprising variants that besides a gac mutation harbored additional mutations conferring higher motility. Our results show that gac mutations are selected both in the stationary phase and during rhizosphere colonization. The enhanced motility phenotype is in turn selected during rhizosphere colonization. Several of these highly motile variants were more competitive than the wild-type strain, displacing it from the root tip within 2 weeks.

  19. Development and Characterization of Immobilized Cannabinoid Receptor (CB1/CB2) Open Tubular Column for On-line Screening

    OpenAIRE

    Moaddel, R.; Rosenberg, A.; Spelman, K.; Frazier, J; Frazier, C.; Nocerino, S.; Brizzi, A; Mugnaini, C.; Wainer, I. W.

    2011-01-01

    Cannabinoid Receptors, CB1 and CB2, are therapeutic targets in the treatment of anxiety, obesity, movement disorders, glaucoma and pain. We have developed an on-line screening method for CB1 and CB2 ligands, where cellular membrane fragments of a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, (KU-812), were immobilized onto the surface of an open tubular capillary to create a CB1/CB2-OT column. The binding activities of the immobilized CB1/CB2 receptors were established using frontal affinity chroma...

  20. Protocol to Study β-Arrestin Recruitment by CB1 and CB2 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; van Gils, Noortje; van der Stelt, Mario; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that recruit β-arrestins upon activation by (partial) agonists. β-Arrestin recruitment is induced by phosphorylation of their C-terminal tails, and is associated with the termination of GPCR signaling; yet, it may also activate cellular signaling pathways independent of G-proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to characterize the potency and efficacy of ligands to induce or inhibit β-arrestin recruitment to the human CB1 and CB2 receptors, by using the PathHunter(®) assay. The latter is a cellular assay that can be performed in plates with 384-wells. The PathHunter(®) assay makes use of β-galactosidase complementation, and has a chemiluminescent readout. We used this assay to characterize a set of reference ligands (both agonists and antagonists) on human CB1 and CB2 receptors.

  1. The Structure-Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W; Rimoldi, John M

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (-)-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure-CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure-activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure-activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles.

  2. The Structure–Function Relationships of Classical Cannabinoids: CB1/CB2 Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bow, Eric W.; Rimoldi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoids are members of a deceptively simple class of terpenophenolic secondary metabolites isolated from Cannabis sativa highlighted by (−)-Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), eliciting distinct pharmacological effects mediated largely by cannabinoid receptor (CB1 or CB2) signaling. Since the initial discovery of THC and related cannabinoids, synthetic and semisynthetic classical cannabinoid analogs have been evaluated to help define receptor binding modes and structure–CB1/CB2 functional activity relationships. This perspective will examine the classical cannabinoids, with particular emphasis on the structure–activity relationship of five regions: C3 side chain, phenolic hydroxyl, aromatic A-ring, pyran B-ring, and cyclohexenyl C-ring. Cumulative structure–activity relationship studies to date have helped define the critical structural elements required for potency and selectivity toward CB1 and CB2 and, more importantly, ushered the discovery and development of contemporary nonclassical cannabinoid modulators with enhanced physicochemical and pharmacological profiles. PMID:27398024

  3. Development and preliminary validation of a plate-based CB1/CB2 receptor functional assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossou, K S S; Devkota, K P; Kavanagh, P V; Beutler, J A; Egan, J M; Moaddel, R

    2013-06-15

    Cannabinoid (CB) receptors are being targeted therapeutically for the treatment of anxiety, obesity, movement disorders, glaucoma, and pain. More recently, cannabinoid agonists have displayed antiproliferative activity against breast cancer and prostate cancer in animal models. To study cannabinoid receptor ligands, we have developed a novel plate-based assay that measures internalization of CB1/CB2 receptors by determining the change in the intracellular levels of the radiolabeled agonists: [(3)H]Win55-212-2 for CB1 and [(3)H]CP55-940 for CB2. The developed plate-based assay was validated by determining IC50 values for known antagonists: AM251, AM281, AM630, and AM6545. The data obtained were consistent with previously reported values, thereby confirming that the assay can be used to determine the functional binding activities (IC50) of antagonists for the CB1 and CB2 receptors. In addition, we demonstrated that the plate-based assay may be used for screening against complex matrices. Specifically, we demonstrated that the plate-based assay was able to identify which extracts of several species of the genus Zanthoxylum had activity at the CB1/CB2 receptors.

  4. Discovery of S-444823, a potent CB1/CB2 dual agonist as an antipruritic agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odan, Masahide; Ishizuka, Natsuki; Hiramatsu, Yoshiharu; Inagaki, Masanao; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Mitsumori, Susumu; Morioka, Yasuhide; Soga, Masahiko; Deguchi, Masashi; Yasui, Kiyoshi; Arimura, Akinori

    2012-04-15

    The optimization of a series of 3-carbamoyl 2-pyridone derivatives as CB agonists is reported. These efforts resulted in the discovery of 3-(2-(1-(cyclohexylmethyl)-2-oxo-1,2,5,6,7,8,9,10-octahydrocycloocta[b]pyridine-3-carboxamido)thiazol-4-yl)propanoic acid (21), a potent dual CB1/CB2 agonist without CNS side effects induced by CB1 receptor activation. It exhibited strong inhibition of scratching as a 1.0% acetone solution in the pruritic model.

  5. Initial characterization of a bolA homologue from Pseudomonas fluorescens indicates different roles for BolA-like proteins in P. fluorescens and Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Birgit; Nybroe, Ole

    2006-09-01

    The RpoS-regulated bolA gene in Escherichia coli is important for the decrease in cell size during stationary phase or sudden carbon starvation. A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain mutated in a gene with homology to bolA reduced its cell size upon carbon starvation, and RpoS had little effect on bolA expression. The mutant grew slower than the wild-type strain in minimal medium with L-serine as the sole nitrogen source, while growth rates were similar on a mixture of L-serine and L-cysteine. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the bolA homologue is the second gene in an operon where the two next ORFs encode putative proteins with homology to sulphurtransferases and protein disulphide isomerases. Complementation of the mutant phenotypes was only obtained by plasmids encoding BolA as well as the above two proteins. Growth phenotypes and gene homologies suggest that BolA-like proteins have different functions in E. coli and Pseudomonas.

  6. CB1 Knockout Mice Unveil Sustained CB2-Mediated Antiallodynic Effects of the Mixed CB1/CB2 Agonist CP55,940 in a Mouse Model of Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Liting; Cornett, Benjamin L.; Mackie, Ken; Hohmann, Andrea G.

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoids suppress neuropathic pain through activation of cannabinoid CB1 and/or CB2 receptors; however, unwanted CB1-mediated cannabimimetic effects limit clinical use. We asked whether CP55,940 [(−)-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol], a potent cannabinoid that binds with similar affinity to CB1 and CB2 in vitro, produces functionally separable CB1- and CB2-mediated pharmacological effects in vivo. We evaluated antiallodynic effects, possible toler...

  7. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor expression during development and in epileptogenic developmental pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurolo, E; Iyer, A M; Spliet, W G M; Van Rijen, P C; Troost, D; Gorter, J A; Aronica, E

    2010-09-29

    Recent data support the involvement of the endocannabinoid signaling in early brain development, as well as a key role of cannabinoid receptors (CBR) in pathological conditions associated with unbalanced neuronal excitability and inflammation. Using immunocytochemistry, we explored the expression and cellular pattern of CBR 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) during prenatal human cortical development, as well as in focal malformations of cortical development associated with intractable epilepsy (focal cortical dysplasia; cortical tubers in patients with the tuberous sclerosis complex and glioneuronal tumors). Strong CB1 immunoreactivity was detected in the cortical plate in developing human brain from the earliest stages tested (gestational week 9) and it persisted throughout prenatal development. Both cannabinoid receptors were not detected in neural progenitor cells located in the ventricular zone. Only CB1 was expressed in the subventricular zone and in Cajal-Retzius cells in the molecular zone of the developing neocortex. CB2 was detected in cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage during development. In malformations of cortical development, prominent CB1 expression was demonstrated in dysplastic neurons. Both CBR were detected in balloon/giant cells, but CB2 appeared to be more frequently expressed than CB1 in these cell types. Reactive astrocytes were mainly stained with CB1, whereas cells of the microglia/macrophage lineage were stained with CB2. These findings confirm the early expression pattern of cannabinoid receptors in the developing human brain, suggesting a function for CB1 in the early stages of corticogenesis. The expression patterns in malformations of cortical development highlight the role of cannabinoid receptors as mediators of the endocannabinoid signaling and as potential pharmacological targets to modulate neuronal and glial cell function in epileptogenic developmental pathologies.

  8. Involvement of cannabinoid CB1- and CB2-receptors in the modulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linari, G; Agostini, S; Amadoro, G; Ciotti, M T; Florenzano, F; Improta, G; Petrella, C; Severini, C; Broccardo, M

    2009-03-01

    The role of the cannabinoid system in the regulation of exocrine pancreatic secretion was investigated by studying the effects of the synthetic CB1- and CB2-receptors agonist, WIN55,212, on amylase secretion in isolated lobules and acini of guinea pig and rat, and the expression of CB-receptors in rat pancreatic tissue by immuno-chemistry and Western-blot analysis in both basal and cerulein (CK)-induced pancreatitis condition. In pancreatic lobules of guinea pig and rat, WIN55,212 significantly inhibited amylase release stimulated by KCl depolarization through inhibition of presynaptic acetylcholine release, but did not modify basal, carbachol- or CK-stimulated amylase secretion. The effect of WIN55,212 was significantly reduced by pre-treatment with selective CB1- and CB2-receptor antagonists. The antagonists, when given alone, did not affect the KCl-evoked response. Conversely, WIN55,212 was unable to affect basal and CK- or carbachol-stimulated amylase release from pancreatic acini of guinea pig and rat. Immunofluorescent staining of rat pancreatic tissues showed that CB1- and CB2-receptors are expressed in lobules and in acinar cells and their presence in acinar cells was also shown by Western-blot analysis. After CK-induced pancreatitis, the expression of CB1-receptors in acinar cells was not changed, whilst a down-regulation of CB2-receptors was observed. In conclusion, the present study shows that WIN55,212 inhibits amylase release from guinea pig and rat pancreatic lobules and, for the first time, that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in lobules of the rat pancreas, suggesting an inhibitory presynaptic role of this receptor system. Finally, in rat pancreatic acinar cells, CB1- and CB2-receptors, expressed both in basal conditions and after CK-induced pancreatitis but inactive on amylase secretion, have an unknown role both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  9. Detection of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 within basal ganglia output neurons in macaques: changes following experimental parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Salvador; Luquin, Natasha; Rico, Alberto J; Gómez-Bautista, Virginia; Roda, Elvira; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Vázquez, Alfonso; Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Labandeira-García, José L; Franco, Rafael; Lanciego, José L

    2015-09-01

    Although type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed abundantly throughout the brain, the presence of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2Rs) in neurons is still somewhat controversial. Taking advantage of newly designed CB1R and CB2R mRNA riboprobes, we demonstrate by PCR and in situ hybridization that transcripts for both cannabinoid receptors are present within labeled pallidothalamic-projecting neurons of control and MPTP-treated macaques, whereas the expression is markedly reduced in dyskinetic animals. Moreover, an in situ proximity ligation assay was used to qualitatively assess the presence of CB1Rs and CB2Rs, as well as CB1R-CB2R heteromers within basal ganglia output neurons in all animal groups (control, parkinsonian and dyskinetic macaques). A marked reduction in the number of CB1Rs, CB2Rs and CB1R-CB2R heteromers was found in dyskinetic animals, mimicking the observed reduction in CB1R and CB2R mRNA expression levels. The fact that chronic levodopa treatment disrupted CB1R-CB2R heteromeric complexes should be taken into consideration when designing new drugs acting on cannabinoid receptor heteromers.

  10. Overexpression of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 correlates with improved prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xundi; Liu, Yi; Huang, Shengfu; Liu, Guoxing; Xie, Chengzhi; Zhou, Jun; Fan, Wentao; Li, Qinglong; Wang, Qunwei; Zhong, Dewu; Miao, Xiongying

    2006-11-01

    CB1 and CB2 are multifunctional cannabinoid-specific receptors considered to be involved in inhibition of tumor development. To elucidate their roles in hepatocarcinogenesis, we analyzed the expression of these receptors in tumor and matched nontumorous tissues of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) samples. In situ hybridization analysis showed overexpression of CB1 mRNAs in 8 of 13 (62%) HCC samples, and of CB2 mRNAs in 7 of 13 (54%). Immunohistochemical analysis of 64 HCC samples showed the expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors to increase from normal liver to chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis. Marked expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors was noted in the majority of cirrhotic liver samples (86 and 78%, respectively). In HCC, high expression of CB1 and CB2 receptors was observed in 29 (45%) and 33 (52%) cases, respectively. Clinicopathological evaluation indicated a significant correlation between CB1 and CB2 expression and two clinicopathological parameters such as the histopathological differentiation (P = 0.021 and 0.001, respectively), portal vein invasion (P = 0.015 and 0.004, respectively). Univariate analysis indicated that disease-free survival was significantly better in HCC patients with high versus those with low CB1 and CB2 expression levels (P = 0.010 and 0.037, respectively). Our results indicate that CB1 and CB2 have potential as prognostic indicators and suggest possible beneficial effects of cannabinoids on prognosis of patients with HCC.

  11. Colonization process of olive tissues by Verticillium dahliae and its in planta interaction with the biocontrol root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Pilar; Navarro‐Raya, Carmen; Valverde‐Corredor, Antonio; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Dobinson, Katherine F.; Mercado‐Blanco, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    Summary The colonization process of Olea europaea by the defoliating pathotype of Verticillium dahliae, and the in planta interaction with the endophytic, biocontrol strain Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 were determined. Differential fluorescent protein tagging was used for the simultaneous visualization of P. fluorescens PICF7 and V. dahliae in olive tissues. Olive plants were bacterized with PICF7 and then transferred to V. dahliae‐infested soil. Monitoring olive colonization events by V. dahliae and its interaction with PICF7 was conducted using a non‐gnotobiotic system, confocal laser scanner microscopy and tissue vibratoming sections. A yellow fluorescently tagged V. dahliae derivative (VDAT‐36I) was obtained by Agrobacterium tumefaciens‐mediated transformation. Isolate VDAT‐36I quickly colonized olive root surface, successfully invaded root cortex and vascular tissues via macro‐ and micro‐breakages, and progressed to the aerial parts of the plant through xylem vessel cells. Strain PICF7 used root hairs as preferred penetration site, and once established on/in root tissues, hindered pathogen colonization. For the first time using this approach, the entire colonization process of a woody plant by V. dahliae is reported. Early and localized root surface and root endophytic colonization by P. fluorescens PICF7 is needed to impair full progress of verticillium wilt epidemics in olive. PMID:21255281

  12. Brain CB2 Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle Roche; Finn, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB2 receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB2 receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB1 receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB2 receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB2 recepto...

  13. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Søndergaard, Mads; Nilsson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    resulted in highly aggregative phenotypes and in increased biofilm formation. Detailed biophysical investigations of purified fibrils confirmed FapC as the main fibril monomer and supported the role of FapB as a minor, nucleating constituent as also indicated by bioinformatic analysis. Bioinformatics......The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P....... fluorescens Pf-5, and P. putida F1 to express Fap fibrils, and investigated the effect of Fap expression on aggregation and biofilm formation. The fap operon in all three Pseudomonas species conferred the ability to express Fap fibrils as shown using a recombinant approach. This Fap overexpression consistently...

  14. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Bouskila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells. However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp. in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function.

  15. Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Modulate the Electroretinographic Waves in Vervet Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Harrar, Vanessa; Javadi, Pasha; Beierschmitt, Amy; Palmour, Roberta; Casanova, Christian; Bouchard, Jean-François; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    The expression patterns of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) and the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2R) are well documented in rodents and primates. In vervet monkeys, CB1R is present in the retinal neurons (photoreceptors, horizontal cells, bipolar cells, amacrine cells, and ganglion cells) and CB2R is exclusively found in the retinal glia (Müller cells). However, the role of these cannabinoid receptors in normal primate retinal function remains elusive. Using full-field electroretinography in adult vervet monkeys, we recorded changes in neural activity following the blockade of CB1R and CB2R by the intravitreal administration of their antagonists (AM251 and AM630, resp.) in photopic and scotopic conditions. Our results show that AM251 increases the photopic a-wave amplitude at high flash intensities, whereas AM630 increases the amplitude of both the photopic a- and b-waves. In scotopic conditions, both blockers increased the b-wave amplitude but did not change the a-wave amplitude. These findings suggest an important role of CB1R and CB2R in primate retinal function.

  16. CB1 and CB2 receptor expression and promoter methylation in patients with cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Andrea; Bayerlein, Kristina; Hansbauer, Max; Weiland, Judith; Sperling, Wolfgang; Kornhuber, Johannes; Biermann, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    CB1 and CB2 receptors are influenced via exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids. To date, little is known regarding changes in receptor expression and methylation in THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) dependence. Therefore, the CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNA expression levels and promoter methylation status in the peripheral blood cells of 77 subjects (36 with THC dependence, 21 cigarette smokers and 20 nonsmokers) were assessed by quantitative real-time PCR and methylation-specific PCR. There was a significant difference in CB1 receptor expression levels between the three groups (ANOVA, p CB1 receptor mRNA expression levels (Spearman's rho: r = -0.37; p = 0.002). Using a mixed general linear model, it was demonstrated that the CB1 mRNA expression (as the dependent variable) was associated with the satisfaction with life scale (SWLS) (r = 0.101; T = 2.8; p = 0.007), craving (as measured with the VAS; r = -0.023; T = -2.3; p = 0.023) and the WHO-Assist Subscale for Cannabis consumption (r = -0.068; T = -2.4; p = 0.02). CB1 receptor expression levels and methylation status appear to be altered in subjects with THC dependence.

  17. Horizontal and vertical movement of Pseudomonas fluorescens toward exudate of Macrophomina phaseolina in soil: influence of motility and soil properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanuja; Srivastava, Alok K; Arora, Dilip K

    2002-01-01

    The role of motility and cell surface hydrophobicity in transport and dispersal of Pseudomonas fluorescens strains LAM1-hydrophilic, LAM2-hydrophobic and LAM(NM) (non-motile mutant of LAM2) under different soil conditions was studied. Maximum adhesion was recorded for LAM2 in clay loam (70%), followed by sandy loam (68%) and sandy soil (40%). Vertical migration of P fluorescens isolates in soils was recorded at 5 and 25 cm flow of wafer or M. phaseolina exudate. In all the treatments, LAM1 exhibited maximum migration followed, by LAM2 and LAM(NM). The rate of migration of such isolates was lowered in water irrigated soils compared to those irrigated with M. phaseolina exudate. In sandy soil, cells of LAM1 migrated up to 13 cm in comparison to LAM2 (11 cm) and LAN(NM) (9 cm) at 5 cm flow of fungal exudate. Population of LAM1, LAM2 and LAM(NM) was 5.7, 5.68 and 5.61 log cfu g(-1) soil at 1 cm depth, but it decreased to 2.56, 2.21 and 1.99 log cfu during migration up to 11 cm in sandy soil at 5 cm flow of fungal exudate. Greater motility was observed in sandy soil irrigated with water or fungal exudate, followed by sandy loam and clay loam. In general, filtration coefficient (lambda) of P. fluorescens was higher in soils irrigated with 5 cm of water or exudate than with 25 cm of irrigation. The horizontal movement of P. fluorescens strains in sandy soil adjusted at different psi m showed marked reduction with decrease in psi m. The non-motile LAN(NM) did not show chemotactic response and migrated up to a maximum of 3 mm in saturated soils (0 kPa). After 96 h, LAM1 and LAM2 migrated upto 35 and 29 mm respectively in sandy soil. Motile isolates had significantly greater colonization of M. phaseolina sclerotia over the non-motile mutant.

  18. Study on the Application of Phage-resistant Strain Pseudomonas fluorescens AR4 in Industrial Production of 2-keto-D-gluconic Acid%荧光假单胞菌AR4在2-酮基-D-葡萄糖酸工业生产中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文敬; 陈丽; 任蓓蕾; 张建国; 刘敬泽

    2006-01-01

    在噬菌体存在的情况下,采用抗噬菌体菌株荧光假单胞菌(Pseudomonas fluorescens)AR4在200m3发酵罐上进行了2-酮基-D-葡萄糖酸的发酵生产.结果表明,荧光假单胞菌AR4对生产环境中噬菌体的抗性稳定,发酵周期短,发酵转化率高;经过10次传代,荧光假单胞菌AR4对噬菌体的抗性及其发酵生产2-酮基-D-葡萄糖酸的能力没有改变;该菌株的发酵产物可以用于食品抗氧化剂D-异抗坏血酸钠的合成.

  19. The CB2-preferring agonist JWH015 also potently and efficaciously activates CB1 in autaptic hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murataeva, N; Mackie, K; Straiker, A

    2012-11-01

    The G protein coupled receptors CB(1) and CB(2) are targets for the psychoactive constituents of cannabis, chief among them Δ(9)-THC. They are also key components of the multifunctional endogenous cannabinoid signaling system. CB(1) and CB(2) receptors modulate a wide variety of physiological systems including analgesia, memory, mood, reward, appetite and immunity. Identification and characterization of selective CB(1) and CB(2) receptor agonists and antagonists will facilitate understanding the precise physiological and pathophysiological roles of cannabinoid receptors in these systems. This is particularly necessary in the case of CB(2) because these receptors are sparsely expressed and problematic to detect using traditional immunocytochemical approaches. 1-Propyl-2-methyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole (JWH015) is an aminoalkylindole that has been employed as a "CB(2)-selective" agonist in more than 40 published papers. However, we have found that JWH015 potently and efficaciously activates CB(1) receptors in neurons. Using murine autaptic hippocampal neurons, which express CB(1), but not CB(2) receptors, we find that JWH015 inhibits excitatory postsynaptic currents with an EC50 of 216nM. JWH015 inhibition is absent in neurons from CB(1)(-/-) cultures and is reversed by the CB(1) antagonist, SR141716 [200nM]. Furthermore, JWH015 partially occludes CB(1)-mediated DSE (∼35% remaining), an action reversed by the CB(2) antagonist, AM630 [1 and 3μM], suggesting that high concentrations of AM630 also antagonize CB(1) receptors. We conclude that while JWH015 is a CB(2)-preferring agonist, it also activates CB(1) receptors at experimentally encountered concentrations. Thus, CB(1) agonism of JWH015 needs to be considered in the design and interpretation of experiments that use JWH015 to probe CB(2)-signaling.

  20. Milk-deteriorating exoenzymes from Pseudomonas fluorescens 041 isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurilio L. Martins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The practice of refrigerating raw milk at the farm has provided a selective advantage for psychrotrophic bacteria that produce heat-stable proteases and lipases causing severe quality problems to the dairy industry. In this work, a protease (AprX and a lipase (LipM produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens 041, a highly proteolytic and lipolytic strain isolated from raw milk obtained from a Brazilian farm, have been purified and characterized. Both enzymes were purified as recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli. The AprX metalloprotease exhibited activity in a broad temperature range, including refrigeration, with a maximum activity at 37 °C. It was active in a pH range of 4.0 to 9.0. This protease had maximum activity with the substrates casein and gelatin in the presence of Ca+2. The LipM lipase had a maximum activity at 25 °C and a broad pH optimum ranging from 7.0 to 10. It exhibited the highest activity, in the presence of Ca+2, on substrates with long-chain fatty acid residues. These results confirm the spoilage potential of strain 041 in milk due to, at least in part, these two enzymes. The work highlights the importance of studies of this kind with strains isolated in Brazil, which has a recent history on the implementation of the cold chain at the dairy farm.

  1. Role of a phenazine antibiotic from Pseudomonas fluorescens in biological control of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomashow, L S; Weller, D M

    1988-08-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 (NRRL B-15132) and its rifampin-resistant derivative 2-79RN10 are suppressive to take-all, a major root disease of wheat caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. Strain 2-79 produces the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylate, which is active in vitro against G. graminis var. tritici and other fungal root pathogens. Mutants defective in phenazine synthesis (Phz-) were generated by Tn5 insertion and then compared with the parental strain to determine the importance of the antibiotic in take-all suppression on wheat roots. Six independent, prototrophic Phz- mutants were noninhibitory to G. graminis var. tritici in vitro and provided significantly less control of take-all than strain 2-79 on wheat seedlings. Antibiotic synthesis, fungal inhibition in vitro, and suppression of take-all on wheat were coordinately restored in two mutants complemented with cloned DNA from a 2-79 genomic library. These mutants contained Tn5 insertions in adjacent EcoRI fragments in the 2-79 genome, and the restriction maps of the region flanking the insertions and the complementary DNA were colinear. These results indicate that sequences required for phenazine production were present in the cloned DNA and support the importance of the phenazine antibiotic in disease suppression in the rhizosphere.

  2. Milk-deteriorating exoenzymes from Pseudomonas fluorescens 041 isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maurilio L.; Pinto, Uelinton M.; Riedel, Katharina; Vanetti, Maria C.D.

    2015-01-01

    The practice of refrigerating raw milk at the farm has provided a selective advantage for psychrotrophic bacteria that produce heat-stable proteases and lipases causing severe quality problems to the dairy industry. In this work, a protease (AprX) and a lipase (LipM) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens 041, a highly proteolytic and lipolytic strain isolated from raw milk obtained from a Brazilian farm, have been purified and characterized. Both enzymes were purified as recombinant proteins from Escherichia coli . The AprX metalloprotease exhibited activity in a broad temperature range, including refrigeration, with a maximum activity at 37 °C. It was active in a pH range of 4.0 to 9.0. This protease had maximum activity with the substrates casein and gelatin in the presence of Ca +2 . The LipM lipase had a maximum activity at 25 °C and a broad pH optimum ranging from 7.0 to 10. It exhibited the highest activity, in the presence of Ca +2 , on substrates with long-chain fatty acid residues. These results confirm the spoilage potential of strain 041 in milk due to, at least in part, these two enzymes. The work highlights the importance of studies of this kind with strains isolated in Brazil, which has a recent history on the implementation of the cold chain at the dairy farm. PMID:26221110

  3. CB1 Knockout Mice Unveil Sustained CB2-Mediated Antiallodynic Effects of the Mixed CB1/CB2 Agonist CP55,940 in a Mouse Model of Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liting; Cornett, Benjamin L; Mackie, Ken; Hohmann, Andrea G

    2015-07-01

    Cannabinoids suppress neuropathic pain through activation of cannabinoid CB1 and/or CB2 receptors; however, unwanted CB1-mediated cannabimimetic effects limit clinical use. We asked whether CP55,940 [(-)-3-[2-hydroxy-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-4-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexanol], a potent cannabinoid that binds with similar affinity to CB1 and CB2 in vitro, produces functionally separable CB1- and CB2-mediated pharmacological effects in vivo. We evaluated antiallodynic effects, possible tolerance, and cannabimimetic effects (e.g., hypothermia, catalepsy, CB1-dependent withdrawal signs) after systemic CP55,940 treatment in a mouse model of toxic neuropathy produced by a chemotherapeutic agent, paclitaxel. The contribution of CB1 and CB2 receptors to in vivo actions of CP55,940 was evaluated using CB1 knockout (KO), CB2KO, and wild-type (WT) mice. Low-dose CP55,940 (0.3 mg/kg daily, i.p. ) suppressed paclitaxel-induced allodynia in WT and CB2KO mice, but not CB1KO mice. Low-dose CP55,940 also produced hypothermia and rimonabant-precipitated withdrawal in WT, but not CB1KO, mice. In WT mice, tolerance developed to CB1-mediated hypothermic effects of CP55,940 earlier than to antiallodynic effects. High-dose CP55,940 (10 mg/kg daily, i.p.) produced catalepsy in WT mice, which precluded determination of antiallodynic efficacy but produced sustained CB2-mediated suppression of paclitaxel-induced allodynia in CB1KO mice; these antiallodynic effects were blocked by the CB2 antagonist 6-iodopravadoline (AM630). High-dose CP55,940 did not produce hypothermia or rimonabant-precipitated withdrawal in CB1KO mice. Our results using the mixed CB1/CB2 agonist CP55,940 document that CB1 and CB2 receptor activations produce mechanistically distinct suppression of neuropathic pain. Our study highlights the therapeutic potential of targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors to bypass unwanted central effects associated with CB1 receptor activation.

  4. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Can Produce a Second Flagellar Apparatus, Which Is Important for Plant Root Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Muriel, Candela; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The genomic sequence of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of a 41 kb cluster of genes that encode the production of a second flagellar apparatus. Among 2,535 pseudomonads strains with sequenced genomes, these genes are only present in the genomes of F113 and other six strains, all but one belonging to the P. fluorescens cluster of species, in the form of a genetic island. The genes are homologous to the flagellar genes of the soil bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii. Regulation of these genes is mediated by the flhDC master operon, instead of the typical regulation in pseudomonads, which is through fleQ. Under laboratory conditions, F113 does not produce this flagellum and the flhDC operon is not expressed. However, ectopic expression of the flhDC operon is enough for its production, resulting in a hypermotile strain. This flagellum is also produced under laboratory conditions by the kinB and algU mutants. Genetic analysis has shown that kinB strongly represses the expression of the flhDC operon. This operon is activated by the Vfr protein probably in a c-AMP dependent way. The strains producing this second flagellum are all hypermotile and present a tuft of polar flagella instead of the single polar flagellum produced by the wild-type strain. Phenotypic variants isolated from the rhizosphere produce this flagellum and mutation of the genes encoding it, results in a defect in competitive colonization, showing its importance for root colonization. PMID:27713729

  5. Beneficial effects of cannabinoids (CB) in a murine model of allergen-induced airway inflammation: role of CB1/CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Andrea; Engel, Tabea; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Zimmer, Andreas; Jakob, Thilo; Behrendt, Heidrun; Mempel, Martin

    2011-04-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) consists of two cannabinoid (CB) receptors, namely CB(1) and CB(2) receptor, and their endogenous (endocannabinoids) and exogenous (cannabinoids, e.g. delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)) ligands which bind to these receptors. Based on studies suggesting a role of THC and the ECS in inflammation, the objective of this study was to examine their involvement in type I hypersensitivity using a murine model of allergic airway inflammation. THC treatment of C57BL/6 wildtype mice dramatically reduced airway inflammation as determined by significantly reduced total cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). These effects were greatest when mice were treated during both, the sensitization and the challenge phase. Furthermore, systemic immune responses were significantly suppressed in mice which received THC during sensitization phase. To investigate a role of CB(1/2) receptors in this setting, we used pharmacological blockade of CB(1) and/or CB(2) receptors by the selective antagonists and moreover CB(1)/CB(2) receptor double-knockout mice (CB(1)(-/-)/CB(2)(-/-)) and found neither significant changes in the cell patterns in BAL nor in immunoglobulin levels as compared to wildtype mice. Our results indicate that the activation of the ECS by applying the agonist THC is involved in the development of type I allergies. However, CB(1)/CB(2) receptor-independent signalling seems likely in the observed results.

  6. No apparent costs for facultative antibiotic production by the soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolina Garbeva

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many soil-inhabiting bacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites that can suppress microorganisms competing for the same resources. The production of antimicrobial compounds is expected to incur fitness costs for the producing bacteria. Such costs form the basis for models on the co-existence of antibiotic-producing and non-antibiotic producing strains. However, so far studies quantifying the costs of antibiotic production by bacteria are scarce. The current study reports on possible costs, for antibiotic production by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, a soil bacterium that is induced to produce a broad-spectrum antibiotic when it is confronted with non-related bacterial competitors or supernatants of their cultures. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured the possible cost of antibiotic production for Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 by monitoring changes in growth rate with and without induction of antibiotic production by supernatant of a bacterial competitor, namely Pedobacter sp.. Experiments were performed in liquid as well as on semi-solid media under nutrient-limited conditions that are expected to most clearly reveal fitness costs. Our results did not reveal any significant costs for production of antibiotics by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1. Comparison of growth rates of the antibiotic-producing wild-type cells with those of non-antibiotic producing mutants did not reveal costs of antibiotic production either. SIGNIFICANCE: Based on our findings we propose that the facultative production of antibiotics might not be selected to mitigate metabolic costs, but instead might be advantageous because it limits the risk of competitors evolving resistance, or even the risk of competitors feeding on the compounds produced.

  7. Relative importance of fluorescent siderophores and other factors in biological control of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici by Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 and M4-80R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, H; Weller, D M; Thomashow, L S

    1991-11-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 2-79 suppresses take-all, a major root disease of wheat caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici. The bacteria produce an antibiotic, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), and a fluorescent pyoverdin siderophore. Previous studies have established that PCA has an important role in the biological control of take-all but that antibiotic production does not account fully for the suppressiveness of the strain. To define the role of the pyoverdin siderophore more precisely, mutants deficient in production of the antibiotic, the siderophore, or both factors were constructed and compared with the parental strain for control of take-all on wheat roots. In all cases, strains that produced PCA were more suppressive than those that did not, and pyoverdin-deficient mutant derivatives controlled take-all as effectively as their respective fluorescent parental strains. Thus, the phenazine antibiotic was the dominant factor in disease suppression and the fluorescent siderophore had little or no role. The siderophore also was of minor importance in a second strain, P. fluorescens M4-80R, that does not produce PCA. Strains 2-79 and M4-80R both produced substances distinct from the pyoverdin siderophore that were responsible for fungal inhibition in vitro under iron limitation, but these substances also had, at most, a minor role in disease suppression in situ.

  8. Brain CB2 Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Michelle; Finn, David P

    2010-01-01

    Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB2 receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB2 receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB1 receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB2 receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB2 receptor expression in the brain is enhanced and CB2 receptor agonists exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. These findings have prompted research into the CB2 receptor as a possible target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Neuroinflammatory alterations are also associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and polymorphisms in the CB2 gene have been reported in depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. This review will examine the evidence to date for a role of brain CB2 receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:27713365

  9. Brain CB2 Receptors: Implications for Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Roche

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Although previously thought of as the peripheral cannabinoid receptor, it is now accepted that the CB2 receptor is expressed in the central nervous system on microglia, astrocytes and subpopulations of neurons. Expression of the CB2 receptor in the brain is significantly lower than that of the CB1 receptor. Conflicting findings have been reported on the neurological effects of pharmacological agents targeting the CB2 receptor under normal conditions. Under inflammatory conditions, CB2 receptor expression in the brain is enhanced and CB2 receptor agonists exhibit potent anti-inflammatory effects. These findings have prompted research into the CB2 receptor as a possible target for the treatment of neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Neuroinflammatory alterations are also associated with neuropsychiatric disorders and polymorphisms in the CB2 gene have been reported in depression, eating disorders and schizophrenia. This review will examine the evidence to date for a role of brain CB2 receptors in neuropsychiatric disorders.

  10. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmöle, Anne-Caroline; Lundt, Ramona; Gennequin, Benjamin; Schrage, Hanna; Beins, Eva; Krämer, Alexandra; Zimmer, Till; Limmer, Andreas; Zimmer, Andreas; Otte, David-Marian

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2). As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg) to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  11. Expression Analysis of CB2-GFP BAC Transgenic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Caroline Schmöle

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system (ECS is a retrograde messenger system, consisting of lipid signaling molecules that bind to at least two G-protein-coupled receptors, Cannabinoid receptor 1 and 2 (CB1 and 2. As CB2 is primarily expressed on immune cells such as B cells, T cells, macrophages, dendritic cells, and microglia, it is of great interest how CB2 contributes to immune cell development and function in health and disease. Here, understanding the mechanisms of CB2 involvement in immune-cell function as well as the trafficking and regulation of CB2 expressing cells are crucial issues. Up to now, CB2 antibodies produce unclear results, especially those targeting the murine protein. Therefore, we have generated BAC transgenic GFP reporter mice (CB2-GFPTg to trace CB2 expression in vitro and in situ. Those mice express GFP under the CB2 promoter and display GFP expression paralleling CB2 expression on the transcript level in spleen, thymus and brain tissue. Furthermore, by using fluorescence techniques we show that the major sources for GFP-CB2 expression are B cells in spleen and blood and microglia in the brain. This novel CB2-GFP transgenic reporter mouse line represents a powerful resource to study CB2 expression in different cell types. Furthermore, it could be used for analyzing CB2-mediated mobilization and trafficking of immune cells as well as studying the fate of recruited immune cells in models of acute and chronic inflammation.

  12. Genomics-Guided Discovery of Traits Contributing to Interactions of Pseudomonas fluorescens with Other Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and the production of structurally diverse, bioactive secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity di...

  13. Genome Sequence of the Banana Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PS006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamez, Rocío M; Rodríguez, Fernando; Ramírez, Sandra; Gómez, Yolanda; Agarwala, Richa; Landsman, David; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo

    2016-05-05

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR). We report here the first whole-genome sequence of PGPR P. fluorescens evaluated in Colombian banana plants. The genome sequences contains genes involved in plant growth and defense, including bacteriocins, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, and genes that provide resistance to toxic compounds.

  14. Inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens on meat surfaces.

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, P V; di Paola, G N; Pasetti, M F; Manghi, M A

    1995-01-01

    An inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed for Pseudomonas fluorescens enumeration of meat surfaces. The assay detected contamination levels as low as 3 x 10(5) bacteria per ml and could be completed within 4 h. It could be used as a framework for a test system for quantifying P. fluorescens spoilage in meat products.

  15. Ultrapure ajulemic acid has improved CB2 selectivity with reduced CB1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Mark A; Zurier, Robert B; Burstein, Sumner H

    2014-07-01

    Ajulemic acid, a side-chain analog of Δ(8)-THC-11-oic acid, was designed as a potent therapeutic agent free of the psychotropic adverse effects typical of most cannabinoids. Subsequent studies of ajulemic acid have yielded widely divergent findings on the occurrence of these adverse effects. To help resolve these discrepancies, we have prepared highly purified ajulemic acid using a different synthetic method than previously reported in the literature and compared its cannabinoid receptor binding constants with those obtained using several other preparations from different sources. Whereas CB2 binding did not vary greatly among all of the samples, the CB1 binding showed a wide range of affinities. The highly purified product (JBT-101) reported here had the weakest affinity for CB1 while the original preparation (HU-239) showed the strongest affinity for CB1. The CB1/CB2 ratio of affinities was 12.3 for JBT-101 whereas that for HU-239 was 0.19, a 65-fold difference. Functional responses such as catalepsy and hypothermia using JBT-101 versus HU-239 displayed reduced CB1 activity in keeping with the receptor binding data. Thus, earlier conclusions on the limited therapeutic index for ajulemic acid need to be reconsidered in the light of the data now obtained using JBT-101.

  16. Development and characterization of immobilized cannabinoid receptor (CB1/CB2) open tubular column for on-line screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaddel, R; Rosenberg, A; Spelman, K; Frazier, J; Frazier, C; Nocerino, S; Brizzi, A; Mugnaini, C; Wainer, I W

    2011-05-01

    Cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, are therapeutic targets in the treatment of anxiety, obesity, movement disorders, glaucoma, and pain. We have developed an on-line screening method for CB1 and CB2 ligands, where cellular membrane fragments of a chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line, KU-812, were immobilized onto the surface of an open tubular (OT) capillary to create a CB1/CB2-OT column. The binding activities of the immobilized CB1/CB2 receptors were established using frontal affinity chromatographic techniques. This is the first report that confirms the presence of functional CB1 and CB2 receptors on KU-812 cells. The data from this study confirm that the CB1/CB2-OT column can be used to determine the binding affinities (K(i) values) for a single compound and to screen individual compounds or a mixture of multiple compounds. The CB1/CB2-OT column was also used to screen a botanical matrix, Zanthoxylum clava-herculis, where preliminary results suggest the presence of a high-affinity phytocannabinoid.

  17. Role of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the development of joint pain induced by monosodium iodoacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Porta, Carmen; Bura, Simona Andreea; Aracil-Fernández, Auxiliadora; Manzanares, Jorge; Maldonado, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Joint pain is a common clinical problem for which both inflammatory and degenerative joint diseases are major causes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the behavioral, histological, and neurochemical alterations associated with joint pain. The murine model of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) was used to induce joint pain in knockout mice for CB1 (CB1KO) and CB2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2KO) and transgenic mice overexpressing CB2 receptors (CB2xP). In addition, we evaluated the changes induced by MIA in gene expression of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors in the lumbar spinal cord of these mice. Wild-type mice, as well as CB1KO, CB2KO, and CB2xP mice, developed mechanical allodynia in the ipsilateral paw after MIA intra-articular injection. CB1KO and CB2KO demonstrated similar levels of mechanical allodynia of that observed in wild-type mice in the ipsilateral paw, whereas allodynia was significantly attenuated in CB2xP. Interestingly, CB2KO displayed a contralateral mirror image of pain developing mechanical allodynia also in the contralateral paw. All mouse lines developed similar histological changes after MIA intra-articular injection. Nevertheless, MIA intra-articular injection produced specific changes in the expression of cannabinoid and opioid receptor genes in lumbar spinal cord sections that were further modulated by the genetic alteration of the cannabinoid receptor system. These results revealed that CB2 receptor plays a predominant role in the control of joint pain manifestations and is involved in the adaptive changes induced in the opioid system under this pain state.

  18. Cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulates axon guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duff, Gabriel; Argaw, Anteneh; Cecyre, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Navigation of retinal projections towards their targets is regulated by guidance molecules and growth cone transduction mechanisms. Here, we present in vitro and in vivo evidences that the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R) is expressed along the retino-thalamic pathway and exerts a modulatory action ...

  19. An alternative physiological role for the EmhABC efflux pump in Pseudomonas fluorescens cLP6a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebusuyi Abigail A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efflux pumps belonging to the resistance-nodulation-division (RND superfamily in bacteria are involved in antibiotic resistance and solvent tolerance but have an unknown physiological role. EmhABC, a RND-type efflux pump in Pseudomonas fluorescens strain cLP6a, extrudes hydrophobic antibiotics, dyes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons including phenanthrene. The effects of physico-chemical factors such as temperature or antibiotics on the activity and expression of EmhABC were determined in order to deduce its physiological role(s in strain cLP6a in comparison to the emhB disruptant strain, cLP6a-1. Results Efflux assays conducted with 14C-phenanthrene showed that EmhABC activity is affected by incubation temperature. Increased phenanthrene efflux was measured in cLP6a cells grown at 10°C and decreased efflux was observed at 35°C compared with cells grown at the optimum temperature of 28°C. Membrane fatty acids in cLP6a cells were substantially altered by changes in growth temperature and in the presence of tetracycline. Changed membrane fatty acids and increased membrane permeability were associated with ~30-fold increased expression of emhABC in cLP6a cells grown at 35°C, and with increased extracellular free fatty acids. Growth of P. fluorescens cLP6a at supra-optimal temperature was enhanced by the presence of EmhABC compared to strain cLP6a-1. Conclusions Combined, these observations suggest that the EmhABC efflux pump may be involved in the management of membrane stress effects such as those due to unfavourable incubation temperatures. Efflux of fatty acids replaced as a result of membrane damage or phospholipid turnover may be the primary physiological role of the EmhABC efflux pump in P. fluorescens cLP6a.

  20. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  1. Iron-regulated metabolites produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting induced systemic resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djavaheri, Mohammad; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús; Versluis, C; Meyer, J-M; Loon, L C; Bakker, Peter A H M

    2012-09-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r produces several iron-regulated metabolites, including the fluorescent siderophore pseudobactin (Psb374), salicylic acid (SA), and pseudomonine (Psm), a siderophore that contains a SA moiety. After purification of Psb374 from culture supernatant of WCS374r, its structure was determined following isoelectrofocusing and tandem mass spectrometry, and found to be identical to the fluorescent siderophore produced by P. fluorescens ATCC 13525. To study the role of SA and Psm production in colonization of Arabidopsis thaliana roots and in induced systemic resistance (ISR) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) by strain WCS374r, mutants disrupted in the production of these metabolites were obtained by homologous recombination. These mutants were further subjected to transposon Tn5 mutagenesis to generate mutants also deficient in Psb374 production. The mutants behaved similar to the wild type in both their Arabidopsis rhizosphere-colonizing capacity and their ability to elicit ISR against Pst. We conclude that Psb374, SA, and Psm production by P. fluorescens WCS374r are not required for eliciting ISR in Arabidopsis.

  2. Investigating the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4 to reduce cadmium stress in Lactuca sativa via an intervention in the ethylene biosynthetic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Lucas J; Macfie, Sheila M

    2016-12-01

    A typical plant response to any biotic or abiotic stress, including cadmium (Cd), involves increased ethylene synthesis, which causes senescence of the affected plant part. Stressed plants can experience reduced ethylene and improved growth if they are inoculated with bacteria that have the enzyme ACC deaminase, which metabolizes the ethylene precursor ACC (1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate). We investigated whether one such bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens UW4, reduces the production of ethylene and improves the growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa) sown in Cd-contaminated potting material (PRO-MIX® BX). Plants were inoculated with the wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 or a mutant strain that cannot produce ACC deaminase. Cadmium-treated plants contained up to 50 times more Cd than did control plants. In noninoculated plants, Cd induced a 5-fold increase in ethylene concentration. The wild-type bacterium prevented Cd-induced reductions in root biomass but there was no relationship between Cd treatment and ethylene production in inoculated plants. In contrast, when the concentration of ethylene was plotted against the extent of bacterial colonization of the roots, increased colonization with wild-type P. fluorescens UW4 was associated with 20% less ethylene production. Ours is the first study to show that the protective effect of this bacterium is proportional to the quantity of bacteria on the root surface.

  3. Analysis of the draft genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC17400 indicates a capacity to take up iron from a wide range of sources, including different exogenous pyoverdines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lumeng; Matthijs, Sandra; Bodilis, Josselin; Hildebrand, Falk; Raes, Jeroen; Cornelis, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    All fluorescent pseudomonads (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. syringae and others) are known to produce the high-affinity peptidic yellow-green fluorescent siderophore pyoverdine. These siderophores have peptide chains that are quite diverse and more than 50 pyoverdine structures have been elucidated. In the majority of the cases, a Pseudomonas species is also able to produce a second siderophore of lower affinity for iron. Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 17400 has been shown to produce a unique second siderophore, (thio)quinolobactin, which has an antimicrobial activity against the phytopathogenic Oomycete Pythium debaryanum. We show that this strain has the capacity to utilize 16 different pyoverdines, suggesting the presence of several ferripyoverdine receptors. Analysis of the draft genome of P. fluorescens ATCC 17400 confirmed the presence of 55 TonB-dependent receptors, the largest so far for Pseudomonas, among which 15 are predicted to be ferripyoverdine receptors (Fpv). Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two different clades containing ferripyoverdine receptors, with sequences similar to the P. aeruginosa type II FpvA forming a separate cluster. Among the other receptors we confirmed the presence of the QbsI (thio)quinolobactin receptor, an ferri-achromobactin and an ornicorrugatin receptor, several catecholate and four putative heme receptors. Twenty five of the receptors genes were found to be associated with genes encoding extracytoplasmic sigma factors (ECF σ) and transmembrane anti-σ sensors.

  4. The sigma factor RpoS is required for stress tolerance and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockwell, Virginia O; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-09-01

    Many micro-organisms exist in natural habitats that are subject to severe or dramatically fluctuating environmental conditions. Such is the case for bacteria inhabiting plant surfaces, where they are exposed to UV irradiation, oxygen radicals, and large fluctuations in temperature and moisture. This study focuses on the role of RpoS, a central regulator of stationary-phase gene expression in bacterial cells, in stress response and environmental fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Strain Pf-5 is a rhizosphere-inhabiting bacterium that suppresses plant diseases caused by several plant-pathogenic fungi and oomycetes. Previous studies demonstrated that rpoS was required for osmotic and oxidative stress resistance of Pf-5. The results of this study demonstrate a role for rpoS in tolerance of Pf-5 to freezing, starvation, UV irradiation and desiccation stress. In field studies, an rpoS mutant was compromised in rhizosphere colonization of plants in dry soil, whereas similar rhizosphere populations were established by Pf-5 and an rpoS mutant in well-irrigated soils. RpoS is a key determinant in stress response and environmental fitness of the rhizosphere bacterium P. fluorescens Pf-5.

  5. The Effects of Targeted Deletion of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 on Intranasal Sensitization and Challenge with Adjuvant-Free Ovalbumin

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Barbara L. F.; Oberdick, Jody E.; Karmaus, Peer W. F.; Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Birmingham, Neil P.; Harkema, Jack R.; Kaminski, Norbert E.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 modulate immune function are not fully elucidated. Critical tools for the determination of the role of both receptors in the immune system are CB1/CB2 double null mice (CB1/CB2 null), and previous studies have shown that CB1/CB2 null mice exhibit exaggerated responses to various immunological stimuli. The objective of these studies was to determine the magnitude to which CB1/CB2 null mice responded to the respiratory allergen ovalbumin...

  6. Attenuation of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Ahmet; Yildirim, Kemal; Ozdemir, Ercan; Bagcivan, Ihsan; Gursoy, Sinan; Durmus, Nedim

    2015-09-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists may be useful for their potential to increase or prolong opioid analgesia while attenuating the development of opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AM251 (a selective CB1 antagonist) and JTE907 (a selective CB2 antagonist) on morphine analgesia and tolerance in rats. Adult male Wistar albino rats weighing 205-225 g were used in these experiments. To constitute morphine tolerance, we used a 3 day cumulative dosing regimen. After the last dose of morphine was injected on day 4, morphine tolerance was evaluated by analgesia tests. The analgesic effects of morphine (5 mg/kg), ACEA (a CB1 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), JWH-015 (a CB2 receptor agonist, 5 mg/kg), AM251 (1 mg/kg) and JTE907 (5 mg/kg) were considered at 30-min intervals (0, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min) by tail-flick and hot-plate analgesia tests. Our findings indicate that ACEA and JWH907 significantly increased morphine analgesia and morphine antinociceptive tolerance in the analgesia tests. In contrast, the data suggested that AM251 and JTE907 significantly attenuated the expression of morphine tolerance. In conclusion, we observed that co-injection of AM251 and JTE907 with morphine attenuated expression of tolerance to morphine analgesic effects and decreased the morphine analgesia.

  7. Endocannabinoid CB1 antagonists inhibit hepatitis C virus production, providing a novel class of antiviral host-targeting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi, Mahsa; Tay, Enoch S E; Read, Scott A; Ramezani-Moghadam, Mehdi; Chayama, Kazuaki; George, Jacob; Douglas, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Direct-acting antivirals have significantly improved treatment outcomes in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), but side effects, drug resistance and cost mean that better treatments are still needed. Lipid metabolism is closely linked with hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication, and endocannabinoids are major regulators of lipid homeostasis. The cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor mediates these effects in the liver. We have previously shown upregulation of CB1 receptors in the livers of patients with CHC, and in a HCV cell-culture model. Here, we investigated whether CB1 blockade inhibited HCV replication. The antiviral effect of a CB1 antagonist, N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251), was examined in HCV strain JFH1 cell-culture and subgenomic replicon models. The effects on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism were also measured. CB1 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) was used to confirm that the effects were specific for the cannabinoid receptor. Treatment with AM251 strongly inhibited HCV RNA (~70 %), viral protein (~80 %), the production of new virus particles (~70 %) and virus infectivity (~90 %). As expected, AM251 reduced the expression of pro-lipogenic genes (SREBP-1c, FASN, SCD1 and ACC1) and stimulated genes promoting lipid oxidation (CPT1 and PPARα). This effect was mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Stable CB1 knockdown of cells infected with HCV showed reduced levels of HCV RNA compared with controls. Thus, reduced CB1 signalling inhibits HCV replication using either pharmacological inhibitors or CB1 shRNA. This may be due, at least in part, to reduced lipogenesis, mediated by AMPK activation. We suggest that CB1 antagonists may represent an entirely new class of drug with activity against HCV.

  8. Semi-scale production of PHAs from waste frying oil by Pseudomonas fluorescens S48

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawia F. Gamal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed at developing a strategy to improve the volumetric production of PHAs by Pseudomonas fluorescens S48 using waste frying oil (WFO as the sole carbon source. For this purpose, several cultivations were set up to steadily improve nutrients supply to attain high cell density and high biopolymer productivity. The production of PHAs was examined in a 14 L bioreactor as one-stage batch, two-stage batch, and high-cell-density fed-batch cultures. The highest value of polymer content in one-stage bioreactor was obtained after 60 h (33.7%. Whereas, the two-stage batch culture increased the polymer content to 50.1% after 54 h. High-cell-density (0.64 g/L at continuous feeding rate 0.55 mL/l/h of WFO recorded the highest polymer content after 54 h (55.34%. Semi-scale application (10 L working volume increased the polymer content in one-stage batch, two-stage batch and high cell density fed-batch cultures by about 12.3%, 5.8% and 11.3%, respectively, as compared with that obtained in 2 L fermentation culture. Six different methods for biopolymer extraction were done to investigate their efficiency for optimum polymer recovery. The maximum efficiency of solvent recovery of PHA was attained by chloroform-hypochlorite dispersion extraction. Gas chromatography (GC analysis of biopolymer produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens S48 indicated that it solely composed of 3-hydrobutyric acid (98.7%. A bioplastic film was prepared from the obtained PHB. The isolate studied shares the same identical sequence, which is nearly the complete 16S rRNA gene. The identity of this sequence to the closest pseudomonads strains is about 98-99%. It was probably closely related to support another meaningful parsiomony analysis and construction of a phylogenetic tree. The isolate is so close to Egyptian strain named EG 639838.

  9. Interaction between Medicago truncatula and Pseudomonas fluorescens: evaluation of costs and benefits across an elevated atmospheric CO(2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Lepinay

    Full Text Available Soil microorganisms play a key role in both plants nutrition and health. Their relation with plant varies from mutualism to parasitism, according to the balance of costs and benefits for the two partners of the interaction. These interactions involved the liberation of plant organic compounds via rhizodeposition. Modification of atmospheric CO(2 concentration may affect rhizodeposition and as a consequence trophic interactions that bind plants and microorganisms. Positive effect of elevated CO(2 on plants are rather well known but consequences for micoorganisms and their interactions with plants are still poorly understood. A gnotobiotic system has been developed to study the interaction between Medicago truncatula Jemalong J5 and the mutualistic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 under two atmospheric CO(2 concentrations: ambient (365 ppm versus enriched (750 ppm. Costs and benefits for each partner have been determined over time by measuring plant development and growth, the C and N contents of the various plant parts and the density of the bacteria in rhizosphere compartments. Following the increase in CO(2, there was a beneficial effect of P. fluorescens C7R12 on development, vegetative growth, and C/N content of M. truncatula. Concerning plant reproduction, an early seed production was noticed in presence of the bacterial strain combined with increased atmospheric CO(2 conditions. Paradoxically, this transient increase in seed production was correlated with a decrease in bacterial density in the rhizosphere soil, revealing a cost of increased CO(2 for the bacterial strain. This shift of costs-benefits ratio disappeared later during the plant growth. In conclusion, the increase in CO(2 concentration modifies transiently the cost-benefit balance in favor of the plant. These results may be explained either by a competition between the two partners or a change in bacterial physiology. The ecosystem functioning depends on the

  10. Interaction between Medicago truncatula and Pseudomonas fluorescens: evaluation of costs and benefits across an elevated atmospheric CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepinay, Clémentine; Rigaud, Thierry; Salon, Christophe; Lemanceau, Philippe; Mougel, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soil microorganisms play a key role in both plants nutrition and health. Their relation with plant varies from mutualism to parasitism, according to the balance of costs and benefits for the two partners of the interaction. These interactions involved the liberation of plant organic compounds via rhizodeposition. Modification of atmospheric CO(2) concentration may affect rhizodeposition and as a consequence trophic interactions that bind plants and microorganisms. Positive effect of elevated CO(2) on plants are rather well known but consequences for micoorganisms and their interactions with plants are still poorly understood. A gnotobiotic system has been developed to study the interaction between Medicago truncatula Jemalong J5 and the mutualistic bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens strain C7R12 under two atmospheric CO(2) concentrations: ambient (365 ppm) versus enriched (750 ppm). Costs and benefits for each partner have been determined over time by measuring plant development and growth, the C and N contents of the various plant parts and the density of the bacteria in rhizosphere compartments. Following the increase in CO(2), there was a beneficial effect of P. fluorescens C7R12 on development, vegetative growth, and C/N content of M. truncatula. Concerning plant reproduction, an early seed production was noticed in presence of the bacterial strain combined with increased atmospheric CO(2) conditions. Paradoxically, this transient increase in seed production was correlated with a decrease in bacterial density in the rhizosphere soil, revealing a cost of increased CO(2) for the bacterial strain. This shift of costs-benefits ratio disappeared later during the plant growth. In conclusion, the increase in CO(2) concentration modifies transiently the cost-benefit balance in favor of the plant. These results may be explained either by a competition between the two partners or a change in bacterial physiology. The ecosystem functioning depends on the stability of many

  11. The mycorrhiza helper Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 has a specific priming effect on the growth, morphology and gene expression of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Palin, B; Delaruelle, C; Peter, M; Kohler, A; Pierrat, J C; Sarniguet, A; Garbaye, J; Martin, F; Frey-Klett, P

    2007-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 promotes the presymbiotic survival and growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N in the soil. An in vitro fungal-bacterial confrontation bioassay mimicking the promoting effects of the bacteria on fungal growth was set up to analyse the fungal morphological and transcriptional changes induced by the helper bacteria at three successive stages of the interaction. The specificity of the P. fluorescens BBc6R8 effect was assessed in comparison with six other rhizobacterial strains possessing mycorrhiza helper or pathogen antagonistic abilities. The helper BBc6R8 strain was the only strain to induce increases in the radial growth of the colony, hyphal apex density and branching angle. These morphological modifications were coupled with pleiotropic alterations of the fungal transcriptome, which varied throughout the interaction. Early stage-responsive genes were presumably involved in recognition processes and transcription regulation, while late stage-responsive genes encoded proteins of primary metabolism. Some of the responsive genes were partly specific to the interaction with P. fluorescens BBc6R8, whereas others were mutually regulated by different rhizobacteria. The results highlight the fact that the helper BBc6R8 strain has a specific priming effect on growth, morphology and gene expression of its fungal associate L. bicolor S238N.

  12. Binding thermodynamics at the human cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merighi, Stefania; Simioni, Carolina; Gessi, Stefania; Varani, Katia; Borea, Pier Andrea

    2010-02-01

    The thermodynamic parameters DeltaG degrees , DeltaH degrees and DeltaS degrees of the binding equilibrium of agonists and antagonists at cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors were determined by means of affinity measurements at different temperatures and van't Hoff plots were constructed. Affinity constants were measured on CHO cells transfected with the human CB(1) and CB(2) receptors by inhibition assays of the binding of the cannabinoid receptor agonist [(3)H]-CP-55,940. van't Hoff plots were linear for agonists and antagonists in the temperature range 0-30 degrees C. The thermodynamic parameters for CB(1) receptors fall in the ranges 17< or =DeltaH degrees < or =59 kJ/mol and 213< or =DeltaS degrees < or =361 kJ/mol for agonists and -52< or =DeltaH degrees < or =-26 kJ/mol and -12< or =DeltaS degrees < or =38 kJ/mol for antagonists. The thermodynamic parameters for CB(2) receptors fall in the ranges 27< or =DeltaH degrees < or =48 kJ/mol and 234< or =DeltaS degrees < or =300 kJ/mol for agonists and -19< or =DeltaH degrees < or =-17 kJ/mol and 43< or =DeltaS degrees < or =74 kJ/mol for antagonists. Collectively, these data show that agonist binding is always totally entropy-driven while antagonist binding is enthalpy and entropy-driven, indicating that CB(1) and CB(2) receptors are thermodynamically discriminated. These data could give new details on the nature of the forces driving the CB(1) and CB(2) binding at a molecular level. Enthalpy, entropy, free energy and binding affinity for each ligand to its receptor can all be assessed and therefore the optimal binding profile discovered. Carrying out these binding investigations as early as possible in the discovery process increases the probability that a lead compound will become a successful pharmaceutical compound.

  13. Detection of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 within basal ganglia output neurons in macaques: changes following experimental parkinsonism

    OpenAIRE

    S. Sierra; Luquin, N. (Natasha); Rico, A.J. (Alberto J.); Gomez-Bautista, V. (V.); Roda, E.; Dopeso-Reyes, I. G.; Vazquez, A.; Martinez-Pinilla, E. (Eva); Labandeira-Garcia, J.L. (José L.); Franco, R; J.L. Lanciego

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1- Rs) are expressed abundantly throughout the brain, the presence of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2Rs) in neurons is still somewhat controversial. Taking advantage of newly designed CB1R and CB2R mRNA riboprobes, we demonstrate by PCR and in situ hybridization that transcripts for both cannabinoid receptors are present within labeled pallidothalamic-projecting neurons of control and MPTP-treated macaques, whereas th...

  14. The Expression Level of CB1 and CB2 Receptors Determines Their Efficacy at Inducing Apoptosis in Astrocytomas

    OpenAIRE

    Eiron Cudaback; William Marrs; Thomas Moeller; Nephi Stella

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids represent unique compounds for treating tumors, including astrocytomas. Whether CB(1) and CB(2) receptors mediate this therapeutic effect is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated astrocytoma subclones that express set levels of CB(1) and CB(2), and found that cannabinoids induce apoptosis only in cells expressing low levels of receptors that couple to ERK1/2. In contrast, cannabinoids do not induce apoptosis in cells expressing high levels of receptors because the...

  15. Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators: Cannabinoid Receptor Inverse Agonists with Differential CB1 and CB2 Selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Lirit N.; Ford, Benjamin M.; Prather, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are used to treat estrogen receptor (ER)-positive breast cancer and osteoporosis. Interestingly, tamoxifen and newer classes of SERMs also exhibit cytotoxic effects in cancers devoid of ERs, indicating a non-estrogenic mechanism of action. Indicative of a potential ER-independent target, reports demonstrate that tamoxifen binds to cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) with affinity in the low μM range and acts as an inverse agonist. To identify cannabinoids with improved pharmacological properties relative to tamoxifen, and further investigate the use of different SERM scaffolds for future cannabinoid drug development, this study characterized the affinity and activity of SERMs in newer structural classes at CBRs. Fourteen SERMs from five structurally distinct classes were screened for binding to human CBRs. Compounds from four of five SERM classes examined bound to CBRs. Subsequent studies fully characterized CBR affinity and activity of one compound from each class. Ospemifine (a triphenylethylene) selectively bound to CB1Rs, while bazedoxifine (an indole) bound to CB2Rs with highest affinity. Nafoxidine (a tetrahydronaphthalene) and raloxifene (RAL; a benzothiaphene) bound to CB1 and CB2Rs non-selectively. All four compounds acted as inverse agonists at CB1 and CB2Rs, reducing basal G-protein activity with IC50 values in the nM to low μM range. Ospemifine, bazedoxifene and RAL also acted as inverse agonists to elevate basal intracellular cAMP levels in intact CHO-hCB2 cells. The four SERMs examined also acted as CB1 and CB2R antagonists in the cAMP assay, producing rightward shifts in the concentration-effect curve of the CBR agonist CP-55,940. In conclusion, newer classes of SERMs exhibit improved pharmacological characteristics (e.g., in CBR affinity and selectivity) relative to initial studies with tamoxifen, and thus suggest that different SERM scaffolds may be useful for development of safe and selective drugs acting

  16. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleftheria Lakiotaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2, their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids, and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins’ expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n=43 and malignant (n=44 lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells’ proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p=0.0010 and p=0.0005, resp.. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p=0.0097 and p=0.0110, resp.. In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p=0.0301. Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p=0.1165, lymphatic (p=0.1989, and vascular invasion (p=0.0555, as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p=0.1165, at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  17. Clinical Significance of Cannabinoid Receptors CB1 and CB2 Expression in Human Malignant and Benign Thyroid Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakiotaki, Eleftheria; Giaginis, Constantinos; Tolia, Maria; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Delladetsima, Ioanna; Giannopoulou, Ioanna; Kyrgias, George; Patsouris, Efstratios; Theocharis, Stamatios

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is comprised of cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), their endogenous ligands (endocannabinoids), and proteins responsible for their metabolism participate in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of CB1 and CB2 expression in human benign and malignant thyroid lesions. CB1 and CB2 proteins' expression was assessed immunohistochemically on paraffin-embedded thyroid tissues obtained from 87 patients with benign (n = 43) and malignant (n = 44) lesions and was statistically analyzed with clinicopathological parameters, follicular cells' proliferative capacity, and risk of recurrence rate estimated according to the American Thyroid Association (ATA) staging system. Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was significantly more frequently observed in malignant compared to benign thyroid lesions (p = 0.0010 and p = 0.0005, resp.). Enhanced CB1 and CB2 expression was also significantly more frequently observed in papillary carcinomas compared to hyperplastic nodules (p = 0.0097 and p = 0.0110, resp.). In malignant thyroid lesions, elevated CB2 expression was significantly associated with the presence of lymph node metastases (p = 0.0301). Enhanced CB2 expression was also more frequently observed in malignant thyroid cases with presence of capsular (p = 0.1165), lymphatic (p = 0.1989), and vascular invasion (p = 0.0555), as well as in those with increased risk of recurrence rate (p = 0.1165), at a nonsignificant level though, whereas CB1 expression was not associated with any of the clinicopathological parameters examined. Our data suggest that CB receptors may be involved in malignant thyroid transformation and especially CB2 receptor could serve as useful biomarker and potential therapeutic target in thyroid neoplasia.

  18. CB5C affects the glucosinolate profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vik, Daniel; Crocoll, Christoph; Andersen, Tonni Grube

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome b5 (CB5) proteins are small heme-binding proteins, that influence cytochrome P450 activity. While only one CB5 isoform is found in mammals, higher plants have several isoforms of these proteins. The roles of the many CB5 isoforms in plants remain unknown. We hypothesized that CB5...... proteins support the cytochrome P450 enzymes of plant specialized metabolism and found CB5C from Arabidopsis thaliana to co-express with glucosinolate biosynthetic genes. We characterized the glucosinolate profiles of two T-DNA insertion mutants of CB5C, and found that long-chained aliphatic glucosinolates...... were reduced in one of the mutant lines - a phenotype that was exaggerated upon methyl-jasmonate treatment. These results support the hypothesis, that CB5C influences glucosinolate biosynthesis, however, the mode of action remains unknown. Furthermore, the mutants differed in their biomass response...

  19. Role of respiratory nitrate reductase in ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 to colonize the rhizosphere of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglione, J F; Gourbiere, F; Potier, P; Philippot, L; Lensi, R

    2000-09-01

    Selection of the denitrifying community by plant roots (i.e., increase in the denitrifier/total heterotroph ratio in the rhizosphere) has been reported by several authors. However, very few studies to evaluate the role of the denitrifying function itself in the selection of microorganisms in the rhizosphere have been performed. In the present study, we compared the rhizosphere survival of the denitrifying Pseudomonas fluorescens YT101 strain with that of its isogenic mutant deficient in the ability to synthesize the respiratory nitrate reductase, coinoculated in nonplanted or planted soil. We demonstrated that under nonlimiting nitrate conditions, the denitrifying wild-type strain had an advantage in the ability to colonize the rhizosphere of maize. Investigations of the effect of the inoculum characteristics (density of the total inoculum and relative proportions of mutant and wild-type strains) on the outcome of the selection demonstrated that the selective effect of the plant was expressed only during the phase of bacterial multiplication and that the intensity of selection was dependent on the magnitude of this phase. Moreover, application of the de Wit replacement series technique to our results suggests that the advantage of the wild-type strain was maximal when the ratio between the two strains in the inoculum was close to 1:1. This work constitutes the first direct demonstration that the presence of a functional structural gene encoding the respiratory nitrate reductase confers higher rhizosphere competence to a microorganism.

  20. Elucidation of the Vibrio anguillarum genetic response to the potential fish probiont Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2, using RNA-arbitrarily primed PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrøm, Kim; Gram, Lone

    2003-01-01

    with the iron chelator 2,2-dipyridyl. A chromosomal transcript homologous to vibE that participates in vibriobactin synthesis in Vibrio cholerae was also upregulated during AH2 exposure. This transcript could represent a functionally active gene in V. anguillarum involved in biosynthesis of anguibactin......The antagonistic interaction between a potential fish probiont, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain AH2, and its target organism, Vibrio anguillarum, was investigated by studying the genetic response of the target organism when it was exposed to the antagonist. We compared the differential display...

  1. Crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of cumene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuesong; Fushinobu, Shinya; Fukuda, Eriko; Terada, Tohru; Nakamura, Shugo; Shimizu, Kentaro; Nojiri, Hideaki; Omori, Toshio; Shoun, Hirofumi; Wakagi, Takayoshi

    2005-04-01

    The crystal structure of the terminal component of the cumene dioxygenase multicomponent enzyme system of Pseudomonas fluorescens IP01 (CumDO) was determined at a resolution of 2.2 A by means of molecular replacement by using the crystal structure of the terminal oxygenase component of naphthalene dioxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain NCIB 9816-4 (NphDO). The ligation of the two catalytic centers of CumDO (i.e., the nonheme iron and Rieske [2Fe-2S] centers) and the bridging between them in neighboring catalytic subunits by hydrogen bonds through a single amino acid residue, Asp231, are similar to those of NphDO. An unidentified external ligand, possibly dioxygen, was bound at the active site nonheme iron. The entrance to the active site of CumDO is different from the entrance to the active site of NphDO, as the two loops forming the lid exhibit great deviation. On the basis of the complex structure of NphDO, a biphenyl substrate was modeled in the substrate-binding pocket of CumDO. The residues surrounding the modeled biphenyl molecule include residues that have already been shown to be important for its substrate specificity by a number of engineering studies of biphenyl dioxygenases.

  2. Multi-strain co-cultures surpass blends for broad spectrum biological control of maladies of potatoes in storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 have been documented to suppress four important problems in potato storages — dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. This research investigates the efficacy and consistency of strain mixtures produced by co-culturing strains t...

  3. Sources of phosphorus associated inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens in development and maize yieldFontes de fósforo associadas à inoculação com Pseudomonas fluorescens no desenvolvimento e produtividade do milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pinceli Chaves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The increased use of fertilizers to raise phosphorus availability to plants has promoted a strong economic impact on agriculture. For the better efficiency of use of phosphate fertilizers, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of P sources linked to inoculation with Pseudomonas fluorescens via seeds, in the development and yield components of corn plants. The experiment was conducted in the field, in 6x2 factorial, in randomized block design with four replications. Were applied 120 kg ha-1 P in the soil through five sources: triple superphosphate (SFT, Gafsa rock phosphate, Itafos rock phosphate, SFT+Gafsa and SFT+Itafos, and a control treatment (no P. The seeds of the cultivar AG 8088 were subjected to inoculation or not with the Pseudomonas fluorescens strain 1008. The variables studied in the flowering were: plant height (AP, height of ear insertion (AIE, stem diameter (DC, leaf area AF, leaf dry mass (MSF, total dry weight (MST and leaf P content (PF. At harvest, there was the assessment of yield components: number of kernels per ear (NG, weight of 100 grains (M100, P content in grain (PG, yield (PROD, harvest index (IC and relative agronomic effectiveness (EAR. The inoculation with P. fluorescens to seeds increased the AIE and AP when used SFT. At control the rhizobacteria inoculation resulted in 87% of EAR. The applications of SFT and SFT+Itafos and SFT+Gafsa can be an alternative to farming systems, aiming to lower use of acidulated phosphate. The yield performance of corn was not altered by the P sources and levels of inoculation with P. fluorescens. A utilização crescente de fertilizantes para elevar a disponibilidade de P para as plantas tem promovido um forte impacto econômico no setor agrícola. Visando a melhor eficiência do uso dos fertilizantes fosfatados, este estudo teve como objetivo avaliar o efeito de fontes de P associados à inoculação com Pseudomonas fluorescens via sementes, no desenvolvimento e nos componentes de

  4. Genetic characterization of psp encoding the DING protein in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue-Xian

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DING proteins constitute a conserved and broadly distributed set of proteins found in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals (including humans. Characterization of DING proteins from animal and plant tissues indicated ligand-binding ability suggesting a role for DING proteins in cell signaling and biomineralization. Surprisingly, the genes encoding DING proteins in eukaryotes have not been identified in the eukaryotic genome or EST databases. Recent discovery of a DING homologue (named Psp here in the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 provided a unique opportunity to investigate the physiological roles of DING proteins. P. fluorescens SBW25 is a model bacterium that can efficiently colonize plant surfaces and enhance plant health. In this report we genetically characterize Psp with a focus on conditions under which psp is expressed and the protein exported. Results Psp is closely related to the periplasmic Pi binding component of the ABC-type phosphate transporter system (Pst. psp is flanked by a gene cluster predicted to function as a type II protein secretion system (Hxc. Deletion analysis combined with chromosomally integrated 'lacZ fusions showed that both psp and pstC are induced by Pi limitation and that pstC is required for competitive growth of the bacterium in Pi limited medium. hxcR is not regulated by Pi limitation. Psp was detected (using anti-DING serum in the supernatant of wild-type culture but was greatly reduced in the supernatant of an isogenic strain carrying an hxcR mutation (ΔhxcR. A promoter fusion between hxcR and a promoterless copy of a gene ('dapB essential for growth in the plant environment showed that expression of hxcR is elevated during colonization of sugar beet seedlings. A similar analysis of psp showed that it is not induced in the plant environment. Conclusion Psp gene is expressed under conditions of Pi limitation. It is an exoprotein secreted mainly via the Hxc type II secretion

  5. A type VI secretion system is involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decoin, Victorien; Barbey, Corinne; Bergeau, Dorian; Latour, Xavier; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Merieau, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G) into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2), suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models), but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium), and our results suggest that there may be a connection between

  6. A type VI secretion system is involved in Pseudomonas fluorescens bacterial competition.

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    Victorien Decoin

    Full Text Available Protein secretion systems are crucial mediators of bacterial interactions with other organisms. Among them, the type VI secretion system (T6SS is widespread in Gram-negative bacteria and appears to inject toxins into competitor bacteria and/or eukaryotic cells. Major human pathogens, such as Vibrio cholerae, Burkholderia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, express T6SSs. Bacteria prevent self-intoxication by their own T6SS toxins by producing immunity proteins, which interact with the cognate toxins. We describe here an environmental P. fluorescens strain, MFE01, displaying an uncommon oversecretion of Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein and VgrG (valine-glycine repeat protein G into the culture medium. These proteins are characteristic components of a functional T6SS. The aim of this study was to attribute a role to this energy-consuming overexpression of the T6SS. The genome of MFE01 contains at least two hcp genes (hcp1 and hcp2, suggesting that there may be two putative T6SS clusters. Phenotypic studies have shown that MFE01 is avirulent against various eukaryotic cell models (amebas, plant or animal cell models, but has antibacterial activity against a wide range of competitor bacteria, including rhizobacteria and clinical bacteria. Depending on the prey cell, mutagenesis of the hcp2 gene in MFE01 abolishes or reduces this antibacterial killing activity. Moreover, the introduction of T6SS immunity proteins from S. marcescens, which is not killed by MFE01, protects E. coli against MFE01 killing. These findings suggest that the protein encoded by hcp2 is involved in the killing activity of MFE01 mediated by effectors of the T6SS targeting the peptidoglycan of Gram-negative bacteria. Our results indicate that MFE01 can protect potato tubers against Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes tuber soft rot. Pseudomonas fluorescens is often described as a major PGPR (plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, and our results suggest that there may be a

  7. Complete genome sequence of the plant commensal Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Ian T; Press, Caroline M; Ravel, Jacques; Kobayashi, Donald Y; Myers, Garry S A; Mavrodi, Dmitri V; DeBoy, Robert T; Seshadri, Rekha; Ren, Qinghu; Madupu, Ramana; Dodson, Robert J; Durkin, A Scott; Brinkac, Lauren M; Daugherty, Sean C; Sullivan, Stephen A; Rosovitz, Mary J; Gwinn, Michelle L; Zhou, Liwei; Schneider, Davd J; Cartinhour, Samuel W; Nelson, William C; Weidman, Janice; Watkins, Kisha; Tran, Kevin; Khouri, Hoda; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Pierson, Leland S; Thomashow, Linda S; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-07-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 is a plant commensal bacterium that inhabits the rhizosphere and produces secondary metabolites that suppress soilborne plant pathogens. The complete sequence of the 7.1-Mb Pf-5 genome was determined. We analyzed repeat sequences to identify genomic islands that, together with other approaches, suggested P. fluorescens Pf-5's recent lateral acquisitions include six secondary metabolite gene clusters, seven phage regions and a mobile genomic island. We identified various features that contribute to its commensal lifestyle on plants, including broad catabolic and transport capabilities for utilizing plant-derived compounds, the apparent ability to use a diversity of iron siderophores, detoxification systems to protect from oxidative stress, and the lack of a type III secretion system and toxins found in related pathogens. In addition to six known secondary metabolites produced by P. fluorescens Pf-5, three novel secondary metabolite biosynthesis gene clusters were also identified that may contribute to the biocontrol properties of P. fluorescens Pf-5.

  8. Bioreporter pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 immobilized in a silica matrix

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    Trogl J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, the whole cell bacterial biosensor that responds to naphthalene and its metabolites via the production of visible light, was immobilized into a silica matrix by the sol-gel technique. The bioluminescence intensities were measured in the maximum of the bioluminescence band at X = 500 nm. The immobilized cells (>105 cells per g silica matrix produced light after induction by salicylate (cone. > 10 g/l, naphthalene and aminobenzoic acid. The bioluminescence intensities induced by 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid were comparable to a negative control. The cells in the silica layers on glass slides produced light in response to the presence of an inductor at least 8 months after immobilization, and >50 induction cycles. The results showed that these test slides could be used as assays for the multiple determination of water pollution.

  9. ISOLASI DAN SELEKSI PSEUDOMONAD FLUORESCENS PADA RISOSFER PENYAMBUNGAN TOMAT

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    Suhartiningsih Dwi Nurcahyanti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available [ENGLISH] Fluorescen pseudomonad had been isolated from the rhizosphere of grafting tomato with resisten rootstock (H 7996 and EG 203 from Asian Vegetable Research Development Center. Tomato varieties Permata and Fortuna were used as scion in grafting. Fluorescen pseudomonad was isolated on King’S B medium and used phosphate buffer 0,1 M + 0,1 % pepton. About 230 isolates of P. fluorescens were isolated from tomato rhizosphere at 14 HST and about 454 isolates at 28 HST. All isolates were tested for their capability to suppress the growth Ralstonia solanacearum in vitro. All isolates inhibited the growth of R. solanacearum with an inhibition zone of 1 mm to 7 mm or more. The mechanism growth of inhibition was bacteriostatic. About Ten isolates of P. fluorescens which had large inhibition zone, were not inhibit each other and inhibition against R. solanacearum due to nutrient competition. Keywords : tomato; grafting; Fluorescens pseudomonad [INDONESIAN] Pseudomonad fluorescens diisolasi dari risosfer tomat hasil penyambungan dengan batang bawah tahan yaitu tomat H 7996 dan terung EG 203 dari Asian vegetebles Research Development Center (Taiwan. Sebagai batang atas digunakan varietas Permata dan Fortuna. Isolasi dilakukan pada media King’s B dan menggunakan buffer phospat 0,1 M + pepton 0,1 %. Sejumlah 230 isolat P. fluorescens berhasil diisolasi dari risosfer pada 14 HST dan 454 isolat pada 28 HST. Semua isolat diuji kemampuannya dalam menghambat pertumbuhan Ralstonia solanacearum secara in vitro. Semua isolat P. fluorescens mampu menghambat R. solanacearum dengan zona hambatan antara 1 mm sampai dengan lebih dari 7 mm. Semua isolat mempunyai mekanisme penghambatan bakteriostatik. Sebanyak sepuluh isolat P. fluorescens yang mempunyai daya hambat besar, tidak saling menghambat satu dengan yang lain dan penghambatan terhadap R solanacearum yang terjadi karena adanya kompetisi nutrisi. Kata kunci: Tomat; Penyambungan; Pseudomonad

  10. Opposite changes in cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor expression in human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús, Maider López; Hostalot, Cristina; Garibi, Jesús M; Sallés, Joan; Meana, J Javier; Callado, Luis F

    2010-01-01

    Gliomas are the most important group of malignant primary brain tumors and one of the most aggressive forms of cancer. During the last years, several studies have demonstrated that cannabinoids induce apoptosis of glioma cells and inhibit angiogenesis of gliomas in vivo. As the effects of cannabinoids rely on CB(1) and CB(2) receptors activation, the aim of the present study was to investigate both receptors protein expression in cellular membrane homogenates of human glial tumors using specific antibodies raised against these proteins. Additionally, we studied the functionality of the cannabinoid receptors in glioblastomas by using WIN 55,212-2 stimulated [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding. Western blot analysis showed that CB(1) receptor immunoreactivity was significantly lower in glioblastoma multiforme (-43%, n=10; p<0.05) than in normal post-mortem brain tissue (n=16). No significant differences were found for astrocytoma (n=6) and meningioma (n=8) samples. Conversely, CB(2) receptor immunoreactivity was significantly greater in membranes of glioblastoma multiforme (765%, n=9; p<0.05) and astrocytoma (471%, n=4; p<0.05) than in control brain tissue (n=10). Finally, the maximal stimulation of [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding by WIN 55,212-2 was significantly lower in glioblastomas (134+/-4%) than in control membranes (183+/-2%; p<0.05). The basal [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding and the EC(50) values were not significantly different between both groups. The present results demonstrate opposite changes in CB(1) and CB(2) receptor protein expression in human gliomas. These changes may be of interest for further research about the therapeutic effects of cannabinoids in glial tumors.

  11. Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool to identify traits involved in Verticillium dahliae biocontrol by the olive root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-González, M. Mercedes; Bakker, Peter A. H. M.; Prieto, Pilar; Mercado-Blanco, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    The effective management of Verticillium wilts (VW), diseases affecting many crops and caused by some species of the soil-borne fungus Verticillium, is problematic. The use of microbial antagonists to control these pathologies fits modern sustainable agriculture criteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from olive roots with demonstrated ability to control VW of olive caused by the highly virulent, defoliating (D) pathotype of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. However, the study of the PICF7-V. dahliae-olive tripartite interaction poses difficulties because of the inherent characteristics of woody, long-living plants. To overcome these problems we explored the use of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Results obtained in this study showed that: (i) olive D and non-defoliating V. dahliae pathotypes produce differential disease severity in A. thaliana plants; (ii) strain PICF7 is able to colonize and persist in the A. thaliana rhizosphere but is not endophytic in Arabidopsis; and (iii) strain PICF7 controls VW in Arabidopsis. Additionally, as previously observed in olive, neither swimming motility nor siderophore production by PICF7 are required for VW control in A. thaliana, whilst cysteine auxotrophy decreased the effectiveness of PICF7. Moreover, when applied to the roots PICF7 controlled Botrytis cinerea infection in the leaves of Arabidopsis, suggesting that this strain is able to induce systemic resistance. A. thaliana is therefore a suitable alternative to olive bioassays to unravel biocontrol traits involved in biological control of V. dahliae by P. fluorescens PICF7. PMID:25904904

  12. ppGpp controlled by the Gac/Rsm regulatory pathway sustains biocontrol activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Yamada, Kosumi; Haas, Dieter

    2012-11-01

    In Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0 and other fluorescent pseudomonads, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway is instrumental for secondary metabolism and biocontrol of root pathogens via the expression of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs). Furthermore, in strain CHA0, an imbalance in the Krebs cycle can affect the strain's ability to produce extracellular secondary metabolites, including biocontrol factors. Here, we report the metabolome of wild-type CHA0, a gacA-negative mutant, which has lost Gac/Rsm activities, and a retS-negative mutant, which shows strongly enhanced Gac/Rsm-dependent activities. Capillary electrophoresis-based metabolomic profiling revealed that the gacA and retS mutations had opposite effects on the intracellular levels of a number of central metabolites, suggesting that the Gac/Rsm pathway regulates not only secondary metabolism but also primary metabolism in strain CHA0. Among the regulated metabolites identified, the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) was characterized in detail by the construction of relA (for ppGpp synthase) and spoT (for ppGpp synthase/hydrolase) deletion mutants. In a relA spoT double mutant, ppGpp synthesis was completely abolished, the expression of Rsm sRNAs was attenuated, and physiological functions such as antibiotic production, root colonization, and plant protection were markedly diminished. Thus, ppGpp appears to be essential for sustaining epiphytic fitness and biocontrol activity of strain CHA0.

  13. CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists promote analgesia through synergy in a murine model of tumor pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasabova, Iryna A; Gielissen, James; Chandiramani, Anisha; Harding-Rose, Catherine; Odeh, Desiree Abu; Simone, Donald A; Seybold, Virginia S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the adverse side-effects of opioids, cannabinoid receptor agonists may provide an effective alternative for the treatment of cancer pain. This study examined the potency and efficacy of synthetic CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists in a murine model of tumor pain. Intraplantar injection of the CB1 receptor agonist arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ED(50) of 18.4 μg) reduced tumor-related mechanical hyperalgesia by activation of peripheral CB1 but not CB2 receptors. Similar injection of the CB2 receptor agonist AM1241 (ED50 of 19.5 μg) reduced mechanical hyperalgesia by activation of peripheral CB2 but not CB1 receptors. Both agonists had an efficacy comparable with that of morphine (intraplantar), but their analgesic effects were independent of opioid receptors. Isobolographic analysis of the coinjection of arachidonylcyclopropylamide and AM1241 determined that the CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists interacted synergistically to reduce mechanical hyperalgesia in the tumor-bearing paw. These data extend our previous findings that the peripheral cannabinoid receptors are a promising target for the management of cancer pain and mixed cannabinoid receptor agonists may have a therapeutic advantage over selective agonists.

  14. The expression level of CB1 and CB2 receptors determines their efficacy at inducing apoptosis in astrocytomas.

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    Eiron Cudaback

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cannabinoids represent unique compounds for treating tumors, including astrocytomas. Whether CB(1 and CB(2 receptors mediate this therapeutic effect is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated astrocytoma subclones that express set levels of CB(1 and CB(2, and found that cannabinoids induce apoptosis only in cells expressing low levels of receptors that couple to ERK1/2. In contrast, cannabinoids do not induce apoptosis in cells expressing high levels of receptors because these now also couple to the prosurvival signal AKT. Remarkably, cannabinoids applied at high concentration induce apoptosis in all subclones independently of CB(1, CB(2 and AKT, but still through a mechanism involving ERK1/2. SIGNIFICANCE: The high expression level of CB(1 and CB(2 receptors commonly found in malignant astrocytomas precludes the use of cannabinoids as therapeutics, unless AKT is concomitantly inhibited, or cannabinoids are applied at concentrations that bypass CB(1 and CB(2 receptors, yet still activate ERK1/2.

  15. Reciprocal regulation of pyoluteorin production with membrane transporter gene expression in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodhagen, Marion; Paulsen, Ian; Loper, Joyce E

    2005-11-01

    Pyoluteorin is a chlorinated polyketide antibiotic secreted by the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Genes encoding enzymes and transcriptional regulators involved in pyoluteorin production are clustered in the genome of Pf-5. Sequence analysis of genes adjacent to the known pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene cluster revealed the presence of an ABC transporter system. We disrupted two putative ABC transporter genes by inserting transcriptional fusions to an ice nucleation reporter gene. Mutations in pltI and pltJ, which are predicted to encode a membrane fusion protein and an ATP-binding cassette of the ABC transporter, respectively, greatly reduced pyoluteorin production by Pf-5. During the transition from exponential growth to stationary phase, populations of a pltI mutant were lower than those of a pltI+ strain in a culture medium containing pyoluteorin, suggesting a role for the transport system in efflux and the resistance of Pf-5 to the antibiotic. Although pltI or pltJ mutant strains displayed low pyoluteorin production, they did not accumulate proportionately more of the antibiotic intracellularly, indicating that pltI and pltJ do not encode an exclusive exporter for pyoluteorin. Transcription of the putative pyoluteorin efflux genes pltI and pltJ was enhanced by exogenous pyoluteorin. These new observations parallel an earlier finding that pyoluteorin enhances the transcription of pyoluteorin biosynthesis genes and pyoluteorin production in Pf-5. This report provides evidence of a coordination of pyoluteorin production and the transcription of genes encoding a linked transport apparatus, wherein each requires the other for optimal expression.

  16. Effect of exogenous ectoines on some antifungal activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens UTPF5 under salt conditions

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    Arghavan Kamaly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plant probiotic bacteria like fluorescent pseudomonads are worldly used against soil-borne pathogens through mechanisms such as production of bacterial metabolites and enzymes. These bacteria can also help plants to tolerate environmental stresses. Ectoine is a compatible solution which plays an important role in environmental osmotic stresses. Materials and methods: Tolerance of 24 bacterial strains to salt and heat was tested and 6 tolerant strains were chosen. Then dual culture of Fusarium solani and bacteria grown in presence of ectoine and hydroxy ectoine with 3 NaCl concentrations (0, 150 and 300 mM was done and Pseudomonas fluorescens UTPF5 was selected. Finally the effect of ectoine, hydroxyectoine and NaCl on bacterial population, lipase, protease, siderophore and hydrogen-cyanide production and biofilm formation was investigated. Results: In 300 mM NaCl, the bacterium grown in presence of ectoines, increased the inhibition percentage 5- times more than control. NaCl had a positive effect on bacterial population in water and ectoine, hydrogen-cyanide production in all treatment and biofilm formation in ectoine and hydroxyectoine and negative effect on bacterial population in hydroxyectoine, protease and siderophore production in all treatments and biofilm formation in water. On the other hand, ectoine increased lipase and hydrogen-cyanide production and biofilm formation in 300 mM NaCl and siderophore production in 150 mM. Hydroxyectoine had similar effects with little differences. Discussion and conclusion: Ectoine and hydroxyectoine moderate the biocontrol reduction in presence of NaCl through positive effect on lipase and hydrogen-cyanide production and biofilm formation.

  17. Increased Expression of Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors in Achilles Tendinosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björklund, Emmelie; Forsgren, Sture; Alfredson, Håkan; Fowler, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Background The endogenous cannabinoid system is involved in the control of pain. However, little is known as to the integrity of the cannabinoid system in human pain syndromes. Here we investigate the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) in human Achilles tendons from healthy volunteers and from patients with Achilles tendinosis. Methodology Cannabinoid CB1 receptor immunoreactivity (CB1IR) was evaluated in formalin-fixed biopsies from individuals suffering from painful Achilles tendinosis in comparison with healthy human Achilles tendons. Principal Findings CB1IR was seen as a granular pattern in the tenocytes. CB1IR was also observed in the blood vessel wall and in the perineurium of the nerve. Quantification of the immunoreactivity in tenocytes showed an increase of CB1 receptor expression in tendinosis tissue compared to control tissue. Conclusion Expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 is increased in human Achilles tendinosis suggesting that the cannabinoid system may be dysregulated in this disorder. PMID:21931835

  18. The effects of targeted deletion of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 on intranasal sensitization and challenge with adjuvant-free ovalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Barbara L F; Lawver, Jody E; Karmaus, Peer W F; Ngaotepprutaram, Thitirat; Birmingham, Neil P; Harkema, Jack R; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2010-04-01

    The mechanisms by which cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) modulate immune function are not fully elucidated. Critical tools for the determination of the role of both receptors in the immune system are CB(1)/CB(2) double null mice (CB(1)/CB(2) null), and previous studies have shown that CB(1)/CB(2) null mice exhibit exaggerated responses to various immunological stimuli. The objective of these studies was to determine the magnitude to which CB(1)/CB(2) null mice responded to the respiratory allergen ovalbumin (OVA) as compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice. The authors determined that in the absence of adjuvant, both wild-type and CB(1)/CB(2) null mice mounted a marked response to intranasally instilled OVA as assessed by inflammatory cell infiltrate in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), eosinophilia, induction of mucous cell metaplasia, and IgE production. Many of the endpoints measured in response to OVA were similar in wild-type versus CB(1)/CB(2) null mice, with exceptions being modest reductions in OVA-induced IgE and attenuation of BALF neutrophilia in CB(1)/CB(2) null mice as compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that T-cell responses are not universally exaggerated in CB(1)/CB(2) null mice.

  19. Stress regulates endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, Cecilia J

    2014-10-01

    The CB1 cannabinoid receptor is a G protein coupled receptor that is widely expressed throughout the brain. The endogenous ligands for the CB1 receptor (endocannabinoids) are N-arachidonylethanolamine and 2-arachidonoylglycerol; together the endocannabinoids and CB1R subserve activity dependent, retrograde inhibition of neurotransmitter release in the brain. Deficiency of CB1 receptor signaling is associated with anhedonia, anxiety, and persistence of negative memories. CB1 receptor-endocannabinoid signaling is activated by stress and functions to buffer or dampen the behavioral and endocrine effects of acute stress. Its role in regulation of neuronal responses is more complex. Chronic variable stress exposure reduces endocannabinoid-CB1 receptor signaling and it is hypothesized that the resultant deficiency in endocannabinoid signaling contributes to the negative consequences of chronic stress. On the other hand, repeated exposure to the same stress can sensitize CB1 receptor signaling, resulting in dampening of the stress response. Data are reviewed that support the hypothesis that CB1 receptor signaling is stress responsive and that maintaining robust endocannabinoid/CB1 receptor signaling provides resilience against the development of stress-related pathologies.

  20. Loss of cannabinoid receptor CB1 induces preterm birth.

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    Haibin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Preterm birth accounting approximate 10% of pregnancies in women is a tremendous social, clinical and economic burden. However, its underlying causes remain largely unknown. Emerging evidence suggests that endocannabinoid signaling via cannabinoid receptor CB1 play critical roles in multiple early pregnancy events in both animals and humans. Since our previous studies demonstrated that loss of CB1 defers the normal implantation window in mice, we surmised that CB1 deficiency would influence parturition events. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Exploiting mouse models with targeted deletion of Cnr1, Cnr2 and Ptgs1 encoding CB1, CB2 and cyclooxygenase-1, respectively, we examined consequences of CB1 or CB2 silencing on the onset of parturition. We observed that genetic or pharmacological inactivation of CB1, but not CB2, induced preterm labor in mice. Radioimmunoassay analysis of circulating levels of ovarian steroid hormones revealed that premature birth resulting from CB1 inactivation is correlated with altered progesterone/estrogen ratios prior to parturition. More strikingly, the phenotypic defects of prolonged pregnancy length and parturition failure in mice missing Ptgs1 were corrected by introducing CB1 deficiency into Ptgs1 null mice. In addition, loss of CB1 resulted in aberrant secretions of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and corticosterone during late gestation. The pathophysiological significance of this altered corticotrophin-releasing hormone-driven endocrine activity in the absence of CB1 was evident from our subsequent findings that a selective corticotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist was able to restore the normal parturition timing in Cnr1 deficient mice. In contrast, wild-type females receiving excessive levels of corticosterone induced preterm birth. CONCLUSIONS: CB1 deficiency altering normal progesterone and estrogen levels induces preterm birth in mice. This defect is independent of prostaglandins produced by

  1. MANAGEMENT OF AE-CB/COPD: A SURVEY OF RESPIRATORY PHYSICIANS IN SOME REGIONS OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the bacteria spectrum isolated from AE-CB/ COPD and the manner of management of AE-CB/ COPD in respiratory or internal medicine department in some regions of China. Methods Respiratory physicians received questionnaire at randomization just after they managed a patient presenting to outpatient department with AE-CB/ COPD, on general conditions and symptoms of patients, type of examinations, diagnosis, type of antibiotics used and mode of administration. Results of sputum bacteria culture were followed up.Results Among the 1583 AE-CB/COPD , 63. 04% were male and 35. 19% were female. 54.6% of them were older than 60 years. 81.87% of the patients produced sputum. Sputum bacteria culture, chest X-ray and chest CT were carried out to 21.3%, 66. 3% and 11. 1% patients, respectively. 355 strains were isolated from patients whose sputum bacteria culture was positive. Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis were the three most isolates. 84. 7% of the 1583 AE-CB/COPD received 1692 times of antibiotic prescribing. The most frequently prescribed antibiotic were B-lactams (51.36% of all antibiotic prescribing), macrolides (14.01%) and quinolones (31.03%). Much more macrolides were prescribed in the area where more patients pay the medicines at his own expense than those in the area where more patients share public health service.Conclusion In China, respiratory physicians can reasonably select antibiotics to manage acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis/ chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in pulmonary outpatient department. Sputum culture is done in part of the patients, but susceptibility tests are missing. One issue revealed by the survey is that the list of prescribing medications laid down by government have great influence on antibiotic use.

  2. Role of fungal trehalose and bacterial thiamine in the improved survival and growth of the ectomycorrhizal fungus Laccaria bicolor S238N and the helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Brulé, C; Palin, B; Champmartin, D; Rubini, P; Garbaye, J; Sarniguet, A; Frey-Klett, P

    2010-08-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterial strain Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8 enhances the establishment of Laccaria bicolor S238N ectomycorrhizae by improving the pre-symbiotic growth and survival of the fungus. Nothing is known about the effect of the ectomycorrhizal fungus on the helper bacteria or the molecules that are involved in the interaction. In this study, we have monitored the population density of the helper strain P. fluorescens BBc6R8 in soils inoculated with L. bicolor and in control soils and found that the ectomycorhizal fungus improves the survival of the helper bacteria. We investigated the identity of the fungal and bacterial metabolites involved in this reciprocal growth-promoting effect using a combination of growth measurements, chemoattractant assays, HPLC and in silico genome analyses. We showed that trehalose, a disaccharide that accumulates to high levels in the fungal hyphae, chemoattracted and promoted the growth of the helper bacteria. Meanwhile, P. fluorescens BBc6R8 produced thiamine at concentrations that enhanced the fungal growth in vitro. Altogether our data indicate that the interaction between the two microorganisms is beneficial for both species and relies, at least in part, on trophic mutualism.

  3. Differential CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor-inotropic response of rat isolated atria: endogenous signal transduction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Del Zar, Claudia F; Borda, Enri

    2005-06-15

    In this study, we have determined the contractile effects of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor activation on rat isolated atria and the different signaling pathways involved. Anandamide did not has significantly effect on atria contractility, however, the treatment with both CB1 (AM251) or CB2 (AM630) receptor antagonists, the endocannabinoids triggered stimulation or inhibition on contractility respectively. The ACEA stimulation of CB1 receptor exerted decrease on contractility, that significantly correlated with the decrement of cAMP and the stimulation of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the accumulation of cyclic GMP (cGMP). On the contrary, JWH 015 stimulation of CB2 receptor triggered positive contractile response that significantly correlated with the increase cAMP production. The inhibiton of adenylate cyclase activity impaired the JWH 015 activation of CB1 receptor induced positive contractile effect, while inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), NOS and soluble nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive guanylate cyclase blocked the dose-response curves of ACEA on contractility. Those inhibitors also attenuated the CB1 receptor-dependent increase in activation of NOS and cGMP accumulation. These results suggest that CB2 receptor agonist mediated positive contractile effect associated with increased production on cAMP while CB1 receptor agonist mediated decrease on contractility associated with decreased cAMP accumulation and increase production of NO and cGMP; that occur secondarily to stimulation of PLC, NOS and soluble guanylate cyclase. Data give pharmacological evidence for the existence of functional CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors in rat isolated atria and may contribute to a better understanding the effects of cannabinoids in the cardiovascular system.

  4. Hypothalamic CB1 cannabinoid receptors regulate energy balance in mice.

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    Cardinal, Pierre; Bellocchio, Luigi; Clark, Samantha; Cannich, Astrid; Klugmann, Matthias; Lutz, Beat; Marsicano, Giovanni; Cota, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor activation is generally considered a powerful orexigenic signal and inhibition of the endocannabinoid system is beneficial for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases. The hypothalamus plays a critical role in regulating energy balance by modulating both food intake and energy expenditure. Although CB(1) receptor signaling has been implicated in the modulation of both these mechanisms, a complete understanding of its role in the hypothalamus is still lacking. Here we combined a genetic approach with the use of adeno-associated viral vectors to delete the CB(1) receptor gene in the adult mouse hypothalamus and assessed the impact of such manipulation on the regulation of energy balance. Viral-mediated deletion of the CB(1) receptor gene in the hypothalamus led to the generation of Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice, which displayed an approximately 60% decrease in hypothalamic CB(1) receptor mRNA levels. Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice maintained on a normocaloric, standard diet showed decreased body weight gain over time, which was associated with increased energy expenditure and elevated β(3)-adrenergic receptor and uncoupling protein-1 mRNA levels in the brown adipose tissue but, surprisingly, not to changes in food intake. Additionally, Hyp-CB(1)-KO mice were insensitive to the anorectic action of the hormone leptin (5 mg/kg) and displayed a time-dependent hypophagic response to the CB(1) inverse agonist rimonabant (3 mg/kg). Altogether these findings suggest that hypothalamic CB(1) receptor signaling is a key determinant of energy expenditure under basal conditions and reveal its specific role in conveying the effects of leptin and pharmacological CB1 receptor antagonism on food intake.

  5. Antiadhesive activity of the biosurfactant pseudofactin II secreted by the Arctic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janek Tomasz

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudofactin II is a recently identified biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas fluorescens BD5, the strain obtained from freshwater from the Arctic Archipelago of Svalbard. Pseudofactin II is a novel compound identified as cyclic lipopeptide with a palmitic acid connected to the terminal amino group of eighth amino acid in peptide moiety. The C-terminal carboxylic group of the last amino acid forms a lactone with the hydroxyl of Thr3. Adhesion is the first stage of biofilm formation and the best moment for the action of antiadhesive and anti-biofilm compounds. Adsorption of biosurfactants to a surface e.g. glass, polystyrene, silicone modifies its hydrophobicity, interfering with the microbial adhesion and desorption processes. In this study the role and applications of pseudofactin II as a antiadhesive compound has been investigated from medicinal and therapeutic perspectives. Results Pseudofactin II lowered the adhesion to three types of surfaces (glass, polystyrene and silicone of bacterial strains of five species: Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus hirae, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Proteus mirabilis and two Candida albicans strains. Pretreatment of a polystyrene surface with 0.5 mg/ml pseudofactin II inhibited bacterial adhesion by 36-90% and that of C. albicans by 92-99%. The same concentration of pseudofactin II dislodged 26-70% of preexisting biofilms grown on previously untreated surfaces. Pseudofactin II also caused a marked inhibition of the initial adhesion of E. faecalis, E. coli, E. hirae and C. albicans strains to silicone urethral catheters. The highest concentration tested (0.5 mg/ml caused a total growth inhibition of S. epidermidis, partial (18-37% inhibition of other bacteria and 8-9% inhibition of C. albicans growth. Conclusion Pseudofactin II showed antiadhesive activity against several pathogenic microorganisms which are potential biofilm formers on catheters, implants and internal

  6. Dielectrical properties of composites LDPE+CB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Škipina Blanka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is currently great interest in the technological properties of conductive polymer composites because their cost-performance balance. They have a wide range of industrial applications -in anti-static materials, self regulating heaters, current overload and overheating protection devices, and materials for electromagnetic radiation shielding. Measurements of the electrical properties of polymer composites are one of the most convenient and sensitive methods for studying polymer structure. A polymer composite differs substantially from a free polymer in a wide range of properties. The presence of filler affects both the electrical, as well as mechanical properties. One of the most important characteristics of conductive polymer composites is that their electrical conductivity increases nonlinearly with the increase of the concentration of filler particles. When the concentration of filler particles reaches a certain critical value, a drastic transition from an electrical insulator to a conductor is exhibited. This conductivity behavior resulting in a sudden insulator-conductor transition is ascribed to a percolation process, and the critical filler concentration at which the conductivity jump occurs is called ‘percolation threshold’. In the past few years, a lot of studies have been carried out to analyze the percolation phenomenon and mechanisms of the conductive behavior in conductive polymer composites. It has been established that the electrical conductivity of conductive polymer composites uncommonly depends on the temperature. Some of such composites show a sharp increase and/or decrease in electrical conductivity at specific temperatures. The conductive temperature coefficient (CTC of conductive polymer composites has been widely investigated. In these work we investigated how concentration of the CB affects the dielectrical properties of the composite LDPE+CB. The ac electrical conductivity, σac, for such composites was measured

  7. Expression of the translocator protein (TSPO from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfo-1 requires the stress regulatory sigma factors AlgU and RpoH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène eLeneveu-Jenvrin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an evolutionary conserved protein that is found in many Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, in which it plays several important functions including for example membrane biogenesis, signaling and stress response. A tspo homologue gene has been identified in several members of the Pseudomonas genus, among which the soil bacterium P. fluorescens Pf0-1. In this bacterium, the tspo gene is located in the vicinity of a putative hybrid histidine kinase-encoding gene. Since tspo has been involved in water stress related response in plants, we explored the effects of hyperosmolarity and temperature on P. fluorescens Pf0-1 tspo expression using a strategy based on lux-reporter fusions. We show that the two genes Pfl01_2810 and tspo are co-transcribed forming a transcription unit. The expression of this operon is growth phase-dependent and is increased in response to high concentrations of NaCl, sucrose and to a D-cycloserine treatment, which are conditions leading to activity of the major cell wall stress responsive extracytoplasmic sigma factor AlgU. Interestingly, the promoter region activity is strongly lowered in a P. aeruginosa algU mutant, suggesting that AlgU may be involved at least partly in the molecular mechanism leading to Pfl01_2810-tspo expression. In silico analysis of this promoter region failed to detect an AlgU consensus binding site; however, we detect a putative binding site for the heat shock response RpoH sigma factor. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the region containing this sequence is increased in response to high growth temperature and slightly lowered in a P. aeruginosa rpoH mutant strain. Taken together, our data suggest that P. fluorescens tspo gene may belong at least partly to the cell wall stress response.

  8. Bio-sorption of neptunium(V) by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Songkasiri, W. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Chemical Technology Div., Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Reed, D.T. [Chemical Technology Div., Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Rittmann, B.E. [Dept. of Civil Engineering, Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The bio-sorption of neptunyl (NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) by Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated. The overall goals of this research are to identify key interactions between neptunium and soil bacteria and to model these effects under subsurface-related conditions. Neptunyl, which is generally thought to be non-sorptive, was significantly sorbed under all conditions studied. At initial neptunyl concentrations of 4.75 {mu}M and pH = 7, as much as 85% of the neptunium was sorbed under aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies show that neptunyl was sorbed rapidly within the first 15 minutes. The extent of sorption also increased with pH. In all cases, the sorbed neptunium was shown to be NpO{sub 2}{sup +} by X-ray absorption near edged spectroscopy (XANES) analysis, confirming that there was no reduction to Np(IV) under the conditions of our experiment. The sorption data were modeled using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. A comparison of the two approaches showed a significantly better fit for the Freundlich isotherm, and the Freundlich parameter values suggest interactions between sorbed NpO{sub 2}{sup +} molecules. These data show that bio-sorption, even for neptunyl, has a significant role in defining the speciation of neptunium and, hence, its overall mobility in the subsurface. (orig.)

  9. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 mutant with enhanced competitive colonization ability and improved biocontrol activity against fungal root pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-08-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible.

  10. Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 Mutant with Enhanced Competitive Colonization Ability and Improved Biocontrol Activity against Fungal Root Pathogens ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Emma; Navazo, Ana; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Zea-Bonilla, Teresa; Pérez-Jiménez, Rosa María; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Motility is one of the most important traits for efficient rhizosphere colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens F113rif (F113). In this bacterium, motility is a polygenic trait that is repressed by at least three independent pathways, including the Gac posttranscriptional system, the Wsp chemotaxis-like pathway, and the SadB pathway. Here we show that the kinB gene, which encodes a signal transduction protein that together with AlgB has been implicated in alginate production, participates in swimming motility repression through the Gac pathway, acting downstream of the GacAS two-component system. Gac mutants are impaired in secondary metabolite production and are unsuitable as biocontrol agents. However, the kinB mutant and a triple mutant affected in kinB, sadB, and wspR (KSW) possess a wild-type phenotype for secondary metabolism. The KSW strain is hypermotile and more competitive for rhizosphere colonization than the wild-type strain. We have compared the biocontrol activity of KSW with those of the wild-type strain and a phenotypic variant (F113v35 [V35]) which is hypermotile and hypercompetitive but is affected in secondary metabolism since it harbors a gacS mutation. Biocontrol experiments in the Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici/Lycopersicum esculentum (tomato) and Phytophthora cactorum/Fragaria vesca (strawberry) pathosystems have shown that the three strains possess biocontrol activity. Biocontrol activity was consistently lower for V35, indicating that the production of secondary metabolites was the most important trait for biocontrol. Strain KSW showed improved biocontrol compared with the wild-type strain, indicating that an increase in competitive colonization ability resulted in improved biocontrol and that the rational design of biocontrol agents by mutation is feasible. PMID:21685161

  11. Root cap influences root colonisation by Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 on maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Sonia N; Bengough, A Glyn; Griffiths, Bryan S; Kilham, Ken; Rodger, Sheena; Stubbs, Vicky; Valentine, Tracy A; Young, Iain M

    2005-09-01

    We investigated the influence of root border cells on the colonisation of seedling Zea mays roots by Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 in sandy loam soil packed at two dry bulk densities. Numbers of colony forming units (CFU) were counted on sequential sections of root for intact and decapped inoculated roots grown in loose (1.0 mg m(-3)) and compacted (1.3 mg m(-3)) soil. After two days of root growth, the numbers of P. fluorescens (CFU cm(-1)) were highest on the section of root just below the seed with progressively fewer bacteria near the tip, irrespective of density. The decapped roots had significantly more colonies of P. fluorescens at the tip compared with the intact roots: approximately 100-fold more in the loose and 30-fold more in the compact soil. In addition, confocal images of the root tips grown in agar showed that P. fluorescens could only be detected on the tips of the decapped roots. These results indicated that border cells, and their associated mucilage, prevented complete colonization of the root tip by the biocontrol agent P. fluorescens, possibly by acting as a disposable surface or sheath around the cap.

  12. Palmitoylethanolamide attenuates PTZ-induced seizures through CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Iraj; Rostampour, Mohammad; Shabani, Mohammad; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Babaei, Parvin; Khakpour-Taleghani, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders. Though there are effective medications available to reduce the symptoms of the disease, their side effects have limited their usage. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been shown to attenuate seizure in different animal models. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in this attenuation. Male wistar rats were used for the current experiment. PTZ was injected to induce chemical kindling in animals. After verification of kindling in animals, treatment was performed with PEA, AM251 and AM630 in different groups. Latency to induce seizure, seizure stages and latency and duration of fifth stage of seizure was recorded for each animal. Injection of PTZ led to seizure in the animals. Pretreatment with PEA increased the latency to initiate seizures and reduced the duration of seizure. Pretreatment with different dosages of AM251 had contrary effects so that at lower doses they increased the seizure in animals but at higher doses led to the attenuation of seizure. AM630 increased seizures in a dose dependent manner. Combination of the antagonists increased the seizure parameters and attenuated the effect of PEA on seizure. PEA attenuated the PTZ-induced seizures and pretreatment with CB1 and CB2 antagonists diminished this effect of PEA, but still PEA was effective, which might be attributed to the contribution of other receptors in PEA anti-epileptic properties. Findings of the current study implied that endocannabinoid signaling pathway might have an important role in the effects of PEA.

  13. Action of CB1 and CB2 antagonists/inverse agonists on mantle cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chui, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the effects of antagonists to the cannabinoid receptors in MCL cell lines were studied. Results presented in this study show that signalling through cannabinoid receptor with antagonists such as SR141716, SR144528 decreases cell viability but hemopressin when analyzing with XTT. The decrease in cell viability by SR141716 is caused by apoptosis triggered after 5 hours of treatment. The CB1 expression was confirmed in all MCL cell lines tested via western blotting but the express...

  14. Risperidone treatment increases CB1 receptor binding in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Secher, Anna; Husum, Henriette; Holst, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Body weight gain is a common side effect of treatment with antipsychotics, but the mechanisms underlying this weight gain are unknown. Several factors may be involved in antipsychotic-induced body weight gain including the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB(1)), the serotonin receptor 2C...... positively correlated with visceral fat mass. Risperidone treatment increased CB(1) receptor binding in the arcuate nucleus (40%), hippocampus (25-30%) and amygdala (35%) without concurrent alterations in the CB(1) receptor mRNA. Risperidone treatment increased adiponectin mRNA. CONCLUSION: The present study...... showed that risperidone treatment altered CB(1) receptor binding in the rat brain. Risperidone-induced adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in the clinic may be explained by increased CB(1) receptor density in brain regions involved in appetite and regulation of metabolic function....

  15. CB1 receptors modulate affective behaviour induced by neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rácz, Ildikó; Nent, Elisa; Erxlebe, Edda; Zimmer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Patients suffering from chronic pain are often diagnosed with a psychiatric condition, in particular generalized anxiety and major depression. The underlying pathomechanisms contributing to this comorbidity, however, are not entirely clear. In this manuscript we have focussed on the potential role of the cannabinoid receptor CB1, because it is known to modulate neuronal circuits contributing to chronic pain states and affective behaviours. For this purpose we analysed the consequences of a partial sciatic nerve ligation on anxiety- and depression-related behaviours in mice lacking CB1 receptors. Our results show that the development of mechanical hypersensitivity was similar in CB1 deficient mice and wild type controls. However, CB1 knockouts showed much more pronounced behavioural manifestations of anxiety-related behaviours in the light-dark and zero-maze tests, sucrose anhedonia, and disturbed home-cage activity. These results indicate that the endocannabinoid system affects chronic pain-induced mood changes through CB1 receptors.

  16. Iron-regulated metabolites of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374 : Their role in induced systemic resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djavaheri, M.

    2007-01-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens WCS374r effectively suppresses fusarium wilt in radish by induced systemic resistance (ISR). In radish, WCS374r-mediated ISR depends partly on iron-regulated metabolites. Under iron-limiting conditions, P. fluorescens WCS374r produces

  17. Lipopeptide biosurfactant viscosin enhances dispersal of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnichsen, Lise; Bygvraa Svenningsen, Nanna; Rybtke, Morten; de Bruijn, Irene; Raaijmakers, Jos M; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Nybroe, Ole

    2015-12-01

    Pseudomonads produce several lipopeptide biosurfactants that have antimicrobial properties but that also facilitate surface motility and influence biofilm formation. Detailed studies addressing the significance of lipopeptides for biofilm formation and architecture are rare. Hence, the present study sets out to determine the specific role of the lipopeptide viscosin in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 biofilm formation, architecture and dispersal, and to relate viscA gene expression to viscosin production and effect. Initially, we compared biofilm formation of SBW25 and the viscosin-deficient mutant strain SBW25ΔviscA in static microtitre assays. These experiments demonstrated that viscosin had little influence on the amount of biofilm formed by SBW25 during the early stages of biofilm development. Later, however, SBW25 formed significantly less biofilm than SBW25ΔviscA. The indication that viscosin is involved in biofilm dispersal was confirmed by chemical complementation of the mutant biofilm. Furthermore, a fluorescent bioreporter showed that viscA expression was induced in biofilms 4 h prior to dispersal. Subsequent detailed studies of biofilms formed in flow cells for up to 5 days revealed that SBW25 and SBW25ΔviscA developed comparable biofilms dominated by well-defined, mushroom-shaped structures. Carbon starvation was required to obtain biofilm dispersal in this system. Dispersal of SBW25 biofilms was significantly greater than of SBW25ΔviscA biofilms after 3 h and, importantly, carbon starvation strongly induced viscA expression, in particular for cells that were apparently leaving the biofilm. Thus, the present study points to a role for viscosin-facilitated motility in dispersal of SBW25 biofilms.

  18. Bistability in a metabolic network underpins the de novo evolution of colony switching in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Gallie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenotype switching is commonly observed in nature. This prevalence has allowed the elucidation of a number of underlying molecular mechanisms. However, little is known about how phenotypic switches arise and function in their early evolutionary stages. The first opportunity to provide empirical insight was delivered by an experiment in which populations of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 evolved, de novo, the ability to switch between two colony phenotypes. Here we unravel the molecular mechanism behind colony switching, revealing how a single nucleotide change in a gene enmeshed in central metabolism (carB generates such a striking phenotype. We show that colony switching is underpinned by ON/OFF expression of capsules consisting of a colanic acid-like polymer. We use molecular genetics, biochemical analyses, and experimental evolution to establish that capsule switching results from perturbation of the pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. Of central importance is a bifurcation point at which uracil triphosphate is partitioned towards either nucleotide metabolism or polymer production. This bifurcation marks a cell-fate decision point whereby cells with relatively high pyrimidine levels favour nucleotide metabolism (capsule OFF, while cells with lower pyrimidine levels divert resources towards polymer biosynthesis (capsule ON. This decision point is present and functional in the wild-type strain. Finally, we present a simple mathematical model demonstrating that the molecular components of the decision point are capable of producing switching. Despite its simple mutational cause, the connection between genotype and phenotype is complex and multidimensional, offering a rare glimpse of how noise in regulatory networks can provide opportunity for evolution.

  19. Biodegradation of phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and iomeprol by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the capillary fringe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Norman; Reinwand, Christian; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Frimmel, Fritz H.

    2015-12-01

    Mass transfer and biological transformation phenomena in the capillary fringe were studied using phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and the iodinated X-ray contrast agent iomeprol as model organic compounds and the microorganism strain Pseudomonas fluorescens. Three experimental approaches were used: Batch experiments (uniform water saturation and transport by diffusion), in static columns (with a gradient of water saturation and advective transport in the capillaries) and in a flow-through cell (with a gradient of water saturation and transport by horizontal and vertical flow: 2-dimension flow-through microcosm). The reactors employed for the experiments were filled with quartz sand of defined particle size distribution (dp = 200…600 μm, porosity ε = 0.42). Batch experiments showed that phenol and salicylic acid have a high, whereas benzenesulfonic acid and iomeprol have a quite low potential for biodegradation under aerobic conditions and in a matrix nearly close to water saturation. Batch experiments under anoxic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor revealed that the biodegradation of the model compounds was lower than under aerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the experiments showed that the moisture content was also responsible for an optimized transport in the liquid phase of a porous medium. Biodegradation in the capillary fringe was found to be influenced by both the moisture content and availability of the dissolved substrate, as seen in static column experiments. The gas-liquid mass transfer of oxygen also played an important role for the biological activity. In static column experiments under aerobic conditions, the highest biodegradation was found in the capillary fringe (e.g. βt/β0 (phenol) = 0 after t = 6 d) relative to the zone below the water table and unsaturated zone. The highest biodegradation occurred in the flow-through cell experiment where the height of the capillary fringe was largest.

  20. Biodegradation of phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and iomeprol by Pseudomonas fluorescens in the capillary fringe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Norman; Reinwand, Christian; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2015-12-01

    Mass transfer and biological transformation phenomena in the capillary fringe were studied using phenol, salicylic acid, benzenesulfonic acid, and the iodinated X-ray contrast agent iomeprol as model organic compounds and the microorganism strain Pseudomonas fluorescens. Three experimental approaches were used: Batch experiments (uniform water saturation and transport by diffusion), in static columns (with a gradient of water saturation and advective transport in the capillaries) and in a flow-through cell (with a gradient of water saturation and transport by horizontal and vertical flow: 2-dimension flow-through microcosm). The reactors employed for the experiments were filled with quartz sand of defined particle size distribution (dp=200...600 μm, porosity ε=0.42). Batch experiments showed that phenol and salicylic acid have a high, whereas benzenesulfonic acid and iomeprol have a quite low potential for biodegradation under aerobic conditions and in a matrix nearly close to water saturation. Batch experiments under anoxic conditions with nitrate as electron acceptor revealed that the biodegradation of the model compounds was lower than under aerobic conditions. Nevertheless, the experiments showed that the moisture content was also responsible for an optimized transport in the liquid phase of a porous medium. Biodegradation in the capillary fringe was found to be influenced by both the moisture content and availability of the dissolved substrate, as seen in static column experiments. The gas-liquid mass transfer of oxygen also played an important role for the biological activity. In static column experiments under aerobic conditions, the highest biodegradation was found in the capillary fringe (e.g. βt/β0 (phenol)=0 after t=6 d) relative to the zone below the water table and unsaturated zone. The highest biodegradation occurred in the flow-through cell experiment where the height of the capillary fringe was largest.

  1. CONSTITUTIVE ACTIVITY AT THE CANNABINOID CB1 RECEPTOR IS REQUIRED FOR BEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO NOXIOUS CHEMICAL STIMULATION OF TRPV1: ANTINOCICEPTIVE ACTIONS OF CB1 INVERSE AGONISTS

    OpenAIRE

    Fioravanti, Beatriz; De Felice, Milena; Stucky, Cheryl L; Medler, Karen A.; Luo, Miaw-chyi; Gardell, Luis R.; Ibrahim, Mohab; Malan, T. Phil; Yamamura, Henry I.; Ossipov, Michael H.; King, Tamara; Lai, Josephine; Porreca, Frank; Vanderah, Todd W

    2008-01-01

    The potential modulation of TRPV1 nociceptive activity by the CB1 receptor was investigated here using CB1 wildtype (WT) and knock-out (KO) mice as well as selective CB1 inverse agonists. No significant differences were detected in baseline thermal thresholds of ICR, CB1WT or CB1KO mice. Intraplantar capsaicin produced dose- and time-related paw flinch responses in ICR and CB1WT mice and induced plasma extravasation yet minimal responses were seen in CB1KO animals with no apparent differences...

  2. CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prather, Paul L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R.; Greer, Aleksandra K.; Bratton, Stacie M. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Ford, Benjamin M.; Franks, Lirit N. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Radominska-Pandya, Anna, E-mail: RadominskaAnna@uams.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 W. Markham, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Tamoxifen produces cytotoxicity via estrogen-receptor (ER) independent mechanisms. •Tamoxifen binds to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors and acts as an inverse agonist. •CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen. •ER-independent effects for Tamoxifen may be mediated via CB1 and/or CB2 receptors. -- Abstract: Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for the ER-independent effects of Tam and its derivatives are poorly understood. Interestingly, similar to Tam and 4OH-Tam, cannabinoids have also been shown to exhibit anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells, and estrogen can regulate expression levels of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). Therefore, this study investigated whether CBRs might serve as novel molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam. We report that both compounds bind to CB1 and CB2Rs with moderate affinity (0.9–3 μM). Furthermore, Tam and 4OH-Tam exhibit inverse activity at CB1 and CB2Rs in membrane preparations, reducing basal G-protein activity. Tam and 4OH-Tam also act as CB1/CB2R-inverse agonists to regulate the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase in intact cells, producing concentration-dependent increases in intracellular cAMP. These results suggest that CBRs are molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam and may contribute to the ER-independent cytotoxic effects reported for these drugs. Importantly, these findings also indicate that Tam and 4OH-Tam might be used as structural scaffolds for development of novel

  3. Functional selectivity in CB(2) cannabinoid receptor signaling and regulation: implications for the therapeutic potential of CB(2) ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Brady K; Wager-Miller, James; Haskins, Christopher; Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2012-02-01

    Receptor internalization increases the flexibility and scope of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling. CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors undergo internalization after sustained exposure to agonists. However, it is not known whether different agonists internalize CB(2) to different extents. Because CB(2) is a promising therapeutic target, understanding its trafficking in response to different agonists is necessary for a complete understanding of its biology. Here we profile a number of cannabinoid receptor ligands and provide evidence for marked functional selectivity of cannabinoid receptor internalization. Classic, aminoalkylindole, bicyclic, cannabilactone, iminothiazole cannabinoid, and endocannabinoid ligands varied greatly in their effects on CB(1) and CB(2) trafficking. Our most striking finding was that (R)-(+)-[2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-3-(4-morpholinylmethyl) pyrrolo-[1,2,3-d,e]-1,4-benzoxazin-6-yl]-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (WIN55,212-2) (and other aminoalkylindoles) failed to promote CB(2) receptor internalization, whereas 5-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)-2-(5-hydroxy-2-(3-hydroxypropyl)cyclohexyl)phenol (CP55,940) robustly internalized CB(2) receptors. Furthermore, WIN55,212-2 competitively antagonized CP55,940-induced CB(2) internalization. Despite these differences in internalization, both compounds activated CB(2) receptors as measured by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and recruitment of β-arrestin(2) to the membrane. In contrast, whereas CP55,940 inhibited voltage-gated calcium channels via CB(2) receptor activation, WIN55,212-2 was ineffective on its own and antagonized the effects of CP55,940. On the basis of the differences we found between these two ligands, we also tested the effects of other cannabinoids on these signaling pathways and found additional evidence for functional selectivity of CB(2) ligands. These novel data highlight that WIN55,212-2 and other cannabinoids show strong functional selectivity at CB(2

  4. Atmospheric-pressure air microplasma jets in aqueous media for the inactivation of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Si-ze [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Liu, Dongping [Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory of Plasma and Magnetic Resonance, School of Physics and Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); Song, Ying [School of Physics and Materials Engineering, Dalian Nationalities University, Dalian 116600 (China); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Sun, Yue [School of Physics, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2013-05-15

    The hollow fiber-based cold air microplasma jet array running at atmospheric pressure has been designed to inactivate Pseudomonas fluorescens (P. fluorescens) cells in vitro in aqueous media. The influences of electrode configurations, air flow rate, and applied voltage on the discharge characteristics of the single microplasma jet operating in aqueous media are presented, and the bactericidal efficiency of the hollow fibers-based and large-volume microplasma jet array is reported. Optical emission spectroscopy is utilized to identify excited species during the antibacterial testing of plasma in solutions. These well-aligned and rather stable air microplasma jets containing a variety of short-lived species, such as OH and O radicals and charged particles, are in direct contact with aqueous media and are very effective in killing P. fluorescens cells in aqueous media. This design shows its potential application for atmospheric pressure air plasma inactivation of bacteria cells in aqueous media.

  5. The CMS Collaboration Board (CB) chairperson, deputy and secretary, with the CMS Spokesperson and deputies

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, M

    2012-01-01

    From left to right: Jorgen D'Hondt (CB Secretary), Claudia Wulz (CB Deputy Chair), Tiziano Camporesi (Deputy Spokesperson), Ian Shipsey (new CB Chair 2013-2014), Joe Incandela (CMS Spokesperson), Joao Varela (Deputy Spokesperson)

  6. Supramolecular structure and functional analysis of the type III secretion system in Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping eLiu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system (T3SS of plant and animal bacterial pathogens directs the secretion and injection of proteins into host cells. Some homologous genes of T3SS were found also in nonpathogenic bacteria, but the organization of its machinery and basic function are still unknown. In this study, we identified a T3SS gene cluster from the plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas fluorescens 2P24 and isolated the corresponding T3SS apparatus. The T3SS gene cluster of strain 2P24 is similar organizationally to that of pathogenic P. syringae, except that it lacks the regulator hrpR and the hrpK1 and hrpH genes, which are involved in translocation of proteins. Electron microscopy revealed that the T3SS supramolecular structure of strain 2P24 was comprised of two distinctive substructures: a long extracellular, filamentous pilus and a membrane-embedded base. We show that strain 2P24 deploys a harpin homologue protein, RspZ1, to elicit a hypersensitive response when infiltrated into Nicotiana tabacum cv. xanthi leaves with protein that is partially purified, and by complementing the hrpZ1 mutation of pHIR11. The T3SS of strain 2P24 retained ability to secrete effectors, whereas its effector translocation activity appeared to be excessively lost. Mutation of the rscC gene from 2P24 T3SS abolished the secretion of effectors, but the general biocontrol properties were unaffected. Remarkably, strain 2P24 induced functional MAMP-triggered immunity that included a burst of reactive oxygen species, strong suppression of challenge cell death, and disease expansion, while it was not associated with the secretion functional T3SS.

  7. CB2 receptors in the brain: role in central immune function

    OpenAIRE

    Cabral, G. A.; Raborn, E S; Griffin, L.; Dennis, J.; Marciano-Cabral, F

    2007-01-01

    Recently, it has been recognized that the cannabinoid receptor CB2 may play a functionally relevant role in the central nervous system (CNS). This role is mediated primarily through microglia, a resident population of cells in the CNS that is morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally related to macrophages. These cells also express the cannabinoid receptor CB1. The CB1 receptor (CB1R) is constitutively expressed at low levels while the CB2 receptor (CB2R) is expressed at higher levels...

  8. Natriuretic peptides modify Pseudomonas fluorescens cytotoxicity by regulating cyclic nucleotides and modifying LPS structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuilloley Marc GJ

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nervous tissues express various communication molecules including natriuretic peptides, i.e. Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP and C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP. These molecules share structural similarities with cyclic antibacterial peptides. CNP and to a lesser extent BNP can modify the cytotoxicity of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The psychrotrophic environmental species Pseudomonas fluorescens also binds to and kills neurons and glial cells, cell types that both produce natriuretic peptides. In the present study, we investigated the sensitivity of Pseudomonas fluorescens to natriuretic peptides and evaluated the distribution and variability of putative natriuretic peptide-dependent sensor systems in the Pseudomonas genus. Results Neither BNP nor CNP modified P. fluorescens MF37 growth or cultivability. However, pre-treatment of P. fluorescens MF37 with BNP or CNP provoked a decrease of the apoptotic effect of the bacterium on glial cells and an increase of its necrotic activity. By homology with eukaryotes, where natriuretic peptides act through receptors coupled to cyclases, we observed that cell-permeable stable analogues of cyclic AMP (dbcAMP and cyclic GMP (8BcGMP mimicked the effect of BNP and CNP on bacteria. Intra-bacterial concentrations of cAMP and cGMP were measured to study the involvement of bacterial cyclases in the regulation of P. fluorescens cytotoxicity by BNP or CNP. BNP provoked an increase (+49% of the cAMP concentration in P. fluorescens, and CNP increased the intra-bacterial concentrations of cGMP (+136%. The effect of BNP and CNP on the virulence of P. fluorescens was independent of the potential of the bacteria to bind to glial cells. Conversely, LPS extracted from MF37 pre-treated with dbcAMP showed a higher necrotic activity than the LPS from untreated or 8BcGMP-pre-treated bacteria. Capillary electrophoresis analysis suggests that these different effects of the LPS may be due

  9. Interaction of the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 with phytopathogens in cold soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    is disease suppressive owing to the presence of diverse antimicrobial microorganisms. Using culture-based approaches, the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 was previously isolated from the soil microbiome. The aim of this study is to unravel key biocontrol traits underpinning the antagonistic activity...... of this cold-active bacterium against phytopathogens. Method: A combination of different technologies including genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics are being used to explore the interaction of the psychrotroph P. fluorescens In5 in dual-culture with diverse plant pathogens. To date, molecular genetics...

  10. Antagonism between Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in planktonic systems and in biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Manuel; Simoes, Lúcia C; Pereira, Maria O; Vieira, Maria J

    2008-01-01

    In the environment, many microorganisms coexist in communities competing for resources, and they are often associated as biofilms. The investigation of bacterial ecology and interactions may help to improve understanding of the ability of biofilms to persist. In this study, the behaviour of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas fluorescens in the planktonic and sessile states was compared. Planktonic tests were performed with single and dual species cultures in growth medium with and without supplemental FeCl3. B. cereus and P. fluorescens single cultures had equivalent growth behaviours. Also, when in co-culture under Fe-supplemented conditions, the bacteria coexisted and showed similar growth profiles. Under Fe limitation, 8 h after co-culture and over time, the number of viable B. cereus cells decreased compared with P. fluorescens. Spores were detected during the course of the experiment, but were not correlated with the decrease in the number of viable cells. This growth inhibitory effect was correlated with the release of metabolite molecules by P. fluorescens through Fe-dependent mechanisms. Biofilm studies were carried out with single and dual species using a continuous flow bioreactor rotating system with stainless steel (SS) substrata. Steady-state biofilms were exposed to a series of increasing shear stress forces. Analysis of the removal of dual species biofilms revealed that the outer layer was colonised mainly by B. cereus. This bacterium was able to grow in the outermost layers of the biofilm due to the inhibitory effect of P. fluorescens being decreased by the exposure of the cells to fresh culture medium. B. cereus also constituted the surface primary coloniser due to its favourable adhesion to SS. P. fluorescens was the main coloniser of the middle layers of the biofilm. Single and dual species biofilm removal data also revealed that B. cereus biofilms had the highest physical stability, followed by P. fluorescens biofilms. This study highlights the

  11. Crystal Structure of the Human Cannabinoid Receptor CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Tian; Vemuri, Kiran; Pu, Mengchen; Qu, Lu; Han, Gye Won; Wu, Yiran; Zhao, Suwen; Shui, Wenqing; Li, Shanshan; Korde, Anisha; Laprairie, Robert B; Stahl, Edward L; Ho, Jo-Hao; Zvonok, Nikolai; Zhou, Han; Kufareva, Irina; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang; Hanson, Michael A; Bohn, Laura M; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Stevens, Raymond C; Liu, Zhi-Jie

    2016-10-20

    Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) is the principal target of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a psychoactive chemical from Cannabis sativa with a wide range of therapeutic applications and a long history of recreational use. CB1 is activated by endocannabinoids and is a promising therapeutic target for pain management, inflammation, obesity, and substance abuse disorders. Here, we present the 2.8 Å crystal structure of human CB1 in complex with AM6538, a stabilizing antagonist, synthesized and characterized for this structural study. The structure of the CB1-AM6538 complex reveals key features of the receptor and critical interactions for antagonist binding. In combination with functional studies and molecular modeling, the structure provides insight into the binding mode of naturally occurring CB1 ligands, such as THC, and synthetic cannabinoids. This enhances our understanding of the molecular basis for the physiological functions of CB1 and provides new opportunities for the design of next-generation CB1-targeting pharmaceuticals.

  12. Location and Survival of Mycorrhiza Helper Pseudomonas fluorescens during Establishment of Ectomycorrhizal Symbiosis between Laccaria bicolor and Douglas Fir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P.; Pierrat, J. C.; Garbaye, J.

    1997-01-01

    The mycorrhiza helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6, isolated from a Laccaria bicolor sporocarp, consistently promotes L. bicolor-Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) ectomycorrhizal formation, even with low doses of bacterial inoculum. In order to describe this phenomenon more accurately, we have looked at the location and survival of the introduced bacterial strain in the soil and in the rhizosphere during the establishment of mycorrhizal symbiosis in glasshouse and nursery experiments. Bacterial populations were quantified with a spontaneous, stable, rifampin-resistant mutant, BBc6R8, which phenotypically conformed to the parental strain. BBc6R8 populations declined rapidly, reaching the detection limit after 19 weeks, and did not increase either when L. bicolor sporocarps were forming in autumn or when Douglas fir roots resumed growing in spring. BBc6R8 was neither an endophyte nor a rhizobacterium. Furthermore, it was not particularly associated with either mycorrhizas of Douglas fir-L. bicolor or L. bicolor sporocarps. Surprisingly, a significant mycorrhiza helper effect was observed when the inoculated BBc6R8 population had dropped as low as 30 CFU g of dry matter(sup-1) in the soil. This study raises questions concerning the bacterial concentration in the soil which is effective for promotion of mycorrhizal establishment and the timing of the bacterial effect. It allows us to develop working hypotheses, which can be tested experimentally, to identify the mechanisms of the mycorrhiza helper effect. PMID:16535478

  13. New blood brothers: the GPR55 and CB2 partnership

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andy Irving

    2011-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are increasingly being recognized as key lipid-derived regulators of immune function [1].Although the peripheral cannabinoid type 2 receptor (CB2) is thought to orchestrate many of these actions,additional non-CB1/CB2-mediated effects ofcannabinoids have been identified in immune cells [1,2],where several orphan G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs),including the effusive GPR55,are implicated [3].Despite numerous studies addressing the cannabinoid sensitivity of GPR55,the area remains a pharmacological minefield,with much inconsistent and conflicting data.

  14. Cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as novel targets for inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer growth and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Anju; Qamri, Zahida; Nasser, Mohd W; Prasad, Anil; Shilo, Konstantin; Zou, Xianghong; Groopman, Jerome E; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2011-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; however, only limited therapeutic treatments are available. Hence, we investigated the role of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as novel therapeutic targets against NSCLC. We observed expression of CB1 (24%) and CB2 (55%) in NSCLC patients. Furthermore, we have shown that the treatment of NSCLC cell lines (A549 and SW-1573) with CB1/CB2- and CB2-specific agonists Win55,212-2 and JWH-015, respectively, significantly attenuated random as well as growth factor-directed in vitro chemotaxis and chemoinvasion in these cells. We also observed significant reduction in focal adhesion complex, which plays an important role in migration, upon treatment with both JWH-015 and Win55,212-2. In addition, pretreatment with CB1/CB2 selective antagonists, AM251 and AM630, prior to JWH-015 and Win55,212-2 treatments, attenuated the agonist-mediated inhibition of in vitro chemotaxis and chemoinvasion. In addition, both CB1 and CB2 agonists Win55,212-2 and JWH-133, respectively, significantly inhibited in vivo tumor growth and lung metastasis (∼50%). These effects were receptor mediated, as pretreatment with CB1/CB2 antagonists abrogated CB1/CB2 agonist-mediated effects on tumor growth and metastasis. Reduced proliferation and vascularization, along with increased apoptosis, were observed in tumors obtained from animals treated with JWH-133 and Win55,212-2. Upon further elucidation into the molecular mechanism, we observed that both CB1 and CB2 agonists inhibited phosphorylation of AKT, a key signaling molecule controlling cell survival, migration, and apoptosis, and reduced matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression and activity. These results suggest that CB1 and CB2 could be used as novel therapeutic targets against NSCLC.

  15. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Shu-Ting; Chang, Hsing-Hua; Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Kamilova, Faina; Lugtenberg, Ben; Kuo, Chih-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN). This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp) in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support for the finding

  16. Genome Analysis of Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751: A Rhizobacterium that Controls Root Diseases and Alleviates Salt Stress for Its Plant Host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Cho

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PCL1751 is a rod-shaped Gram-negative bacterium isolated from the rhizosphere of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant in Uzbekistan. It controls several plant root diseases caused by Fusarium fungi through the mechanism of competition for nutrients and niches (CNN. This mechanism does not rely on the production of antibiotics, so it avoids the concerns of resistance development and is environmentally safe. Additionally, this bacterium promotes plant growth by alleviating salt stress for its plant host. To investigate the genetic mechanisms that may explain these observations, we determined the complete genome sequence of this bacterium, examined its gene content, and performed comparative genomics analysis with other Pseudomonas strains. The genome of P. fluorescens PCL1751 consisted of one circular chromosome that is 6,143,950 base-pairs (bp in size; no plasmid was found. The annotation included 19 rRNA, 70 tRNA, and 5,534 protein-coding genes. The gene content analysis identified a large number of genes involved in chemotaxis and motility, colonization of the rhizosphere, siderophore biosynthesis, and osmoprotectant production. In contrast, the pathways involved in the biosynthesis of phytohormones or antibiotics were not found. Comparison with other Pseudomonas genomes revealed extensive variations in their genome size and gene content. The presence and absence of secretion system genes were highly variable. As expected, the synteny conservation among strains decreased as a function of phylogenetic divergence. The integration of prophages appeared to be an important driver for genome rearrangements. The whole-genome gene content analysis of this plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR provided some genetic explanations to its phenotypic characteristics. The extensive and versatile substrate utilization pathways, together with the presence of many genes involved in competitive root colonization, provided further support

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana as a tool to identify traits involved in Verticillium dahliae biocontrol by the olive root endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mercedes eMaldonado-González

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The effective management of Verticillium wilts, diseases affecting many crops and caused by some species of the soil-borne fungus Verticillium, is problematic. The use of microbial antagonists to control these pathologies fits modern sustainable agriculture criteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 is an endophytic bacterium isolated from olive roots with demonstrated ability to control Verticillium wilt of olive caused by the highly-virulent, defoliating (D pathotype of Verticillium dahliae Kleb. However, the study of the PICF7-V.dahliae-olive tripartite interaction poses difficulties because of the inherent characteristics of woody, long-living plants. To overcome these problems we explored the use of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Results obtained in this study showed that: (i olive D and non-defoliating (ND V. dahliae pathotypes produce differential disease severity in A. thaliana plants; (ii strain PICF7 is able to colonize and persist in the A. thaliana rhizosphere but is not endophytic in Arabidopsis; and (iii strain PICF7 controls Verticillium wilt (VW in Arabidopsis. Additionally, as previously observed in olive, neither swimming motility nor siderophore production by PICF7 are required for VW control in A. thaliana, whilst cysteine auxotrophy decreased the effectiveness of PICF7. Moreover, when applied to the roots PICF7 controlled Botrytis cinerea infection in the leaves of Arabidopsis, suggesting that this strain is able to induce systemic resistance. Arabidopsis thaliana is therefore a suitable alternative to olive bioassays to unravel biocontrol traits involved in biological control of V. dahliae by P. fluorescens PICF7.

  18. Effects of targeted deletion of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 on immune competence and sensitivity to immune modulation by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, Alison E B; Karmaus, Peer W F; Crawford, Robert B; Kaplan, Barbara L F; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2008-12-01

    The role of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, in immune competence and modulation by Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC) was investigated in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. Immunofluorescence analysis of splenic leukocytes showed no significant differences in the percentage of T cell subsets, B cells, or macrophages between wild-type and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. Lymphoproliferative control responses to PHA, phorbol ester plus ionomycin, or LPS and sensitivity to suppression by Delta9-THC showed no profound differences between the two genotypes, although some differences were observed in control baseline responses. Likewise, similar control responses and sensitivity to Delta9-THC were observed in mixed lymphocyte responses (MLR) and in IL-2 and IFN-gamma production in both genotypes. Conversely, humoral immune responses showed a markedly different profile of activity. Delta9-THC suppressed the in vivo T cell-dependent, anti-sheep RBC (anti-sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response in wild-type but not in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice, and the in vitro anti-sRBC IgM response in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) splenocytes was too low to rigorously assess CB1/CB2 involvement in modulation by Delta9-THC. Conversely, comparable in vitro IgM AFC control responses to LPS and CD40 ligand (CD40L) activation were observed in the two genotypes. Interestingly, LPS-induced IgM responses were refractory to suppression by Delta9-THC, regardless of genotype, and CD40L-induced IgM responses were only suppressed by Delta9-THC in wild-type but not in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) B cells. Collectively, we demonstrate differential involvement of CB1 and/or CB2 in immune modulation by Delta9-THC and in some control responses. Moreover, CB1/CB2 involvement was observed in humoral responses requiring CD40-initiated signaling for suppression by Delta9-THC.

  19. LEP measurements of $V_{cb}$ and $V_{ub}$

    CERN Document Server

    Hawkings, R

    2001-01-01

    The measurements of the magnitudes of the CKM matrix elements V/sub cb/ and V/sub ub/ from LEP are reviewed. V/sub cb/ is measured using the decay B/sup 0/ to D*/sup +/l/sup -/ nu , whilst V/sub ub/ is measured using inclusive charmless semileptonic b decays. Particular attention is paid to the limiting systematic errors in each case. (20 refs).

  20. Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Macrococcus caseolyticus by nano-TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photocatalytic disinfection of spoilage bacteria gram-negative (G-) P. fluorescens and gram-positive (G+) M. caseolyticus by nano-TiO2 under different experimental conditions and the disinfection mechanism were investigated. The experimental conditions included the initial bacterial populations, nan...

  1. Pseudomonas fluorescens Tn5-B20 mutant RA92 responds to carbon limitation in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overbeek, van L.S.; Elsas, van J.D.; Veen, van J.A.

    1997-01-01

    Tn5-B20 (lacZ as reporter gene) transcriptional fusion mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens R2f Rpr were screened for their response to carbon limitation. Reporter gene expression was specifically induced by this stress factor in one mutant, designated RA92, and to a lower extent by phosphorus and nit

  2. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  3. Improved Performance of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase by covalent immobilization onto Amberzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aslan, Yakup; Handayani, Nurrahmi; Stavila, Erythrina; Loos, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this study, the conditions of covalent immobilization of Pseudomonas fluorescens lipase onto an oxirane-activated support (Amberzyme) were optimized to obtain a high activity yield. Furthermore, the operational and storage stabilities of immobilized lipase were tested. Methods: Optimum

  4. Comparison of the growth kinetics and proteolytic activities of Chryseobacterium species and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, A; Steyn, L; Charimba, G; Jooste, P; Hugo, C

    2015-12-01

    The effect of temperature on the growth kinetics and proteolytic activity of Chryseobacterium joostei and Chryseobacterium bovis was determined during this study. The results were compared with the activities of Pseudomonas fluorescens, which is regarded to be a major food spoilage psychrotolerant microorganism. For the growth studies, cultures were incubated in nutrient broth in a temperature gradient incubator (from 9 to 50 °C) and separately at 4 °C, and the optical density was measured at different time intervals. Growth temperature profiles for each organism were constructed. For determination of proteolytic activity, the cultures were incubated in fat-free ultra-high temperature processed milk in the temperature gradient incubator for 72 h (temperature range as above). Cell-free extracts were used to determine the proteolytic activity using the azocasein method. Results of the growth studies showed that C. joostei had the ability to grow over a wider temperature range than C. bovis and P. fluorescens without being affected by changes in the temperature. For the proteolytic activity, C. joostei had significantly (p < 0.001) higher activity per milligram of protein at 15.5 °C, followed by C. bovis and P. fluorescens. The results showed that C. joostei potentially has an even greater spoilage capacity in milk on the basis of growth rate and proteolytic activity than did P. fluorescens.

  5. Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns as affected by inoculant treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekman, W.E.; Heijnen, C.E.; Trevors, J.T.; Elsas, van J.D.

    1994-01-01

    Water flow induced transport of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells through soil columns was measured as affected by the inoculant treatment. Bacterial cells were introduced into the topsoil of columns, either encapsulated in alginate beads of different types or mixed with bentonite clay in concentrations

  6. Evolutionary history of the phl gene cluster in the plant-associated bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moynihan, J.A.; Morrissey, J.P.; Coppoolse, E.; Stiekema, W.J.; O'Gara, F.; Boyd, E.F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is of agricultural and economic importance as a biological control agent largely because of its plant-association and production of secondary metabolites, in particular 2, 4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2, 4-DAPG). This polyketide, which is encoded by the eight gene phl cluster,

  7. Switching Catalysis from Hydrolysis to Perhydrolysis in Pseudomonas fluorescens Esterase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, D.; Bernhardt, P; Morley, K; Jiang, Y; Cheeseman, J; Purpero, V; Schrag, J; Kazlauskas, R

    2010-01-01

    Many serine hydrolases catalyze perhydrolysis, the reversible formation of peracids from carboxylic acids and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we showed that a single amino acid substitution in the alcohol binding pocket, L29P, in Pseudomonas fluorescens (SIK WI) aryl esterase (PFE) increased the specificity constant of PFE for peracetic acid formation >100-fold [Bernhardt et al. (2005) Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 44, 2742]. In this paper, we extend this work to address the three following questions. First, what is the molecular basis of the increase in perhydrolysis activity? We previously proposed that the L29P substitution creates a hydrogen bond between the enzyme and hydrogen peroxide in the transition state. Here we report two X-ray structures of L29P PFE that support this proposal. Both structures show a main chain carbonyl oxygen closer to the active site serine as expected. One structure further shows acetate in the active site in an orientation consistent with reaction by an acyl-enzyme mechanism. We also detected an acyl-enzyme intermediate in the hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone by mass spectrometry. Second, can we further increase perhydrolysis activity? We discovered that the reverse reaction, hydrolysis of peracetic acid to acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide, occurs at nearly the diffusion limited rate. Since the reverse reaction cannot increase further, neither can the forward reaction. Consistent with this prediction, two variants with additional amino acid substitutions showed 2-fold higher k{sub cat}, but K{sub m} also increased so the specificity constant, k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, remained similar. Third, how does the L29P substitution change the esterase activity? Ester hydrolysis decreased for most esters (75-fold for ethyl acetate) but not for methyl esters. In contrast, L29P PFE catalyzed hydrolysis of {var_epsilon}-caprolactone five times more efficiently than wild-type PFE. Molecular modeling suggests that moving the carbonyl group closer to the

  8. CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors and their Associated Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, Allyn C.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Dalton, George D.

    2011-01-01

    CB1 receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) abundant in neurons, in which they modulate neurotransmission. The CB1 receptor influence on memory and learning is well recognized, and disease states associated with CB1 receptors are observed in addiction disorders, motor dysfunction, schizophrenia, and in bipolar, depression, and anxiety disorders. Beyond the brain, CB1 receptors also function in liver and adipose tissues, vascular as well as cardiac tissue, reproductive tissues and bone. Signal transduction by CB1 receptors occurs through interaction with Gi/o proteins to inhibit adenylyl cyclase, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, activate K+ currents (Kir), and influence Nitric Oxide (NO) signaling. CB1 receptors are observed in internal organelles as well as plasma membrane. β-Arrestins, adaptor protein AP-3, and G-protein receptor-associated sorting protein 1 (GASP1) modulate cellular trafficking. Cannabinoid Receptor Interacting Protein 1a (CRIP1a) is an accessory protein whose function has not been delineated. Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase (FAN) regulates ceramide signaling. Such diversity in cellular signaling and modulation by interacting proteins suggests that agonists and allosteric modulators could be developed to specifically regulate unique, cell type-specific responses. PMID:20166926

  9. Cannabinoid receptors are widely expressed in goldfish: molecular cloning of a CB2-like receptor and evaluation of CB1 and CB2 mRNA expression profiles in different organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Erika; Pomatto, Valentina; Cerri, Fulvio; Campantico, Ezio; Mackie, Ken; Delpero, Massimiliano; Guastalla, Alda; Dati, Claudio; Bovolin, Patrizia; Franzoni, Maria Fosca

    2013-10-01

    Cannabinoids, the bioactive constituents of Cannabis sativa, and endocannabinoids, among which the most important are anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, control various biological processes by binding to specific G protein-coupled receptors, namely CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors. While a vast amount of information on the mammalian endocannabinoid system does exist, few data have been reported on bony fish. In the goldfish, Carassius auratus, the CB1 receptor has been cloned and its distribution has been analyzed in the retina, brain and gonads, while CB2 had not yet been isolated. In the present paper, we cloned the goldfish CB2 receptor and show that it presents a quite high degree of amino acid identity with zebrafish Danio rerio CB2A and CB2B receptors, while the percentage of identity is lower with the puffer fish Fugu rubripes CB2, as also confirmed by the phylogenetic analysis. The sequence identity becomes much lower when comparing the goldfish and the mammalian CB2 sequences; as for other species, goldfish CB2 and CB1 amino acid sequences share moderate levels of identity. Western-blotting analysis shows the CB2 receptor as two major bands of about 53 and 40 kDa and other faint bands with apparent molecular masses around 70, 57 and 55 kDa. Since the distribution of a receptor could give information on its physiological role, we evaluated and compared CB1 and CB2 mRNA expression in different goldfish organs by means of qReal-Time PCR. Our results show that both CB1 and CB2 receptors are widely expressed in the goldfish, displaying some tissue specificities, thus opening the way for further functional studies on bony fish and other nonmammalian vertebrates.

  10. Analysis of Bacillus thuringiensis Population Dynamics and Its Interaction With Pseudomonas fluorescens in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Ruiz, Norma Elena; Sansinenea-Royano, Estibaliz; Cedillo-Ramirez, Maria Lilia; Marsch-Moreno, Rodolfo; Sanchez-Alonso, Patricia; Vazquez-Cruz, Candelario

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bacillus thuringiensis is the most successful biological control agent, however, studies so far have shown that B. thuringiensis is very sensitive to environmental factors such as soil moisture and pH. Ultraviolet light from the sun had been considered as the main limiting factor for its persistence in soil and it has recently been shown that the antagonism exerted by other native soil organisms, such as Pseudomonas fluorescens, is a determining factor in the persistence of this bacterium under in vitro culture conditions. Objectives: The aim of the present investigation was to analyze the population dynamics of B. thuringiensis and its interaction with P. fluorescens using microbiological and molecular methods in soil, under different conditions, and to determinate the effect of nutrients and moisture on its interaction. Materials and Methods: The monitoring was performed by microbiological methods, such as viable count of bacteria, and molecular methods such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and hybridization, using the direct extraction of DNA from populations of inoculated soil. Results: The analysis of the interaction between B. thuringiensis and P. fluorescens in soil indicated that the disappearance of B. thuringiensis IPS82 is not dependent on the moisture but the composition of nutrients that may be affecting the secretion of toxic compounds in the environment of P. fluorescens. The results showed that the recovered cells were mostly spores and not vegetative cells in all proved treatments. The molecular methods were effective for monitoring bacterial population inoculated in soil. Conclusions: Bacillus thuringiensis is very sensitive to the interaction of P. fluorescens, however is capable to survive in soil due to its capacity of sporulate. Some of the cells in the form of spores germinated and folded slightly and remained in a constant cycle of sporulation and germination. This confirms that B. thuringiensis IPS82 can germinate, grow and

  11. Genetic Control of Plant Root Colonization by the Biocontrol agent, Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Benjamin J.; Fletcher, Meghan; Waters, Jordan; Wetmore, Kelly; Blow, Matthew J.; Deutschbauer, Adam M.; Dangl, Jeffry L.; Visel, Axel

    2015-03-19

    Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) are a critical component of plant root ecosystems. PGPR promote plant growth by solubilizing inaccessible minerals, suppressing pathogenic microorganisms in the soil, and directly stimulating growth through hormone synthesis. Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-established PGPR isolated from wheat roots that can also colonize the root system of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We have created barcoded transposon insertion mutant libraries suitable for genome-wide transposon-mediated mutagenesis followed by sequencing (TnSeq). These libraries consist of over 105 independent insertions, collectively providing loss-of-function mutants for nearly all genes in the P.fluorescens genome. Each insertion mutant can be unambiguously identified by a randomized 20 nucleotide sequence (barcode) engineered into the transposon sequence. We used these libraries in a gnotobiotic assay to examine the colonization ability of P.fluorescens on A.thaliana roots. Taking advantage of the ability to distinguish individual colonization events using barcode sequences, we assessed the timing and microbial concentration dependence of colonization of the rhizoplane niche. These data provide direct insight into the dynamics of plant root colonization in an in vivo system and define baseline parameters for the systematic identification of the bacterial genes and molecular pathways using TnSeq assays. Having determined parameters that facilitate potential colonization of roots by thousands of independent insertion mutants in a single assay, we are currently establishing a genome-wide functional map of genes required for root colonization in P.fluorescens. Importantly, the approach developed and optimized here for P.fluorescens>A.thaliana colonization will be applicable to a wide range of plant-microbe interactions, including biofuel feedstock plants and microbes known or hypothesized to impact on biofuel-relevant traits including biomass productivity

  12. CB1 and CB2 receptors are novel molecular targets for Tamoxifen and 4OH-Tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Paul L; FrancisDevaraj, FeAna; Dates, Centdrika R; Greer, Aleksandra K; Bratton, Stacie M; Ford, Benjamin M; Franks, Lirit N; Radominska-Pandya, Anna

    2013-11-15

    Tamoxifen (Tam) is classified as a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and is used for treatment of patients with ER-positive breast cancer. However, it has been shown that Tam and its cytochrome P450-generated metabolite 4-hydroxy-Tam (4OH-Tam) also exhibit cytotoxic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells. These observations suggest that Tam and 4OH-Tam can produce cytotoxicity via estrogen receptor (ER)-independent mechanism(s) of action. The molecular targets responsible for the ER-independent effects of Tam and its derivatives are poorly understood. Interestingly, similar to Tam and 4OH-Tam, cannabinoids have also been shown to exhibit anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in ER-negative breast cancer cells, and estrogen can regulate expression levels of cannabinoid receptors (CBRs). Therefore, this study investigated whether CBRs might serve as novel molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam. We report that both compounds bind to CB1 and CB2Rs with moderate affinity (0.9-3 μM). Furthermore, Tam and 4OH-Tam exhibit inverse activity at CB1 and CB2Rs in membrane preparations, reducing basal G-protein activity. Tam and 4OH-Tam also act as CB1/CB2R-inverse agonists to regulate the downstream intracellular effector adenylyl cyclase in intact cells, producing concentration-dependent increases in intracellular cAMP. These results suggest that CBRs are molecular targets for Tam and 4OH-Tam and may contribute to the ER-independent cytotoxic effects reported for these drugs. Importantly, these findings also indicate that Tam and 4OH-Tam might be used as structural scaffolds for development of novel, efficacious, non-toxic cancer drugs acting via CB1 and/or CB2Rs.

  13. Inactivation of Salmonella serovars by Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains on tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica and its serovars have been associated with pathogen contamination of tomatoes and numerous outbreaks of Salmonellisis. To improve food safety, pathogen control is of immediate concern. The aim of this reserach was to: 1) Assess the populations of natural microflora (aerobic meso...

  14. Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouskila, Joseph; Javadi, Pasha; Casanova, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The presence of the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1R) has been largely documented in the rodent and primate retinae in recent years. There is, however, some controversy concerning the presence of the CB2 receptor (CB2R) within the central nervous system. Only recently, CB2R has been found...... in the rodent retina, but its presence in the primate retina has not yet been demonstrated. The aim of this study was twofold: 1) to characterize the distribution patterns of CB2R in the monkey retina and compare this distribution with that previously reported for CB1R and 2) to resolve the controversy...... on the presence of CB2R in the neural component of the retina. We therefore thoroughly examined the cellular localization of CB2R in the vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) retina, using confocal microscopy. Our results demonstrate that CB2R, like CB1R, is present throughout the retinal layers, but with striking...

  15. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2 suppresses microglial activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernandez Francisco

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activated microglial cells have been implicated in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's disease (AD, multiple sclerosis (MS, and HIV dementia. It is well known that inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide (NO, cytokines, and chemokines play an important role in microglial cell-associated neuron cell damage. Our previous studies have shown that CD40 signaling is involved in pathological activation of microglial cells. Many data reveal that cannabinoids mediate suppression of inflammation in vitro and in vivo through stimulation of cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2. Methods In this study, we investigated the effects of a cannabinoid agonist on CD40 expression and function by cultured microglial cells activated by IFN-γ using RT-PCR, Western immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and anti-CB2 small interfering RNA (siRNA analyses. Furthermore, we examined if the stimulation of CB2 could modulate the capacity of microglial cells to phagocytise Aβ1–42 peptide using a phagocytosis assay. Results We found that the selective stimulation of cannabinoid receptor CB2 by JWH-015 suppressed IFN-γ-induced CD40 expression. In addition, this CB2 agonist markedly inhibited IFN-γ-induced phosphorylation of JAK/STAT1. Further, this stimulation was also able to suppress microglial TNF-α and nitric oxide production induced either by IFN-γ or Aβ peptide challenge in the presence of CD40 ligation. Finally, we showed that CB2 activation by JWH-015 markedly attenuated CD40-mediated inhibition of microglial phagocytosis of Aβ1–42 peptide. Taken together, these results provide mechanistic insight into beneficial effects provided by cannabinoid receptor CB2 modulation in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly AD.

  16. Phenazine-1-Carboxylic Acid Production by Pseudomonas fluorescens LBUM636 Alters Phytophthora infestans Growth and Late Blight Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christopher K; Arseneault, Tanya; Novinscak, Amy; Filion, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Phytophthora infestans causes late blight of potato, one of the most devastating diseases affecting potato production. Alternative approaches for controlling late blight are being increasingly sought due to increasing environmental concerns over the use of chemical pesticides and the increasing resistance of P. infestans to fungicides. Our research group has isolated a new strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens (LBUM636) of biocontrol interest producing the antibiotic phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA). Wild-type LBUM636 was shown to significantly inhibit the growth of Phytophthora infestans in in vitro confrontational assays whereas its isogenic mutant (phzC-; not producing PCA) only slightly altered the pathogen's growth. Wild-type LBUM636 but not the phzC- mutant also completely repressed disease symptom development on tubers. A pot experiment revealed that wild-type LBUM636 can significantly reduce P. infestans populations in the rhizosphere and in the roots of potato plants, as well as reduce in planta disease symptoms due to PCA production. The expression of eight common plant defense-related genes (ChtA, PR-1b, PR-2, PR-5, LOX, PIN2, PAL-2, and ERF3) was quantified in tubers, roots, and leaves by reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and revealed that the biocontrol observed was not associated with the induction of a plant defense response by LBUM636. Instead, a direct interaction between P. infestans and LBUM636 is required and PCA production appears to be a key factor for LBUM636's biocontrol ability.

  17. A novel psychrophilic lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens with unique property in chiral resolution and biodiesel production via transesterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yu; Zheng Yitao; Jiang Zhengbing; Ma Yushu; Wei Dongzhi [East China Univ. of Science and Tech., Shanghai (China). State Key Lab. of Bioreactor Engineering

    2006-11-15

    A lipase-producing bacterium strain B68 screened from soil samples of China was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. With GenomeWalker, the open reading frame of lipase gene lipB68, encoding 476 amino acids, was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). By affinity chromatography, the recombinant LipB68 protein was purified to the purity of 95%. As a member of lipase subfamily I.3, LipB68 has a unique optimum temperature of 20 C, which was the lowest in this subfamily. In chiral resolution, LipB68 effectively catalyzed the transesterification of both a-phenylethanol and a-phenylpropanol at 20 C, achieving E values greater than 100 and 60 after 120 h, respectively. Among all the known catalysts in biodiesel production, LipB68 produced biodiesel with a yield of 92% after 12 h, at the lowest temperature of 20 C, and is the first one of the I.3 lipase subfamily reported to be capable of catalyzing the transesterification reaction of biodiesel production. Since lipasemediated biodiesel production is normally carried out at 35-50 C, the availability of a highly active lipase with a low optimal temperature can provide substantial savings in energy consumption. Thus, this novel psychrophilic lipase (LipB68) may represent a highly competitive energy-saving biocatalyst. (orig.)

  18. Genetic responses induced in olive roots upon colonization by the biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Schilirò

    Full Text Available Knowledge on the genetic basis underlying interactions between beneficial bacteria and woody plants is still very limited, and totally absent in the case of olive. We aimed to elucidate genetic responses taking place during the colonization of olive roots by the native endophyte Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, an effective biocontrol agent against Verticillium wilt of olive. Roots of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after PICF7 inoculation. A Suppression Subtractive Hybridization cDNA library enriched in induced genes was generated. Quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis validated the induction of selected olive genes. Computational analysis of 445 olive ESTs showed that plant defence and response to different stresses represented nearly 45% of genes induced in PICF7-colonized olive roots. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR analysis confirmed induction of lipoxygenase, phenylpropanoid, terpenoids and plant hormones biosynthesis transcripts. Different classes of transcription factors (i.e., bHLH, WRKYs, GRAS1 were also induced. This work highlights for the first time the ability of an endophytic Pseudomonas spp. strain to mount a wide array of defence responses in an economically-relevant woody crop such as olive, helping to explain its biocontrol activity.

  19. Oxygen isotopic compositions of chondrules from the metal-rich chondrites Isheyevo (CH/CB b), MAC 02675 (CB b) and QUE 94627 (CB b)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Yoshitake, Miwa; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2010-04-01

    It has been recently suggested that (1) CH chondrites and the CB b/CH-like chondrite Isheyevo contain two populations of chondrules formed by different processes: (i) magnesian non-porphyritic (cryptocrystalline and barred) chondrules, which are similar to those in the CB chondrites and formed in an impact-generated plume of melt and gas resulted from large-scale asteroidal collision, and (ii) porphyritic chondrules formed by melting of solid precursors in the solar nebula. (2) Porphyritic chondrules in Isheyevo and CH chondrites are different from porphyritic chondrules in other carbonaceous chondrites ( Krot et al., 2005, 2008a,b). In order to test these hypotheses, we measured in situ oxygen isotopic compositions of porphyritic (magnesian, Type I and ferroan, Type II) and non-porphyritic (magnesian and ferroan cryptocrystalline) chondrules from Isheyevo and CB b chondrites MAC 02675 and QUE 94627, paired with QUE 94611, using a Cameca ims-1280 ion microprobe. On a three-isotope oxygen diagram ( δ17O vs. δ18O), compositions of chondrules measured follow approximately slope-1 line. Data for 19 magnesian cryptocrystalline chondrules from Isheyevo, 24 magnesian cryptocrystalline chondrules and 6 magnesian cryptocrystalline silicate inclusions inside chemically-zoned Fe,Ni-metal condensates from CB b chondrites have nearly identical compositions: Δ17O = -2.2 ± 0.9‰, -2.3 ± 0.6‰ and -2.2 ± 1.0‰ (2 σ), respectively. These observations and isotopically light magnesium compositions of cryptocrystalline magnesian chondrules in CB b chondrites ( Gounelle et al., 2007) are consistent with their single-stage origin, possibly as gas-melt condensates in an impact-generated plume. In contrast, Δ17O values for 11 Type I and 9 Type II chondrules from Isheyevo range from -5‰ to +4‰ and from -17‰ to +3‰, respectively. In contrast to typical chondrules from carbonaceous chondrites, seven out of 11 Type I chondrules from Isheyevo plot above the terrestrial

  20. 47 CFR 95.423 - (CB Rule 23) What must I do if the FCC tells me that my CB station is causing interference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 23) What must I do if the FCC tells me...) Radio Service Other Things You Need to Know § 95.423 (CB Rule 23) What must I do if the FCC tells me that my CB station is causing interference? (a) If the FCC tells you that your CB station is...

  1. The diverse CB1 and CB2 receptor pharmacology of three plant cannabinoids: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol and delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pertwee, R G

    2008-01-01

    Cannabis sativa is the source of a unique set of compounds known collectively as plant cannabinoids or phytocannabinoids. This review focuses on the manner with which three of these compounds, (-)-trans-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC), (-)-cannabidiol (CBD) and (-)-trans-delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (delta9-THCV), interact with cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. Delta9-THC, the main psychotropic constituent of cannabis, is a CB1 and CB2 receptor partial agonist and in line with classical pharmacology, the responses it elicits appear to be strongly influenced both by the expression level and signalling efficiency of cannabinoid receptors and by ongoing endogenous cannabinoid release. CBD displays unexpectedly high potency as an antagonist of CB1/CB2 receptor agonists in CB1- and CB2-expressing cells or tissues, the manner with which it interacts with CB2 receptors providing a possible explanation for its ability to inhibit evoked immune cell migration. Delta9-THCV behaves as a potent CB2 receptor partial agonist in vitro. In contrast, it antagonizes cannabinoid receptor agonists in CB1-expressing tissues. This it does with relatively high potency and in a manner that is both tissue and ligand dependent. Delta9-THCV also interacts with CB1 receptors when administered in vivo, behaving either as a CB1 antagonist or, at higher doses, as a CB1 receptor agonist. Brief mention is also made in this review, first of the production by delta9-THC of pharmacodynamic tolerance, second of current knowledge about the extent to which delta9-THC, CBD and delta9-THCV interact with pharmacological targets other than CB1 or CB2 receptors, and third of actual and potential therapeutic applications for each of these cannabinoids.

  2. Comparison of the D2 Receptor Regulation and Neurotoxicant Susceptibility of Nigrostriatal Dopamine Neurons in Wild-Type and CB1/CB2 Receptor Knockout Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Simkins, Tyrell J.; Janis, Kelly L.; McClure, Alison K.; Behrouz, Bahareh; Pappas, Samuel S.; Lehner, Andreas; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Goudreau, John L.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Kaplan, Barbara L. F.

    2012-01-01

    Motor dysfunctions of Parkinson Disease (PD) are due to the progressive loss of midbrain nigrostriatal dopamine (NSDA) neurons. Evidence suggests a role for cannabinoid receptors in the neurodegeneration of these neurons following neurotoxicant-induced injury. This work evaluates NSDA neurons in CB1/CB2 knockout (KO) mice and tests the hypothesis that CB1/CB2 KO mice are more susceptible to neurotoxicant exposure. NSDA neuronal indices were assessed using unbiased stereological cell counting,...

  3. An attempt to protect winter wheat against Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici by the use of rhizobacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens and Bacillus mycoides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaban, Janusz; Ksiezniak, Andrzej; Wróblewska, Barbara; Paszkowski, Wojciech L

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains III107 and II21 and Bacillus mycoides strains JC192 and K184, stimulating growth of winter wheat, were chosen for the studies. The bacterial strains inhibited on agar nutrient medium the growth of Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici (Ggt)--the pathogenic fungus causing take-all on wheat. Both strains of pseudomonads synthesized relatively high amounts of Fe3+ chelators. The strains of bacilli were characterized by the very fast spreading on agar media. Furthermore, strain II21 was highly cyanogenic, and strain JC192 highly chitinolytic. Bacterization of winter wheat seeds (especially with strains III107 and JC192) significantly reduced the percentage of the plants infested with the pathogen in the 28 day glasshouse pot experiment. In the plot experiment, the winter wheat seeds were inoculated with a mixture of strains III107, II21 and JC192. Due to the bacterization the yield of wheat grain and straw was higher in comparison to the series with Ggt alone by 122% and 75%, respectively, but it amounted only to 45% and 43% of the control series not contaminated with Ggt. The decrease of percentage of wheat ears with weight less than 500 mg from 61% in Ggt-series to 25% in Ggt-bacterized-series, and especially the decrease of percentage of wheat ears with weight less than 200 mg from 43% to 14% additionally indicate the partial protection of the winter wheat against Ggt by the rhizobacteria. In the experimental series not contaminated with Ggt the percentage of these wheat ears fractions did not exceed 3% and 0.5%, respectively.

  4. Structure of a putative BenF-like porin from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 at 2.6 A resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampathkumar, P.; Swaminathan, S.; Lu, F.; Zhao, X.; Li, Z.; Gilmore, J.; Bain, K.; Rutter, M. E.; Gheyi, T.; Schwinn, D.; Bonanno, J. B.; Pieper, U.; Fajardo, J. E.; Fiser, A.; Almo, S. C.; Chance, M. R.; Baker, D.; Atwell, S.; Thompson, D. A.; Emtage, J. S.; Wasserman, S. R.; Sali, A.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.

    2010-11-01

    of benzoate. BLAST analysis of the amino acid sequence of P. fluorescens Pf-5 gene PFL1329 (Uniprot id: http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/Q4KH25) against P. putida KT2440 strain identified 20 related porins. The top six hits include P. putida KT2440 genes PP1383 (annotated as BenF-like), PP2517 (annotated as BenF-like), and PP3168 (annotated as BenF), which share sequence identities of 76%, 66%, and 44% with PFL1329, respectively. The precise functions of these genes are not yet known. Therefore, we refer to the protein product of gene PFL1329 as PflBenF-like, which reflects its current annotation in the Uniprot database. Crystal structures of OprD and OpdK (vanillate specific porin), both from P. aeruginosa (designated below as PaOprD and PaOpdK, respectively) have been determined. Herein, we report the crystal structure of a putative BenF-like porin from P. fluorescens Pf-5 (PflBenF-like). For the sake of brevity, all subsequent references to the PflBenF-like porin will be made using PflBenF. X-ray crystallography revealed a canonical 18-stranded {beta}-barrel fold that forms a central pore with a diameter of {approx}4.6 E. We describe detailed comparisons of the PflBenF structure with those of PaOprD and PaOpdK.

  5. Pseudomine, an isoxazolidone with siderophoric activity from Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2 isolated from Lake Victorian Nile Perch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthoni, U.; Christophersen, C.; Nielsen, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    A siderophore, pseudomonine, and sodium salicylate were isolated from the culture broth of iron-deficient cultures of Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2 isolated from the surface of spoiled Nile Perch from Lake Victoria......A siderophore, pseudomonine, and sodium salicylate were isolated from the culture broth of iron-deficient cultures of Pseudomonas fluorescens AH2 isolated from the surface of spoiled Nile Perch from Lake Victoria...

  6. The effects of charge-neutralizing mutation D6.30N on the functions of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebane, Ntsang M; Kellie, Brandon; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2006-10-02

    Charge-neutralizing mutation D6.30N of the human cannabinoid receptor subtype 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid receptor subtype 2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors was made to test two hypotheses: (1) D6.30 may be crucial for the functions of CB1 and CB2 receptors. (2) D6.30 may participate in an ionic lock with R3.50 that keeps the receptors in an inactive conformation. Specific ligand binding and ligand-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation were observed with human embryonic kidney epithelial cell line (HEK293) cells expressing wild-type CB1 and CB2, as well as CB1D6.30N and CB2D6.30N mutant receptors. There was however a decrease in maximum response of the mutant receptors compared to their wild-type counterparts, suggesting that D6.30 is essential for full activation of both CB1 and CB2 receptors. Both CB1D6.30N and CB2D6.30N demonstrated a level of constitutive activity no greater than that of their wild-type counterparts, indicating that either D6.30 does not participate in a salt bridge with R3.50, or the salt bridge is not critical for keeping cannabinoid receptors in the inactive conformation.

  7. Novel adamantyl cannabinoids as CB1 receptor probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ganesh A; Bajaj, Shama; Paronis, Carol; Peng, Yan; Bowman, Anna L; Barak, Lawrence S; Caron, Marc G; Parrish, Demon; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2013-05-23

    In previous studies, compound 1 (AM411), a 3-(1-adamantyl) analogue of the phytocannabinoid (-)-Δ(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(8)-THC), was shown to have improved affinity and selectivity for the CB1 receptor. In this work, we further explored the role of the 1-adamantyl group at the C-3 position in a series of tricyclic cannabinoid analogues modified at the 9-northern aliphatic hydroxyl (NAH) position. Of these, 9-hydroxymethyl hexahydrocannabinol 11 (AM4054) exhibited high CB1 affinity and full agonist profile. In the cAMP assay, the 9-hydroxymethyl cannabinol analogue 24 (AM4089) had a partial agonist profile, with high affinity and moderate selectivity for rCB1 over hCB2. In vivo results in rat models of hypothermia and analgesia were congruent with in vitro data. Our in vivo data indicate that 3-(1-adamantyl) substitution, within NAH cannabinergics, imparts improved pharmacological profiles when compared to the corresponding, traditionally used 3-dimethylheptyl analogues and identifies 11 and 24 as potentially useful in vivo CB1 cannabinergic probes.

  8. Decoloring Conditions to Congon Red by Irpex lacteus CB1%乳白耙齿菌菌株CB1对刚果红染料的脱色条件

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石亚攀; 池玉杰; 于存; 韩树英

    2016-01-01

    [Objective]Strain Irpex lacteus CB1 ( Il-CB1 ) was identified firstly and its decoloring conditions to congo red was systematically studied so as to prove its application potentials in dye decolorization.[Method]On the basis of morphological identification,the ITS sequence of Il-CB1 was cloned and its phylogenetic analysis was made. The effects of pH value,congo red concentration,and adding time of dye on decoloring congo red by Il-CB1 were tested through single factor experiments,and the effects of other five factors including carbon concentration,nitrogen concentration,Cu2 +and Mn2 + concentration and inoculum volume on decolorization of Il-CB1 were studied through orthogonal experiment.[Result]The ITS sequence of Il-CB1 and other 24 ITS sequences from different I. lacteus strains clustered together, indicating that Il-CB1 was I. lacteus. The effect of pH value on congo red decolorization showed that decolorization percent increased first and then decreased with the increase of pH value. The decolorization percent both was very low under pH 3 and 8 ,the optimum pH value was 6. 0 . Decolorization percents under different congo red concentrations increased first and then decreased with the increase of congo red concentration. Decolorization percent under 100 mg·L -1 congo red was the highest,and it decreased significantly under 250 mg·L -1 congo red,indicating that lower congo red concentrations promoted decolorization,while higher congo red concentration inhibited decolorization. Orthogonal experiment showed that the most optimal culture parameters to decolorization were: glucose 10 g·L -1 ,peptone 3 g·L -1 ,Cu2 +and Mn2 +both 0. 2 mmol·L -1 ,7 mL inoculum volume of mycelium liquor in 100 mL culture solution bottled in 250 mL flask. Decolorization percent was 99. 60% on 5 d under above-mentioned conditions. Decolorization at different adding time of congo red was tested based on all above optimal culture conditions. The initial decolorization percent

  9. Evaluation of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma: associations with clinicopathological parameters and patients' survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, Stamatios; Giaginis, Constantinos; Alexandrou, Paraskevi; Rodriguez, Jose; Tasoulas, Jason; Danas, Eugene; Patsouris, Efstratios; Klijanienko, Jerzy

    2016-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptors (CB1R and CB2R) constitute essential members of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) which participates in many different functions indispensable to homeostatic regulation in several tissues, exerting also antitumorigenic effects. The present study aimed to assess the clinical significance of CB1R and CB2R protein expression in mobile tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). CB1R and CB2R expression was assessed immunohistochemically on 28 mobile tongue SCC tissue samples and was analyzed in relation with clinicopathological characteristics and overall and disease-free patients' survival. CB1R, CB2R, and concomitant CB1R/CB2R expression was significantly increased in older compared to younger mobile tongue SCC patients (p = 0.0243, p = 0.0079, and p = 0.0366, respectively). Enhanced CB2R and concomitant CB1R/CB2R expression was significantly more frequently observed in female compared to male mobile tongue SCC patients (p = 0.0025 and p = 0.0016, respectively). Elevated CB2R expression was significantly more frequently observed in mobile tongue SCC patients presenting well-defined tumor shape compared to those with diffuse (p = 0.0430). Mobile tongue SCC patients presenting enhanced CB1R, CB2R, or concomitant CB1R/CB2R expression showed significantly longer overall (log-rank test, p = 0.004, p = 0.011, p = 0.018, respectively) and disease-free (log-rank test, p = 0.003, p = 0.007, p = 0.027, respectively) survival times compared to those with low expression. In multivariate analysis, CB1R was identified as an independent prognostic factor for disease-free patients' survival (Cox-regression analysis, p = 0.032). The present study provides evidence that CB1R and CB2R may play a role in the pathophysiological aspects of the mobile tongue SCC and even each molecule may constitute a potential target for the development of novel anti-cancer drugs for this type of malignancy.

  10. Blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors does not prevent the antipruritic effect of systemic paracetamol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saglam, Gulis; Gunduz, Ozgur; Ulugol, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors have been shown to mediate the antinociceptive, but not the hypothermic, action of the worldwide used analgesic, paracetamol. Since itch and pain sensations share many similarities, the purpose of the present study was to investigate whether blockade of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors participates in the antipruritic activity of paracetamol in mice. Scratching behavior was induced by intradermal serotonin injection into the rostral part of the back of the mice. After serotonin administration, scratching of the injected site by the hind paws were videotaped and counted for 30 min. Serotonin-induced scratching behavior was attenuated with high-dose paracetamol (300 mg/kg). The CB1 receptor antagonist, AM-251 (1 mg/kg), and the CB2 receptor antagonist, SR-144528 (1 mg/kg), did not alter the anti-scratching behavioral effect of paracetamol. Our results indicate that, in contrast to its antinociceptive action, but similar to its hypothermic effect, cannabinoid receptors are not involved in the antipruritic activity of paracetamol.

  11. The biocontrol endophytic bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7 induces systemic defense responses in aerial tissues upon colonization of olive roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen eGómez-Lama Cabanás

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens PICF7, a native olive root endophyte and effective biocontrol agent (BCA against Verticillium wilt of olive, is able to trigger a broad range of defense responses in root tissues of this woody plant. In order to elucidate whether strain PICF7 also induces systemic defense responses in above-ground organs, aerial tissues of olive plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions were collected at different time points after root bacterization with this endophytic BCA. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library, enriched in up-regulated genes, was generated. This strategy enabled the identification of 376 ESTs (99 contigs and 277 singlets, many of them related to response to different stresses. Five ESTs, involved in defense responses, were selected to carry out time-course quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR experiments aiming to: (i validate the induction of these genes, and (ii shed light on their expression pattern along time (from 1 to 15 days. Induction of olive genes potentially coding for lypoxigenase 2, catalase, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase and phenylananine ammonia-lyase was thus confirmed at some time points. Computational analysis also revealed that different transcription factors were up-regulated in olive aerial tissues (i.e. jerf, bHLH, WRKYs, as previously reported for roots. Results confirmed that root colonization by this endophytic bacterium does not only trigger defense responses in this organ but also mount a wide array of systemic defense responses in distant tissues (stems, leaves. This sheds light on how olive plants respond to the ‘non-hostile’ colonization by a bacterial endophyte and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of strain PICF7.

  12. Control of Fusarium verticillioides, cause of ear rot of maize, by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayaka, Siddaiah Chandra; Shankar, Akarere C. Udaya; Reddy, Munagala S.

    2009-01-01

    elicited considerable attention over the past decade owing to their association with animal disease syndromes. Hence, the present study was conducted to evaluate ecofriendly approaches by using a maize rhizosphere isolate of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Trev.) Mig. and its formulation to control ear rot......Abstract BACKGROUND: Maize is one of the staple food crops grown in India. Fusarium verticillioides (Sacc.) Nirenberg is the most important fungal pathogen of maize, associated with diseases such as ear rot and kernel rot. Apart from the disease, it is capable of producing fumonisins, which have....... verticillioides and the level of fumonisins to a maximum extent compared with the other treatments. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrates the potential role of P. fluorescens and its formulations in ear rot disease management. The biocontrol potential of this isolate is more suited for fumonisin reduction in maize...

  13. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and

  14. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and attac

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain V48, Isolated from a Coastal Sand Dune in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitzer, A.S.; Garbeva, P.V.; Silby, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Pedobacter sp. strain V48 participates in an interaction with Pseudomonas fluorescens which elicits interaction-induced phenotypes. We report the draft genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. V48, consisting of 6.46 Mbp. The sequence will contribute to improved understanding of the genus and facilitate

  16. Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase are specific markers of plaque cell subtypes in human multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Cristina; Romero, Juan Pablo; Tolón, Rosa María; Clemente, Diego; Docagne, Fabián; Hillard, Cecilia J; Guaza, Camen; Romero, Julián

    2007-02-28

    Increasing evidence supports the idea of a beneficial effect of cannabinoid compounds for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, most experimental data come from animal models of MS. We investigated the status of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) enzyme in brain tissue samples obtained from MS patients. Areas of demyelination were identified and classified as active, chronic, and inactive plaques. CB1 and CB2 receptors and FAAH densities and cellular sites of expression were examined using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. In MS samples, cannabinoid CB1 receptors were expressed by cortical neurons, oligodendrocytes, and also oligodendrocyte precursor cells, demonstrated using double immunofluorescence with antibodies against the CB1 receptor with antibodies against type 2 microtubule-associated protein, myelin basic protein, and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-alpha, respectively. CB1 receptors were also present in macrophages and infiltrated T-lymphocytes. Conversely, CB2 receptors were present in T-lymphocytes, astrocytes, and perivascular and reactive microglia (major histocompatibility complex class-II positive) in MS plaques. Specifically, CB2-positive microglial cells were evenly distributed within active plaques but were located in the periphery of chronic active plaques. FAAH expression was restricted to neurons and hypertrophic astrocytes. As seen for other neuroinflammatory conditions, selective glial expression of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors and FAAH enzyme is induced in MS, thus supporting a role for the endocannabinoid system in the pathogenesis and/or evolution of this disease.

  17. Antimicrobial action of essential oil vapours and negative air ions against Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, A K; Malik, A

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial activity of essential oil (in liquid as well as in vapour phase) and negative air ions (NAI) against Pseudomonas fluorescens. The combined effect of NAI with essential oil vapour was also investigated to determine kill time and morphological changes in bacterial cells. The MIC of Cymbopogon citratus (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha arvensis (0.567 mg/ml), Mentha piperita (1.125 mg/ml) and Eucalyptus globulus (2.25 mg/ml) was studied via the agar dilution method. To estimate the antibacterial activity of essential oils in the vapour phase, agar plates inoculated with P. fluorescens were incubated with various concentrations of each essential oil vapour and zone of inhibition was recorded. Further, in order to assess the kill time, P. fluorescens inoculated agar plates were exposed to selected bactericidal essential oil vapour and NAI, separately, in an air-tight chamber. A continuous decrease in bacterial count was observed over time. A significant enhancement in the bactericidal action was observed by exposure to the combination of essential oil vapour and NAI as compared to their individual action. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the alteration in morphology of P. fluorescens cells after exposure to C. citratus oil vapour, NAI, and combination of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. Maximum morphological deformation was found due to the combined effect of C. citratus oil vapour and NAI. This study demonstrates that the use of essential oils in the vapour phase is more advantageous than the liquid phase. Further the antibacterial effect of the essential oil vapours can be significantly enhanced by the addition of NAI. The work described here offers a novel and efficient approach for control of bacterial contamination that could be applied for food stabilization practices. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyanase-mediated utilization of cyanate in Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIB 11764.

    OpenAIRE

    Kunz, D A; Nagappan, O

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIB 11764 was capable of utilizing cyanate (OCN-) as a sole nitrogen source for growth. Crude cell extracts from cells grown on cyanate, but not on ammonium sulfate, were induced for an enzyme catalyzing cyanate conversion to ammonia. Enzymatic activity was shown to be bicarbonate dependent and specific for cyanate as a substrate, suggesting that cyanate utilization in this organism is facilitated by an enzyme resembling cyanase (cyanate amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.5.3), a...

  19. Evolution of fitness trade-offs in locally adapted populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schick, Alana; Bailey, Susan; Kassen, Rees

    2015-01-01

    characterize the genetic causes of trade-offs generating local adaptation in populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens that had previously been evolved for specialization on three different carbon resources. We measured the fitness effects of mutations that arose during selection in that environment...... provide a detailed account of the genetics of specialization and suggest that the evolution of trade-offs associated with local adaptation may often result from the antagonistic effects of beneficial mutations substituted later in adaptation....

  20. Reciprocal Regulation of Pyoluteorin Production with Membrane Transporter Gene Expression in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Pyoluteorin is a chlorinated polyketide antibiotic secreted by the rhizosphere bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5. Genes encoding enzymes and transcriptional regulators involved in pyoluteorin production are clustered in the genome of Pf-5. Sequence analysis of genes adjacent to the known pyoluteorin biosynthetic gene cluster revealed the presence of an ABC transporter system. We disrupted two putative ABC transporter genes by inserting transcriptional fusions to an ice nucleation reporte...

  1. Spatial distributions of Pseudomonas fluorescens colony variants in mixed-culture biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew L Workentine; Wang, Siyuan; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of colony morphology variants in structured environments is being recognized as important to both niche specialization and stress tolerance. Pseudomonas fluorescens demonstrates diversity in both its natural environment, the rhizosphere, and in laboratory grown biofilms. Sub-populations of these variants within a biofilm have been suggested as important contributors to antimicrobial stress tolerance given their altered susceptibility to various agents. As such it is o...

  2. Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens Species Group Recovery from Human Homes Varies Seasonally and by Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna K Remold

    Full Text Available By shedding light on variation in time as well as in space, long-term biogeographic studies can help us define organisms' distribution patterns and understand their underlying drivers. Here we examine distributions of Pseudomonas in and around 15 human homes, focusing on the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups. We describe recovery from 10,941 samples collected during up to 8 visits per home, occurring on average 2.6 times per year. We collected a mean of 141 samples per visit, from sites in most rooms of the house, from the surrounding yards, and from human and pet occupants. We recovered Pseudomonas in 9.7% of samples, with the majority of isolates being from the P. putida and P. fluorescens species groups (approximately 62% and 23% of Pseudomonas samples recovered respectively. Although representatives of both groups were recovered from every season, every house, and every type of environment sampled, recovery was highly variable across houses and samplings. Whereas recovery of P. putida group was higher in summer and fall than in winter and spring, P. fluorescens group isolates were most often recovered in spring. P. putida group recovery from soils was substantially higher than its recovery from all other environment types, while higher P. fluorescens group recovery from soils than from other sites was much less pronounced. Both species groups were recovered from skin and upper respiratory tract samples from healthy humans and pets, although this occurred infrequently. This study indicates that even species that are able to survive under a broad range of conditions can be rare and variable in their distributions in space and in time. For such groups, determining patterns and causes of stochastic and seasonal variability may be more important for understanding the processes driving their biogeography than the identity of the types of environments in which they can be found.

  3. Soil amendment with Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0: lasting effects on soil biological properties in soils low in microbial biomass and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliessbach, Andreas; Winkler, Manuel; Lutz, Matthias P; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Mäder, Paul

    2009-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains are used in agriculture as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR). Nontarget effects of released organisms should be analyzed prior to their large-scale use, and methods should be available to sensitively detect possible changes in the environments the organism is released to. According to ecological theory, microbial communities with a greater diversity should be less susceptible to disturbance by invading organisms. Based on this principle, we laid out a pot experiment with field-derived soils different in their microbial biomass and activity due to long-term management on similar parent geological material (loess). We investigated the survival of P. fluorescens CHA0 that carried a resistance toward rifampicin and the duration of potential changes of the soil microflora caused by the inoculation with the bacterium at the sowing date of spring wheat. Soil microbial biomass (C(mic), N(mic)) basal soil respiration (BR), qCO(2), dehydrogenase activity (DHA), bacterial plate counts, mycorrhiza root colonization, and community level substrate utilization were analyzed after 18 and 60 days. At the initial stage, soils were clearly different with respect to most of the parameters measured, and a time-dependent effect between the first and the second set point were attributable to wheat growth and the influence of roots. The effect of the inoculum was small and merely transient, though significant long-term changes were found in soils with a relatively low level of microbial biomass. Community level substrate utilization as an indicator of changes in microbial community structure was mainly changed by the growth of wheat, while other experimental factors were negligible. The sensitivity of the applied methods to distinguish the experimental soils was in decreasing order N(mic), DHA, C(mic), and qCO(2). Besides the selective enumeration of P. fluorescens CHA0 rif(+), which was only found in amended soils, methods to distinguish the

  4. Early gene expression in Pseudomonas fluorescens exposed to a polymetallic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Sagasti, María T; Becerril, José M; Epelde, Lur; Alkorta, Itziar; Garbisu, Carlos

    2015-02-01

    The molecular response of Pseudomonas fluorescens cells exposed to a mixture of heavy metals remains largely unknown. Here, we studied the temporal changes in the early gene expression of P. fluorescens cells exposed to three doses of a polymetallic solution over two exposure times, through the application of a customized cDNA microarray. At the lowest metal dose (MD/4), we observed a repression of the Hsp70 chaperone system, MATE and MFS transporters, TonB membrane transporter and histidine kinases, together with an overexpression of metal transport (ChaC, CopC), chemotaxis and glutamine synthetase genes. At the intermediate metal dose (MD), several amino acid transporters, a response regulator (CheY), a TonB-dependent receptor and the mutT DNA repair gene were repressed; by contrast, an overexpression of genes associated with the antioxidative stress system and the transport of chelates and sulfur was observed. Finally, at the highest metal dose (4MD), a repression of genes encoding metal ion transporters, drug resistance and alginate biosynthesis was found, together with an overexpression of genes encoding antioxidative proteins, membrane transporters, ribosomal proteins, chaperones and proteases. It was concluded that P. fluorescens cells showed, over exposure time, a highly complex molecular response when exposed to a polymetallic solution, involving mechanisms related with chemotaxis, signal transmission, membrane transport, cellular redox state, and the regulation of transcription and ribosomal activity.

  5. CB-SMoT+: UNA EXTENSIÓN AL ALGORITMO CB-SMoT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCO MORENO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Una trayectoria es un registro de la evoluciónde la posición de un objeto móvil. Por ejemplo,un vehículo que se mueve en el espacio durante unintervalo de tiempo. Una trayectoria se representamediante una secuencia de observaciones que indicanla posición y el tiempo en el que fue tomada cadaobservación. CB-SMoT es un algoritmo que identificalas partes de una trayectoria durante las cuales elobjeto mantuvo una velocidad promedio por debajode un límite dado. En este artículo se propone unaextensión para dicho algoritmo que permite identificarlas partes de una trayectoria durante las cualesel objeto mantuvo una velocidad promedio entre observacionespor debajo de un límite dado. Esto posibilitala identificación, por ejemplo, de violacionesa un límite de velocidad que no son advertidas porel algoritmo original. Para el estudio se usó el sistemade gestión de bases de datos PostgreSQL y losalgoritmos se implementaron en su lenguaje de programación,llamado PL/pgSQL. Además, se hicieronexperimentos con 100 trayectorias de vehículos conel propósito de mostrar la utilidad y la viabilidad de lapropuesta.

  6. The hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide critically depends on brain CB1, but not CB2 or TRPV1, receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Alexandre A; Molchanova, Alla Y; Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Pétervári, Erika; Balaskó, Márta; Wanner, Samuel P; Eales, Justin; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Almeida, M Camila; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2011-05-01

    Hypothermia occurs in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. This study evaluated whether the hypothermic response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is modulated by the endocannabinoid anandamide(AEA) and its receptors: cannabinoid-1 (CB1), cannabinoid-2 (CB2) and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1). In rats exposed to an ambient temperature of 22◦C, a moderate dose of LPS (25 - 100 μg kg−1 I.V.) induced a fall in body temperature with a nadir at ∼100 minpostinjection. This response was not affected by desensitization of intra-abdominal TRPV1 receptors with resiniferatoxin (20 μg kg - 1 I.P.), by systemic TRPV1 antagonism with capsazepine(40mg kg−1 I.P.), or by systemic CB2 receptor antagonism with SR144528 (1.4 mg kg−1 I.P.).However, CB1 receptor antagonism by rimonabant (4.6mg kg−1 I.P.) or SLV319 (15mg kg−1 I.P.)blocked LPS hypothermia. The effect of rimonabant was further studied. Rimonabant blocked LPS hypothermia when administered I.C.V. at a dose (4.6 μg) that was too low to produce systemic effects. The blockade of LPS hypothermia by I.C.V. rimonabant was associated with suppression of the circulating level of tumour necrosis factor-α. In contrast to rimonabant,the I.C.V. administration of AEA (50 μg) enhanced LPS hypothermia. Importantly, I.C.V. AEAdid not evoke hypothermia in rats not treated with LPS, thus indicating that AEA modulates LPS-activated pathways in the brain rather than thermo effector pathways. In conclusion, the present study reveals a novel, critical role of brain CB1 receptors in LPS hypothermia. Brain CB1 receptors may constitute a new therapeutic target in systemic inflammation and sepsis.

  7. 棘阿米巴土壤分离株CB/S1的线粒体DNA限制性片段长度多态性%MITOCHONDRIAL DNA RESTRICTION FRAGMENT LENGTH POLYMORPHISM (RFLP) OF ACANTHAMOEBA SP. CB/S1 ISOLAT ED FROM SOIL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔春权; 玄英花; 郑善子; 金松竹; 杨香

    2012-01-01

    [目的]观察棘阿米巴土壤分离株CB/S1的线粒体DNA限制性片段长度多态性(RFLP).[方法]从棘阿米巴CB/S1提取线粒体DNA用Eco RI酶切,与土壤分离株CJY/S4比较观察限制性片段长度多态性.用地衣红-卡红染色观察棘阿米巴内共生细菌.[结果]棘阿米巴土壤分离株CB/S1线粒体DNA RFLP与CJY/S4相比除了额外的片段(extra bands),两个分离株具有相同的片段模式.经地衣红染色观察CB/S1内共生细菌呈黑色、棒状、不规则的分布在胞质内.[结论]额外的片段表明棘阿米巴CB/S1内含有内共生细菌的环状DNA,并且除了内共生细菌的存在棘阿米巴CB/S1与土壤分离株CJY/S4具有密切的亲缘关系.线粒体DNA限制性片段长度多态性是棘阿米巴分类及发现内共生细菌的简便而有效的方法.%[Objective] To survey characterization of Mitochondrial DNA Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (MtDNA RFLP) of Aeanthamoeba sp. CB/SI isolated from soil of china. [Methods] The extracted MlDNA was digested with the Eco RI restriction enzyme, electrophoresed in 0.7% agarose gel. The endosymbiont of Acanthamoeba sp. was characterized with orcein-camiime staining [Results] Acanthamoeba sp. CB/SI showED extra bands as weli as common bands with the other Aeanthamoeba sp. CJY/S4 strain isolated from soil, rode-shaped endosymbionts were randomly distributed within the cytoplasm of trophozoite of Aeanthamoeba sp. CB/SI. [Conclusion] These results indicated that the.Acanlhamoeba sp. CB/SI may possi-bly harbor intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria containing circular DNAs. With the exception of the presence of endosymbionts, Aeanthamoeba sp. CB/S1 with Aeanthamoeba CJY/S4 were found to be closely phylogenetically related.

  8. 47 CFR 95.667 - CB transmitter power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transmitter power. The dissipation rating of all the semiconductors or electron tubes which supply RF power to the antenna terminals of each CB transmitter must not exceed 10 W. For semiconductors, the dissipation... semiconductor. These values may be temperature de-rated by no more than 50 °C. For an electron tube,...

  9. Mutational Analyses of Glucose Dehydrogenase and Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Reveal Their Effects on Growth and Alginate Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Mærk, Mali; Valla, Svein; Ertesvåg, Helga

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of alginate has been studied extensively due to the importance of this polymer in medicine and industry. Alginate is synthesized from fructose-6-phosphate and thus competes with the central carbon metabolism for this metabolite. The alginate-producing bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens relies on the Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways for glucose metabolism, and these pathways are also important for the metabolism of fructose and glycerol. In the present study, the impact of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes on growth and alginate synthesis was investigated in P. fluorescens. Mutants defective in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes (Zwf-1 and Zwf-2) or glucose dehydrogenase (Gcd) were evaluated using media containing glucose, fructose, or glycerol. Zwf-1 was shown to be the most important glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase for catabolism. Both Zwf enzymes preferred NADP as a coenzyme, although NAD was also accepted. Only Zwf-2 was active in the presence of 3 mM ATP, and then only with NADP as a coenzyme, indicating an anabolic role for this isoenzyme. Disruption of zwf-1 resulted in increased alginate production when glycerol was used as the carbon source, possibly due to decreased flux through the Entner-Doudoroff pathway rendering more fructose-6-phosphate available for alginate biosynthesis. In alginate-producing cells grown on glucose, disruption of gcd increased both cell numbers and alginate production levels, while this mutation had no positive effect on growth in a non-alginate-producing strain. A possible explanation is that alginate synthesis might function as a sink for surplus hexose phosphates that could otherwise be detrimental to the cell.

  10. Negative inotropic effect of a CB2 agonist A-955840 in isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes is independent of CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi; Preusser, Lee; Diaz, Gilbert; Green, Jonathon; Liu, Xiaoqin; Polakowski, James; Dart, Michael; Yao, Betty; Meyer, Michael; Limberis, James T; Martin, Ruth L; Cox, Bryan F; Gintant, Gary A

    2011-11-01

    A-955840, a selective CB2 agonist, has been shown to elicit concentration-dependent decreases in cardiac contractility in the anesthetized dog (decreased maximal velocity of left ventricular pressure development [LV dP/dt max]). However, it is unknown whether this represents a direct effect or a response dependent on other factors (such as autonomic tone and neurohumoral factors) present in vivo. This study examined if A-955840 had a direct effect on contractility of isolated cardiac myocytes, and if so to determine the potential mechanisms. Contractility was assessed in vitro using percent changes in maximal shortening velocity of sarcomeres (dL/dt max) and fractional shortening of sarcomere length (FS) in rabbit left ventricular myocytes. L-type calcium current in myocytes was recorded using wholecell voltage-clamp techniques. A-955840 reduced dL/dt max and FS in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 11.4 μg/mL (based on dL/dt max) which is similar to the estimated IC50 value of 9.8 μg/mL based on the effects of A-955840 on LV dP/dt max in anesthetized dogs. A-955840 (4.1 μg/mL) reduced myocyte contractility (%FS) to a similar extent in the absence and presence of a CB2 antagonist, SR-2 (24.0 ± 3.4 vs 23.1 ± 3.0 %, n=5) or a CB1 antagonist, Rimonabant (18.8 ± 2.3 vs 19.8 ± 2.7 %, n=5). A-955840 (4.1 μg/mL) also reduced L-type calcium current of rabbit ventricular myocytes (1.05 ± 0.11 vs 0.70 ± 0.12 nA, n=5, P CB2 nor CB1 receptors, and consistent with off-target negative inotropy mediated by inhibition of the cardiac L-type calcium current.

  11. Induction of proteinuria by cannabinoid receptors 1 signaling activation in CB1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Ho, Cheng; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2015-02-01

    Proteinuria is not only a sign of kidney damage but is also involved in the progression of renal disease as an independent pathologic factor. Although patients with mutated type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1) polymorphism are associated with renal microvascular damage, the biologic role of CB1 signaling in proteinuria remains uncharacterized till now. Herein, we investigate whether CB1 participates in glomerular proteinuria in CB1 transgenic mice and treatment with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 rat, neither of which are diabetic models. The CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher kidney weight and urinary protein concentrations but not blood glucose levels compared with the wild-type group. A combination of laser-capture microsdissection, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting and immunohistochemical validation revealed that CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 had higher vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in renal glomeruli than that of the wild-type group. Geneticorpharmacological activation of CB1 by transgenic CB1 mice or treatment with WIN55212-2 reduced nephrin expression in the renal glomeruli compared with that of the wild-type group in the glomerular mesanglium. Taken together, CB1 transgenic mice and rats treated with CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 induced proteinuria with upregulation of CB1 resulting in impaired nephrin expression, by inducing excess VEGF reaction in the renal glomeruli. Genetic and pharmacological manipulation of CB1 signaling revealed VEGF-dependent nephrin depression of glomerulopathy. Controlling CB1 activity can be used an alternative strategy for sustaining renal function in the presence of CB1 activation.

  12. A comparison between Pseudomonas aureofaciens (chlororaphis and P. fluorescens in biological control of cotton seedling damping-off disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Samavat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of the biological control of plant diseases, testing and introducing new biocontrol-active microorganisms is a major concern among plant pathologists. The causal agent of cotton seedling damping-off disease is Rhizoctonia solani. In this regard, we tried to investigate the antagonistic activities of Pseudomonas aureofaciens (chlororaphis 30–84 (phenazine producing wild type and non-phenazine producing mutant strains on R. solani, in comparison with some isolates of P. fluorescent under both in vitro (laboratory and in vivo (greenhouse conditions. In the laboratory experiment, the inhibitory effects of all the bacteria, on the growth of R. solani, were evaluated using the dual culture procedure. Results showed that five isolates of P. fluorescent along with both strains of P. aureofaciens significantly inhibited the growth of R. solani. Effective bacterial antagonists were then evaluated in a greenhouse experiment where cotton seeds were coated with their suspensions and were sown in pasteurised field-soil. The soil had been pre-inoculated with a virulent isolate of R. solani. The efficacy of the bacterial antagonists was evaluated by counting the number of surviving seedlings in different treatments, at 15 and 60 days after sowing, for determining pre- and post-emergence damping-off incidence. According to the results of the greenhouse experiment, at both intervals, two isolates of P. fluorescens along with both strains of P. aureofaciens caused significant increases in the number of healthy seedlings, in comparison with the untreated control, and a commonly used fungicide (carboxin-thiram. The efficacy of phenazine producing a wild type strain of P. aureofaciens was higher than its non-phenazine producing mutant, indicating that phenazine plays an important role in the antagonistic activity of P. aureofaciens. Effective bacterial antagonists were then studied for their antagonistic mechanisms. The results showed that all

  13. Comparison of the D2 receptor regulation and neurotoxicant susceptibility of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons in wild-type and CB1/CB2 receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkins, Tyrell J; Janis, Kelly L; McClure, Alison K; Behrouz, Bahareh; Pappas, Samuel S; Lehner, Andreas; Kaminski, Norbert E; Goudreau, John L; Lookingland, Keith J; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2012-09-01

    Motor dysfunctions of Parkinson Disease (PD) are due to the progressive loss of midbrain nigrostriatal dopamine (NSDA) neurons. Evidence suggests a role for cannabinoid receptors in the neurodegeneration of these neurons following neurotoxicant-induced injury. This work evaluates NSDA neurons in CB1/CB2 knockout (KO) mice and tests the hypothesis that CB1/CB2 KO mice are more susceptible to neurotoxicant exposure. NSDA neuronal indices were assessed using unbiased stereological cell counting, high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection or mass spectrometry, and Western blot. Results reveal that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor signaling is not necessary for the maintenance of a normally functioning NSDA neuronal system. Mice lacking CB1 and CB2 receptors were found to be equally susceptible to the neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). These studies support the use of CB1/CB2 KO mice for investigating the cannabinoid receptor-mediated regulation of the NSDA neuronal system in models of PD.

  14. Opposite regulation of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the prefrontal cortex of rats treated with cocaine during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cabrerizo, Rubén; García-Fuster, M Julia

    2016-02-26

    The endocannabinoid system is implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine addiction, although it is not clear how cocaine regulates brain CB1 and CB2 receptors, especially during adolescence, a critical moment for shaping adult response to drug use. This study evaluated CB1 and CB2 protein levels in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HC) by western blot analysis with specific and validated antibodies: (1) basally during adolescence (post-natal day PND 40, PND 47, PND 54), (2) by a sensitizing regimen of cocaine (15mg/kg, 7 days, i.p.) during different windows of adolescence vulnerability (PND 33-39, PND 40-46, PND 47-53), and (3) following repeated cocaine administration during adolescence (PND 33-39) in adulthood (PND 64). The results demonstrated a dynamic and opposite basal modulation of CB1 and CB2 receptors in PFC and HC during adolescence. CB1 receptor levels were increased while CB2 receptors were decreased as compared to adulthood with asymptotes values around mid adolescence (PND 47) both in PFC (CB1: +45±22, pCB1: +53±23, pCB1 (+55±10%, p<0.05) and CB2 (-25±10%, p<0.05) receptors when administered during early adolescence and only in PFC. However, the changes observed in PFC by repeated cocaine administration in adolescence were transient and did not endure into adulthood. These results identified a period of vulnerability during adolescence at which cocaine dysregulated the content of CB receptors in PFC, suggesting an opposite role for these receptors in the effects mediated by cocaine.

  15. CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptor antagonists prevent minocycline-induced neuroprotection following traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Siopi, Eleni; Finn, David P; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Jafarian-Tehrani, Mehrnaz; Viveros, Maria-Paz

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its consequences represent one of the leading causes of death in young adults. This lesion mediates glial activation and the release of harmful molecules and causes brain edema, axonal injury, and functional impairment. Since glial activation plays a key role in the development of this damage, it seems that controlling it could be beneficial and could lead to neuroprotective effects. Recent studies show that minocycline suppresses microglial activation, reduces the lesion volume, and decreases TBI-induced locomotor hyperactivity up to 3 months. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) plays an important role in reparative mechanisms and inflammation under pathological situations by controlling some mechanisms that are shared with minocycline pathways. We hypothesized that the ECS could be involved in the neuroprotective effects of minocycline. To address this hypothesis, we used a murine TBI model in combination with selective CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630, respectively). The results provided the first evidence for the involvement of ECS in the neuroprotective action of minocycline on brain edema, neurological impairment, diffuse axonal injury, and microglial activation, since all these effects were prevented by the CB1 and CB2 receptor antagonists.

  16. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1DTGA-1CB6A [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1DTGA-1CB6A 1DTG 1CB6 A A ---KTVRWCAVSEHEATKCQSFRDHMKSVIPSDGPSVAC...LAVAVVRRSDTSLTWNSVKGKKSCHTAVDRTAGWNIPMGLLFNQTGSCKFDEYFSQSCAPGSDPRSNLCALCIGDEQGENKCVPNSNERYYGYTGAFRCLAENAGDVA...l> 0 1DTG A 1DTGA... 1DTG A 1DTGA 1DTG A 1DTGA LFSSP-

  17. Data of evolutionary structure change: 1CB4B-1FUNF [Confc[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1CB4B-1FUNF 1CB4 1FUN B F ATKAVCVLKGDGPVQGTIHFEAKG--DTVVVTGSITGLT...VIGIAK ATKAVAVLKGDGPVQGIINFEQKESNGPVKVWGSIKGLTEGLHGFHVHEFGDNTAGCTSAGPHFNPLSRKHGGPKDEERHVGDLGNVT...E EEEEEEEE GGG EEEEE EEEEEEE EEEEE HHHH EEEEEEE EVID> 01FUN F 1FUNF FEQKESNGPVKV

  18. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a modulates CB1 receptor signaling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tricia H; Blume, Lawrence C; Straiker, Alex; Cox, Jordan O; David, Bethany G; McVoy, Julie R Secor; Sayers, Katherine W; Poklis, Justin L; Abdullah, Rehab A; Egertová, Michaela; Chen, Ching-Kang; Mackie, Ken; Elphick, Maurice R; Howlett, Allyn C; Selley, Dana E

    2015-04-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediate the presynaptic effects of endocannabinoids in the central nervous system (CNS) and most behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor-interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) binds to the CB1R C-terminus and can attenuate constitutive CB1R-mediated inhibition of Ca(2+) channel activity. We now demonstrate cellular colocalization of CRIP1a at neuronal elements in the CNS and show that CRIP1a inhibits both constitutive and agonist-stimulated CB1R-mediated guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G-protein) activity. Stable overexpression of CRIP1a in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably expressing CB1Rs (CB1-HEK), or in N18TG2 cells endogenously expressing CB1Rs, decreased CB1R-mediated G-protein activation (measured by agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS (guanylyl-5'-[O-thio]-triphosphate) binding) in both cell lines and attenuated inverse agonism by rimonabant in CB1-HEK cells. Conversely, small-interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CRIP1a in N18TG2 cells enhanced CB1R-mediated G-protein activation. These effects were not attributable to differences in CB1R expression or endocannabinoid tone because CB1R levels did not differ between cell lines varying in CRIP1a expression, and endocannabinoid levels were undetectable (CB1-HEK) or unchanged (N18TG2) by CRIP1a overexpression. In CB1-HEK cells, 4-hour pretreatment with cannabinoid agonists downregulated CB1Rs and desensitized agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS binding. CRIP1a overexpression attenuated CB1R downregulation without altering CB1R desensitization. Finally, in cultured autaptic hippocampal neurons, CRIP1a overexpression attenuated both depolarization-induced suppression of excitation and inhibition of excitatory synaptic activity induced by exogenous application of cannabinoid but not by adenosine A1 agonists. These results confirm that CRIP1a inhibits constitutive CB1R activity and demonstrate that CRIP1a can also inhibit agonist

  19. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and function...

  20. Chronic ethanol exposure decreases CB1 receptor function at GABAergic synapses in the rat central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varodayan, Florence P; Soni, Neeraj; Bajo, Michal; Luu, George; Madamba, Samuel G; Schweitzer, Paul; Parsons, Loren H; Roberto, Marisa

    2016-07-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) influence the acute response to ethanol and the development of tolerance, dependence and relapse. Chronic alcohol exposure alters eCB levels and Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1 ) expression and function in brain regions associated with addiction. CB1 inhibits GABA release, and GABAergic dysregulation in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is critical in the transition to alcohol dependence. We investigated possible disruptions in CB1 signaling of rat CeA GABAergic transmission following intermittent ethanol exposure. In the CeA of alcohol-naive rats, CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) decreased the frequency of spontaneous and miniature GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (s/mIPSCs). This effect was prevented by CB1 antagonism, but not Type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2 ) antagonism. After 2-3 weeks of intermittent ethanol exposure, these WIN inhibitory effects were attenuated, suggesting ethanol-induced impairments in CB1 function. The CB1 antagonist AM251 revealed a tonic eCB/CB1 control of GABAergic transmission in the alcohol-naive CeA that was occluded by calcium chelation in the postsynaptic cell. Chronic ethanol exposure abolished this tonic CB1 influence on mIPSC, but not sIPSC, frequency. Finally, acute ethanol increased CeA GABA release in both naive and ethanol-exposed rats. Although CB1 activation prevented this effect, the AM251- and ethanol-induced GABA release were additive, ruling out a direct participation of CB1 signaling in the ethanol effect. Collectively, these observations demonstrate an important CB1 influence on CeA GABAergic transmission and indicate that the CeA is particularly sensitive to alcohol-induced disruptions of CB1 signaling.

  1. 47 CFR 95.428 - (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? 95.428... (CB Rule 28) How do I contact the FCC? (a) FCC National Call Center at 1-888-225-5322. (b) FCC World Wide Web homepage: http://www.fcc.gov. (c) In writing, to FCC, Attention: CB, 1270 Fairfield...

  2. N-Acetyl Cysteine (NAC)-Directed Detoxification of Methacryloxylethyl Cetyl Ammonium Chloride (DMAE-CB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yang; Ma, Sai; Li, Jing; Shan, Lequn; Wang, Yingjie; Tian, Min; Yang, Yanwei; Sun, Jinlong; Ban, Jinghao; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Methacryloxylethyl cetyl ammonium chloride (DMAE-CB) is a polymerizable antibacterial monomer and has been proved as an effective strategy to achieve bioactive bonding with reliable bacterial inhibitory effects. However, the toxicity of DMAE-CB may hamper its wide application in clinical situations. Thus, this study was designed to investigate the toxicity of DMAE-CB and explore the possible protective effects of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis showed that chemical binding of NAC and DMAE-CB occurred in a time dependent manner. Pre-incubation of fourty-eight hours is required for adequate reaction between DMAE-CB and NAC. DMAE-CB reduced human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) viability in a dose-dependent manner. The toxic effects of DMAE-CB were accompanied by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and reduced glutathione (GSH) content. NAC alleviated DMAE-CB-induced oxidative stress. Annexin V/ Propidium Iodide (PI) staining and Hoechst 33342 staining indicated that DMAE-CB induced apoptosis. Collapsed mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and activation of caspase-3 were also observed after DMAE-CB treatment. NAC rescued hDPCs from DMAE-CB-induced apoptosis, accompanied by lower level of MMP loss and caspase-3 activity. This study assists to elucidate the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects of DMAE-CB and provides theoretical supports for the searching of effective strategies to reduce toxicity of quaternary ammonium dental monomers.

  3. Suppression of outward K⁺ currents by WIN55212-2 in rat retinal ganglion cells is independent of CB1/CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C-Q; Wu, H-J; Wang, S-Y; Yin, S; Lu, X-J; Miao, Y; Wang, X-H; Yang, X-L; Wang, Z

    2013-12-03

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) signaling system is extensively distributed in the vertebrate retina. Activation of CB1Rs regulates a variety of functions of retinal neurons through modulating different ion channels. In the present work we studied effects of this receptor signaling on K(+) channels in retinal ganglion cells by patch-clamp techniques. The CB1R agonist WIN55212-2 (WIN) suppressed outward K(+) currents in acutely isolated rat retinal ganglion cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 4.7 μM. We further showed that WIN mainly suppressed the tetraethylammonium (TEA)-sensitive K(+) current component. While CB1Rs were expressed in rat retinal ganglion cells, the WIN effect on K(+) currents was not blocked by either AM251/SR141716, specific CB1R antagonists, or AM630, a selective CB2R antagonist. Consistently, cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways were unlikely involved in the WIN-induced suppression of the K(+) currents because both PKA inhibitors H-89/Rp-cAMP and MAPK/ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 failed to block the WIN effects. WIN-induced suppression of the K(+) currents was not observed when WIN was intracellularly applied. Furthermore, an endogenous ligand of the cannabinoid receptor anandamide, the specific CB1R agonist ACEA and the selective CB2R agonist CB65 also suppressed the K(+) currents, and the effects were not blocked by AM251/SR141716 or AM630 respectively. All these results suggest that the WIN-induced suppression of the outward K(+) currents in rat retinal ganglion cells, thereby regulating the cell excitability, were not through CB1R/CB2R signaling pathways.

  4. Draft genome sequences of five clinical Enterococcus cecorum strains isolated from different poultry species in Poland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolka, Beata; Olsen, Rikke Heidemann; Thøfner, Ida;

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report five draft genome sequences of Enterococcus cecorum strains that were isolated from different bird species of affected poultry flocks (commercial broilers [CB], broiler breeders [BB], commercial layers [CL], ducks [D], and geese [G]) in Poland....

  5. Expression and function of cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 and their cognate cannabinoid ligands in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxian Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Characterization of intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulating the self-renewal/division and differentiation of stem cells is crucial in determining embryonic stem (ES cell fate. ES cells differentiate into multiple hematopoietic lineages during embryoid body (EB formation in vitro, which provides an experimental platform to define the molecular mechanisms controlling germ layer fate determination and tissue formation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 and cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2 are members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR family, that are activated by endogenous ligands, the endocannabinoids. CB1 receptor expression is abundant in brain while CB2 receptors are mostly expressed in hematopoietic cells. However, the expression and the precise roles of CB1 and CB2 and their cognate ligands in ES cells are not known. We observed significant induction of CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors during the hematopoietic differentiation of murine ES (mES-derived embryoid bodies. Furthermore, mES cells as well as ES-derived embryoid bodies at days 7 and 14, expressed endocannabinoids, the ligands for both CB1 and CB2. The CB1 and CB2 antagonists (AM251 and AM630, respectively induced mES cell death, strongly suggesting that endocannabinoids are involved in the survival of mES cells. Treatment of mES cells with the exogenous cannabinoid ligand Delta(9-THC resulted in the increased hematopoietic differentiation of mES cells, while addition of AM251 or AM630 blocked embryoid body formation derived from the mES cells. In addition, cannabinoid agonists induced the chemotaxis of ES-derived embryoid bodies, which was specifically inhibited by the CB1 and CB2 antagonists. CONCLUSIONS: This work has not been addressed previously and yields new information on the function of cannabinoid receptors, CB1 and CB2, as components of a novel pathway regulating murine ES cell differentiation. This study provides insights

  6. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology.

  7. The effects of cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and vanilloid TRPV1 receptor antagonists on cocaine addictive behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Przemysław; Miszkiel, Joanna; McCreary, Andrew C; Filip, Małgorzata; Papp, Mariusz; Przegaliński, Edmund

    2012-03-20

    There is evidence that indicates that tonic activation of cannabinoid CB1 receptors plays a role in extinction/reinstatement of cocaine seeking-behavior but is not involved in the maintenance of cocaine self-administration. To further explore the importance of other endocannabinoid-related receptors in an animal model of cocaine addiction, the present paper examines cannabinoid CB2 receptor antagonist N-((1S)-endo-1,3,3-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)heptan-2-yl)-5-(4-chloro-3-methylphenyl)-1-(4-methylbenzyl)-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (SR144528) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type-1 (TRPV1) receptor antagonist N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamide (SB366791) on intravenous (i.v.) cocaine self-administration and extinction/reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior in rats. For comparison and reference purposes, the effect of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was also examined. Moreover, for comparison effects of those drugs on operant lever responding for artificial (cocaine) vs. natural (food) reward, food self-administration was also evaluated. Our findings show that AM251 (1-3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.3-1mg/kg) did not affect cocaine self-administration. However, AM251 (0.1-1mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) decreased cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, and AM251 (0.3-1mg/kg) decreased cue-induced reinstatement. Moreover, AM251 (3mg/kg), SR144528 (0.1-1mg/kg) and SB366791 (0.1-1mg/kg) slightly decreased food self-administration behavior, but only AM251 (3mg/kg) reduced food reward. In conclusion, our results indicate for the first time, that tonic activation of CB2 or TRPV1 receptors is involved in cocaine-induced reinstatement of cocaine-seeking behavior, but their activity is not necessary for the rewarding effect of this psychostimulant. In contrast to CB1 receptors, neither CB2 nor

  8. Involvement of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the modulation of cholinergic neurotransmission in mouse gastric preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulè, Flavia; Amato, Antonella; Baldassano, Sara; Serio, Rosa

    2007-09-01

    While most of the studies concerning the role of cannabinoids on gastric motility have focused the attention on the gastric emptying in in vivo animal models, there is little information about the cannabinoid peripheral influence in the stomach. In addition, the functional features of CB2 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract have been poorly characterized. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoid drugs on the excitatory cholinergic and inhibitory non-adrenergic non-cholinergic (NANC) neurotransmission in mouse isolated gastric preparations. Intraluminal pressure from isolated whole stomach was recorded and mechanical responses induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were analyzed in different experimental conditions. EFS (0.5ms duration, supramaximal voltage, in trains of 5s, 2-16Hz) caused a cholinergic contraction, which was abolished by atropine or tetrodotoxin (TTX). The cannabinoid receptor agonist, WIN 55,212-2, the endogenous ligand, anandamide, the selective CB1 receptor agonist ACEA, and the selective CB2 receptor agonists, JWH015 and JWH133, produced a concentration-dependent reduction of the EFS-evoked cholinergic contractions. SR141716A, CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide or ACEA, without affecting those caused by JWH133. AM630, CB2 receptor antagonist, reduced the inhibitory effects induced by WIN 55,212-2, anandamide, JWH015 or JWH133, without affecting those caused by ACEA. The joint application of SR141716A and AM630 was able of fully preventing the WIN 55,212-2 and anandamide actions. The cannabinoid antagonists failed per se to affect the neurally evoked responses. Cannabinoids did not modify the contractions produced by exogenous carbachol. In the presence of atropine and guanethidine (NANC conditions) EFS-induced TTX-sensitive relaxation consisting in an early and rapid component followed by a second slow phase, which were

  9. Marketingový mix firmy ALU KOLA CB

    OpenAIRE

    URBAN, Karel

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on a marketing mix practical application in my own company ALU KOLA CB. My company sells alloy wheels and tyres for personal cars. In a literary review are introduced and explained terms marketing, marketing mix and its parts - product, price, place and promotion. In a practical part of this thesis are these terms applied on my company. The end of this part contains results and improvement suggestions.

  10. Marketingový mix firmy ALU KOLA CB

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Karel

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is focused on a marketing mix practical application in my own company ALU KOLA CB. My company sells alloy wheels and tyres for personal cars. In a literary review are introduced and explained terms marketing, marketing mix and its parts - product, price, place and promotion. In a practical part of this thesis are these terms applied on my company. The end of this part contains results and improvement suggestions.

  11. The combined effects of Pseudomonas fluorescens CECT 844 and the black truffle co-inoculation on Pinus nigra seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominguez-Nuñez JA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The inoculation of forest seedlings with mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobacteria can improve the morphology and physiology of the seedlings and benefit the reforestation of Mediterranean areas and the reintroduction of mycorrhizal fungal inocula into these areas. Pinus nigra subsp. salzmannii,a forest component of the Mediterranean natural ecosystems, is currently used in the reforestation of Mediterranean regions. Its roots are able to form an ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with the Ascomycetes fungus Tuber melanosporum Vitt., the black truffle. The ecological, economic and social values of this ectomycorrhizal fungus is well known. Previously, we demonstrated that the inoculation of Pinus halepensis seedlings with Pseudomonas fluorescens CECT 844 rhizobacteria and the black truffle T. melanosporum improved the plant growth and N absorption of the seedlings. Furthermore, the addition of P. fluorescens CECT 844 doubled the rate of mycorrhization of T. melanosporum. In the present work, P. nigra seedlings were produced in a nursery under well-watered conditions. We studied the morphophysiological response of these seedlings to a combined T. melanosporum and/or a rhizobacteria P. fluorescens CECT 844 inoculation. Five months after inoculation, the growth parameters (seedling height, basal diameter, and shoot and root dry weight, mycorrhizal colonization, water parameters (osmotic potential at both full and zero turgor and modulus of elasticity, and the total contents and concentrations of N, P, and K in the seedlings roots and shoots were measured. The root growth potentials were subsequently estimated. The addition of P. fluorescens CECT 844 did not significantly improve the mycorrhizal colonization by T. melanosporum on P. nigra seedlings. Additionally, the P. fluorescens inoculation caused few significant improvements in the growth and water parameters. Moreover, apparently opposing effects were observed between the two inoculations regarding the

  12. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Mendizabal-Zubiaga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1, where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahidrocannabinol (Δ9-THC concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12% and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant

  13. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez De Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and functional role of mtCB1 in three different striated muscles. Immunoelectron microscopy for CB1 was used in skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius and rectus abdominis) and myocardium from wild-type and CB1-KO mice. Functional assessments were performed in mitochondria purified from the heart of the mice and the mitochondrial oxygen consumption upon application of different acute delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) concentrations (100 nM or 200 nM) was monitored. About 26% of the mitochondrial profiles in gastrocnemius, 22% in the rectus abdominis and 17% in the myocardium expressed CB1. Furthermore, the proportion of mtCB1 versus total CB1 immunoparticles was about 60% in the gastrocnemius, 55% in the rectus abdominis and 78% in the myocardium. Importantly, the CB1 immunolabeling pattern disappeared in muscles of CB1-KO mice. Functionally, acute 100 nM or 200 nM THC treatment specifically decreased mitochondria coupled respiration between 12 and 15% in wild-type isolated mitochondria of myocardial muscles but no significant difference was noticed between THC treated and vehicle in mitochondria isolated from CB1-KO heart. Furthermore, gene expression of key enzymes involved in pyruvate synthesis, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and mitochondrial respiratory chain was evaluated in the striated muscle of CB1-WT and CB1-KO. CB1-KO showed an increase in the gene expression of Eno3, Pkm2, and Pdha1, suggesting an increased production of pyruvate. In contrast, no significant difference was

  14. Growth Inhibition of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides by Trichoderma harzianum, Trichoderma koningii, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febrilia Nur ‘Aini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum  gloeosporioides is  a  disease  which  can  cause  significant yield  loss  of  cocoa.  The  objective  of  this  research  is  to  investigate  the  abilityof  antagonist  microbes,  Trichoderma  harzianum,  Trichoderma  koningii,  Bacillus subtilis  and Pseudomonas  fluorescens  in  controlling  gloeosporioides  biologically  in  laboratorium  condition.  The  experiment  was  carried  out  in  Crop  Protection  Laboratory,  Indonesian  Coffee  and  Cocoa  Research  Institute.  Results of  this  research  showed  that  antagonist  fungi,  T.  harzianum,  T.  koningii,  had  a stronger  ability  in  inhibiting  growth  of  C.  gloeosporioides about  83%  compared  to  the  ability  of  antagonist  bacteria,  B.  subtilis  and P.  fluorescens,  only about  49%. Key words: Growth  inhibition,  Colletotrichum  gloeosporioides,  Trichoderma  harzianum, Trichoderma koningii,  Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  15. Two strains of Pseudomonas fluorscens bacteria differentially affect survivorship of waxworm (Galleria mellonella) larvae exposed to an arthropod fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens were found contaminating a biopesticide used in a previous study against Varroa destructor infestations in honey bee hives. In the aforementioned study the biopesticide, a formulation of the arthropod pathogen Beauveria bassiana, failed to have any impact on t...

  16. Searching for circumbinary planets with CB-BLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofir, Aviv

    2015-08-01

    Transiting circumbinary planets (CBP) produce transit signals that are neither periodic not constant in duration or depth. These complications contribute to the low number of detected transiting CBP (nine in total so far), and limited detection to systems that exhibit transits that are relatively deep, i.e. individually-significant transit events. Planets around single stars taught us that small planets far outnumber larger ones, consequently the ability to detect small CBP is of the essence in order to correctly describe CBP demographics. Unfortunately, all currently known transiting CBP were detected either by eye or by some ad-hoc technique that has nothing to do with the 3-body dynamics of CBP (e.g. QATS, Carter & Agol 2013) -- limiting their detection power. CB-BLS (Ofir 2008) is an algorithm for the detection of transiting CBP that was proposed well before the first transiting CBP was detected (Doyle et al 2011). CB-BLS is tailored for CBP dynamics and is optimally sensitive and general. Here we present further evolution and the Matlab source code of CB-BLS that allows it to detect all currently known transiting CBP, including in eccentric and/or inclined orbits. We then describe our preliminary results on searching for transiting CBP in a small subset of the Kepler eclipsing binaries.

  17. Magnetic field geometry of the large globule CB 34

    CERN Document Server

    Das, A; Medhi, Biman J; Wolf, S

    2016-01-01

    We report the results of optical polarimetric observations of a Bok globule CB34 to study magnetic field structure on large scales ($10^5-10^6$ AU), which is combined with archival sub-mm observations to characterize the magnetic field structure of CB34 on small scales ($10^4 - 10^5$ AU). The optical polarization measurements indicate that the magnetic field in the globule is constrained to a maximum radius of $10^5$AU around the core, out to densities not smaller than $10^4$cm$^{-3}$. Our study is mainly concentrated on two submillimeter cores C1 and C2 of CB34. The direction of magnetic field of core C2 is found to be nearly perpendicular to the CO outflow direction of the globule. The magnetic field of core C1 is almost aligned with the minor axis of the core which is typical for magnetically dominated star formation models. The mean value of offset between the minor axis of core C2 and the outflow direction is found to be $14^\\circ$ which suggests that the direction of the outflow is almost aligned with t...

  18. Biodegradation of benzidine based azodyes Direct red and Direct blue by the immobilized cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens D41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puvaneswari, N; Muthukrishnan, J; Gunasekaran, P

    2002-10-01

    Benzidine based azodyes are proven carcinogens, mutagens and have been linked to bladder cancer of human beings and laboratory animals. The textile and dyestuff manufacturing industry are the two major sources that released azodyes in their effluents. The dye, Direct blue contains two carcinogenic compounds namely benzidine (BZ), 4-amino biphenyl (4-ABP), while the dye Direct red has benzidine (BZ). Among 40 isolates of Pseudomonas fluorescens screened, one isolate designated as D41 was found to be capable of extensively degrading the dyes Direct blue and Direct red. Immobilized cells of P. fluorescens D41 efficiently degraded Direct red (82%) and Direct blue (71%) in the presence of glucose.

  19. An improved, high-quality draft genome sequence of the Germination-Arrest Factor-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens WH6

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    Creason Allison L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas fluorescens is a genetically and physiologically diverse species of bacteria present in many habitats and in association with plants. This species of bacteria produces a large array of secondary metabolites with potential as natural products. P. fluorescens isolate WH6 produces Germination-Arrest Factor (GAF, a predicted small peptide or amino acid analog with herbicidal activity that specifically inhibits germination of seeds of graminaceous species. Results We used a hybrid next-generation sequencing approach to develop a high-quality draft genome sequence for P. fluorescens WH6. We employed automated, manual, and experimental methods to further improve the draft genome sequence. From this assembly of 6.27 megabases, we predicted 5876 genes, of which 3115 were core to P. fluorescens and 1567 were unique to WH6. Comparative genomic studies of WH6 revealed high similarity in synteny and orthology of genes with P. fluorescens SBW25. A phylogenomic study also placed WH6 in the same lineage as SBW25. In a previous non-saturating mutagenesis screen we identified two genes necessary for GAF activity in WH6. Mapping of their flanking sequences revealed genes that encode a candidate anti-sigma factor and an aminotransferase. Finally, we discovered several candidate virulence and host-association mechanisms, one of which appears to be a complete type III secretion system. Conclusions The improved high-quality draft genome sequence of WH6 contributes towards resolving the P. fluorescens species, providing additional impetus for establishing two separate lineages in P. fluorescens. Despite the high levels of orthology and synteny to SBW25, WH6 still had a substantial number of unique genes and represents another source for the discovery of genes with implications in affecting plant growth and health. Two genes are demonstrably necessary for GAF and further characterization of their proteins is important for developing

  20. Cyanase-mediated utilization of cyanate in Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIB 11764.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, D A; Nagappan, O

    1989-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIB 11764 was capable of utilizing cyanate (OCN-) as a sole nitrogen source for growth. Crude cell extracts from cells grown on cyanate, but not on ammonium sulfate, were induced for an enzyme catalyzing cyanate conversion to ammonia. Enzymatic activity was shown to be bicarbonate dependent and specific for cyanate as a substrate, suggesting that cyanate utilization in this organism is facilitated by an enzyme resembling cyanase (cyanate amidohydrolase; EC 3.5.5.3), as described previously in Escherichia coli and Flavobacterium sp.

  1. Lipopeptide biosurfactant viscosin enhances dispersal of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise; Svenningsen, Nanna Bygvraa; Rybtke, Morten Levin;

    2015-01-01

    study sets out to determine the specific role of the lipopeptide viscosin in Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 biofilm formation, architecture and dispersal, and to relate viscA gene expression to viscosin production and effect. Initially, we compared biofilm formation of SBW25 and the viscosin...... that viscosin is involved in biofilm dispersal was confirmed by chemical complementation of the mutant biofilm. Furthermore, a fluorescent bioreporter showed that viscA expression was induced in biofilms 4 h prior to dispersal. Subsequent detailed studies of biofilms formed in flow cells for up to 5 days...

  2. Primary Macrophage Chemotaxis Induced by Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Agonists Occurs Independently of the CB2 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lewis; Christou, Ivy; Kapellos, Theodore S; Buchan, Alice; Brodermann, Maximillian H; Gianella-Borradori, Matteo; Russell, Angela; Iqbal, Asif J; Greaves, David R

    2015-06-02

    Activation of CB2 has been demonstrated to induce directed immune cell migration. However, the ability of CB2 to act as a chemoattractant receptor in macrophages remains largely unexplored. Using a real-time chemotaxis assay and a panel of chemically diverse and widely used CB2 agonists, we set out to examine whether CB2 modulates primary murine macrophage chemotaxis. We report that of 12 agonists tested, only JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 acted as macrophage chemoattractants. Surprisingly, neither pharmacological inhibition nor genetic ablation of CB2 had any effect on CB2 agonist-induced macrophage chemotaxis. As chemotaxis was pertussis toxin sensitive in both WT and CB2(-/-) macrophages, we concluded that a non-CB1/CB2, Gi/o-coupled GPCR must be responsible for CB2 agonist-induced macrophage migration. The obvious candidate receptors GPR18 and GPR55 could not mediate JWH133 or HU308-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement or JWH133-induced β-arrestin recruitment in cells transfected with either receptor, demonstrating that neither are the unidentified GPCR. Taken together our results conclusively demonstrate that CB2 is not a chemoattractant receptor for murine macrophages. Furthermore we show for the first time that JWH133, HU308, L-759,656 and L-759,633 have off-target effects of functional consequence in primary cells and we believe that our findings have wide ranging implications for the entire cannabinoid field.

  3. Regulation of Soluble Phosphate on the Ability of Phytate Mineralization and β-Propeller Phytase Gene Expression of Pseudomonas fluorescens JZ-DZ1, a Phytate-Mineralizing Rhizobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lan; Wu, Xiao-Qin; Zeng, Qing-Wei; Liu, Hong-Bin

    2016-12-01

    Phytate-mineralizing rhizobacteria (PMR) play an important role in providing phosphorus for the sustainable plant growth. It is important to investigate the ability of PMR to produce phytase under different phosphate levels for its application. The effects of different concentrations of soluble phosphate on the ability of phytate mineralization of Pseudomonas fluorescens JZ-DZ1, a phytate-mineralizing rhizobacterium, were investigated in both solid and liquid media. The results on solid media showed that halo zone width gradually reduced with concentrations of soluble phosphate increasing from 0.05 to 20 mM, indicating the reduction of the ability of phytate mineralization. The results were consistent with the quantitative detection of phytase activity from the overall trend. An 1866-bp β-propeller phytase (BPP) gene (phyPf) was cloned from the strain, and the deduced amino acid sequence of phyPf shared 98 % of identity with a known BPP from Pseudomonas sp. BS10-3 (AJF36073.1). The results of relative real-time quantitative PCR assay showed that the expression of phyPf was induced by a low concentration (0.1 mM) of soluble phosphate, suggesting that BPP secretion was regulated by gene phyPf. The BPP-harboring bacterium P. fluorescens JZ-DZ1 with low phosphate-inducible ability of phytate mineralization could be potentially applied to promote phosphorus uptake for plants in the future.

  4. Sex-dependent changes in brain CB1R expression and functionality and immune CB2R expression as a consequence of maternal deprivation and adolescent cocaine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente-Berzal, Alvaro; Assis, María A; Rubino, Tiziana; Zamberletti, Erica; Marco, Eva M; Parolaro, Daniela; Ambrosio, Emilio; Viveros, María-Paz

    2013-08-01

    Early life stress has been associated with several psychiatric disorders, including drug addiction. Actually, maternal deprivation (MD) alters the endocannabinoid system, which participates in motivation and reward for drugs, including cocaine. At youth, the rate of cocaine abuse is alarmingly increasing. Herein, we have investigated the consequences of MD and/or adolescent cocaine exposure in brain CB1Rs and CB2Rs in immune tissues. Control and maternally deprived (24h on postnatal day, pnd, 9) male and female Wistar rats were administered cocaine (8mg/kg/day) or saline during adolescence (pnd 28-42). At adulthood, [(3)H]-CP-55,940 autoradiographic binding was employed for the analysis of CB1R density and CP-55,940-stimulated [(35)S]-GTPgammaS binding for CB1R functionality; CB2R expression was analyzed by Western blotting. Sex differences in CB1R expression and functionality were found, and MD induced important and enduring sex-dependent changes. In addition, the plastic changes induced by adolescent cocaine administration in brain CB1Rs were differentially influenced by early life events. MD increased spleen CB2R expression while adolescent cocaine administration attenuated this effect; cocaine exposure also diminished CB2R expression in bone marrow. Present findings provide evidence for changes in brain CB1R expression and functionality and immune CB2R expression as a consequence of early life stress and adolescent cocaine exposure, and indicate functional interactions between both treatments, which in many regions differ between males and females.

  5. Inhibitory effects of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists on responses of DRG neurons and dorsal horn neurons in neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Devi Rani; Kelly, Sara; Millns, Paul J; O'Shaughnessey, Celestine T; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2005-07-01

    Cannabinoid 2 (CB2) receptor mediated antinociception and increased levels of spinal CB2 receptor mRNA are reported in neuropathic Sprague-Dawley rats. The aim of this study was to provide functional evidence for a role of peripheral, vs. spinal, CB2 and cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptors in neuropathic rats. Effects of the CB2 receptor agonist, JWH-133, and the CB1 receptor agonist, arachidonyl-2-chloroethylamide (ACEA), on primary afferent fibres were determined by calcium imaging studies of adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons taken from neuropathic and sham-operated rats. Capsaicin (100 nm) increased [Ca2+]i in DRG neurons from sham and neuropathic rats. JWH-133 (3 microm) or ACEA (1 microm) significantly (PCB2 receptor antagonist, SR144528, (1 microm) significantly inhibited the effects of JWH-133. Effects of ACEA were significantly inhibited by the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (1 microm). In vivo experiments evaluated the effects of spinal administration of JWH-133 (8-486 ng/50 microL) and ACEA (0.005-500 ng/50 microL) on mechanically evoked responses of neuropathic and sham-operated rats. Spinal JWH-133 attenuated mechanically evoked responses of spinal neurons in neuropathic, but not sham-operated rats. These inhibitory effects were blocked by SR144528 (0.001 microg/50 microL). Spinal ACEA inhibited mechanically evoked responses of neuropathic and sham-operated rats, these effects were blocked by SR141716A (0.01 microg/50 microL). Our data provide evidence for a functional role of CB2, as well as CB1 receptors on DRG neurons in sham and neuropathic rats. At the level of the spinal cord, CB2 receptors have inhibitory effects in neuropathic, but not sham-operated rats suggesting that spinal CB2 may be an important analgesic target.

  6. Modeling of ligand binding to G protein coupled receptors: cannabinoid CB1, CB2 and adrenergic β 2 AR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latek, Dorota; Kolinski, Michal; Ghoshdastider, Umesh; Debinski, Aleksander; Bombolewski, Rafal; Plazinska, Anita; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Filipek, Slawomir

    2011-09-01

    Cannabinoid and adrenergic receptors belong to the class A (similar to rhodopsin) G protein coupled receptors. Docking of agonists and antagonists to CB(1) and CB(2) cannabinoid receptors revealed the importance of a centrally located rotamer toggle switch and its possible participation in the mechanism of agonist/antagonist recognition. The switch is composed of two residues, F3.36 and W6.48, located on opposite transmembrane helices TM3 and TM6 in the central part of the membranous domain of cannabinoid receptors. The CB(1) and CB(2) receptor models were constructed based on the adenosine A(2A) receptor template. The two best scored conformations of each receptor were used for the docking procedure. In all poses (ligand-receptor conformations) characterized by the lowest ligand-receptor intermolecular energy and free energy of binding the ligand type matched the state of the rotamer toggle switch: antagonists maintained an inactive state of the switch, whereas agonists changed it. In case of agonists of β(2)AR, the (R,R) and (S,S) stereoisomers of fenoterol, the molecular dynamics simulations provided evidence of different binding modes while preserving the same average position of ligands in the binding site. The (S,S) isomer was much more labile in the binding site and only one stable hydrogen bond was created. Such dynamical binding modes may also be valid for ligands of cannabinoid receptors because of the hydrophobic nature of their ligand-receptor interactions. However, only very long molecular dynamics simulations could verify the validity of such binding modes and how they affect the process of activation.

  7. Chronic alcohol exposure disrupts CB1 regulation of GABAergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varodayan, Florence P; Bajo, Michal; Soni, Neeraj; Luu, George; Madamba, Samuel G; Schweitzer, Paul; Roberto, Marisa

    2017-05-01

    The basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA) is critical to the pathophysiology of anxiety-driven alcohol drinking and relapse. The endogenous cannabinoid/type 1 cannabinoid receptor (eCB/CB1 ) system curbs BLA-driven anxiety and stress responses via a retrograde negative feedback system that inhibits neurotransmitter release, and BLA CB1 activation reduces GABA release and drives anxiogenesis. Additionally, decreased amygdala CB1 is observed in abstinent alcoholic patients and ethanol withdrawn rats. Here, we investigated the potential disruption of eCB/CB1 signaling on GABAergic transmission in BLA pyramidal neurons of rats exposed to 2-3 weeks intermittent ethanol. In the naïve rat BLA, the CB1 agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) decreased GABA release, and this effect was prevented by the CB1 antagonist AM251. AM251 alone increased GABA release via a mechanism requiring postsynaptic calcium-dependent activity. This retrograde tonic eCB/CB1 signaling was diminished in chronic ethanol exposed rats, suggesting a functional impairment of the eCB/CB1 system. In contrast, acute ethanol increased GABAergic transmission similarly in naïve and chronic ethanol exposed rats, via both presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. Notably, CB1 activation impaired ethanol's facilitation of GABAergic transmission across both groups, but the AM251-induced and ethanol-induced facilitation of GABA release was additive, suggesting independent presynaptic sites of action. Collectively, the present findings highlight a critical CB1 influence on BLA GABAergic transmission that is dysregulated by chronic ethanol exposure and, thus, may contribute to the alcohol-dependent state. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. Brain neuronal CB2 cannabinoid receptors in drug abuse and depression: from mice to human subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel S Onaivi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Addiction and major depression are mental health problems associated with stressful events in life with high relapse and reoccurrence even after treatment. Many laboratories were not able to detect the presence of cannabinoid CB2 receptors (CB2-Rs in healthy brains, but there has been demonstration of CB2-R expression in rat microglial cells and other brain associated cells during inflammation. Therefore, neuronal expression of CB2-Rs had been ambiguous and controversial and its role in depression and substance abuse is unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of CB2 gene might be associated with depression in a human population and that alteration in CB2 gene expression may be involved in the effects of abused substances including opiates, cocaine and ethanol in rodents. Here we demonstrate that a high incidence of (Q63R but not (H316Y polymorphism in the CB2 gene was found in Japanese depressed subjects. CB2-Rs and their gene transcripts are expressed in the brains of naïve mice and are modulated following exposure to stressors and administration of abused drugs. Mice that developed alcohol preference had reduced CB2 gene expression and chronic treatment with JWH015 a putative CB2-R agonist, enhanced alcohol consumption in stressed but not in control mice. The direct intracerebroventricular microinjection of CB2 anti-sense oligonucleotide into the mouse brain reduced mouse aversions in the plus-maze test, indicating the functional presence of CB2-Rs in the brain that modifies behavior. We report for the using electron microscopy the sub cellular localization of CB2-Rs that are mainly on post-synaptic elements in rodent brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data demonstrate the functional expression of CB2-Rs in brain that may provide novel targets for the effects of cannabinoids in depression and substance abuse disorders beyond neuro-immunocannabinoid activity.

  9. CB1 receptor deficiency decreases wheel-running activity: consequences on emotional behaviours and hippocampal neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreucq, Sarah; Koehl, Muriel; Abrous, Djoher N; Marsicano, Giovanni; Chaouloff, Francis

    2010-07-01

    Chronic voluntary wheel-running activity has been reported to hypersensitise central CB1 receptors in mice. On the other hand, pharmacological findings suggest that the CB1 receptor could be involved in wheel-running behaviour and in running-induced neurogenesis in the hippocampus. We analysed wheel-running behaviour for 6 weeks and measured its consequences on hippocampal neurogenesis in CB1 knockout (CB1(-/-)) animals, compared to wild-type (CB1(+/+)) littermates. Because wheel running has been shown to affect locomotor reactivity in novel environments, memory for aversive events and depression-like behaviours, we also assessed these behaviours in control and running CB1(+/+) and CB1(-/-) mice. When compared with running CB1(+/+) mice, the distance covered weekly by CB1(-/-) mice was decreased by 30-40%, an observation accounted for by decreased time spent and maximal velocity on the wheels. Analyses of running distances with respect to the light/dark cycle revealed that mutant covered less distance throughout both the inactive and the active phases of that cycle. Locomotion in an activity cage, exploration in an open field, and immobility time in the forced swim test proved insensitive to chronic wheel running in either genotype. Wheel running, per se, did not influence the expression and extinction of cued fear memory but counteracted in a time-dependent manner the deficiency of extinction measured in CB1(-/-) mice. Hippocampal neurogenesis, assessed by doublecortin labelling of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus, was lowered by 40% in control CB1(-/-) mice, compared to control CB1(+/+) mice. Although CB1(-/-) mice ran less than their wild-type littermates, the 6-week running protocol increased neurogenesis to similar extents (37-39%) in both genotypes. This study suggests that mouse CB1 receptors control wheel running but not its neurogenic consequences in the hippocampus.

  10. Vascular Dysfunction in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Effects of CB1R and CB2R Cannabinoid Agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Dorado, Jorge; Villalba, Nuria; Prieto, Dolores; Brera, Begoña; Martín-Moreno, Ana M.; Tejerina, Teresa; de Ceballos, María L.

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence of altered vascular function, including cerebrovascular, in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transgenic models of the disease. Indeed vasoconstrictor responses are increased, while vasodilation is reduced in both conditions. β-Amyloid (Aβ) appears to be responsible, at least in part, of alterations in vascular function. Cannabinoids, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory agents, induce vasodilation both in vivo and in vitro. We have demonstrated a beneficial effect of cannabinoids in models of AD by preventing glial activation. In this work we have studied the effects of these compounds on vessel density in amyloid precursor protein (APP) transgenic mice, line 2576, and on altered vascular responses in aortae isolated ring. First we showed increased collagen IV positive vessels in AD brain compared to control subjects, with a similar increase in TgAPP mice, which was normalized by prolonged oral treatment with the CB1/CB2 mixed agonist WIN 55,212-2 (WIN) and the CB2 selective agonist JWH-133 (JWH). In Tg APP mice the vasoconstriction induced by phenylephrine and the thromboxane agonist U46619 was significantly increased, and no change in the vasodilation to acetylcholine (ACh) was observed. Tg APP displayed decreased vasodilation to both cannabinoid agonists, which were able to prevent decreased ACh relaxation in the presence of Aβ. In summary, we have confirmed and extended the existence of altered vascular responses in Tg APP mice. Moreover, our results suggest that treatment with cannabinoids may ameliorate the vascular responses in AD-type pathology. PMID:27695396

  11. The effect of iron limitation on the transcriptome and proteome of Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Kent Lim

    Full Text Available One of the most important micronutrients for bacterial growth is iron, whose bioavailability in soil is limited. Consequently, rhizospheric bacteria such as Pseudomonas fluorescens employ a range of mechanisms to acquire or compete for iron. We investigated the transcriptomic and proteomic effects of iron limitation on P. fluorescens Pf-5 by employing microarray and iTRAQ techniques, respectively. Analysis of this data revealed that genes encoding functions related to iron homeostasis, including pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis, a number of TonB-dependent receptor systems, as well as some inner-membrane transporters, were significantly up-regulated in response to iron limitation. Transcription of a ribosomal protein L36-encoding gene was also highly up-regulated during iron limitation. Certain genes or proteins involved in biosynthesis of secondary metabolites such as 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG, orfamide A and pyrrolnitrin, as well as a chitinase, were over-expressed under iron-limited conditions. In contrast, we observed that expression of genes involved in hydrogen cyanide production and flagellar biosynthesis were down-regulated in an iron-depleted culture medium. Phenotypic tests revealed that Pf-5 had reduced swarming motility on semi-solid agar in response to iron limitation. Comparison of the transcriptomic data with the proteomic data suggested that iron acquisition is regulated at both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  12. An ATP and oxalate generating variant tricarboxylic acid cycle counters aluminum toxicity in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranji Singh

    Full Text Available Although the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle is essential in almost all aerobic organisms, its precise modulation and integration in global cellular metabolism is not fully understood. Here, we report on an alternative TCA cycle uniquely aimed at generating ATP and oxalate, two metabolites critical for the survival of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The upregulation of isocitrate lyase (ICL and acylating glyoxylate dehydrogenase (AGODH led to the enhanced synthesis of oxalate, a dicarboxylic acid involved in the immobilization of aluminum (Al. The increased activity of succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS and oxalate CoA-transferase (OCT in the Al-stressed cells afforded an effective route to ATP synthesis from oxalyl-CoA via substrate level phosphorylation. This modified TCA cycle with diminished efficacy in NADH production and decreased CO(2-evolving capacity, orchestrates the synthesis of oxalate, NADPH, and ATP, ingredients pivotal to the survival of P. fluorescens in an Al environment. The channeling of succinyl-CoA towards ATP formation may be an important function of the TCA cycle during anaerobiosis, Fe starvation and O(2-limited conditions.

  13. Phenotypic and metabolic profiling of colony morphology variants evolved from Pseudomonas fluorescens biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Weljie, Aalim M; Tran, Vy A; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Tremaroli, Valentina; Vogel, Hans J; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2010-06-01

    Colony morphology variants isolated from natural and laboratory-grown biofilms represent subpopulations of biofilm cells that may be important for multiple aspects of the sessile lifestyle, from surface colonization to stress resistance. There are many genetic and environmental factors that determine the frequency at which colony morphology variants are recovered from biofilms. One of these factors involves an increased selection for variants in biofilms of Pseudomonas species bearing inactivating mutations in the global activator of cyanide biosynthesis/regulator of secondary metabolism (gac/rsm) signal transduction pathway. Here we characterize two distinct colony morphology variants isolated from biofilms of Pseudomonas fluorescens missing the gacS sensor kinase. These variants produced more biofilm cell mass, and in one case, this was likely due to overproduction of the exopolysaccharide cellulose. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) metabolomics revealed distinct metabolic changes for each of the two phenotypic variants, and these changes involved amino acids and metabolites produced through glutathione biochemistry. Some of these metabolites are hypothesized to play a role in redox and metal homeostasis, and corresponding to this, we show that biofilm populations grown from each of these variants had a different ability to survive when exposed to toxic doses of metal ions. These data suggest that colony morphology variants that evolve during growth of P. fluorescens as a biofilm may have distinct metabolic capacities that contribute to their individual abilities to withstand environmental stress.

  14. Spatial distributions of Pseudomonas fluorescens colony variants in mixed-culture biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Wang, Siyuan; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-07-28

    The emergence of colony morphology variants in structured environments is being recognized as important to both niche specialization and stress tolerance. Pseudomonas fluorescens demonstrates diversity in both its natural environment, the rhizosphere, and in laboratory grown biofilms. Sub-populations of these variants within a biofilm have been suggested as important contributors to antimicrobial stress tolerance given their altered susceptibility to various agents. As such it is of interest to determine how these variants might be distributed in the biofilm environment. Here we present an analysis of the spatial distribution of Pseudomonas fluorescens colony morphology variants in mixed-culture biofilms with the wildtype phenotype. These findings reveal that two variant colony morphotypes demonstrate a significant growth advantage over the wildtype morphotype in the biofilm environment. The two variant morphotypes out-grew the wildtype across the entire biofilm and this occurred within 24 h and was maintained through to 96 h. This competitive advantage was not observed in homogeneous broth culture. The significant advantage that the variants demonstrate in biofilm colonization over the wildtype denotes the importance of this phenotype in structured environments.

  15. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  16. Effects of Se-phenyl thiazolidine-4-carboselenoate on mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in brachial plexus avulsion in mice: mediation by cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Fabbro, Lucian; Borges Filho, Carlos; Cattelan Souza, Leandro; Savegnago, Lucielli; Alves, Diego; Henrique Schneider, Paulo; de Salles, Helena Domingues; Jesse, Cristiano R

    2012-09-26

    In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of treatment with (R)-Se-phenyl thiazolidine-4-carboselenoate (Se-PTC), an organic selenium compound with antinociceptive properties, against mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia induced by brachial plexus avulsion (BPA), a neuropathic model in mice. The involvement of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors in the Se-PTC anti-hyperalgesic effect was also investigated. Se-PTC treatment at (25 and 50mg/kg, per oral, p.o.) lowered (BPA model) induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in mice. Pretreatment with cannabinoid CB(1) (AM251; 1mg/kg, intraperitoneally, i.p.), or CB(2) (AM630; 3mg/kg, i.p.) receptor antagonists reverted the mechanical and thermal anti-hyperalgesic effect of Se-PTC (25mg/kg) in the BPA model. Selective CB(1) (ACEA, 10mg/kg, i.p.) and CB(2) (JWH-133, 10mg/kg, i.p.) receptor agonists lowered mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the BPA model, and this effect was prevented by selective CB(1) and CB(2) receptor antagonists. Gabapentin (70mg/kg, p.o.), positive control administration also lowered mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in the BPA model. The results suggest that the mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia observed following BPA in mice is dependent on cannabinoid receptors. The results indicate that modulating cannabinoid receptors represent a valuable approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain. In conclusion, the results suggested that Se-PTC produces pronounced mechanical and thermal anti-hyperalgesic effects in neuropathic models in mice by modulating CB(1) and CB(2) receptors.

  17. The CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN-55,212-2 reduces viability of human Kaposi's sarcoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luca, Tonia; Di Benedetto, Giulia; Scuderi, Mariagrazia Rita; Palumbo, Marco; Clementi, Silvia; Bernardini, Renato; Cantarella, Giuseppina

    2009-08-15

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a highly vascularized mesenchymal neoplasm arising with multiple lesions of the skin. Endogenous cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit proliferation of a wide spectrum of tumor cells. We studied the effects of cannabinoids on human Kaposi's sarcoma cell proliferation in vitro. To do so, we first investigated the presence of the cannabinoid receptors CB(1) and CB(2) mRNAs in the human Kaposi's sarcoma cell line KS-IMM by RT-PCR and, subsequently, the effects of the mixed CB(1)/CB(2) agonist WIN-55,212-2 (WIN) on cell proliferation in vitro. WIN showed antimitogenic effects on Kaposi's sarcoma cells. Western blot analysis of Kaposi's sarcoma lysates suggested that WIN treatment induced activation of both caspase-3 and -6, as well as increased phosphorylation of the stress kinase p38 and JNK, along with transient phosphorylation of ERK(1/2). To better characterize the involvement of each single CB receptor in cannabinoid-induced cell death, we incubated Kaposi's sarcoma cells with different selective cannabinoid receptor agonists, respectively ACEA (CB(1)) and JWH-133 (CB(2)). None of the agonists was able to induce KS-IMM cell apoptosis. Moreover, we co-incubated Kaposi's sarcoma cells with WIN-55,212-2 and either the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, the CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630, or a combination of both substances. The CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630 was able to significantly increase survival of Kaposi's sarcoma cells treated with WIN. In view of the antiproliferative effects of cannabinoids on KS-IMM cells, one could envision the cannabinoid system as a potential target for pharmacological treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma.

  18. Activation of Both CB1 and CB2 Endocannabinoid Receptors Is Critical for Masculinization of the Developing Medial Amygdala and Juvenile Social Play Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvo, David J; Whitaker, Allison R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Juvenile social play behavior is a shared trait across a wide variety of mammalian species. When play is characterized by the frequency or duration of physical contact, males usually display more play relative to females. The endocannabinoid system contributes to the development of the sex difference in social play behavior in rats. Treating newborn pups with a nonspecific endocannabinoid agonist, WIN55,212-2, masculinizes subsequent juvenile rough-and-tumble play behavior by females. Here we use specific drugs to target signaling through either the CB1 or CB2 endocannabinoid receptor (CB1R or CB2R) to determine which modulates the development of sex differences in play. Our data reveal that signaling through both CB1R and CB2R must be altered neonatally to modify development of neural circuitry regulating sex differences in play. Neonatal co-agonism of CB1R and CB2R masculinized play by females, whereas co-antagonism of these receptors feminized rates of male play. Because of a known role for the medial amygdala in the sexual differentiation of play, we reconstructed Golgi-impregnated neurons in the juvenile medial amygdala and used factor analysis to identify morphological parameters that were sexually differentiated and responsive to dual agonism of CB1R and CB2R during the early postnatal period. Our results suggest that sex differences in the medial amygdala are modulated by the endocannabinoid system during early development. Sex differences in play behavior are loosely correlated with differences in neuronal morphology. PMID:28144625

  19. CB1 cannabinoid receptor expression in the striatum: Association with corticostriatal circuits and developmental regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent eVan Waes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corticostriatal circuits mediate various aspects of goal-directed behavior and are critically important for basal ganglia-related disorders. Activity in these circuits is regulated by the endocannabinoid system via stimulation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors. CB1 receptors are highly expressed in projection neurons and select interneurons of the striatum, but expression levels vary considerably between different striatal regions (functional domains. We investigated CB1 receptor expression within specific corticostriatal circuits by mapping CB1 mRNA levels in striatal sectors defined by their cortical inputs in rats. We also assessed changes in CB1 expression in the striatum during development. Our results show that CB1 expression is highest in juveniles (P25 and then progressively decreases towards adolescent (P40 and adult (P70 levels. At every age, CB1 receptors are predominantly expressed in sensorimotor striatal sectors, with considerably lower expression in associative and limbic sectors. Moreover, for most corticostriatal circuits there is an inverse relationship between cortical and striatal expression levels. Thus, striatal sectors with high CB1 expression (sensorimotor sectors tend to receive inputs from cortical areas with low expression, while striatal sectors with low expression (associative/limbic sectors receive inputs from cortical regions with higher expression (medial prefrontal cortex. In so far as CB1 mRNA levels reflect receptor function, our findings suggest differential CB1 signaling between different developmental stages and between sensorimotor and associative/limbic circuits. The regional distribution of CB1 receptor expression in the striatum further suggests that, in sensorimotor sectors, CB1 receptors mostly regulate GABA inputs from local axon collaterals of projection neurons, whereas in associative/limbic sectors, CB1 regulation of GABA inputs from interneurons and glutamate inputs may be more important.

  20. A phosphate-starvation-inducible outermembrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1 as an immunological phosphate-starvation marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Kristine; Jacobsen, Susanne; Nybroe, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A phosphate-starvation-inducible outer-membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1, expressed at phosphate concentrations below0.08-0.13 mM, was purified and characterized. The purification method involved separation of outer-membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE andextraction of the protein from...

  1. Gac-mediated changes in pyrroloquinoline quinone biosynthesis enhance the antimicrobial activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.; Voort, van der M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    In Pseudomonas species, production of secondary metabolites and exoenzymes is regulated by the GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system. In P. fluorescens SBW25, mutations in the Gac-system cause major transcriptional changes and abolished production of the lipopeptide viscosin and of an exoproteas

  2. Detoxification of selenite and mercury by reduction and mutual protection in the assimilation of both elements by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belzile, Nelson [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: nbelzile@laurentian.ca; Wu Gaojun [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Chen, Yu-Wei [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada); Appanna, Vasu D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2006-08-31

    A study on the assimilation and detoxification of selenium and mercury and on the interaction between these two elements was conducted on Pseudomonas fluorescens. P. fluorescens was able to convert separately both elements to their elemental forms, which are less toxic and biologically less available. To study the converting mechanism of selenite to elemental Se, cells were grown in the presence of various selenite concentrations and several parameters such as extracellular protein concentrations, pH, carbohydrate concentrations, isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) and malic enzyme were monitored. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and various analytical methods were applied to confirm the interaction between selenium and cell. The former appeared as a red precipitate localized predominantly in the consumed culture medium. P. fluorescens also resisted to the toxic effect of mercury by converting Hg{sup 2+} to the volatile and less toxic form Hg . Mercury reductase was likely responsible for the conversion of Hg{sup 2+} to Hg . More importantly, the interaction between mercury and selenium was also studied. The presence of selenite significantly reduced the accumulation of mercury in P. fluorescens. It was also interesting to note that mercury appeared to behave as a protecting agent against selenium intoxication as the bioaccumulation of Se was also inhibited by this metal. The formation of Se-Hg complexes could explain this mutual protective effect. No precipitate of elemental Se could be detected when Hg was present in the cultures.

  3. Factors impacting the activity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens against take-all of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Take-all, caused by Gaeumannomyces graminis var. tritici, is an important soilborne disease of wheat worldwide. Pseudomonas fluorescens producing the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (2,4-DAPG) are biocontrol agents of take-all and provide natural suppression of the disease during wheat monocul...

  4. Kinetic modelling of enzyme inactivation Kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schokker, E.P.

    1997-01-01

    The kinetics of heat inactivation of the extracellular proteinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens 22F was studied. It was established, by making use of kinetic modelling, that heat inactivation in the temperature range 35 - 70 °C was most likely caused by intermolecular autoproteolysis, where unfolded

  5. Cost modeling of pseudomonoas fluorescens and pseudomonoas chlororphis biocontrol for competitive exclusion of salmonella enterica on tomatoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biocontrol measures may enhance postharvest interventions, however; published research on process-based models for biocontrol of foodborne pathogens on produce is limited. The aim of this research was to develop cost model estimates for competitive exclusion process using Pseudomonas fluorescens and...

  6. Comparative study of semi-specific Aeromonas hydrophila and universal Pseudomonas fluorescens biosensors for BOD measurements in meat industry wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raud, Merlin; Tenno, Toomas; Jõgi, Eerik; Kikas, Timo

    2012-04-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila P69.1 (A. hydrophila) was used to construct a semi-specific biosensor to estimate biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in high fat and grease content wastewaters. A. hydrophila cells were grown in fat containing medium to induce necessary enzymes for transport and degradation of fatty substances. Universal biosensor based on non-specific Pseudomonas fluorescens P75 (P. fluorescens) was used to conduct comparison experiments. Biosensors were calibrated using OECD synthetic wastewater and steady-state method, subsequently several experiments with synthetic and industrial wastewaters were conducted. A linear range up to 45 mg l(-1) BOD(7) was gained using A. hydrophila biosensor, in comparison to 40 mg l(-1) BOD(7) obtained using P. fluorescens biosensors. The lower limit of detection was 5 mg l(-1) BOD(7). Service life of A. hydrophila and P. fluorescens biosensors were 110 and 115 days, respectively. The response time of the biosensors depended on the BOD(7) of measuring solution and was up to 20 min when analyzing different wastewaters. Both biosensors underestimated BOD in meat industry wastewater from 43% up to 71%, but more accurate results could be obtained with A. hydrophila biosensor. Semi-specific A. hydrophila biosensor was able to measure proportion of fat found in wastewater sample, while other refractory compounds remained undetectable to both biosensors.

  7. 4-Hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB as an oxidative biocatalyst in the synthesis of optically active sulfoxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonzalo, Gonzalo de; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E.; Ottolina, Gianluca; Fraaije, Marco W.; Carrea, Giacomo

    2006-01-01

    Recombinant 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (HAPMO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB has been tested as a catalyst in sulfoxidation reactions on a set of aromatic sulfides. With a few exceptions, excellent enantioselectivities in the synthesis of chiral phenyl and benzyl sulfoxides were achieved

  8. Assessment of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas fluorescens for management of Meloidogyne incognita and Fusarium oxysporum on watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens isolates Clinto 1R, Wayne 1R and Wood 1R, which produce the antibiotic 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), can suppress soilborne diseases and promote plant growth. Consequently, these beneficial bacterial isolates were tested on watermelon plants for suppression of Meloidogy...

  9. Variation of resistance and infectivity between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophage Ф2 and its therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanchen; Chen; Guohua; Chen

    2015-01-01

    <正>Dear Editor,Studies of the coevolutionary dynamics between Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and bacteriophageФ2 can explore host resistance and parasite infectivity with applications in the ecological and therapeutic fields.Coevolutionary dynamics determine the efficacy of phage-based therapy.In the study described here,bacterial resistance and phage infectivity fluctuated with culture

  10. T-cell responsiveness to LCMV segregates as a single locus in crosses between BALB/cA and C.B-17 mice. Evidence for regulation by a gene outside the Igh region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, Ole; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    1993-01-01

    The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) was studied in BALB/cA and C.B-17 mouse strains differing in the immunoglobulin heavy chain region (Igh). Susceptibility to intracerebral infection and the ability to clear the virus differed significantly between...

  11. Targeting Cannabinoid CB2 Receptors in the Central Nervous System. Medicinal Chemistry Approaches with Focus on Neurodegenerative Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gema Navarro; Paula Morales; Carmen Rodríguez-Cueto; Javier Fernández-Ruiz; Nadine Jagerovic; Rafael Franco

    2016-01-01

    Endocannabinoids activate two types of specific G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), namely cannabinoid CB1 and CB2. Contrary to the psychotropic actions of agonists of CB1 receptors, and serious side effects of the selective antagonists of this receptor, drugs acting on CB2 receptors appear as promising drugs to combat CNS diseases (Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, cerebellar ataxia, amyotrohic lateral sclerosis). Differential localization of CB2 receptors in neural cell types and u...

  12. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  13. Activation of CB1 and CB2 receptors attenuates the induction and maintenance of inflammatory pain in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmes, Steven J R; Winyard, Lisa A; Medhurst, Stephen J; Clayton, Nick M; Wilson, Alex W; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoid agonists on established inflammatory hyperalgesia. We have compared the effects of pre-administration versus post-administration of a potent non-selective cannabinoid agonist HU210 and a selective CB2 receptor agonist JWH-133 on hindpaw weight bearing and paw oedema in the carrageenan model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. For comparative purposes we also determined the effects of the mu-opioid receptor agonist morphine and the COX2 inhibitor rofecoxib in this model. At 3 h following intraplantar injection of carrageenan (2%, 100 microl) there was a significant (P pain responses.

  14. The dynamic nature of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) gene transcription

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is an integral component of the endocannabinoid system that modulates several functions in the CNS and periphery. The majority of our knowledge of the endocannabinoid system involves ligand–receptor binding, mechanisms of signal transduction, and protein–protein interactions. In contrast, comparatively little is known about regulation of CB1 gene expression. The levels and anatomical distribution of CB1 mRNA and protein are developmental stage-specific an...

  15. Computational analysis of the CB1 carboxyl-terminus in the receptor-G protein complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Joong-Youn; Khurana, Leepakshi; Kendall, Debra A

    2016-04-01

    Despite the important role of the carboxyl-terminus (Ct) of the activated brain cannabinoid receptor one (CB1) in the regulation of G protein signaling, a structural understanding of interactions with G proteins is lacking. This is largely due to the highly flexible nature of the CB1 Ct that dynamically adapts its conformation to the presence of G proteins. In the present study, we explored how the CB1 Ct can interact with the G protein by building on our prior modeling of the CB1-Gi complex (Shim, Ahn, and Kendall, The Journal of Biological Chemistry 2013;288:32449-32465) to incorporate a complete CB1 Ct (Glu416(Ct)-Leu472(Ct)). Based on the structural constraints from NMR studies, we employed ROSETTA to predict tertiary folds, ZDOCK to predict docking orientation, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to obtain two distinct plausible models of CB1 Ct in the CB1-Gi complex. The resulting models were consistent with the NMR-determined helical structure (H9) in the middle region of the CB1 Ct. The CB1 Ct directly interacted with both Gα and Gβ and stabilized the receptor at the Gi interface. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies of Glu416(Ct), Asp423(Ct), Asp428(Ct), and Arg444(Ct) of CB1 Ct suggested that the CB1 Ct can influence receptor-G protein coupling by stabilizing the receptor at the Gi interface. This research provided, for the first time, models of the CB1 Ct in contact with the G protein.

  16. Brain regional differences in CB1 receptor adaptation and regulation of transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Lazenka, M.F.; Selley, D.E.; Sim-Selley, L J

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed throughout the brain and mediate the central effects of cannabinoids, including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Repeated THC administration produces tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated effects, although the magnitude of tolerance varies by effect. Consistent with this observation, CB1R desensitization and downregulation, as well induction of immediate early genes (IEGs), varies by brain region. Zif268...

  17. INFLUÊNCIA DA ATIVIDADE ENZIMÁTICA DE PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS 041 EM LABNEH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Angélica Ferreira

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A refrigeração do leite proporciona a seleção de bactérias psicrotróficas deteriorantes produtoras de enzimas termoresistentes que podem comprometer a qualidade do leite e derivados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as implicações causadas pela atividade enzimática de Pseudomonas fluorescens 041 na produção de Labneh. O leite pasteurizado foi inoculado intencionalmente com, aproximadamente, 106 UFC.mL-1 de P. fluorescens 041 e Labneh foi produzido imediatamente após inoculação no leite (tempo 0 e após 48, 72 e 96 horas de inoculação e armazenamento a 4 ºC. A qualidade físico-química do leite, do Labneh e do soro resultante da fabricação foi determinada. O rendimento prático, o rendimento técnico ajustado e o aproveitamento final de sólidos no Labneh em relação ao volume de leite (coeficiente GL também foram avaliados. Constatou-se alterações nas características físico-químicas do soro e do Labneh fabricado com leite armazenado a partir de 48 horas. Também, observou-se um aumento significativo em litros de leite destinado à produção de um quilo do produto ao longo do tempo de estocagem do leite inoculado com P. fluorescens 041, sendo os rendimentos prático, técnico ajustado e o coeficiente GL afetados pelo fator tempo. Portanto, a redução do tempo de estocagem do leite sob refrigeração e a prevenção da contaminação da matéria-prima por meio da adoção de boas práticas na cadeia do leite são medidas a serem adotadas para assegurar a qualidade e o rendimento do produto final.

  18. Role of microbial adhesion in phenanthrene biodegradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens LP6a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasnezhad, Hassan

    Biodegradation of poorly water soluble hydrocarbons, such as n-alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is often limited by the low availability of the pollutant to microbes. Adhesion of microorganisms to the oil-water interface can influence this availability. Our approach was to study a range of compounds and mechanisms to promote the adhesion of a hydrophilic PAH degrading bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens LP6a, to an oil-water interface and examine the effect on biodegradation of phenanthrene by the bacteria. The cationic surfactants cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC), poly-L-lysine and chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) and the long chain alcohols 1-dodecanol, 2-dodecanol and farnesol increased the adhesion of P. fluorescens LP6a to n-hexadecane from ca. 30% to ca. 90% of suspended cells adhering. The alcohols also caused a dramatic change in the oil-water contact angle of the cell surface, increasing it from 24° to 104°, whereas the cationic compounds had little effect. In contrast, cationic compounds changed the electrophoretic mobility of the bacteria, reducing the mean zeta potential from --23 to --7 mV in 0.01M potassium phosphate buffer, but the alcohols had no effect on zeta potential. This results illustrate that alcohols acted through altering the cell surface hydrophobicity, whereas cationic surfactants changed the surface charge density. Phenanthrene was dissolved in heptamethylnonane and introduced to the aqueous growth medium, hence forming a two phase system. Introducing 1-dodecanol at concentrations of 217, 820 or 4100 mg/L resulted in comparable increases in phenanthrene biodegradation of about 30% after 120 h incubation with non-induced cultures. After 100 h of incubation with LP6a cultures induced with 2-aminobenzoate, 4.5% of the phenanthrene was mineralized by cultures versus more than 10% by the cultures containing initial 1-dodecanol or 2-dodecanol concentrations of 120 or 160 mg/L. The production and accumulation of metabolites in

  19. Evaluation of selective cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptor agonists in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide-induced interstitial cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambaro, Simone; Casu, Maria Antonietta; Mastinu, Andrea; Lazzari, Paolo

    2014-04-15

    Interstitial cystitis is a debilitating bladder inflammation disorder. To date, the understanding of the causes of interstitial cystitis remains largely fragmentary and there is no effective treatment available. Recent experimental results have shown a functional role of the endocannabinoid system in urinary bladder. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of selective cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists in a mouse model of interstitial cystitis. Bladder inflammation was induced in mice by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and whole bladders were removed 24h later. LPS induced a significant increase of the contractile amplitude in spontaneous activity and a hypersensitivity to exogenous acetylcholine-induced contraction of whole-isolated bladder. Next, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoidergic compounds by pretreating mice with CB1 or CB2 selective agonist compounds, respectively ACEA and JWH015. Interestingly, JWH015, but not ACEA, antagonized LPS-induced bladder inflammation. Additionally, anti-inflammatory activity was studied by evaluation, leukocytes mucosa infiltration, myeloperoxidase activity, and mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory interleukin (IL-1α and IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. JWH015 significantly decreased leukocytes infiltration in both submucosa and mucosa, as well as the myeloperoxydase activity, in LPS treated mice. JWH015 reduced mRNA expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, and TNF-α. LPS treatment increased expression of bladder CB2 but not CB1 mRNA. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that modulation of the cannabinoid CB2 receptors might be a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of bladder diseases and conditions characterized by inflammation, such as interstitial cystitis.

  20. 2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol suppresses interferon-gamma production in phorbol ester/ionomycin-activated mouse splenocytes independent of CB1 or CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Barbara L F; Ouyang, Yanli; Rockwell, Cheryl E; Rao, Gautham K; Kaminski, Norbert E

    2005-06-01

    2-Arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous ligand for cannabinoid receptor types 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2), has previously been demonstrated to modulate immune functions including suppression of interleukin-2 expression and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) activity. The objective of the present studies was to investigate the effect of 2-AG on interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and associated upstream signaling events. Pretreatment of splenocytes with 2-AG markedly suppressed phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate plus calcium ionophore (PMA/Io)-induced IFN-gamma secretion. In addition, 2-AG suppressed IFN-gamma steady-state mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. To unequivocally determine the putative involvement of CB1 and CB2, splenocytes derived from CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) knockout mice were used. No difference in the magnitude of IFN-gamma suppression by 2-AG in wild-type versus CB1/CB2 null mice was observed. Time-of-addition studies revealed that 2-AG treatment up to 12 h post-cellular activation resulted in suppression of IFN-gamma, which was consistent with a time course conducted with cyclosporin A, an inhibitor of NFAT activity. Coincidentally, 2-AG perturbed the nuclear translocation of NFAT protein and blocked thapsigargin-induced elevation in intracellular calcium, suggesting that altered calcium regulation might partly explain the suppression of NFAT nuclear translocation and subsequent IFN-gamma production. Indeed, Io partially attenuated the 2-AG-induced suppression of PMA/Io-stimulated IFN-gamma production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that 2-AG suppresses IFN-gamma expression in murine splenocytes in a CB receptor-independent manner and that the mechanism partially involves suppression of intracellular calcium signaling and perturbation of NFAT nuclear translocation.

  1. C3-heteroaroyl cannabinoids as photolabeling ligands for the CB2 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Darryl D; Tius, Marcus A; Thakur, Ganesh A; Zhou, Han; Bowman, Anna L; Shukla, Vidyanand G; Peng, Yan; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2012-08-15

    A series of tricyclic cannabinoids incorporating a heteroaroyl group at C3 were prepared as probes to explore the binding site(s) of the CB1 and CB2 receptors. This relatively unexplored structural motif is shown to be CB2 selective with K(i) values at low nanomolar concentrations when the heteroaromatic group is 3-benzothiophenyl (41) or 3-indolyl (50). When photoactivated, the lead compound 41 was shown to successfully label the CB2 receptor through covalent attachment at the active site while 50 failed to label. The benzothiophenone moiety may be a photoactivatable moiety suitable for selective labeling.

  2. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    János Haskó

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2; therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1 and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2, GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma.

  3. Review of biomedical aspects of CB masks and their relationship to military performance. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muza, S.R.

    1986-11-01

    This review describes the most important factors affecting military work performance while wearing a CB mask: (1) the additional inspiratory and expiratory breathing resistance; (2) increased external dead space; (3) thermal stress of the mask and hood; (4) restriction of functional vision; (5) hindrance of speech transmission and reception; (6) weight, size, and pressure on the face by the CB mask; (7) claustrophobic reactions, and (8) sleep loss and lack of nutrient intake due to long-term wear. In assessing the biomedical aspects of these factors, rather than making comparisons between specific models of CB masks, the review addresses these factors as they apply to CB masks in general.

  4. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskó, János; Fazakas, Csilla; Molnár, Judit; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Herman, Hildegard; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Persidsky, Yuri; Krizbai, István A.

    2014-01-01

    During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2); therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1) and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2), GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma. PMID:24815068

  5. Cannabinoid Receptor–Interacting Protein 1a Modulates CB1 Receptor Signaling and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Tricia H.; Blume, Lawrence C.; Straiker, Alex; Cox, Jordan O.; David, Bethany G.; McVoy, Julie R. Secor; Sayers, Katherine W.; Poklis, Justin L.; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Egertová, Michaela; Chen, Ching-Kang; Mackie, Ken; Maurice R. Elphick; Howlett, Allyn C; Selley, Dana E

    2015-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) mediate the presynaptic effects of endocannabinoids in the central nervous system (CNS) and most behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoids. Cannabinoid receptor–interacting protein 1a (CRIP1a) binds to the CB1R C-terminus and can attenuate constitutive CB1R-mediated inhibition of Ca2+ channel activity. We now demonstrate cellular colocalization of CRIP1a at neuronal elements in the CNS and show that CRIP1a inhibits both constitutive and agonist-stimulated ...

  6. Orchestrated activation of mGluR5 and CB1 promotes neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Edleusa M L; Doria, Juliana G; Ferreira-Vieira, Talita H; Alves-Silva, Juliana; Ferguson, Stephen S G; Moreira, Fabricio A; Ribeiro, Fabiola M

    2016-08-20

    The metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) and the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) exhibit a functional interaction, as CB1 regulates pre-synaptic glutamate release and mGluR5 activation increases endocannabinoid synthesis at the post-synaptic site. Since both mGluR5 and CB1 promote neuroprotection, we delineated experiments to investigate a possible link between CB1 and mGluR5 activation in the induction of neuroprotection using primary cultured corticostriatal neurons. We find that either the pharmacological blockade or the genetic ablation of either mGluR5 or CB1 can abrogate both CB1- and mGluR5-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate insult. Interestingly, decreased glutamate release and diminished intracellular Ca(2+) do not appear to play a role in CB1 and mGluR5-mediated neuroprotection. Rather, these two receptors work cooperatively to trigger the activation of cell signaling pathways to promote neuronal survival, which involves MEK/ERK1/2 and PI3K/AKT activation. Interestingly, although mGluR5 activation protects postsynaptic terminals and CB1 the presynaptic site, intact signaling of both receptors is required to effectively promote neuronal survival. In conclusion, mGluR5 and CB1 act in concert to activate neuroprotective cell signaling pathways and promote neuronal survival.

  7. Correlation between the change in the kinetics of the ribosomal RNA rrnB P2 promoter and the transition from lag to exponential phase with Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellar, Robin C

    2008-01-15

    Developing accurate mathematical models to describe the pre-exponential lag phase in food-borne pathogens presents a considerable challenge to food microbiologists. While the growth rate is influenced by current environmental conditions, the lag phase is affected in addition by the history of the inoculum. A deeper understanding of physiological changes taking place during the lag phase would improve accuracy of models, and in earlier studies a strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens containing the Tn7-luxCDABE gene cassette regulated by the rRNA promoter rrnB P2 was used to measure the influence of starvation, growth temperature and sub-lethal heating on promoter expression and subsequent growth. The present study expands the models developed earlier to include a model which describes the change from exponential to linear increase in promoter expression with time when the exponential phase of growth commences. A two-phase linear model with Poisson weighting was used to estimate the lag (LPDLin) and the rate (RLin) for this linear increase in bioluminescence. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r=0.830) between the LPDLin and the growth lag phase (LPDOD) was extremely significant (Pexponential growth. These results suggest that models based on measurable physiological changes in the cells can be useful in predicting the behaviour of food-borne pathogens.

  8. Effect of aluminium and copper on biofilm development of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and P. fluorescens as a function of different media compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sean C; George, Iain F S; Zannoni, Davide; Cappelletti, Martina; Duggan, Gavin E; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2013-06-01

    Bioremediation efforts worldwide are faced with the problem of metals interfering with the degradation of organic pollutants. There has been little systematic investigation into how the important environmental factors of media composition, buffering agent, and carbon source affect the exertion of metal toxicity on bacteria. This study aimed to systematically separate and investigate the influence of these factors by examining planktonic and biofilm establishment and growth. Two Pseudomonads were chosen, the PCB degrader P. pseudoalcaligenes KF707 and P. fluorescens. The two strains were grown in the presence of Al(3+) and Cu(2+) under different media conditions of carbon source (Lysogeny broth, biphenyl, succinate, aspartic acid, butyric acid, oxaloacetic acid, putrescine and benzoic acid) and under different buffering conditions (high and low phosphate or MOPS). These experiments allowed for the elucidation of an effect of different metabolic conditions and metal speciation on planktonic bacteria growth and biofilm establishment and development under metal stress. Here we show that the nature of bacterial growth (planktonic and biofilm development) is dramatically affected by the interplay between toxic metals, carbon source and media composition. The capacity of a media to bind toxic metals as well as quality of carbon source greatly influences the amount of metal that bacteria can tolerate, depending on both the bacterium and metal. Future studies evaluating metal ion toxicity should consider these effects, as well as their interactions with specific environments into account in order to improve clean-up success.

  9. Biofilm Formation and Adaptation by Pseudomonas fluorescens on both Biotite and Glass Coupons Under Varying Fe-Nutrient Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, M.; Helms, G. L.; Shi, Z.; Thomashow, L.; Keller, C. K.; Harsh, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We isolated an efficient weathering strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens from the rhizosphere of a White Pine (Pinus strobus) seedling. We grew it in a drip-flow biofilm reactor using both Fe-abundant and Fe-deficient media on either a glass or biotite coupon. Our working hypothesis was that the bacterium would respond to Fe deficiency by enhancing biotite weathering through an increase in the relative amount of polysaccharides in the biofilm compared to the Fe-abundant treatment. Because Fe is necessary for biofilm development, we hypothesized that biomass production on the biotite surface would exceed that on a Fe-free glass slide only in the Fe-deficient medium. We quantified total biomass, specific number of viable cells (SNVC), and the concentrations of K, Mg, and Fe in the biofilm. High-resolution magic angle spinning proton nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS 1H-NMR) spectroscopy was used to characterize the biofilm matrix in terms of relative biofilm constituent concentrations. Compared with biofilms grown on glass, biofilms grown on biotite had higher total biomass and SNVC irrespective of Fe supply, with a near doubling of both the biofilm biomass from 0.43 to 0.76 mg cm-2 and SNVC from 1.52 × 107 to 3.24 × 107 CFU cm-2 mg-1 when Fe was deficient, and an increase in biomass from 1.94 to 2.46 mg cm-2 and in SNVC from 8.39 × 107 to 1.96 × 108 CFU cm-2 mg-1 when Fe was sufficient. Similarly with Fe deficient, the cation concentrations in biofilms grown on biotite vs. glass increased 2.14 and 2.46 times for K and Mg, respectively, and 7.01 times for Fe. When Fe was sufficient, the concentrations of cations increased 1.24, 2.07, and 3.77 times for K, Mg, and Fe, respectively. Based on NMR spectra, no significant change in biofilm chemistry occurred between the glass and biotite systems whether Fe was deficient or not. However, we did observe an increase in the ratio of the integrated areas corresponding to the carbohydrate and protein NMR regions, increasing

  10. Physicochemical Properties of Biosurfactant Produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens Grown on Whey Tofu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, V.; Handayani, D. S.; Marliyana, S. D.; Suratmi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The research aims to examine the physicochemical properties of biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens. Biosurfactant was produced in whey tofu media containing 8 g/L nutrient broth and 5 g/L NaCl which was fermented for 2 days at room temperature. Biosurfactant was identified as rhamnolipids which had critical micelle concentration (CMC) value of 638 mg/L and surface tension of 54 mN/m. The biosurfactant had water in oil (w/o) emulsion type. The biosurfactant was able to decrease the interfacial tension more than 40% for emulsion of water with hexane, pentane, benzene, lubricants or kerosene. The stable emulsions were reached up to 30 days with the E24 value of about 50% when paraffin, toluene, lubricants or palm oil was used as an immiscible compound. Commercial surfactants, such as Triton X-100 and Tween-80 were investigated to compare their emulsification activities and emulsion stabilities with the produced biosurfactant.

  11. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol modulates human endothelial cell/leukocyte interactions by controlling selectin expression through CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperi, Valeria; Evangelista, Daniela; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Florenzano, Fulvio; Savini, Isabella; Oddi, Sergio; Avigliano, Luciana; Catani, Maria Valeria; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2014-06-01

    Accumulated evidence points to a key role for endocannabinoids in cell migration, and here we sought to characterize the role of these substances in early events that modulate communication between endothelial cells and leukocytes. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) was able to initiate and complete the leukocyte adhesion cascade, by modulating the expression of selectins. A short exposure of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to 2-AG was sufficient to prime them towards an activated state: within 1h of treatment, endothelial cells showed time-dependent plasma membrane expression of P- and E-selectins, which both trigger the initial steps (i.e., capture and rolling) of leukocyte adhesion. The effect of 2-AG was mediated by CB1 and CB2 receptors and was long lasting, because endothelial cells incubated with 2-AG for 1h released the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) for up to 24h. Consistently, TNF-α-containing medium was able to promote leukocyte recruitment: human Jurkat T cells grown in conditioned medium derived from 2-AG-treated HUVECs showed enhanced L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL1) expression, as well as increased efficiency of adhesion and trans-migration. In conclusion, our in vitro data indicate that 2-AG, by acting on endothelial cells, might indirectly promote leukocyte recruitment, thus representing a potential therapeutic target for treatment of diseases where impaired endothelium/leukocyte interactions take place.

  12. Blockade of cannabinoid CB receptor function protects against in vivo disseminating brain damage following NMDA-induced excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, H.H.; Ramos, J.A.; Fernández-Ruiz, J.

    2002-01-01

    The ability of cannabinoid CB, receptors to influence glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission has fueled interest in how these receptors and their endogenous ligands may interact in conditions of excitotoxic insults. The present study characterized the impact of stimulated and inhibited CB...... receptor function on NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Neonatal (6-day-old) rat pups received a systemic injection of a mixed CB/CB receptor agonist (WIN55,212-2) or their respective antagonists (SR141716A for CB and SR144528 for CB) prior to an unilateral intrastriatal microinjection of NMDA. The NMDA......-induced excitotoxic damage in the ipsilateral forebrain was not influenced by agonist-stimulated CB receptor function. In contrast, blockade of CB, but not CB, receptor activity evoked a robust neuroprotective response by reducing the infarct area and the number of cortical degenerating neurons. These results suggest...

  13. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Silby

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  14. MOLECULAR MODELING AND DOCKING STUDIES OF COLD ACTIVE LIPASE FROM Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Gupta

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Modeling is essential tool in the drug design process describes the generation, manipulation or representation of 3D structures of the molecules and associated physico-chemical properties while docking predicts the preferred orientation of one molecule to a second when bound to each other to form a stable complex. A cold active lipase producing potential psychrophilic bacteria (GN was isolated and identified by 16S rRNA molecular studies as Pseudomonas vancouverensis. Lipase gene from closely related species P. fluorescens was investigated for their functional role and in silico characterization using molecular modeling and docking studies. A 3D structure of lipase gene was generated with SWISS-MODEL and Discovery Studio 3.0. The stereochemistry of the constructed model of cold active lipase was subjected to energy minimization and the stereo-chemical quality of the predicted structure was assessed. The superimposition of the template (PDBID: 2Z8X with predicted structure showed that weighted root mean square deviation of Cα trace between the template and the final refined model was 0.2 Å with a significant Zscore of 8.2 and sequence identity was 80.5%. Three ligands P-Nitrophenol, Acetate ion and Diethyl phosphonate were taken for docking calculation with generated structure. They were interacting on the functional motifs of predicted model. It has been observed that Leu26, Tyr29, Asn31, Asp33, Pro315 and Thr316 residues were involved in hydrogen bonding interactions with selected ligands. So these interacted residues can be used as prominent active binding sites and which was common to the predicted active site. Based on above investigations it has been found that P. vancouverensis lipase protein can play a similar role in lipid metabolic process and triglyceride lipase functional activity as reported for P. fluorescens lipase protein.

  15. Application of Pseudomonas fluorescens to Blackberry under Field Conditions Improves Fruit Quality by Modifying Flavonoid Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garcia-Seco

    Full Text Available Application of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR, Pseudomonas fluorescens N21.4, to roots of blackberries (Rubus sp. is part of an optimised cultivation practice to improve yields and quality of fruit throughout the year in this important fruit crop. Blackberries are especially rich in flavonoids and therefore offer potential benefits for human health in prevention or amelioration of chronic diseases. However, the phenylpropanoid pathway and its regulation during ripening have not been studied in detail, in this species. PGPR may trigger flavonoid biosynthesis as part of an induced systemic response (ISR given the important role of this pathway in plant defence, to cause increased levels of flavonoids in the fruit. We have identified structural genes encoding enzymes of the phenylpropanoid and flavonoid biosynthetic pathways catalysing the conversion of phenylalanine to the final products including flavonols, anthocyanins and catechins from blackberry, and regulatory genes likely involved in controlling the activity of pathway branches. We have also measured the major flavonols, anthocyanins and catechins at three stages during ripening. Our results demonstrate the coordinated expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes with the accumulation of anthocyanins, catechins, and flavonols in developing fruits of blackberry. Elicitation of blackberry plants by treatment of roots with P.fluorescens N21.4, caused increased expression of some flavonoid biosynthetic genes and an accompanying increase in the concentration of selected flavonoids in fruits. Our data demonstrate the physiological mechanisms involved in the improvement of fruit quality by PGPR under field conditions, and highlight some of the genetic targets of elicitation by beneficial bacteria.

  16. BIOCONTROL OF Rhizoctonia solani IN NATIVE POTATO (Solanum phureja PLANTS USING NATIVE Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GLORIA BAUTISTA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhizoctonia solani es un hongo fitopatógeno del suelo, el cual produce una reducción significativa del vigor de las plantas y de la producción de tubérculos en cultivos de papa. Es de gran interés la búsqueda de alternativas de manejo de esta enfermedad, especialmente desde la perspectiva de control biológico ya que los cultivos de papa son los mayores consumidores de plaguicidas de origen químicos en Colombia. Con el objeto de obtener una cepa del grupo de las Pseudomonas fluorescentes con la capa- cidad para reducir los síntomas de la enfermedad producidos por R. solani, se realizó en un estudio previo el aislamiento y caracterización de una colección de aislamientos de Pseudomonas fluorescentes provenientes de diferentes cultivos de la región papera más productiva del país. Seis cepas nativas de P. fluorescens con buena, moderada o ninguna capacidad para inhibir el crecimiento fúngico in vitro fueron seleccionadas. A pesar de las diferencias encontradas en términos de la dinámica y capacidad de colonización, todas las cepas evaluadas indujeron el crecimiento en las plantas de S. phureja y redujeron los síntomas de la enfermedad producidos por R. solani a nivel de invernadero. Nuestros resultados sustentan la conclusión que la asociación de cepas de P. fluorescens con la rizosfera de S. phureja es una alternativa para el manejo de R. solani en papa.

  17. Overlapping protein-encoding genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2008-06-13

    The annotated genome sequences of prokaryotes seldom include overlapping genes encoded opposite each other by the same stretch of DNA. However, antisense transcription is becoming recognized as a widespread phenomenon in eukaryotes, and examples have been linked to important biological processes. Pseudomonas fluorescens inhabits aquatic and terrestrial environments, and can be regarded as an environmental generalist. The genetic basis for this ecological success is not well understood. In a previous search for soil-induced genes in P. fluorescens Pf0-1, ten antisense genes were discovered. These were termed 'cryptic' genes, as they had escaped detection by gene-hunting algorithms, and lacked easily recognizable promoters. In this communication, we designate such genes as 'non-predicted' or 'hidden'. Using reverse transcription PCR, we show that at each of six non-predicted gene loci chosen for study, transcription occurs from both 'sense' and 'antisense' DNA strands. Further, at least one of these hidden antisense genes, iiv14, encodes a protein, as does the sense transcript, both identified by poly-histidine tags on the C-terminus of the proteins. Mutational and complementation studies showed that this novel antisense gene was important for efficient colonization of soil, and multiple copies in the wildtype host improved the speed of soil colonization. Introduction of a stop codon early in the gene eliminated complementation, further implicating the protein in colonization of soil. We therefore designate iiv14 "cosA". These data suggest that, as is the case with eukaryotes, some bacterial genomes are more densely coded than currently recognized.

  18. Reversible disruption of pre-pulse inhibition in hypomorphic-inducible and reversible CB1-/- mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Franca Marongiu

    Full Text Available Although several genes are implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia, in animal models for such a severe mental illness only some aspects of the pathology can be represented (endophenotypes. Genetically modified mice are currently being used to obtain or characterize such endophenotypes. Since its cloning and characterization CB1 receptor has increasingly become of significant physiological, pharmacological and clinical interest. Recently, its involvement in schizophrenia has been reported. Among the different approaches employed, gene targeting permits to study the multiple roles of the endocannabinoid system using knockout ((-/- mice represent a powerful model but with some limitations due to compensation. To overcome such a limitation, we have generated an inducible and reversible tet-off dependent tissue-specific CB1(-/- mice where the CB1R is re-expressed exclusively in the forebrain at a hypomorphic level due to a mutation (IRh-CB1(-/- only in absence of doxycycline (Dox. In such mice, under Dox(+ or vehicle, as well as in wild-type (WT and CB1(-/-, two endophenotypes motor activity (increased in animal models of schizophrenia and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI of startle reflex (disrupted in schizophrenia were analyzed. Both CB1(-/- and IRh-CB1(-/- showed increased motor activity when compared to WT animals. The PPI response, unaltered in WT and CB1(-/- animals, was on the contrary highly and significantly disrupted only in Dox(+ IRh-CB1(-/- mice. Such a response was easily reverted after either withdrawal from Dox or haloperidol treatment. This is the first Inducible and Reversible CB1(-/- mice model to be described in the literature. It is noteworthy that the PPI disruption is not present either in classical full CB1(-/- mice or following acute administration of rimonabant. Such a hypomorphic model may provide a new tool for additional in vivo and in vitro studies of the physiological and pathological roles of cannabinoid system in

  19. Adolescent chronic mild stress alters hippocampal CB1 receptor-mediated excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, C G; Mihalik, G R; Iskander, A N; Seckler, J C; Weiss, M S

    2013-12-03

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are involved in the stress response and alterations in eCB signaling may contribute to the etiology of mood disorders. Exposure to chronic mild stress (CMS), a model of depression, produces downregulation of the cannabinoid 1 (CB1) receptor in the hippocampus of male rats. However, it is unknown how this stress-induced change in CB1 levels affects eCB-mediated neurotransmission. In vitro, field potential recordings from CMS-exposed (21-days) rats were performed to assess the effects of stress on eCB-regulated glutamatergic neurotransmission in/on hippocampal area CA1. We observed that application of the CB1 agonist, WIN 55,212-5 (1 μM), in stress animals resulted in a ∼135% increase in excitatory neurotransmission, whereas CB1 activation in non-stress animals leads to a ∼30% decrease. However, during blockade of GABA(A) neurotransmission with picrotoxin, CB1 activation yielded a ∼35% decrease in stress animals. These findings indicate that CMS does not directly affect glutamatergic neurotransmission. Rather, CMS sensitizes CB1 function on GABAergic terminals, leading to less inhibition and an increase in excitatory neurotransmission. This finding is reinforced in that induction of weak long-term-potentiation (LTP) is enhanced in CMS-exposed animals compared to controls and this enhancement is CB1-dependent. Lastly, we observed that the LTP-blocking property of WIN 55,212-5 shifts from being glutamate-dependent in non-stress animals to being GABA-dependent in stress animals. These results effectively demonstrate that CMS significantly alters hippocampal eCB-mediated neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity.

  20. Salicylic acid degradation from aqueous solutions using Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44: parameters studies and application tools Degradação de ácido salicílico presente em soluções sintéticas utilizando Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyane R. Silva

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The optimal conditions for salicylic acid biodegradation by Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 were determined in this study with the intention to create a microbial sensor. Kinetic experiments permitted a definition of 60 and 30min the time needed to achieve the maximum degradation of salicylic acid presented in a medium with and without yeast extract, respectively. The degradation in medium without yeast extract and the quantification by spectrophotometry 230 nm were selected to be used in further tests. The use of preactivated cells or on the exponential growth phase showed better salicylic acid degradation percentages when compared to nonactivated cells or on the stationary growth state. Finally, the best cellular concentration used on the salicylic acid degradation was 0,1 g.L-1. Strain HK44 shows to be capable of degrade salicylic acid presented in simple aqueous systems, making this strain a promising tool for the application on a luminescent microbial sensor.Com a intenção de criar um sensor microbiano, as condições ótimas para a biodegradação de ácido salicílico por Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 foram determinadas neste estudo. Os experimentos cinéticos permitiram a definição dos tempos de 60 e 30 minutos como necessários para atingir a máxima degradação de ácido salicílico presente em meio com ou sem extrato de lêvedo, respectivamente. A degradação no meio sem extrato de lêvedo e a quantificação através de espectrofotometria 230 nm foram selecionadas para serem utilizadas em testes posteriores. O uso de células pré-ativadas ou na fase exponencial de crescimento apresentou melhores porcentagens de degradação de ácido salicílico quando comparadas a células não-ativadas ou no estado estacionário de crescimento. Além disso, a melhor concentração celular utilizada nessa degradação foi 0,1 g.L¹. A cepa HK44 parece ser capaz de degradar o ácido salicílico presente em sistemas aquosos simples, tornando este

  1. 3D-QSAR/CoMFA-based structure-affinity/selectivity relationships of aminoalkylindoles in the cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Hernández-Pino, Santiago; Morales-Verdejo, César; Pessoa-Mahana, David

    2014-03-05

    A 3D-QSAR (CoMFA) study was performed in an extensive series of aminoalkylindoles derivatives with affinity for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The aim of the present work was to obtain structure-activity relationships of the aminoalkylindole family in order to explain the affinity and selectivity of the molecules for these receptors. Major differences in both, steric and electrostatic fields were found in the CB1 and CB2 CoMFA models. The steric field accounts for the principal contribution to biological activity. These results provide a foundation for the future development of new heterocyclic compounds with high affinity and selectivity for the cannabinoid receptors with applications in several pathological conditions such as pain treatment, cancer, obesity and immune disorders, among others.

  2. 3D-QSAR/CoMFA-Based Structure-Affinity/Selectivity Relationships of Aminoalkylindoles in the Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Mella-Raipán

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 3D-QSAR (CoMFA study was performed in an extensive series of aminoalkylindoles derivatives with affinity for the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The aim of the present work was to obtain structure-activity relationships of the aminoalkylindole family in order to explain the affinity and selectivity of the molecules for these receptors. Major differences in both, steric and electrostatic fields were found in the CB1 and CB2 CoMFA models. The steric field accounts for the principal contribution to biological activity. These results provide a foundation for the future development of new heterocyclic compounds with high affinity and selectivity for the cannabinoid receptors with applications in several pathological conditions such as pain treatment, cancer, obesity and immune disorders, among others.

  3. V. NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB): measuring working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, David S; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Chevalier, Nicolas; Espy, Kimberly A; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Mungas, Dan

    2013-08-01

    This chapter focuses on the NIH Toolbox List Sorting Working Memory Test, which was developed to assess processing speed within the NIH Toolbox Cognition Battery (CB). This test is a sequencing task requiring children and adults to process stimuli (presented both visually and auditorily) and sequence the stimuli according to size. We describe the development of the NIH Toolbox List Sorting Working Memory Test, highlighting its utility in children. We examine descriptive data, test-retest reliability, and convergent and discriminant validity. Results indicated that List Sorting performance was positively correlated with age indicating that performance on the task improved throughout childhood and early adolescence. Further, test-retest reliability coefficients were high and there was support for both convergent and discriminant validity. These data suggest that the NIH Toolbox List Sorting Working Memory Test is reliable and shows evidence of construct validity.

  4. Non-CB1, non-CB2 receptors for endocannabinoids, plant cannabinoids, and synthetic cannabimimetics: focus on G-protein-coupled receptors and transient receptor potential channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2010-03-01

    The molecular mechanism of action of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychotropic constituent of Cannabis, has been a puzzle during the three decades separating its characterization, in 1964, and the cloning, in the 1990s, of cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors. However, while these latter proteins do mediate most of the pharmacological actions of THC, they do not seem to act as receptors for other plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), nor are they the unique targets of the endogenous lipids that were originally identified in animals as agonists of CB1 and CB2 receptors, and named endocannabinoids. Over the last decade, several potential alternative receptors for phytocannabinoids, endocannabinoids, and even synthetic cannabimimetics, have been proposed, often based uniquely on pharmacological evidence obtained in vitro. In particular, the endocannabinoid anandamide, and the other most abundant Cannabis constituent, cannabidiol, seem to be the most "promiscuous" of these compounds. In this article, we review the latest data on the non-CB1, non-CB2 receptors suggested so far for endocannabinoids and plant or synthetic cannabinoids, and lay special emphasis on uncharacterized or orphan G-protein-coupled receptors as well as on transient receptor potential channels.

  5. 47 CFR 95.408 - (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? 95.408 Section 95.408 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL....408 (CB Rule 8) How high may I put my antenna? (a) Antenna means the radiating system...

  6. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor-interacting proteins: novel targets for central nervous system drug discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tricia H; Sim-Selley, Laura J; Selley, Dana E

    2010-06-01

    The main pharmacological effects of marijuana, as well as synthetic and endogenous cannabinoids, are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including CB(1) and CB(2) receptors. The CB(1) receptor is the major cannabinoid receptor in the central nervous system and has gained increasing interest as a target for drug discovery for treatment of nausea, cachexia, obesity, pain, spasticity, neurodegenerative diseases and mood and substance abuse disorders. Evidence has accumulated to suggest that CB(1) receptors, like other GPCRs, interact with and are regulated by several other proteins beyond the established role of heterotrimeric G-proteins. These proteins, which include the GPCR kinases, beta-arrestins, GPCR-associated sorting proteins, factor associated with neutral sphingomyelinase, other GPCRs (heterodimerization) and the novel cannabinoid receptor-interacting proteins: CRIP(1a/b), are thought to play important roles in the regulation of intracellular trafficking, desensitization, down-regulation, signal transduction and constitutive activity of CB(1) receptors. This review examines CB(1) receptor-interacting proteins, including heterotrimeric G-proteins, but with particular emphasis on non-G-protein entities, that might comprise the CB(1) receptosomal complex. The evidence for direct interaction with CB(1) receptors and potential functional roles of these interacting proteins is discussed, as are future directions and challenges in this field with an emphasis on the possibility of eventually targeting these proteins for drug discovery.

  7. Acute Effects of the Novel Psychoactive Drug 2C-B on Emotions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. 2C-B (Nexus is one of the most widespread novel psychoactive substances. There is limited information about its pharmacological properties, and few studies in humans concern its acute and chronic effects. 2C-B has been classified as a stimulant, hallucinogen, entactogen, and/or empathogen. Objectives. To evaluate the emotional, subjective, and cardiovascular effects of 2C-B. Methods. Twenty healthy recreational 2C-B users (12 women self-administered a 20 mg dose of 2C-B. Evaluations included emotional (IAPS, FERT, and speech, subjective (visual analog scales, ARCI, VESSPA, HRS, and POMS questionnaires, and cardiovascular effects (blood pressure and heart rate. Results. Positive subjective effects predominated with a reduction of anger under the influence of 2C-B. It did, however, increase reactivity to negative emotional stimuli and decrease the ability to recognize expressions of happiness. Augmented emotionality in speech could be appreciated by others. 2C-B induced euphoria and well-being, changes in perceptions, and slight hallucinogenic states. Mild sympathetic actions were observed. Conclusions. The specific profile that 2C-B exerts on emotions suggests its classification as an entactogen with psychedelic properties.

  8. Deficits in Sensory-Specific Devaluation Task Performance Following Genetic Deletions of Cannabinoid (CB1) Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombag, Hans S.; Johnson, Alexander W.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Holland, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor is abundantly expressed throughout the CNS and is implicated in numerous physiological and behavioral functions, including appetite and feeding. In the present study, wild-type and CB1 heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice were tested on an instrumental outcome-selective devaluation task to assess changes in acquired…

  9. CB1 cannabinoid receptors mediate endochondral skeletal growth attenuation by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Elad; Tam, Joseph; Mechoulam, Raphael; Zimmer, Andreas; Maor, Gila; Bab, Itai

    2015-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (EC) system regulates bone mass. Because cannabis use during pregnancy results in stature shorter than normal, we examined the role of the EC system in skeletal elongation. We show that CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors are expressed specifically in hypertrophic chondrocytes of the epiphyseal growth cartilage (EGC), which drives vertebrate growth. These cells also express diacylglycerol lipases, critical biosynthetic enzymes of the main EC, and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), which is present at significant levels in the EGC. Femora of CB1- and/or CB2-deficient mice at the end of the rapid growth phase are longer compared to wild-type (WT) animals. We find that Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) slows skeletal elongation of female WT and CB2-, but not CB1-, deficient mice, which is reflected in femoral and lumbar vertebral body length. This in turn results in lower body weight, but unaltered fat content. THC inhibits EGC chondrocyte hypertrophy in ex vivo cultures and reduces the hypertrophic cell zone thickness of CB1-, but not CB2-, deficient mice. These results demonstrate a local growth-restraining EC system in the EGC. The relevance of the present findings to humans remains to be studied.

  10. The adsorption of fluorinated dopants at the surface of 5CB: a neutron reflection study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mears, Laura L.E.; Vos, de Wiebe M.; Prescott, Stuart W.; Magro, Germinal; Rogers, Sarah; Skoda, Maximilian W.A.; Watkins, Erik B.; Zimmerman, Herbert; Richardson, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of dopants at the surface of 5CB has been studied using neutron reflection. The dopants were versions of 11OCB with partly fluorinated chains, and the 5CB was interfaced with air or with silica treated with fluorocarbon or hydrocarbon coatings. At the air interface, the F17-11OCB adso

  11. A cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist ameliorates impairment of recognition memory on withdrawal from MDMA (Ecstasy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawata, Yoko; Hiranita, Takato; Yamamoto, Tsuneyuki

    2010-01-01

    (+/-)-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'Ecstasy') abusers have persistent neuropsychiatric deficits including memory impairments after the cessation of abuse. On the other hand, cannabinoid CB(1) receptors have been implicated in learning/memory, and are highly expressed in the hippocampus, a region of the brain believed to have an important function in certain forms of learning and memory. In this study, we clarified the mechanism underlying the cognitive impairment that develops during MDMA withdrawal from the standpoint of the cannabinoid CB(1) receptors. Mice were administered MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) once a day for 7 days. On the 7th day of withdrawal, a novel object recognition task was performed and the amount of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor protein was measured with western blotting. Recognition performance was impaired on the 7th day of withdrawal. This impairment was blocked by AM251, a cannabinoid CB(1) receptor antagonist, administered 30 min before the training trial or co-administered with MDMA. At this time, the level of cannabinoid CB(1) receptor protein increased significantly in the hippocampus but not the prefrontal cortex or striatum. This increase of CB(1) receptor protein in the hippocampus was also blocked by the co-administration of AM251. Furthermore, CB(1) receptor knockout mice showed no impairment of recognition performance on the withdrawal from MDMA. The impairment of recognition memory during withdrawal from MDMA may result from the activation of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors in the hippocampus.

  12. Allosteric Modulation: An Alternate Approach Targeting the Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy; Li, Jun-Xu; Thomas, Brian F; Wiley, Jenny L; Kenakin, Terry P; Zhang, Yanan

    2016-11-23

    The cannabinoid CB1 receptor is a G protein coupled receptor and plays an important role in many biological processes and physiological functions. A variety of CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists, including endocannabinoids, phytocannabinoids, and synthetic cannabinoids, have been discovered or developed over the past 20 years. In 2005, it was discovered that the CB1 receptor contains allosteric site(s) that can be recognized by small molecules or allosteric modulators. A number of CB1 receptor allosteric modulators, both positive and negative, have since been reported and importantly, they display pharmacological characteristics that are distinct from those of orthosteric agonists and antagonists. Given the psychoactive effects commonly associated with CB1 receptor agonists and antagonists/inverse agonists, allosteric modulation may offer an alternate approach to attain potential therapeutic benefits while avoiding inherent side effects of orthosteric ligands. This review details the complex pharmacological profiles of these allosteric modulators, their structure-activity relationships, and efforts in elucidating binding modes and mechanisms of actions of reported CB1 allosteric modulators. The ultimate development of CB1 receptor allosteric ligands could potentially lead to improved therapies for CB1-mediated neurological disorders.

  13. Deficits in Sensory-Specific Devaluation Task Performance Following Genetic Deletions of Cannabinoid (CB1) Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombag, Hans S.; Johnson, Alexander W.; Zimmer, Anne M.; Zimmer, Andreas; Holland, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptor is abundantly expressed throughout the CNS and is implicated in numerous physiological and behavioral functions, including appetite and feeding. In the present study, wild-type and CB1 heterozygous and homozygous knockout mice were tested on an instrumental outcome-selective devaluation task to assess changes in acquired…

  14. Prototypic implementations of the building block for component based open Hypermedia systems (BB/CB-OHSs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Omer I. Eldai

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we describe the prototypic implementations of the BuildingBlock (BB/CB-OHSs) that proposed to address some of the Component-based Open Hypermedia Systems (CB-OHSs) issues, including distribution and interoperability [4, 11, 12]. Four service implementations were described below...

  15. Association of cannabis use during adolescence, prefrontal CB1 receptor signaling and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana eCaballero

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R is the G-protein coupled receptor responsible for the majority of the endocannabinoid signaling in the human brain. It is widely distributed in the limbic system, basal ganglia, and cerebellum, which are areas responsible for cognition, memory, and motor control. Because of this widespread distribution, it is not surprising that drugs that co-opt CB1R have expected behavioral outcomes consistent with dysregulated signaling from these areas (e.g. memory loss, cognitive deficits, etc. In the context of this review, we present evidence for the role of CB1R signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC, an area involved in executive functions, with emphasis on the developmental regulation of CB1R signaling in the acquisition of mature PFC function. We further hypothesize how alterations of CB1R signaling specifically during adolescent maturation might confer liability to psychiatric disorders.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Caulobacter crescentus bacteriophage φCbK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panis, Gaël; Lambert, Christophe; Viollier, Patrick H

    2012-09-01

    φCbK is a B3 morphotype bacteriophage of the Siphoviridae family that infects Caulobacter crescentus, the preeminent model system for bacterial cell cycle studies. The last 4 decades of research with φCbK as a genetic and cytological tool to study the biology of the host warrant an investigation of the phage genome composition. Herein, we report the complete genome sequence of φCbK and highlight unusual features that emerged from its annotation. The complete genome analysis of the φCbK phage provides new insight into its characteristics and potential interactions with its Caulobacter crescentus host, setting the stage for future functional studies with φCbK.

  17. Astroglial type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1): A new player in the tripartite synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira da Cruz, J F; Robin, L M; Drago, F; Marsicano, G; Metna-Laurent, M

    2016-05-26

    The endocannabinoid system is an important regulator of physiological functions. In the brain, this control is mainly exerted through the type-1-cannabinoid (CB1) receptors. CB1 receptors are abundant at neuron terminals where their stimulation inhibits neurotransmitter release. However, CB1 receptors are also expressed in astrocytes and recent studies showed that astroglial cannabinoid signaling is a key element of the tripartite synapse. In this review we discuss the different mechanisms by which astroglial CB1 receptors control synaptic transmission and plasticity. The recent involvement of astroglial CB1 receptors in the effects of cannabinoids on memory highlights their key roles in cognitive processes and further indicates that astrocytes are central active elements of high-order brain functions.

  18. Semi-continuous production of 2-keto-gluconic acid by Pseudomonas fluorescens AR4 from rice starch hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen-Jing; Zhou, Yan-Zheng; Zhou, Qiang; Cui, Feng-Jie; Yu, Shi-Lian; Sun, Lei

    2012-04-01

    2-Keto-gluconic acid (2KGA) was produced in a semi-continuous process using Pseudomonas fluorescens AR4 and rice starch hydrolysate (RSH). The bacterium was cultured in medium with an initial glucose concentration of 170g/L supplied as RSH. Once the glucose level had dropped to 20g/L, 60% of the culture volume was replaced with fresh medium containing 190g/L of glucose in the form of RSH. After an additional two cycles of growth and media replacement, a total of 476.88g/L of glucose was consumed and 444.96g/L of 2KGA was produced. A total productivity of 6.74g/L and a yield of 0.93g/g were obtained. These findings suggest that P. fluorescens AR4 is suitable for the production of commercially acceptable levels of 2KGA in semi-continuous culture.

  19. Bacterial Feeders, the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and the Flagellate Cercomonas longicauda, have different Effects on Outcome of Competition among the Pseudomonas Biocontrol Strains CHA0 and DSS73

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Annette; Nybroe, Ole; Winding, Anne;

    2009-01-01

    selective feeding flagellate Cercomonas longicauda versus the non-selective feeding nematode Caenorhabditis elegans) influence the abundance of two bacteria that compete for resources in simple model communities. Microcosms consisted of either one gfp-tagged bacterial strain (Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM......50090 or one of two biocontrol strains P. fluorescens CHA0 or Pseudomonas sp. DSS73) or combinations of two bacterial strains. DSM50090 is a suitable food bacterium, DSS73 is of intermediate food quality, and CHA0 is inedible to the bacterial feeders. Bacterial and protozoan cell numbers were measured......How bacterial feeding fauna affects colonization and survival of bacteria in soil is not well understood, which constrains the applicability of bacterial inoculants in agriculture. This study aimed to unravel how food quality of bacteria and bacterial feeders with different feeding habits (the...

  20. Efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder for controlling zebra mussels adhering to test substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, James A.; Severson, Todd J.; Weber, Kerry L.; Mayer, Denise A.

    2015-01-01

    A mobile bioassay trailer was used to assess the efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (Pf-CL145A) spray dried powder (SDP) formulation for controlling zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) from two midwestern lakes: Lake Carlos (Alexandria, Minnesota) and Shawano Lake (Shawano, Wisconsin). The effects of SDP exposure concentration and exposure duration on zebra mussel survival were evaluated along with the evaluation of a benthic injection application technique to reduce the amount of SDP required to induce zebra mortality.

  1. Impact du séchage sur la viabilité de Pseudomonas fluorescens (synthèse bibliographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mputu Kanyinda, JN.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of drying on Pseudomonas fluorescens viability. A review. Drying Pseudomonas fluorescens makes for more economical storage, transportation and marketing. The aim of the drying process is to stop and to stabilize all biological activity for optimal storage, compatible with the conservation of the maximum desired viability of the microorganisms. However, the viability rate of the bacteria after drying depends on the operating conditions of the drying process. One of the most important criteria to consider during the drying of biologically active products is the quality of the final dried product. Freeze-drying is the drying method most commonly used for Pseudomonas fluorescens. After their production, the bacteria are harvested by centrifugation and are freeze-dried, but the changes in temperature induced by freeze-drying are not without consequence for the cells. The freeze-drying process induces cell damage: peroxidation of fatty acids and proteins and DNA oxidation. However, use of protective compounds during freeze-drying and during storage increases significantly the rate of cell viability.

  2. Development of bioformulation and delivery system of Pseudomonas fluorescens against bacterial leaf blight of rice (Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhulkar, P P; Sharma, P

    2014-09-01

    Antagonistic potential of Pseudomonas fluorescens isolate RRb-11 has been evaluated against bacterial leaf blight (BLB) pathogen of rice in vitro, in vivo, microplot and field tests. RRb-11 isolate mass multiplied in substrates like talc and kaolinite powder and bran of barley, soybean and wheat to prepare suitable bioformulation. The maximum shelf life of P. fluorescens was recorded in talc based bioformulation up to 150 days after storage. In rhizosphere competence study, the root rhizosphere of talc, kaolinite and barley based bioformulation treated plants showed good survivability and competence even up to 90 days after treatment. In field study, the talc based bioformulation was applied and the best results were obtained when talc based bioformulation of P. fluorescens RRb-11 was applied as seed treatment, seedling root dip and soil application in combination which reduced the disease by 92.3 and 88.5% over control in the year 2009 and 2010, respectively. This treatment also produced maximum yield of 3.88 t ha(-1) i.e., 61% greater than control.

  3. Small RNA-dependent expression of secondary metabolism is controlled by Krebs cycle function in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Kiefer, Patrick; Reimmann, Cornelia; Keel, Christoph; Dubuis, Christophe; Rolli, Joëlle; Vorholt, Julia A; Haas, Dieter

    2009-12-11

    Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0, an antagonist of phytopathogenic fungi in the rhizosphere of crop plants, elaborates and excretes several secondary metabolites with antibiotic properties. Their synthesis depends on three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ), whose expression is positively controlled by the GacS-GacA two-component system at high cell population densities. To find regulatory links between primary and secondary metabolism in P. fluorescens and in the related species Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we searched for null mutations that affected central carbon metabolism as well as the expression of rsmY-gfp and rsmZ-gfp reporter constructs but without slowing down the growth rate in rich media. Mutation in the pycAB genes (for pyruvate carboxylase) led to down-regulation of rsmXYZ and secondary metabolism, whereas mutation in fumA (for a fumarase isoenzyme) resulted in up-regulation of the three small RNAs and secondary metabolism in the absence of detectable nutrient limitation. These effects required the GacS sensor kinase but not the accessory sensors RetS and LadS. An analysis of intracellular metabolites in P. fluorescens revealed a strong positive correlation between small RNA expression and the pools of 2-oxoglutarate, succinate, and fumarate. We conclude that Krebs cycle intermediates (already known to control GacA-dependent virulence factors in P. aeruginosa) exert a critical trigger function in secondary metabolism via the expression of GacA-dependent small RNAs.

  4. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  5. Chronic ethanol exposure decreases CB1 receptor function at GABAergic synapses in the rat central amygdala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varodayan, Florence P.; Soni, Neeraj; Bajo, Michal

    2016-01-01

    The endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) influence the acute response to ethanol and the development of tolerance, dependence and relapse. Chronic alcohol exposure alters eCB levels and Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) expression and function in brain regions associated with addiction. CB1 inhibits GABA...

  6. CB2 Cannabinoid Receptor Knockout in Mice Impairs Contextual Long-Term Memory and Enhances Spatial Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurocognitive effects of cannabinoids have been extensively studied with a focus on CB1 cannabinoid receptors because CB1 receptors have been considered the major cannabinoid receptor in the nervous system. However, recent discoveries of CB2 cannabinoid receptors in the brain demand accurate determination of whether and how CB2 receptors are involved in the cognitive effects of cannabinoids. CB2 cannabinoid receptors are primarily involved in immune functions, but also implicated in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. Here, we examined the effects of CB2 receptor knockout in mice on memory to determine the roles of CB2 receptors in modulating cognitive function. Behavioral assays revealed that hippocampus-dependent, long-term contextual fear memory was impaired whereas hippocampus-independent, cued fear memory was normal in CB2 receptor knockout mice. These mice also displayed enhanced spatial working memory when tested in a Y-maze. Motor activity and anxiety of CB2 receptor knockout mice were intact when assessed in an open field arena and an elevated zero maze. In contrast to the knockout of CB2 receptors, acute blockade of CB2 receptors by AM603 in C57BL/6J mice had no effect on memory, motor activity, or anxiety. Our results suggest that CB2 cannabinoid receptors play diverse roles in regulating memory depending on memory types and/or brain areas.

  7. The CB2 receptor and its role as a regulator of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Caroline; Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Laviolette, Michel; Flamand, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    The CB2 receptor is the peripheral receptor for cannabinoids. It is mainly expressed in immune tissues, highlighting the possibility that the endocannabinoid system has an immunomodulatory role. In this respect, the CB2 receptor was shown to modulate immune cell functions, both in cellulo and in animal models of inflammatory diseases. In this regard, numerous studies have reported that mice lacking the CB2 receptor have an exacerbated inflammatory phenotype. This suggests that therapeutic strategies aiming at modulating CB2 signaling could be promising for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Herein, we review the pharmacology of the CB2 receptor, its expression pattern, and the signaling pathways induced by its activation. We next examine the regulation of immune cell functions by the CB2 receptor and the evidence obtained from primary human cells, immortalized cell lines, and animal models of inflammation. Finally, we discuss the possible therapies targeting the CB2 receptor and the questions that remain to be addressed to determine whether this receptor could be a potential target to treat inflammatory disease.

  8. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor-mediated anti-nociception in models of acute and chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Maulik D; Sagar, Devi R; Elmes, Steven J R; Kendall, David A; Chapman, Victoria

    2007-08-01

    The endocannabinoid system consists of cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors, endogenous ligands and their synthesising/metabolising enzymes. Cannabinoid receptors are present at key sites involved in the relay and modulation of nociceptive information. The analgesic effects of cannabinoids have been well documented. The usefulness of nonselective cannabinoid agonists can, however, be limited by psychoactive side effects associated with activation of CB(1) receptors. Following the recent evidence for CB(2) receptors existing in the nervous system and reports of their up-regulation in chronic pain states and neurodegenerative diseases, much research is now aimed at shedding light on the role of the CB(2) receptor in human disease. Recent studies have demonstrated anti-nociceptive effects of selective CB(2) receptor agonists in animal models of pain in the absence of CNS side effects. This review focuses on the analgesic potential of CB(2) receptor agonists for inflammatory, post-operative and neuropathic pain states and discusses their possible sites and mechanisms of action.

  9. Computational Prediction and Biochemical Analyses of New Inverse Agonists for the CB1 Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Caitlin E; Ahn, Kwang H; Graf, Steven T; Goddard, William A; Kendall, Debra A; Abrol, Ravinder

    2016-01-25

    Human cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) G-protein coupled receptor is a potential therapeutic target for obesity. The previously predicted and experimentally validated ensemble of ligand-free conformations of CB1 [Scott, C. E. et al. Protein Sci. 2013 , 22 , 101 - 113 ; Ahn, K. H. et al. Proteins 2013 , 81 , 1304 - 1317] are used here to predict the binding sites for known CB1-selective inverse agonists including rimonabant and its seven known derivatives. This binding pocket, which differs significantly from previously published models, is used to identify 16 novel compounds expected to be CB1 inverse agonists by exploiting potential new interactions. We show experimentally that two of these compounds exhibit inverse agonist properties including inhibition of basal and agonist-induced G-protein coupling activity, as well as an enhanced level of CB1 cell surface localization. This demonstrates the utility of using the predicted binding sites for an ensemble of CB1 receptor structures for designing new CB1 inverse agonists.

  10. Involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor in the aqueous humor outflow-enhancing effects of abnormal-cannabidiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhuanhong; Kumar, Akhilesh; Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-cbd), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid agonist, on aqueous humor outflow via the trabecular meshwork (TM) of porcine eye, and to examine the involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor and the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/44 MAPK) pathway. The effects of abn-cbd on aqueous humor outflow were measured using a porcine anterior segment perfused organ culture model. The activation of p42/44 MAPK by abn-cbd was determined in cultured TM cells with western blot analysis using an anti-phospho-p42/44 MAPK antibody. Administration of abn-cbd caused a concentration-dependent enhancement of aqueous humor outflow facility with a maximum effect (155.0 ± 11.7% of basal outflow facility) after administration of 30 nM abn-cbd. Pretreatment with 1 μM of O-1918, a cannabidiol analog that acts as a selective antagonist at the non-CB1/CB2 receptor, produced a full antagonism of 30 nM abn-cbd induced increase of aqueous humor outflow facility. Pretreatment with 1 μM of CB1 antagonist SR141716A partially blocked, whereas pretreatment with either 1 μM of CB1 antagonist AM251 or 1 μM of CB2 antagonist SR144528 had no effect on abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. Treatment of TM cells with 30 nM of abn-cbd activated p42/44 MAPK, which was blocked completely by pretreatment with O-1918, and partially by pretreatment with SR141716A, but not by either AM251 or SR144528. In addition, PD98059, an inhibitor of p42/44 MAPK pathway, blocked completely the abn-cbd induced p42/44 MAPK activation and blocked partially the abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. In conclusion, the results from this study demonstrate that abn-cbd increases aqueous humor outflow through the TM pathway of the eye, and this effect is mediated by a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor, with an involvement of p42/44 MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:22580290

  11. Comparative molecular dynamics simulations of the potent synthetic classical cannabinoid ligand AMG3 in solution and at binding site of the CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdagi, Serdar; Reis, Heribert; Papadopoulos, Manthos G; Mavromoustakos, Thomas

    2008-08-01

    The C-1'-dithiolane Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta(8)-THC) amphiphilic analogue (-)-2-(6a,7,10,10a-tetrahydro-6,6,9-trimethylhydroxy-6H-dibenzo[b,d]pyranyl)-2-hexyl-1,3-dithiolane (AMG3) is considered as one of the most potent synthetic analgesic cannabinoid (CB) ligands. Its structure is characterized by rigid tricyclic and flexible alkyl chain segments. Its conformational properties have not been fully explored. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies on classical CBs showed that the alkyl side chain is the most critical structural part for the receptor activation. However, reported low energy conformers of classical CB analogues vary mainly in the conformation of their alkyl side chain segment. Therefore, comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of low energy conformers of AMG3 were performed in order to investigate its structural and dynamical properties in two different systems. System-I includes ligand and amphoteric solvent DMSO, simulating the biological environment and system-II includes ligand at active site of the homology models of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the solvent. The trajectory analysis results are compared for the systems I and II. In system-I, the dihedral angle defined between aromatic ring and dithiolane ring of AMG3 shows more resistance to be transformed into another torsional angle and the dihedral angle adjacent to dithiolane ring belonging in the alkyl chain has flexibility to adopt gauche+/- and trans dihedral angles. The rest of the dihedral angles within the alkyl chain are all trans. These results point out that wrapped conformations are dynamically less favored in solution than linear conformations. Two possible plane angles defined between the rigid and flexible segments are found to be the most favored and adopting values of approximately 90 degrees and approximately 140 degrees. In system-II, these values are approximately 90 degrees and approximately 120 degrees. Conformers of AMG3 at the CB1 receptor favor to

  12. Involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor in the aqueous humor outflow-enhancing effects of abnormal-cannabidiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhuanhong; Kumar, Akhilesh; Kumar, Pritesh; Song, Zhao-Hui

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of abnormal-cannabidiol (abn-cbd), a non-psychoactive cannabinoid agonist, on aqueous humor outflow via the trabecular meshwork (TM) of porcine eye, and to examine the involvement of a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor and the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p42/44 MAPK) pathway. The effects of abn-cbd on aqueous humor outflow were measured using a porcine anterior segment perfused organ culture model. The activation of p42/44 MAPK by abn-cbd was determined in cultured TM cells with western blot analysis using an anti-phospho-p42/44 MAPK antibody. Administration of abn-cbd caused a concentration-dependent enhancement of aqueous humor outflow facility with a maximum effect (155.0 ± 11.7% of basal outflow facility) after administration of 30 nM abn-cbd. Pretreatment with 1 μM of O-1918, a cannabidiol analog that acts as a selective antagonist at the non-CB1/CB2 receptor, produced a full antagonism of 30 nM abn-cbd induced increase of aqueous humor outflow facility. Pretreatment with 1 μM of CB1 antagonist SR141716A partially blocked, whereas pretreatment with either 1 μM of CB1 antagonist AM251 or 1 μM of CB2 antagonist SR144528 had no effect on abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. Treatment of TM cells with 30 nM of abn-cbd activated p42/44 MAPK, which was blocked completely by pretreatment with O-1918, and partially by pretreatment with SR141716A, but not by either AM251 or SR144528. In addition, PD98059, an inhibitor of p42/44 MAPK pathway, blocked completely the abn-cbd induced p42/44 MAPK activation and blocked partially the abn-cbd induced enhancement of outflow facility. In conclusion, the results from this study demonstrate that abn-cbd increases aqueous humor outflow through the TM pathway of the eye, and this effect is mediated by a non-CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor, with an involvement of p42/44 MAPK signaling pathway.

  13. Synchronously Tailoring Strain Sensitivity and Electrical Stability of Silicone Elastomer Composites by the Synergistic Effect of a Dual Conductive Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanying Ning

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of conductive polymer composites (CPCs as strain sensors has been widely investigated. A wide range of strain sensitivities and high repeatability are vital for different applications of CPCs. In this study, the relations of the conductive filler network and the strain-sensing behavior and electrical stability under fatigue cycles were studied systematically for the first time based on the conductive polymethylvinylsiloxane (PMVS composites filled with both carbon nanotubes arrays (CNTAs and carbon black (CB. It was proved that the composites could be fabricated with large strain-sensing capability and a wide range of strain sensitivities by controlling the volume ratio of CNTA/CB and their amounts. Additionally, the CNTA/CB/PMVS composite with 3 vol % content of fillers showed high sensitivity (GF is 10 at 60% strain, high repeatability (the relative standard deviation (RSD of the max R/R0 value is 3.58%, and electrical stability under fatigue cycles (value range of R/R0 is 1.62 to 1.82 at the same time due to the synergistic effects of the dual conductive network of CNTAs and CB. This could not be achieved by relying on a single CNTA or CB conductive network. This study may provide guidance for the preparation of high performance CPCs for applications in strain sensors.

  14. CB1 receptor mediates the effects of glucocorticoids on AMPK activity in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerif, Miski; Füzesi, Tamás; Thomas, Julia D; Kola, Blerina; Grossman, Ashley B; Fekete, Csaba; Korbonits, Márta

    2013-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a regulator of cellular and systemic energy homeostasis, can be influenced by several hormones. Tissue-specific alteration of AMPK activity by glucocorticoids may explain the increase in appetite, the accumulation of lipids in adipose tissues, and the detrimental cardiac effects of Cushing's syndrome. Endocannabinoids are known to mediate the effects of various hormones and to influence AMPK activity. Cannabinoids have central orexigenic and direct peripheral metabolic effects via the cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1). In our preliminary experiments, WT mice received implants of a corticosterone-containing pellet to establish a mouse model of Cushing's syndrome. Subsequently, WT and Cb1 (Cnr1)-knockout (CB1-KO) littermates were treated with corticosterone and AMPK activity in the hypothalamus, various adipose tissues, liver and cardiac tissue was measured. Corticosterone-treated CB1-KO mice showed a lack of weight gain and of increase in hypothalamic and hepatic AMPK activity. In adipose tissues, baseline AMPK activity was higher in CB1-KO mice, but a glucocorticoid-induced drop was observed, similar to that observed in WT mice. Cardiac AMPK levels were reduced in CB1-KO mice, but while WT mice showed significantly reduced AMPK activity following glucocorticoid treatment, CB1-KO mice showed a paradoxical increase. Our findings indicate the importance of the CB1 receptor in the central orexigenic effect of glucocorticoid-induced activation of hypothalamic AMPK activity. In the periphery adipose tissues, changes may occur independently of the CB1 receptor, but the receptor appears to alter the responsiveness of the liver and myocardial tissues to glucocorticoids. In conclusion, our data suggest that an intact cannabinoid pathway is required for the full metabolic effects of chronic glucocorticoid excess.

  15. CB2 cannabinoid receptors contribute to bacterial invasion and mortality in polymicrobial sepsis.

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    Balázs Csóka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a major healthcare problem and current estimates suggest that the incidence of sepsis is approximately 750,000 annually. Sepsis is caused by an inability of the immune system to eliminate invading pathogens. It was recently proposed that endogenous mediators produced during sepsis can contribute to the immune dysfunction that is observed in sepsis. Endocannabinoids that are produced excessively in sepsis are potential factors leading to immune dysfunction, because they suppress immune cell function by binding to G-protein-coupled CB(2 receptors on immune cells. Here we examined the role of CB(2 receptors in regulating the host's response to sepsis. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The role of CB(2 receptors was studied by subjecting CB(2 receptor wild-type and knockout mice to bacterial sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture. We report that CB(2 receptor inactivation by knockout decreases sepsis-induced mortality, and bacterial translocation into the bloodstream of septic animals. Furthermore, CB(2 receptor inactivation decreases kidney and muscle injury, suppresses splenic nuclear factor (NF-kappaB activation, and diminishes the production of IL-10, IL-6 and MIP-2. Finally, CB(2 receptor deficiency prevents apoptosis in lymphoid organs and augments the number of CD11b(+ and CD19(+ cells during CLP. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, our results establish for the first time that CB(2 receptors are important contributors to septic immune dysfunction and mortality, indicating that CB(2 receptors may be therapeutically targeted for the benefit of patients suffering from sepsis.

  16. Expression of the cannabinoid receptor CB1 in distinct neuronal subpopulations in the adult mouse forebrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, G; Lutz, B

    1999-12-01

    Cannabinoids can modulate motor behaviour, learning and memory, cognition and pain perception. These effects correlate with the expression of the cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and with the presence of endogenous cannabinoids in the brain. In trying to obtain further insights into the mechanisms underlying the modulatory effects of cannabinoids, CB1-positive neurons were determined in the murine forebrain at a single cell resolution. We performed a double in situ hybridization study to detect mRNA of CB1 in combination with mRNA of glutamic acid decarboxylase 65k, neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK), parvalbumin, calretinin and calbindin D28k, respectively. Our results revealed that CB1-expressing cells can be divided into distinct neuronal subpopulations. There is a clear distinction between neurons containing CB1 mRNA either at high levels or low levels. The majority of high CB1-expressing cells are GABAergic (gamma-aminobutyric acid) neurons belonging mainly to the cholecystokinin-positive and parvalbumin-negative type of interneurons (basket cells) and, to a lower extent, to the calbindin D28k-positive mid-proximal dendritic inhibitory interneurons. Only a fraction of low CB1-expressing cells is GABAergic. In the hippocampus, amygdala and entorhinal cortex area, CB1 mRNA is present at low but significant levels in many non-GABAergic cells that can be considered as projecting principal neurons. Thus, a complex mechanism appears to underlie the modulatory effects of cannabinoids. They might act on principal glutamatergic circuits as well as modulate local GABAergic inhibitory circuits. CB1 is very highly coexpressed with CCK. It is known that cannabinoids and CCK often have opposite effects on behaviour and physiology. Therefore, we suggest that a putative cross-talk between cannabinoids and CCK might exist and will be relevant to better understanding of physiology and pharmacology of the cannabinoid system.

  17. Expression, surface immobilization, and characterization of functional recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli-Hoops, Silvia C; Gorshkova, Inna; Gawrisch, Klaus; Yeliseev, Alexei A

    2013-10-01

    Human peripheral cannabinoid receptor CB2, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) involved in regulation of immune response has become an important target for pharmaceutical drug development. Structural and functional studies on CB2 may benefit from immobilization of the purified and functional receptor onto a suitable surface at a controlled density and, preferably in a uniform orientation. The goal of this project was to develop a generic strategy for preparation of functional recombinant CB2 and immobilization at solid interfaces. Expression of CB2 as a fusion with Rho-tag (peptide composed of the last nine amino acids of rhodopsin) in E. coli was evaluated in terms of protein levels, accessibility of the tag, and activity of the receptor. The structural integrity of CB2 was tested by ligand binding to the receptor solubilized in detergent micelles, captured on tag-specific monoclonal 1D4 antibody-coated resin. Highly pure and functional CB2 was obtained by sequential chromatography on a 1D4- and Ni-NTA-resin and its affinity to the 1D4 antibody characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Either the purified receptor or fusion CB2 from the crude cell extract was captured onto a 1D4-coated CM4 chip (Biacore) in a quantitative fashion at uniform orientation as demonstrated by the SPR signal. Furthermore, the accessibility of the extracellular surface of immobilized CB2 and the affinity of interaction with a novel monoclonal antibody NAA-1 was studied by SPR. In summary, we present an integral strategy for purification, surface immobilization, ligand- and antibody binding studies of functional cannabinoid receptor CB2.

  18. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor calibrates excitatory synaptic balance in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monory, Krisztina; Polack, Martin; Remus, Anita; Lutz, Beat; Korte, Martin

    2015-03-04

    The endocannabinoid system negatively regulates the release of various neurotransmitters in an activity-dependent manner, thereby influencing the excitability of neuronal circuits. In the hippocampus, cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is present on both GABAergic and glutamatergic axon terminals. CB1 receptor-deficient mice were previously shown to have increased hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). In this study, we have investigated the consequences of cell-type-specific deletion of the CB1 receptor on the induction of hippocampal LTP and on CA1 pyramidal cell morphology. Deletion of CB1 receptor in GABAergic neurons in GABA-CB1-KO mice leads to a significantly decreased hippocampal LTP compared with WT controls. Concomitantly, CA1 pyramidal neurons have a significantly reduced dendritic branching both on the apical and on the basal dendrites. Moreover, the average spine density on the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons is significantly diminished. In contrast, in mice lacking CB1 receptor in glutamatergic cells (Glu-CB1-KO), hippocampal LTP is significantly enhanced and CA1 pyramidal neurons show an increased branching and an increased spine density in the apical dendritic region. Together, these results indicate that the CB1 receptor signaling system both on inhibitory and excitatory neurons controls functional and structural synaptic plasticity of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region to maintain an appropriate homeostatic state upon neuronal activation. Consequently, if the CB1 receptor is lost in either neuronal population, an allostatic shift will occur leading to a long-term dysregulation of neuronal functions.

  19. Behavioral effects of the novel potent cannabinoid CB1 agonist AM 4054.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Peter J; Thakur, Ganesh A; Vemuri, V Kiran; McClure, Evan D; Brown, Cara M; Winston, Keisha M; Wood, Jodianne T; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Salamone, John D

    2013-08-01

    Due to the ubiquity of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor throughout the nervous system, as well as the many potential therapeutic uses of CB1 agonist-based interventions, it is desirable to synthesize novel probes of the CB1 receptor. Here, the acute behavioral effects of systemic (i.p.) administration of the putative novel CB1 full agonist AM 4054 were tested in rats. In Experiment 1, a dose range (0.15625-1.25 mg/kg) of AM 4054 produced effects consistent with CB1 agonism in the cannabinoid tetrad of tasks in rats, including induction of analgesia, catalepsy, hypothermia, and locomotor suppression. These effects were reversed with the CB1-selective inverse agonist AM 251 in Experiment 2, indicating that AM 4054 produced CB1 receptor-mediated effects. Analysis of open-field activity indicated that the reduction in locomotion is more consistent with general motor slowing than anxiogenesis. AM 4054 (0.0625-0.5 mg/kg) also dose-dependently reduced fixed-ratio 5 (FR5) operant responding for food in Experiment 3, and microanalysis of the timing and rate of lever pressing indicated a pattern of suppression similar to other CB1 agonists. Minimum doses of AM 4054 (0.125-0.3125 mg/kg) required to produce significant effects in these behavioral assays were lower than those of many CB1 agonists. It is likely that AM 4054 is a potent pharmacological tool for assessment of cannabinoid receptor function. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurophysiological evidence for the presence of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soni, Neeraj; Satpathy, Shankha; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2014-01-01

    Marijuana, which acts within the endocannabinoid (eCB) system as an agonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R), exhibits addictive properties and has powerful actions on the state of arousal of an organism. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT), as a component of the reticular activating...... the firing frequency and synaptic activity of neurons in this nucleus. Therefore, endogenous eCB transmission could play a role in processes involving the LDT, such as cortical activation and motivated behaviours and, further, behavioural actions of marijuana are probably mediated, in part, via cellular...

  1. TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins and siderophore utilization in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartney, Sierra L; Mazurier, Sylvie; Kidarsa, Teresa A; Quecine, Maria Carolina; Lemanceau, Philippe; Loper, Joyce E

    2011-04-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5 produces two siderophores, a pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin, and its proteome includes 45 TonB-dependent outer-membrane proteins, which commonly function in uptake of siderophores and other substrates from the environment. The 45 proteins share the conserved β-barrel and plug domains of TonB-dependent proteins but only 18 of them have an N-terminal signaling domain characteristic of TonB-dependent transducers (TBDTs), which participate in cell-surface signaling systems. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18 TBDTs and 27 TonB-dependent receptors (TBDRs), which lack the N-terminal signaling domain, suggest a complex evolutionary history including horizontal transfer among different microbial lineages. Putative functions were assigned to certain TBDRs and TBDTs in clades including well-characterized orthologs from other Pseudomonas spp. A mutant of Pf-5 with deletions in pyoverdine and enantio-pyochelin biosynthesis genes was constructed and characterized for iron-limited growth and utilization of a spectrum of siderophores. The mutant could utilize as iron sources a large number of pyoverdines with diverse structures as well as ferric citrate, heme, and the siderophores ferrichrome, ferrioxamine B, enterobactin, and aerobactin. The diversity and complexity of the TBDTs and TBDRs with roles in iron uptake clearly indicate the importance of iron in the fitness and survival of Pf-5 in the environment.

  2. Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas putida for Promoting Growth of Jatropha curcas Seedling Root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Sumarsih

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens and P. putida are Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR that can produce growth hormone. The objective of this study is to know the effects of those two combined species of PGPR on seedling root growth of Jatropha curcas. The condition of the seedling root determines the success of dry land cultivation. The root which has wider coverage, is larger in number, and is bigger in diameter makes seedling more resistant to stress in dry land environment. In the experiment, two kinds of plant materials are used for seedling, the Jatropha seed and stem material, which are treated in a mixed culture of PGPR. For the Jatropha seed, this mixed culture of PGPR is given at the same time of cultivating the sprout on the seedling medium. For the stem cutting, the PGPR is poured in together during the first watering of the seedling cultivation medium. In the fourthweek, the observed growth parameters are root length, root diameter, primary and secondary lateral root numbers, Root Length Density (RLD, Frequency of Lateral Root (FLR, and Specific Root Length (SRL. These data are analyzed using analysis of variant with DMRT test at 0.05 level of significance. The result of this study shows that PGPR tend to reduce FLR values on the seedling root made from seeds. On the seedling root m