WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluorescence photoactivation localization

  1. Fiber-optic system for monitoring fast photoactivation dynamics of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Zhiguo; Qin, Lingsong; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins is crucial to the realization of photoactivation localization microscopy. In contrast to those fluorescence-based approaches that require complex data processing and calibration procedures, here we report a simple and quantitative alternative, which relies on the measurement of small absorption spectra changes over time with a fiber-optic system. Using Dronpa as a representative highlighter protein, we have investigated the capacity of this system in monitoring the fast photoactivation process.

  2. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin G Kopek

    Full Text Available The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM and scanning electron microscope (SEM system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  3. Correlative photoactivated localization and scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopek, Benjamin G; Shtengel, Gleb; Grimm, Jonathan B; Clayton, David A; Hess, Harald F

    2013-01-01

    The ability to localize proteins precisely within subcellular space is crucial to understanding the functioning of biological systems. Recently, we described a protocol that correlates a precise map of fluorescent fusion proteins localized using three-dimensional super-resolution optical microscopy with the fine ultrastructural context of three-dimensional electron micrographs. While it achieved the difficult simultaneous objectives of high photoactivated fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation, it required a super-resolution optical and specialized electron microscope that is not available to many researchers. We present here a faster and more practical protocol with the advantage of a simpler two-dimensional optical (Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (PALM)) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system that retains the often mutually exclusive attributes of fluorophore preservation and ultrastructure preservation. As before, cryosections were prepared using the Tokuyasu protocol, but the staining protocol was modified to be amenable for use in a standard SEM without the need for focused ion beam ablation. We show the versatility of this technique by labeling different cellular compartments and structures including mitochondrial nucleoids, peroxisomes, and the nuclear lamina. We also demonstrate simultaneous two-color PALM imaging with correlated electron micrographs. Lastly, this technique can be used with small-molecule dyes as demonstrated with actin labeling using phalloidin conjugated to a caged dye. By retaining the dense protein labeling expected for super-resolution microscopy combined with ultrastructural preservation, simplifying the tools required for correlative microscopy, and expanding the number of useful labels we expect this method to be accessible and valuable to a wide variety of researchers.

  4. A straightforward and quantitative approach for characterizing the photoactivation performance of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Pei, Zhiguo; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Zeng, Shaoqun; Huang, Zhen-Li

    2010-11-01

    Characterizing the photoactivation performance of highlighter fluorescence proteins (FPs) is crucial for screening better highlighter FPs and optimizing the photoactivation efficiency of a certain highlighter FP. Currently, photoactivation contrast and half-time values of photoactivation and photobleaching processes are used for such purpose. However, the relations among these parameters are not clear, and little guidance for practical experiments could be obtained from the half-time values. Here, we show that light dose dependent fluorescence curve, which is calculated from activation-intensity-dependent photoactivation and photobleaching rates, is capable of quantifying the photoactivation performance straightforwardly. Moreover, the photoactivation contrast is easily obtained from the curve.

  5. Photoactivation and imaging of optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, George H

    2011-07-01

    A major advance in the microscopic study of cells and tissues is the introduction of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, which can specifically mark proteins of interest within a living cell. Fluorescent proteins are now available that allow a pool of molecules to be "turned on" by photoactivation. This unit discusses technical aspects for the general use of photoactivatable fluorescent proteins and introduces some specific applications in the concluding remarks.

  6. Photoactivation of neurons by laser-generated local heating

    CERN Document Server

    Migliori, Benjamin; Kristan, William

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for achieving temporally and spatially precise photoactivation of neurons without the need for genetic expression of photosensitive proteins. Our method depends upon conduction of thermal energy via absorption by a dye or carbon particles and does not require the presence of voltage-gated channels to create transmembrane currents. We demonstrate photothermal initiation of action potentials in Hirudo verbana neurons and of transmembrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. Thermal energy is delivered by focused 50 ms, 650 nm laser pulses with total pulse energies between 250 and 3500 \\muJ. We document an optical delivery system for targeting specific neurons that can be expanded for multiple target sites. Our method achieves photoactivation reliably (70 - 90% of attempts) and can issue multiple pulses (6-9) with minimal changes to cellular properties as measured by intracellular recording. Direct photoactivation presents a significant step towards all-optical analysis of neural circuits in animals ...

  7. Photoactivation of neurons by laser-generated local heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Migliori

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for achieving temporally and spatially precise photoactivation of neurons without the need for genetic expression of photosensitive proteins. Our method depends upon conduction of thermal energy via absorption by chemically inert carbon particles and does not require the presence of voltage-gated channels to create transmembrane currents. We demonstrate photothermal initiation of action potentials in Hirudo verbana neurons within an intact ganglion and of transmembrane currents in Xenopus oocytes. Thermal energy is delivered by focused 50 ms, 650 nm laser pulses with total pulse energies between 250 and 3500 μJ. We document an optical delivery system for targeting specific neurons that can be expanded for multiple target sites. Our method achieves photoactivation reliably (70 - 90% of attempts and can issue multiple pulses (6-9 with minimal changes to cellular properties as measured by intracellular recording. Direct photoactivation presents a significant step towards all-optical analysis of neural circuits in animals such as Hirudo verbana where genetic expression of photosensitive compounds is not feasible.

  8. Dual color photoactivation localization microscopy of cardiomyopathy-associated desmin mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodehl, Andreas; Hedde, Per Niklas; Dieding, Mareike; Fatima, Azra; Walhorn, Volker; Gayda, Susan; Šarić, Tomo; Klauke, Bärbel; Gummert, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario; Heilemann, Mike; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Milting, Hendrik

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in the DES gene coding for the intermediate filament protein desmin may cause skeletal and cardiac myopathies, which are frequently characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates of desmin and associated proteins at the cellular level. By atomic force microscopy, we demonstrated filament formation defects of desmin mutants, associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To understand the pathogenesis of this disease, it is essential to analyze desmin filament structures under conditions in which both healthy and mutant desmin are expressed at equimolar levels mimicking an in vivo situation. Here, we applied dual color photoactivation localization microscopy using photoactivatable fluorescent proteins genetically fused to desmin and characterized the heterozygous status in living cells lacking endogenous desmin. In addition, we applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer to unravel short distance structural patterns of desmin mutants in filaments. For the first time, we present consistent high resolution data on the structural effects of five heterozygous desmin mutations on filament formation in vitro and in living cells. Our results may contribute to the molecular understanding of the pathological filament formation defects of heterozygous DES mutations in cardiomyopathies.

  9. Dual Color Photoactivation Localization Microscopy of Cardiomyopathy-associated Desmin Mutants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodehl, Andreas; Hedde, Per Niklas; Dieding, Mareike; Fatima, Azra; Walhorn, Volker; Gayda, Susan; Šarić, Tomo; Klauke, Bärbel; Gummert, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario; Heilemann, Mike; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Milting, Hendrik

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the DES gene coding for the intermediate filament protein desmin may cause skeletal and cardiac myopathies, which are frequently characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates of desmin and associated proteins at the cellular level. By atomic force microscopy, we demonstrated filament formation defects of desmin mutants, associated with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. To understand the pathogenesis of this disease, it is essential to analyze desmin filament structures under conditions in which both healthy and mutant desmin are expressed at equimolar levels mimicking an in vivo situation. Here, we applied dual color photoactivation localization microscopy using photoactivatable fluorescent proteins genetically fused to desmin and characterized the heterozygous status in living cells lacking endogenous desmin. In addition, we applied fluorescence resonance energy transfer to unravel short distance structural patterns of desmin mutants in filaments. For the first time, we present consistent high resolution data on the structural effects of five heterozygous desmin mutations on filament formation in vitro and in living cells. Our results may contribute to the molecular understanding of the pathological filament formation defects of heterozygous DES mutations in cardiomyopathies. PMID:22403400

  10. Highlights of the optical highlighter fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G H

    2011-07-01

    The development of super-resolution microscopy techniques using molecular localization, such as photoactivated localization microscopy, fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, photoactivated localization microscopy with independent running acquisition and many others, has heightened interest in molecules that will be grouped here into a category referred to as 'optical highlighter' fluorescent proteins. This review will survey many of the advances in development of fluorescent proteins for optically highlighting sub-populations of fluorescently labelled molecules.

  11. Nanoscale effects of ethanol and naltrexone on protein organization in the plasma membrane studied by photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Tobin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ethanol affects the signaling of several important neurotransmitter and neuromodulator systems in the CNS. It has been recently proposed that ethanol alters the dynamic lateral organization of proteins and lipids in the plasma membrane, thereby affecting surface receptor-mediated cellular signaling. Our aims are to establish whether pharmacologically relevant levels of ethanol can affect the lateral organization of plasma membrane and cytoskeletal proteins at the nanoscopic level, and investigate the relevance of such perturbations for mu-opioid receptor (MOP function. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Photoactivated Localization Microscopy with pair-correlation analysis (pcPALM, a quantitative fluorescence imaging technique with high spatial resolution (15-25 nm and single-molecule sensitivity, to study ethanol effects on protein organization in the plasma membrane. We observed that short (20 min exposure to 20 and 40 mM ethanol alters protein organization in the plasma membrane of cells that harbor endogenous MOPs, causing a rearrangement of the lipid raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI. These effects could be largely occluded by pretreating the cells with the MOP antagonist naltrexone (200 nM for 3 hours. In addition, ethanol induced pronounced actin polymerization, leading to its partial co-localization with GPI. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Pharmacologically relevant levels of ethanol alter the lateral organization of GPI-linked proteins and induce actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Pretreatment with the MOP antagonist naltrexone is protective against ethanol action and significantly reduces the extent to which ethanol remodels the lateral organization of lipid-rafts-associated proteins in the plasma membrane. Super-resolution pcPALM reveals details of ethanol action at the nanoscale level, giving new mechanistic insight on the cellular and molecular mechanisms of its action.

  12. Three-dimensional Super Resolution Microscopy of F-actin Filaments by Interferometric PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy (iPALM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yilin; Kanchanawong, Pakorn

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence microscopy enables direct visualization of specific biomolecules within cells. However, for conventional fluorescence microscopy, the spatial resolution is restricted by diffraction to ~ 200 nm within the image plane and > 500 nm along the optical axis. As a result, fluorescence microscopy has long been severely limited in the observation of ultrastructural features within cells. The recent development of super resolution microscopy methods has overcome this limitation. In particular, the advent of photoswitchable fluorophores enables localization-based super resolution microscopy, which provides resolving power approaching the molecular-length scale. Here, we describe the application of a three-dimensional super resolution microscopy method based on single-molecule localization microscopy and multiphase interferometry, called interferometric PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy (iPALM). This method provides nearly isotropic resolution on the order of 20 nm in all three dimensions. Protocols for visualizing the filamentous actin cytoskeleton, including specimen preparation and operation of the iPALM instrument, are described here. These protocols are also readily adaptable and instructive for the study of other ultrastructural features in cells.

  13. Common fluorescent proteins for single-molecule localization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Natalia V.; Bozhanova, Nina G.; Mishina, Natalie M.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Mishin, Alexander S.

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution techniques for breaking the diffraction barrier are spread out over multiple studies nowadays. Single-molecule localization microscopy such as PALM, STORM, GSDIM, etc allow to get super-resolved images of cell ultrastructure by precise localization of individual fluorescent molecules via their temporal isolation. However, these methods are supposed the use of fluorescent dyes and proteins with special characteristics (photoactivation/photoconversion). At the same time, there is a need for retaining high photostability of fluorophores during long-term acquisition. Here, we first showed the potential of common red fluorescent protein for single-molecule localization microscopy based on spontaneous intrinsic blinking. Also, we assessed the effect of different imaging media on photobleaching of these fluorescent proteins. Monomeric orange and red fluorescent proteins were examined for stochastic switching from a dark state to a bright fluorescent state. We studied fusions with cytoskeletal proteins in NIH/3T3 and HeLa cells. Imaging was performed on the Nikon N-STORM system equipped with EMCCD camera. To define the optimal imaging conditions we tested several types of cell culture media and buffers. As a result, high-resolution images of cytoskeleton structure were obtained. Essentially, low-intensity light was sufficient to initiate the switching of tested red fluorescent protein reducing phototoxicity and provide long-term live-cell imaging.

  14. New red-fluorescent calcium indicators for optogenetics, photoactivation and multi-color imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oheim, Martin; van 't Hoff, Marcel; Feltz, Anne; Zamaleeva, Alsu; Mallet, Jean-Maurice; Collot, Mayeul

    2014-10-01

    Most chemical and, with only a few exceptions, all genetically encoded fluorimetric calcium (Ca(2+)) indicators (GECIs) emit green fluorescence. Many of these probes are compatible with red-emitting cell- or organelle markers. But the bulk of available fluorescent-protein constructs and transgenic animals incorporate green or yellow fluorescent protein (GFP and YFP respectively). This is, in part, not only heritage from the tendency to aggregate of early-generation red-emitting FPs, and due to their complicated photochemistry, but also resulting from the compatibility of green-fluorescent probes with standard instrumentation readily available in most laboratories and core imaging facilities. Photochemical constraints like limited water solubility and low quantum yield have contributed to the relative paucity of red-emitting Ca(2+) probes compared to their green counterparts, too. The increasing use of GFP and GFP-based functional reporters, together with recent developments in optogenetics, photostimulation and super-resolution microscopies, has intensified the quest for red-emitting Ca(2+) probes. In response to this demand more red-emitting chemical and FP-based Ca(2+)-sensitive indicators have been developed since 2009 than in the thirty years before. In this topical review, we survey the physicochemical properties of these red-emitting Ca(2+) probes and discuss their utility for biological Ca(2+) imaging. Using the spectral separability index Xijk (Oheim M., 2010. Methods in Molecular Biology 591: 3-16) we evaluate their performance for multi-color excitation/emission experiments, involving the identification of morphological landmarks with GFP/YFP and detecting Ca(2+)-dependent fluorescence in the red spectral band. We also establish a catalog of criteria for evaluating Ca(2+) indicators that ideally should be made available for each probe. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium signaling in health and disease. Guest Editors: Geert Bultynck

  15. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut fuer Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India)

    2012-01-02

    Graphical abstract: Protein color center emissions were observed in the wavelength range from 340 nm to 900 nm from nano-clusters of the photo-activated adenylate cyclase (nPAC) from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adenylyl cyclase nPAC in aqueous pH 7.5 buffer dissolved only to nano-clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-cluster size was determined by light attenuation (scattering) measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The size of the nano-clusters was growing by coalescing during observation period. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In nPAC nano-clusters color centers were present in emission range of 360-900 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nPAC color center emission is compared with fluorescent protein emission. - Abstract: The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  16. Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, Joana T.; Savenije, Tom J.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect

  17. Photoactivation and calcium sensitivity of the fluorescent NO indicator 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2): implications for cellular NO imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broillet, M; Randin, O; Chatton, J

    2001-03-02

    The fluorescent indicator of nitric oxide (NO), 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF-2), and its membrane-permeable derivative (DAF-2 diacetate) have been recently developed to perform real-time biological imaging of NO. In this study, we show that DAF-2 is strongly influenced by factors other than the concentration of NO itself. Using measurements with a fluorimeter as well as fluorescence microscopy, we found that the divalent cation concentration in the medium, as well as the incident light, strongly affects the ability of DAF-2 to detect NO. Calcium, in particular, enhanced the signal detection of NO released by NO donors by up to 200 times. With multiple and longer exposures to light, no bleaching of the dye was observed but, instead, a potentiation of the fluorescence response could be measured. While these two properties will affect the use and interpretation of the hitherto acquired data with this fluorescent compound, they may also open up new possibilities for its application.

  18. Interaction between titanium dioxide nanoparticles and human serum albumin revealed by fluorescence spectroscopy in the absence of photoactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Wen [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Du Yingxiang, E-mail: du_yingxiang@126.co [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, No. 24, Tongjiaxiang, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China) and Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Chen Jianqiu [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Kou Junping; Yu Boyang [Department of Complex Prescription of TCM, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2009-08-15

    Titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as an important kind of biomaterials. The interaction between TiO{sub 2} (P25) at 20 nm in diameter and human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy in this work. Under the simulative physiological conditions, fluorescence data revealed the presence of a single class of binding site on HSA and its binding constants (K{sub a}) were 2.18+-0.04x10{sup 4}, 0.87+-0.05x10{sup 4}, 0.68+-0.06x10{sup 4} M{sup -1} at 298, 304 and 310 K, respectively. In addition, according to the Van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic functions standard enthalpy (DELTAH{sup 0}) and standard entropy (DELTAS{sup 0}) for the reaction were calculated to be -75.18+-0.15 kJ mol{sup -1} and -170.11+-0.38 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. These results indicated that TiO{sub 2} NPs bond to HSA mainly by van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding formation in low dielectric media, and the electrostatic interactions cannot be excluded. Furthermore, the effects of common ions on the binding constant of TiO{sub 2} NPs-HSA complex were discussed.

  19. Improved localization accuracy in stochastic super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by K-factor image deshadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Meiri, Amihai; Ebeling, Carl G; Menon, Rajesh; Gerton, Jordan M; Jorgensen, Erik M; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-12-16

    Localization of a single fluorescent particle with sub-diffraction-limit accuracy is a key merit in localization microscopy. Existing methods such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) achieve localization accuracies of single emitters that can reach an order of magnitude lower than the conventional resolving capabilities of optical microscopy. However, these techniques require a sparse distribution of simultaneously activated fluorophores in the field of view, resulting in larger time needed for the construction of the full image. In this paper we present the use of a nonlinear image decomposition algorithm termed K-factor, which reduces an image into a nonlinear set of contrast-ordered decompositions whose joint product reassembles the original image. The K-factor technique, when implemented on raw data prior to localization, can improve the localization accuracy of standard existing methods, and also enable the localization of overlapping particles, allowing the use of increased fluorophore activation density, and thereby increased data collection speed. Numerical simulations of fluorescence data with random probe positions, and especially at high densities of activated fluorophores, demonstrate an improvement of up to 85% in the localization precision compared to single fitting techniques. Implementing the proposed concept on experimental data of cellular structures yielded a 37% improvement in resolution for the same super-resolution image acquisition time, and a decrease of 42% in the collection time of super-resolution data with the same resolution.

  20. Tracking molecular dynamics without tracking: image correlation of photo-activation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandžić, Elvis; Rossy, Jérémie; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-03-01

    Measuring protein dynamics in the plasma membrane can provide insights into the mechanisms of receptor signaling and other cellular functions. To quantify protein dynamics on the single molecule level over the entire cell surface, sophisticated approaches such as single particle tracking (SPT), photo-activation localization microscopy (PALM) and fluctuation-based analysis have been developed. However, analyzing molecular dynamics of fluorescent particles with intermittent excitation and low signal-to-noise ratio present at high densities has remained a challenge. We overcame this problem by applying spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) analysis to photo-activated (PA) microscopy time series. In order to determine under which imaging conditions this approach is valid, we simulated PA images of diffusing particles in a homogeneous environment and varied photo-activation, reversible blinking and irreversible photo-bleaching rates. Further, we simulated data with high particle densities that populated mobile objects (such as adhesions and vesicles) that often interfere with STICS and fluctuation-based analysis. We demonstrated in experimental measurements that the diffusion coefficient of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) fused to PAGFP in live COS-7 cells can be determined in the plasma membrane and revealed differences in the time-dependent diffusion maps between wild-type and mutant Lck in activated T cells. In summary, we have developed a new analysis approach for live cell photo-activation microscopy data based on image correlation spectroscopy to quantify the spatio-temporal dynamics of single proteins.

  1. Conjugates of a photoactivated rhodamine with biopolymers for cell staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N; Solovyeva, Daria O; Solovyeva, Valeria V; Rizvanov, Albert A

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan ("Chitosan-PFD") and histone H1 ("Histone H1.3-PFD"). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes ("caged" dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized "Chitosan-PFD" and "Histone H1-PFD" have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  2. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, Sergei Yu.; Shaposhnikov, Mikhail N.; Solovyeva, Daria O.; Solovyeva, Valeria V.; Rizvanov, Albert A.

    2014-01-01

    Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids) are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD) has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD”) and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”). The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK). Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes) for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy. PMID:25383365

  3. Conjugates of a Photoactivated Rhodamine with Biopolymers for Cell Staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei Yu. Zaitsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Conjugates of the photoactivated rhodamine dyes with biopolymers (proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids are important tools for microscopic investigation of biological tissue. In this study, a precursor of the photoactivated fluorescent dye (PFD has been successfully used for staining of numerous mammalian cells lines and for conjugate formation with chitosan (“Chitosan-PFD” and histone H1 (“Histone H1.3-PFD”. The intensive fluorescence has been observed after photoactivation of these conjugates inside cells (A431, HaCaT, HEK239, HBL-100, and MDCK. Developed procedures and obtained data are important for further application of novel precursors of fluorescent dyes (“caged” dyes for microscopic probing of biological objects. Thus, the synthesized “Chitosan-PFD” and “Histone H1-PFD” have been successfully applied in this study for intracellular transport visualization by fluorescent microscopy.

  4. Fluorescence bronchoscope for lung tumor localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profio, A.E. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara); Doiron, D.R.; Huth, G.C.

    1977-02-01

    A fluorescence bronchoscope has been developed for localization of small bronchogenic tumors at the carcinoma in situ stage. Injected hematoporphyrin-derivative is preferentially taken up or retained by a malignant tumor, and very small amounts can be detected by the red fluorescence under excitation by violet light. The target lesion is 80 ..mu..m thick, with a mass of 250 ..mu..g, containing 250 pg of hematoporphyrin-derivative. A fiberoptic bronchoscope system with a 200W high pressure mercury arc lamp, primary filter passing 405 nm light, special violet transmitting light conductor, coherent imaging bundle, red secondary filter, and three-stage electrostatic focus image intensifier tube was designed for this application. Tumors have been visualized in animals and preparations for clinical use are underway.

  5. State space approach to single molecule localization in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid, Milad R; Chao, Jerry; Kim, Dongyoung; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2017-03-01

    Single molecule super-resolution microscopy enables imaging at sub-diffraction-limit resolution by producing images of subsets of stochastically photoactivated fluorophores over a sequence of frames. In each frame of the sequence, the fluorophores are accurately localized, and the estimated locations are used to construct a high-resolution image of the cellular structures labeled by the fluorophores. Many methods have been developed for localizing fluorophores from the images. The majority of these methods comprise two separate steps: detection and estimation. In the detection step, fluorophores are identified. In the estimation step, the locations of the identified fluorophores are estimated through an iterative approach. Here, we propose a non-iterative state space-based localization method which combines the detection and estimation steps. We demonstrate that the estimated locations obtained from the proposed method can be used as initial conditions in an estimation routine to potentially obtain improved location estimates. The proposed method models the given image as the frequency response of a multi-order system obtained with a balanced state space realization algorithm based on the singular value decomposition of a Hankel matrix. The locations of the poles of the resulting system determine the peak locations in the frequency domain, and the locations of the most significant peaks correspond to the single molecule locations in the original image. The performance of the method is validated using both simulated and experimental data.

  6. Micro mirror arrays as high-resolution spatial light modulators for photoactivation and optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, F.; Kielhorn, Martin; Tinevez, J.-Y.; Heber, J.; Heintzmann, R.; Shorte, S.

    2013-03-01

    The ability to control the illumination and imaging paths of optical microscopes is an essential part of advanced fluorescence microscopy, and a powerful tool for optogenetics. In order to maximize the visualization and the image quality of the objects under observation we use programmable, fast Micro Mirror Arrays (MMAs) as high-resolution Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs). Using two 256x256 MMAs in a mirror-based illumination setup allows for fast angular-spatial control at a wide range of wavelengths (300-1000nm). Additionally, the illumination intensity can be controlled at 10-bit resolution. The setup allows selective illumination of subcellular regions of interest enabling the precise, localized activation of fluorescent probes and the activation and deactivation of subcellular and cellular signaling cascades using photo-activated ion-channels. Furthermore, inasmuch as phototoxicity is dependent on the rate of photo illumination [1] we show that our system, which provides fast, compartmentalized illumination is minimally phototoxic.

  7. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  8. Photoactivation and optogenetics with micro mirror enhanced illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückerl, F.; Berndt, D.; Heber, J.; Shorte, S.

    2014-05-01

    Photoactivation and "optogenetics" require the precise control of the illumination path in optical microscopes. It is equally important to shape the illumination spatially as well as to have control over the intensity and the duration of the illumination. In order to achieve these goals we use programmable, diffractive Micro Mirror Arrays (MMA) as fast spatial light modulators for beam steering. By combining two MMAs with 256×256 mirrors each, our illumination setup allows for fast angular and spatial control at a wide spectral range (260-1000 nm). Illumination pulses can be as short as 50 μs, or can also extend to several seconds. The specific illumination modes of the individual areas results in a precise control over the light dose to the sample, giving significant advantage when investigating dosage dependent activation inasmuch as both the duration and the intensity can be controlled distinctly. The setup is integrated to a microscope and allows selective illumination of regions in the sample, enabling the precise, localized activation of fluorescent probes and the activation and deactivation of cellular and subcellular signaling cascades using photo activated ion channels. The high reflectivity in the UV range (up to 260nm) further allows gene silencing using UV activated constructs (e.g. caged morpholinos).

  9. Low-energy photon scattering and photoactivation experiments: selected recent results from the Stuttgart Dynamitron facility

    CERN Document Server

    Kneiss, U

    2002-01-01

    Photon scattering off bound nuclear states (nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF)) and photoactivation of long-lived isomers are complementary to one another and share the principal advantage of a well-known reaction mechanism. The experimental progress achieved during the last years allows nowadays experiments of tremendously increased sensitivity opening new fields of applications. In the present lecture recent results are summarized from experiments performed at the well-established Bremsstrahlung photon scattering and photoactivation facilities of the 4.3 MV Stuttgart Dynamitron accelerator. Three current topics are discussed in details: The systematics of E1 two-phonon excitations of the type (2 sup + x 3 sup -) in nuclei near shell closures; the first observation of a population inversion of nuclear states, the precondition for a possible gamma-laser, by feeding from higher-lying photo-excited states (NRF experiments on sup 1 sup 0 sup 3 Rh); and the photoactivation of long-lived isomers. Here first resu...

  10. Local excitation and collection in polymeric fluorescent microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrique, Franciele Renata; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2016-04-01

    Integrated photonics has gained attention in recent years due to its wide range of applications which span from biology to optical communications. The use of polymer-based platforms for photonic devices is of great interest because organic compounds can be easily incorporated to polymers, enabling modifications to the system physical properties. The two-photon polymerization technique has emerged as an interesting tool for the production of three-dimensional polymeric microstructures. However, for their further incorporation in photonic devices it is necessary to develop methods to perform optical excitation and signal collection on such microstructures. With such purpose, we demonstrate approaches to perform local excitation and collection in polymeric microstructures doped with fluorescent dyes, employing tapered fibers. The obtained results indicate that fiber tapers are suitable to couple light in and out of fluorescent polymeric microstructures, paving the way for their incorporation in photonic devices. We also show that microstructures doped with more than one dye can be used as built-in broadband light sources to photonic circuits and their emission spectrum can be tuned by the right choice of the excitation position.

  11. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Henrik Krarup; Garcia, Javier; Væth, Michael; Schlafer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes) were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  12. Five Degree of Freedom Fluorescence Localization of Ellipsoidal Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeyink, Craig; Islam, Md. Anisul; Christopher, Gordon

    2016-11-01

    Symmetry breaking non-spherical particles can exhibit unique behavior when self-assembling due to increased degrees of freedom. For example, ellipsoidal particles on a fluid interface exhibit mesostructures that are dependent upon the both the contact angle of the ellipsoidal particle as well as the orientation. However, measuring the three dimensional position and orientation of these particles can be challenging. Here we present preliminary results on five degree of freedom fluorescence measurements of ellipsoidal particles on a fluid interface. Using the Bessel Beam Microscopy system and a novel compressed sensing based image analysis algorithm we will demonstrate 3D localization of ellipsoidal particles with 50 nm accuracy as well as pitch and yaw measurements with a resolution of 10 and 1 degrees respectively. We will discuss the technique as well as its implications for our understanding of non-spherical particle interactions and assembly at interfaces. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1604398.

  13. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Krarup; Garcia, Javier; Væth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin...... as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available...... on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli...

  14. Does super-resolution fluorescence microscopy obsolete previous microscopic approaches to protein co-localization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Laura; Baldini, Giulia; Storrie, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, namely, the confocal microscope or deconvolution processes, are resolution limited to approximately 200-250 nm by the diffraction properties of light as developed by Ernst Abbe in 1873. This diffraction limit is appreciably above the size of most multi-protein complexes, which are typically 20-50 nm in diameter. In the mid-2000s, biophysicists moved beyond the diffraction barrier by structuring the illumination pattern and then applying mathematical principles and algorithms to allow a resolution of approximately 100 nm, sufficient to address protein subcellular co-localization questions. This "breaking" of the diffraction barrier, affording resolution beyond 200 nm, is termed super-resolution microscopy. More recent approaches include single-molecule localization (such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM)/stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM)) and point spread function engineering (such as stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy). In this review, we explain basic principles behind currently commercialized super-resolution setups and address advantages and considerations in applying these techniques to protein co-localization in biological systems.

  15. Planar bilayer membranes from photoactivable phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borle, F; Sänger, M; Sigrist, H

    1991-07-22

    Planar bilayer membranes formed from photoactivable phospholipids have been characterized by low frequency voltametry. Cyclic voltametric measurements were applied for simultaneous registration of planar membrane conductivity and capacitance. The procedure has been utilized to characterize the formation and stability of planar bilayer membranes. Bilayer membranes were formed from N'-(1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethyl)-N-((m-3- trifluoromethyldiazirine)phenyl)thiourea (C14-PED), a head-group photosensitive phospholipid. In situ photoactivation of C14-PED at wavelengths greater than or equal to 320 nm altered neither the mean conductivity nor the capacitance of the bilayer. Ionophore (valinomycin) and ion channel (gramicidin) activities were not impaired upon photoactivation. In contrast, bilayer membranes formed from 1,2-bis(hexadeca-2,4-dienoyl)-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (C16-DENPC) revealed short life times. In situ photopolymerization of the diene fatty acids significantly increased the membrane conductivity or led to membrane rupture.

  16. FRET-Based Localization of Fluorescent Protein Insertions Within the Ryanodine Receptor Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Raina, Shweta A.; Jeffrey Tsai; Montserrat Samsó; Fessenden, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM) maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP) inse...

  17. Observation of intracellular interactions between DNA origami and lysosomes by the fluorescence localization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Meifang; Dai, Luru; Jiang, Qiao; Tang, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaoming; Ding, Baoquan; Li, Junbai

    2016-07-28

    We obtained the fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures in NIH 3T3 cells for the first time. The fluorescence localization images of tube DNA origami nanostructures and TIRF images of lysosomes were combined and they revealed the detailed interactions between the two structures. Quantitative analysis illustrated that the tube origami can be captured as well as degraded by lysosomes with time.

  18. Local blood flow measured by fluorescence excitation of nonradioactive microspheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Y.; Payne, B.D.; Aldea, G.S.; McWatters, C.; Husseini, W.; Mori, H.; Hoffman, J.I.; Kaufman, L. (Univ. of California, San Francisco (USA))

    1990-05-01

    An X-ray fluorescence system with low Compton background and high counting efficiency was developed to measure regional blood flow with nonradioactive microspheres. The performance of the system was tested in vitro by counting mixed aqueous solutions of either Mo, Ag, and I; Nb, Ag, and Ba; or Zr, Mo, Rh, Ag, Sn, I, and Ba, as well as a mixture of Ag and Ba nonradioactive microspheres. Mixtures containing 2-20 ppm of each element were counted for 10 min by the fluorescence system, and the individual elements in mixtures of three to seven nonradioactive elements were measured with high accuracy. The best counting statistics were obtained for Ag. For 10-min counts, the system measures as few as 120 Ag microspheres with 30% standard deviation but measures 800 Ag microspheres per sample with 3.6% standard deviation. We compared regional myocardial blood flows determined simultaneously by fluorescence and radioactive microsphere methods; the latter samples were counted by a 3-in. NaI (Tl) well detector and pulse-height analyzer. The radioactive and nonradioactive measurements showed good correlations.

  19. Laser fluorescence bronchoscope for localization of occult lung tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Profio, A.E.; Doiron, D.R.; King, E.G.

    1979-11-01

    A system for imaging occult bronchogenic carcinoma by the fluorescence of previously-injected, tumor-specific compound hematoporphyrin-derivative has been assembled and successfully used to locate a tumor l mm thick. The violet excitation source is a krypton ion laser coupled to fused quartz fiber light conductor. An electrostatic image intensifier attached to a standard flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope provides a bright image even at relatively low irradiance. A red secondary filter rejects most reflected background and autofluorescence. Sensitivity and contrast capability of the system should permit detection of a tumor less than 0.1 mm thick.

  20. Comparison of Riboflavin and Toluidine Blue O as Photosensitizers for Photoactivated Disinfection on Endodontic and Periodontal Pathogens In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Krarup Nielsen

    Full Text Available Photoactivated disinfection has a strong local antimicrobial effect. In the field of dentistry it is an emerging adjunct to mechanical debridement during endodontic and periodontal treatment. In the present study, we investigate the effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin as a photosensitizer and blue LED light for activation, and compare it to photoactivated disinfection with the widely used combination of toluidine blue O and red light. Riboflavin is highly biocompatible and can be activated with LED lamps at hand in the dental office. To date, no reports are available on the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection using riboflavin/blue light on oral microorganisms. Planktonic cultures of eight organisms frequently isolated from periodontal and/or endodontic lesions (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherischia coli, Lactobacillus paracasei, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Propionibacterium acnes were subjected to photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light and toluidine blue O/red light, and survival rates were determined by CFU counts. Within the limited irradiation time of one minute, photoactivated disinfection with riboflavin/blue light only resulted in minor reductions in CFU counts, whereas full kills were achieved for all organisms when using toluidine blue O/red light. The black pigmented anaerobes P. gingivalis and P. intermedia were eradicated completely by riboflavin/blue light, but also by blue light treatment alone, suggesting that endogenous chromophores acted as photosensitizers in these bacteria. On the basis of our results, riboflavin cannot be recommended as a photosensitizer used for photoactivated disinfection of periodontal or endodontic infections.

  1. Studies on the photoactivation of two cytotoxic trans,trans,trans-diazidodiaminodihydroxo-Pt(IV) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westendorf, Aron F; Bodtke, Anja; Bednarski, Patrick J

    2011-05-21

    Light-activation of metal ion complexes to cytotoxic species is of interest due to the potential use in anticancer therapy. Two platinum complexes, trans,trans,trans-[Pt(IV)(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(NH(3))(2)] (3) and trans,trans,trans-[Pt(IV)(N(3))(2)(OH)(2)(py)(NH(3))] (4) were irradiated with either UV (λ = 366 nm) or white fluorescent light and the various photochemical and photobiological phenomena were characterized. HPLC coupled to UV/Vis and MS detection was used to identify photochemical species resulting from irradiation of 4 with UV and white light. These studies showed that various Pt(IV) and Pt(II) products formed during the photolysis. The mass spectra of Pt(IV) complexes showed Pt ions in both the positive as well as the negative mode while Pt(II) complexes resulted in only positively charged Pt(III) ions. Since cellular DNA is considered to be a key target for platinum antitumor drugs, the irreversible platination of calf thymus DNA by the photoactivated Pt(IV) complexes was followed by Atomic Adsorption spectrometry (AAS). The effect of adding chloride or biological reducing agents glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid on the rates of DNA platination where also studied. Upon activation by light, both compounds show similar binding behaviour to DNA, but the rates of DNA platination for 3 were faster than for 4. Both chloride and GSH protected DNA from platination by the photoactivated compounds; consistent with the trapping of reactive aqua-Pt species. The presence of ascorbate increased the level of platinum bound to DNA for photoactivated 4 but not for 3. Without photoactivation, little or no DNA platination was observed, either with or without ascorbate or GSH. Cytotoxicity studies with two human cancer cell lines underline the photochemotherapeutic potential of these compounds. Striking is the increase in cytotoxic potency with the replacement of an ammine by a pyridine ligand.

  2. The influence of local pressure on evaluation parameters of skin blood perfusion and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsov, E. A.; Kandurova, K. Y.; Seryogina, E. S.; Kozlov, I. O.; Dremin, V. V.; Zherebtsova, A. I.; Dunaev, A. V.; Meglinski, I.

    2017-03-01

    This article presents the results of the study of the pressure applied on optical diagnostic probes as a significant factor affecting the results of measurements. During stepwise increasing and decreasing of local pressure on skin we conducted measurements using the methods of laser Doppler flowmetry and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found out that pressure on optical probe has sufficient impact on skin microcirculation to affect registered fluorescence intensity. Data obtained in this study are of interest for design and development of diagnostic technologies for wearable devices. This data will also inform further investigation into issues of compensation of blood absorption influence on fluorescence spectrum, allowing increased accuracy and reproducibility of measurements by fluorescence spectroscopy methods in optical diagnosis.

  3. Dual-Utility of Digital Holography & Epi-Fluorescence to Localize Cellular Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Eric

    Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM) and Epi-Fluorescence have been combined for biological imaging. DHM is a non-invasive phase contrast microscopy technique that provides quantitative information such as the variations in refractive index and physical height. 3D physical height and refractive index profiles are imaged for HEK293 and CHO cells. These values and profiles are compared with known values for the sample gathered from literature and other microscopy techniques, including Scanning Electron Microscopy. The measured CHO cellular length is (15.31 +/- 2.60) microm. Localization of cellular nuclei is performed using the Epi-Fluorescence setup and the DNA specific fluorophore DAPI. The fluorescence intensity profile was imaged, where nuclei shape, size, and localization are compared using an A.1 Zeiss Fluorescence Microscope. The CHO cells are comparable with apoptotic cells, where the measured nucleus length is (10.91 +/- 2.27) microm. DHM and Epi-Fluorescence are combined to analyze the physical heights of the cell as well as localize its nucleus. The combination of these techniques are greatly advantageous to understand cellular functions and variability.

  4. A dark-field scanning spectroscopy platform for localized scatter and fluorescence imaging of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Laughney, Ashley M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Tissue ultra-structure and molecular composition provide native contrast mechanisms for discriminating across pathologically distinct tissue-types. Multi-modality optical probe designs combined with spatially confined sampling techniques have been shown to be sensitive to this type of contrast but their extension to imaging has only been realized recently. A modular scanning spectroscopy platform has been developed to allow imaging localized morphology and molecular contrast measures in breast cancer surgical specimens. A custom designed dark-field telecentric scanning spectroscopy system forms the core of this imaging platform. The system allows imaging localized elastic scatter and fluorescence measures over fields of up to 15 mm x 15 mm at 100 microns resolution in tissue. Results from intralipid and blood phantom measurements demonstrate the ability of the system to quantify localized scatter parameters despite significant changes in local absorption. A co-registered fluorescence spectroscopy mode is also demonstrated in a protophorphyrin-IX phantom.

  5. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Bronchoscopy for Detection and Localization of Early Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Shusen; LI Buhong; LI Hui; ZHENG Wei; LU Zukang

    2001-01-01

    Experimenatal results on the development of a Laser-Induced Fluorescence Bronchoscopy(LIFB) for the detection and localization of early lung cancer are reported in this paper. The system utilizes fluorescence of photosensitizer drug to provide real time video imaging for the examined lung tissue. Color filters are used to differentiate signal from background and a computer image processing technique is also applied to subtract the background. Moreover, a pseudocolor contrast enhancement method was developed to enhance the fluorescence image displayed on the vidio monitor. Suspicious areas are identified by pseudocolor image to guide biopsy, and several clinical trials show that sensitivity and contrast capability of the system should permit the detection and localization of early lung cancer.

  6. A non-Gaussian distribution quantifies distances measured with fluorescence localization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchman, L.S.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Spudich, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    When single-molecule fluorescence localization techniques are pushed to their lower limits in attempts to measure ever-shorter distances, measurement errors become important to understand. Here we describe the non-Gaussian distribution of measured distances that is the key to proper interpretation...

  7. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until "bleached". This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes.

  8. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until “bleached”. This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes. PMID:25482122

  9. Single-molecule analysis of fluorescent carbon dots towards localization-based super-resolution microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Navneet C.; Khan, Syamantak; Nandi, Chayan K.

    2016-12-01

    The advancement of high-resolution bioimaging has always been dependent on the discovery of bright and easily available fluorescent probes. Fluorescent carbon nanodots, an interesting class of relatively new nanomaterials, have emerged as a versatile alternative due to their superior optical properties, non-toxicity, cell penetrability and easy routes to synthesis. Although a plethora of reports is available on bioimaging using carbon dots, single-molecule-based super-resolution imaging is rare in the literature. In this study, we have systematically characterized the single-molecule fluorescence of three carbon dots and compared them with a standard fluorescent probe. Each of these carbon dots showed a long-lived dark state in the presence of an electron acceptor. The electron transfer mechanism was investigated in single-molecule as well as in ensemble experiments. The average on-off rate between the fluorescent bright and dark states, which is one of the important parameters for single-molecule localization-based super-resolution microscopy, was measured by changing the laser power. We report that the photon budget and on-off rate of these carbon dots were good enough to achieve single-molecule localization with a precision of ~35 nm.

  10. Digital Holographic Tomography and Fluorescence Used to Localize sGC in HEK293 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldrake, Eric; Mann, Christopher; Gage, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Digital Holographic Tomography (DHT) is used to analyze and localize the intracellular protein soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. DHT is a non-invasive phase microscopy technique that provides three dimensional quantitative information of HEK293 cells including variance of index of refraction or physical thickness. A fluorescence component will be added to the microscope to further studies of sGC localization. The signaling pathway including nitric oxide (NO) and sGC is studied and has been linked to various cardiovascular diseases, platelet aggregation, and variations in blood pressure via vasodilation. sGC will be labeled using a fluorescent antibody and analyzed using the DHT microscope. DHT will be used to analyze changes in sGC localization in its natural environment and when stimulated by NO. An understanding of how sGC interacts with its surroundings is vital to further research in cardiovascular disease.

  11. Low-frequency phased-array 2D fluorescence localization in breast cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yu; Chance, Britton; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    A method for rapid, non-invasive 2D fluorescence localization of breast cancer using low frequency phased array near-infrared technique is presented in this article. In our study, we have developed a dual-channel fluorescence detection system to locate breast cancer. This system consists two pair of in-phase and out-of-phase light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light sources and Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) as the detector. Two null planes generated by cancellation of diffusion photon density waves (DPDW) will indicate the 2D position of breast cancer with exogenous contrast agents. The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG) and the minimum amount of ICG detected by our system is 0.5 μM. With the 2 cm separation of sources and detector, the maximum depth our system can detect is 10 mm. The whole system is in compact size and portable. Phantom experiments show that the system can provide real time detection and localization of small hidden absorbing-fluorescent objects inside the highly scattering medium with high accuracy of +/-3 mm. The potential application is that it is low-cost and can be used for breast cancer localization as operation aid and self-examination.

  12. Local mobility of polymer chain grafted onto polyethylene monitored by fluorescence depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneda, Satoshi; Endo, Toshihiro; Saito, Kyoichi; Sugita, Kazuyuki; Horie, Kazuyuki; Yamashita, Takashi; Sugo, Takanobu

    1997-08-01

    The fluorescence depolarization method was used for investigating the local mobility of polymer chains grafted onto a porous polyethylene membrane. The real value of the rotational diffusion coefficient of a dansyl probe attached to the grafted polymer chain was obtained by using a correction method which eliminated the effect of multiple scattering on fluorescence anisotropy. The rotational mobility of the dansyl probe attached to the grafted polymer chain was sensitive to both degree of grafting and solvent polarity, which indicated that the conformation of the grafted polymer chain and the pore size of the base membrane strongly governed the dynamic parameters of the grafted polymer chain.

  13. Nanoscopic Visualization of Soft Matter Using Fluorescent Diarylethene Photoswitches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevskyi, Oleksii; Sysoiev, Dmytro; Oppermann, Alex; Huhn, Thomas; Wöll, Dominik

    2016-10-04

    The in situ imaging of soft matter is of paramount importance for a detailed understanding of functionality on the nanoscopic scale. Although super-resolution fluorescence microscopy methods with their unprecedented imaging capabilities have revolutionized research in the life sciences, this potential has been far less exploited in materials science. One of the main obstacles for a more universal application of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy methods is the limitation of readily available suitable dyes to overcome the diffraction limit. Here, we report a novel diarylethene-based photoswitch with a highly fluorescent closed and a nonfluorescent open form. Its photophysical properties, switching behavior, and high photostability make the dye an ideal candidate for photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM). It is capable of resolving apolar structures with an accuracy far beyond the diffraction limit of optical light in cylindrical micelles formed by amphiphilic block copolymers.

  14. Localization of GroEL determined by in vivo incorporation of a fluorescent amino acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Wang, Jiangyun; Brustad, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli cells, indicated colocalization with the cell division protein FtsZ at the cleavage furrow, while a second E. coli study of fixed cells indicated more even distribution throughout the cytoplasm. Here, for the first time, we have examined the spatial distribution of GroEL in living cells using......The molecular chaperone GroEL is required for bacterial growth under all conditions, mediating folding assistance, via its central cavity, to a diverse set of cytosolic proteins; yet the subcellular localization of GroEL remains unresolved. An earlier study, using antibody probing of fixed...... incorporation of a fluorescent unnatural amino acid into the chaperone. Fluorescence microscopy indicated that GroEL is diffusely distributed, both under normal and stress conditions. Importantly, the present procedure uses a small, fluorescent unnatural amino acid to visualize GroEL in vivo, avoiding...

  15. Excision of Nonpalpable Breast Cancer with Indocyanine Green Fluorescence-Guided Occult Lesion Localization (IFOLL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Fatih; Ozben, Volkan; Aytac, Erman; Yilmaz, Halit; Cercel, Ali; Celik, Varol

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently employed techniques for the localization of nonpalpable breast lesions suffer from various limitations. In this paper, we report on 2 patients in order to introduce an alternative technique, indocyanine green fluorescence-guided occult lesion localization (IFOLL), and determine its applicability for the surgical removal of this type of breast lesions. CASE REPORTS: Preoperatively, one of the patients had a needle biopsy-proven diagnosis of breast cancer, and the other one had suspicious findings for malignancy. Lesion localization was performed within 1 h before surgery under ultrasonography control by injecting 2 ml and 0.2 ml of indocyanine green into the lesion and its subcutaneous tissue projection, respectively. During surgery, the site of skin incision and the resection margins were identified by observing the area of indocyanine-derived fluorescence under the guidance of a near-infrared-sensitive camera. In both cases, the breast lesion was correctly localized, and the area of fluorescence corresponded well to the site of the lesions. Subsequent surgical excision was successful with no complications. On histopathologic examination, the surgical margins were found to be clear. CONCLUSION: IFOLL seems to be a technically applicable and clinically acceptable procedure for the removal of nonpalpable breast cancer.

  16. Fluorescence exclusion: A simple versatile technique to calculate cell volumes and local heights (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, A. Claude

    2017-02-01

    Understanding volume regulation during mitosis is technically challenging. Indeed, a very sensitive non invasive imaging over time scales ranging from seconds to hours and over large fields is required. Therefore, Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI) would be a perfect tool for such a project. However, because of asymmetric protein segregation during mitosis, an efficient separation of the refractive index and the height in the phase signal is required. Even though many strategies to make such a separation have been developed, they usually are difficult to implement, have poor sensitivity, or cannot be performed in living cells, or in a single shot. In this paper, we will discuss the use of a new technique called fluorescence exclusion to perform volume measurements. By coupling such technique with a simultaneous phase measurement, we were also able to recover the refractive index inside the cells. Fluorescence exclusion is a versatile and powerful technique that allows the volume measurement of many types of cells. A fluorescent dye, which cannot penetrate inside the cells, is mixed with the external medium in a confined environment. Therefore, the fluorescent signal depends on the inverse of the object's height. We could demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically that fluorescence exclusion can accurately measure cell volumes, even for cells much higher than the depth of focus of the objective. A local accurate height and RI measurement can also be obtained for smaller cells. We will also discuss the way to optimize the confinement of the observation chamber, either mechanically or optically.

  17. The accurate localization of fluorescent nanoparticle Au–Ft in nu/nu mice kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Yang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Au–Ft, as a green synthesized nanoparticle, is composed of a ferritin nanocage enclosing a pair of Au nanoclusters inside. Our previous study has demonstrated that Au–Ft can be an excellent fluorescent probe for whole body imaging of mice with kidney specific targeting. But, the accurate localization of Au–Ft in kidney is still absent. In the current study, we detected and assessed the cellular and subcellular localization of Au–Ft in renal cortex and medulla of nu/nu mice after tail vein injection by using Nuance optical system (CRi, Woburn, USA and inForm intelligent image analysis software based on single cell segmentation. We obtained the fluorescence intensity and cellular location of kidney-targeting Au–Ft probe in particular cell of renal glomerulus or renal tubules, which provided valuable proofs to clarify the mechanism of Au–Ft selective enrichment in kidney and the associated metabolic processes.

  18. Enhanced-locality fiber-optic two-photon-fluorescence live-brain interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Anokhin, K. V. [Kurchatov Institute National Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); P.K. Anokhin Institute of Normal Physiology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kilin, S. Ya. [B.I. Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus); Sakoda, K. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Zheltikov, A. M. [International Laser Center, Physics Department, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119992 (Russian Federation); Russian Quantum Center, ul. Novaya 100, Skolkovo, Moscow Region 1430125 (Russian Federation); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Center of Photochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Novatorov 7a, Moscow 117421 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-24

    Two-photon excitation is shown to substantially enhance the locality of fiber-based optical interrogation of strongly scattering biotissues. In our experiments, a high-numerical-aperture, large-core-are fiber probe is used to deliver the 200-fs output of a 100-MHz mode-locked ytterbium fiber laser to samples of live mouse brain, induce two-photon fluorescence of nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond markers in brain sample. Fiber probes with a high numerical aperture and a large core area are shown to enable locality enhancement in fiber-laser–fiber-probe two-photon brain excitation and interrogation without sacrificing the efficiency of fluorescence response collection.

  19. Effect of photoactivation on the reduction of composite resin contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauletti, Natalia A; Girotto, Luiza P S; Leite, Françoise H S; Mario, Débora N

    2017-06-01

    Composite resins are predominantly marketed in developing countries in tube form, and the contents of the tube may be used in numerous procedures for different patients. This represents a problem because of the risk of cross-contamination. This study aimed to evaluate contamination in vitro of the internal contents of composite resin tubes in the dental clinics of a higher-education institution, as well as the effect of photoactivation on the level of contamination. Twenty-five tubes containing composite resin were randomly chosen (by lottery). From each tube, two samples of approximately 2 mm of composite resin were removed, and then one sample, but not the other, was photoactivated. These samples were plated on Brain-Heart Infusion (BHI), Sabouraud and MacConkey agars, and the plates were incubated at 37°C for 24-48 h. Colony counting and Gram staining were performed for subsequent microscopic identification of fungi and bacteria. The non-photoactivated composite resin group presented significantly higher microbial contamination in relation to the photoactivated composite resin group. The photoactivation of camphorquinone present in composite resin produces reactive oxygen species, which might promote cell death of contaminant microorganisms. Thus, although the same tube of composite resin may be used for a number of different patients in the dental clinics of developing countries, the photoactivation process potentially reduces the risk of cross-contamination. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. PRODUCTION OF PROTEASE AND UREASE BY KEROSENE UTILIZING FLUORESCENT PSEUDOMONADS ISOLATED FROM LOCAL RED LATIRITE SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    V.Umamaheswara Rao; N. JYOTHI

    2013-01-01

    The present work relates to a simple, safe, and efficient process for the complete utilization of kerosene usingfluorescent pseudomonads. Fluorescent pseudomonads used in this study were isolated from local red soilcollected at Acharya Nagarjuna University Campus, Guntur Dt., (AP) India. The isolates were identified asPseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas aureofaciens, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens onthe basis of biochemical characteristics. The isolates were screened for their...

  1. A set of enhanced green fluorescent protein concatemers for quantitative determination of nuclear localization signal strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Jennifer; Thavaraja, Ramya; Giehler, Susanne; Nalaskowski, Marcus M

    2017-09-15

    Regulated transport of proteins between nucleus and cytoplasm is an important process in the eukaryotic cell. In most cases, active nucleo-cytoplasmic protein transport is mediated by nuclear localization signal (NLS) and/or nuclear export signal (NES) motifs. In this study, we developed a set of vectors expressing enhanced GFP (EGFP) concatemers ranging from 2 to 12 subunits (2xEGFP to 12xEGFP) for analysis of NLS strength. As shown by in gel GFP fluorescence analysis and αGFP Western blotting, EGFP concatemers are expressed as fluorescent full-length proteins in eukaryotic cells. As expected, nuclear localization of concatemeric EGFPs decreases with increasing molecular weight. By oligonucleotide ligation this set of EGFP concatemers can be easily fused to NLS motifs. After determination of intracellular localization of EGFP concatemers alone and fused to different NLS motifs we calculated the size of a hypothetic EGFP concatemer showing a defined distribution of EGFP fluorescence between nucleus and cytoplasm (n/c ratio = 2). Clear differences of the size of the hypothetic EGFP concatemer depending on the fused NLS motif were observed. Therefore, we propose to use the size of this hypothetic concatemer as quantitative indicator for comparing strength of different NLS motifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient and dynamic nuclear localization of green fluorescent protein via RNA binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira; Nakayama, Yusaku; Kinjo, Masataka, E-mail: kinjo@sci.hokudai.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Classical nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences have been used for artificial localization of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the nucleus as a positioning marker or for measurement of the nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling rate in living cells. However, the detailed mechanism of nuclear retention of GFP-NLS remains unclear. Here, we show that a candidate mechanism for the strong nuclear retention of GFP-NLS is via the RNA-binding ability of the NLS sequence. GFP tagged with a classical NLS derived from Simian virus 40 (GFP-NLS{sup SV40}) localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus, the nuclear subdomain in which ribosome biogenesis takes place. GFP-NLS{sup SV40} in the nucleolus was mobile, and intriguingly, the diffusion coefficient, which indicates the speed of diffusing molecules, was 1.5-fold slower than in the nucleoplasm. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) analysis showed that GFP-NLS{sup SV40} formed oligomers via RNA binding, the estimated molecular weight of which was larger than the limit for passive nuclear export into the cytoplasm. These findings suggest that the nuclear localization of GFP-NLS{sup SV40} likely results from oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. The analytical technique used here can be applied for elucidating the details of other nuclear localization mechanisms, including those of several types of nuclear proteins. In addition, GFP-NLS{sup SV40} can be used as an excellent marker for studying both the nucleoplasm and nucleolus in living cells. - Highlights: • Nuclear localization signal-tagged GFP (GFP-NLS) showed clear nuclear localization. • The GFP-NLS dynamically localized not only in the nucleoplasm, but also to the nucleolus. • The nuclear localization of GFP-NLS results from transient oligomerization mediated via RNA binding. • Our NLS-tagging procedure is ideal for use in artificial sequestration of proteins in the nucleus.

  3. Enhanced simulator software for image validation and interpretation for multimodal localization super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, Miklós; Sinkó, József; Gajdos, Tamás.; Novák, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Optical super-resolution techniques such as single molecule localization have become one of the most dynamically developed areas in optical microscopy. These techniques routinely provide images of fixed cells or tissues with sub-diffraction spatial resolution, and can even be applied for live cell imaging under appropriate circumstances. Localization techniques are based on the precise fitting of the point spread functions (PSF) to the measured images of stochastically excited, identical fluorescent molecules. These techniques require controlling the rate between the on, off and the bleached states, keeping the number of active fluorescent molecules at an optimum value, so their diffraction limited images can be detected separately both spatially and temporally. Because of the numerous (and sometimes unknown) parameters, the imaging system can only be handled stochastically. For example, the rotation of the dye molecules obscures the polarization dependent PSF shape, and only an averaged distribution - typically estimated by a Gaussian function - is observed. TestSTORM software was developed to generate image stacks for traditional localization microscopes, where localization meant the precise determination of the spatial position of the molecules. However, additional optical properties (polarization, spectra, etc.) of the emitted photons can be used for further monitoring the chemical and physical properties (viscosity, pH, etc.) of the local environment. The image stack generating program was upgraded by several new features, such as: multicolour, polarization dependent PSF, built-in 3D visualization, structured background. These features make the program an ideal tool for optimizing the imaging and sample preparation conditions.

  4. A comparison of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators for imaging local Ca2+ signals in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jeffrey T.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Localized subcellular changes in Ca2+ serve as important cellular signaling elements, regulating processes as diverse as neuronal excitability and gene expression. Studies of cellular Ca2+ signaling have been greatly facilitated by the availability of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. The respective merits of different indicators to monitor bulk changes in cellular Ca2+ levels have been widely evaluated, but a comprehensive comparison for their use in detecting and analyzing local, subcellular Ca2+ signals is lacking. Here, we evaluated several fluorescent Ca2+ indicators in the context of local Ca2+ signals (puffs) evoked by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, using high-speed video-microscopy. Altogether, nine synthetic Ca2+ dyes (Fluo-4, Fluo-8, Fluo-8 high affinity, Fluo-8 low affinity, Oregon Green BAPTA-1, Cal-520, Rhod-4, Asante Calcium Red, and X-Rhod-1) and three genetically-encoded Ca2+-indicators (GCaMP6-slow, -medium and -fast variants) were tested; criteria include the magnitude, kinetics, signal-to-noise ratio and detection efficiency of local Ca2+ puffs. Among these, we conclude that Cal-520 is the optimal indicator for detecting and faithfully tracking local events; that Rhod-4 is the red-emitting indicator of choice; and that none of the GCaMP6 variants are well suited for imaging subcellular Ca2+ signals. PMID:26572560

  5. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta A Raina

    Full Text Available Fluorescent protein (FP insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1, a large intracellular Ca(2+ release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  6. FRET-based localization of fluorescent protein insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, Shweta A; Tsai, Jeffrey; Samsó, Montserrat; Fessenden, James D

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent protein (FP) insertions have often been used to localize primary structure elements in mid-resolution 3D cryo electron microscopic (EM) maps of large protein complexes. However, little is known as to the precise spatial relationship between the location of the fused FP and its insertion site within a larger protein. To gain insights into these structural considerations, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) measurements were used to localize green fluorescent protein (GFP) insertions within the ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1), a large intracellular Ca(2+) release channel that plays a key role in skeletal muscle excitation contraction coupling. A series of full-length His-tagged GFP-RyR1 fusion constructs were created, expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293T cells and then complexed with Cy3NTA, a His-tag specific FRET acceptor. FRET efficiency values measured from each GFP donor to Cy3NTA bound to each His tag acceptor site were converted into intermolecular distances and the positions of each inserted GFP were then triangulated relative to a previously published X-ray crystal structure of a 559 amino acid RyR1 fragment. We observed that the chromophoric centers of fluorescent proteins inserted into RyR1 can be located as far as 45 Å from their insertion sites and that the fused proteins can also be located in internal cavities within RyR1. These findings should prove useful in interpreting structural results obtained in cryo EM maps using fusions of small fluorescent proteins. More accurate point-to-point distance information may be obtained using complementary orthogonal labeling systems that rely on fluorescent probes that bind directly to amino acid side chains.

  7. Fluorescent Risedronate Analogues Reveal Bisphosphonate Uptake by Bone Marrow Monocytes and Localization Around Osteocytes In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Ebetino, Frank H; Lundy, Mark W; Henneman, Zachary J; Nancollas, George H; Sun, Shuting; Blazewska, Katarzyna M; Bala, Joy Lynn F; Kashemirov, Boris A; Khalid, Aysha B; McKenna, Charles E; Rogers, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are effective antiresorptive agents owing to their bone-targeting property and ability to inhibit osteoclasts. It remains unclear, however, whether any non-osteoclast cells are directly affected by these drugs in vivo. Two fluorescent risedronate analogues, carboxyfluorescein-labeled risedronate (FAM-RIS) and Alexa Fluor 647–labeled risedronate (AF647-RIS), were used to address this question. Twenty-four hours after injection into 3-month-old mice, fluorescent risedronate analogues were bound to bone surfaces. More detailed analysis revealed labeling of vascular channel walls within cortical bone. Furthermore, fluorescent risedronate analogues were present in osteocytic lacunae in close proximity to vascular channels and localized to the lacunae of newly embedded osteocytes close to the bone surface. Following injection into newborn rabbits, intracellular uptake of fluorescently labeled risedronate was detected in osteoclasts, and the active analogue FAM-RIS caused accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A in these cells. In addition, CD14high bone marrow monocytes showed relatively high levels of uptake of fluorescently labeled risedronate, which correlated with selective accumulation of unprenylated Rap1A in CD14+ cells, as well as osteoclasts, following treatment with risedronate in vivo. Similar results were obtained when either rabbit or human bone marrow cells were treated with fluorescent risedronate analogues in vitro. These findings suggest that the capacity of different cell types to endocytose bisphosphonate is a major determinant for the degree of cellular drug uptake in vitro as well as in vivo. In conclusion, this study shows that in addition to bone-resorbing osteoclasts, bisphosphonates may exert direct effects on bone marrow monocytes in vivo. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research PMID:20422624

  8. Localized surface plasmon-influenced fluorescence decay in dye-doped metallo-dielectric opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Dipak [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Vijaya, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Centre for Lasers and Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2016-01-14

    Well-ordered opaline photonic crystals are grown by inward growing self-assembly method from Rhodamine B dye-doped polystyrene colloids. Subsequent to self-assembly, the crystals are infiltrated with gold nanoparticles of 40 nm diameter. Measurements of the stopband features and photoluminescence intensity from these crystals are supplemented by fluorescence decay time analysis. The fluorescence decay times from the dye-doped photonic crystals before and after the infiltration are dramatically different from each other. A lowered fluorescence decay time was observed for the case of gold infiltrated crystal along with an enhanced emission intensity. Double-exponential decay nature of the fluorescence from the dye-doped crystal gets converted into single-exponential decay upon the infiltration of gold nanoparticles due to the resonant radiative process resulting from the overlap of the surface plasmon resonance with the emission spectrum. The influence of localized surface plasmon due to gold nanoparticles on the increase in emission intensity and decrease in decay time of the emitters is established.

  9. Light-sheet fluorescence imaging to localize cardiac lineage and protein distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yichen; Lee, Juhyun; Ma, Jianguo; Sung, Kevin; Yokota, Tomohiro; Singh, Neha; Dooraghi, Mojdeh; Abiri, Parinaz; Wang, Yibin; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Nguyen, Thao P.; Fei, Peng; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2017-02-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) serves to advance developmental research and regenerative medicine. Coupled with the paralleled advances in fluorescence-friendly tissue clearing technique, our cardiac LSFM enables dual-sided illumination to rapidly uncover the architecture of murine hearts over 10 by 10 by 10 mm3 in volume; thereby allowing for localizing progenitor differentiation to the cardiomyocyte lineage and AAV9-mediated expression of exogenous transmembrane potassium channels with high contrast and resolution. Without the steps of stitching image columns, pivoting the light-sheet and sectioning the heart mechanically, we establish a holistic strategy for 3-dimentional reconstruction of the “digital murine heart” to assess aberrant cardiac structures as well as the spatial distribution of the cardiac lineages in neonates and ion-channels in adults.

  10. Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Martens, Helle; Schulz, Alexander

    Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein.......Developmental changes in cytosolic coupling between epidermis cells as visualized by photoactivation of fluorescein....

  11. Applications of X-ray fluorescence holography to determine local lattice distortions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kouichi, E-mail: khayashi@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Happo, Naohisa [Graduate School of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shinya [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We summarized topics of X-ray fluorescence holography focused on the local lattice distortions. • We found details of behaviors of nearest neighbor atoms around dopants. • We found the average distributions of the atoms at the individual sites in mixed crystals. • Distorted and undistorted sires sometimes coexist in a same mixed crystal. - Abstract: X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a method for investigating atomic order up to the medium ranges, and can provide 3D atomic images around specific elements within a radius of nm order. In addition to these characteristics, XFH is sensitive to positional fluctuations of atoms, and therefore it is useful for characterizing the local lattice distortions around specific elements. We have applied XFH to dopants and mixed crystals. We found interesting features in local lattice distortions, such as the displacements of first-neighbor atoms around dopants, far-sighted views of the atomistic fluctuations in mixed crystals, and the coexistence of distorted/undistorted sites in the same material.

  12. 3D super-resolution imaging by localization microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Astrid; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is an important tool in all fields of biology to visualize structures and monitor dynamic processes and distributions. Contrary to conventional microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy, which are limited by their spatial resolution, super-resolution techniques such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) have made it possible to observe and quantify structure and processes on the single molecule level. Here, we describe a method to image and quantify the molecular distribution of membrane-associated proteins in two and three dimensions with nanometer resolution.

  13. Uptake and localization of fluorescent labelled gold nanoparticles in living zebrafish (Danio rerio) using Light Sheet Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Asmonaite, G.; Jolk, R.

    2015-01-01

    and localization of fluorescent labelled nanoparticles in living whole organisms with minimal sample preparation. Two strains of D. rerio (wildtype AB and transparent Casper) were exposed to 50 nm PEG coated gold nanoparticles (Au NP) synthesized with 1% of a fluorescent probe (FITC). The fish were exposed...... and determine localization on a whole organism level. Furthermore, methods used to identify nanoparticle uptake have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation including staining methods for electron microscopy.  This study used Fluorescent Light Sheet Microscopy (FLSM) to determine uptake...... the suitability for whole imaging of living organisms using FLSM....

  14. Quantitative generalized ratiometric fluorescence spectroscopy for turbid media based on probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xiu-Fang; Chen, Zeng-Ping, E-mail: zpchen2002@hotmail.com; Cui, Yin-Yin; Hu, Yuan-Liang; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2016-05-19

    PEBBLE (probe encapsulated by biologically localized embedding) nanosensor encapsulating an intensity-based fluorescence indicator and an inert reference fluorescence dye inside the pores of stable matrix can be used as a generalized wavelength-ratiometric probe. However, the lack of an efficient quantitative model render the choices of inert reference dyes and intensity-based fluorescence indicators used in PEBBLEs based generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes rather limited. In this contribution, an extended quantitative fluorescence model was derived specifically for generalized wavelength-ratiometric probes based on PEBBLE technique (QFM{sub GRP}) with a view to simplify the design of PEBBLEs and hence further extend their application potentials. The effectiveness of QFM{sub GRP} has been tested on the quantitative determination of free Ca{sup 2+} in both simulated and real turbid media using a Ca{sup 2+} sensitive PEBBLE nanosensor encapsulating Rhod-2 and eosin B inside the micropores of stable polyacrylamide matrix. Experimental results demonstrated that QFM{sub GRP} could realize precise and accurate quantification of free Ca{sup 2+} in turbid samples, even though there is serious overlapping between the fluorescence excitation peaks of eosin B and Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2. The average relative predictive error value of QFM{sub GRP} for the test simulated turbid samples was 5.9%, about 2–4 times lower than the corresponding values of partial least squares calibration model and the empirical ratiometric model based on the ratio of fluorescence intensities at the excitation peaks of Ca{sup 2+} bound Rhod-2 and eosin B. The recovery rates of QFM{sub GRP} for the real and spiked turbid samples varied from 93.1% to 101%, comparable to the corresponding results of atomic absorption spectrometry. - Highlights: • An advanced model was derived for generalized wavelength-ratiometric PEBBLEs. • The model can simplify the design of generalized wavelength

  15. Radiation induced chromatin conformation changes analysed by fluorescent localization microscopy, statistical physics, and graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Máté, Gabriell; Müller, Patrick; Hillebrandt, Sabina; Krufczik, Matthias; Bach, Margund; Kaufmann, Rainer; Hausmann, Michael; Heermann, Dieter W

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that the architecture of chromatin in cell nuclei is not random but functionally correlated. Chromatin damage caused by ionizing radiation raises complex repair machineries. This is accompanied by local chromatin rearrangements and structural changes which may for instance improve the accessibility of damaged sites for repair protein complexes. Using stably transfected HeLa cells expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) labelled histone H2B or yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) labelled histone H2A, we investigated the positioning of individual histone proteins in cell nuclei by means of high resolution localization microscopy (Spectral Position Determination Microscopy = SPDM). The cells were exposed to ionizing radiation of different doses and aliquots were fixed after different repair times for SPDM imaging. In addition to the repair dependent histone protein pattern, the positioning of antibodies specific for heterochromatin and euchromatin was separately recorded by SPDM. The present paper aims to provide a quantitative description of structural changes of chromatin after irradiation and during repair. It introduces a novel approach to analyse SPDM images by means of statistical physics and graph theory. The method is based on the calculation of the radial distribution functions as well as edge length distributions for graphs defined by a triangulation of the marker positions. The obtained results show that through the cell nucleus the different chromatin re-arrangements as detected by the fluorescent nucleosomal pattern average themselves. In contrast heterochromatic regions alone indicate a relaxation after radiation exposure and re-condensation during repair whereas euchromatin seemed to be unaffected or behave contrarily. SPDM in combination with the analysis techniques applied allows the systematic elucidation of chromatin re-arrangements after irradiation and during repair, if selected sub-regions of nuclei are

  16. A system for endoscopic mechanically scanned localized proton MR and light-induced fluorescence emission spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Ahmet E.; Webb, Andrew G.; Spees, William M.; Ozcan, Alpay; Tsekos, Nikolaos V.

    2012-09-01

    Molecular and near-cellular modalities offer new opportunities in assessing living tissue in situ, and multimodality approaches, which offer complementary information, may lead to improved characterization of tissue pathophysiology benefiting diagnosis and focal therapy. However, many such modalities are limited by their low penetration through tissue, which has led to minimally invasive trans-cannula approaches to place the corresponding sensors locally at the area of interest. This work presents a system for performing localized fluorescence emission and proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopies via endoscopic access. The in-house developed side-firing 1.9-mm wide dual-sensor integrates a three-fiber optical sensor for fluorescence emission optical spectroscopy and a 1-mm circular radiofrequency (RF) coil for localized MR proton spectroscopy. An MR-compatible manipulator was developed for carrying and mechanically translating the dual-sensor along a linear access channel. The hardware and software control of the system allows reconfigurable synchronization of the manipulator-assisted translation of the sensor, and MR and optical data collection. The manipulator serves as the mechanical link for the three modalities and MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra are inherently co-registered to the MR scanner coordinate system. These spectra were then used to generate spatio-spectral maps of the fluorophores and proton MR-signal sources in three-compartment phantoms with optically- and MR-visible, and distinguishable, materials. These data demonstrate a good spatial match between MR images, MR spectra and optical spectra along the scanned path. In addition to basic research, such a system may have clinical applications for assessing and characterizing cancer in situ, as well as guiding focal therapies.

  17. Genetically encoded fluorescent probe to visualize intracellular phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate localization and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Zhao, Mingkun; Tsang, Wai Lok; Zhang, Yanling; Yau, Richard Gar Wai; Weisman, Lois S; Xu, Haoxing

    2013-12-24

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PI(3,5)P2] is a low-abundance phosphoinositide presumed to be localized to endosomes and lysosomes, where it recruits cytoplasmic peripheral proteins and regulates endolysosome-localized membrane channel activity. Cells lacking PI(3,5)P2 exhibit lysosomal trafficking defects, and human mutations in the PI(3,5)P2-metabolizing enzymes cause lysosome-related diseases. The spatial and temporal dynamics of PI(3,5)P2, however, remain unclear due to the lack of a reliable detection method. Of the seven known phosphoinositides, only PI(3,5)P2 binds, in the low nanomolar range, to a cytoplasmic phosphoinositide-interacting domain (ML1N) to activate late endosome and lysosome (LEL)-localized transient receptor potential Mucolipin 1 (TRPML1) channels. Here, we report the generation and characterization of a PI(3,5)P2-specific probe, generated by the fusion of fluorescence tags to the tandem repeats of ML1N. The probe was mainly localized to the membranes of Lamp1-positive compartments, and the localization pattern was dynamically altered by either mutations in the probe, or by genetically or pharmacologically manipulating the cellular levels of PI(3,5)P2. Through the use of time-lapse live-cell imaging, we found that the localization of the PI(3,5)P2 probe was regulated by serum withdrawal/addition, undergoing rapid changes immediately before membrane fusion of two LELs. Our development of a PI(3,5)P2-specific probe may facilitate studies of both intracellular signal transduction and membrane trafficking in the endosomes and lysosomes.

  18. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, Jörg P.; Mogensen, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver...... quantum clusters are subsequently synthesized at the surface of the nanoparticles by photoactivation in presence of Ag+ cations in solution. The photogeneration of these silver quantum clusters leads to a great increase in the fluorescent signal. This photoactivated surface can then be used for sensing...... purposes. It was found, that in presence of a strong nucleophile (such as CN-), silver quantum clusters are dissolved into non-fluorescing AgCN complexes, resulting in a fast and observable decrease of the fluorescent signal....

  19. Localization and movement of mineral oil in plants by fluorescence and confocal microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, B L; Sarafis, V; Beattie, G A C; White, R; Darley, E M; Spooner-Hart, R

    2005-10-01

    Fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy were explored to investigate the movement and localization of mineral oils in citrus. In a laboratory experiment, fluorescence microscopy observation indicated that when a 'narrow' distillation fraction of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil was applied to adaxial and opposing abaxial leaf surfaces of potted orange [Citrus x aurantium L. (Sapindales: Rutaceae)] trees, oil penetrated steadily into treated leaves and, subsequently, moved to untreated petioles of the leaves and adjacent untreated stems. In another experiment, confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the penetration into, and the subsequent cellular distribution of, an nC24 agricultural mineral oil in C. trifoliata L. seedlings. Oil droplets penetrated or diffused into plants via both stomata and the cuticle of leaves and stems, and then moved within intercellular spaces and into various cells including phloem and xylem. Oil accumulated in droplets in intercellular spaces and within cells near the cell membrane. Oil entered cells without visibly damaging membranes or causing cell death. In a field experiment with mature orange trees, droplets of an nC23 horticultural mineral oil were observed, by fluorescence microscopy, in phloem sieve elements in spring flush growth produced 4-5 months and 16-17 months after the trees were sprayed with oil. These results suggest that movement of mineral oil in plants is both apoplastic via intercellular spaces and symplastic via plasmodesmata. The putative pattern of the translocation of mineral oil in plants and its relevance to oil-induced chronic phytotoxicity are discussed.

  20. LASER BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE: Combination of fluorescence imaging and local spectrophotometry in fluorescence diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Vladimir V.; Filonenko, E. V.; Telegina, L. V.; Boulgakova, N. N.; Smirnov, V. V.

    2002-11-01

    The results of comparative studies of autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX, used in the diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi, are presented. The autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence images of larynx and bronchial tissues are analysed during the endoscopic study. The method of local spectrophotometry is used to verify findings obtained from fluorescence images. It is shown that such a combined approach can be efficiently used to improve the diagnostics of precancer and early cancer, to detect a primary multiple tumours, as well as for the diagnostics of a residual tumour or an early recurrence after the endoscopic, surgery or X-ray treatment. The developed approach allows one to minimise the number of false-positive results and to reduce the number of biopsies, which are commonly used in the white-light bronchoscopy search for occult cancerous loci.

  1. Image thresholding techniques for localization of sub-resolution fluorescent biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaye, Julien; Kamat, Madhura Avinash; Corbino-Giunta, Linda; Silacci, Paolo; Vergères, Guy; De Micheli, Giovanni; Carrara, Sandro

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we explore adaptive global and local segmentation techniques for a lab-on-chip nutrition monitoring system (NutriChip). The experimental setup consists of Caco-2 intestinal cells that can be artificially stimulated to trigger an immune response. The eventual response is optically monitored using immunofluoresence techniques targeting toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Two problems of interest need to be addressed by means of image processing. First, a new cell sample must be properly classified as stimulated or not. Second, the location of the stained TLR2 must be recovered in case the sample has been stimulated. The algorithmic approach to solving these problems is based on the ability of a segmentation technique to properly segment fluorescent spots. The sample classification is based on the amount and intensity of the segmented pixels, while the various segmenting blobs provide an approximate localization of TLR2. A novel local thresholding algorithm and three well-known spot segmentation techniques are compared in this study. Quantitative assessment of these techniques based on real and synthesized data demonstrates the improved segmentation capabilities of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Local delivery of fluorescent dye for fiber-optics confocal microscopy of the living heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Kaza, Aditya K; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM) is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption, and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release vs. foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  3. Local Delivery of Fluorescent Dye For Fiber-Optics Confocal Microscopy of the Living Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao eHuang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optics confocal microscopy (FCM is an emerging imaging technology with various applications in basic research and clinical diagnosis. FCM allows for real-time in situ microscopy of tissue at sub-cellular scale. Recently FCM has been investigated for cardiac imaging, in particular, for discrimination of cardiac tissue during pediatric open-heart surgery. FCM relies on fluorescent dyes. The current clinical approach of dye delivery is based on systemic injection, which is associated with high dye consumption and adverse clinical events. In this study, we investigated approaches for local dye delivery during FCM imaging based on dye carriers attached to the imaging probe. Using three-dimensional confocal microscopy, automated bench tests, and FCM imaging we quantitatively characterized dye release of carriers composed of open-pore foam only and foam loaded with agarose hydrogel. In addition, we compared local dye delivery with a model of systemic dye delivery in the isolated perfused rodent heart. We measured the signal-to-noise ratio of images acquired in various regions of the heart. Our evaluations showed that foam-agarose dye carriers exhibited a prolonged dye release versus foam-only carriers. Foam-agarose dye carriers allowed reliable imaging of 5-9 lines, which is comparable to 4-8 min of continuous dye release. Our study in the living heart revealed that the SNR of FCM images using local and systemic dye delivery is not different. However, we observed differences in the imaged tissue microstructure with the two approaches. Structural features characteristic of microvasculature were solely observed for systemic dye delivery. Our findings suggest that local dye delivery approach for FCM imaging constitutes an important alternative to systemic dye delivery. We suggest that the approach for local dye delivery will facilitate clinical translation of FCM, for instance, for FCM imaging during pediatric heart surgery.

  4. Rapid Retinal Release from a Cone Visual Pigment Following Photoactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min-Hsuan; Kuemmel, Colleen; Birge, Robert R.; Knox, Barry E.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the visual cycle, the retinal chromophore in both rod and cone visual pigments undergoes reversible Schiff base hydrolysis and dissociation following photobleaching. We characterized light-activated retinal release from a short-wavelength sensitive cone pigment (VCOP) in 0.1% dodecyl maltoside using fluorescence spectroscopy. The half-time (t1/2) of retinal release from VCOP was 7.1 s, 250-fold faster than rhodopsin. VCOP exhibited pH-dependent release kinetics, with the t1/2 decreasing from 23 s to 4 s with pH 4.1 to 8, respectively. However, the Arrhenius activation energy (Ea) for VCOP derived from kinetic measurements between 4° and 20°C was 17.4 kcal/mol, similar to 18.5 kcal/mol for rhodopsin. There was a small kinetic isotope (D2O) effect in VCOP, but less than that observed in rhodopsin. Mutation of the primary Schiff base counterion (VCOPD108A) produced a pigment with an unprotonated chromophore (⌊max = 360 nm) and dramatically slowed (t1/2 ~ 6.8 min) light-dependent retinal release. Using homology modeling, a VCOP mutant with two substitutions (S85D/ D108A) was designed to move the counterion one alpha helical turn into the transmembrane region from the native position. This double mutant had a UV-visible absorption spectrum consistent with a protonated Schiff base (⌊max = 420 nm). Moreover, VCOPS85D/D108A mutant had retinal release kinetics (t1/2 = 7 s) and Ea (18 kcal/mol) similar to the native pigment exhibiting no pH-dependence. By contrast, the single mutant VCOPS85D had a ~3-fold decrease in retinal release rate compared to the native pigment. Photoactivated VCOPD108A had kinetics comparable to a rhodopsin counterion mutant, RhoE113Q, both requiring hydroxylamine to fully release retinal. These results demonstrate that the primary counterion of cone visual pigments is necessary for efficient Schiff base hydrolysis. We discuss how the large differences in retinal release rates between rod and cone visual pigments arise, not from

  5. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; PRAKASH, KIRTI; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA mino...

  6. Fluorescence Microscopy of Nanoscale Silver Oxide Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Xin-Yu; JIANG Hong-Bing; LIU Chun-Ling; GONG Qi-Huang; ZHANG Xi-Yao; ZHANG Qi-Feng; XU Bei-Xue; WU Jin-Lei

    2003-01-01

    The experimental conditions for photoactivated intermittent fluorescence from nanoscale silver oxide were studied with fluorescence microscopy. Strong fluorescence was observed from the Ag?O particles with size of 10-20nm excited with both blue and green light. We observed the saturation of photoexcitation with blue light and explained the experimental results using the model of agglomeration of silver atoms to form small clusters and the fluorescence of Ag2 and Ags clusters.

  7. Super-resolution Localization and Defocused Fluorescence Microscopy on Resonantly Coupled Single-Molecule, Single-Nanorod Hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Rocha, Susana; Orrit, Michel; Hofkens, Johan; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2016-02-23

    Optical antennas made of metallic nanostructures dramatically enhance single-molecule fluorescence to boost the detection sensitivity. Moreover, emission properties detected at the optical far field are dictated by the antenna. Here we study the emission from molecule-antenna hybrids by means of super-resolution localization and defocused imaging. Whereas gold nanorods make single-crystal violet molecules in the tip's vicinity visible in fluorescence, super-resolution localization on the enhanced molecular fluorescence reveals geometrical centers of the nanorod antenna instead. Furthermore, emission angular distributions of dyes linked to the nanorod surface resemble that of nanorods in defocused imaging. The experimental observations are consistent with numerical calculations using the finite-difference time-domain method.

  8. One- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy enabling the detection of localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeesters, L.; Meulebroeck, W.; Raeymaekers, S.; Thienpont, H.

    2016-04-01

    The presence of carcinogenic aflatoxins in food and feed products is a major worldwide problem. To date, the aflatoxin contamination can only be detected by the use of destructive sample-based chemical analyses. Therefore, we developed an optical setup able to detect the localized aflatoxin contamination in individual maize kernels, on the basis of one- and two- photon induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Our developed optical configuration comprises a tunable titanium-sapphire laser (710nm-830nm) in combination with second harmonic wavelength generation (355nm-415nm), enabling the measurement of both one- and two-photon induced fluorescence spectra. Moreover, an accurate scanning of the kernel's surface was induced by the use of automated translation stages, allowing to study the localized maize contamination. First, the operation of the setup is validated by the characterization of pure aflatoxin B1 powder. Second, the fluorescence spectra of healthy (maize kernels (>70ppb aflatoxin B1) were measured, after excitation with 365nm, 730nm, 750nm and 780nm. For both the one- and two- photon induced fluorescence processes, the presence of the aflatoxin inside the contaminated maize kernels influenced the intrinsic fluorescence signals. Based on the fluorescence spectrum between 400nm and 550nm, we defined a detection criterion to identify the contaminated maize kernels. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the localized contamination level, indicating both contaminated maize kernels with a high contamination level in a limited surface area (as small as 1mm2) as with a lower contamination spread over a large surface area (up to 20mm2). As a result, our developed measurement methodology allows the identification of the localized aflatoxin contamination, paving the way to the non-destructive, real-time and high-sensitive industrial scanning-based detection of aflatoxins in food products.

  9. Photoactivated Fuel Cells (PhotoFuelCells. An alternative source of renewable energy with environmental benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Sfaelou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a short review of Photoactivated Fuel Cells, that is, photoelectrochemical cells which consume an organic or inorganic fuel to produce renewable electricity or hydrogen. The work presents the basic features of photoactivated fuel cells, their modes of operation, the materials, which are frequently used for their construction and some ideas of cell design both for electricity and solar hydrogen production. Water splitting is treated as a special case of photoactivated fuel cell operation.

  10. Fluorescence imaging of local membrane electric fields during the excitation of single neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, P; Schmiedel-Jakob, I; Chitti, Y; Tyc-Dumont, S

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution of depolarized patches of membrane during the excitation of single neurons in culture has been recorded with a high spatial resolution (1 micron2/pixel) imaging system based on a liquid-nitrogen-cooled astronomical camera mounted on an inverted microscope. Images were captured from rat nodose neurons stained with the voltage-sensitive dye RH237. Conventional intracellular microelectrode recordings were made in synchrony with the images. During an action potential the fluorescence changes occurred in localized, unevenly distributed membrane areas, which formed clusters of depolarized sites of different sizes and intensities. When fast conductances were blocked by the addition of tetrodotoxin, a reduction in the number and the intensities of the depolarized sites was observed. The blockade by tetrodotoxin of voltage-clamped neurons also reduced the number of depolarized sites, although the same depolarizing voltage step was applied. Similarly, when a voltage-clamped neuron was depolarized by a constant-amplitude voltage step, the number of depolarized sites varied according to the degree of activation of the voltage-sensitive channels, which was modified by changing the holding potential. These results suggest that the spatial patterns of depolarization observed during excitation are related to the operations of ionic channels in the membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 PMID:8527643

  11. A two-photon laser induced fluorescence diagnostic with improved sensitivity, localization, and measurement rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary

    2016-10-01

    A two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic has been developed for measuring neutrals in fusion plasmas. Implementation of this diagnostic on the HIT-SI3 spheromak has demonstrated the sensitivity of the diagnostic and shown that measurements taken over several plasma pulses are possible. These measurements yielded an unexpected loss of signal when complex collection optics were utilized. Simulations show that this loss of signal can be explained by chromatic aberrations caused by the disparate Kr and D emission. This loss of signal has been addressed with the development of a new calibration scheme involving xenon gas. The Xe calibration scheme emission occurs at 656.00 nm while the deuterium emission is 656.09 nm. This nearly identical emission allows for advanced optical techniques such as confocal collection/injection and spatial filtering to be employed without loss of signal. Spatial filtering has been demonstrated to decrease noise while improving measurement localization, while confocal collection/injection allows for probing and measuring to occur through one viewport. The Xe scheme also allows for a Doppler-free hydrogen measurement. Doppler-free measurements eliminate the need to scan the laser spectrally thus greatly increasing the rate of measurement.

  12. Clustered localization of STAT3 during the cell cycle detected by super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Chen, Junling; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tong, Ti; Wang, Hongda

    2017-06-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and immune responses. In particular, STAT3 has emerged as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. The functional role and standard activation mechanism of STAT3 have been well studied, however, the spatial distribution of STAT3 during the cell cycle is poorly known. Therefore, it is indispensable to study STAT3 spatial arrangement and nuclear-cytoplasimic localization at the different phase of cell cycle in cancer cells. By direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy imaging, we find that STAT3 forms various number and size of clusters at the different cell-cycle stage, which could not be clearly observed by conventional fluorescent microscopy. STAT3 clusters get more and larger gradually from G1 to G2 phase, during which time transcription and other related activities goes on consistently. The results suggest that there is an intimate relationship between the clustered characteristic of STAT3 and the cell-cycle behavior. Meanwhile, clustering would facilitate STAT3 rapid response to activating signals due to short distances between molecules. Our data might open a new door to develop an antitumor drug for inhibiting STAT3 signaling pathway by destroying its clusters.

  13. Direct visualisation of internalization of the adenosine A3 receptor and localization with arrestin3 using a fluorescent agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Leigh A; Vernall, Andrea J; Briddon, Stephen J; Kellam, Barrie; Hill, Stephen J

    2015-11-01

    Fluorescence based probes provide a novel way to study the dynamic internalization process of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Recent advances in the rational design of fluorescent ligands for GPCRs have been used here to generate new fluorescent agonists containing tripeptide linkers for the adenosine A3 receptor. The fluorescent agonist BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA was found to be a highly potent agonist at the adenosine A3 receptor in both reporter gene (pEC50 = 8.48 ± 0.09) and internalization assays (pEC50 = 7.47 ± 0.11). Confocal imaging studies showed that BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA was internalized with A3 linked to yellow fluorescent protein, which was blocked by the competitive antagonist MRS1220. Internalization of untagged adenosine A3 could also be visualized with BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA treatment. Further, BY630-X-(D)-A-(D)-A-G-ABEA stimulated the formation of receptor-arrestin3 complexes and was found to localize with these intracellular complexes. This highly potent agonist with excellent imaging properties should be a valuable tool to study receptor internalization. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Fluorescent Tools in Neuropharmacology'.

  14. Fluorescent in situ hybridization for the localization of viruses, bacteria and other microorganisms in insect and plant tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Ghanim, Murad

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the localization of cellular components such as nucleic acids, proteins, cellular vesicles and more, and the localization of microorganisms including viruses, bacteria and fungi have become an important part of any research program in biological sciences that enable the visualization of these components in fixed and live tissues without the need for complex processing steps. The rapid development of microscopy tools and technologies as well as related fluorescent markers and fluorophores for many cellular components, and the ability to design DNA and RNA sequence-based molecular probes and antibodies which can be visualized fluorescently, have rapidly advanced this field. This review will focus on some of the localizations methods which have been used in plants and insect pests in agriculture, and other microorganisms, which are rapidly advancing the research in agriculture-related fields.

  15. Illuminating plant biology: using fluorescent proteins for high-throughput analysis of protein localization and function in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Sylvester, Anne W; Jackson, David

    2010-03-01

    First discovered in jellyfish, fluorescent proteins (FPs) have been successfully optimized for use as effective biomarkers within living plant cells. When exposed to light, FPs fused to a protein or regulatory element will fluoresce, and non-invasively mark expression and protein localization, which allows for the in vivo monitoring of diverse cellular processes. In this review, we discuss how FP technology has evolved from small-scale analysis of individual genes to more high-throughput techniques for global expression and functional profiling in plants.

  16. Fluorescence lifetimes of tyrosine residues in cytochrome c'' as local probes to study protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Melinda; Santos, Raquel; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2009-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that multiple tyrosine residues of a protein can serve as localized probes of structural changes during thermal unfolding. Cytochrome c'' from Methylophilus methylotrophus, which has four tyrosine residues, was chosen as a model protein. The procedure involved, first, the assignment of the experimental decay times to the tyrosine residues, followed by the interpretation of the changes in the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients with temperature. We found that the fluorescence decays of cytochrome c'' are double-exponential from 23 to 80 degrees C, with decay times much shorter than those of the parent compound N-acetyl-tyrosinamide; this quenching was ascribed to dipole-dipole energy transfer from the tyrosine residues to the heme. The tyrosine-heme distances (R) and theoretical decay times, tau(comp), were estimated for each tyrosine residue. The analysis of the simulated decay generated with tau(comp), showed that a double-exponential fit is sufficient to describe the four decay times with two pre-exponential coefficients close to values observed from the experimental decay. Therefore, the decay times at 23 degrees C could be assigned to the individual tyrosine residues as tau(1) to Tyr-10 and Tyr-23 (at 20.3 A) and tau(2) to Tyr-12 and Tyr-115 (at 12-14 A). On the basis of this assignment and MD simulations, the temperature dependence of the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients suggest that upon unfolding, Tyr-12 is displaced from the heme, with loss of the structure of alpha-helix I. Moreover, Tyr-115 remains close to the heme and the structure in this region of the protein is not altered significantly. Altogether the data support the view that the protein core, comprising the heme and the four alpha-helices II to V, is clearly more stable than the remaining region that includes alpha-helix I and the loop between residues 19-27.

  17. Superresolution imaging in live Caulobacter crescentus cells using photoswitchable enhanced yellow fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie S.; Thompson, Michael A.; Tselentis, Nicole K.; Shapiro, Lucy; Moerner, W. E.

    2009-02-01

    Recently, photoactivation and photoswitching were used to control single-molecule fluorescent labels and produce images of cellular structures beyond the optical diffraction limit (e.g., PALM, FPALM, and STORM). While previous live-cell studies relied on sophisticated photoactivatable fluorescent proteins, we show in the present work that superresolution imaging can be performed with fusions to the commonly used fluorescent protein EYFP. Rather than being photoactivated, however, EYFP can be reactivated with violet light after apparent photobleaching. In each cycle after initial imaging, only a sparse subset fluorophores is reactivated and localized, and the final image is then generated from the measured single-molecule positions. Because these methods are based on the imaging nanometer-sized single-molecule emitters and on the use of an active control mechanism to produce sparse sub-ensembles, we suggest the phrase "Single-Molecule Active-Control Microscopy" (SMACM) as an inclusive term for this general imaging strategy. In this paper, we address limitations arising from physiologically imposed upper boundaries on the fluorophore concentration by employing dark time-lapse periods to allow single-molecule motions to fill in filamentous structures, increasing the effective labeling concentration while localizing each emitter at most once per resolution-limited spot. We image cell-cycle-dependent superstructures of the bacterial actin protein MreB in live Caulobacter crescentus cells with sub-40-nm resolution for the first time. Furthermore, we quantify the reactivation quantum yield of EYFP, and find this to be 1.6 x 10-6, on par with conventional photoswitchable fluorescent proteins like Dronpa. These studies show that EYFP is a useful emitter for in vivo superresolution imaging of intracellular structures in bacterial cells.

  18. Presence and localization of bacteria in the bovine endometrium postpartum using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstrup, C. C.; Agerholm, J. S.; Jensen, Tim Kåre

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate bacterial invasiveness of the bovine endometrium during the postpartum period. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was applied to endometrial biopsies using probes for Fusobacterium necrophorum, Porphyromonas levii, Trueperella pyogenes, Escherichia coli...

  19. Localization of the human OB gene (OBS) to chromosome 7q32 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffroy, S.; Duban, B.; Martinville, B. de [Universitaire de Lille (France)] [and others

    1995-08-10

    An important gene involved in the pathogenesis of obesity is the product of the human homologue of the murine obese gene (gene symbol OBS). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we have localized the human OB gene to human chromosome 7, specifically to region 7q32.1. The FISH data of human OBS provide a gene-associated marker for genetic mapping. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Photo-activated biological processes as quantum measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Imamoglu, Atac

    2014-01-01

    We outline a framework for describing photo-activated biological reactions as generalized quantum measurements of external fields, for which the biological system takes on the role of a quantum meter. By using general arguments regarding the Hamiltonian that describes the measurement interaction, we identify the cases where it is essential for a complex chemical or biological system to exhibit non-equilibrium quantum coherent dynamics in order to achieve the requisite functionality. We illustrate the analysis by considering measurement of the solar radiation field in photosynthesis and measurement of the earth's magnetic field in avian magnetoreception.

  1. Decrypting Cryptochrome: Revealing the Molecular Identity of the Photoactivation Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Shahi, Abdul Rehaman Moughal

    2012-01-01

    of cryptochrome must arise from the photoactivation reaction occurring in the protein: exposure to blue light results in electron transfer to a flavin pigment co-factor, leading to formation of an electron spin-entangled pair of radicals. Theoretical and experimental studies established long ago that such radical...... pairs, indeed, can act as a magnetic compass. The photo-reaction pathway in cryptochrome is not fully resolved yet. We employ ab initio quantum chemistry and classical all-atom MD simulations for Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome to determine how the radical pair is formed, becomes stabilized through...

  2. Separating Hazardous Aerosols from Ambient Aerosols: Role of Fluorescence-Spectral Determination, Aerodynamic Deflector and Pulse Aerodynamic Localizer (PAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yong-Le; Cobler, Patrick J.; Rhodes, Scott A.; Halverson, Justin; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-08-22

    An aerosol deflection technique based on the single-shot UV-laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from a flowing particle is presented as a possible front-end bio-aerosol/hazardous-aerosol sensor/identifier. Cued by the fluorescence spectra, individual flowing bio-aerosol particles (1-10 {micro}m in diameter) have been successfully deflected from a stream of ambient aerosols. The electronics needed to compare the fluorescence spectrum of a particular particle with that of a pre-determined fluorescence spectrum are presented in some detail. The deflected particles, with and without going through a funnel for pulse aerodynamic localization (PAL), were collected onto a substrate for further analyses. To demonstrate how hazardous materials can be deflected, TbCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O (a simulant material for some chemical forms of Uranium Oxide) aerosol particles (2 {micro}m in diameter) mixed with Arizona road dust was separated and deflected with our system.

  3. Plasmon enhanced silver quantum cluster fluorescence for biochemical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernard, S.; Kutter, J.P.; Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of individual silver quantum clusters on the surface of silver nanoparticles reveals strong photoactivated emission under blue light excitation [1-4]. In this work, silver nanoparticles are produced by annealing silver thin films deposited on a glass substrate and silver q...

  4. Photo-activated luminescence sensor and method of detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Tuan V.

    1996-01-01

    A sensor for detecting trichloroethylene and related volatile organochloride compounds uses a photo-activator that produces a photo-product complex with the contaminant. Characteristics of the light emitted from the complex will indicate the presence of the contaminant. A probe containing the photo-activator has an excitation light interface and a contaminant interface. One particular embodiment uses a porous membrane as the contaminant interface, so that the contaminant can migrate therethrough to the photo-activator and thereby form the complex.

  5. Localization of 18S + 28S and 5S ribosomal RNA genes in the dog by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, A; Zijlstra, C; de Haan, N A; Mellink, C H; Bosma, A A

    1997-01-01

    The gene clusters encoding 18S + 28S and 5S rRNA in the dog (Canis familiaris) have been localized by using GTG-banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization. The 18S + 28S rDNA maps to chromosome regions 7q2.5-->q2.7, 17q1.7, qter of a medium-sized, not yet numbered autosome, and Yq1.2-->q1.3. Our data show that there is one cluster of 5S rDNA in the dog, which maps to chromosome region 4q1.4.

  6. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE) super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Sun, Mingzhai; Lin, Pei-Hui; Ma, Jianjie; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF). In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  7. Spatial covariance reconstructive (SCORE super-resolution fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Deng

    Full Text Available Super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has become a powerful tool to resolve structural information that is not accessible to traditional diffraction-limited imaging techniques such as confocal microscopy. Stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM and photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM are promising super-resolution techniques due to their relative ease of implementation and instrumentation on standard microscopes. However, the application of STORM is critically limited by its long sampling time. Several recent works have been focused on improving the STORM imaging speed by making use of the information from emitters with overlapping point spread functions (PSF. In this work, we present a fast and efficient algorithm that takes into account the blinking statistics of independent fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging. Our method is insensitive to background and can be applied to different types of fluorescence sources, including but not limited to the organic dyes and quantum dots that we demonstrate in this work.

  8. Simultaneous localization of six antigens in single sections of transgenic mouse intestine using a combination of light and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermiston, M L; Latham, C B; Gordon, J I; Roth, K A

    1992-09-01

    To study the geographic differentiation of the intestinal epithelium and to understand the complex lineage relationships of its cell populations, it is often necessary to visualize the protein products of multiple genes in sections prepared from different positions along the duodenal-to-colonic and/or crypt-to-villus axes. Multilabel fluorescence or brightfield immunohistochemical techniques have previously been used for this purpose. However, the number of antigens that can be identified on single sections is limited in fluorescence microscopy by the number of fluorophores with non-overlapping absorption and emission characteristics, in brightfield microscopy by the number of visually distinguishable chromogens, and in both methods by the availability of primary antisera raised in multiple species. We have now used a combination of light and fluorescence microscopic techniques to increase the number of antigens that can be detected in a single section to six. Sections were sequentially stained using immunogold with silver intensification, peroxidase-antiperoxidase with diaminobenzidine chromogen, and peroxidase-anti-peroxidase with alpha-naphthol/basic dye as chromogen, followed by simultaneous fluorescent detection with fluorescein, 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid, and beta-phycoerythrin. This method enables up to four separate antigens to be visualized within a single cell and two additional antigens to be detected in unrelated cells. The technique is illustrated by examining the cellular patterns of expression of liver fatty acid binding protein/human growth hormone fusion genes in the intestinal epithelium of adult transgenic mice. It should be generally applicable to other experimental systems that require localization of multiple antigens in single tissue sections.

  9. Photoactivated disinfection (PAD) in endodontics: an in vitro microbiological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Arciola, Carla Renata; Dagna, Alberto; Florindi, Filippo; Chiesa, Marco; Saino, Enrica; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2011-09-01

    The objective of the present study was the in vitro evaluation by MTT test of the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection (PAD) and, comparatively, of a conventional 5.25% NaOCl irrigating solution. Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis strains were selected for the test. Freshly extracted single-rooted human teeth were endodontically treated, inoculated with bacterial strains and then divided into different groups, each of them treated with PAD, with PAD plus 0.5% NaOCl solution, with TBO, with PAD for longer time and with 5% NaOCl solution (positive control). The results were significantly different among the various groups, and for Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis. PAD applied for a longer time (in respect to manufacturer's instructions) or PAD associated to 5% NaOCl showed the significantly higher antibacterial effects.

  10. Localization of introduced genes on the chromosomes of transgenic barley, wheat and triticale by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, C.; Zimny, J.; Becker, D.

    1997-01-01

    transformant showed a totally different integration pattern. Southern analysis confirmed that the inserted genes were segregating independently, resulting in different integration patterns among the progeny lines. The application of the FISH technique for the analysis of transgenic plants is discussed.......Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) we localized introduced genes on metaphase chromosomes of barley, wheat, and triticale transformed by microprojectile bombardment of microspores and scutellar tissue with the pDB1 plasmid containing the uidA and bar genes. Thirteen integration sites...... of single-copy integrations. There was a slight tendency towards the localization of transgenes in distal chromosome regions. Using the GAA-satellite sequence for chromosome banding, the chromosomes containing the inserted genes were identified in most cases. Two barley lines derived from the same...

  11. Evaluation of photo-activation appliances used in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Ribeiro de Magalhães Filho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Verify the Vickers microhardness promoted by three photo-activation appliances: one Halogen Light Ultralux (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and two Light Emitting Diodes. One with a larger diode (Ultraled, Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and the other with seven smaller diodes (Ultraled xp, Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil in composites with different matrixes. Methods: Three test specimens were made for each resinous materials using silicone molds measuring 4 X 8 X 30 mm. Polymerization was performedin three stages and on the two surfaces. After having been submitted to careful polishing with sequential abrasive papers and diamond paste, the Vickers microhardness of the test specimens was determined. Afterwards these values were submitted to statistical analysis by the ANOVA table and Student’s-t test. Results: The microhardness values obtained in the hybrid composite were as follows: 51.63 kg/mm2 +- 3.27; 52.22 kg/mm2 +- 3.3; 38.08 kg/mm2 +-0.31 and in the ormocer, 41.87 kg/mm2 +- 2.36; 41.5 kg/mm2 +- 1.2; 33.63 kg/mm2 +- 1.2, by the Ultralux (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, Ultraled xp (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil appliances, respectively. Conclusion: The Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and Ultraled xp (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil appliances promoted microhardness values that were similar between them and higher than the values produced by Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil in the composites. It was verified that the intensity of the photo-activator appliances is directly related to the microhardness they produce in the composites.

  12. Super-resolution fluorescence imaging and correlation spectroscopy: Principles and examples of application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović-Talisman Tijana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-organization of cell-surface receptors in structurally distinct domains in the plasma membrane is of vital interest for correct cellular signaling. However, this dynamic process is difficult to study in cells with sufficiently high temporal and spatial resolution. We present here two quantitative high-resolution methods with single-molecule sensitivity, Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS and pair-correlation Photoactivated Localization Microscopy (pcPALM, which enable nondestructive study of receptor diffusion and lateral organization at the nanoscale level. We introduce here the methods and review their application in studies of lateral organization of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs. Examples from our own work on opioid receptor lateral organization are presented in order to illustrate the most recent advances in the field. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172015 i br. 45001

  13. Super-resolution Analysis of TCR-Dependent Signaling: Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Valarie A; Yi, Jason; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2017-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) comprises methods that produce super-resolution images from molecular locations of single molecules. These techniques mathematically determine the center of a diffraction-limited spot produced by a fluorescent molecule, which represents the most likely location of the molecule. Only a small cohort of well-separated molecules is visualized in a single image, and then many images are obtained from a single sample. The localizations from all the images are combined to produce a super-resolution picture of the sample. Here we describe the application of two methods, photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), to the study of signaling microclusters in T cells.

  14. Fluorescence in situ hybridizations (FISH) for the localization of viruses and endosymbiotic bacteria in plant and insect tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Kontsedalov, Svetlana; Lebedev, Galina; Brumin, Marina; Cathrin, Pakkianathan Britto; Marubayashi, Julio Massaharu; Skaljac, Marisa; Belausov, Eduard; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-02-24

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a name given to a variety of techniques commonly used for visualizing gene transcripts in eukaryotic cells and can be further modified to visualize other components in the cell such as infection with viruses and bacteria. Spatial localization and visualization of viruses and bacteria during the infection process is an essential step that complements expression profiling experiments such as microarrays and RNAseq in response to different stimuli. Understanding the spatiotemporal infections with these agents complements biological experiments aimed at understanding their interaction with cellular components. Several techniques for visualizing viruses and bacteria such as reporter gene systems or immunohistochemical methods are time-consuming, and some are limited to work with model organisms and involve complex methodologies. FISH that targets RNA or DNA species in the cell is a relatively easy and fast method for studying spatiotemporal localization of genes and for diagnostic purposes. This method can be robust and relatively easy to implement when the protocols employ short hybridizing, commercially-purchased probes, which are not expensive. This is particularly robust when sample preparation, fixation, hybridization, and microscopic visualization do not involve complex steps. Here we describe a protocol for localization of bacteria and viruses in insect and plant tissues. The method is based on simple preparation, fixation, and hybridization of insect whole mounts and dissected organs or hand-made plant sections, with 20 base pairs short DNA probes conjugated to fluorescent dyes on their 5' or 3' ends. This protocol has been successfully applied to a number of insect and plant tissues, and can be used to analyze expression of mRNAs or other RNA or DNA species in the cell.

  15. Cloning of DNA sequences localized on proximal fluorescent chromosome bands by microdissection in Pinus densiflora Sieb. & Zucc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizume, M; Shibata, F; Maruyama, Y; Kondo, T

    2001-09-01

    Japanese red pine, Pinus densiflora, has 2n=24 chromosomes, of which most carry chromomycin A3 (CMA) and 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) bands at their centromere-proximal regions. It was proposed that these regions contain highly repetitive DNA. The DNA localized in the proximal fluorescent bands was isolated and characterized. In P. densiflora, centromeric and neighboring segments of the somatic chromosomes were dissected with a manual micromanipulator. The centromeric DNA was amplified from the DNA contained in dissected centromeric segments by degenerate oligonucleotide primed-polymerase chain reaction (DOP-PCR) and a cloned DNA library was constructed. Thirty-one clones carrying highly repetitive DNA were selected by colony hybridization using Cot-1 DNA from this species as a probe, and their chromosomal localization was determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Clone PDCD501 was localized to the proximal CMA band of 20 chromosomes. This clone contained tandem repeats, comprising a 27 bp repeat unit, which was sufficient to provide the proximal FISH signal, with a 52.3% GC content. The repetitive sequence was named PCSR (proximal CMA band-specific repeat). Clone PDCD159 was 1700 bp in length, with a 61.7% AT content, and produced FISH signals at the proximal DAPI band of the remaining four chromosomes. Four clones hybridized strongly to the secondary constriction and gave weak signals at the centromeric region of several chromosomes. Clone PDCD537, one of the four clones, was homologous to the 26S rRNA gene. A PCR experiment using microdissected centromeric regions suggested that the centromeric region contains 18S and 26S rDNA. Another 24 clones hybridized to whole chromosome arms, with varying intensities and might represent dispersed repetitive DNA.

  16. Controlling fluorescent proteins by manipulating the local density of photonic states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Cesa, Yanina; Broek, van den Johanna M.; Mosk, Allard P.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Vos, Willem L.; Campagnola, Paul J.; Stelzer, Ernst H.K.; Bally, von Gert

    2009-01-01

    We present the first demonstration of control of the emission lifetime of a biological emitter by manipulating the local density of optical states (LDOS). LDOS control is achieved by positioning the emitters at defined distances from a metallic mirror. This results in a characteristic oscillation in

  17. Localization of iron in rice grain using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Kyriacou, Bianca

    2014-03-01

    Cereal crops accumulate low levels of iron (Fe) of which only a small fraction (5-10%) is bioavailable in human diets. Extensive co-localization of Fe in outer grain tissues with phytic acid, a strong chelator of metal ions, results in the formation of insoluble complexes that cannot be digested by humans. Here we describe the use of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) and high resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) to map the distribution of Fe, zinc (Zn), phosphorus (P) and other elements in the aleurone and subaleurone layers of mature grain from wild-type and an Fe-enriched line of rice (Oryza sativa L.). The results obtained from both XFM and NanoSIMS indicated that most Fe was co-localized with P (indicative of phytic acid) in the aleurone layer but that a small amount of Fe, often present as "hotspots", extended further into the subaleurone and outer endosperm in a pattern that was not co-localized with P. We hypothesize that Fe in subaleurone and outer endosperm layers of rice grain could be bound to low molecular weight chelators such as nicotianamine and/or deoxymugineic acid. © 2014.

  18. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominika Żurek-Biesiada

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015 [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  19. Quantitative super-resolution localization microscopy of DNA in situ using Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika; Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Best, Gerrit; Mohana, Giriram K; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Roignant, Jean-Yves; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM) is a recently emerged optical imaging method that was shown to achieve a resolution in the order of tens of nanometers in intact cells. Novel high resolution imaging methods might be crucial for understanding of how the chromatin, a complex of DNA and proteins, is arranged in the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Such an approach utilizing switching of a fluorescent, DNA-binding dye Vybrant® DyeCycle™ Violet has been previously demonstrated by us (Żurek-Biesiada et al., 2015) [1]. Here we provide quantitative information on the influence of the chemical environment on the behavior of the dye, discuss the variability in the DNA-associated signal density, and demonstrate direct proof of enhanced structural resolution. Furthermore, we compare different visualization approaches. Finally, we describe various opportunities of multicolor DNA/SMLM imaging in eukaryotic cell nuclei.

  20. Localizing internal friction along the reaction coordinate of protein folding by combining ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgia, Alessandro; Wensley, Beth G; Soranno, Andrea; Nettels, Daniel; Borgia, Madeleine B; Hoffmann, Armin; Pfeil, Shawn H; Lipman, Everett A; Clarke, Jane; Schuler, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Theory, simulations and experimental results have suggested an important role of internal friction in the kinetics of protein folding. Recent experiments on spectrin domains provided the first evidence for a pronounced contribution of internal friction in proteins that fold on the millisecond timescale. However, it has remained unclear how this contribution is distributed along the reaction and what influence it has on the folding dynamics. Here we use a combination of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, nanosecond fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, microfluidic mixing and denaturant- and viscosity-dependent protein-folding kinetics to probe internal friction in the unfolded state and at the early and late transition states of slow- and fast-folding spectrin domains. We find that the internal friction affecting the folding rates of spectrin domains is highly localized to the early transition state, suggesting an important role of rather specific interactions in the rate-limiting conformational changes.

  1. DNA repair inhibition by UVA photoactivated fluoroquinolones and vemurafenib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Matthew; Brem, Reto; Macpherson, Peter; Karran, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous photosensitization is a common side effect of drug treatment and can be associated with an increased skin cancer risk. The immunosuppressant azathioprine, the fluoroquinolone antibiotics and vemurafenib—a BRAF inhibitor used to treat metastatic melanoma—are all recognized clinical photosensitizers. We have compared the effects of UVA radiation on cultured human cells treated with 6-thioguanine (6-TG, a DNA-embedded azathioprine surrogate), the fluoroquinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin and vemurafenib. Despite widely different structures and modes of action, each of these drugs potentiated UVA cytotoxicity. UVA photoactivation of 6-TG, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin was associated with the generation of singlet oxygen that caused extensive protein oxidation. In particular, these treatments were associated with damage to DNA repair proteins that reduced the efficiency of nucleotide excision repair. Although vemurafenib was also highly phototoxic to cultured cells, its effects were less dependent on singlet oxygen. Highly toxic combinations of vemurafenib and UVA caused little protein carbonylation but were nevertheless inhibitory to nucleotide excision repair. Thus, for three different classes of drugs, photosensitization by at least two distinct mechanisms is associated with reduced protection against potentially mutagenic and carcinogenic DNA damage. PMID:25414333

  2. Protease and urease production during utilization of diesel by fluorescent Pseudomonas species isolated from local soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Umamaheswara Rao

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Bacteria, most prevalently the Pseudomonas species possess high capacity to utilize and degrade"npetroleum hydrocarbons and are classified as the hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms. Many species of the genus"nPseudomonas are notorious for their aerobic degradation capacity, extracellular enzyme production and are metabolically"nversatile organisms capable of utilizing a wide range of hydrocarbons and other compounds. In this study, the ability of diesel"nutilization by some locally isolated Pseudomonas species was tested."nMaterials and Methods: From a local red laterite soil, four different Pseudomonas species were isolated on King’s B medium,"ncharacterized, identified and tested their potential in utilizing diesel, a petroleum hydrocarbon. At the same time, production"nof protease and urease enzymes during the utilization of diesel was also assayed following the standard procedures."nResults: The isolates were grown well on diesel and subsequently produced the extracellular enzymes protease and urease"nat significant levels when compared to their production in the absence of diesel. Optimum temperature and pH for increased"ngrowth by four isolates was found to be 37oC and pH 8.0 indicating the maximum utilization of diesel. All the isolates showed"nmaximum growth in medium with 100% diesel than 100% glycerol as carbon source, when tested with different proportions"nof diesel and glycerol as carbon sources. Plasmid profile of the isolates revealed that, all four Pseudomonas isolates harbored"ntwo low molecular weight plasmids; one with 3 Kb size and the other with 10 kb to 12 Kb size."nConclusion: The four Pseudomonas isolates of the present study were found to have potential in diesel degradation and can"nbe recommended for bioremediation of sites that are contaminated with diesel.

  3. A nuclear-localized fluorescent hydrogen peroxide probe for monitoring sirtuin-mediated oxidative stress responses in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Bryan C; Tang, Yan; Chang, Zengyi; Chang, Christopher J

    2011-08-26

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) can serve as a beneficial signaling agent or toxin depending on its concentration and location within a cell or organism. Methods to measure the localized accumulation of H(2)O(2) in living specimens remain limited. Motivated to meet this need, we have developed a nuclear-localized fluorescent probe for H(2)O(2), Nuclear Peroxy Emerald 1 (NucPE1), to selectively interrogate ROS fluxes within this sensitive organelle. NucPE1 selectively accumulates in the nuclei of a variety of mammalian cell lines as well as in whole model organisms like Caenorhabditis elegans, where it can respond to subcellular changes in H(2)O(2) fluxes. Moreover, in vivo NucPE1 imaging reveals a reduction in nuclear H(2)O(2) levels in worms overexpressing sir-2.1 compared with wild-type congeners, supporting a link between this longevity-promoting sirtuin protein and enhanced regulation of nuclear ROS pools.

  4. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K.; Zahid, N. Idayu; Khyasudeen, M. Faisal; Giera, David S.; Thimm, Julian C.; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-01-01

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism. PMID:25731606

  5. Detecting local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region of different lipidic phases using modified fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Zied, Osama K; Zahid, N Idayu; Khyasudeen, M Faisal; Giera, David S; Thimm, Julian C; Hashim, Rauzah

    2015-03-03

    Local heterogeneity in lipid self-assembly is important for executing the cellular membrane functions. In this work, we chemically modified 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and attached a C8 alkyl chain in two different locations to probe the microscopic environment of four lipidic phases of dodecyl β-maltoside. The fluorescence change in HBO and the new probes (HBO-1 and HBO-2) shows that in all phases (micellar, hexagonal, cubic and lamellar) three HBO tautomeric species (solvated syn-enol, anionic, and closed syn-keto) are stable. The formation of multi tautomers reflects the heterogeneity of the lipidic phases. The results indicate that HBO and HBO-1 reside in a similar location within the head group region, whereas HBO-2 is slightly pushed away from the sugar-dominated area. The stability of the solvated syn-enol tautomer is due to the formation of a hydrogen bond between the OH group of the HBO moiety and an adjacent oxygen atom of a sugar unit. The detected HBO anions was proposed to be a consequence of this solvation effect where a hydrogen ion abstraction by the sugar units is enhanced. Our results point to a degree of local heterogeneity and ionization ability in the head group region as a consequence of the sugar amphoterism.

  6. Localization of protein-protein interactions among three fluorescent proteins in a single living cell: three-color FRET microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuansheng; Booker, Cynthia F.; Day, Richard N.; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2009-02-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) methodology has been used for over 30 years to localize protein-protein interactions in living specimens. The cloning and modification of various visible fluorescent proteins (FPs) has generated a variety of new probes that can be used as FRET pairs to investigate the protein associations in living cells. However, the spectral cross-talk between FRET donor and acceptor channels has been a major limitation to FRET microscopy. Many investigators have developed different ways to eliminate the bleedthrough signals in the FRET channel for one donor and one acceptor. We developed a novel FRET microscopy method for studying interactions among three chromophores: three-color FRET microscopy. We generated a genetic construct that directly links the three FPs - monomeric teal FP (mTFP), Venus and tandem dimer Tomato (tdTomato), and demonstrated the occurrence of mutually dependent energy transfers among the three FPs. When expressed in cells and excited with the 458 nm laser line, the mTFP-Venus-tdTomato fusion proteins yielded parallel (mTFP to Venus and mTFP to tdTomato) and sequential (mTFP to Venus and then to tdTomato) energy transfer signals. To quantify the FRET signals in the three-FP system in a single living cell, we developed an algorithm to remove all the spectral cross-talk components and also to separate different FRET signals at a same emission channel using the laser scanning spectral imaging and linear unmixing techniques on the Zeiss510 META system. Our results were confirmed with fluorescence lifetime measurements and using acceptor photobleaching FRET microscopy.

  7. Subcellular localization of the hypusine-containing eukaryotic initiation factor 5A by immunofluorescent staining and green fluorescent protein tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, David Li-En; Yu Chen, Kuang

    2002-01-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 5A (eIF-5A) is the only protein in nature that contains hypusine, an unusual amino acid residue formed posttranslationally by deoxyhypusine synthase and deoxyhypusine hydroxylase. Although the eIF-5A gene is essential for cell survival and proliferation, the precise function and localization of eIF-5A remain unclear. In this study, we have determined the subcellular distribution of eIF-5A by indirect immunofluorescent staining and by direct visualization of green fluorescent protein tagged eIF-5A (GFP-eIF5A). Immunofluorescent staining of the formaldehyde-fixed cells showed that eIF-5A was present in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Only the nuclear eIF-5A was resistant to Triton extraction. Direct visualization of GFP tagged eIF-5A in living cells revealed the same whole-cell distribution pattern. However, a fusion of an additional pyruvate kinase (PK) moiety into GFP-eIF-5A precluded the nuclear localization of GFP-PK-eIF-5A fusion protein. Fusion of the GFP-PK tag with three different domains of eIF-5A also failed to reveal any nuclear localization of the fusion proteins, suggesting the absence of receptor-mediated nuclear import. Using interspecies heterokaryon fusion assay, we could detect the nuclear export of GFP-Rev, but not of GFP-eIF-5A. The whole-cell distribution pattern of eIF-5A was recalcitrant to the treatments that included energy depletion, heat shock, and inhibition of transcription, translation, polyamine synthesis, or CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Collectively, our data indicate that eIF-5A gains nuclear entry via passive diffusion, but it does not undergo active nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Flexible non-diffractive vortex microscope for three-dimensional depth-enhanced super-localization of dielectric, metal and fluorescent nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchal, Petr; Bouchal, Zdeněk

    2017-10-01

    In the past decade, probe-based super-resolution using temporally resolved localization of emitters became a groundbreaking imaging strategy in fluorescence microscopy. Here we demonstrate a non-diffractive vortex microscope (NVM), enabling three-dimensional super-resolution fluorescence imaging and localization and tracking of metal and dielectric nanoparticles. The NVM benefits from vortex non-diffractive beams (NBs) creating a double-helix point spread function that rotates under defocusing while maintaining its size and shape unchanged. Using intrinsic properties of the NBs, the dark-field localization of weakly scattering objects is achieved in a large axial range exceeding the depth of field of the microscope objective up to 23 times. The NVM was developed using an upright microscope Nikon Eclipse E600 operating with a spiral lithographic mask optimized using Fisher information and built into an add-on imaging module or microscope objective. In evaluation of the axial localization accuracy the root mean square error below 18 nm and 280 nm was verified over depth ranges of 3.5 μm and 13.6 μm, respectively. Subwavelength gold and polystyrene beads were localized with isotropic precision below 10 nm in the axial range of 3.5 μm and the axial precision reduced to 30 nm in the extended range of 13.6 μm. In the fluorescence imaging, the localization with isotropic precision below 15 nm was demonstrated in the range of 2.5 μm, whereas in the range of 8.3 μm, the precision of 15 nm laterally and 30–50 nm axially was achieved. The tracking of nanoparticles undergoing Brownian motion was demonstrated in the volume of 14 × 10 × 16 μm3. Applicability of the NVM was tested by fluorescence imaging of LW13K2 cells and localization of cellular proteins.

  9. Kinetics and subcellular localization of 5-ALA-induced PpIX in DHL cells via two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Huang, Zufang; Chen, Guannan; Li, Yongzeng; Chen, Xianlian; Chen, Jianxin; Zeng, Haishan

    2008-04-01

    Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy was used to measure the 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA)-induced PpIX fluorescence in follicular lymphoma DHL cells. Kinetics of 5-ALA-induced PpIX accumulation in DHL cells under various 5-ALA concentrations was studied. We found that during the course of continuous incubation with 5-ALA, the relationship between the DHL cell fluorescence signal and the incubation time showed a biphasic variation. Initially the PpIX signal increased with the incubation time and reached the maximal value at about 3 h, and then it decreased with time during the subsequent incubation period. By labeling the 5-ALA incubated DHL cells with different organelle-specific fluorescence probes: Rhodamine 123 (for mitochondria), DioC6(3) (for endoplasmic reticulum) and LysoTracker Green (for lysosomes) respectively, we found that 5-ALA-induced PpIX was primarily localized in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria; its concentration in the lysosome was much lower. The results suggested that 5-ALA could potentially be an effective photosensitizer in photodynamic purging of DHL cells. Two-photon excitation fluorescence microscope is a useful tool for studying 5-ALA-induced PpIX subcellular localization.

  10. Evaluating the effect of local pH on fluorescence emissions from oral bacteria of the genus Prevotella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Christopher K.; Higham, Susan M.

    2016-08-01

    A number of anaerobic oral bacteria, notably Prevotellaceae, exhibit red fluorescence when excited by short-wavelength visible light due to their accumulation of porphyrins, particularly protoporphyrin IX. pH affects the fluorescence of abiotic preparations of porphyrins due to transformations in speciation between monomers, higher aggregates, and dimers. To elucidate whether the porphyrin speciation phenomenon could be manifested within a microbiological system, suspensions of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens were examined by fluorescence spectrophotometry while being titrated against NaOH. The initial pH of the samples was dental plaque fluorescence.

  11. MEMBRANE MOBILITY AND MICRODOMAIN LOCALIZATION OF THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER STUDIED BY CONFOCAL FLUORESCENCE CORRELATION SPECTROSCOPY (FCS) AND FRAP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adkins, Erica; (Vægter), Christian Bjerggaard; van Deurs, Bo;

    FCS measurements in transiently transfected N2A neuroblastoma cells were impaired by photobleachning suggesting immobilization of the transporter in the membrane. This was confirmed by the use of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which showed clear recovery of YFP-DAT fluorescence...

  12. Analysis of Cell Movement by Simultaneous Quantification of Local Membrane Displacement and Fluorescent Intensities Using Quimp2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosgraaf, Leonard; van Haastert, Peter J. M.; Bretschneider, Till

    The use of fluorescent markers in living cells has increased dramatically in the recent years. The quantitative analysis of the images requires specific analysis software. Previously, the program Quimp was launched for quantitating fluorescent intensities at the membrane or the cortex of the cell.

  13. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy combined with optical coherence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Kim, Gyeong Tae; Jang, Soohyun; Shim, Sang-Hee; Bae, Sung Chul

    2015-03-01

    Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence imaging technique such as stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and photoactived localization microscope (PALM) has brought us beyond the diffraction limits. It allows numerous opportunities in biology because vast amount of formerly obscured molecular structures, due to lack of spatial resolution, now can be directly observed. A drawback of fluorescence imaging, however, is that it lacks complete structural information. For this reason, we have developed a super-resolution multimodal imaging system based on STORM and full-field optical coherence microscopy (FF-OCM). FF-OCM is a type of interferometry systems based on a broadband light source and a bulk Michelson interferometer, which provides label-free and non-invasive visualization of biological samples. The integration between the two systems is simple because both systems use a wide-field illumination scheme and a conventional microscope. This combined imaging system gives us both functional information at a molecular level (~20nm) and structural information at the sub-cellular level (~1μm). For thick samples such as tissue slices, while FF-OCM is readily capable of imaging the 3D architecture, STORM suffer from aberrations and high background fluorescence that substantially degrade the resolution. In order to correct the aberrations in thick tissues, we employed an adaptive optics system in the detection path of the STORM microscope. We used our multimodal system to obtain images on brain tissue samples with structural and functional information.

  14. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luis Faria-e-Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem(r (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA, or a regular (etch-and-rinse resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil. Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05. Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem(r demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of Her2-NLP peptide conjugates targeting circulating breast cancer cells: cellular uptake and localization by fluorescent microscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huawei; Singh, Ajay N; Sun, Xiankai; Peng, Fangyu

    2015-01-01

    To synthesize a fluorescent Her2-NLP peptide conjugate consisting of Her2/neu targeting peptide and nuclear localization sequence peptide (NLP) and assess its cellular uptake and intracellular localization for radionuclide cancer therapy targeting Her2/neu-positive circulating breast cancer cells (CBCC). Fluorescent Cy5.5 Her2-NLP peptide conjugate was synthesized by coupling a bivalent peptide sequence, which consisted of a Her2-binding peptide (NH2-GSGKCCYSL) and an NLP peptide (CGYGPKKKRKVGG) linked by a polyethylene glycol (PEG) chain with 6 repeating units, with an activated Cy5.5 ester. The conjugate was separated and purified by HPLC and then characterized by Maldi-MS. The intracellular localization of fluorescent Cy5.5 Her2-NLP peptide conjugate was assessed by fluorescent microscopic imaging using a confocal microscope after incubation of Cy5.5-Her2-NLP with Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells and Her2/neu negative control breast cancer cells, respectively. Fluorescent signals were detected in cytoplasm of Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells (SKBR-3 and BT474 cell lines), but not or little in cytoplasm of Her2/neu negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231), after incubation of the breast cancer cells with Cy5.5-Her2-NLP conjugates in vitro. No fluorescent signals were detected within the nuclei of Her2/neu positive SKBR-3 and BT474 breast cancer cells, neither Her2/neu negative MDA-MB-231 cells, incubated with the Cy5.5-Her2-NLP peptide conjugates, suggesting poor nuclear localization of the Cy5.5-Her2-NLP conjugates localized within the cytoplasm after their cellular uptake and internalization by the Her2/neu positive breast cancer cells. Her2-binding peptide (KCCYSL) is a promising agent for radionuclide therapy of Her2/neu positive breast cancer using a β(-) or α emitting radionuclide, but poor nuclear localization of the Her2-NLP peptide conjugates may limit its use for eradication of Her2/neu-positive CBCC using I-125 or other Auger electron

  16. QuickPALM: 3D real-time photoactivation nanoscopy image processing in ImageJ

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henriques, R

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Nature Methods 7, 339?340 (1 May 2010) | doi:10.1038/nmeth0510-339 QuickPALM: 3D real-time photoactivation nanoscopy image processing in ImageJ Ricardo Henriques , Mickael Lelek , Eugenio F Fornasiero , Flavia Valtorta , Christophe Zimmer & Musa M...

  17. Impact of adhesive and photoactivation method on sealant integrity and polymer network formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniek Castillo Dutra Borges

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the influence of photoactivation method and hydrophobic resin (HR application on the marginal and internal adaptation, hardness (KHN, and crosslink density (CLD of a resin-based fissure sealant. Model fissures were created in bovine enamel fragments (n = 10 and sealed using one of the following protocols: no adhesive system + photoactivation of the sealant using continuous light (CL, no adhesive system + photoactivation of the sealant using the soft-start method (SS, HR + CL, or HR + SS. Marginal and internal gaps and KHN were assessed after storage in water for 24 h. The CLD was indirectly assessed by repeating the KHN measurement after 24 h of immersion in 100% ethanol. There was no difference among the samples with regard to marginal or internal adaptation. The KHN and CLD were similar for samples cured using either photoactivation method. Use of a hydrophobic resin prior to placement of fissure sealants and curing the sealant using the soft-start method may not provide any positive influence on integrity or crosslink density.

  18. A chemiluminescence-based continuous flow aqueous ozone analyzer using photoactivated chromotropic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshio; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2005-05-15

    Ozone has become the oxidant of choice for water disinfection, especially in large water treatment facilities. This paper describes a fast and sensitive method for the determination of ozone content by reaction with photoactivated chromotropic acid (CA, 4,5-dihydroxynaphthalene-2,7-disulfonic acid), which results in intense chemiluminescence (CL). Freshly ozonated water from a recirculating ozonizer/reservoir is injected into a carrier stream of deionized water in the flow-injection mode. This flow mixes with a stream of photoactivated CA solution in a spiral cell placed directly on top of an inexpensive miniature (8mm diameter active area) photomultiplier tube (PMT). Alkaline CA is photoactivated by passing it through a FEP-Teflon((R)) coil (residence time approximately 50s) wrapped around a 1W UV lamp emitting at 254nm; without photoactivation, the signal is approximately 70-fold lower. The S/N=3 limit of detection for aqueous ozone is 3mugl(-1) and good response slope is obtained up to an ozone concentration of 1.4mgl(-1), the highest that could be made in this study. The response obeyed a quadratic equation with r(2)=0.9984. No interference from permanganate ion is observed. The proposed system was applied to the monitoring of ozonation status of a playa lake water that exhibited significant ozone demand.

  19. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.T. Tauböck; A.J. Feilzer; W. Buchalla; C.J. Kleverlaan; I. Krejci; T. Attin

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Re

  20. Influence of photoactivation method and mold for restoration on the Knoop hardness of resin composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, William Cunha; Silva-Concilio, Lais Regiane; Neves, Ana Christina Claro; de Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jose Carvalho; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the Knoop hardness in the top and bottom of composite photo activated by different methods when different mold materials were used. Z250 (3M ESPE) and XL2500 halogen unit (3M ESPE) were used. For hardness test, conical restorations were made in extracted bovine incisors (tooth mold) and also metal mold (approximately 2 mm top diameter × 1.5 mm bottom diameter × 2 mm in height). Different photoactivation methods were tested: high-intensity continuous (HIC), low-intensity continuous (LIC), soft-start, or pulse-delay (PD), with constant radiant exposure. Knoop readings were performed on top and bottom restoration surfaces. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p = 0.05). On the top, regardless of the mold used, no significant difference in the Knoop hardness (Knoop hardness number, in kilograms-force per square millimeter) was observed between the photoactivation methods. On the bottom surface, the photoactivation method HIC shows higher means of hardness than LIC when tooth and metal were used. Significant differences of hardness on the top and in the bottom were detected between tooth and metal. The photoactivation method LIC and the material mold can interfere in the hardness values of composite restorations.

  1. Methods for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    2008-03-18

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method comprises the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention also provides a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent.

  2. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation and detection of molecular diagnostic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-10

    A method for the imaging of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue, wherein the plant or animal tissue contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. The method includes the steps of treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent contained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, photo-activating at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, thereby producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent, wherein the at least one photo-activated molecular agent emits energy, detecting the energy emitted by the at least one photo-activated molecular agent, and producing a detected energy signal which is characteristic of the particular volume of plant or animal tissue. The present invention is also a method for the imaging of a particular volume of material, wherein the material contains at least one photo-active molecular agent. 13 figs.

  3. Influence of photo-activation source on enamel demineralization around restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira Ferla

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of the photoactivation source and restorative material on the development of caries-like lesions on human enamel after an in vitro pH challenge. Enamel cavities were prepared in 36 blocks, which were assigned to two groups according to the restorative material: resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI and composite resin (CR. Samples were exposed to quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp, argon-ion laser, or light-emitting diode (n = 6. The Knoop microhardness (KHN values of the top surface of all materials were evaluated. Restored enamel blocks were thermocycled and subjected to 10 demineralization-remineralization cycles at 37°C. KHN analysis of the superficial enamel was performed by four indentations located 100 mm from the restoration margin. The material KHN was not affected by the photoactivation source. No significant difference in KHN was noted between CR and RMGI. The enamel surface around RMGI exhibited a higher KHN (272.8 KHN than the enamel around CR (93.3 KHN, regardless of the photoactivation source. Enamel demineralization around the dental restoration was not influenced by the photoactivation source. Less enamel demineralization was observed around the RMGI than around the CR restoration.

  4. Fluorescent co-localization of PTS1 and PTS2 and its application in analysis of the gene function and the peroxisomal dynamic in Magnaporthe oryzae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-yu WANG; Fu-cheng LIN; Guo-chang SUN; Xiao-yan WU; Zhen ZHANG; Xin-fa DU; Rong-yao CHAI; Xiao-hong LIU; Xue-qin MAO; Hai-ping QIU; Yan-li WANG

    2008-01-01

    The peroxisomal matrix proteins involved in many important biological metabolism pathways in eukaryotic cells are encoded by nucleal genes, synthesized in the cytoplasm and then transported into the organelles. Targeting and import of these proteins depend on their two peroxisomal targeting signals (PTS1 and PTS2) in sequence as we have known so far. The vectors of the fluorescent fusions with PTS, i.e., green fluorescence protein (GFP)-PTSI, GFP-PTS2 and red fluorescence protein (RFP)-PTS1, were constructed and introduced into Magnaporthe oryzae Guy11 cells. Transformants containing these fusions emitted fluorescence in a punctate pattern, and the locations of the red and green fluorescence overlapped exactly in RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 co-transformed strains. These data indicated that both PTS 1 and PTS2 fusions were imported into peroxisomes. A probable higher efficiency of PTSI machinery was revealed by comparing the fluorescence backgrounds in GFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 transformants. By introducing both RFP-PTS1 and GFP-PTS2 into △mgpex6 mutants, the involvement of MGPEX6 gene in both PTS1 and PTS2 pathways was proved. In addition, using these transformants, the inducement of peroxisomes and the dynamic of peroxisomal number during the pre-penetration processes were investigated as well. In summary, by the localization and co-localization of PTSI and PTS2, we provided a useful tool to evaluate the biological roles of the peroxisomes and the related genes.

  5. Subcellular localization of a fluorescent derivative of CuII(atsm) offers insight into the neuroprotective action of CuII(atsm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katherine Ann; Crouch, Peter J; Lim, SinChun; Paterson, Brett M; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Donnelly, Paul S; White, Anthony R

    2011-12-01

    Copper complexes of bis(thiosemicarbazone) (Cu(II)(btsc)s) have been studied as potential anti-cancer agents and hypoxia imaging agents. More recently, Cu(II)(btsc)s have been identified as possessing potent neuroprotective properties in cell and animal models of neurodegenerative disease. Despite their broad range of pharmacological activity little is known about how cells traffic Cu(II)(btsc)s and how this relates to potential anti-cancer or neuroprotective outcomes. One method of investigating sub-cellular localization of metal complexes is through confocal fluorescence imaging of the compounds in cells. Previously we harnessed the fluorescence of a pyrene group attached to diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(ii)) (Cu(II)(atsm)), (Cu(II)L(1)). We demonstrated that Cu(II)L(1) was partially localized to lysosomes in HeLa cancer epithelial cells. Here we extend these studies to map the sub-cellular localization of Cu(II)L(1) in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Treatment of M17 or HeLa cells led to rapid association of the Cu-complex into distinct punctate structures that partially co-localized with lysosomes as assessed by co-localization with Lysotracker and acridine orange. No localization to early or late endosomes, the nucleus or mitochondria was observed. We also found evidence for a limited association of Cu(II)L(1) with autophagic structures, however, this did not account for the majority of the punctate localization of Cu(II)L(1). In addition, Cu(II)L(1) revealed partial localization with ER Tracker and was found to inhibit ER stress induced by tunicamycin. This is the first report to comprehensively characterize the sub-cellular localization of a Cu(II)(atsm) derivative in cells of a neuronal origin and the partial association with lysosome/autophagic structures and the ER may have a potential role in neuroprotection.

  6. Gold Nanoparticle-Quantum Dot Fluorescent Nanohybrid: Application for Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance-induced Molecular Beacon Ultrasensitive DNA Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-11-01

    In biosensor design, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR)-induced signal from gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-conjugated reporter can produce highly sensitive nanohybrid systems. In order to retain the physicochemical properties of AuNPs upon conjugation, high colloidal stability in aqueous solution is needed. In this work, the colloidal stability with respect to the zeta potential (ZP) of four negatively charged thiol-functionalized AuNPs, thioglycolic (TGA)-AuNPs, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)-AuNPs, l-cysteine-AuNPs and l-glutathione (GSH)-AuNPs, and a cationic cyteamine-capped AuNPs was studied at various pHs, ionic strength, and NP concentration. A strong dependence of the ZP charge on the nanoparticle (NP) concentration was observed. High colloidal stability was exhibited between pH 3 and 9 for the negatively charged AuNPs and between pH 3 and 7 for the cationic AuNPs. With respect to the ionic strength, high colloidal stability was exhibited at ≤104 μM for TGA-AuNPs, l-cysteine-AuNPs, and GSH-AuNPs, whereas ≤103 μM is recommended for MPA-AuNPs. For the cationic AuNPs, very low ionic strength of ≤10 μM is recommended due to deprotonation at higher concentration. GSH-AuNPs were thereafter bonded to SiO2-functionalized alloyed CdZnSeS/ZnSe1.0S1.3 quantum dots (SiO2-Qdots) to form a plasmon-enhanced AuNP-SiO2-Qdots fluorescent nanohybrid. The AuNP-SiO2-Qdots conjugate was afterward conjugated to a molecular beacon (MB), thus forming an ultrasensitive LSPR-induced SiO2-Qdots-MB biosensor probe that detected a perfect nucleotide DNA sequence at a concentration as low as 10 fg/mL. The limit of detection was 11 fg/mL (1.4 fM) while the biosensor probe efficiently distinguished between single-base mismatch and noncomplementary sequence target.

  7. Localization of hypericin-induced fluorescence after Hypericum perforatum polar fraction instillation in normal rat urinary bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Nikos E.; Skalkos, Dimitris; Tsimaris, Ioannis; Kalogeras, D.; Nseyo, Unyime O.; Batistatou, A.; Agnantis, N. J.

    2005-04-01

    The photodynamic action of the Hypericum perforatum L. extract, mainly its polar methanolic fraction (PMF) has recently been substantiated by our group. The herb contains a number of naphthodianthrones - photosensitizers mainly hypericin and pseudohypericin. The concentration of hypericins in PMF was found to be 1.37 %. The distribution of hypericins fluorescence in sections of normal rat bladder tissues after the intravesical instillation of the polar methanolic fraction of hypericum (PMF) was studied by the use of fluorescence microscopy. PMF was dissolved in normal saline containing 0.5 μg/ml concentration of hypericins, and was then instilled in rat bladder for 15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes respectively. PMF solutions were withdrawn, bladders were rinsed through the catheter with normal saline and rats were sacrificed. Bladders were then removed, cut open and immediately mounted in medium, and immersed in liquid nitrogen. Two consecutive 3-μm frozen sections were cut with a cryostat. The first section was examined by fluorescence microscopy and the second section was stained with hematoxylin and eosin. For fluorescence imaging the filter set used included a 535/50 nm bandpass excitation filter and a 610/75 nm emission filter. Fluorescence images were acquired and documented using photography. Fluorescene could be detected in bladder samples after only 15 minutes of instillation with the above described solution. The urothelium / muscle fluorescence ratio ranged from 5/1 to 11/1 in various sites of the samples examined. No fluorescence originating from the muscle could be detected. PMF should be further studied towards the direction of its use in photodynamic therapy.

  8. Fluorescent microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  9. A novel method for localizing reporter fluorescent beads near the cell culture surface for traction force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Samantha G; Ali, M Yakut; Saif, M Taher A

    2014-09-16

    PA gels have long been used as a platform to study cell traction forces due to ease of fabrication and the ability to tune their elastic properties. When the substrate is coated with an extracellular matrix protein, cells adhere to the gel and apply forces, causing the gel to deform. The deformation depends on the cell traction and the elastic properties of the gel. If the deformation field of the surface is known, surface traction can be calculated using elasticity theory. Gel deformation is commonly measured by embedding fluorescent marker beads uniformly into the gel. The probes displace as the gel deforms. The probes near the surface of the gel are tracked. The displacements reported by these probes are considered as surface displacements. Their depths from the surface are ignored. This assumption introduces error in traction force evaluations. For precise measurement of cell forces, it is critical for the location of the beads to be known. We have developed a technique that utilizes simple chemistry to confine fluorescent marker beads, 0.1 and 1 µm in diameter, in PA gels, within 1.6 μm of the surface. We coat a coverslip with poly-D-lysine (PDL) and fluorescent beads. PA gel solution is then sandwiched between the coverslip and an adherent surface. The fluorescent beads transfer to the gel solution during curing. After polymerization, the PA gel contains fluorescent beads on a plane close to the gel surface.

  10. Tetracysteine-based fluorescent tags to study protein localization and trafficking in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Crivat

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum (Pf malaria parasites remodel host erythrocytes by placing membranous structures in the host cell cytoplasm and inserting proteins into the surrounding erythrocyte membranes. Dynamic imaging techniques with high spatial and temporal resolutions are required to study the trafficking pathways of proteins and the time courses of their delivery to the host erythrocyte membrane.Using a tetracysteine (TC motif tag and TC-binding biarsenical fluorophores (BAFs including fluorescein arsenical hairpin (FlAsH and resorufin arsenical hairpin (ReAsH, we detected knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP constructs in Pf-parasitized erythrocytes and compared their fluorescence signals to those of GFP (green fluorescent protein-tagged KAHRP. Rigorous treatment with BAL (2, 3 dimercaptopropanol; British anti-Lewisite was required to reduce high background due to nonspecific BAF interactions with endogenous cysteine-rich proteins. After this background reduction, similar patterns of fluorescence were obtained from the TC- and GFP-tagged proteins. The fluorescence from FlAsH and ReAsH-labeled protein bleached at faster rates than the fluorescence from GFP-labeled protein.While TC/BAF labeling to Pf-infected erythrocytes is presently limited by high background signals, it may offer a useful complement or alternative to GFP labeling methods. Our observations are in agreement with the currently-accepted model of KAHRP movement through the cytoplasm, including transient association of KAHRP with Maurer's clefts before its incorporation into knobs in the host erythrocyte membrane.

  11. Effects of Photoactivated Titanium Dioxide Nanopowders and Coating on Planktonic and Biofilm Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polo, Andrea; Diamanti, Maria Vittoria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    . A running protocol for the photoactivation of TiO(2) was set up using the dye rhodamine B. The microorganisms studied were Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a Bacillus cereus-group as planktonic cells. P. aeruginosa biofilms were also studied at both the solid-liquid and the solid......-air interface. The TiO(2) nanopowder produced 1-log reduction of Bacillus sp. planktonic cells in 24 h, 2-log reduction of P. stutzeri planktonic cells in 30 min and 1-log reduction of P. aeruginosa planktonic cells in 2 h compared to non-photoactivated TiO(2) . TiO(2) thin film produced almost a complete...

  12. Photoactivation experiment on 197Au and its implications for the dipole strength in heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Nair, C; Junghans, A R; Bemmerer, D; Beyer, R; Grosse, E; Klug, J; Kosev, K; Rusev, G; Schilling, K D; Schwengner, R; Wagner, A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.78.055802

    2008-01-01

    The 197Au(gamma,n) reaction is used as an activation standard for photodisintegration studies on astrophysically relevant nuclei. At the bremsstrahlung facility of the superconducting electron accelerator ELBE (Electron Linear accelerator of high Brilliance and low Emittance) of Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, photoactivation measurements on 197Au have been performed with bremsstrahlung endpoint energies from 8.0 to 15.5 MeV. The measured activation yield is compared with previous experiments as well as with calculations using Hauser-Feshbach statistical models. It is shown that the experimental data are best described by a two-Lorentzian parametrization with taking the axial deformation of 197Au into account. The experimental 197Au(gamma,n) reaction yield measured at ELBE via the photoactivation method is found to be consistent with previous experimental data using photon scattering or neutron detection methods.

  13. Single-wavelength-controlled in situ dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging for block copolymer nanostructures via blue-light-switchable FRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wen-Liang; Yan, Jie; Zhao, Ling-Xi; Li, Chong; Huang, Zhen-Li; Tang, Ben Zhong; Zhu, Ming-Qiang

    2016-11-02

    Photoswitchable fluorophores are promising in single-molecule optical devices and super-resolution fluorescence imaging, especially in single-molecule photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) or stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). However, the scarcity of current photoswitchable fluorophores stimulates researchers to develop complicated optical systems and processing software, in accordance with the limited photoswitchable fluorescent proteins and organic fluorophores. Previous efforts to develop synthetic photoswitchable fluorophores have exhibited their promising potential in super-resolution fluorescence imaging. Here, we have designed and synthesized a fluorescence molecular switch with reversible green emission, a napthalimide-hexaarylbiimidazole conjugate (NI-N-HABI), which exhibits strong fluorescence in the emissive state, with fast thermal fading of the photochromism and spontaneous fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) induced by blue-light. The photoswitchable fluorophore enables the red-edge wavelength of the optical response to red-shift from the initial near-UV region at less than 400 nm, to 500 nm. The relatively fast fading speed of NI-N-HABI and its sensitivity to longer blue-light irradiation (400-500 nm) have allowed simplification of the optical microscopic system from a two-wavelength laser source to a single-wavelength laser. We applied NI-N-HABI in single-wavelength-controlled in situ dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging for the self-assembly and solvent annealing of amphiphilic block polymers, with 50 nm of optical resolution. Single-wavelength-controlled dynamic super-resolution fluorescence imaging facilitates nanoscale optical visualization for the dynamic physical and chemical fluctuation processes of stimuli-responsive nanostructures.

  14. Photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT): the potential of excited-state d-block metals in medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Farrer, Nicola J.; Salassa, Luca; Sadler, P. J.

    2009-01-01

    The fields of phototherapy and of inorganic chemotherapy both have long histories. Inorganic photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT) offers both temporal and spatial control over drug activation and has remarkable potential for the treatment of cancer. Following photoexcitation, a number of different decay pathways (both photophysical and photochemical) are available to a metal complex. These pathways can result in radiative energy release, loss of ligands or transfer of energy to another species,...

  15. Use of photoactivated disinfection and platelet-rich fibrin in regenerative Endodontics

    OpenAIRE

    Dexton Antony Johns; Vasundara Yayathi Shivashankar; Shoba Krishnamma; Manu Johns

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Photoactivated disinfection has been used as an adjunct to conventional endodontic treatment. Its use in regenerative endodontics is not reported in literature. The aim of this case report was to describe a new proposal for pulp revascularization with disinfection of pulp canal space using a unique combination of a photosensitizer solution and low-power laser light. Materials and Methods: A 9-year-old boy came with the chief complaint of discolored upper central incisors (#8, #9). A ...

  16. De novo generation of singlet oxygen and ammine ligands by photoactivation of a platinum anticancer complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yao; Farrer, Nicola J; Li, Huilin; Butler, Jennifer S; McQuitty, Ruth J; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wang, Fuyi; Sadler, Peter J

    2013-12-16

    Worth the excitement: Highly reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are generated by photoactivation of the anticancer platinum(IV) complex trans,trans,trans-[Pt(N3 )2 (OH)2 (MA)(Py)] (MA=methylamine, Py=pyridine). Singlet oxygen is formed from the hydroxido ligands and not from dissolved oxygen, and ammine ligands are products from the conversion of azido ligands to nitrenes. Both processes can induce oxidation of guanine.

  17. Structural Changes of the Active Center during the Photoactivation of Xenopus (6-4) Photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Daichi; Yamamoto, Junpei; Zhang, Yu; Iwata, Tatsuya; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Iwai, Shigenori; Kandori, Hideki

    2016-02-02

    Photolyases (PHRs) repair the UV-induced photoproducts, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) or pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct [(6-4) PP], restoring normal bases to maintain genetic integrity. CPD and (6-4) PP are repaired by substrate-specific PHRs, CPD PHR and (6-4) PHR, respectively. Flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) is the chromophore of both PHRs, and the resting oxidized form (FAD(ox)), at least under in vitro purified conditions, is first photoconverted to the neutral semiquinoid radical (FADH(•)) form, followed by photoconversion into the enzymatically active fully reduced (FADH(-)) form. Previously, we reported light-induced difference Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra corresponding to the photoactivation process of Xenopus (6-4) PHR. Spectral differences between the absence and presence of (6-4) PP were observed in the photoactivation process. To identify the FTIR signals where these differences appeared, we compared the FTIR spectra of photoactivation (i) in the presence and absence of (6-4) PP, (ii) of (13)C labeling, (15)N labeling, and [(14)N]His/(15)N labeling, and (iii) of H354A and H358A mutants. We successfully assigned the vibrational bands for (6-4) PP, the α-helix and neutral His residue(s). In particular, we assigned three bands to the C ═ O groups of (6-4) PP in the three different redox states of FAD. Furthermore, the changed hydrogen bonding environments of C ═ O groups of (6-4) PP suggested restructuring of the binding pocket of the DNA lesion in the process of photoactivation.

  18. FTIR Study of the Photoactivation Process of Xenopus (6-4) Photolyase†

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Photolyases (PHRs) are blue-light activated DNA repair enzymes that maintain genetic integrity by reverting UV-induced photoproducts into normal bases. The FAD chromophore of PHRs has four different redox states: oxidized (FADox), anion radical (FAD•−), neutral radical (FADH•) and fully reduced (FADH−). We combined difference Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with UV-visible spectroscopy to study the detailed photoactivation process of Xenopus (6-4) PHR. Two photons produce the e...

  19. Predicting small molecule fluorescent probe localization in living cells using QSAR modeling. 1. Overview and models for probes of structure, properties and function in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horobin, R W; Rashid-Doubell, F; Pediani, J D; Milligan, G

    2013-11-01

    Small molecule fluorochromes (synonyms: biosensors, chemosensors, fluorescent probes, vital stains) are widely used to investigate the structure, composition, physicochemical properties and biological functions of living cells, tissues and organisms. Selective entry and accumulation within particular cells and cellular structures are key processes for achieving these diverse objectives. Despite the complexities, probes routinely are applied using standard protocols, often without experimenter awareness of what factors that control accumulation and localization. The mechanisms of many such selective accumulations, however, now are known. Moreover, the influence of physicochemical properties of probes on their uptake and localization often can be defined numerically, hence predicted, using quantitative structure activity relations (QSAR) models with its required numerical structure parameters (or "descriptors"). The state of the art of this approach is described. Available QSAR models are summarized for uptake into cells and localization in the cytosol, endoplasmic reticulum, generic biomembranes, Golgi apparatus, lipid droplets, lysosomes/endosomes, mitochondria, eukaryotic nuclei (histones and DNA), plasma membrane, and ribosomal RNA (cytoplasmic and nucleolar). Integration of such core models to both aid understanding and troubleshooting of current fluorescent probes and to assist the design of novel probes is outlined and illustrated using case examples. Limitations and generic problems arising with this approach and comments on application of such approaches to xenobiotics other than probes, e.g., drugs and herbicides, together with a brief note about an alternative approach to prediction, are given.

  20. Dynamics of Excited States for Fluorescent Emitters with Hybridized Local and Charge-Transfer Excited State in Solid Phase: A QM/MM Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianzhong; Cai, Lei; Lin, Lili; Wang, Chuan-Kui

    2016-12-01

    The highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDS) based on fluorescent emitters with hybridized local and charge-transfer (HLCT) excited state have attracted great attention recently. The excited-state dynamics of the fluorescent molecule with consideration of molecular interaction are studied using the hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics method. The results show that, in solid state, the internal conversion rate (KIC) between the first singlet excited state (S1) and the ground state (S0) is smaller than the fluorescent rate (Kr), while in gas phase KIC is much larger than Kr. By analyzing the Huang-Rhys (HR) factor and reorganization energy (λ), we find that these two parameters in solid state are much smaller than those in gas phase due to the suppression of the vibration modes in low-frequency regions (solid state than that in gas phase. Moreover, combining the dynamics of the excited states and the adiabatic energy structures calculated in solid state, we illustrate the suggested "hot-exciton" mechanism of the HLCT emitters in OLEDs. Our work presents a rational explanation for the experimental results and demonstrates the importance of molecular interaction for theoretical simulation of the working principle of OLEDs.

  1. The application of the fluorescence procedure for the determination of local lubricant film thicknesses; Die Anwendung des Fluoreszenzverfahrens zur Bestimmung lokaler Schmierfilmdicken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, H.; Hildebrand, M. [Technische Univ. Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Metallformung

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the friction and lubrication during the deformation of metals requires the determination of local lubricant film thicknesses. For this purpose the fluorescence procedure was used by the excitation with lasers. The aspired high local resolution could not be realized due to photolysis of the dye. A measuring spot of a minimum size of 1.5 x 1.5 mm was reached for the measurement of lubricant film thicknesses up to 5 {mu}m with a luminescence scanner. (orig.) [German] Die Analyse der Reibung und Schmierung in der Umformung von Metallen erfordert die Bestimmung lokaler Schmierfilmdicken. Dazu wurde das Fluoreszenzverfahren mit Anregung durch Laser angewendet. Die angestrebte hohe oertliche Aufloesung konnte infolge Fotolyse des Farbstoffes nicht realisiert werden. Mit einem Lumineszenztaster konnte ein Messfleck mit einer minimalen Groesse von 1,5 x 1,5 mm bei Schmierfilmdicken bis zu 5 {mu}m erreicht werden. (orig.)

  2. An Engineered Split Intein for Photoactivated Protein Trans-Splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley Wong

    Full Text Available Protein splicing is mediated by inteins that auto-catalytically join two separated protein fragments with a peptide bond. Here we engineered a genetically encoded synthetic photoactivatable intein (named LOVInC, by using the light-sensitive LOV2 domain from Avena sativa as a switch to modulate the splicing activity of the split DnaE intein from Nostoc punctiforme. Periodic blue light illumination of LOVInC induced protein splicing activity in mammalian cells. To demonstrate the broad applicability of LOVInC, synthetic protein systems were engineered for the light-induced reassembly of several target proteins such as fluorescent protein markers, a dominant positive mutant of RhoA, caspase-7, and the genetically encoded Ca2+ indicator GCaMP2. Spatial precision of LOVInC was demonstrated by targeting activity to specific mammalian cells. Thus, LOVInC can serve as a general platform for engineering light-based control for modulating the activity of many different proteins.

  3. Localized immunoassay in flow-through optical microbubble resonator (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneschi, Simone; Baldini, Francesco; Cosci, Alessandro; Cosi, Franco; Farnesi, Daniele; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Pelli, Stefano; Giannetti, Ambra

    2016-05-01

    The integration of the Whispering Gallery Modes (WGMs) resonators in a microfluidics platform represents an important feature towards the realization of a compact high performance label-free biosensor. These hollow resonant microstructures present the advantage to combine the WGM resonator properties with the intrinsic capability of integrated microfluidics. In this sense, optical microbubble resonators (OMBRs), intended as a hollow core spherical bulge realized in a glass microcapillary by a suitable fabrication process, with their high Q factors (microfluidic parts completely inert from a biochemical point of view. The method is based on UV photoactivation, which allows to localize the biolayers only in correspondence of the OMBR inner wall. As a proof of concept, an immunoassay based on rabbit IgG/anti rabbit-IgG interaction was performed and. The anti rabbit-IgG antibody was labelled with Alexa Fluor 488 to verify, by a fluorescence characterization, the goodness of this procedure. Moreover, an anti mouse-IgG, labelled with the same fluorophore (Alexa Fluor 488) was used for specificity-tests of the IgG/anti-IgG interaction. The immunoassay based on fluorescence was characterized using an optical microscope (Zeiss AXIO inverted fluorescence microscope) working at the wavelengths of 470 nm for excitation of Alexa Fluor 488. The real time measurement of the resonance broadening after each functionalization step together with the high Q factor (< 105) measured after the IgG/anti-IgG interaction in water, gives a further proof for the method validity.

  4. Chromosomal localization of silkworm (Bombyx mori) sericin gene 1 and chymotrypsin inhibitor 13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG FangZhou; CHANG PingAn; ZHANG PingBo; YI FaPing; MA YongPing; LU Cheng; Yutaka BANNO; Hiroshi FUJII

    2008-01-01

    The chromosomal locations of two single-copy genes, Ser-1 and C1-13, in silkworm (Bombyx mori)were detected at the molecular cytogenetics level by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the study. The resuits showed that Ser-1 is located near the distal end of the 11th linkage group, relatively st the 12.5±1.4position in pachytene; and that C1-13 has been mapped near the distal end of the 2nd linkage group,relatively at the 8.2±1.2 position in pachytene. Furthermore, their location model map-FISH map on silkworm chromosome was drawn. The FISH technique and its application to silkworm are also discussed in this paper.

  5. Chromosomal localization of silkworm (Bombyx mori) sericin gene 1 and chymotrypsin inhibitor 13 using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka; BANNO; Hiroshi; FUJII

    2008-01-01

    The chromosomal locations of two single-copy genes, Ser-1 and CI-13, in silkworm (Bombyx mori) were detected at the molecular cytogenetics level by fluorescence in situ hybridization in the study. The results showed that Ser-1 is located near the distal end of the 11th linkage group, relatively at the 12.5±1.4 position in pachytene; and that CI-13 has been mapped near the distal end of the 2nd linkage group, relatively at the 8.2±1.2 position in pachytene. Furthermore, their location model map-FISH map on silkworm chromosome was drawn. The FISH technique and its application to silkworm are also discussed in this paper.

  6. A Quantitative Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Fluorescent Labeling on Membrane-Bound HIV-Gag Assembly by Titration of Unlabeled Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Gunzenhäuser

    Full Text Available The assembly process of the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 is driven by the viral polyprotein Gag. Fluorescence imaging of Gag protein fusions is widely performed and has revealed important information on viral assembly. Gag fusion proteins are commonly co-transfected with an unlabeled form of Gag to prevent labeling artifacts such as morphological defects and decreased infectivity. Although viral assembly is widely studied on individual cells, the efficiency of the co-transfection rescue has never been tested at the single cell level. Here, we first develop a methodology to quantify levels of unlabeled to labeled Gag in single cells using a fluorescent reporter protein for unlabeled Gag and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Using super-resolution imaging based on photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM combined with molecular counting we then study the nanoscale morphology of Gag clusters as a function of unlabeled to labeled Gag ratios in single cells. We show that for a given co-transfection ratio, individual cells express a wide range of protein ratios, necessitating a quantitative read-out for the expression of unlabeled Gag. Further, we show that monomerically labeled Gag assembles into membrane-bound clusters that are morphologically indistinguishable from mixtures of unlabeled and labeled Gag.

  7. Compressive strength of dental composites photo-activated with different light tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, M. R.; Caldas, S. G. F. R.; Calabrez-Filho, S.; Campos, E. A.; Bagnato, V. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the compressive strength of microhybrid (Filtek™ Z250) and nanofilled (Filtek™ Supreme XT) composite resins photo-activated with two different light guide tips, fiber optic and polymer, coupled with one LED. The power density was 653 mW cm-2 when using the fiber optic light tip and 596 mW cm-2 with the polymer. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 2 °C for seven days, the samples were subjected to mechanical testing of compressive strength in an EMIC universal mechanical testing machine with a load cell of 5 kN and speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA with a confidence interval of 95% and Tamhane’s test. The results showed that the mean values of compressive strength were not influenced by the different light tips (p > 0.05). However, a statistical difference was observed (p composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip and the nanofilled composite resin. Based on these results, it can be concluded that microhybrid composite resin photo-activated with the fiber optic light tip showed better results than nanofilled, regardless of the tip used, and the type of the light tip did not influence the compressive strength of either composite. Thus, the presented results suggest that both the fiber optic and polymer light guide tips provide adequate compressive strength to be used to make restorations. However, the fiber optic light tip associated with microhybrid composite resin may be an interesting option for restorations mainly in posterior teeth.

  8. Light-induced structural changes in a short light, oxygen, voltage (LOV protein revealed by molecular dynamics simulations – implications for the understanding of LOV photoactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco eBocola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The modularity of light, oxygen, voltage (LOV blue-light photoreceptors has recently been exploited for the design of LOV-based optogenetic tools, which allow the light-dependent control of biological functions. For the understanding of LOV sensory function and hence the optimal design of LOV-based optogentic tools it is essential to gain an in depth atomic-level understanding of the underlying photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay mechanisms. To address this question we performed molecular dynamics simulations on both the dark- and light-adapted state of PpSB1-LOV, a short dimeric bacterial LOV-photoreceptor protein, recently crystallized under constant illumination. While LOV dimers remained globally stable during the light-state simulation with regard to the Jα coiled-coil, distinct conformational changes for a glutamine in the vicinity of the FMN chromophore are observed. In contrast, multiple Jα-helix conformations are sampled in the dark-state. These changes coincide with a displacement of the Iβ and Hβ strands relative to the light-state structure and result in a correlated rotation of both LOV core domains in the dimer. These global changes are most likely initiated by the reorientation of the conserved glutamine Q116, whose side chain flips between the Aβ (dark state and Hβ strand (light state, while maintaining two potential hydrogen bonds to FMN-N5 and FMN-O4, respectively. This local Q116-FMN reorientation impacts on an inter-subunit salt-bridge (K117-E96, which is stabilized in the light state, hence accounting for the observed decreased mobility. Based on these findings we propose an alternative mechanism for dimeric LOV photoactivation and intramolecular signal-relay, assigning a distinct structural role for the conserved flipping glutamine. The proposed mechanism is discussed in light of universal applicability and its implications for the understanding of LOV-based optogenetic tools.

  9. Cytoplasmic localization of a functionally active Fanconi anemia group A green fluorescent protein chimera in human 293 cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruyt, FAE; Waisfisz, Q; Dijkmans, LM; Hermsen, M.A.; Youssoufian, H; Arwert, F; Joenje, H

    1997-01-01

    Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents and predisposition to malignancy are characteristic of the genetically heterogeneous inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, Fanconi anemia (FA). The protein encoded by the recently cloned FA complementation group A gene, FAA, has been expected to localize in

  10. local

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abílio Amiguinho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of socio-educational territorialisation in rural contexts is the topic of this text. The theme corresponds to a challenge to address it having as main axis of discussion either the problem of social exclusion or that of local development. The reasons to locate the discussion in this last field of analysis are discussed in the first part of the text. Theoretical and political reasons are there articulated because the question is about projects whose intentions and practices call for the political both in the theoretical debate and in the choices that anticipate intervention. From research conducted for several years, I use contributions that aim at discuss and enlighten how school can be a potential locus of local development. Its identification and recognition as local institution (either because of those that work and live in it or because of those that act in the surrounding context are crucial steps to progressively constitute school as a partner for development. The promotion of the local values and roots, the reconstruction of socio-personal and local identities, the production of sociabilities and the equation and solution of shared problems were the dimensions of a socio-educative intervention, markedly globalising. This scenario, as it is argued, was also, intentionally, one of transformation and of deliberate change of school and of the administration of the educative territoires.

  11. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  12. Partitioning and Localization of Environment-Sensitive 2-(2′-Pyridyl)- and 2-(2′-Pyrimidyl)-Indoles in Lipid Membranes: A Joint Refinement Using Fluorescence Measurements and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Wu, Feiyue; Thummel, Randolph P.; Waluk, Jacek; Ladokhin, Alexey S.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence of environment-sensitive dyes is widely applied to monitor local structure and solvation dynamics of biomolecules. It has been shown that, in comparison with a parent indole fluorophore, fluorescence of 2-(2′-pyridyl)-5-methylindole (5M-PyIn-0) and 2-[2′-(4′,6′-dimethylpyrimidyl)]-indole (DMPmIn-0) is remarkably sensitive to hydrogen bonding with protic partners. Strong fluorescence, observed for these compounds in nonpolar and polar aprotic solvents, is efficiently quenched in a...

  13. Fluorescently labeled inhibitors detect localized serine protease activities in Drosophila melanogaster pole cells, embryos, and ovarian egg chambers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Rasmus Kragh; Ono, S.; Powers, J. C.

    2005-01-01

    processes that they mediate. Until only recently, the tools to conveniently address the question of where and when serine proteases are active within complex tissues have been lacking. In order to detect spatially restricted serine protease activities in Drosophila embryos and ovaries we introduce...... activity localized to the oocyte-somatic follicle cell interface of the developing egg chamber. Our results suggest that this technique holds promise to identify new spatially restricted activities in adult Drosophila tissues and developing embryos....

  14. Analysis of local structure of Arg10 domain in apo-α- lactalbumin with a polarity-sensitive arginine-specific fluorescent probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe, 3-(4-chloro-6-p-glyoxalphenoxy-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7- (dimethylamino)-2-methylphenazine, was used to analyze the local structure of apo-α-lactalbumin by detecting the polarity and conformational changes of the arginine residue (Arg10) domain. The polarity of the Arg10 domain in both native and heat-denatured apo-α-lactalbumin was determined, which corresponds to a dielectric constant of 16, and the hydrophobic core near the Arg10 was found to be conservative for heating. Meanwhile, the effect of Ca2+ binding on the conformational changes of the Arg10 domain was studied, revealing that the hydrophobic core near the Arg10 is insensitive to the binding of Ca2+.

  15. Robust augmented reality registration method for localization of solid organs' tumors using CT-derived virtual biomechanical model and fluorescent fiducials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Seong-Ho; Haouchine, Nazim; Soares, Renato; Klymchenko, Andrey; Andreiuk, Bohdan; Marques, Bruno; Shabat, Galyna; Piechaud, Thierry; Diana, Michele; Cotin, Stéphane; Marescaux, Jacques

    2017-07-01

    Augmented reality (AR) is the fusion of computer-generated and real-time images. AR can be used in surgery as a navigation tool, by creating a patient-specific virtual model through 3D software manipulation of DICOM imaging (e.g., CT scan). The virtual model can be superimposed to real-time images enabling transparency visualization of internal anatomy and accurate localization of tumors. However, the 3D model is rigid and does not take into account inner structures' deformations. We present a concept of automated AR registration, while the organs undergo deformation during surgical manipulation, based on finite element modeling (FEM) coupled with optical imaging of fluorescent surface fiducials. Two 10 × 1 mm wires (pseudo-tumors) and six 10 × 0.9 mm fluorescent fiducials were placed in ex vivo porcine kidneys (n = 10). Biomechanical FEM-based models were generated from CT scan. Kidneys were deformed and the shape changes were identified by tracking the fiducials, using a near-infrared optical system. The changes were registered automatically with the virtual model, which was deformed accordingly. Accuracy of prediction of pseudo-tumors' location was evaluated with a CT scan in the deformed status (ground truth). In vivo: fluorescent fiducials were inserted under ultrasound guidance in the kidney of one pig, followed by a CT scan. The FEM-based virtual model was superimposed on laparoscopic images by automatic registration of the fiducials. Biomechanical models were successfully generated and accurately superimposed on optical images. The mean measured distance between the estimated tumor by biomechanical propagation and the scanned tumor (ground truth) was 0.84 ± 0.42 mm. All fiducials were successfully placed in in vivo kidney and well visualized in near-infrared mode enabling accurate automatic registration of the virtual model on the laparoscopic images. Our preliminary experiments showed the potential of a biomechanical model with fluorescent

  16. EFFICENCY OF PHOTOACTIVATED DISINFECTION ON EXPERIMENTAL BIOFILM - SCANING ELECTRON MICROSCOPY RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Filipov

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Photoactivated disinfection is a new antimicrobial method for root canal disinfection, based on photodynamic therapy.Purpose: The goal of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial effect of photoactivated disinfection on experimental biofilm from Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans, through scanning electron microscopy.Material and Methods: Freshly extracted, one root teeth were prepared with a sequence of rotary nickel-titanium files (ProTaper ; Dentsply ; Mailefer , irrigated, the external root canal surfaces isolated with nail polish and autoclaved. After the incubation with the experimental biofilm, the root canals were filled with photosensitizer - Toluidine Blue – 0,01% and irradiated with Foto San(CMS Dental, 630 nm, 2000mW/cm2 for 30 seconds.SEM was performed on the coronal, middle and apical third of the root canal, for evaluation of the results.Results and discussion: In the range of 600 to 8000, SEM showed significant reduction of microorganisms from the canal system. A large increase in microorganisms was observed, showing a disturbance in the cell membrane, as effect from the activation of chromophore with the laser and the penetration of the photosensitizer in dental tubules. In the apical third single microorganisms were observed. This may due to decreased penetration of the photosensitizer, incomplete pervasion of MB in the biofilm or insufficient oxygenation.Conclusion: FAD has the potential to be a good alternative and addition to the conventional root canal disinfection methods.SEM is a precise method for endodontic treatment result evaluation.

  17. Photoactivation Intermediates of a G-Protein Coupled Receptor Rhodopsin Investigated by a Hybrid Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Motoshi; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2017-04-20

    Rhodopsin is a G-protein coupled receptor functioning as a photoreceptor for vision through photoactivation of a covalently bound ligand of a retinal protonated Schiff base chromophore. Despite the availability of structural information on the inactivated and activated forms of the receptor, the transition processes initiated by the photoabsorption have not been well understood. Here we theoretically examined the photoactivation processes by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and ab initio quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy geometry optimizations which enabled accurate geometry determination of the ligand molecule in ample statistical conformational samples of the protein. Structures of the intermediate states of the activation process, blue-shifted intermediate and Lumi, as well as the dark state first generated by MD simulations and then refined by the QM/MM free energy geometry optimizations were characterized by large displacement of the β-ionone ring of retinal along with change in the hydrogen bond of the protonated Schiff base. The ab initio calculations of vibrational and electronic spectroscopic properties of those states well reproduced the experimental observations and successfully identified the molecular origins underlying the spectroscopic features. The structural evolution in the formation of the intermediates provides a molecular insight into the efficient activation processes of the receptor.

  18. A photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome for tumour control and simultaneous inhibition of treatment escape pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Bryan Sears, R.; Zheng, Lei Zak; Mai, Zhiming; Watanabe, Reika; Sherwood, Margaret E.; Schoenfeld, David A.; Pogue, Brian W.; Pereira, Stephen P.; Villa, Elizabeth; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2016-04-01

    Nanoscale drug delivery vehicles can facilitate multimodal therapies of cancer by promoting tumour-selective drug release. However, few are effective because cancer cells develop ways to resist and evade treatment. Here, we introduce a photoactivable multi-inhibitor nanoliposome (PMIL) that imparts light-induced cytotoxicity in synchrony with a photoinitiated and sustained release of inhibitors that suppress tumour regrowth and treatment escape signalling pathways. The PMIL consists of a nanoliposome doped with a photoactivable chromophore (benzoporphyrin derivative, BPD) in the lipid bilayer, and a nanoparticle containing cabozantinib (XL184)—a multikinase inhibitor—encapsulated inside. Near-infrared tumour irradiation, following intravenous PMIL administration, triggers photodynamic damage of tumour cells and microvessels, and simultaneously initiates release of XL184 inside the tumour. A single PMIL treatment achieves prolonged tumour reduction in two mouse models and suppresses metastatic escape in an orthotopic pancreatic tumour model. The PMIL offers new prospects for cancer therapy by enabling spatiotemporal control of drug release while reducing systemic drug exposure and associated toxicities.

  19. High pressure chemistry of red phosphorus by photo-activated simple molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppatelli, M.; Fanetti, S.; Bini, R.; Caporali, M.; Peruzzini, M.

    2014-05-01

    High pressure (HP) is very effective in reducing intermolecular distances and inducing unexpected chemical reactions. In addition the photo-activation of the reactants in HP conditions can lead to very efficient and selective processes. The chemistry of phosphorus is currently based on the white molecular form. The red polymeric allotrope, despite more stable and much less toxic, has not attracted much attention so far. However, switching from the white to the red form would benefit any industrial procedure, especially from an environmental point of view. On the other side, water and ethanol are renewable, environmental friendly and largely available molecules, usable as reactants and photo-activators in HP conditions. Here we report a study on the HP photo-induced reactivity of red phosphorus with water and ethanol, showing the possibility of very efficient and selective processes, leading to molecular hydrogen and valuable phosphorus compounds. The reactions have been studied by means of FTIR and Raman spectroscopy and pressure has been generated using membrane Diamond (DAC) and Sapphire (SAC) anvil cells. HP reactivity has been activated by the two-photon absorption of near-UV wavelengths and occurred in total absence of solvents, catalysts and radical initiators, at room T and mild pressure conditions (0.2-1.5 GPa).

  20. Photoactivated excited states of DNA repair photolyase: Dynamical and semiempircal identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuehe; Ly, Ngan M.; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A.

    DNA damage caused by UV light radiation is often naturally repaired in a process initiated by excited state electron transfer from the photoactivated photolyase enzyme to the DNA cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesion. The active cofactor in the excited state electron transfer in the photolyase is the two-electron fully reduced form of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH-). To calculate electron tunneling matrix element and model the DNA binding with photolyase, the LUMO of the FADH- calculated using extended Huckel method was previously chosen from the SCF wavefunctions. Recently, the DNA-photolyase complex was crystallized in its bound form, in good agreement with our previous model in even minute details at the active site. Here we carry out molecular dynamics simulation of the entire complex using the new experimental structure of Anacystis nidulans and identify the low-lying photoactivated states of the enzyme for the dynamical confirmations. Our results from ZINDO/S CIS calculations are compared with experimental UV spectra, and their implications for excited state electron transfer and energy transfer are discussed.0

  1. Sub-diffraction limit localization of proteins in volumetric space using Bayesian restoration of fluorescence images from ultrathin specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Wang

    Full Text Available Photon diffraction limits the resolution of conventional light microscopy at the lateral focal plane to 0.61λ/NA (λ = wavelength of light, NA = numerical aperture of the objective and at the axial plane to 1.4nλ/NA(2 (n = refractive index of the imaging medium, 1.51 for oil immersion, which with visible wavelengths and a 1.4NA oil immersion objective is -220 nm and -600 nm in the lateral plane and axial plane respectively. This volumetric resolution is too large for the proper localization of protein clustering in subcellular structures. Here we combine the newly developed proteomic imaging technique, Array Tomography (AT, with its native 50-100 nm axial resolution achieved by physical sectioning of resin embedded tissue, and a 2D maximum likelihood deconvolution method, based on Bayes' rule, which significantly improves the resolution of protein puncta in the lateral plane to allow accurate and fast computational segmentation and analysis of labeled proteins. The physical sectioning of AT allows tissue specimens to be imaged at the physical optimum of modern high NA plan-apochormatic objectives. This translates to images that have little out of focus light, minimal aberrations and wave-front distortions. Thus, AT is able to provide images with truly invariant point spread functions (PSF, a property critical for accurate deconvolution. We show that AT with deconvolution increases the volumetric analytical fidelity of protein localization by significantly improving the modulation of high spatial frequencies up to and potentially beyond the spatial frequency cut-off of the objective. Moreover, we are able to achieve this improvement with no noticeable introduction of noise or artifacts and arrive at object segmentation and localization accuracies on par with image volumes captured using commercial implementations of super-resolution microscopes.

  2. Development of an automated fluorescence microscopy system for photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins (optogenetics) in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Nobukazu; Ikeda, Yuka; Kato, Takuma; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Egami, Youhei; Miyake, Katsuya; Tsurumaki, Nobuhide; Yamaguchi, Mitsunari

    2014-06-01

    Photomanipulation of genetically encoded light-sensitive protein activity, also known as optogenetics, is one of the most innovative recent microscopy techniques in the fields of cell biology and neurobiology. Although photomanipulation is usually performed by diverting the photobleaching mode of a confocal laser microscope, photobleaching by the laser scanning unit is not always suitable for photoactivation. We have developed a simple automated wide-field fluorescence microscopy system for the photomanipulation of genetically encoded photoactivatable proteins in live cells. An electrically automated fluorescence microscope can be controlled through MetaMorph imaging software, making it possible to acquire time-lapse, multiwavelength images of live cells. Using the journal (macro recording) function of MetaMorph, we wrote a macro program to change the excitation filter for photoactivation and illumination area during the intervals of image acquisition. When this program was run on the wide-field fluorescence microscope, cells expressing genetically encoded photoactivatable Rac1, which is activated under blue light, showed morphological changes such as lamellipodial extension and cell surface ruffling in the illuminated region. Using software-based development, we successfully constructed a fully automated photoactivation microscopy system for a mercury lamp-based fluorescence microscope.

  3. UV-photoactivation technique for size and shape controlled synthesis and annealing of stable gold nanoparticles in micelle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhuri Mandal; Subrata Kundu; Sujit Kumar Ghosh; Tarasankar Pal

    2002-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes have been prepared by UV-photoactivation technique using the micelle TX-100 (poly(oxyethylene) iso-octylphenyl ether) as reducing agent, stabilizing agent as well as template which has been authenticated from the plasmon absorption band and TEM picture. The heating effect on those gold nanoparticles has also been studied.

  4. Locally-excited (LE) versus charge-transfer (CT) excited state competition in a series of para-substituted neutral green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Seth

    2015-02-12

    In this paper, I provide a characterization of the low-energy electronic structure of a series of para-substituted neutral green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore models using a theoretical approach that blends linear free energy relationships (LFERs) with state-averaged complete-active-space self-consistent field (SA-CASSCF) theory. The substituents are chosen to sample the Hammett σ(p) scale from R = F to NH2, and a model of the neutral GFP chromophore structure (R = OH) is included. I analyze the electronic structure for different members of the series in a common complete-active-space valence-bond (CASVB) representation, exploiting an isolobal analogy between active-space orbitals for different members of the series. I find that the electronic structure of the lowest adiabatic excited state is a strong mixture of weakly coupled states with charge-transfer (CT) or locally excited (LE) character and that the dominant character changes as the series is traversed. Chromophores with strongly electron-donating substituents have a CT-like excited state such as expected for a push-pull polyene or asymmetric cyanine. Chromophores with weakly electron-donating (or electron-withdrawing) substituents have an LE-like excited state with an ionic biradicaloid structure localized to the ground-state bridge π bond.

  5. Analysis of local polarity change around Cys34 in bovine serum albumin during N→B transition by a polarity-sensitive fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Guo, Lihong; Ma, Huimin

    2009-09-01

    The change trend of the local environment of Cys34 domain in bovine serum albumin has been studied as a function of pH value by using thiol-specific and polarity-sensitive fluorescent probe 3-(4-chloro-6- p-maleimidylphenoxyl-1,3,5-triazinylamino)-7-dimethylamino-2-methyl-phenazine. The local polarity of the Cys34 domain is found to rise with the increase of pH values, and the corresponding dielectric constant is raised from 12.8 at pH 6.0 to 23.3 at pH 9.1. The result shows that the environment of the Cys34 domain is rather hydrophobic in normal state at pH 6.0 and becomes a little hydrophilic in the course of N→B transition, which may be attributed to the slight unfolding of the protein and thus the increasing of exposure of the previously relatively buried Cys34. In addition, the increased dielectric constant (23.3) is much lower than that (80.1) of water, suggesting that the unfolding of bovine serum albumin does not cause the full exposure of the Cys34 to the aqueous media during the transition.

  6. Spatial localization of discrete fluorescent inclusions with early photons: an analysis on the stability with respect to variations of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Geoffroy; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2009-06-01

    We recently developed a time-domain technique for localizing in 3D discrete fluorescent inclusions embedded in a scattering medium. It exploits early photon arrival times (EPATs), that is the time of flight of early arriving photons at a detector determined via numerical constant fraction discrimination. Our localization technique requires the knowledge of the speed of propagation of diffuse light pulses in the turbid medium to convert measured propagation times to distances. We have developed an experimental method for measuring the speed of propagation of such pulses. We have shown that time differences between a reference detector position and other positions around the medium allow finding the position of the inclusion. Our technique allows localizing inclusions to millimeter precision in a thick 5 cm diameter turbid medium. Herein, we analyze the stability of EPAT differences introduced above and propagation speeds with respect to changes in the medium's optical properties for optical properties typical of biological tissues. As we target small animal imaging, we concentrate on optical properties of mouse organs and tissues. Our objective is to determine bounds to be expected on the precision that can be achieved when media properties can vary and determine the limits of validity of our localization technique. Our results show that EPAT differences and propagation speeds obtained by our approach can vary; these values depend on the medium. We study 5 kinds of mouse organs and tissues. Propagations speeds are between 2.97 × 107ms-1 and 5.52 × 107ms-1. Thus, it becomes important to evaluate the discrepancy between true geometrical distance differences and distances as obtained by our approach using a constant propagation speed and the measurement of EPAT differences. It is such discrepancies that ultimately determine the localization accuracy of our algorithm because if distance differences based on EPATs are far from true distances, our algorithm although it

  7. Cellular localization of kinin B1 receptor in the spinal cord of streptozotocin-diabetic rats with a fluorescent [Nα-Bodipy]-des-Arg9-bradykinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaudreau Pierrette

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kinin B1 receptor (B1R is upregulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines, bacterial endotoxins and hyperglycaemia-induced oxidative stress. In animal models of diabetes, it contributes to pain polyneuropathy. This study aims at defining the cellular localization of B1R in thoracic spinal cord of type 1 diabetic rats by confocal microscopy with the use of a fluorescent agonist, [Nα-Bodipy]-des-Arg9-BK (BdABK and selective antibodies. Methods Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (STZ; 65 mg/kg, i.p.. Four days post-STZ treatment, B1R expression was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR and autoradiography. The B1R selectivity of BdABK was determined by assessing its ability to displace B1R [125I]-HPP-desArg10-Hoe140 and B2R [125I]-HPP-Hoe 140 radioligands. The in vivo activity of BdABK was also evaluated on thermal hyperalgesia. Results B1R was increased by 18-fold (mRNA and 2.7-fold (binding sites in the thoracic spinal cord of STZ-treated rats when compared to control. BdABK failed to displace the B2R radioligand but displaced the B1R radioligand (IC50 = 5.3 nM. In comparison, IC50 values of B1R selective antagonist R-715 and B1R agonist des-Arg9-BK were 4.3 nM and 19 nM, respectively. Intraperitoneal BdABK and des-Arg9-BK elicited dose-dependent thermal hyperalgesia in STZ-treated rats but not in control rats. The B1R fluorescent agonist was co-localized with immunomarkers of microglia, astrocytes and sensory C fibers in the spinal cord of STZ-treated rats. Conclusion The induction and up-regulation of B1R in glial and sensory cells of the spinal cord in STZ-diabetic rats reinforce the idea that kinin B1R is an important target for drug development in pain processes.

  8. Zirconium oxocluster/polymer hybrid nanoparticles prepared by photoactivated miniemulsion copolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Cesare; Flouda, Paraskevi; Antonello, Alice; Rosenauer, Christine; Pérez-Pla, Francisco F.; Landfester, Katharina; Gross, Silvia; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael

    2017-09-01

    The photoactivated free radical miniemulsion copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and the zirconium oxocluster Zr4O2(methacrylate)12 is used as an effective and fast preparation method for polymer/inorganic hybrid nanoparticles. The oxoclusters, covalently anchored to the polymer network, act as metal-organic cross-linkers, thus improving the thermomechanical properties of the resulting hybrid nanoparticles. Benzoin carbonyl organic compounds were used as photoinitiators. The obtained materials are compared in terms of cross-linking, effectiveness of cluster incorporation, and size distribution with the analogous nanoparticles produced by using conventional thermally induced free radical miniemulsion copolymerization. The kinetics of the polymerization process in the absence and in the presence of the oxocluster is also investigated.

  9. A novel method for spatially complex diffraction-limited photoactivation and photobleaching in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkryl, Vyacheslav M; Maxwell, Joshua T; Blatter, Lothar A

    2012-03-01

    Photoactivated probes have gained interest as experimental tools to study intracellular signalling pathways all the way to the molecular level. However technical limitations of the means to activate such compounds have put constraints on their use in spatially highly restricted subcellular areas. The Mosaic digital illumination system uses a high-speed array of individually addressable, tiltable micromirrors to direct continuous-wave laser light onto a specimen with diffraction-limited precision. The system, integrated into a Nikon A1R confocal microscope, was used to uncage Ca²⁺ or IP3 and conduct photobleaching experiments from multiple geometrically complex subcellular regions while simultaneously measuring [Ca²⁺]i with high-speed confocal imaging.

  10. 42 MeV bremsstrahlung spectrum analysis by a photoactivation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calzado, A.; Vano, E.; Delgado, V.; Gonzalez, L. (Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Catedra de Fisica Medica; Junta de Energia Nuclear, Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Estudios Nucleares)

    1984-08-01

    The evaluation of 42 MeV, bremsstrahlung spectra from a clinical betatron by using the photoactivation method is described. Photonuclear reactions, mainly of the (..gamma.., n) type, are used as activation detectors. After measurements of photon-induced activities from residual nuclei are performed, the spectral distribution of photons is evaluated by solving the unfolding problem. The latter is carried out through the use of two independent methods, orthonormal expansion and Monte Carlo. In both cases prior conditions to the solution are imposed. Spectra evaluated by both methods and making use of two different size flattening filters are presented. An empirical method to estimate the 'effective' thickness of the Pt target is described.

  11. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

    1999-12-07

    This application describes a method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent. In this treatment the tissue retains at least a portion of one photo-active molecular agent. Then the tissue is treated with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of the photo-active molecular agent, causing it to become active in the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  12. Dopamine receptor DOP-4 modulates habituation to repetitive photoactivation of a C. elegans polymodal nociceptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiel, Evan L; Giles, Andrew C; Yu, Alex J; Lindsay, Theodore H; Lockery, Shawn R; Rankin, Catharine H

    2016-10-01

    Habituation is a highly conserved phenomenon that remains poorly understood at the molecular level. Invertebrate model systems, like Caenorhabditis elegans, can be a powerful tool for investigating this fundamental process. Here we established a high-throughput learning assay that used real-time computer vision software for behavioral tracking and optogenetics for stimulation of the C. elegans polymodal nociceptor, ASH. Photoactivation of ASH with ChR2 elicited backward locomotion and repetitive stimulation altered aspects of the response in a manner consistent with habituation. Recording photocurrents in ASH, we observed no evidence for light adaptation of ChR2. Furthermore, we ruled out fatigue by demonstrating that sensory input from the touch cells could dishabituate the ASH avoidance circuit. Food and dopamine signaling slowed habituation downstream from ASH excitation via D1-like dopamine receptor, DOP-4. This assay allows for large-scale genetic and drug screens investigating mechanisms of nociception modulation.

  13. FTIR Study of the Photoactivation Process of Xenopus (6-4) Photolyase†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Daichi; Zhang, Yu; Iwata, Tatsuya; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Kandori, Hideki

    2012-01-01

    Photolyases (PHRs) are blue-light activated DNA repair enzymes that maintain genetic integrity by reverting UV-induced photoproducts into normal bases. The FAD chromophore of PHRs has four different redox states: oxidized (FADox), anion radical (FAD•−), neutral radical (FADH•) and fully reduced (FADH−). We combined difference Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with UV-visible spectroscopy to study the detailed photoactivation process of Xenopus (6-4) PHR. Two photons produce the enzymatically active, fully reduced PHR from oxidized FAD: FADox is converted to semiquinone via light-induced one-electron and one-proton transfers, and then to FADH− by light-induced one-electron transfer. We successfully trapped FAD•− at 200 K, where electron transfer occurs, but proton transfer does not. UV-visible spectroscopy following 450-nm illumination of FADox at 277 K defined the FADH•/FADH− mixture and allowed calculation of difference FTIR spectra among the four redox states. The absence of a characteristic C=O stretching vibration indicated that the proton donor is not a protonated carboxylic acid. Structural changes in Trp and Tyr are suggested from UV-visible and FTIR analysis of FAD•− at 200 K. Spectral analysis of amide-I vibrations revealed structural perturbation of the protein’s β-sheet during initial electron transfer (FAD•− formation), transient increase in α-helicity during proton transfer (FADH• formation) and reversion to the initial amide-I signal following subsequent electron transfer (FADH− formation). Consequently, in (6-4) PHR, unlike cryptochrome-DASH, formation of enzymatically active FADH− did not perturb α-helicity. Protein structural changes in the photoactivation of (6-4) PHR are discussed on the basis of the present FTIR observations. PMID:22747528

  14. SEM evaluation of marginal sealing on composite restorations using different photoactivation and composite insertion methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Murilo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This in vitro study evaluates the influence of marginal sealing methods in composite restorations with different adhesive systems submitted to mechanical load. Materials and Methods: Eighty bovine incisor crowns were embedded in Polyvinyl chloride (PVC molds with the buccal surface exposed, where cavities (4mm x 4mm x 3mm were made. Samples had the adhesive systems, Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond, applied according to the manufacturer′s recommendations. The cavities were filled with a Z-250 composite according to the restoration technique (bulk filling or three increments and photoactivation (conventional, soft start, pulsatile light or light-emitting diode [LED]. The samples were duplicated with epoxy resin for scanning electron microscopy observations. Samples were also submitted to mechanical load (200,000 cycles; 2 Hz and new replicas were made. Results: The results, in percentages, were submitted to ANOVA followed by Tukey′s test (P < 0.05. There was statistical difference between the cycle group (23.84% and the non cycle group (18.63%. Comparing the restoration technique, there was no statistical difference between bulk filling (19.62% and three increments (22.84%. There was no statistical difference among the groups: Pulsatile light (24.38%, soft start (22.75%, LED (21.47% or conventional (16.34%. Furthermore, there were no statistical differences between the adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (21.32% and Single Bond (20.83%. Conclusions: The photoactivation methods, the restorative techniques and the adhesive systems did not influence gap formation.

  15. Fourier-transform infrared study of the photoactivation process of Xenopus (6-4) photolyase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Daichi; Zhang, Yu; Iwata, Tatsuya; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kandori, Hideki

    2012-07-24

    Photolyases (PHRs) are blue light-activated DNA repair enzymes that maintain genetic integrity by reverting UV-induced photoproducts into normal bases. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) chromophore of PHRs has four different redox states: oxidized (FAD(ox)), anion radical (FAD(•-)), neutral radical (FADH(•)), and fully reduced (FADH(-)). We combined difference Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with UV-visible spectroscopy to study the detailed photoactivation process of Xenopus (6-4) PHR. Two photons produce the enzymatically active, fully reduced PHR from oxidized FAD: FAD(ox) is converted to semiquinone via light-induced one-electron and one-proton transfers and then to FADH(-) by light-induced one-electron transfer. We successfully trapped FAD(•-) at 200 K, where electron transfer occurs but proton transfer does not. UV-visible spectroscopy following 450 nm illumination of FAD(ox) at 277 K defined the FADH(•)/FADH(-) mixture and allowed calculation of difference FTIR spectra among the four redox states. The absence of a characteristic C=O stretching vibration indicated that the proton donor is not a protonated carboxylic acid. Structural changes in Trp and Tyr are suggested by UV-visible and FTIR analysis of FAD(•-) at 200 K. Spectral analysis of amide I vibrations revealed structural perturbation of the protein's β-sheet during initial electron transfer (FAD(•-) formation), a transient increase in α-helicity during proton transfer (FADH(•) formation), and reversion to the initial amide I signal following subsequent electron transfer (FADH(-) formation). Consequently, in (6-4) PHR, unlike cryptochrome-DASH, formation of enzymatically active FADH(-) did not perturb α-helicity. Protein structural changes in the photoactivation of (6-4) PHR are discussed on the basis of these FTIR observations.

  16. Speciation and localization of Zn in the hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii by extended X-ray absorption fine structure and micro-X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingli; Liao, Xingcheng; Labavitch, John; Yang, Xiaoe; Nelson, Erik; Du, Yonghua; Brown, Patrick H; Tian, Shengke

    2014-11-01

    Differences in metal homeostasis among related plant species can give important information of metal hyperaccumulation mechanisms. Speciation and distribution of Zn were investigated in a hyperaccumulating population of Sedum alfredii by using extended X-ray absorption fine structure and micro-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), respectively. The hyperaccumulator uses complexation with oxygen donor ligands for Zn storage in leaves and stems, and variations in the Zn speciation was noted in different tissues. The dominant chemical form of Zn in leaves was most probably a complex with malate, the most prevalent organic acid in S. alfredii leaves. In stems, Zn was mainly associated with malate and cell walls, while Zn-citrate and Zn-cell wall complexes dominated in the roots. Two-dimensional μ-XRF images revealed age-dependent differences in Zn localization in S. alfredii stems and leaves. In old leaves of S. alfredii, Zn was high in the midrib, margin regions and the petiole, whereas distribution of Zn was essentially uniform in young leaves. Zinc was preferentially sequestered by cells near vascular bundles in young stems, but was highly localized to vascular bundles and the outer cortex layer of old stems. The results suggest that tissue- and age-dependent variations of Zn speciation and distribution occurred in the hyperaccumulator S. alfredii, with most of the Zn complexed with malate in the leaves, but a shift to cell wall- and citric acid-Zn complexes during transportation and storage in stems and roots. This implies that biotransformation in Zn complexation occurred during transportation and storage processes in the plants of S. alfredii. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The role of local and remote amino acid substitutions for optimizing fluorescence in bacteriophytochromes: A case study on iRFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, David; Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Sauthof, Luisa; Wilkening, Svea; Herder, Nico; Tavraz, Neslihan N; Willoweit, Mario; Keidel, Anke; Utesch, Tillmann; Mroginski, Maria-Andrea; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Hildebrandt, Peter; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-06-22

    Bacteriophytochromes are promising tools for tissue microscopy and imaging due to their fluorescence in the near-infrared region. These applications require optimization of the originally low fluorescence quantum yields via genetic engineering. Factors that favour fluorescence over other non-radiative excited state decay channels are yet poorly understood. In this work we employed resonance Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy to analyse the consequences of multiple amino acid substitutions on fluorescence of the iRFP713 benchmark protein. Two groups of mutations distinguishing iRFP from its precursor, the PAS-GAF domain of the bacteriophytochrome P2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, have qualitatively different effects on the biliverdin cofactor, which exists in a fluorescent (state II) and a non-fluorescent conformer (state I). Substitution of three critical amino acids in the chromophore binding pocket increases the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield of state II from 1.7 to 5.0% due to slight structural changes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Whereas these changes are accompanied by an enrichment of state II from ~40 to ~50%, a major shift to ~88% is achieved by remote amino acid substitutions. Additionally, an increase of the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield of this conformer by ~34% is achieved. The present results have important implications for future design strategies of biofluorophores.

  18. The role of local and remote amino acid substitutions for optimizing fluorescence in bacteriophytochromes: A case study on iRFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, David; Velazquez Escobar, Francisco; Sauthof, Luisa; Wilkening, Svea; Herder, Nico; Tavraz, Neslihan N.; Willoweit, Mario; Keidel, Anke; Utesch, Tillmann; Mroginski, Maria-Andrea; Schmitt, Franz-Josef; Hildebrandt, Peter; Friedrich, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophytochromes are promising tools for tissue microscopy and imaging due to their fluorescence in the near-infrared region. These applications require optimization of the originally low fluorescence quantum yields via genetic engineering. Factors that favour fluorescence over other non-radiative excited state decay channels are yet poorly understood. In this work we employed resonance Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy to analyse the consequences of multiple amino acid substitutions on fluorescence of the iRFP713 benchmark protein. Two groups of mutations distinguishing iRFP from its precursor, the PAS-GAF domain of the bacteriophytochrome P2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris, have qualitatively different effects on the biliverdin cofactor, which exists in a fluorescent (state II) and a non-fluorescent conformer (state I). Substitution of three critical amino acids in the chromophore binding pocket increases the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield of state II from 1.7 to 5.0% due to slight structural changes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Whereas these changes are accompanied by an enrichment of state II from ~40 to ~50%, a major shift to ~88% is achieved by remote amino acid substitutions. Additionally, an increase of the intrinsic fluorescence quantum yield of this conformer by ~34% is achieved. The present results have important implications for future design strategies of biofluorophores. PMID:27329837

  19. Kinetic parameters and monomeric conversion of different dental composites using standard and soft-start photoactivation modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, A. B.; Viana, R. B.; Plepis, A. M. G.

    2012-06-01

    This paper evaluates the photopolymerization kinetics and degree of conversion of different commercial dental composites when photoactivated by a LED curing unit using two different modes (standard and soft-start mode). The investigation was performed on with RelyX ARC (dual-cured), Filtek Z-350 (Nanocomposite), Filtek Z-250 (Hybrid), and Filtek Z-350flow (Flowable) resin composites. The analysis used was attenuated total reflection with a Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR). The RelyX ARC resin demonstrated the highest degree of conversion with both LED photoactivation modes. For this resin a 28% decrease in maximum rate was observed and the time to reach its highest rate was almost 2.3 times higher than when the soft-start photoactivation light curing was used. Z-350flow resin recorder a higher maximum rate using the soft-start mode rather than the standard mode. In contrast, the Z-250 showed a higher value using the standard mode. Although Z-250 and Z-350 showed a higher total degree of conversion effectiveness using the soft-start mode, RelyX and Z-350flow achieved a higher value using the standard mode.

  20. Enhanced Antiproliferative and Apoptotic Response of HT-29 Adenocarcinoma Cells to Combination of Photoactivated Hypericin and Farnesyltransferase Inhibitor Manumycin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Fedoročko

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Several photodynamically-active substances and farnesyltransferase inhibitors are currently being investigated as promising anticancer drugs. In this study, the combined effect of hypericin (the photodynamically-active pigment from Hypericum perforatum and selective farnesyltransferase inhibitor manumycin (manumycin A; the selective farnesyltransferase inhibitor from Streptomyces parvulus on HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells was examined. We found that the combination treatment of cells with photoactivated hypericin and manumycin resulted in enhanced antiproliferative and apoptotic response compared to the effect of single treatments. This was associated with increased suppression of clonogenic growth, S phase cell cycle arrest, elevated caspase-3/7 activity and time-dependent total cleavage of procaspase-3 and lamin B, cleavage of p21Bax into p18Bax and massive PARP cleavage. Moreover, we found that the apoptosis-inducing factor is implicated in signaling events triggered by photoactivated hypericin. Our results showed the relocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF to the nuclei after hypericin treatment. In addition, we discovered that not only manumycin but also photoactivated hypericin induced the reduction of total Ras protein level. Manumycin decreased the amount of farnesylated Ras, and the combination treatment decreased the amount of both farnesylated and non-farnesylated Ras protein more dramatically. The present findings indicate that the inhibition of Ras processing may be the determining factor for enhancing the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of combination treatment on HT-29 cells.

  1. A bona fide two-dimensional percolation model: an insight into the optimum photoactivator concentration in La2/3-xEuxTa2O7 nanosheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi C Ozawa, Katsutoshi Fukuda, Yasuo Ebina, Kosuke Kosuda, Akira Sato, Yuichi Michiue, Keiji Kurashima and Takayoshi Sasaki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available La–Eu solid solution nanosheets La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 have been synthesized, and their photoluminescence properties have been investigated. La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 nanosheets were prepared from layered perovskite compounds Li2La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 as the precursors by soft chemical exfoliation reactions. Both the precursors and the exfoliated nanosheets exhibit a decrease in intralayer lattice parameters as the Eu contents increase. However, there is a discontinuity in this trend between the nominal Eu content ranges x≤ 0.3 and x ≥ 0.4. This discontinuity is attributed to the difference in degree of TaO6 octahedra tilting for the La- and Eu-rich phases. La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 nanosheets exhibit red emission, characteristic of the f–f transitions in Eu3+ photoactivators. The photoluminescence emission can be obtained from both host and direct photoactivator excitation. However, photoluminescence emission through host excitation is much more dominant than that through direct photoactivator excitation, and this behavior is consistent with that of all the other rare-earth photoactivated nanosheets reported previously. The absolute photoluminescence quantum efficiency of the La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 nanosheets increases as the experimentally determined Eu contents increase up to x=0.45 and decrease above it. This result is in good agreement with the optimum photoactivator concentration expected from the percolation theory. These solid solution La2/3−xEuxTa2O7 nanosheets are excellent models for validating the theory of optimum photoactivator concentration in the truly two-dimensional photoactivator matrix.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  3. Partitioning and localization of environment-sensitive 2-(2'-pyridyl)- and 2-(2'-pyrimidyl)-indoles in lipid membranes: a joint refinement using fluorescence measurements and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrychenko, Alexander; Wu, Feiyue; Thummel, Randolph P; Waluk, Jacek; Ladokhin, Alexey S

    2010-10-28

    Fluorescence of environment-sensitive dyes is widely applied to monitor local structure and solvation dynamics of biomolecules. It has been shown that, in comparison with a parent indole fluorophore, fluorescence of 2-(2'-pyridyl)-5-methylindole (5M-PyIn-0) and 2-[2'-(4',6'-dimethylpyrimidyl)]-indole (DMPmIn-0) is remarkably sensitive to hydrogen bonding with protic partners. Strong fluorescence, observed for these compounds in nonpolar and polar aprotic solvents, is efficiently quenched in aqueous solution. This study demonstrates that 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0, which are almost nonemitting in aqueous solution, become highly fluorescent upon titrating with phospholipid vesicles. The fluorescence enhancement is accompanied by a significant blue shift of emission maximum. The Gibbs free energy of membrane partitioning, measured by the increase in the steady-state fluorescence intensities during transfer from an aqueous environment to a lipid bilayer, is very favorable for both compounds, being in a range from -7.1 to -8.0 kcal/mol and depending only slightly on lipid composition of the membrane. The fluorescence enhancement upon membrane partitioning is indicative of the loss of the specific hydrogen-bonding interactions between the excited fluorophore and water molecules, causing efficient fluorescence quenching in bulk water. This conclusion is supported by atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, demonstrating that both 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0 bind rapidly and partition deeply into a lipid bilayer. MD simulations also show a rapid, nanosecond-scale decrease in the probability of solute-solvent hydrogen bonding during passive diffusion of the probe molecules from bulk water into a lipid bilayer. At equilibrium conditions, both 5M-PyIn-0 and DMPmIn-0 prefer deep localization within the hydrophobic, water-free region of the bilayer. A free energy profile of penetration across a bilayer estimated using MD umbrella sampling shows that both indole derivatives favor

  4. Identification of photoactivated adenylyl cyclases in Naegleria australiensis and BLUF-containing protein in Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasukawa, Hiro; Sato, Aya; Kita, Ayaka; Kodaira, Ken-Ichi; Iseki, Mineo; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Shibusawa, Mami; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Yagita, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of Naegleria gruberi has revealed that the organism encodes polypeptides similar to photoactivated adenylyl cyclases (PACs). Screening in the N. australiensis genome showed that the organism also encodes polypeptides similar to PACs. Each of the Naegleria proteins consists of a "sensors of blue-light using FAD" domain (BLUF domain) and an adenylyl cyclase domain (AC domain). PAC activity of the Naegleria proteins was assayed by comparing sensitivities of Escherichia coli cells heterologously expressing the proteins to antibiotics in a dark condition and a blue light-irradiated condition. Antibiotics used in the assays were fosfomycin and fosmidomycin. E. coli cells expressing the Naegleria proteins showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light, indicating that the proteins functioned as PACs in the bacterial cells. Analysis of the N. fowleri genome revealed that the organism encodes a protein bearing an amino acid sequence similar to that of BLUF. A plasmid expressing a chimeric protein consisting of the BLUF-like sequence found in N. fowleri and the adenylyl cyclase domain of N. gruberi PAC was constructed to determine whether the BLUF-like sequence functioned as a sensor of blue light. E. coli cells expressing a chimeric protein showed increased fosfomycin sensitivity and fosmidomycin sensitivity when incubated under blue light. These experimental results indicated that the sequence similar to the BLUF domain found in N. fowleri functioned as a sensor of blue light.

  5. Effect of modulated photo-activation on polymerization shrinkage behavior of dental restorative resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauböck, Tobias T; Feilzer, Albert J; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Kleverlaan, Cornelis J; Krejci, Ivo; Attin, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the influence of modulated photo-activation on axial polymerization shrinkage, shrinkage force, and hardening of light- and dual-curing resin-based composites. Three light-curing resin composites (SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD) and one dual-curing material (Rebilda DC) were subjected to different irradiation protocols with identical energy density (27 J cm(-2) ): high-intensity continuous light (HIC), low-intensity continuous light (LIC), soft-start (SS), and pulse-delay curing (PD). Axial shrinkage and shrinkage force of 1.5-mm-thick specimens were recorded in real time for 15 min using custom-made devices. Knoop hardness was determined at the end of the observation period. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences among the curing protocols for both Knoop hardness and axial shrinkage, irrespective of the composite material. Pulse-delay curing generated the significantly lowest shrinkage forces within the three light-curing materials SDR bulk-fill, Esthet X flow, and Esthet X HD. High-intensity continuous light created the significantly highest shrinkage forces within Esthet X HD and Rebilda DC, and caused significantly higher forces than LIC within Esthet X flow. In conclusion, both the composite material and the applied curing protocol control shrinkage force formation. Pulse-delay curing decreases shrinkage forces compared with high-intensity continuous irradiation without affecting hardening and axial polymerization shrinkage. © 2014 Eur J Oral Sci.

  6. Use of photoactivated disinfection and platelet-rich fibrin in regenerative Endodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Krishnamma, Shoba; Johns, Manu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Photoactivated disinfection has been used as an adjunct to conventional endodontic treatment. Its use in regenerative endodontics is not reported in literature. The aim of this case report was to describe a new proposal for pulp revascularization with disinfection of pulp canal space using a unique combination of a photosensitizer solution and low-power laser light. Materials and Methods: A 9-year-old boy came with the chief complaint of discolored upper central incisors (#8, #9). A diagnosis of pulp necrosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings. The canal was irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution and dried with paper points. Photodynamic therapy was used to disinfect the root canal and platelet-rich fibrin was used to revitalize the pulp. Three millimeters of gray mineral trioxide aggregate was placed directly over the platelet-rich plasma clot. Three days later, the tooth was double-sealed with permanent filling materials. Results: Clinical examination revealed no sensitivity to percussion or palpation tests. Radiograph revealed continued thickening of the dentinal walls, root lengthening, regression of the peri-apical lesion and apical closure. Both the roots showed complete apical closure at the 10-month follow-up. However, the teeth were not responsive to electric pulp test. Conclusion: This report of pulp revascularization shows that disinfection with photodynamic therapy combined with platelet-rich fibrin leads to satisfactory root development in necrotic immature teeth. PMID:25298655

  7. Assembly and Transport of Microscopic Cargos via Reconfigurable Photoactivated Magnetic Microdockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Pedrero, Fernando; Massana-Cid, Helena; Tierno, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    The realization of micromotors able to dock and transport microscopic objects in a fluid medium has direct applications toward the delivery of drugs and chemicals in small channels and pores, and the realization of functional wireless microrobots in lab-on-a-chip technology. A simple and general method to tow microscopic particles in water by using remotely controllable light-activated hematite microdockers is demonstrated. These anisotropic ferromagnetic particles can be synthesized in bulk and present the remarkable ability to be activated by light while independently manipulated via external fields. The photoactivation process induces a phoretic flow capable to attract cargos toward the surface of the propellers, while a rotating magnetic field is used to transport the composite particles to any location of the experimental platform. The method allows the assembling of small colloidal clusters of various sizes, composed by a skeleton of mobile magnetic dockers, which cooperatively keep, transport, and release the microscopic cargos. The possibility to easily reconfigure in situ the location of the docker above the cargo is demonstrated, which enables optimize transport and cargo release operations. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Kinetics of photo-activated charge carriers in Sn:CdS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patidar, Manju Mishra, E-mail: manjumishra.iuc@gmail.com; Gorli, V. R.; Gangrade, Mohan; Nath, R.; Ganesan, V. [UGC-DAE CSR, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore (M.P.)-452001 (India); Panda, Richa [S.S. Jain Subodh Girls College, Airport Road Sanganer, Jaipur - 302029 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Kinetics of the photo-activated charge carriers has been investigated in Tin substituted Cadmium Sulphide, Cd{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}S (x=0, 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15), thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis. X-Ray Diffraction shows an increase in strain that resulted in the decreased crystallite size upon Sn substitution. At the first sight, the photo current characteristics show a quenching effect on Sn substitution. However, survival of persistent photocurrents is seen even up to 15% of Sn substitution. Transient photo current decay could be explained with a 2τ relaxation model. CdS normally has an n-type character and the Sn doping expected to inject hole carriers. The two fold increase in τ{sub 1}, increase in activation energy and the decrease in photocurrents upon Sn substitution point towards a band gap cleaning scenario that include compensation and associated carrier injection dynamics. In addition Atomic Force Microscopy shows a drastic change in microstructure that modulates the carrier dynamics as a whole.

  9. Use of photoactivated disinfection and platelet-rich fibrin in regenerative Endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Dexton Antony; Shivashankar, Vasundara Yayathi; Krishnamma, Shoba; Johns, Manu

    2014-09-01

    Photoactivated disinfection has been used as an adjunct to conventional endodontic treatment. Its use in regenerative endodontics is not reported in literature. The aim of this case report was to describe a new proposal for pulp revascularization with disinfection of pulp canal space using a unique combination of a photosensitizer solution and low-power laser light. A 9-year-old boy came with the chief complaint of discolored upper central incisors (#8, #9). A diagnosis of pulp necrosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings. The canal was irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution and dried with paper points. Photodynamic therapy was used to disinfect the root canal and platelet-rich fibrin was used to revitalize the pulp. Three millimeters of gray mineral trioxide aggregate was placed directly over the platelet-rich plasma clot. Three days later, the tooth was double-sealed with permanent filling materials. Clinical examination revealed no sensitivity to percussion or palpation tests. Radiograph revealed continued thickening of the dentinal walls, root lengthening, regression of the peri-apical lesion and apical closure. Both the roots showed complete apical closure at the 10-month follow-up. However, the teeth were not responsive to electric pulp test. This report of pulp revascularization shows that disinfection with photodynamic therapy combined with platelet-rich fibrin leads to satisfactory root development in necrotic immature teeth.

  10. Photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT): the potential of excited-state d-block metals in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrer, Nicola J; Salassa, Luca; Sadler, Peter J

    2009-12-28

    The fields of phototherapy and of inorganic chemotherapy both have long histories. Inorganic photoactivated chemotherapy (PACT) offers both temporal and spatial control over drug activation and has remarkable potential for the treatment of cancer. Following photoexcitation, a number of different decay pathways (both photophysical and photochemical) are available to a metal complex. These pathways can result in radiative energy release, loss of ligands or transfer of energy to another species, such as triplet oxygen. We discuss the features which need to be considered when developing a metal-based anticancer drug, and the common mechanisms by which the current complexes are believed to operate. We then provide a comprehensive overview of PACT developments for complexes of the different d-block metals for the treatment of cancer, detailing the more established areas concerning Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Re, Fe, Ru, Os, Co, Rh, Pt, and Cu and also highlighting areas where there is potential for greater exploration. Nanoparticles (Ag, Au) and quantum dots (Cd) are also discussed for their photothermal destructive potential. We also discuss the potential held in particular by mixed-metal systems and Ru complexes.

  11. Use of photoactivated disinfection and platelet-rich fibrin in regenerative Endodontics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dexton Antony Johns

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Photoactivated disinfection has been used as an adjunct to conventional endodontic treatment. Its use in regenerative endodontics is not reported in literature. The aim of this case report was to describe a new proposal for pulp revascularization with disinfection of pulp canal space using a unique combination of a photosensitizer solution and low-power laser light. Materials and Methods: A 9-year-old boy came with the chief complaint of discolored upper central incisors (#8, #9. A diagnosis of pulp necrosis was made on the basis of clinical and radiographic findings. The canal was irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite solution and dried with paper points. Photodynamic therapy was used to disinfect the root canal and platelet-rich fibrin was used to revitalize the pulp. Three millimeters of gray mineral trioxide aggregate was placed directly over the platelet-rich plasma clot. Three days later, the tooth was double-sealed with permanent filling materials. Results: Clinical examination revealed no sensitivity to percussion or palpation tests. Radiograph revealed continued thickening of the dentinal walls, root lengthening, regression of the peri-apical lesion and apical closure. Both the roots showed complete apical closure at the 10-month follow-up. However, the teeth were not responsive to electric pulp test. Conclusion: This report of pulp revascularization shows that disinfection with photodynamic therapy combined with platelet-rich fibrin leads to satisfactory root development in necrotic immature teeth.

  12. Reconstitution of rhodopsin into polymerizable planar supported lipid bilayers: influence of dienoyl monomer structure on photoactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Varuni; D'Ambruoso, Gemma D; Hall, H K; Wysocki, Ronald J; Brown, Michael F; Saavedra, S Scott

    2008-10-07

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play key roles in cellular signal transduction and many are pharmacologically important targets for drug discovery. GPCRs can be reconstituted in planar supported lipid bilayers (PSLBs) with retention of activity, which has led to development of GPCR-based biosensors and biochips. However, PSLBs composed of natural lipids lack the high stability desired for many technological applications. One strategy is to use synthetic lipid monomers that can be polymerized to form robust bilayers. A key question is how lipid polymerization affects GPCR structure and activity. Here we have investigated the photochemical activity of bovine rhodopsin (Rho), a model GPCR, reconstituted into PSLBs composed of lipids having one or two polymerizable dienoyl moieties located in different regions of the acyl chains. Plasmon waveguide resonance spectroscopy was used to compare the degree of Rho photoactivation in fluid and poly(lipid) PSLBs. The position of the dienoyl moiety was found to have a significant effect: polymerization near the glycerol backbone significantly attenuates Rho activity whereas polymerization near the acyl chain termini does not. Differences in cross-link density near the acyl chain termini also do not affect Rho activity. In unpolymerized PSLBs, an equimolar mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipids enhances activity relative to pure PC; however after polymerization, the enhancement is eliminated which is attributed to stabilization of the membrane lamellar phase. These results should provide guidance for the design of robust lipid bilayers functionalized with transmembrane proteins for use in membrane-based biochips and biosensors.

  13. Preliminary results of Sr/Ca ratio study of teeth samples by photoactivation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavun Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have performed Photoactivation Analysis (PAA, a non-destructive method, which is used to determine elemental concentration of any sample. This paper presents the first use of this method in medical sciences in Turkey. The method was applied to the determination of Sr/Ca ratios in teeth. The collected teeth samples and standards (SrO and CaCO3 have been irradiated for a fixed time interval with high energy photons. The photons were generated by a clinical linear accelerator (cLINAC. The photon end-point energy was 18 MeV. The energy and the time interval were sufficient to achieve good activation. Afterward, the samples and standards have been analysed with gamma spectroscopic analysis by using an HPGe detector system. By analysing many samples, a database of Sr/Ca ratios will be created at Nuclear Research and Application Center (NUBA. In this paper we present a small subset of the already analysed data as an example of our capabilities and goal. We hope to set an example for future studies.

  14. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, W.G.; Wachter, E.A.; Dees, H.C.

    1998-11-03

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material. 23 figs.

  15. Method for improved selectivity in photo-activation of molecular agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Walter G. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dees, H. Craig (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method for the treatment of a particular volume of plant or animal tissue comprising the steps of treating the plant or animal tissue with at least one photo-active molecular agent, wherein the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue retains at least a portion of the at least one photo-active molecular agent, and then treating the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue with light sufficient to promote a simultaneous two-photon excitation of at least one of the at least one photo-active molecular agent retained in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue, wherein the at least one photo-active molecular agent becomes active in the particular volume of the plant or animal tissue. There is also disclosed a method for the treatment of cancer in plant or animal tissue and a method for producing at least one photo-activated molecular agent in a particular volume of a material.

  16. Affinity chromatography purification of angiotensin II reactor using photoactivable biotinylated probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marie, J.; Seyer, R.; Lombard, C.; Desarnaud, F.; Aumelas, A.; Jard, A.; Bonnafous, J.C. (Centre CNRS-INSERM de Pharmacologie-Endocrinologie, Montpellier (France))

    1990-09-25

    The authors have developed biotinylated photoactivable probes that are suitable for covalent labeling of angiotensin II (AII) receptors and the subsequent purification of covalent complexes through immobilized avidin or streptavidin. One of these probes, biotin-NH(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}SS(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}CO-(Ala{sup 1}, Phe(4N{sub 3}){sup 8})AII, which contains a cleavage disulfide bridge in its spacer arm and which displays, in its radioiodinated form, very high affinity for AII receptors (K{sub d}{approximately}1 nM), proved to be suitable for indirect affinity chromatography of rate liver receptor with facilitated recovery from avidin gels by use of reducing agents. This constituted the central step of an efficient partial purification scheme involving hydroxylapatite chromatography, streptavidin chromatography, and thiopropyl-Sepharose chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography established the identity of the purified entity (molecular weight 65K) as the AII receptor. Possible ways of completing purification to homogeneity and extrapolation of the protocols to a preparative scale are discussed, as well as the potential contribution of our new probes to the study of the structural properties of angiotensin receptors.

  17. Affinity chromatography purification of angiotensin II receptor using photoactivable biotinylated probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, J; Seyer, R; Lombard, C; Desarnaud, F; Aumelas, A; Jard, S; Bonnafous, J C

    1990-09-25

    We have developed biotinylated photoactivable probes that are suitable for covalent labeling of angiotensin II (AII) receptors and the subsequent purification of covalent complexes through immobilized avidin or streptavidin. One of these probes, biotin-NH(CH2)2SS(CH2)2CO-[Ala1,Phe(4N3)8]AII, which contains a cleavable disulfide bridge in its spacer arm and which displays, in its radioiodinated form, very high affinity for AII receptors (Kd approximately 1 nM), proved to be suitable for indirect affinity chromatography of rat liver receptor with facilitated recovery from avidin gels by use of reducing agents. This constituted the central step of an efficient partial purification scheme involving hydroxylapatite chromatography, streptavidin chromatography, and thiopropyl-Sepharose chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis and autoradiography established the identity of the purified entity (molecular weight 65K) as the AII receptor. Possible ways of completing purification to homogeneity and extrapolation of the protocols to a preparative scale are discussed, as well as the potential contribution of our new probes to the study of the structural properties of angiotensin receptors.

  18. Knoop microhardness and FT-Raman evaluation of composite resins: influence of opacity and photoactivation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Barrotte Albino

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion by Knoop microhardness (KHN and FT-Raman spectroscopy (FTIR of one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme-3M-ESPE [FS] and one microhybrid composite (Charisma-Heraeus-Kulzer [CH], each with different opacities, namely enamel, dentin, and translucent, which were photo-activated by a quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp (QTH and a light-emitting diode (LED. Resin was bulk inserted into a disc-shaped mold that was 2.0 mm thick and 4 mm in diameter, obtaining 10 samples per group. KHN and FTIR values were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05. Nanofilled resin activated by a LED presented higher microhardness values than samples activated by a QTH for dentin opacity (p < 0.05. The microhybrid resin showed no differences in KHN or FTIR values with different activation sources or opacity. The nanofilled dentin and enamel resins showed lower FTIR values than the translucent resin. The KHN values of the translucent resins were not influenced by the light source.

  19. Improved localization of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity in cells with 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride as fluorescent redox dye reveals its cell cycle-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiks, Wilma M; van Marle, Jan; van Oven, Carel; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Cascante, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Since the introduction of cyano-ditolyl-tetrazolium chloride (CTC), a tetrazolium salt that gives rise to a fluorescent formazan after reduction, it has been applied to quantify activity of dehydrogenases in individual cells using flow cytometry. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed that the fluorescent formazan was exclusively localized at the surface of individual cells and not at intracellular sites of enzyme activity. In the present study, the technique has been optimized to localize activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) intracellularly in individual cells. Activity was demonstrated in cultured fibrosarcoma cells in different stages of the cell cycle. Cells were incubated for the detection of G6PD activity using a medium containing 6% (w/v) polyvinyl alcohol, 5 mM CTC, magnesium chloride, sodium azide, the electron carrier methoxyphenazine methosulphate, NADP, and glucose-6-phosphate. Before incubation, cells were permeabilized with 0.025% glutaraldehyde. Fluorescent formazan was localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of fibrosarcoma cells. The amount of fluorescent formazan in cells increased linearly with incubation time when measured with flow cytometry and CLSM. When combining the Hoechst staining for DNA with the CTC method for the demonstration of G6PD activity, flow cytometry showed that G6PD activity of cells in S phase and G2/M phase is 27 +/- 4% and 43 +/- 4% higher, respectively, than that of cells in G1 phase. CLSM revealed that cells in all phases of mitosis as well as during apoptosis contained considerably lower G6PD activity than cells in interphase. It is concluded that posttranslational regulation of G6PD is responsible for this cell cycle-dependent activity.

  20. Fluorescence and Spectral Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph S. DaCosta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of dysplasia remains a critical goal for diagnostic endoscopy since early discovery directly improves patient survival because it allows endoscopic or surgical intervention with disease localized without lymph node involvement. Clinical studies have successfully used tissue autofluorescence with conventional white light endoscopy and biopsy for detecting adenomatous colonic polyps, differentiating benign hyperplastic from adenomas with acceptable sensitivity and specificity. In Barrett's esophagus, the detection of dysplasia remains problematic because of background inflammation, whereas in the squamous esophagus, autofluorescence imaging appears to be more dependable. Point fluorescence spectroscopy, although playing a crucial role in the pioneering mechanistic development of fluorescence endoscopic imaging, does not seem to have a current function in endoscopy because of its nontargeted sampling and suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Other point spectroscopic modalities, such as Raman spectroscopy and elastic light scattering, continue to be evaluated in clinical studies, but still suffer the significant disadvantages of being random and nonimaging. A recent addition to the fluorescence endoscopic imaging arsenal is the use of confocal fluorescence endomicroscopy, which provides real-time optical biopsy for the first time. To improve detection of dysplasia in the gastrointestinal tract, a new and exciting development has been the use of exogenous fluorescence contrast probes that specifically target a variety of disease-related cellular biomarkers using conventional fluorescent dyes and novel potent fluorescent nanocrystals (i.e., quantum dots. This is an area of great promise, but still in its infancy, and preclinical studies are currently under way.

  1. Eradication of C. albicans and T. rubrum with photoactivated indocyanine green, Citrus aurantifolia essential oil and fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekrazad, Reza; Poorsattar Bejeh Mir, Arash; Ghasemi Barghi, Vadood; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh

    2015-06-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of alternative therapies rather than the current antifungal conventional therapy and with assessing the hypothesis of photoactivation of citrus essential oil, fluconazole and Indocyanine green to treat two common mucocutaneous fungal infections. Suspensions of Candida albicans and Tricophyton rubrum containing 10(6)cells/ml was prepared. Equal samples were treated with infrared (IR) laser irradiation (810 nm, 55 J/cm(2)) in the presence of Indocyanine green (Emundo, 1 mg/ml) (IRLE), photoactivated Citrus aurantifolia essential oil (EO) with sequential exposure to natural and tungsten lights (CE), control non-activated essential oil (CC), laser alone (IRL), indocyanine green alone (E) and neither of treatments as the control group (C). Additional fluconazole (FL, 25.6 μg/ml) and IR activated fluconazole (IRLFL) groups were designed for T. rubrum fungi. Inoculums were serially diluted to 10(-2) and 10(-4) and streaked on Sabouraud dextrose agar plates. Final outcomes were assessed as the percent of reduction. Cell reduction rates (%) in C. albicans groups were 99.99 (CE), 91.67 (IRLE), 86.67 (CC), 72.37 (E) and 67.27 (RL). Whereas, a 99.99 (CE), 89.99 (CC), 74.5 (IRLE), 64.5 (E), 38.5 (IRLF), 37.5 (RL), and 31 (FL) percent eradication was achieved in T. rubrum groups. Photoactivation of Citrus EO increased the killing capability by 10-13%. A modest 7.5% augmented effect was observed with IR activation of Fluconazole. Both Citrus EO and photothermal-photodynamic therapy with ICG and IR diode laser exhibited remarkable lethal effect on fungal cells. Candida viable cells are more susceptible to laser only and ICG only treatments than Tricophyton cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Progress in the Research of Photoactivated Pesticides%光活化农药的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静; 廖美德

    2014-01-01

    Photoactivated pesticide called“green pesticide”would have great potential in promoting the development of agriculture. They own novel design concept and don’t cause environment pollution during control disease. Photoactivated pesticides have a good control against pest damage with the natural factors of crop growth such as sunshine and oxygen, which separately acts as motivational factor and supplementary conditions. The progress in the research of photoactivated pesticides was reviewed in this paper, including their mechanism of action, main classes and prospect.%光活化农药具有全新的设计思路,其利用农作物生长环境中的阳光、氧气等自然因子作为发挥活性的激发因子和辅助条件来提高生物活性,从而将农作物生长的条件和药效发挥的条件统一起来。相比于传统农药具有更多优点,促进农业发展的同时还不易造成环境污染,因此光活化农药也被冠以“绿色农药”的美称。综述了光活化农药的研究进展,讨论了光活化农药作用机理、分类及应用前景。

  3. Effect of surface modification and UVA photoactivation on antibacterial bioactivity of zinc oxide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann, Ling Chuo; Mahmud, Shahrom; Bakhori, Siti Khadijah Mohd; Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mohamad, Dasmawati; Hasan, Habsah; Seeni, Azman; Rahman, Rosliza Abdul

    2014-02-01

    The effects of surface modification of zinc oxide (ZnO) powder and UVA illumination on the powder towards Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus were investigated. FESEM-EDS results showed that oxygen annealing increased the O:Zn ratio on the surface of ZnO-rod and ZnO-plate samples. Surface conductances of ZnO-rod and ZnO-plate pellets were reduced from 1.05 nS to 0.15 nS and 1.34 nS to 0.23 nS, respectively. Meanwhile, UVA illumination on the surface of the ZnO-rod and ZnO-plate samples was found to improve surface conductance to 7.08 nS and 6.51 nS, respectively, due to the release of charge carrier. Photoluminescence results revealed that oxygen annealing halved the UV emission intensity and green emission intensity, presumably caused by oxygen absorption in the ZnO lattice. The antibacterial results showed that oxygen-treated ZnO exhibited slightly higher growth inhibition on E. coli and S. aureus compared with unannealed ZnO. UVA illumination on ZnO causes the greatest inhibition toward E. coli and S. aureus. Under the UVA excitation, the inhibition of E. coli increased by 18% (ZnO-rod) and 13% (ZnO-plate) while the inhibition of S. aureus increased by 22% (ZnO-rod) and 21% (ZnO-plate). Release of reactive oxygen species were proposed in antibacterial mechanisms, which were aided by surface modification and UVA photoactivation. The reactive oxygen species disrupted the DNA and protein synthesis of the bacterial cell, causing bacteriostatic effects toward E. coli and S. aureus.

  4. [Affinity modification of Escherichia coli ribosomes with photoactivated analogs of mRNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimautdinova, O I; Zenkova, M A; Karpova, G G; Podust, L M

    1984-01-01

    Oligoribonucleotide derivatives containing the photoactivated arylazidogroup at 5'-end of the oligonucleotide fragment [2-(N-2,4-dinitro-5-azidophenyl) aminoethyl] phosphamides of the oligoribonucleotides, azido-NH (CH2)2NHpN (pN) n-1, were prepared. It was demonstrated that azido-NH(CH2)2NHpA(pA)4 and azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU)3 stimulate the binding of the codonspecific aminoacyl-tRNA with ribosome. After irradiation of the ternary complex ribosome-azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 X tRNA with UV-light (lambda greater than 350 nm) covalent binding of the reagent to ribosome occurs. Up to 10% of the reagent, bound in the ternary complex with ribosome, is cross-linked with the ribosomal proteins of 30S and 50S subunits. The ribosomal RNA are not modified by azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1. The proteins of 30S and 50S subunits, modified with azido-NH (CH2)2NHpU (pU) n-1 with n = 4,7 and 8, were identified. It is shown that proteins of 30S subunits S3, S4, S9, S11, S12, S14, S17, S19, S20 undergo modification. The proteins of 50S subunits L2, L13, L16, L27, L32, L33 are modified. The set of the modified proteins essentially depends on the length of the oligonucleotide part of the reagent and on occupancy of ribosome A-site by a molecule of tRNA.

  5. Membrane transporters in self resistance of Cercospora nicotianae to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beseli, Aydin; Amnuaykanjanasin, Alongkorn; Herrero, Sonia; Thomas, Elizabeth; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-11-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize membrane transporter genes in Cercospora fungi required for autoresistance to the photoactivated, active-oxygen-generating toxin cercosporin they produce for infection of host plants. Previous studies implicated a role for diverse membrane transporters in cercosporin resistance. In this study, transporters identified in a subtractive cDNA library between a Cercospora nicotianae wild type and a cercosporin-sensitive mutant were characterized, including two ABC transporters (CnATR2, CnATR3), an MFS transporter (CnMFS2), a uracil transporter, and a zinc transport protein. Phylogenetic analysis showed that only CnATR3 clustered with transporters previously characterized to be involved in cercosporin resistance. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of gene expression under conditions of cercosporin toxicity, however, showed that only CnATR2 was upregulated, thus this gene was selected for further characterization. Transformation and expression of CnATR2 in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa significantly increased cercosporin resistance. Targeted gene disruption of CnATR2 in the wild type C. nicotianae, however, did not decrease resistance. Expression analysis of other transporters in the cnatr2 mutant under conditions of cercosporin toxicity showed significant upregulation of the cercosporin facilitator protein gene (CFP), encoding an MFS transporter previously characterized as playing an important role in cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora species. We conclude that cercosporin autoresistance in Cercospora is mediated by multiple genes, and that the fungus compensates for mutations by up-regulation of other resistance genes. CnATR2 may be a useful gene, alone or in addition to other known resistance genes, for engineering Cercospora resistance in crop plants.

  6. PHOSPHOLIPIDS ARE NEEDED FOR PROPER FORMATION, STABILITY AND FUNCTION OF THE PHOTOACTIVATED RHODOPSIN-TRANSDUCIN COMPLEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebska, Beata; Goc, Anna; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins become activated after they form a catalytically active complex with activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GTP replaces GDP on the G protein α subunit. This transient coupling can be stabilized by nucleotide depletion, resulting in an empty-nucleotide G-protein-GPCR complex. Efficient and reproducible formation of conformationally homogenous GPCR-Gt complexes is a prerequisite for structural studies. Herein, we report isolation conditions that enhance the stability, and preserve activity and proper stoichiometry of productive complexes between the purified prototypical GPCR, rhodopsin (Rho), and the rod cell-specific G protein, transducin (Gt). Binding of purified Gt to photoactivated Rho (Rho*) in n-dodecyl-β-maltoside (DDM) examined by gel filtration chromatography was generally modest and purified complexes provided heterogeneous ratios of protein components, most likely because of excess detergent. Rho*-Gt complex stability and activity was greatly increased by addition of phospholipids such as DOPC, DOPE and DOPS, and asolectin to detergent-containing solutions of these proteins. In contrast, native Rho*-Gt complexes purified directly from light-exposed bovine ROS membranes by sucrose gradient centrifugation exhibited improved stability and the expected 2:1 stoichiometry between Rho* and Gt. The above results strongly indicate a lipid requirement for stable complex formation wherein the likely oligomeric structure of Rho provides a superior platform for coupling to Gt, and phospholipids likely form a matrix to which Gt can anchor through its myristoyl and farnesyl groups. Our findings also demonstrate that the choice of detergent and purification method is critical for obtaining highly purified, stable, and active complexes with appropriate stoichiometry between GPCRs and G proteins needed for structural studies. PMID:19413332

  7. Reconstructing the origin of oxygenic photosynthesis: do assembly and photoactivation recapitulate evolution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanai eCardona

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the great abundance of genomes and protein structures that today span a broad diversity of organisms, now more than ever before, it is possible to reconstruct the molecular evolution of protein complexes at an incredible level of detail. Here, I recount the story of oxygenic photosynthesis or how an ancestral reaction center was transformed into a sophisticated photochemical machine capable of water oxidation. First, I review the evolution of all reaction center proteins in order to highlight that Photosystem II and Photosystem I, today only found in the phylum Cyanobacteria, branched out very early in the history of photosynthesis. Therefore, it is very unlikely that they were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from any of the described phyla of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. Second, I present a new evolutionary scenario for the origin of the CP43 and CP47 antenna of Photosystem II. I suggest that the antenna proteins originated from the remodeling of an entire Type I reaction center protein and not from the partial gene duplication of a Type I reaction center gene. Third, I highlight how Photosystem II and Photosystem I reaction center proteins interact with small peripheral subunits in remarkably similar patterns and hypothesize that some of this complexity may be traced back to the most ancestral reaction center. Fourth, I outline the sequence of events that led to the origin of the Mn4CaO5 cluster and show that the most ancestral Type II reaction center had some of the basic structural components that would become essential in the coordination of the water-oxidizing complex. Finally, I collect all these ideas, starting at the origin of the first reaction center proteins and ending with the emergence of the water-oxidizing cluster, to hypothesize that the complex and well-organized process of assembly and photoactivation of Photosystem II recapitulate evolutionary transitions in the path to oxygenic photosynthesis.

  8. Reconstructing the Origin of Oxygenic Photosynthesis: Do Assembly and Photoactivation Recapitulate Evolution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Tanai

    2016-01-01

    Due to the great abundance of genomes and protein structures that today span a broad diversity of organisms, now more than ever before, it is possible to reconstruct the molecular evolution of protein complexes at an incredible level of detail. Here, I recount the story of oxygenic photosynthesis or how an ancestral reaction center was transformed into a sophisticated photochemical machine capable of water oxidation. First, I review the evolution of all reaction center proteins in order to highlight that Photosystem II and Photosystem I, today only found in the phylum Cyanobacteria, branched out very early in the history of photosynthesis. Therefore, it is very unlikely that they were acquired via horizontal gene transfer from any of the described phyla of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. Second, I present a new evolutionary scenario for the origin of the CP43 and CP47 antenna of Photosystem II. I suggest that the antenna proteins originated from the remodeling of an entire Type I reaction center protein and not from the partial gene duplication of a Type I reaction center gene. Third, I highlight how Photosystem II and Photosystem I reaction center proteins interact with small peripheral subunits in remarkably similar patterns and hypothesize that some of this complexity may be traced back to the most ancestral reaction center. Fourth, I outline the sequence of events that led to the origin of the Mn4CaO5 cluster and show that the most ancestral Type II reaction center had some of the basic structural components that would become essential in the coordination of the water-oxidizing complex. Finally, I collect all these ideas, starting at the origin of the first reaction center proteins and ending with the emergence of the water-oxidizing cluster, to hypothesize that the complex and well-organized process of assembly and photoactivation of Photosystem II recapitulate evolutionary transitions in the path to oxygenic photosynthesis.

  9. The role of key amino acids in the photoactivation pathway of the Synechocystis Slr1694 BLUF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Cosimo; Stierl, Manuela; Mathes, Tilo; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Mullen, Katharine M; Cohen-Stuart, Thomas A; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hegemann, Peter; Kennis, John T M

    2009-12-08

    BLUF (blue light sensing using FAD) domains belong to a novel group of blue light sensing receptor proteins found in microorganisms. We have assessed the role of specific aromatic and polar residues in the Synechocystis Slr1694 BLUF protein by investigating site-directed mutants with substitutions Y8W, W91F, and S28A. The W91F and S28A mutants formed the red-shifted signaling state upon blue light illumination, whereas in the Y8W mutant, signaling state formation was abolished. The W91F mutant shows photoactivation dynamics that involve the successive formation of FAD anionic and neutral semiquinone radicals on a picosecond time scale, followed by radical pair recombination to result in the long-lived signaling state in less than 100 ps. The photoactivation dynamics and quantum yield of signaling state formation were essentially identical to those of wild type, which indicates that only one significant light-driven electron transfer pathway is available in Slr1694, involving electron transfer from Y8 to FAD without notable contribution of W91. In the S28A mutant, the photoactivation dynamics and quantum yield of signaling state formation as well as dark recovery were essentially the same as in wild type. Thus, S28 does not play an essential role in the initial hydrogen bond switching reaction in Slr1694 beyond an influence on the absorption spectrum. In the Y8W mutant, two deactivation branches upon excitation were identified: the first involves a neutral semiquinone FADH(*) that was formed in approximately 1 ps and recombines in 10 ps and is tentatively assigned to a FADH(*)-W8(*) radical pair. The second deactivation branch forms FADH(*) in 8 ps and evolves to FAD(*-) in 200 ps, which recombines to the ground state in about 4 ns. In the latter branch, W8 is tentatively assigned as the FAD redox partner as well. Overall, the results are consistent with a photoactivation mechanism for BLUF domains where signaling state formation proceeds via light-driven electron

  10. The Pocketscope: a spatial light modulator based epi-fluorescence microscope for optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnenberger, Anna; Peterka, Darcy S.; Quirin, Sean; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-09-01

    Microscopy incorporating spatial light modulators (SLMs) enables three dimensional (3D) excitation and monitoring of the activity of neuronal ensembles, enabling studies of neuronal circuit activity both in vitro and in vivo. In this paper we present a portable (22 cm x 42.5 cm x 30 cm), SLM-based epi-fluorescence upright microscope ("Pocketscope") that enables 3D calcium imaging and photoactivation of neurons in brain slices. Here we describe the implementation of the instrument; quantify the volume over which neural activity can be excited; and demonstrate the use of the system for mapping neural circuits in brain slices.

  11. Subcellular co-localization of aluminum (III) phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulphonate with fluorescent markers in the human melanoma cell-line HT-144

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ndhundhuma, I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available for the treatment of skin cancers. The subcellular localization of the photosensitizer has been shown to be a key factor in the outcome of PDT. Mitochondrial localized photosensitizers are able to induce apoptosis very rapidly. Lysosomal localized photosensitizers...

  12. In situ fluorescence imaging of glutamate-evoked mitochondrial Na+ responses in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardinelli, Yann; Azarias, Guillaume; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2006-10-01

    Astrocytes can experience large intracellular Na+ changes following the activation of the Na+-coupled glutamate transport. The present study investigated whether cytosolic Na+ changes are transmitted to mitochondria, which could therefore influence their function and contribute to the overall intracellular Na+ regulation. Mitochondrial Na+ (Na+(mit)) changes were monitored using the Na+-sensitive fluorescent probe CoroNa Red (CR) in intact primary cortical astrocytes, as opposed to the classical isolated mitochondria preparation. The mitochondrial localization and Na+ sensitivity of the dye were first verified and indicated that it can be safely used as a selective Na+(mit) indicator. We found by simultaneously monitoring cytosolic and mitochondrial Na+ using sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate and CR, respectively, that glutamate-evoked cytosolic Na+ elevations are transmitted to mitochondria. The resting Na+(mit) concentration was estimated at 19.0 +/- 0.8 mM, reaching 30.1 +/- 1.2 mM during 200 microM glutamate application. Blockers of conductances potentially mediating Na+ entry (calcium uniporter, monovalent cation conductances, K+(ATP) channels) were not able to prevent the Na+(mit) response to glutamate. However, Ca2+ and its exchange with Na+ appear to play an important role in mediating mitochondrial Na+ entry as chelating intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA or inhibiting Na+/Ca2+ exchanger with CGP-37157 diminished the Na+(mit) response. Moreover, intracellular Ca2+ increase achieved by photoactivation of caged Ca2+ also induced a Na+(mit) elevation. Inhibition of mitochondrial Na/H antiporter using ethylisopropyl-amiloride caused a steady increase in Na+(mit) without increasing cytosolic Na+, indicating that Na+ extrusion from mitochondria is mediated by these exchangers. Thus, mitochondria in intact astrocytes are equipped to efficiently sense cellular Na+ signals and to dynamically regulate their Na+ content.

  13. In Vivo Optical Imaging of Acute Myeloid Leukemia by Green Fluorescent Protein: Time-Domain Autofluorescence Decoupling, Fluorophore Quantification, and Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmet McCormack

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Human xenografts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID mice result in disease states of diffuse, nonpalpable tissue infiltrates exhibiting a variable disease course, with some animals not developing a disease phenotype. Thus, disease staging and, more critically, quantification of preclinical therapeutic effect in these models are particularly difficult. In this study, we present the generation of a green fluorescent protein (GFP-labeled human leukemic cell line, NB4, and validate the potential of a time-domain imager fitted with a 470 nm picosecond pulsed laser diode to decouple GFP fluorescence from autofluorescence on the basis of fluorescence lifetime and thus determine the depth and relative concentration of GFP inclusions in phantoms of homogeneous and heterogeneous optical properties. Subsequently, we developed an optical imageable human xenograft model of NB4-GFP AML and illustrate early disease detection, depth discrimination of leukemic infiltrates, and longitudinal monitoring of disease course employing time-domain optical imaging. We conclude that early disease detection through use of time-domain imaging in this initially slowly progressing AML xenograft model permits accurate disease staging and should aid in future preclinical development of therapeutics for AML.

  14. A fluorescence scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kanemaru

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence techniques are widely used in biological research to examine molecular localization, while electron microscopy can provide unique ultrastructural information. To date, correlative images from both fluorescence and electron microscopy have been obtained separately using two different instruments, i.e. a fluorescence microscope (FM and an electron microscope (EM. In the current study, a scanning electron microscope (SEM (JEOL JXA8600 M was combined with a fluorescence digital camera microscope unit and this hybrid instrument was named a fluorescence SEM (FL-SEM. In the labeling of FL-SEM samples, both Fluolid, which is an organic EL dye, and Alexa Fluor, were employed. We successfully demonstrated that the FL-SEM is a simple and practical tool for correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

  15. Quantification of fluorescent reporters in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Michael; French, Andrew P; Wells, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent reporters are powerful tools for plant research. Many studies require accurate determination of fluorescence intensity and localization. Here, we describe protocols for the quantification of fluorescence intensity in plant cells from confocal laser scanning microscope images using semiautomated software and image analysis techniques.

  16. Degree of conversion of Z250 composite determined by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: comparison of techniques, storage periods and photo-activation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa Carla Obici

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of the Z250 composite, using six photo-activation methods, two storage periods and two preparation techniques of the FTIR specimens (n = 3. For the KBr pellet technique, the composite was placed into a metallic mold and photo-activated as follows: continuous light, exponential light, intermittent light, stepped light, PAC and LED. The measurements were made after 24 h and 20 days. For the resin film technique, approximately 0.07 g of the composite was pressed between two polyester strips, photo-activated as above described and analyzed. The DC was calculated by the standard technique and submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha = 5%. Independently of the storage period and specimen preparation technique, there were no significant differences among photo-activation methods. No statistical difference was observed between the time periods used. The specimens analyzed under the KBr pellet technique presented higher DC values than those analyzed by the resin film technique.

  17. Photoswitching of Green mEos2 by Intense 561 nm Light Perturbs Efficient Green-to-Red Photoconversion in Localization Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thédié, Daniel; Berardozzi, Romain; Adam, Virgile; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2017-09-05

    Green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (PCFPs) such as mEos2 and its derivatives are widely used in PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy (PALM). However, the complex photophysics of these genetically encoded markers complicates the quantitative analysis of PALM data. Here, we show that intense 561 nm light (∼1 kW/cm(2)) typically used to localize single red molecules considerably affects the green-state photophysics of mEos2 by populating at least two reversible dark states. These dark states retard green-to-red photoconversion through a shelving effect, although one of them is rapidly depopulated by 405 nm light illumination. Multiple mEos2 switching and irreversible photobleaching is thus induced by yellow/green and violet photons before green-to-red photoconversion occurs, contributing to explain the apparent limited signaling efficiency of this PCFP. Our data reveals that the photophysics of PCFPs of anthozoan origin is substantially more complex than previously thought, and suggests that intense 561 nm laser light should be used with care, notably for quantitative or fast PALM approaches.

  18. Green fluorescent protein-tagged sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase overexpression in Paramecium cells: isoforms, subcellular localization, biogenesis of cortical calcium stores and functional aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, K; Pavlovic, N; Klauke, N; Geissinger, D; Plattner, H

    2000-08-01

    We have followed the time-dependent transfection of Paramecium cells with a vector containing the gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C-terminus of the PtSERCA1 gene. The outlines of alveolar sacs (ASs) are labelled, as is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) throughout the cell. When GFP fluorescence is compared with previous anti-PtSERCA1 antibody labelling, the much wider distribution of GFP (ER+ASs) indicates that only a small amount of SERCA molecules is normally retained in the ER. A second isoform, PtSERCA2, also occurs and its C-terminal GFP-tagging results in the same distribution pattern. However, when GFP is inserted in the major cytoplasmic loop, PtSERCA1 and two fusion proteins are mostly retained in the ER, probably because of the presence of the overt C-terminal KKXX ER-retention signal and/or masking of a signal for transfer into ASs. On the overall cell surface, new SERCA molecules seem to be permanently delivered from the ER to ASs by vesicle transport, whereas in the fission zone of dividing cells ASs may form anew. In cells overexpressing PtSERCA1 (with C-terminal GFP) in ASs, [Ca2+]i regulation during exocytosis is not significantly different from controls, probably because their Ca2+ pump has to mediate only slow reuptake.

  19. Degree of conversion of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins photo-activated by different generations of LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benicia Carolina Iaskieviscz Ribeiro

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:This study aimed at evaluating the degree of conversion (DC of four composite resins, being one nanofilled and 3 microhybrid resins, photo-activated with second- and third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Filtek TM Z350 nanofilled composite resins and Amelogen® Plus, Vit-l-escenceTM and Opallis microhybrid resins were photo-activated with two second-generation LEDs (Radii-cal and Elipar Free LightTM 2 and one third-generation LED (Ultra-Lume LED 5 by continuous light mode, and a quartz halogen-tungsten bulb (QHT, control. After 24 h of storage, the samples were pulverized into fine powder and 5 mg of each material were mixed with 100 mg of potassium bromide (KBr. After homogenization, they were pressed, which resulted in a pellet that was evaluated using an infrared spectromer (Nexus 470, Thermo Nicolet equipped with TGS detector using diffuse reflectance (32 scans, resolution of 4 cm-1 coupled to a computer. The percentage of unreacted carbon-carbon double bonds (% C=C was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1 against internal standard before and after curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1. RESULTS: The ANOVA showed a significant effect on the interaction between the light-curing units (LCUs and the composite resins (p<0.001. The Tukey’s test showed that the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350 and Opallis when photo-activated by the halogen lamp (QTH had the lowest DC compared with the other microhybrid composite resins. The DC of the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350 was also lower using LEDs. The highest degrees of conversion were obtained using the third-generation LED and one of second-generation LEDs (Elipar Free LightTM 2. CONCLUSIONS: The nanofilled resin showed the lowest DC, and the Vit-l-escenceTM microhybrid composite resin showed the highest DC. Among the LCUs, it was not possible to establish an order, even though the second

  20. Degree of conversion of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins photo-activated by different generations of LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    RIBEIRO, Benicia Carolina Iaskieviscz; BOAVENTURA, Juliana Maria Capelozza; de BRITO-GONÇALVES, Joel; RASTELLI, Alessandra Nara de Souza; BAGNATO, Vanderlei Salvador; SAAD, José Roberto Cury

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed at evaluating the degree of conversion (DC) of four composite resins, being one nanofilled and 3 microhybrid resins, photo-activated with second- and third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Material and methods FiltekTM Z350 nanofilled composite resins and Amelogen® Plus, Vit-l-escenceTM and Opallis microhybrid resins were photo-activated with two second-generation LEDs (Radii-cal and Elipar Free LightTM 2) and one third-generation LED (Ultra-Lume LED 5) by continuous light mode, and a quartz halogen-tungsten bulb (QHT, control). After 24 h of storage, the samples were pulverized into fine powder and 5 mg of each material were mixed with 100 mg of potassium bromide (KBr). After homogenization, they were pressed, which resulted in a pellet that was evaluated using an infrared spectromer (Nexus 470, Thermo Nicolet) equipped with TGS detector using diffuse reflectance (32 scans, resolution of 4 cm-1) coupled to a computer. The percentage of unreacted carbon-carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1) against internal standard before and after curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1). Results The ANOVA showed a significant effect on the interaction between the light-curing units (LCUs) and the composite resins (p<0.001). The Tukey's test showed that the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350) and Opallis when photo-activated by the halogen lamp (QTH) had the lowest DC compared with the other microhybrid composite resins. The DC of the nanofilled resin (FiltekTM Z350) was also lower using LEDs. The highest degrees of conversion were obtained using the third-generation LED and one of second-generation LEDs (Elipar Free LightTM 2). Conclusions The nanofilled resin showed the lowest DC, and the Vit-l-escenceTM microhybrid composite resin showed the highest DC. Among the LCUs, it was not possible to establish an order, even though the second

  1. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-photon and visible-light photoactivation of neurons and dendritic spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Fino

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photo-activation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single spine, or single cell, precision.

  2. RuBi-Glutamate: Two-Photon and Visible-Light Photoactivation of Neurons and Dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Elodie; Araya, Roberto; Peterka, Darcy S; Salierno, Marcelo; Etchenique, Roberto; Yuste, Rafael

    2009-01-01

    We describe neurobiological applications of RuBi-Glutamate, a novel caged-glutamate compound based on ruthenium photochemistry. RuBi-Glutamate can be excited with visible wavelengths and releases glutamate after one- or two-photon excitation. It has high quantum efficiency and can be used at low concentrations, partly avoiding the blockade of GABAergic transmission present with other caged compounds. Two-photon uncaging of RuBi-Glutamate has a high spatial resolution and generates excitatory responses in individual dendritic spines with physiological kinetics. With laser beam multiplexing, two-photon RuBi-Glutamate uncaging can also be used to depolarize and fire pyramidal neurons with single-cell resolution. RuBi-Glutamate therefore enables the photoactivation of neuronal dendrites and circuits with visible or two-photon light sources, achieving single cell, or even single spine, precision.

  3. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus Phytochrome in the Photoactivated State Reveals a Cascade of Structural Rearrangements during Photoconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgie, E Sethe; Zhang, Junrui; Vierstra, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    Phytochromes are photochromic photoreceptors responsible for a myriad of red/far-red light-dependent processes in plants and microorganisms. Interconversion is initially driven by photoreversible isomerization of bilin, but how this alteration directs the photostate-dependent changes within the protein to actuate signaling is poorly understood. Here, we describe the structure of the Deinococcus phytochrome photosensory module in its near complete far-red light-absorbing Pfr state. In addition to confirming the 180° rotation of the D-pyrrole ring, the dimeric structure clearly identifies downstream rearrangements that trigger large-scale conformational differences between the dark-adapted and photoactivated states. Mutational analyses verified the importance of residues surrounding the bilin in Pfr stabilization, and protease sensitivity assays corroborated photostate alterations that propagate along the dimeric interface. Collectively, these data support a cooperative "toggle" model for phytochrome photoconversion and advance our understanding of the allosteric connection between the photosensory and output modules.

  4. Analysis of the near-resonant fluorescence spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Wookrae; Kim, Jung-Ryul; Lee, Yea-Lee; Ihm, Jisoon; An, Kyungwon

    2010-01-01

    Supplementary information is presented on the recent work by W. Kim et al. on the matter-wave-tunneling-induced broadening in the near-resonant spectra of a single rubidium atom localized in a three-dimensional optical lattice in a strong Lamb-Dicke regime.

  5. Degree of conversion of nanofilled and microhybrid composite resins photo-activated by different generations of LEDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Benicia Carolina Iaskieviscz; Boaventura, Juliana Maria Capelozza; Brito-Gonçalves, Joel de; Rastelli, Alessandra Nara de Souza; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Saad, José Roberto Cury

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the degree of conversion (DC) of four composite resins, being one nanofilled and 3 microhybrid resins, photo-activated with second- and third-generation light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Filtek™ Z350 nanofilled composite resins and Amelogen® Plus, Vit-l-escence™ and Opallis microhybrid resins were photo-activated with two second-generation LEDs (Radii-cal and Elipar Free Light™ 2) and one third-generation LED (Ultra-Lume LED 5) by continuous light mode, and a quartz halogen-tungsten bulb (QHT, control). After 24 h of storage, the samples were pulverized into fine powder and 5 mg of each material were mixed with 100 mg of potassium bromide (KBr). After homogenization, they were pressed, which resulted in a pellet that was evaluated using an infrared spectromer (Nexus 470, Thermo Nicolet) equipped with TGS detector using diffuse reflectance (32 scans, resolution of 4 cm(-1)) coupled to a computer. The percentage of unreacted carbon-carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1) against internal standard before and after curing of the specimen: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1). The ANOVA showed a significant effect on the interaction between the light-curing units (LCUs) and the composite resins (pLEDs. The highest degrees of conversion were obtained using the third-generation LED and one of second-generation LEDs (Elipar Free Light™ 2). The nanofilled resin showed the lowest DC, and the Vit-l-escence™ microhybrid composite resin showed the highest DC. Among the LCUs, it was not possible to establish an order, even though the second-generation LED Radii-cal provided the lowest DC.

  6. Photoactivation of the BLUF protein PixD Probed by the Site-Specific Incorporation of Fluorotyrosine Residues

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Agnieszka A.

    2017-09-06

    The flavin chromophore in blue light using FAD (BLUF) photoreceptors is surrounded by a hydrogen bond network that senses and responds to changes in the electronic structure of the flavin on the ultrafast time scale. The hydrogen bond network includes a strictly conserved Tyr residue, and previously we explored the role of this residue, Y21, in the photoactivation mechanism of the BLUF protein AppA by the introduction of fluorotyrosine (F-Tyr) analogs that modulated the pKa and reduction potential of Y21 by 3.5 pH units and 200 mV, respectively. Although little impact on the forward (dark to light adapted form) photoreaction was observed, the change in Y21 pKa led to a 4,000-fold increase in the rate of dark state recovery. In the present work we have extended these studies to the BLUF protein PixD, where, in contrast to AppA, modulation in the Tyr (Y8) pKa has a profound impact on the forward photoreaction. In particular, a decrease in Y8 pKa by 2 or more pH units prevents formation of a stable light state, consistent with a photoactivation mechanism that involves proton transfer or proton coupled electron transfer from Y8 to the electronically excited FAD. Conversely, the effect of pKa on the rate of dark recovery is markedly reduced in PixD. These observations highlight very significant differences between the photocycles of PixD and AppA, despite their sharing highly conserved FAD binding architectures.

  7. Compressive strength and the effect of duration after photo-activation among dual-cure bulk fill composite core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhudhairy, Fahad; Vohra, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    To assess compressive strength and effect of duration after photoactivation on the compressive strength of different dual cure bulk fill composites. Seventy-two disc shaped (4x10mm) specimens were prepared from three dual cure bulk fill materials, ZirconCore (ZC) (n=24), MulticCore Flow (MC) (n=24) and Luxacore Dual (LC) (n=24). Half of the specimens in each material were tested for failure loads after one hour [MC1 (n=12), LC1 (n=12) & ZC1 (n=12)] and the other half in 7 days [MC7 (n=12), LC7 (n=12), ZC7 (n=12)] from photo-polymerization using the universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 cm/minutes. Compressive strength was calculated using the formula UCS=4f/πd(2). Compressive strengths among different groups were compared using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparisons test. Maximum and minimum compressive strengths were observed in ZC7 (344.14±19.22) and LC1 (202.80±15.52) groups. Specimens in LC1 [202.80 (15.52)] showed significantly lower compressive strength as compared to MC1 [287.06 (15.03)] (pstrengths compared to LC7 [324.56 (19.47)] and MC7 [315.26 (12.36)]. Compressive strengths among all three materials were significantly higher (pstrength compared to MC and LC. Increasing the post photo-activation duration (from one hour to 7 days) significantly improves the compressive strengths of dual cure bulk fill material.

  8. Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) localized to band 21q22. 1 by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization displays gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemieux, N. (Universite de Montreal (Canada)); Malfoy, B. (Institut Curie Section de Biologie, Paris (France)); Forrest, G.L. (Beckman Research Institute at the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Human carbonyl reductase (CBR) belongs to a group of NADPH-dependent enzymes called aldo-keto reductases. The enzyme can function as an aldo-keto reductase or as a quinone reductase with potential for modulating quinone-mediated oxygen free radicals. The CBR gene was mapped by high-resolution fluorescence in situ hybridization to band 21q22.12, very close to the SOD1 locus at position 2lq22.11. CBR displayed gene dosage effects in trisomy 21 human lymphoblasts at the DNA and mRNA levels. Lymphoblasts with increasing chromosome 21 ploidy also showed increased aldo-keto reductase activity and increased quinone reductase activity. Both aldo-keto reductase activity and quinone reductase activity have been shown to be associated with carbonyl reductase. The location of CBR near SOD1 and the increased enzyme activity and potential for free radical modulation in trisomy 21 cells implicate CBR as a candidate for contributing to the pathology of certain diseases such as Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease. 28 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) localizes to human chromosome 3p25 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, C.F. Jr.; Clancy, T.E.; Quan, R. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    The human oxytocin receptor regulates parturition and myometrial contractility, breast milk let-down, and reproductive behaviors in the mammalian central nervous system. Kimura et al. recently identified a human oxytocin receptor cDNA by means of expression cloning from a human myometrial cDNA library. To elucidate further the molecular mechanisms that regulate oxytocin receptor gene expression and to define the expected Mendelian inheritance of possible human disease states, we must determine the number of genes, their localization, and their organization and structure. We summarize below our data indicating that the human oxytocin receptor gene is localized to 3p25 and exists as a single copy in the haploid genome. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Large GLUT4 vesicles are stationary while locally and reversibly depleted during transient insulin stimulation of skeletal muscle of living mice: imaging analysis of GLUT4-enhanced green fluorescent protein vesicle dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Hans P M M; Galbo, Henrik; Brandauer, Josef

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Insulin stimulates glucose transport in skeletal muscle by GLUT4 translocation from intracellular compartments to sarcolemma and t-tubules. We studied in living animals the recruitment of GLUT4 vesicles in more detail than previously done and, for the first time, analyzed the steady......-state recycling and subsequent re-internalization of GLUT4 on an insulin bolus. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A confocal imaging technique was used in GLUT4-enhanced green fluorescent protein-transfected superficial muscle fibers in living mice. RESULTS: During the first 30 min of insulin stimulation, very few...... superficially or deeply located GLUT4 storage vesicles (>1 microm) moved in toto. Rather, big vesicles were stationary in their original position at sarcolemma or t-tubules and were locally depleted of GLUT4 by budding off of smaller vesicles. Photobleaching experiments revealed that during initial...

  11. X-ray fluorescence holography

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, K; Takahashi, Y

    2003-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence holography (XFH) is a new structural analysis method of determining a 3D atomic arrangement around fluorescing atoms. We developed an XFH apparatus using advanced X-ray techniques and succeeded in obtaining high-quality hologram data. Furthermore, we introduced applications to the structural analysis of a thin film and the environment around dopants and, discussed the quantitative analysis of local lattice distortion. (author)

  12. Regional-scale simulations of fungal spore aerosols using an emission parameterization adapted to local measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hummel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fungal spores as a prominent type of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP have been incorporated into the COSMO-ART regional atmospheric model, using and comparing three different emission parameterizations. Two literature-based emission rates derived from fungal spore colony counts and chemical tracer measurements were used as a parameterization baseline for this study. A third, new emission parameterization was adapted to field measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP from four locations across Northern Europe. FBAP concentrations can be regarded as a lower estimate of total PBAP concentrations. Size distributions of FBAP often show a distinct mode at approx. 3 μm, corresponding to a diameter range characteristic for many fungal spores. Previous studies have suggested the majority of FBAP in several locations are dominated by fungal spores. Thus, we suggest that simulated fungal spore concentrations obtained from the emission parameterizations can be compared to the sum of total FBAP concentrations. A comparison reveals that parameterized estimates of fungal spore concentrations based on literature numbers underestimate measured FBAP concentrations. In agreement with measurement data, the model results show a diurnal cycle in simulated fungal spore concentrations, which may develop partially as a consequence of a varying boundary layer height between day and night. Measured FBAP and simulated fungal spore concentrations also correlate similarly with simulated temperature and humidity. These meteorological variables, together with leaf area index, were chosen to drive the new emission parameterization discussed here. Using the new emission parameterization on a model domain covering Western Europe, fungal spores in the lowest model layer comprise a fraction of 15% of the total aerosol mass over land and reach average number concentrations of 26 L−1. The results confirm that fungal spores and biological particles

  13. Subnuclear localization, rates and effectiveness of UVC-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis visualized by fluorescence widefield, confocal and super-resolution microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierzyńska-Mach, Agnieszka; Szczurek, Aleksander; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca; Pennacchietti, Francesca; Drukała, Justyna; Diaspro, Alberto; Cremer, Christoph; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew; Dobrucki, Jurek W

    2016-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) is the final stage of the process of repair of DNA lesions induced by UVC. We detected UDS using a DNA precursor, 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). Using wide-field, confocal and super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and normal human fibroblasts, derived from healthy subjects, we demonstrate that the sub-nuclear pattern of UDS detected via incorporation of EdU is different from that when BrdU is used as DNA precursor. EdU incorporation occurs evenly throughout chromatin, as opposed to just a few small and large repair foci detected by BrdU. We attribute this difference to the fact that BrdU antibody is of much larger size than EdU, and its accessibility to the incorporated precursor requires the presence of denatured sections of DNA. It appears that under the standard conditions of immunocytochemical detection of BrdU only fragments of DNA of various length are being denatured. We argue that, compared with BrdU, the UDS pattern visualized by EdU constitutes a more faithful representation of sub-nuclear distribution of the final stage of nucleotide excision repair induced by UVC. Using the optimized integrated EdU detection procedure we also measured the relative amount of the DNA precursor incorporated by cells during UDS following exposure to various doses of UVC. Also described is the high degree of heterogeneity in terms of the UVC-induced EdU incorporation per cell, presumably reflecting various DNA repair efficiencies or differences in the level of endogenous dT competing with EdU within a population of normal human fibroblasts.

  14. Probing of the local environment and calculation of J.O. parameters for Eu{sup 3+} CMPO functionalized pillararene complexes by time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Arijit, E-mail: arijita@barc.gov.in [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Fang, Yuyu; Yuan, Xiangyang; Yuan, Lihua [Key Laboratory for Radiation Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education, Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2015-10-15

    An attempt was made to understand the complexation of Eu{sup 3+} with structurally modified CMPO-functionalized pillararenes by luminescence spectroscopy. Formation of single species with different numbers of inner sphere water molecules was found to be present for all the complexes. On increasing spacer length between ligating moieties and supramolecular pillararenes, the stereo-chemical crowding around ligating oxygen decreased. Therefore, strong covalent metal–oxygen bond was formed which was reflected in the increasing trend of the computed Ω{sub 2} values (Judd–Offelt parameter): LI (4.66×10{sup −20})local symmetry around Eu{sup 3+} was C{sub 6}/C{sub 6v}. The radiative lifetime for the Eu complexes followed LI (4.09 ms)>LII (3.19 ms)>LIII (2.94 ms) while the branching ratio values for all three complexes followed the same trend as β{sub 2}>β{sub 4}>β{sub 1}. The other photo-physical constants like asymmetric factor, quantum efficiency, magnetic and electric dipole transition probabilities were also computed. - Highlights: • Probing of the local environment of Eu{sup 3+} complex with three structurally modified CMPO functionalized pillararenes. • J.O. parameter Ω{sub 2} followed the trend: LI (4.66E−20)local symmetry around Eu{sup 3+} in the complex is C{sub 6} or C{sub 6v}. • The mono-exponential lifetime plots indicated the presence of

  15. Radiothérapie par photoactivation de nanoparticules et effet Mössbauer

    OpenAIRE

    Gimenez, Paul

    2015-01-01

    An efficient radiotherapy needs a localized dose to the tumour, which means a high contrast between tumorous and healthy tissues. A synchrotron low energy monochromatic irradiation of a tumour charged in high-Z elements allows maximizing photoelectric interactions in the tumour and spare the healthy tissues. Photoelectrons and high LET Auger electrons thus produced deposit their energy locally, enhancing radiation dose to tumor cells. Another interaction allows to enhance the dose by Auger el...

  16. Radical formation at the gallium nitride nanowire-electrolyte interface by photoactivated charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, J M; Müntze, G M; Hille, P; Wallys, J; Schörmann, J; Teubert, J; Hofmann, D M; Eickhoff, M

    2013-08-16

    We investigated the transfer of photogenerated charge carriers from GaN nanowires into a surrounding electrolyte by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. Using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap we find that the formation of hydroxyl radicals dominates in acidic, neutral and moderately basic environments, while in an electrolyte with a pH of 13.5 the superoxide formation becomes detectable. We explain the two processes considering the redox potentials for radical formation in the electrolyte as well as the positions of the conduction and valence bands. The role of surface band bending and surface states in the semiconductor is discussed.

  17. Photoactivation mechanisms of flavin-binding photoreceptors revealed through ultrafast spectroscopy and global analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Tilo; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Kennis, John T M

    2014-01-01

    Flavin-binding photoreceptor proteins use the isoalloxazine moiety of flavin cofactors to absorb light in the blue/UV-A wavelength region and subsequently translate it into biological information. The underlying photochemical reactions and protein structural dynamics are delicately tuned by the protein environment and represent fundamental reactions in biology and chemistry. Due to their photo-switchable nature, these proteins can be studied efficiently with laser-flash induced transient absorption and emission spectroscopy with temporal precision down to the femtosecond time domain. Here, we describe the application of both visible and mid-IR ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved fluorescence methods in combination with sophisticated global analysis procedures to elucidate the photochemistry and signal transduction of BLUF (Blue light receptors using FAD) and LOV (Light oxygen voltage) photoreceptor domains.

  18. Influence of the light-curing unit, storage time and shade of a dental composite resin on the fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, R. S.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Gaiao, U.; Cuin, A.; Porto-Neto, S. T.

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of three light-curing units, storage times and colors of the dental composite resin on the fluorescence. The specimens (diameter 10.0 ± 0.1 mm, thickness 1.0 ± 0.1 mm) were made using a stainless steel mold. The mold was filled with the microhybrid composite resin and a polyethylene film covered each side of the mold. After this, a glass slide was placed on the top of the mold. To standardize the top surface of the specimens a circular weight (1 kg) with an orifice to pass the light tip of the LCU was placed on the top surface and photo-activated during 40 s. Five specimens were made for each group. The groups were divided into 9 groups following the LCUs (one QTH and two LEDs), storage times (immediately after curing, 24 hours, 7 and 30 days) and colors (shades: A2E, A2D, and TC) of the composite resin. After photo-activation, the specimens were storage in artificial saliva during the storage times proposed to each group at 37°C and 100% humidity. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s posthoc tests showed no significant difference between storage times (immediately, 24 hours and 30 days) ( P > 0.05). The means of fluorescence had difference significant to color and light-curing unit used to all period of storage ( P 0.05).

  19. Dynamic structural changes underpin photoconversion of a blue/green cyanobacteriochrome between its dark and photoactivated states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornilescu, Claudia C; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Burgie, E Sethe; Markley, John L; Ulijasz, Andrew T; Vierstra, Richard D

    2014-01-31

    The phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors exploits reversible light-driven changes in the bilin chromophore to initiate a variety of signaling cascades. The nature of these alterations and how they impact the protein moiety remain poorly resolved and might include several species-specific routes. Here, we provide a detailed picture of photoconversion for the photosensing cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (Te) PixJ, a member of the cyanobacteriochrome clade. Solution NMR structures of the blue light-absorbing dark state Pb and green light-absorbing photoactivated state Pg, combined with paired crystallographic models, revealed that the bilin and GAF domain dynamically transition via breakage of the C10/Cys-494 thioether bond, opposite rotations of the A and D pyrrole rings, sliding of the bilin in the GAF pocket, and the appearance of an extended region of disorder that includes Cys-494. Changes in GAF domain backbone dynamics were also observed that are likely important for inter-domain signal propagation. Taken together, photoconversion of T. elongatus PixJ from Pb to Pg involves complex structural changes within the GAF domain pocket that transduce light into a mechanical signal, many aspects of which should be relevant to others within the extended phytochrome superfamily.

  20. Elucidating the role of methyl viologen as a scavenger of photoactivated electrons from photosystem I under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Tyler; Niroomand, Hanieh; Pamu, Ravi; Ivanov, Ilia; Mukherjee, Dibyendu; Khomami, Bamin

    2016-03-28

    We present detailed electrochemical investigations into the role of dissolved O2 in electrolyte solutions in scavenging photoactivated electrons from a uniform photosystem I (PS I) monolayer assembled on alkanethiolate SAM (self-assembled monolayer)/Au surfaces while using methyl viologen (MV(2+)) as the redox mediator. To this end, we report results for direct measurements of light induced photocurrent from uniform monolayer assemblies of PS I on C9 alkanethiolate SAM/Au surfaces. These measurements, apart from demonstrating the ability of dissolved O2 in the electrolyte medium to act as an electron scavenger, also reveal its essential role in driving the solution-phase methyl viologen to initiate light-induced directional electron transfer from an electron donor surface (Au) via surface assembled PS I trimers. Specifically, our systematic electrochemical measurements have revealed that the dissolved O2 in aqueous electrolyte solutions form a complex intermediate species with MV that plays the essential role in mediating redox pathways for unidirectional electron transfer processes. This critical insight into the redox-mediated electron transfer pathways allows for rational design of electron scavengers through systematic tuning of mediator combinations that promote such intermediate formation. Our current findings facilitate the incorporation of PS I-based bio-hybrid constructs as photo-anodes in future photoelectrochemical cells and bio-electronic devices.

  1. Photoactivated hypericin increases the expression of SOD-2 and makes MCF-7 cells resistant to photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimáková, Patrícia; Solár, Peter; Fecková, Barbora; Sačková, Veronika; Solárová, Zuzana; Ilkovičová, Lenka; Kello, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Photoactivated hypericin increased production of reactive oxygen species in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 as well as in MDA-MB-231 cells 1h after photodynamic therapy. On the other hand, reactive oxygen species dropped 3h after photodynamic therapy with hypericin, but only in MCF-7 cells, whereas in MDA-MB-231 cells remained elevated. The difference in the dynamics of reactive oxygen species after hypericin activation was related to increased activity of SOD-2 in MCF-7 cells compared to MDA-MB-231 cells. Indeed, photodynamic therapy with hypericin significantly increased SOD-2 activity in MCF-7 cells, but only slightly in MDA-MB-231 cells. In this regard, SOD-2 activity correlated well with enhanced both mRNA expression as well as SOD-2 protein level in MCF-7 cells. The role of SOD-2 in the resistance of MCF-7 cells to photodynamic therapy with hypericin was monitored using SOD-2 inhibitor - 2-methoxyestradiol. Interestingly, the combination of photodynamic therapy with hypericin and methoxyestradiol sensitized MCF-7 cells to photodynamic therapy and significantly reduced its clonogenic ability. Furthermore, methoxyestradiol potentiated the activation of caspase 3/7 and apoptosis induced by photodynamic therapy with hypericin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Locally resolved investigation of wedged Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} films prepared by physical vapor deposition using hard X-ray photoelectron and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvet, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.calvet@helmholtz-berlin.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Ümsür, Bünyamin; Höpfner, Britta; Lauermann, Iver; Prietzel, Karsten; Kaufmann, Christan A.; Unold, Thomas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Lux-Steiner, Martha C. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Freie Universität Berlin, Department of Physics, Arnimallee 14, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    We have investigated a specially grown Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGSe) absorber, which was deposited by co-evaporation of Cu, In, Ga, and Se using a modified three stage process. Prior to the growth, the molybdenum-coated glass substrate was covered by a bent shroud made from tantalum (Ta), leading to a wedged absorber structure with a width of about 2 mm where the film thickness varies from 0 to 2 μm. In this region of interest the thickness dependency of morphology, concentration ratios and electronic properties was studied with secondary electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), probing the CIGSe sample along the thickness gradient. The evidence of the thickness gradient itself was proven with SEM measurements in cross section geometry. By using XRF it was found that with decreasing film thickness the Cu concentration decreases significantly. This finding was also verified by HAXPES measurements. Furthermore, an enrichment of Ga towards the Mo back contact was found using the same technique. Besides these results the formation of a molybdenum selenide (MoSe) phase was observed on the fully covered part of the Mo coated substrate indicating a high mobility of Se on Mo under the given temperature conditions of the modified three stage deposition process. - Highlights: • Growth of a CIGSe wedge • Application of HAXPES and XRF as local probing techniques • Good agreement with former studies • Wedged CIGSe structures can be used for further, locally resolved experiments.

  3. Chromophore photophysics and dynamics in fluorescent proteins of the GFP family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Karin; Nienhaus, G. Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Proteins of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) family are indispensable for fluorescence imaging experiments in the life sciences, particularly of living specimens. Their essential role as genetically encoded fluorescence markers has motivated many researchers over the last 20 years to further advance and optimize these proteins by using protein engineering. Amino acids can be exchanged by site-specific mutagenesis, starting with naturally occurring proteins as templates. Optical properties of the fluorescent chromophore are strongly tuned by the surrounding protein environment, and a targeted modification of chromophore-protein interactions requires a profound knowledge of the underlying photophysics and photochemistry, which has by now been well established from a large number of structural and spectroscopic experiments and molecular-mechanical and quantum-mechanical computations on many variants of fluorescent proteins. Nevertheless, such rational engineering often does not meet with success and thus is complemented by random mutagenesis and selection based on the optical properties. In this topical review, we present an overview of the key structural and spectroscopic properties of fluorescent proteins. We address protein-chromophore interactions that govern ground state optical properties as well as processes occurring in the electronically excited state. Special emphasis is placed on photoactivation of fluorescent proteins. These light-induced reactions result in large structural changes that drastically alter the fluorescence properties of the protein, which enables some of the most exciting applications, including single particle tracking, pulse chase imaging and super-resolution imaging. We also present a few examples of fluorescent protein application in live-cell imaging experiments.

  4. Enhanced localized fluorescence in plasmonic nanoantennae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R.M.; Yuan, H.-K.; Liu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    Pairs of gold elliptical nanoparticles form antennae, resonant in the visible. A dye, embedded in a dielectric host, coats the antennae; its emission excites plasmon resonances in the antennae and is enhanced. Far-field excitation of the dye-nanoantenna system shows a wavelength-dependent increase...

  5. Going Viral with Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Lindsey M; Snapp, Erik L

    2015-10-01

    Many longstanding questions about dynamics of virus-cell interactions can be answered by combining fluorescence imaging techniques with fluorescent protein (FP) tagging strategies. Successfully creating a FP fusion with a cellular or viral protein of interest first requires selecting the appropriate FP. However, while viral architecture and cellular localization often dictate the suitability of a FP, a FP's chemical and physical properties must also be considered. Here, we discuss the challenges of and offer suggestions for identifying the optimal FPs for studying the cell biology of viruses.

  6. Fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth submitted to bleaching treatment with hydrogen peroxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles photoactivated by LED-laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Cristina JORDÃO-BASSO

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was evaluate the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth after bleaching treatment using 15% hydrogen peroxide plus titanium dioxide nanoparticles (15HPTiO2 photoactivated by LED-laser, in comparison with protocols using 35% hydrogen peroxide (35HP, 37% carbamide peroxide (37CP or sodium perborate (SP. Material and method: After endodontic treatment, fifty bovine extracted incisors were divided into five groups (n = 10: G1- without bleaching; G2- 35HP; G3- 37CP; G4- 15HPTiO2 photoactivated by LED-laser and G5- SP. In G2 and G4, the bleaching protocol was applied in 4 sessions, with a 7 day interval between each session. In G3 and G5, the materials were kept in the pulp chamber for 21 days, but replaced every 7 days. After 21 days, the crowns were subjected to compressive load at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min, applied at 135° to the long axis of the root using an eletromechanical testing machine, until fracture. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p = 0.05. Result: The bleaching treatment in endodontically-treated teeth with 15HP plus TiO2 nanoparticles and photoactivated by LED-laser caused reduction of the fracture resistance similarly provided by 35HP, 37CP or SP (p>0.05. All bleaching treatments reduced the fracture resistance compared to unbleached teeth (p<0.05. Conclusion: All bleaching protocols reduced the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth, but there were no differences between each other.

  7. Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy for deep super-resolution vascular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Claudia; Pierre, Juliette; Pezet, Sophie; Desailly, Yann; Lenkei, Zsolt; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive imaging deep into organs at microscopic scales remains an open quest in biomedical imaging. Although optical microscopy is still limited to surface imaging owing to optical wave diffusion and fast decorrelation in tissue, revolutionary approaches such as fluorescence photo-activated localization microscopy led to a striking increase in resolution by more than an order of magnitude in the last decade. In contrast with optics, ultrasonic waves propagate deep into organs without losing their coherence and are much less affected by in vivo decorrelation processes. However, their resolution is impeded by the fundamental limits of diffraction, which impose a long-standing trade-off between resolution and penetration. This limits clinical and preclinical ultrasound imaging to a sub-millimetre scale. Here we demonstrate in vivo that ultrasound imaging at ultrafast frame rates (more than 500 frames per second) provides an analogue to optical localization microscopy by capturing the transient signal decorrelation of contrast agents—inert gas microbubbles. Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy allowed both non-invasive sub-wavelength structural imaging and haemodynamic quantification of rodent cerebral microvessels (less than ten micrometres in diameter) more than ten millimetres below the tissue surface, leading to transcranial whole-brain imaging within short acquisition times (tens of seconds). After intravenous injection, single echoes from individual microbubbles were detected through ultrafast imaging. Their localization, not limited by diffraction, was accumulated over 75,000 images, yielding 1,000,000 events per coronal plane and statistically independent pixels of ten micrometres in size. Precise temporal tracking of microbubble positions allowed us to extract accurately in-plane velocities of the blood flow with a large dynamic range (from one millimetre per second to several centimetres per second). These results pave the way for deep non

  8. Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy for deep super-resolution vascular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Claudia; Pierre, Juliette; Pezet, Sophie; Desailly, Yann; Lenkei, Zsolt; Couture, Olivier; Tanter, Mickael

    2015-11-26

    Non-invasive imaging deep into organs at microscopic scales remains an open quest in biomedical imaging. Although optical microscopy is still limited to surface imaging owing to optical wave diffusion and fast decorrelation in tissue, revolutionary approaches such as fluorescence photo-activated localization microscopy led to a striking increase in resolution by more than an order of magnitude in the last decade. In contrast with optics, ultrasonic waves propagate deep into organs without losing their coherence and are much less affected by in vivo decorrelation processes. However, their resolution is impeded by the fundamental limits of diffraction, which impose a long-standing trade-off between resolution and penetration. This limits clinical and preclinical ultrasound imaging to a sub-millimetre scale. Here we demonstrate in vivo that ultrasound imaging at ultrafast frame rates (more than 500 frames per second) provides an analogue to optical localization microscopy by capturing the transient signal decorrelation of contrast agents--inert gas microbubbles. Ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy allowed both non-invasive sub-wavelength structural imaging and haemodynamic quantification of rodent cerebral microvessels (less than ten micrometres in diameter) more than ten millimetres below the tissue surface, leading to transcranial whole-brain imaging within short acquisition times (tens of seconds). After intravenous injection, single echoes from individual microbubbles were detected through ultrafast imaging. Their localization, not limited by diffraction, was accumulated over 75,000 images, yielding 1,000,000 events per coronal plane and statistically independent pixels of ten micrometres in size. Precise temporal tracking of microbubble positions allowed us to extract accurately in-plane velocities of the blood flow with a large dynamic range (from one millimetre per second to several centimetres per second). These results pave the way for deep non

  9. Low-visibility light-intensity laser-triggered release of entrapped calcein from 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes is mediated through a type I photoactivation pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavlovich A

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Amichai Yavlovich,1,* Mathias Viard,1,2,* Kshitij Gupta,1,* Jessica Sine,1,* Mylinh Vu,1 Robert Blumenthal,1 Darrell B Tata,3 Anu Puri1,*1Center for Cancer Research Nanobiology Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD, USA; 2Basic Science Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA; 3Centre for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH/Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories(OSEL/Division of Physics, US Food and Drug Administration, White Oak, MD, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: We recently reported on the physical characteristics of photo-triggerable liposomes containing dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, and 1,2-bis (tricosa-10,12-diynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DC8,9PC carrying a photo agent as their payload. When exposed to a low-intensity 514 nm wavelength (continuous-wave laser light, these liposomes were observed to release entrapped calcein green (Cal-G; Ex/Em 490/517 nm but not calcein blue (Cal-B; Ex/Em 360/460 nm. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism for the 514 nm laser-triggered release of the Cal-G payload using several scavengers that are known specifically to inhibit either type I or type II photoreaction pathways. Liposomes containing DPPC:DC8,9PC: distearoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DSPE-polyethylene glycol (PEG-2000 (86:10:04 mole ratio were loaded either with fluorescent (calcein or nonfluorescent (3H-inulin aqueous markers. In addition, a non-photo-triggerable formulation (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine [POPC]:DC8,9PC:DSPE-PEG2000 was also studied with the same payloads. The 514 nm wavelength laser exposure on photo-triggerable liposomes resulted in the release of Cal-G but not that of Cal-B or 3H-inulin, suggesting an involvement of a photoactivated state of Cal-G due to the 514 nm laser exposure. Upon 514 nm laser exposures, substantial hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, ≈100 µM levels were detected from

  10. The Antibacterial Efficacy of Photo-Activated Disinfection, Chlorhexidine and Sodium Hypochlorite in Infected Root Canals: An in Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Shahi, Shahriar; Abdollahi, Amir Ardalan; Eskandarinezhad, Mahsa; Negahdari, Ramin; Pakseresht, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study compared the efficacy of light-activated low-power laser, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 2.5% NaOCl in eliminating Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis) from the root canal system. Methods and Materials: The root canals of 60 maxillary central incisors were contaminated with E. faecalis and then the bacteria were incubated for 24 h. All the root canals were instrumented in a crown-down manner with #4 and 3 Gates-Glidden drills, followed by RaCe rotary files (40/0.10, 35/0.08, and 30/0.06). The samples were randomly assigned to three experimental groups and one control group (n=15). In the control group no intervention was made. In the photo-activated disinfection (PAD) group, laser therapy was undertaken with diode laser beams (with an output power of 100 mW/cm2) for 120 sec. For the other two experimental groups, root canals were irrigated either with 5 mL of 2% CHX or 2.5% NaOCl solutions, respectively. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the CFU values of the bacteria and post-hoc Bonferroni test was used for pairwise comparisons. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: The inhibition of bacterial growth in all the experimental groups was significantly superior to the control group (Pfaecalis counts in comparison with the control group, but 2.5% NaOCl solution was the most effective protocol. PMID:27471527

  11. Influence of light energy density on heat generation during photoactivation of dental composites with different dentin and composite thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Danil Guiraldo

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different energy densities on the heat generated during photoactivation of Filtek Z250 (3M/ESPE and Z100 (3M/ESPE composite resins with different dentin and composite thickness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The temperature increase was registered with a type-K thermocouple connected to a digital thermometer (Iopetherm 46. A chemically polymerized acrylic resin base was prepared to serve as a guide for the thermocouple and as a support for 0.5-, 1.0-, and 1.5-mm-thick bovine dentin discs. Circular elastomer molds (1.0 mm-height x 3.0-mm diameter or 2.0-mm height x 3.0-mm diameter were adapted on the acrylic resin base to standardize the composite resin thickness. A conventional halogen light-curing unit (XL 2500, 3M/ESPE was used with light intensity of 700 mW/cm². Energy density was calculated by the light intensity applied during a certain time with values of 28 J/cm² for Z100 and 14 J/cm² for Filtek Z250. The temperature change data were subjected to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% level. RESULTS: The higher energy density (Z100 promoted greater temperature increase (p<0.05 than the lower energy density (Filtek Z250. For both composites and all composite thicknesses, the lowest dentin thickness (0.5 mm yielded significantly higher (p<0.05 temperature increase than the other two dentin thicknesses. The 1-mm-thick composite resin layer yielded significantly higher (p<0.05 temperature changes for both composites and all dentin thicknesses. CONCLUSIONS: Temperature increase was influenced by higher energy density and dentin/composite thickness.

  12. Rhodopsin kinase and arrestin binding control the decay of photoactivated rhodopsin and dark adaptation of mouse rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Rikard; Nymark, Soile; Kolesnikov, Alexander V; Berry, Justin D; Adler, Leopold; Koutalos, Yiannis; Kefalov, Vladimir J; Cornwall, M Carter

    2016-07-01

    Photoactivation of vertebrate rhodopsin converts it to the physiologically active Meta II (R*) state, which triggers the rod light response. Meta II is rapidly inactivated by the phosphorylation of C-terminal serine and threonine residues by G-protein receptor kinase (Grk1) and subsequent binding of arrestin 1 (Arr1). Meta II exists in equilibrium with the more stable inactive form of rhodopsin, Meta III. Dark adaptation of rods requires the complete thermal decay of Meta II/Meta III into opsin and all-trans retinal and the subsequent regeneration of rhodopsin with 11-cis retinal chromophore. In this study, we examine the regulation of Meta III decay by Grk1 and Arr1 in intact mouse rods and their effect on rod dark adaptation. We measure the rates of Meta III decay in isolated retinas of wild-type (WT), Grk1-deficient (Grk1(-/-)), Arr1-deficient (Arr1(-/-)), and Arr1-overexpressing (Arr1(ox)) mice. We find that in WT mouse rods, Meta III peaks ∼6 min after rhodopsin activation and decays with a time constant (τ) of 17 min. Meta III decay slows in Arr1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼27 min), whereas it accelerates in Arr1(ox) rods (τ of ∼8 min) and Grk1(-/-) rods (τ of ∼13 min). In all cases, regeneration of rhodopsin with exogenous 11-cis retinal is rate limited by the decay of Meta III. Notably, the kinetics of rod dark adaptation in vivo is also modulated by the levels of Arr1 and Grk1. We conclude that, in addition to their well-established roles in Meta II inactivation, Grk1 and Arr1 can modulate the kinetics of Meta III decay and rod dark adaptation in vivo.

  13. Susceptibility of In Vitro Melanoma Skin Cancer to Photoactivated Hypericin versus Aluminium(III Phthalocyanine Chloride Tetrasulphonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Ndhundhuma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of human melanoma cells to photoactivated Hypericin (Hyp compared to aluminium(III phthalocyanine chloride tetrasulphonate (AlPcS4Cl is reported in this study. Melanoma cells (A375 cell line were treated with various concentrations of Hyp or AlPcS4Cl alone, for 1, 4, and 24 hrs; varying doses of laser irradiation alone (594 or 682 nm; or optimal concentrations of PSs combined with laser irradiation. Changes in cell morphology, viability, membrane integrity, and proliferation after treatment of cells were determined using inverted microscopy, Trypan blue cell exclusion, Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH membrane integrity, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP cell proliferation assay, respectively. More than 60% of cell survival was observed when cells were treated with 2.5 μM of Hyp or AlPcS4Cl alone at all incubation times or with 5 J/cm2 of 594 or 682 nm laser alone. Combination of PSs and respective lasers leads to a statistically significant incubation time-dependent decrease in survival of cells. Flow cytometry using the FITC Annexin V/PI apoptosis kit demonstrated that cell death induced after Hyp-PDT is via early and late apoptosis whereas early apoptosis was the main mechanism observed with AlPcS4Cl-PDT. Hyp-PDT compared to AlPcS4Cl-PDT is indicated to be a more effective cancer cell death inducer in melanoma cells.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of local pulmonary distribution of TiO2 in rats following single or multiple intratracheal administrations of TiO2 nanoparticles using X-ray fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guihua; Shinohara, Naohide; Kano, Hirokazu; Senoh, Hideki; Suzuki, Masaaki; Sasaki, Takeshi; Fukushima, Shoji; Gamo, Masashi

    2016-10-01

    Uneven pulmonary nanoparticle (NP) distribution has been described when using single-dose intratracheal administration tests. Multiple-dose intratracheal administrations with small quantities of NPs are expected to improve the unevenness of each dose. The differences in local pulmonary NP distribution (called microdistribution) between single- and multiple-dose administrations may cause differential pulmonary responses; however, this has not been evaluated. Here, we quantitatively evaluated the pulmonary microdistribution (per mesh: 100 μm × 100 μm) of TiO2 in lung sections from rats following one, two, three, or four doses of TiO2 NPs at a same total dosage of 10 mg kg(-1) using X-ray fluorescence microscopy. The results indicate that: (i) multiple-dose administrations show lower variations in TiO2 content (ng mesh(-1) ) for sections of each lobe; (ii) TiO2 appears to be deposited more in the right caudal and accessory lobes located downstream of the administration direction of NP suspensions, and less so in the right middle lobes, irrespective of the number of doses; (iii) there are not prominent differences in the pattern of pulmonary TiO2 microdistribution between rats following single and multiple doses of TiO2 NPs. Additionally, the estimation of pulmonary TiO2 deposition for multiple-dose administrations imply that every dose of TiO2 would be randomly deposited only in part of the fixed 30-50% of lung areas. The evidence suggests that multiple-dose administrations do not offer remarkable advantages over single-dose administration on the pulmonary NP microdistribution, although multiple-dose administrations may reduce variations in the TiO2 content for each lung lobe. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  16. Photoactivation approaches reveal a role for Rab11 in FGFR4 recycling and signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugsten, Ellen M; Brech, Andreas; Liestøl, Knut; Norman, Jim C; Wesche, Jørgen

    2014-06-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) plays important roles during development and in the adult to maintain tissue homeostasis. Moreover, overexpression of FGFR4 or activating mutations in FGFR4 has been identified as tumour-promoting events in several forms of cancer. Endocytosis is important for regulation of signalling receptors and we have previously shown that FGFR4 is mainly localized to transferrin-positive structures after ligand-induced endocytosis. Here, using a cell line with a defined pericentriolar endocytic recycling compartment, we show that FGFR4 accumulates in this compartment after endocytosis. Furthermore, using classical recycling assays and a new, photoactivatable FGFR4-PA-GFP fusion protein combined with live-cell imaging, we demonstrate that recycling of FGFR4 is dependent on Rab11. Upon Rab11b depletion, FGFR4 is trapped in the pericentriolar recycling compartment and the total levels of FGFR4 in cells are increased. Moreover, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1)-induced autophosphorylation of FGFR4 as well as phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)-γ is prolonged in cells depleted of Rab11. Interestingly, the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and AKT pathways were not prolonged but rather reduced in Rab11-depleted cells, indicating that recycling of FGFR4 is important for the nature of its signalling output. Thus, Rab11-dependent recycling of FGFR4 maintains proper levels of FGFR4 in cells and regulates FGF1-induced FGFR4 signalling.

  17. A Photoactivated Gas Detector for Toluene Sensing at Room Temperature Based on New Coral-Like ZnO Nanostructure Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Li-Ko; Luo, Jie-Chun; Chen, Min-Chun; Wu, Chih-Hung; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Cheng, I-Chun; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Tian, Wei-Cheng

    2016-10-31

    A photoactivated gas detector operated at room temperature was microfabricated using a simple hydrothermal method. We report that the photoactivated gas detector can detect toluene using a UV illumination of 2 μW/cm². By ultraviolet (UV) illumination, gas detectors sense toluene at room temperature without heating. A significant enhancement of detector sensitivity is achieved because of the high surface-area-to-volume ratio of the morphology of the coral-like ZnO nanorods arrays (NRAs) and the increased number of photo-induced oxygen ions under UV illumination. The corresponding sensitivity (ΔR/R₀) of the detector based on coral-like ZnO NRAs is enhanced by approximately 1022% compared to that of thin-film detectors. The proposed detector greatly extends the dynamic range of detection of metal-oxide-based detectors for gas sensing applications. We report the first-ever detection of toluene with a novel coral-like NRAs gas detector at room temperature. A sensing mechanism model is also proposed to explain the sensing responses of gas detectors based on coral-like ZnO NRAs.

  18. A Photoactivated Gas Detector for Toluene Sensing at Room Temperature Based on New Coral-Like ZnO Nanostructure Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ko Yeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A photoactivated gas detector operated at room temperature was microfabricated using a simple hydrothermal method. We report that the photoactivated gas detector can detect toluene using a UV illumination of 2 μW/cm2. By ultraviolet (UV illumination, gas detectors sense toluene at room temperature without heating. A significant enhancement of detector sensitivity is achieved because of the high surface-area-to-volume ratio of the morphology of the coral-like ZnO nanorods arrays (NRAs and the increased number of photo-induced oxygen ions under UV illumination. The corresponding sensitivity (ΔR/R0 of the detector based on coral-like ZnO NRAs is enhanced by approximately 1022% compared to that of thin-film detectors. The proposed detector greatly extends the dynamic range of detection of metal-oxide-based detectors for gas sensing applications. We report the first-ever detection of toluene with a novel coral-like NRAs gas detector at room temperature. A sensing mechanism model is also proposed to explain the sensing responses of gas detectors based on coral-like ZnO NRAs.

  19. A Photoactivated Gas Detector for Toluene Sensing at Room Temperature Based on New Coral-Like ZnO Nanostructure Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Li-Ko; Luo, Jie-Chun; Chen, Min-Chun; Wu, Chih-Hung; Chen, Jian-Zhang; Cheng, I-Chun; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Tian, Wei-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    A photoactivated gas detector operated at room temperature was microfabricated using a simple hydrothermal method. We report that the photoactivated gas detector can detect toluene using a UV illumination of 2 μW/cm2. By ultraviolet (UV) illumination, gas detectors sense toluene at room temperature without heating. A significant enhancement of detector sensitivity is achieved because of the high surface-area-to-volume ratio of the morphology of the coral-like ZnO nanorods arrays (NRAs) and the increased number of photo-induced oxygen ions under UV illumination. The corresponding sensitivity (ΔR/R0) of the detector based on coral-like ZnO NRAs is enhanced by approximately 1022% compared to that of thin-film detectors. The proposed detector greatly extends the dynamic range of detection of metal-oxide-based detectors for gas sensing applications. We report the first-ever detection of toluene with a novel coral-like NRAs gas detector at room temperature. A sensing mechanism model is also proposed to explain the sensing responses of gas detectors based on coral-like ZnO NRAs. PMID:27809222

  20. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope.

  1. The cyanobacterial Fluorescence Recovery Protein has two distinct activities: Orange Carotenoid Protein amino acids involved in FRP interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurotte, Adrien; Bourcier de Carbon, Céline; Wilson, Adjélé; Talbot, Léa; Cot, Sandrine; López-Igual, Rocio; Kirilovsky, Diana

    2017-04-01

    To deal with fluctuating light condition, cyanobacteria have developed a photoprotective mechanism which, under high light conditions, decreases the energy arriving at the photochemical centers. It relies on a photoswitch, the Orange Carotenoid Protein (OCP). Once photoactivated, OCP binds to the light harvesting antenna, the phycobilisome (PBS), and triggers the thermal dissipation of the excess energy absorbed. Deactivation of the photoprotective mechanism requires the intervention of a third partner, the Fluorescence Recovery Protein (FRP). FRP by interacting with the photoactivated OCP accelerates its conversion to the non-active form and its detachment from the phycobilisome. We have studied the interaction of FRP with free and phycobilisome-bound OCP. Several OCP variants were constructed and characterized. In this article we show that OCP amino acid F299 is essential and D220 important for OCP deactivation mediated by FRP. Mutations of these amino acids did not affect FRP activity as helper to detach OCP from phycobilisomes. In addition, while mutated R60L FRP is inactive on OCP deactivation, its activity on the detachment of the OCP from the phycobilisomes is not affected. Thus, our results demonstrate that FRP has two distinct activities: it accelerates OCP detachment from phycobilisomes and then it helps deactivation of the OCP. They also suggest that different OCP and FRP amino acids could be involved in these two activities.

  2. Photoactivation of the Ni-SIr state to the Ni-SIa state in [NiFe] hydrogenase: FT-IR study on the light reactivity of the ready Ni-SIr state and as-isolated enzyme revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Hulin; Xu, Liyang; Inoue, Seiya; Nishikawa, Koji; Higuchi, Yoshiki; Hirota, Shun

    2016-08-10

    The Ni-SIr state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F was photoactivated to its Ni-SIa state by Ar(+) laser irradiation at 514.5 nm, whereas the Ni-SL state was light induced from a newly identified state, which was less active than any other identified state and existed in the "as-isolated" enzyme.

  3. Subcellular localization of the voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in the cerebellar dentate nucleus of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Espinaco, V; Elezgarai, I; Díez-García, J; Puente, N; Knöpfel, T; Grandes, P

    2008-09-09

    Deep cerebellar dentate nuclei are in a key position to control motor planning as a result of an integration of cerebropontine inputs and hemispheric Purkinje neurons signals, and their influence through synaptic outputs onto extracerebellar hubs. GABAergic dentate neurons exhibit broader action potentials and slower afterhyperpolarization than non-GABAergic (presumably glutamatergic) neurons. Specific potassium channels may be involved in these distinct firing profiles, particularly, Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 subunits which rapidly activate at relatively positive potentials to support the generation of fast action potentials. To investigate the subcellular localization of Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 in GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67-green fluorescent protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice a preembedding immunocytochemical method for electron microscopy was used. Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 were in membranes of cell somata, dendrites, axons and synaptic terminals of both GAD- and GAD+ dentate neurons. The vast majority of GAD- somatodendritic membrane segments domains labeled for Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 (96.1% and 84.7%, respectively) whereas 56.2% and 69.8% of GAD- axonal membrane segments were immunopositive for these subunits. Furthermore, density of Kv3.1b immunoparticles was much higher in GAD- somatodendritic than axonal domains. As to GAD+ neurons, only 70.6% and 50% of somatodendritic membrane segments, and 53.3% and 59.5% of axonal membranes exhibited Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 labeling, respectively. In contrast to GAD- cells, GAD+ cells exhibited a higher density labeling for both Kv3 subunits at their axonal than at their somatodendritic membranes. Taken together, Kv3.1b and Kv3.3 potassium subunits are expressed in both GAD- and GAD+ cells, albeit at different densities and distribution. They likely contribute to the distinct biophysical properties of both GAD- and GAD+ neurons in the dentate nucleus.

  4. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  5. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  6. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  7. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  8. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  9. PHOTODYNAMIC DIAGNOSIS AND FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY IN SUPERFICIAL BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rusakov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive fluorescence technique has been developed to study the urinary bladder mucosa in patients with superficial bladder cancer (BC, by using alasense, white light cystoscopy, fluorescence cytoscopy, and local fluorescence spectroscopy in vivo. Quantification of urothelium fluorescence in the red emission foci of 5-ALA-induced protophorphyrin, with the local autofluorescence intensity being borne in mind, has been shown to increase the specificity of photodynamic diagnosis of superficial BC from 70 to 85% (p ≤ 0.05 and the total accuracy of the technique from 80 to 86%.  

  10. Quantitative imaging with fluorescent biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumoto, Sakiko; Jones, Alexander; Frommer, Wolf B

    2012-01-01

    Molecular activities are highly dynamic and can occur locally in subcellular domains or compartments. Neighboring cells in the same tissue can exist in different states. Therefore, quantitative information on the cellular and subcellular dynamics of ions, signaling molecules, and metabolites is critical for functional understanding of organisms. Mass spectrometry is generally used for monitoring ions and metabolites; however, its temporal and spatial resolution are limited. Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology-e.g., fluorescent proteins can report on gene expression or protein localization in real time-yet promoter-based reporters are often slow to report physiologically relevant changes such as calcium oscillations. Therefore, novel tools are required that can be deployed in specific cells and targeted to subcellular compartments in order to quantify target molecule dynamics directly. We require tools that can measure enzyme activities, protein dynamics, and biophysical processes (e.g., membrane potential or molecular tension) with subcellular resolution. Today, we have an extensive suite of tools at our disposal to address these challenges, including translocation sensors, fluorescence-intensity sensors, and Förster resonance energy transfer sensors. This review summarizes sensor design principles, provides a database of sensors for more than 70 different analytes/processes, and gives examples of applications in quantitative live cell imaging.

  11. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzkofer, A.; Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S. K.; Kateriya, S.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.

    2013-09-01

    The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr-Tyr cross-linking (o,o‧-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  12. STUDY ON A NEW SYNTHETIC POLYACETYLENE PHOTOACTIVATED INSECTICIDE BY HPLC%一种新型多炔类光活化杀虫剂的HPLC研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋志胜; 尚稚珍; 万树青; 徐汉虹; 刘新清; 赵善欢

    2001-01-01

    建立了一种新型多炔类光活化杀虫剂的HPLC分析方法.研究表明,峰面积和峰高均可作为该化合物的定量评价指标,并以菜粉蝶Pieris rapae幼虫为例,证明紫外光照的先后顺序与试虫对该化合物的代谢与排泄有关.%A determination of a new synthetic polyacetylene photoactivated insecticide by high performance liquid chromatography was reported. The results indicated that both peak area and peak height could be used as index of quantitative and qualitative analysis, and the sequence of ultraviolet radiation had a great influence on metabolism and excretion of the synthetic polyacetylene in Pieris rapae larvae.

  13. Photo-activated psoralen binds the ErbB2 catalytic kinase domain, blocking ErbB2 signaling and triggering tumor cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenle Xia

    Full Text Available Photo-activation of psoralen with UVA irradiation, referred to as PUVA, is used in the treatment of proliferative skin disorders. The anti-proliferative effects of PUVA have been largely attributed to psoralen intercalation of DNA, which upon UV treatment, triggers the formation of interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICL that inhibit transcription and DNA replication. Here, we show that PUVA exerts antitumor effects in models of human breast cancer that overexpress the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase oncogene, through a new mechanism. Independent of ICL formation, the antitumor effects of PUVA in ErbB2+ breast cancer models can instead be mediated through inhibition of ErbB2 activation and signaling. Using a mass spectroscopy-based approach, we show for the first time that photo-activated 8MOP (8-methoxypsoralen interacts with the ErbB2 catalytic autokinase domain. Furthermore, PUVA can reverse therapeutic resistance to lapatinib and other ErbB2 targeted therapies, including resistance mediated via expression of a phosphorylated, truncated form of ErbB2 (p85(ErbB2 that is preferentially expressed in tumor cell nuclei. Current ErbB2 targeted therapies, small molecule kinase inhibitors or antibodies, do not block the phosphorylated, activated state of p85(ErbB2. Here we show that PUVA reduced p85(ErbB2 phosphorylation leading to tumor cell apoptosis. Thus, in addition to its effects on DNA and the formation of ICL, PUVA represents a novel ErbB2 targeted therapy for the treatment of ErbB2+ breast cancers, including those that have developed resistance to other ErbB2 targeted therapies.

  14. Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirra, Randall T; Zhang, Peijun

    2014-10-01

    Correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy (CFEM) is a multimodal technique that combines dynamic and localization information from fluorescence methods with ultrastructural data from electron microscopy, to give new information about how cellular components change relative to the spatiotemporal dynamics within their environment. In this review, we will discuss some of the basic techniques and tools of the trade for utilizing this attractive research method, which is becoming a very powerful tool for biology labs. The information obtained from correlative methods has proven to be invaluable in creating consensus between the two types of microscopy, extending the capability of each, and cutting the time and expense associated with using each method separately for comparative analysis. The realization of the advantages of these methods in cell biology has led to rapid improvement in the protocols and has ushered in a new generation of instruments to reach the next level of correlation--integration.

  15. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  16. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Marc-Ph.; Court, Andrew; Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Crocco, Luiggi; Heilimo, Jyro; Honig, Andre

    1999-12-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1 - 0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two channels: one in the red (648 - 664 nm) and one in the blue (391 - 438 nm) for working with several Fraunhofer lines. The across track FOV is 8.4 degrees; ground spatial resolution is better than 0.5 X 0.5 km2. To increase the S/N ratio a steering mirror will be used, if necessary, to 'freeze' the image and also to provide plus or minus 4 degrees across track depointing. Calibration is made by viewing the sun via a diffuser plate switched into the telescope field of view. A separate CCD camera will allow cloud detection and scene identification. A TIR radiometer will provide simultaneous surface temperature measurements. The spacecraft, overall mass estimated at 200 kg, is derived from the ASI-MITA bus which provides all the necessary subsystems and stabilized platform. By use of on-board storage, ground requirements for satellite control and data link are minimized; the possibility of local stations for real time reception/distribution is also envisaged. Provisional orbit characteristics are: LEO sun synchronous, 500 - 900 km altitude. Priority will be given to highest revisit frequency on a sufficient number of selected test sites.

  17. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  18. Photouncaging nanoparticles for MRI and fluorescence imaging in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibu, Edakkattuparambil S; Ono, Kenji; Sugino, Sakiko; Nishioka, Ayami; Yasuda, Akikazu; Shigeri, Yasushi; Wakida, Shin-Ichi; Sawada, Makoto; Biju, Vasudevanpillai

    2013-11-26

    Multimodal and multifunctional nanomaterials are promising candidates for bioimaging and therapeutic applications in the nanomedicine settings. Here we report the preparation of photouncaging nanoparticles with fluorescence and magnetic modalities and evaluation of their potentials for in vitro and in vivo bioimaging. Photoactivation of such bimodal nanoparticles prepared using photouncaging ligands, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, and super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles results in the systematic uncaging of the particles, which is correlated with continuous changes in the absorption, mass and NMR spectra of the ligands. Fluorescence and magnetic components of the bimodal nanoparticles are characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analyses using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Bioconjugation of the nanoparticles with peptide hormones renders them with biocompatibility and efficient intracellular transport as seen in the fluorescence and MRI images of mouse melanoma cells (B16) or human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells (H1650). Biocompatibility of the nanoparticles is evaluated using MTT cytotoxicity assays, which show cell viability over 90%. Further, we combine MRI and NIR fluorescence imaging in C57BL/6 (B6) mice subcutaneously or intravenously injected with the photouncaging nanoparticles and follow the in vivo fate of the nanoparticles. Interestingly, the intravenously injected nanoparticles initially accumulate in the liver within 30 min post injection and subsequently clear by the renal excretion within 48 h as seen in the time-dependent MRI and fluorescence images of the liver, urinary bladder, and urine samples. Photouncaging ligands such as the ones reported in this article are promising candidates for not only the site-specific delivery of nanomaterials-based contrast agents and drugs but also the systematic uncaging and renal

  19. Optical antenna design for fluorescence enhancement in the ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xiaojin; Blair, Steve

    2012-12-31

    Through rational design, we compare the performance of three plasmonic antenna structures for UV fluorescence enhancement. Among the antenna performance metrics considered are the local increase in excitation intensity and the increase in quantum efficiency, the product of which represents the net fluorescence enhancement. With realistic structures in aluminum, we predict that greater than 100× net enhancement can be obtained.

  20. Fluorescence antibunching microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Osip

    2011-01-01

    Breaking the diffraction limit in microscopy by utilizing quantum properties of light has been the goal of intense research in the recent years. We propose a quantum superresolution technique based on non-classical emission statistics of fluorescent markers, routinely used as contrast labels for bio-imaging. The technique can be readily implemented using standard fluorescence microscopy equipment.

  1. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  2. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Light-emitting diode, LED, lighting, fluorescent, waste reduction, energy conservation, net zero , mercury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Center (ATC) to assess the benefits of converting fluorescent tube lighting to light-emitting diode (LED) technology. The report documents the waste ...1-15 SECTION 2. SUBTESTS 2.1 HAZARDOUS WASTE REDUCTION

  3. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  4. Localization of P42 and F(1)-ATPase α-subunit homolog of the gliding machinery in Mycoplasma mobile revealed by newly developed gene manipulation and fluorescent protein tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulum, Isil; Yabe, Masaru; Uenoyama, Atsuko; Miyata, Makoto

    2014-05-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a unique mechanism that enables it to glide on solid surfaces faster than any other gliding mycoplasma. To elucidate the gliding mechanism, we developed a transformation system for M. mobile based on a transposon derived from Tn4001. Modification of the electroporation conditions, outgrowth time, and colony formation from the standard method for Mycoplasma species enabled successful transformation. A fluorescent-protein tagging technique was developed using the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) and applied to two proteins that have been suggested to be involved in the gliding mechanism: P42 (MMOB1050), which is transcribed as continuous mRNA with other proteins essential for gliding, and a homolog of the F1-ATPase α-subunit (MMOB1660). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of P42 by PSI-BLAST suggested that P42 evolved from a common ancestor with FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homologue. The roles of P42 and the F(1)-ATPase subunit homolog are discussed as part of our proposed gliding mechanism.

  5. Localization of P42 and F1-ATPase α-Subunit Homolog of the Gliding Machinery in Mycoplasma mobile Revealed by Newly Developed Gene Manipulation and Fluorescent Protein Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulum, Isil; Yabe, Masaru; Uenoyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a unique mechanism that enables it to glide on solid surfaces faster than any other gliding mycoplasma. To elucidate the gliding mechanism, we developed a transformation system for M. mobile based on a transposon derived from Tn4001. Modification of the electroporation conditions, outgrowth time, and colony formation from the standard method for Mycoplasma species enabled successful transformation. A fluorescent-protein tagging technique was developed using the enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) and applied to two proteins that have been suggested to be involved in the gliding mechanism: P42 (MMOB1050), which is transcribed as continuous mRNA with other proteins essential for gliding, and a homolog of the F1-ATPase α-subunit (MMOB1660). Analysis of the amino acid sequence of P42 by PSI-BLAST suggested that P42 evolved from a common ancestor with FtsZ, the bacterial tubulin homologue. The roles of P42 and the F1-ATPase subunit homolog are discussed as part of our proposed gliding mechanism. PMID:24509320

  6. Influence of light guide tip used in the photo-activation on degree of conversion and hardness of one nanofilled dental composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, M. R.; Costa, S. X. S.; Victorino, K. R.; Ribeiro, A. A.; Menezes, F. C. H.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion and hardness of a dental composite resin Filtek™ Z-350 (3M ESPE, Dental Products St. Paul, MN) photo-activated for 20 s of irradiation time with two different light guide tips, metal and polymer, coupled on blue LED Ultraled LCU (Dabi Atlante, SP, Brazil). With the metal light tip, power density was of 352 and with the polymer was of 456 mW/cm2, respectively. Five samples (4 mm in diameter and 2mm in thickness—ISO 4049), were made for each Group evaluated. The measurements for DC (%) were made in a Nexus-470 FT-IR, Thermo Nicolet, E.U.A. Spectroscopy (FTIR). Spectra for both uncured and cured samples were analyzed using an accessory of reflectance diffuse. The measurements were recorded in absorbance operating under the following conditions: 32 scans, 4 cm-1 resolution, 300-4000 cm-1 wavelength. The percentage of unreacted carbon double bonds (% C=C) was determined from the ratio of absorbance intensities of aliphatic C=C (peak at 1637 cm-1) against internal standard before and after curing of the sample: aromatic C-C (peak at 1610 cm-1). The Vickers hardness measurements (top and bottom surfaces) were performed in a universal testing machine (Buehler MMT-3 digital microhardness tester Lake Bluff, Illinois USA). A 50 gf load was used and the indenter with a dwell time of 30 s. The data were submitted to the test t Student at significance level of 5%. The mean values of degree of conversion for the polymer and metal light guide tip no were statistically different ( p = 0.8389). The hardness mean values were no statistically significant different among the light guide tips ( p = 0.6244), however, there was difference between top and bottom surfaces ( p < 0.001). The results show that so much the polymer light tip as the metal light tip can be used for the photo-activation, probably for the low quality of the light guide tip metal.

  7. Mitochondrially targeted fluorescent redox sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kylie; Kolanowski, Jacek L; New, Elizabeth J

    2017-04-06

    The balance of oxidants and antioxidants within the cell is crucial for maintaining health, and regulating physiological processes such as signalling. Consequently, imbalances between oxidants and antioxidants are now understood to lead to oxidative stress, a physiological feature that underlies many diseases. These processes have spurred the field of chemical biology to develop a plethora of sensors, both small-molecule and fluorescent protein-based, for the detection of specific oxidizing species and general redox balances within cells. The mitochondrion, in particular, is the site of many vital redox reactions. There is therefore a need to target redox sensors to this particular organelle. It has been well established that targeting mitochondria can be achieved by the use of a lipophilic cation-targeting group, or by utilizing natural peptidic mitochondrial localization sequences. Here, we review how these two approaches have been used by a number of researchers to develop mitochondrially localized fluorescent redox sensors that are already proving useful in providing insights into the roles of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondria.

  8. Genetically encoded biosensors based on engineered fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Wolf B; Davidson, Michael W; Campbell, Robert E

    2009-10-01

    Fluorescent proteins have revolutionized cell biology by allowing researchers to non-invasively peer into the inner workings of cells and organisms. While the most common applications of fluorescent proteins are to image expression, localization, and dynamics of protein chimeras, there is a growing interest in using fluorescent proteins to create biosensors for minimally invasive imaging of concentrations of ions and small molecules, the activity of enzymes, and changes in the conformation of proteins in living cells. This tutorial review provides an overview of the progress made in the development of fluorescent protein-based biosensors to date.

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Surface plasmon resonance-induced photoactivation of gold nanoparticles as bactericidal agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Lucian; Ilie, Ioana; Matea, Cristian; Tabaran, Flaviu; Kalman, Ersjebet; Iancu, Cornel; Mocan, Teodora

    2014-01-01

    Systemic infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other bacteria are responsible for millions of deaths worldwide, and much of this mortality is due to the rise of antibiotic-resistant organisms as a result of natural selection. Gold nanoparticles synthesized using the standard wet chemical procedure were photoexcited using an 808 nm 2 W laser diode and further administered to MRSA bacteria. Flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, contrast phase microscopy, and fluorescence microscopy combined with immunochemical staining were used to examine the interaction of the photoexcited gold nano-particles with MRSA bacteria. We show here that phonon-phonon interactions following laser photoexcitation of gold nanoparticles exhibit increased MRSA necrotic rates at low concentrations and short incubation times compared with MRSA treated with gold nanoparticles alone. These unique data may represent a step forward in the study of bactericidal effects of various nanomaterials, with applications in biology and medicine.

  12. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  13. Photo-dynamics of the lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätsstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Tanwar, M.; Veetil, S.K.; Kateriya, S. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi 110021 (India); Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P. [Institut für Biologie/Experimentelle Biophysik, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 42, D-10115 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-09-23

    Highlights: • Lyophilizing of NgPAC2 from Naegleria gruberi caused loss of BLUF domain activity. • Photo-induced tyrosine to flavin electron transfer in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced Tyr–Tyr cross-linking to o,o′-dityrosine in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Photo-induced partial flavin cofactor reduction in lyophilized NgPAC2. • Two NgPAC2 conformations with fast and slow photo-induced electron transfer. - Abstract: The absorption and emission spectroscopic behavior of lyophilized photo-activated adenylate cyclase NgPAC2 from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain consisting of a BLUF domain (BLUF = Blue Light sensor Using Flavin) and a cyclase homology domain was studied in the dark, during blue-light exposure and after blue-light exposure at a temperature of 4 °C. The BLUF domain photo-cycle dynamics observed for snap-frozen NgPAC2 was lost by lyophilization (no signaling state formation with flavin absorption red-shift). Instead, blue-light photo-excitation of lyophilized NgPAC2 caused sterically restricted Tyr–Tyr cross-linking (o,o′-ditysosine formation) and partial flavin cofactor reduction.

  14. Comparative efficacy of photo-activated disinfection and calcium hydroxide for disinfection of remaining carious dentin in deep cavities: a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sidhartha; Logani, Ajay; Shah, Naseem

    2014-08-01

    To comparatively evaluate the efficacy of photo-activated disinfection (PAD), calcium hydroxide (CH) and their combination on the treatment outcome of indirect pulp treatment (IPT). Institutional ethical clearance and informed consent of the patients were taken. The study was also registered with clinical registry of India. Sixty permanent molars exhibiting deep occlusal carious lesion in patients with the age range of 18 - 22 yr were included. Clinical and radiographic evaluation and set inclusion and exclusion criteria's were followed. Gross caries excavation was accomplished. In group I (n = 20) PAD was applied for sixty seconds. In group II (n = 20), CH was applied to the remaining carious dentin, while in group III (n = 20), PAD application was followed by CH placement. The teeth were permanently restored. They were clinically and radiographically followed-up at 45 day, 6 mon and 12 mon. Relative density of the remaining affected dentin was measured by 'Radiovisiography (RVG) densitometric' analysis. Successful outcome with an increase in radiographic grey values were observed in all three groups. However, on inter-group comparison, this change was not significant (p > 0.05). PAD and CH both have equal disinfection efficacy in the treatment of deep carious dentin. PAD alone is as effective for treatment of deep carious lesion as calcium hydroxide and hence can be used as an alternative to CH. They can be used independently in IPT, since combining both does not offer any additional therapeutic benefits.

  15. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  16. Functional Fluorescent Organic Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Campioli, Elisa

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents an extensive study on fluorescent organic nanoparticles and fluorescent organic binary and ternary nanoassemblies. In particular the attention is focused on the preparation and characterization of organic nanoparticles and new nanocomposites obtained from different types of small organic molecules, their stabilization and the use of these materials for biological and optoelectronics applications. The work deals at the beginning with the description of some methods used...

  17. Single molecule fluorescence image patterns linked to dipole orientation and axial position: application to myosin cross-bridges in muscle fibers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P Burghardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photoactivatable fluorescent probes developed specifically for single molecule detection extend advantages of single molecule imaging to high probe density regions of cells and tissues. They perform in the native biomolecule environment and have been used to detect both probe position and orientation. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Fluorescence emission from a single photoactivated probe captured in an oil immersion, high numerical aperture objective, produces a spatial pattern on the detector that is a linear combination of 6 independent and distinct spatial basis patterns with weighting coefficients specifying emission dipole orientation. Basis patterns are tabulated for single photoactivated probes labeling myosin cross-bridges in a permeabilized muscle fiber undergoing total internal reflection illumination. Emitter proximity to the glass/aqueous interface at the coverslip implies the dipole near-field and dipole power normalization are significant affecters of the basis patterns. Other characteristics of the basis patterns are contributed by field polarization rotation with transmission through the microscope optics and refraction by the filter set. Pattern recognition utilized the generalized linear model, maximum likelihood fitting, for Poisson distributed uncertainties. This fitting method is more appropriate for treating low signal level photon counting data than χ(2 minimization. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that emission dipole orientation is measurable from the intensity image except for the ambiguity under dipole inversion. The advantage over an alternative method comparing two measured polarized emission intensities using an analyzing polarizer is that information in the intensity spatial distribution provides more constraints on fitted parameters and a single image provides all the information needed. Axial distance dependence in the emission pattern is also exploited to measure relative probe position near focus. Single

  18. Fluorescence diagnosis of pre-tumor and tumor pathology of endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of fluorescence hysteroscopy with Alasens includes visual assessment of fluorescence of Alasens-induced protoporphyrin IX and local fluorescence spectroscopy. The technique allows to improve the efficacy of early diagnosis for endometrial pathology including early endometrial cancer, to assess definitely an extent of pre-tumor and tumor process. The sensitivity of fluorescence hysteroscopy accounts for 100%, the specificity – 98%. 

  19. Nonnegative matrix factorization: a blind spectra separation method for in vivo fluorescent optical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcuquet, Anne-Sophie; Hervé, Lionel; Navarro, Fabrice; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Mars, Jérôme I

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in diffusive media is an emerging imaging modality for medical applications that uses injected fluorescent markers that bind to specific targets, e.g., carcinoma. The region of interest is illuminated with near-IR light and the emitted back fluorescence is analyzed to localize the fluorescence sources. To investigate a thick medium, as the fluorescence signal decreases with the light travel distance, any disturbing signal, such as biological tissues intrinsic fluorescence (called autofluorescence) is a limiting factor. Several specific markers may also be simultaneously injected to bind to different molecules, and one may want to isolate each specific fluorescent signal from the others. To remove the unwanted fluorescence contributions or separate different specific markers, a spectroscopic approach is explored. The nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) is the blind positive source separation method we chose. We run an original regularized NMF algorithm we developed on experimental data, and successfully obtain separated in vivo fluorescence spectra.

  20. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  1. ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence in epileptogenic tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleen, Jonathan K.; Valdes, Pablo A.; Harris, Brent T.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Roberts, David W.

    2011-03-01

    Astrogliotic tissue displays markedly increased levels of ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence, making it useful for fluorescence-guided resection in glioma surgery. In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and corresponding animal models, there are areas of astrogliosis that often co-localize with the epileptic focus, which can be resected to eliminate seizures in the majority of treated patients. If this epileptogenic tissue can exhibit PpIX fluorescence that is sufficiently localized, it could potentially help identify margins in epilepsy surgery. We tested the hypothesis that ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence could visually accentuate epileptogenic tissue, using an established animal model of chronic TLE. An acute dose of pilocarpine was used to induce chronic seizure activity in a rat. This rat and a normal control were given ALA, euthanized, and brains examined post-mortem for PpIX fluorescence and neuropathology. Preliminary evidence indicates increased PpIX fluorescence in areas associated with chronic epileptic changes and seizure generation in TLE, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal areas. In addition, strong PpIX fluorescence was clearly observed in layer II of the piriform cortex, a region known for epileptic reorganization and involvement in the generation of seizures in animal studies. We are further investigating whether ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence can consistently identify epileptogenic zones, which could warrant the extension of this technique to clinical studies for use as an adjuvant guidance technology in the resection of epileptic tissue.

  2. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  3. Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, Wiebke [Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Hayata-Takano, Atsuko [Molecular Research Center for Children' s Mental Development, United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kamo, Toshihiko [Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nakazawa, Takanobu, E-mail: takanobunakazawa-tky@umin.ac.jp [iPS Cell-based Research Project on Brain Neuropharmacology and Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Nagayasu, Kazuki [iPS Cell-based Research Project on Brain Neuropharmacology and Toxicology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kasai, Atsushi; Seiriki, Kaoru [Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Interdisciplinary Program for Biomedical Sciences, Institute for Academic Initiatives, Osaka University, 1-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shintani, Norihito [Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ago, Yukio [Laboratory of Medicinal Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Farfan, Camille [Laboratory of Molecular Neuropharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Osaka University, 1-6 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-27

    Systematic and simultaneous analysis of multiple cell types in the brain is becoming important, but such tools have not yet been adequately developed. Here, we aimed to generate a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes, two major cell types in the brain, and we have developed lentiviral vectors to express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in neurons and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in astrocytes. Importantly, both fluorescent proteins are fused to histone 2B protein (H2B) to confer nuclear localization to distinguish between single cells. We also constructed several expression constructs, including a tandem alignment of the neuron- and astrocyte-expression cassettes for simultaneous labeling. Introducing these vectors and constructs in vitro and in vivo resulted in cell type-specific and nuclear-localized fluorescence signals enabling easy detection and distinguishability of neurons and astrocytes. This tool is expected to be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of changes in neurons and astrocytes in healthy and diseased brains. - Highlights: • We develop a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes. • Neuron-specific labeling is achieved using Scg10 and synapsin promoters. • Astrocyte-specific labeling is generated using the minimal GFAP promoter. • Nuclear localization of fluorescent proteins is achieved with histone 2B protein.

  4. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  5. Deconvolution of calcium fluorescent indicator signal from AFM cantilever reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Oliver, David J; Grutter, Peter H; Komarova, Svetlana V

    2012-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be combined with fluorescence microscopy to measure the changes in intracellular calcium levels (indicated by fluorescence of Ca²⁺ sensitive dye fluo-4) in response to mechanical stimulation performed by AFM. Mechanical stimulation using AFM is associated with cantilever movement, which may interfere with the fluorescence signal. The motion of the AFM cantilever with respect to the sample resulted in changes of the reflection of light back to the sample and a subsequent variation in the fluorescence intensity, which was not related to changes in intracellular Ca²⁺ levels. When global Ca²⁺ responses to a single stimulation were assessed, the interference of reflected light with the fluorescent signal was minimal. However, in experiments where local repetitive stimulations were performed, reflection artifacts, correlated with cantilever motion, represented a significant component of the fluorescent signal. We developed a protocol to correct the fluorescence traces for reflection artifacts, as well as photobleaching. An added benefit of our method is that the cantilever reflection in the fluorescence recordings can be used for precise temporal correlation of the AFM and fluorescence measurements.

  6. Nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-03-01

    This article is a summary of a short course lecture given in conjunction with the 1984 Nuclear Science Symposium. Measuring systems for nanosecond fluorescence spectroscopy using single-photon counting techniques are presented. These involve systems based on relaxation-type spark gap light pulser and synchronously pumped mode-locked dye lasers. Furthermore, typical characteristics and optimization of operating conditions of the critical components responsible for the system time resolution are discussed. A short comparison of the most important deconvolution methods for numerical analysis of experimental data is given particularly with respect to the signal-to-noise ratio of the fluorescence signal. 22 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  8. Near-membrane refractometry using supercritical angle fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Brunstein, Maia; Oheim, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its variants are key technologies for visualizing the dynamics of single molecules or organelles in live cells. Yet, truely quantitative TIRF remains problematic. One unknown hampering the interpretation of evanescent-wave excited fluorescence intensities is the undetermined cell refractive index (RI). Here, we use a combination of TIRF excitation and supercritical angle fluorescence emission detection to directly mea-sure the average RI in the 'footprint' region of the cell, during imaging. Our RI measurement is based on the determination on a back-focal plane image of the critical angle separating supercritical and undercritial fluorescence emission components. We validate our method by imaging mouse embryonic fibroblasts. By targeting various dyes and fluorescent-protein chimerae to vesicles, the plasma membrane as well as mitochondria and the ER, we demonstrate local RI measurements with subcellular resolution on a standard TIRF microscope with ...

  9. Fluorescence Experiments with Quinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, James E.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a series of experiments which illustrate the analytical capabilities of fluorescence, and outlines two straightforward analyses involving real analyses. These experiments are suitable for an undergraduate instrumental analysis course and require approximately six to seven hours of laboratory time. (MLH)

  10. FLEX: fluorescence explorer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoll, M.Ph.; Court, A.J.; Smorenburg, C.; Visser, H.; Crocco, L.; Heilimo, J.; Honig, A.

    1999-01-01

    FLEX is a scientifically driven space mission to provide demonstration/validation of the instrumentation and technique for measuring the natural fluorescence of vegetation in the Fraunhofer lines. The payload consists of high spectral resolution (0.1-0.3 nm) CCD imaging grating spectrometer with two

  11. Dielectrophoretic manipulation of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureau, Natacha; Mendoza, Ernest; Silva, S Ravi P

    2007-05-01

    We investigate the behavior of fluorescing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) under dielectrophoretic conditions and demonstrate their collection with fluorescence microscopy. SWCNTs are dispersed in water with the aid of a nonionic surfactant, Triton X-100, and labeled through noncovalent binding with the dye 3,3'-dihexyloxacarbocyanine iodide (diOC(6)). The chromophore's affinity to the SWCNTs is due to pi-stacking interactions. Carbon nanotube (CNT) localization is clearly identified on the fluorescence images, showing that the nanotubes concentrate between the electrodes and align along the electric field lines.

  12. Synthesis and Fluorescence Spectra of Triazolylcoumarin Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Xian-fu; LI Hong-qi

    2009-01-01

    Much attention is devoted to fluorescent dyes especially those with potential in versatile applications. Reactions under "click" conditions between nonfluorescent 3 - azidocoumarins and terminal alkynes produced 3 -(1, 2, 3- triazol- 1 - yl)cournarins, a novel type of fluorescent dyes with intense fluorescence. The structures of the new coumarins were characterized by 1H NMR, MS, and IR spectra. Fluorescence spectra measurement demonstrated excellent fluorescence performance of the triazolylcoumarins and this click reaction is a promising candidate for bioconjugation and bioimaging applications since both azide and alkynes are quite inert to biological systems.

  13. Fluorescence nanoscopy. Methods and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Requejo-Isidro, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence nanoscopy refers to the experimental techniques and analytical methods used for fluorescence imaging at a resolution higher than conventional, diffraction-limited, microscopy. This review explains the concepts behind fluorescence nanoscopy and focuses on the latest and promising developments in acquisition techniques, labelling strategies to obtain highly detailed super-resolved images and in the quantitative methods to extract meaningful information from them.

  14. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Barbier

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  15. One year of urban background fluorescent aerosol measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Francis

    2016-04-01

    Online aerosol fluorescence is a popular methodology for detecting bioaerosols in the atmosphere. In recent years there has been considerable effort into refining the technique to be able to distinguish between different bioaerosol classes such as pollen, spores and bacteria. A near continuous record of aerosol fluorescence measurements has been recorded at an urban background observation site in Birmingham, UK for the year 2015. Fluorescence measurements were performed using the Biral aerosol fluorescence spectrometer (AFS) which measures both UV and visible fluorescence resulting from the excitation of aerosol particles at 280 nm. Speciation of the fluorescent particles into different bioaerosol class is possible with the AFS but the lack of particle sizing makes the task difficult compared to other techniques. In addition to the fluorescence measurements, further campaign mode measurements were also generated for size segregated total particle numbers, ozone, nitrogen oxides and other chemical species. These measurements allow for the influence of road traffic on the concentration of fluorescent particle to be determined. This presentation will provide an in depth look into how bioaerosol concentrations and speciation (pollen, spores and bacteria) change throughout the year. These changes will be linked to local and regional meteorology and climate. In particular, the consequences of the unusually warm UK winter upon bioaerosol concentrations will be highlighted.

  16. Patterns of fluorescent protein expression in Scleractinian corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, David F; Kao, Hung-Teh; Janoschka, Stephen; Tsai, Julia; Pieribone, Vincent A

    2008-10-01

    Biofluorescence exists in only a few classes of organisms, with Anthozoa possessing the majority of species known to express fluorescent proteins. Most species within the Anthozoan subgroup Scleractinia (reef-building corals) not only express green fluorescent proteins, they also localize the proteins in distinct anatomical patterns.We examined the distribution of biofluorescence in 33 coral species, representing 8 families, from study sites on Australia's Great Barrier Reef. For 28 of these species, we report the presence of biofluorescence for the first time. The dominant fluorescent emissions observed were green (480-520 nm) and red (580-600 nm). Fluorescent proteins were expressed in three distinct patterns (highlighted, uniform, and complementary) among specific anatomical structures of corals across a variety of families. We report no significant overlap between the distribution of fluorescent proteins and the distribution of zooxanthellae. Analysis of the patterns of fluorescent protein distribution provides evidence that the scheme in which fluorescent proteins are distributed among the anatomical structures of corals is nonrandom. This targeted expression of fluorescent proteins in corals produces contrast and may function as a signaling mechanism to organisms with sensitivity to specific wavelengths of light.

  17. UV fluorescence enhancement from nanostructured aluminum materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Danielle E.; Dean, Nathan; Poston, Pete E.; Blair, Steve; Harris, Joel M.

    2016-09-01

    Interest in label-free detection of biomolecules has given rise to the need for UV plasmonic materials. DNA bases and amino acid residues have electronic resonances in the UV which allow for sensitive detection of these species by surface-enhanced UV fluorescence spectroscopy. Electrochemical roughening has been used extensively to generate plasmonically-active metal surfaces that produce localized enhancement of excitation and emission of electromagnetic radiation from surface-bound molecules. Electrochemically roughened gold and silver surfaces produce enhancement in the visible and near-IR regions, but to the best of our knowledge, application of this technique for producing UV-enhancing substrates has not been reported. Using electropolishing of aluminum, we are able to generate nanostructured surfaces that produce enhanced spectroscopic detection of molecules in the UV. Aluminum is a natural choice for substrate composition as it exhibits a relatively large quality factor in the UV. We have fabricated electropolished aluminum films with nanometer scale roughness and have studied UV-excited fluorescence enhancement from submonolayer coverage of tryptophan on these substrates using a UV-laser based spectrometer. Quantitative dosing by dip-coating was used to deposit known surface concentrations of the aromatic amino acid tryptophan, so that fluorescence enhancement could be evaluated. Compared to a dielectric substrate (surface-oxidized silicon), we observe a 180-fold enhancement in the total fluorescence emitted by tryptophan on electropolished aluminum under photobleaching conditions, allowing detection of sub-monolayer coverages of molecules essential for development of biosensor technologies.

  18. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  19. The Use of Coumarins as Environmentally-Sensitive Fluorescent Probes of Heterogeneous Inclusion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Wagner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coumarins, as a family of molecules, exhibit a wide range of fluorescence emission properties. In many cases, this fluorescence is extremely sensitive to the local environment of the molecule, especially the local polarity and microviscosity. In addition, coumarins show a wide range of size, shape, and hydrophobicity. These properties make them especially useful as fluorescent probes of heterogeneous environments, such as supramolecular host cavities, micelles, polymers and solids. This article will review the use of coumarins to probe such heterogeneous systems using fluorescence spectroscopy.

  20. Assembly of BODIPY-carbazole dyes with liposomes to fabricate fluorescent nanoparticles for lysosomal bioimaging in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Hai-Juan; Zhang, Xiao-Tai; Wang, Shu; Xing, Guo-Wen

    2017-01-31

    Two BODIPY-carbazole dye based fluorescent probes BCA and BCAS were designed, synthesized and encapsulated by liposomes to obtain fluorescent nanoparticles BCA-FNP and BCAS-FNP. The fluorescence imaging showed that BCA-FNP was membrane-permeable and capable of localizing lysosomes in living cells.

  1. Inmunoterapia local Local immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lasa

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available La inmunoterapia específica, junto con la evitación del alergeno y el tratamiento sintomático, forma parte del tratamiento de la patología alérgica. La modalidad más antigua, más conocida y mejor estudiada es la inmunoterapia subcutánea (ITSC, cuya eficacia tanto a corto como a largo plazo, ha sido ampliamente demostrada en numerosos estudios. Sin embargo, a pesar de haberse demostrado segura, no está exenta de efectos adversos y precisa ser administrada bajo supervisión de personal médico. Esto ha animado a buscar nuevas vías de administración de eficacia similar, con un buen perfil de seguridad, y de buena cumplimentación por parte del paciente. De las distintas alternativas estudiadas la más relevante es la inmunoterapia sublingual (ITSL. En ésta, se administra el antígeno en forma de gotas debajo de la lengua. Existen diferentes pautas de administración en función del alergeno implicado. La dosis óptima de tratamiento está aún sin determinar, hallándose en este momento en un rango amplio de dosis respecto a la inmunoterapia subcutánea. Su mecanismo de acción es poco conocido aunque en diversos estudios se han observado cambios inmunológicos. La ITSL ha mostrado un buen perfil de seguridad con escasos efectos secundarios, habitualmente de carácter local. Asimismo se han realizado distintos ensayos clínicos en los que se ha demostrado su eficacia en el tratamiento de la alergia respiratoria tanto en niños como en adultos. Por ello, aunque aún existen datos sin resolver respecto a esta vía de administración de inmunoterapia, ha sido propuesta por la OMS como una alternativa válida a la ITSC.Specific immunotherapy, together with avoidance of the allergen and symptomatic treatment, forms part of the treatment of allergic pathology. The oldest, best known and most studied form is subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT, whose efficacy, both in the short and the long term, has been widely demonstrated in numerous studies

  2. Nanoscale resolution for fluorescence microscopy via adiabatic passage

    CERN Document Server

    Rubio, Juan Luis; Ahufinger, Verònica; Mompart, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    We propose the use of the subwavelength localization via adiabatic passage technique for fluorescence microscopy with nanoscale resolution in the far field. This technique uses a {\\Lambda}-type medium coherently coupled to two laser pulses: the pump, with a node in its spatial profile, and the Stokes. The population of the {\\Lambda} system is adiabatically transferred from one ground state to the other except at the node position, yielding a narrow population peak. This coherent localization allows fluorescence imaging with nanometer lateral resolution. We derive an analytical expression to asses the resolution and perform a comparison with the coherent population trapping and the stimulated-emission-depletion techniques.

  3. Documenting localities

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Richard J

    1996-01-01

    Now in paperback! Documenting Localities is the first effort to summarize the past decade of renewed discussion about archival appraisal theory and methodology and to provide a practical guide for the documentation of localities.This book discusses the continuing importance of the locality in American historical research and archival practice, traditional methods archivists have used to document localities, and case studies in documenting localities. These chapters draw on a wide range of writings from archivists, historians, material culture specialists, historic preservationists

  4. Blood Compatibility Evaluations of Fluorescent Carbon Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sha; Guo, Zhong; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Liu, Zonghua

    2015-09-02

    Because of their unique advantages, fluorescent carbon dots are gaining popularity in various biomedical applications. For these applications, good biosafety is a prerequisite for their use in vivo. Studies have reported the preliminary biocompatibility evaluations of fluorescent carbon dots (mainly cytotoxicity); however, to date, little information is available about their hemocompatibility, which could impede their development from laboratory to bedside. In this work, we evaluated the hemocompatibility of fluorescent carbon dots, which we prepared by hydrothermal carbonization of α-cyclodextrin. The effects of the carbon dots on the structure and function of key blood components were investigated at cellular and molecular levels. In particular, we considered the morphology and lysis of human red blood cells, the structure and conformation of the plasma protein fibrinogen, the complement activation, platelet activation, and in vitro and in vivo blood coagulation. We found that the carbon dots have obvious concentration-dependent effects on the blood components. Overall, concentrations of the fluorescent carbon dots at ≤0.1 mg/mL had few adverse effects on the blood components, but at higher doses, the carbon dots impair the structure and function of the blood components, causing morphological disruptions and lysis of red blood cells, interference in the local microenvironments of fibrinogen, activation of the complement system, and disturbances in the plasma and whole blood coagulation function in vitro. However, the carbon dots tend to activate platelets only at low concentrations. Intravenous administration of the carbon dots at doses up to 50 mg/kg did not impair the blood coagulation function. These results provide valuable information for the clinical application of fluorescent carbon dots.

  5. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  6. 不同光固化方法对可压型及通用型树脂硬度的影响%Influence of two photoactivation modes on the hardness of packable and conventional resin-based composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨军英; 陈珊; 张盛炎; 王海燕

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soft-start is a newly photoactivation mode, which has certain effect on composite resin. However, previous study mainly concentrated on the conventional resin-based composites, the reports regarding soft-start on packable resin-based composites is poorly understood. OBJECTIVE: It is assumed that soft-start photoactivation had effect on packable resin-based composites, in addition, to investigate its effect on the hardness of packable resin-based composites. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A double factors design. The experiment was performed at the Department of Stomatology, First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Chemical Mine Metal Material Test Laboratory, Guangdong Inspection and Quarantine Technology Center in October 2007. MATERIALS: Three packable resin-based composites were Ecusphere-Carat (EC, DMG Company, Germany), Filtek P60 (P60, 3M EPSE Company, USA), Tetric Ceram HB (HB, Ivoclar Vivadent Company, Liechtenstein) and a conventional composite FiltekZ250 (Z250, 3M EPSE Company, USA). The color of composites was A3. METHODS: Three packable resin-based composites and a conventional composite were filling in a cylindrical container (7 mm diameter, 4 mm depth), to obtain 80 samples, and then were divided into different groups according to the composite and photoactivation mode (n=10). In the soft-start photoactivation, samples were irradiated by 300 mW/cm~2 for 10 s, and then 600 mW/cm~2 for 30 s. Standard photoactivation was irradiated with 600 mW/cm~2 for 40 s.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The microhardness of the top and bottom of the specimens was determined by Vickers microhardness tester. RESULTS: Three packable composites had higher hardness values than conventional composite. Though soft-start photoactivation could decrease the hardness of packable composites, the difference had no significant difference to standard mode (P > 0.05). There was significant difference on the top hardness and on the bottom hardness of conventional composite

  7. Photoswitchable fluorescent diheteroarylethenes: substituent effects on photochromic and solvatochromic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillanders, Florencia; Giordano, Luciana; Díaz, Sebastián A; Jovin, Thomas M; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    Photoswitchable fluorescent diheteroarylethenes are promising candidates for applications in super-resolution molecular localization fluorescence microscopy thanks to their high quantum yields and fatigue-resistant photoswitching characteristics. We have studied the effect of varying substituents on the photophysical properties of six sulfone derivatives of diheteroarylethenes, which display fluorescence in one (closed form) of two thermally stable photochromic states. Electron-donating substituents displace the absorption and emission spectra towards the red without substantially affecting the fluorescence quantum yields. Furthermore, ethoxybromo, a very electron-donating substituent, stabilizes the excited state of the closed isomer to the extent of almost entirely inhibiting its cycloreversion. Multi-parameter Hammett correlations indicate a relationship between the emission maxima and electron-donating character, providing a useful tool in the design of future photochromic molecules. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibit small bathochromic shifts and shorter fluorescence lifetimes with an increase in solvent polarity. However, the ethoxybromo-substituted fluorescent photochrome is unique in its strong solvatochromic behaviour, constituting a photoactivatable (photochromic), fluorescent and highly solvatochromic small organic compound. The Catalán formalism identified solvent dipolarity as the principal basis of the solvatochromism, reflecting the highly polarized nature of this molecule.

  8. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  9. Fluorescence-Based Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Guillermo

    The natural luminescent phenomena (from the Latin words "lumen" and "essentia", i.e., "made of light") such as northern lights (aurora borealis), marine brightness, glow-worms, shining putrid fish scales, "bluish"- appearing water when contained in certain wooden cups (quinine fluorescence), some stones heated at high temperatures with reducing agents (BaS phosphorescence), or light emitted while crushing sugar (triboluminescence) already fascinated our ancestors. Nowadays we understand that ultraviolet and visible emission of light originates from a competitive deactivation pathway of the lowest electronic excited state of atoms and molecules that produces the so called luminescence (the sub-terms fluorescence and phosphorescence just designate whether the return of the excited to the ground state is an "allowed" or "forbidden" process, namely it is fast or slow, the loosely-defined border between them being a 1-μs-1 rate constant). Actually, luminescence is the only method to generate light in the known Universe regardless it is powered by the nuclear reactions in the stars, the ohmical heating in bulbs, an electric discharge, the absorption of light or a (bio)chemical reaction (chemiluminescence).

  10. The TALE Fluorescence Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jui, Charles

    2009-05-01

    The TALE fluorescence detectors are designed to extend the threshold for fluorescence observation by TA down to 3x10^16 eV. It will comprise two main components. The first is a set of 24 telescopes working in stereo, with an existing TA FD station at ˜6 km separation. These will cover between 3-31 degrees in elevation and have azimuthal coverage maximizing the stereo aperture in the 10^18-10^19 eV energy range. The second component consists of 15 telescopes equipped with 4m diameter mirrors and covering the sky between 31 and 73 degrees in elevation. The larger mirror size pushes the physics threshold down to 3x10^16 eV, and provides view of the shower maximum for the lower energy events. The Tower detector will cover one quadrant in azimuth and operate in hybrid mode with the TALE infill array to provide redundant composition measurements from both shower maximum information and muon-to-electron ratio.

  11. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    , were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane....../water interface. For instance, when glycerophospholipid containing membranes undertake a solid ordered (gel) to liquid disordered phase transition the fluorescence emission maximum of these probes shift ~ 50 nm with a significant change in their fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, the fluorescence parameters...... of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...

  12. Fluorescence anisotropy characterization of urine in the diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is considered as the second most commonly occurring malignancy among women, next to breast cancer. It is well known that most of the cancer patients diagnosed with advanced stages and there is a pressing need for improved methods to detect cancer at its initial stages. Many techniques have been adopted for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Among these, fluorescence polarization spectroscopy is a complementary technique of fluorescence spectroscopy which helps us to elucidate the spectral characteristics which highly depend on pH, viscosity and local environment. Since urine has many metabolites and the measurement of native fluorescence of urine, in principle, able to provide an indication of a number of health conditions, attempts were made to study fluorescence anisotropic characterization of the human urine of cervical cancer patients and normal subjects. Significant differences were observed between the anisotropic and polarization values of cancer subjects and normal subjects.

  13. Monitoring photosensitizer uptake using two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Chi Allison; Diamond, Kevin R; Patterson, Michael S; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin(®) at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL) cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin(®) was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns) compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05).

  14. Monitoring Photosensitizer Uptake Using Two Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh, Kevin R. Diamond, Michael S. Patterson, Zhaojun Nie, Joseph E. Hayward, Qiyin Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin® at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin® was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05.

  15. Fluorescence anisotropy of DNA/DAPI complex: torsional dynamics and geometry of the complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization of synthetic polydeoxynucleotide/4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride complexes has been investigated as a function of dye/polymer coverage. At low coverage, fluorescence depolarization is due to local torsional motions of the DNA segment where the dye resides. At relatively high coverage, fluorescence depolarization is dominated by energy transfer to other dye molecules along the DNA. The extent of the observed depolarization due to torsional motion depe...

  16. Local architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Local architecture refers to structures built in the countryside,such as temples,memorial halls,residences, stores,pavilions, bridges,decorated archways, and wells. Because these structures were all built by focal craftsmen and villagers in the traditional local style, they are generally called local architecture.

  17. Detection of brain tumors using fluorescence diffuse optical tomography and nanoparticles as contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Pierre-Yves; Genevois, Coralie; Koenig, Anne; Heinrich, Emilie; Texier, Isabelle; Couillaud, Franck

    2012-12-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence-enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is used to localize tumors in mice using fluorescent nanoparticles as a blood pool contrast agent. The infrared dye DiR is loaded in the lipid core of nontargeted nanoparticles (DiR-lipidots) and injected systemically via the tail vein in mice bearing U87 tumors. Distribution and time-course of DiR-lipidots are followed using in vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and reveal enhanced fluorescent signal within the subcutaneous tumors up to seven days due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Tumor growth into the brain is followed using bioluminescent imaging, and tumor localization is further determined by magnetic resonance imaging. The fDOT provides three-dimensional fluorescent maps that allow for consistent localization for both subcutaneous and brain tumors.

  18. Fluorescence of ceramic color standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Annette; Clare, John F; Nield, Kathryn M; Deadman, Andrew; Usadi, Eric

    2010-04-20

    Fluorescence has been found in color standards available for use in calibration and verification of color measuring instruments. The fluorescence is excited at wavelengths below about 600?nm and emitted above 700?nm, within the response range of silicon photodiodes, but at the edge of the response of most photomultipliers and outside the range commonly scanned in commercial colorimeters. The degree of fluorescence on two of a set of 12 glossy ceramic tiles is enough to introduce significant error when those tiles have been calibrated in one mode of measurement and are used in another. We report the nature of the fluorescence and the implications for color measurement.

  19. A genetically encoded fluorescent probe in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhishek; Guo, Jiantao; Lee, Hyun Soo; Schultz, Peter G

    2013-08-28

    Fluorescent reporters are useful in vitro and in vivo probes of protein structure, function, and localization. Here we report that the fluorescent amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), can be site-specifically incorporated into proteins in mammalian cells in response to the TAG codon with high efficiency using an orthogonal amber suppressor tRNA/aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase (aaRS) pair. We further demonstrate that Anap can be used to image the subcellular localization of proteins in live mammalian cells. The small size of Anap, its environment-sensitive fluorescence, and the ability to introduce Anap at specific sites in the proteome by simple mutagenesis make it a unique and valuable tool in eukaryotic cell biology.

  20. Fluorescence dynamics of green fluorescent protein in AOT reversed micelles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uskova, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hink, M.A.; Hoek, van A.; Schots, A.; Klyachko, N.L.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    We have used the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to investigate the properties of surfactant-entrapped water pools in organic solvents (reversed micelles) with steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods. The surfactant used was sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) and the

  1. Nuclear Import Analysis of Two Different Fluorescent Marker Proteins into Hepatocyte Cell Lines (HuH-7 Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Haryanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescent proteins as expression markers and protein fusion partners has provedimmensely valuable for resolving the organization of biological events in living cells. EGFP and DsRed2 arecommonly fluorescent marker protein which is used for biotechnology and cell biology research. The presentstudy was designed to identify the expression vector that suitable to ligate with DNA encoding HBV coreprotein for intracellular localization study in hepatocyte cell, which were expressed as fusion proteins. We alsocompared and quantified the expressed fluorescent protein which predominantly localized in the cellcompartment. The results indicated that DsRed2 shown as less than ideal for intracellular localization study ofthan EGFP, because of its tetrameric structure of the fluorescent protein and when fused to a protein of interest,the fusion protein often forms aggregates in the living cells. In contrast, EGFP fluorescent protein shown a muchhigher proportion of cytoplasmic localization, thus being more suitable for analysis of intracellular localizationthan DsRed2 fluorescent protein. EGFP fluorescent protein is also capable to produce a strong green fluorescencewhen excited by blue light, without any exogenously added substrate or cofactor, events inside living cell canthus be visualized in a non-invasive way. Based on our present quantitative data and some reasons above shownthat EGFP is more suitable than DsRed2 as a fluorescent marker protein for intracellular localization study intoHuH-7 cell.Keywords: EGFP, DsRed2 fluorescent protein , HuH-7 cell, HBV, intracellular localization

  2. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  3. X-ray Fluorescence Sectioning

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an x-ray fluorescence imaging system for elemental analysis. The key idea is what we call "x-ray fluorescence sectioning". Specifically, a slit collimator in front of an x-ray tube is used to shape x-rays into a fan-beam to illuminate a planar section of an object. Then, relevant elements such as gold nanoparticles on the fan-beam plane are excited to generate x-ray fluorescence signals. One or more 2D spectral detectors are placed to face the fan-beam plane and directly measure x-ray fluorescence data. Detector elements are so collimated that each element only sees a unique area element on the fan-beam plane and records the x-ray fluorescence signal accordingly. The measured 2D x-ray fluorescence data can be refined in reference to the attenuation characteristics of the object and the divergence of the beam for accurate elemental mapping. This x-ray fluorescence sectioning system promises fast fluorescence tomographic imaging without a complex inverse procedure. The design can be ad...

  4. Fluorescent carbon nanowires made by pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers and plasmon-assisted emission enhancement of their fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hidenobu; Tokonami, Shiho; Yamamoto, Yojiro; Shiigi, Hiroshi; Takeda, Yoshihiko

    2014-10-14

    We report on a facile method for preparing fluorescent carbon nanowires (CNWs) with pyrolysis of highly aligned DNA nanofibers as carbon sources. Silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-doped CNWs were also produced using pyrolysis of DNA nanofibers with well-attached AgNPs, indicating emission enhancement assisted by localized plasmon resonances.

  5. Optical Properties of Fluorescent Dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李戎; 陈东辉

    2001-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes have been widely used these years.Because of the special optical performance, conventional CCM systems seem to be unable to predict the recipes of fabrics dyed with fluorescent dyes. In order to enhance the functions of CCM systems, the optical properties of fluorescent dyes in their absorption region were investigated. It has been found that there was a fixed maximum absorption wavelength for each fluorescent dyes whatever its concentration is. Both absorption region and maximum absorption wavelength of the dyes in solution are the same to those in fabric, and that the absorption is directly proportional to the concentration of the dye. So the optical properties obtained in solutions cna be applied for describing the optics performance of fluorescent dyes in fabrics.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of intrinsically unstructured proteins: application to α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Sarah; Kluba, Malgorzata; Meuvis, Jessika; Engelborghs, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Lifetimes of fluorescent states and their fluorescence intensities are strictly coupled and very sensitive to the environment of the fluorophores. The advantage of measuring lifetimes, next to intensities, comes from the fact that it can reveal heterogeneity and dynamic properties of this environment. In this way lifetime analysis can be used to characterize static and dynamic conformational properties and heterogeneity of fluorescent groups in different areas of a protein and as a function of time for an evolving protein. The phenomena that determine the lifetime of a label are its intrinsic properties, dynamic quenching by neighboring groups, exposure to the solvent, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different groups. The basic principles of these fluorescence phenomena can be found extensively described in the excellent book of Lakowicz (Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, 3rd edn. Springer, New York, 2006). The fluorescent groups involved are either natural amino acid side chains like tryptophan (Trp) or tyrosine (Tyr), or fluorescent labels covalently engineered into the protein. Even a single fluorescent group can show indications of heterogeneity in the local environment. If several natural fluorescent groups are present, the properties of the individual groups can be separated using site-directed mutagenesis, and additivity of their contributions can be analyzed (Engelborghs, Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 57(11):2255-2270, 2001). If no fluorescent group is naturally present, site-directed mutagenesis can be used to introduce either a fluorescent amino acid or a cysteine allowing chemical labeling.

  7. Local Helioseismology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizon Laurent

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the current status of local helioseismology, covering both theoretical and observational results. After a brief introduction to solar oscillations and wave propagation through inhomogeneous media, we describe the main techniques of local helioseismology: Fourier-Hankel decomposition, ring-diagram analysis, time-distance helioseismology, helioseismic holography, and direct modeling. We discuss local helioseismology of large-scale flows, the solar-cycle dependence of these flows, perturbations associated with regions of magnetic activity, and solar supergranulation.

  8. Fluorescence calibration method for single-particle aerosol fluorescence instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley Robinson, Ellis; Gao, Ru-Shan; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Fahey, David W.; Perring, Anne E.

    2017-05-01

    Real-time, single-particle fluorescence instruments used to detect atmospheric bioaerosol particles are increasingly common, yet no standard fluorescence calibration method exists for this technique. This gap limits the utility of these instruments as quantitative tools and complicates comparisons between different measurement campaigns. To address this need, we have developed a method to produce size-selected particles with a known mass of fluorophore, which we use to calibrate the fluorescence detection of a Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS-4A). We use mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles to calibrate one detector (FL1; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 310-400 nm) and pure quinine particles to calibrate the other (FL2; excitation = 280 nm, emission = 420-650 nm). The relationship between fluorescence and mass for the mixed tryptophan-ammonium sulfate particles is linear, while that for the pure quinine particles is nonlinear, likely indicating that not all of the quinine mass contributes to the observed fluorescence. Nonetheless, both materials produce a repeatable response between observed fluorescence and particle mass. This procedure allows users to set the detector gains to achieve a known absolute response, calculate the limits of detection for a given instrument, improve the repeatability of the instrumental setup, and facilitate intercomparisons between different instruments. We recommend calibration of single-particle fluorescence instruments using these methods.

  9. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  10. Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Wiebke; Hayata-Takano, Atsuko; Kamo, Toshihiko; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Nagayasu, Kazuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Seiriki, Kaoru; Shintani, Norihito; Ago, Yukio; Farfan, Camille; Hashimoto, Ryota; Baba, Akemichi; Hashimoto, Hitoshi

    2015-03-27

    Systematic and simultaneous analysis of multiple cell types in the brain is becoming important, but such tools have not yet been adequately developed. Here, we aimed to generate a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes, two major cell types in the brain, and we have developed lentiviral vectors to express the red fluorescent protein tdTomato in neurons and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in astrocytes. Importantly, both fluorescent proteins are fused to histone 2B protein (H2B) to confer nuclear localization to distinguish between single cells. We also constructed several expression constructs, including a tandem alignment of the neuron- and astrocyte-expression cassettes for simultaneous labeling. Introducing these vectors and constructs in vitro and in vivo resulted in cell type-specific and nuclear-localized fluorescence signals enabling easy detection and distinguishability of neurons and astrocytes. This tool is expected to be utilized for the simultaneous analysis of changes in neurons and astrocytes in healthy and diseased brains.

  11. Wide field-of-view fluorescence imaging of coral reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treibitz, Tali; Neal, Benjamin P; Kline, David I; Beijbom, Oscar; Roberts, Paul L D; Mitchell, B Greg; Kriegman, David

    2015-01-13

    Coral reefs globally are declining rapidly because of both local and global stressors. Improved monitoring tools are urgently needed to understand the changes that are occurring at appropriate temporal and spatial scales. Coral fluorescence imaging tools have the potential to improve both ecological and physiological assessments. Although fluorescence imaging is regularly used for laboratory studies of corals, it has not yet been used for large-scale in situ assessments. Current obstacles to effective underwater fluorescence surveying include limited field-of-view due to low camera sensitivity, the need for nighttime deployment because of ambient light contamination, and the need for custom multispectral narrow band imaging systems to separate the signal into meaningful fluorescence bands. Here we describe the Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS), based on a consumer camera modified for greatly increased sensitivity to chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and we show high spectral correlation between acquired images and in situ spectrometer measurements. This system greatly facilitates underwater wide field-of-view fluorophore surveying during both night and day, and potentially enables improvements in semi-automated segmentation of live corals in coral reef photographs and juvenile coral surveys.

  12. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  13. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Fluorescent Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2009-01-01

    The discovery and use of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cellular biology. Despite the widespread use of visible fluorescent proteins as reporters and sensors in cellular environments the versatile photophysics of fluorescent proteins is still subject to intense research. Understanding the

  14. Fluorescent blood cell angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-nun, Joshua; Constable, Ian J.

    1994-06-01

    Fluorescein angiography is currently the main method for evaluation of the retinal vascular patency. Ashton noted that capillary patency to the small fluorescein molecule may differ from that of the larger red blood cells. He concluded that fluorescein angiography is not able to demonstrate a developing stenosis, that might be the precipitating cause of a later capillary closure in various microvasculopathies. Sarelius et al have shown, in hamster cheek pouch and cremaster muscle, that fluorescently labeled erythrocytes in known concentrations can be used for the direct measurement of capillary flow parameters. The only assumption that this method relies on, is that the labeled cells are rheologically normal and therefore reflect the behavior of the total cell population. We have developed a new method for an in-vivo, real-time demonstration of the blood cell flow in the retinal capillary net. Based on the assumption presented by Sarelius et al, measurement and analysis of the retinal capillary blood cell flow is also possible from the results achieved by the new method.

  15. Fluorescence endoscopy and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messmann, H; Endlicher, E; Gelbmann, C M; Schölmerich, J

    2002-10-01

    Fluorescence endoscopy is a new technique which allows a better detection of non-visible malignant or premalignant lesions or, those which are difficult to detect. Exogenously applied sensitisers accumulate selectively in malignant lesions and induce fluorescence after illumination with light of adequate wavelength. However, also endogenous fluorophores, different located in malignant or benign lesions, induce a different autofluorescence in these lesions. Tissue fluorescence can be detected by optical sampling of the mucosa using fluorescence spectroscopy or by generating real time fluorescence images with specialised camera systems. Compared to point fluorescence spectroscopy the latter technique enables the screening of large surface areas of mucosa. Meanwhile, fluorescence endoscopy is a widely used technique in urology employing 5-aminolaevulinic acid sensitisation. In gastroenterology, this technique seems promising for the detection of early cancers or dysplasia in patients with Barrett's oesophagus or ulcerative colitis. Using different sensitisers, photodynamic therapy seems to be a promising option for patients with advanced oesophageal cancer and in the palliative treatment of non-resectable bile duct cancer, furthermore for patients with early gastric cancer and dysplasia in Barrett's oesophagus. Probably, by laser light fractionation or a combination of different sensitisers, an enhanced effect can be expected.

  16. Local food:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundbo, Donna Isabella Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been more focus on food in general and local food in particular. But what is local food? And what are the perceptions of this concept according to theory and to providers and consumers of local food? This article first summarises and compares three different theoretical...... as expressed by a group of Danish providers and consumers is empirically investigated through interviews, observation and surveys. From this, qualitative and quantitative data are generated, the analysis of which shows how varied perceptions of local food are. The elements of which the perceptions consist...... are identified and then categorised according to whether they pertain to the food product itself or the production methods and facilities and whether they describe physical or social properties of local food. From this a model with four categories is developed. It is found that properties of the product are more...

  17. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A family of polarity sensitive fluorescent probes (2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes, i.e. LAURDAN, PRODAN, ACDAN) was introduced by Gregorio Weber in 1979, with the aim to monitor solvent relaxation phenomena on protein matrices. In the following years, however, PRODAN and particularly LAURDAN......, were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane/water...

  18. Fluorescence cystoscopy in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rusakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge of treating non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is multifocal tumors. Current methods of diagnosis are failed to detect all superficial flat tumor lesions in bladder mucosa. The use of fluorescence imaging with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA allows to improve the sensibility of routine cystoscopy, but low specificity decreases its diagnostic accuracy. The method of fluorescence imaging combined with local fluorescence spectroscopy developed in P.A. Herzen MCRI has been shown to increase the specificity from 71% to 84%. Thus, local fluorescence spectroscopy in visible fluorescence of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin allows to perform guided biopsy and decrease the rate of diagnostic mistakes. 

  19. Dependence of fluorescence intensity on the spectral overlap between fluorophores and plasmon resonant single silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yeechi; Munechika, Keiko; Ginger, David S

    2007-03-01

    We investigate the fluorescence from dyes coupled to individual DNA-functionalized metal nanoparticles. We use single-particle darkfield scattering and fluorescence microscopy to correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) spectra of the individual metal nanoparticles to which they are attached. For each of three different dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak approximately 40-120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. These results should prove useful for understanding and optimizing metal-enhanced fluorescence.

  20. Distribution of aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate in an oral squamous cell carcinoma model. In vivo fluorescence imaging compared with ex vivo analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, MJH; Mank, AJG; Speelman, OC; Posthumus, R; Nooren, CAAM; Nauta, JM; Roodenburg, JLN

    1997-01-01

    Photosensitizer-induced fluorescence is studied as a technique for the detection of cancer, Therefore we investigated the ability of a photosensitizer, aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate (AlPcS2), to localize in tumor tissue. In vivo endoscopic fluorescence imaging, fluorescence microscopy, convent

  1. Modular generation of fluorescent phycobiliproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xian-Jun; Chang, Kun; Luo, Juan; Zhou, Ming; Scheer, Hugo; Zhao, Kai-Hong

    2013-06-01

    Phycobiliproteins are brightly-fluorescent light-harvesting pigments for photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and red algae. They are also of interest as fluorescent biomarkers, but their heterologous generation in vivo has previously required multiple transformations. We report here a modular approach that requires only two DNA segments. The first codes for the apo-protein. The second codes for fusions capable of chromophore biosynthesis and its covalent attachment to the apo-protein; it contains the genes of heme oxygenase, a bilin reductase, and a chromophore lyase. Phycobiliproteins containing phycoerythrobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 560 nm), phycourobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 500 nm), phycocyanobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 630 nm) or phycoviolobilin (λ(fluor) ~ 580 nm) were obtained in high yield in E. coli. This approach facilitates chromophorylation studies of phycobiliproteins, as well as their use for fluorescence labeling based on their high fluorescence.

  2. Fluorescence diagnosis in tissue injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Vitória H.; Ferreira, Juliana; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2009-06-01

    Background and Objectives: The paper aim was to evaluate the efficacy of the fluorescence spectroscopy in the detection of UV-induced skin change of Wistar rats. Study Design/ Materials and Methods: In a group male Wistar rats, the skin damage was produced by an UV-C lamp, periodically monitored using the laser-induced fluorescence, until complete healing process. After determining a characteristic emission band present in the fluorescence spectra of the induced injuries, the amplitude band monitoring allowed the follow up on the injury and the recovery. Results: We observed the appearance of two new emission bands more evident at the injury spectra when compared to the spectrums from normal non-exposed tissue. Following such spectral bands was possible to observe the establishment and recovery. Conclusions: The fluorescence spectroscopy is a promising technique in distinguishing between normal and UV induced skin change helping the evaluation of changes which are irreversible cancer tissue characteristics.

  3. Fluorescent Sensors for Biological Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-wang Ai

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence is one of the most important analytical methods used in biological studies. In the past decade or two, instrumentation in this field has greatly advanced, and now it is possible to detect single photons or fluorescent molecules [1,2], or break the Abbe diffraction limit to distinguish two points spaced less than 50 nm apart [3]. Concurrently, the development of improved fluorescent probes, which can be coupled with state-of-the-art instruments, has been equally important. This special issue on “fluorescent biosensors” in Sensors reports recent results from eight research groups in the field of sensor development. It includes three review articles, and six research articles reporting original results. [...

  4. A Bayesian cluster analysis method for single-molecule localization microscopy data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffié, Juliette; Shannon, Michael; Bromley, Claire L; Boelen, Lies; Burn, Garth L; Williamson, David J; Heard, Nicholas A; Cope, Andrew P; Owen, Dylan M; Rubin-Delanchy, Patrick

    2016-12-01

    Cell function is regulated by the spatiotemporal organization of the signaling machinery, and a key facet of this is molecular clustering. Here, we present a protocol for the analysis of clustering in data generated by 2D single-molecule localization microscopy (SMLM)-for example, photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) or stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM). Three features of such data can cause standard cluster analysis approaches to be ineffective: (i) the data take the form of a list of points rather than a pixel array; (ii) there is a non-negligible unclustered background density of points that must be accounted for; and (iii) each localization has an associated uncertainty in regard to its position. These issues are overcome using a Bayesian, model-based approach. Many possible cluster configurations are proposed and scored against a generative model, which assumes Gaussian clusters overlaid on a completely spatially random (CSR) background, before every point is scrambled by its localization precision. We present the process of generating simulated and experimental data that are suitable to our algorithm, the analysis itself, and the extraction and interpretation of key cluster descriptors such as the number of clusters, cluster radii and the number of localizations per cluster. Variations in these descriptors can be interpreted as arising from changes in the organization of the cellular nanoarchitecture. The protocol requires no specific programming ability, and the processing time for one data set, typically containing 30 regions of interest, is ∼18 h; user input takes ∼1 h.

  5. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps, to...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  6. Net Locality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Souza e Silva, Adriana Araujo; Gordon, Eric

    Provides an introduction to the new theory of Net Locality and the profound effect on individuals and societies when everything is located or locatable. Describes net locality as an emerging form of location awareness central to all aspects of digital media, from mobile phones, to Google Maps, to...... of emerging technologies, from GeoCities to GPS, Wi-Fi, Wiki Me, and Google Android....

  7. In Vivo Follow-up of Brain Tumor Growth via Bioluminescence Imaging and Fluorescence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Genevois

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Reporter gene-based strategies are widely used in experimental oncology. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI using the firefly luciferase (Fluc as a reporter gene and d-luciferin as a substrate is currently the most widely employed technique. The present paper compares the performances of BLI imaging with fluorescence imaging using the near infrared fluorescent protein (iRFP to monitor brain tumor growth in mice. Fluorescence imaging includes fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI, fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT, and fluorescence molecular Imaging (FMT®. A U87 cell line was genetically modified for constitutive expression of both the encoding Fluc and iRFP reporter genes and assayed for cell, subcutaneous tumor and brain tumor imaging. On cultured cells, BLI was more sensitive than FRI; in vivo, tumors were first detected by BLI. Fluorescence of iRFP provided convenient tools such as flux cytometry, direct detection of the fluorescent protein on histological slices, and fluorescent tomography that allowed for 3D localization and absolute quantification of the fluorescent signal in brain tumors.

  8. Local Contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Schlenker

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic approach posits that a presupposition must be satisfied in its local context. But how is a local context derived from the global one? Extant dynamic analyses must specify in the lexical entry of any operator what its 'Context Change Potential' is, and for this very reason they fail to be sufficiently explanatory. To circumvent the problem, we revise two assumptions of the dynamic approach: we take the update process to be derivative from a classical, non-dynamic semantics -- which obviates the need for dynamic lexical entries; and we deny that a local context encodes what the speech act participants 'take for granted.' Instead, we take the local context of an expression E in a sentence S to be the smallest domain that one may restrict attention to when assessing E without jeopardizing the truth conditions of S. To match the results of dynamic semantics, local contexts must be computed incrementally, using only information about the expressions that precede E. This version of the theory can be shown to be nearly equivalent to the dynamic theory of Heim 1983 -- but unlike the latter, it is entirely predictive. We also suggest that local contexts can, at some cost, be computed symmetrically, taking into account information about all of S (except E; this leads to gradient predictions, whose assessment is left for future research. doi:10.3765/sp.2.3 BibTeX info

  9. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  10. Fluorescence detection of esophageal neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Vladimirov, B.; Avramov, L.

    2008-06-01

    White-light endoscopy is well-established and wide used modality. However, despite the many technological advances that have been occurred, conventional endoscopy is suboptimal and usually detects advanced stage lesions. The limitations of standard endoscopy initiate development of spectroscopic techniques, additional to standard endoscopic equipment. One of the most sensitive approaches is fluorescence spectroscopy of gastrointestinal mucosa for neoplasia detection. In the recent study delta-aminolevulinic acid/Protoporphyrin IX (5-ALA/PpIX) is used as fluorescent marker for dysplasia and tumor detection in esophagus. The 5-ALA is administered per os six hours before measurements at dose 20 mg/kg weight. Excitation source has max of emission at 405 nm and light is delivered by the standard light guide of the endoscopic equipment. Through endoscopic instrumental channel a fiber is applied to return information about fluorescence to microspectrometer. Spectral features observed during endoscopic investigations could be distinct as the next regions: 450-630 nm region, where tissue autofluorescence is observed; 630-710 nm region, where fluorescence of PpIX is clearly pronounced; 530-580 nm region, where minima in the autofluorescence signal are observed, related to reabsorption of blood. The lack of fluorescence peaks in the red spectral area for normal mucosa is an indication for selective accumulation of 5-ALA/PpIX only in abnormal sites Very good correlation between fluorescence signals and histology examination of the lesions investigated is achieved.

  11. Fluorescent visualization of macromolecules in Drosophila whole mounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Ricardo Guelerman Pinheiro; Machado, Luciana Claudia Herculano; Moda, Livia Maria Rosatto

    2010-01-01

    The ability to determine the expression dynamics of individual genes "in situ" by visualizing the precise spatial and temporal distribution of their products in whole mounts by histochemical and immunocytochemical reactions has revolutionized our understanding of cellular processes. Drosophila developmental genetics was one of the fields that benefited most from these technologies, and a variety of fluorescent methods were specifically designed for investigating the localization of developmentally important proteins and cell markers during embryonic and post embryonic stages of this model organism. In this chapter we present detailed protocols for fluorescence immunocytochemistry of whole mount embryos, imaginal discs, pupal retinas, and salivary glands of Drosophila melanogaster, as well as methods for fluorescent visualization of specific subcellular structures in these tissues.

  12. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  13. Surface-Enhanced X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Surface-enhanced x-ray fluorescence (SEn-XRF) spectroscopy is a form of surface- enhanced spectroscopy that was conceived as a means of obtaining greater sensitivity in x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. As such, SEn-XRF spectroscopy joins the ranks of such other, longer-wavelength surface-enhanced spectroscopies as those based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS), and surfaceenhanced infrared Raman absorption (SEIRA), which have been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. XRF spectroscopy has been used in analytical chemistry for determining the elemental compositions of small samples. XRF spectroscopy is rapid and quantitative and has been applied to a variety of metal and mineralogical samples. The main drawback of XRF spectroscopy as practiced heretofore is that sensitivity has not been as high as required for some applications. In SEn-XRF as in the other surface-enhanced spectroscopies, one exploits several interacting near-field phenomena, occurring on nanotextured surfaces, that give rise to local concentrations of incident far-field illumination. In this case, the far-field illumination comes from an x-ray source. Depending on the chemical composition and the geometry of a given nanotextured surface, these phenomena could include the lightning-rod effect (concentration of electric fields at the sharpest points on needlelike surface features), surface plasmon resonances, and grazing incidence geometric effects. In the far field, the observable effect of these phenomena is an increase in the intensity of the spectrum of interest - in this case, the x-ray fluorescence spectrum of chemical elements of interest that may be present within a surface layer at distances no more than a few nanometers from the surface.

  14. Combining fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goda, Kazuhito; Hatta-Ohashi, Yoko; Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Sugiyama, Takashi; Sakai, Ikuko; Takahashi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hirobumi

    2015-08-01

    Bioluminescence microscopy has revealed that gene expression in individual cells can respond differently to the same stimulus. To understand this phenomenon, it is important to sequentially observe the series of events from cellular signal transduction to gene expression regulated by specific transcription factors derived from signaling cascades in individual cells. However, these processes have been separately analyzed with fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopy. Furthermore, in culture medium, the background fluorescence of luciferin-a substrate of luciferase in promoter assays of gene expression in cultured cells-confounds the simultaneous observation of fluorescence and bioluminescence. Therefore, we optimized conditions for optical filter sets based on spectral properties and the luciferin concentration based on cell permeability for fluorescence observation combined with bioluminescence microscopy. An excitation and emission filter set (492-506 nm and 524-578 nm) was suitable for green fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein imaging of cells, and >100 μM luciferin was acceptable in culture medium based on kinetic constants and the estimated intracellular concentration. Using these parameters, we present an example of sequential fluorescence and bioluminescence microscopic observation of signal transduction (translocation of protein kinase C alpha from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane) coupled with activation of gene expression by nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide B in individual cells and show that the gene expression response is not completely concordant with upstream signaling following stimulation with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate. Our technique is a powerful imaging tool for analysis of heterogeneous gene expression together with upstream signaling in live single cells.

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  16. Locals Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Hastings-King

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A locals collection is a set of parameters that are used to delimit data-mining operations. This piece uses a collection of locals from around Essex Massachusetts to shape and delimit an interrogation of post-reality in contemporary America. It explores the notion of crisis, the possibility of a crisis of empire that may or may not emerge in a media-space that does not allow crisis of empire to be mentioned and relations this maybe-crisis to the various levels of economic dysfunction that have become evident since late 2008. But mostly this piece explores ways in which particular stories about particular people do and do not link/link to these larger-scale narratives. This is the first of a potential series of locals collections that will mine the American post-real.

  17. Optimized localization analysis for single-molecule tracking and super-resolution microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Churchman, L. S.; Spudich, J. A.;

    2010-01-01

    We optimally localized isolated fluorescent beads and molecules imaged as diffraction-limited spots, determined the orientation of molecules and present reliable formulas for the precision of various localization methods. Both theory and experimental data showed that unweighted least-squares fitt......We optimally localized isolated fluorescent beads and molecules imaged as diffraction-limited spots, determined the orientation of molecules and present reliable formulas for the precision of various localization methods. Both theory and experimental data showed that unweighted least...

  18. Localized shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Daniel A; Susskind, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    We study products of precursors of spatially local operators, $W_{x_{n}}(t_{n}) ... W_{x_1}(t_1)$, where $W_x(t) = e^{-iHt} W_x e^{iHt}$. Using chaotic spin-chain numerics and gauge/gravity duality, we show that a single precursor fills a spatial region that grows linearly in $t$. In a lattice system, products of such operators can be represented using tensor networks. In gauge/gravity duality, they are related to Einstein-Rosen bridges supported by localized shock waves. We find a geometrical correspondence between these two descriptions, generalizing earlier work in the spatially homogeneous case.

  19. DNA Duplex Engineering for Enantioselective Fluorescent Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuehua; Lin, Fan; Wu, Tao; Zhou, Yufeng; Li, Qiusha; Shao, Yong; Xu, Zhiai

    2017-02-21

    The rapid identification of biomacromolecule structure that has a specific association with chiral enantiomers especially from natural sources will be helpful in developing enantioselective sensor and in speeding up drug exploitation. Herein, owing to its existence also in living cells, apurinic/apyrimidinic site (AP site) was first engineered into ds-DNA duplex to explore its competence in enantiomer selectivity. An AP site-specific fluorophore was utilized as an enantioselective discrimination probe to develop a straightforward chiral sensor using natural tetrahydropalmatine (L- and D-THP) as enantiomer representatives. We found that only L-THP can efficiently replace the prebound fluorophore to cause a significant fluorescence increase due to its specific binding with the AP site (two orders magnitude higher in affinity than binding with D-THP). The AP site binding specificity of L-THP over D-THP was assessed via intrinsic fluorescence, isothermal titration calorimetry, and DNA stability. The enantioselective performance can be easily tuned by the sequences near the AP site and the number of AP sites. A single AP site provides a perfect binding pocket to differentiate the chiral atom-induced structure discrepancy. We expect that our work will inspire interest in engineering local structures into a ds-DNA duplex for developing novel enantioselective sensors.

  20. Near-Membrane Refractometry Using Supercritical Angle Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunstein, Maia; Roy, Lopamudra; Oheim, Martin

    2017-05-09

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and its variants are key technologies for visualizing the dynamics of single molecules or organelles in live cells. Yet truly quantitative TIRF remains problematic. One unknown hampering the interpretation of evanescent-wave excited fluorescence intensities is the undetermined cell refractive index (RI). Here, we use a combination of TIRF excitation and supercritical angle fluorescence emission detection to directly measure the average RI in the "footprint" region of the cell during image acquisition. Our RI measurement is based on the determination on a back-focal plane image of the critical angle separating evanescent and far-field fluorescence emission components. We validate our method by imaging mouse embryonic fibroblasts and BON cells. By targeting various dyes and fluorescent-protein chimeras to vesicles, the plasma membrane, as well as mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum, we demonstrate local RI measurements with subcellular resolution on a standard TIRF microscope, with a removable Bertrand lens as the only modification. Our technique has important applications for imaging axial vesicle dynamics and the mitochondrial energy state or detecting metabolically more active cancer cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. X-ray fluorescence measurements of dissolved gas and cavitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Daniel J.; Kastengren, Alan L.; Swantek, Andrew B.; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Powell, Christopher F.

    2016-10-01

    The dynamics of dissolved gas and cavitation are strongly coupled, yet these phenomena are difficult to measure in-situ. Both create voids in the fluid that can be difficult to distinguish. We present an application of X-ray fluorescence in which liquid density and total noncondensible gas concentration (both dissolved and nucleated) are simultaneously measured. The liquid phase is doped with 400 ppm of a bromine tracer, and dissolved air is removed and substituted with krypton. Fluorescent emission at X-ray wavelengths is simultaneously excited from the Br and Kr with a focused monochromatic X-ray beam from a synchrotron source. We measure the flow in a cavitating nozzle 0.5 mm in diameter. From Br fluorescence, total displacement of the liquid is measured. From Kr fluorescence, the mass fraction of both dissolved and nucleated gas is measured. Volumetric displacement of liquid due to both cavitation and gas precipitation can be separated through estimation of the local equilibrium dissolved mass fraction. The uncertainty in the line of sight projected densities of the liquid and gas phases is 4-6 %. The high fluorescence yields and energies of Br and Kr allow small mass fractions of gas to be measured, down to 10-5, with an uncertainty of 8 %. These quantitative measurements complement existing optical diagnostic techniques and provide new insight into the diffusion of gas into cavitation bubbles, which can increase their internal density, pressure and lifetimes by orders of magnitude.

  2. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  3. Fluorescent Dendrimer Nanoconjugates as Advanced Probes for Biological Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Daniel; Kim, Sung Hoon; Katzenellenbogen, John A.; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in fluorescence microscopy have enabled improvements in spatial resolution for biological imaging. However, there is a strong need for development of advanced fluorescent probes to enable a molecular-scale understanding of biological events. In this work, we report the development of a new class of probes for fluorescence imaging based on dye-conjugated dendrimer nanoconjugates. We utilize molecular-scale dendritic scaffolds as fluorescent probes, thereby enabling conjugation of multiple dyes and linkers to the scaffold periphery. In particular, we use polyamidoamine dendrimers as molecular scaffolds, wherein dye conjugation can be varied over a wide range. Single molecule fluorescence imaging shows that dendrimer nanoconjugates are far brighter than single fluorophores, resulting in increased localization precision. In addition, we further developed a new set of remarkably photostable probes by conjugating photoprotective triplet state quenchers directly onto the dendritic scaffold. We observe large increases in the photobleaching times compared to single dyes and reduced transient dark states (blinking). Overall, we believe that these new probes will allow for single molecule imaging over long time scales, enabling new vistas in biological imaging.

  4. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  5. Platinum plasmonic nanostructure arrays for massively parallel single-molecule detection based on enhanced fluorescence measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Toshiro; Takahashi, Satoshi; Obara, Takayuki; Itabashi, Naoshi; Imai, Kazumichi

    2011-11-04

    We fabricated platinum bowtie nanostructure arrays producing fluorescence enhancement and evaluated their performance using two-photon photoluminescence and single-molecule fluorescence measurements. A comprehensive selection of suitable materials was explored by electromagnetic simulation and Pt was chosen as the plasmonic material for visible light excitation near 500 nm, which is preferable for multicolor dye-labeling applications like DNA sequencing. The observation of bright photoluminescence (λ = 500-600 nm) from each Pt nanostructure, induced by irradiation at 800 nm with a femtosecond laser pulse, clearly indicates that a highly enhanced local field is created near the Pt nanostructure. The attachment of a single dye molecule was attempted between the Pt triangles of each nanostructure by using selective immobilization chemistry. The fluorescence intensities of the single dye molecule localized on the nanostructures were measured. A highly enhanced fluorescence, which was increased by a factor of 30, was observed. The two-photon photoluminescence intensity and fluorescence intensity showed qualitatively consistent gap size dependence. However, the average fluorescence enhancement factor was rather repressed even in the nanostructure with the smallest gap size compared to the large growth of photoluminescence. The variation of the position of the dye molecule attached to the nanostructure may influence the wide distribution of the fluorescence enhancement factor and cause the rather small average value of the fluorescence enhancement factor.

  6. Gallstone identification by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Asima; Laxmi, B. V.; Jena, Sidhartha S.; Khulbe, P. K.; Bist, Hari D.; Agarwal, Asha

    1998-04-01

    Gallstones have been classified as being cholesterol type and pigment type. The classification is important for diet control of the patient to avoid recurrence of the stone. Spectroscopy is a sensitive technique to determine the composition of the gallstone both in-vitro and in-vivo. this work deals with the fluorescence spectroscopy of gallstone. For fluorescence spectroscopic studies of gallstone, samples were excited with 5 mw of 488 nm line of argon-ion laser and spectra were recorded with a SPEX 1877E triplemate attached with a cooled PMT and DM3000R data acquisition system. Fluorescence spectra from pure cholesterol and bilirubin were also recorded for comparison. Different types of gallstones: mixed, cholesterol, pigment type were studied. All spectra exhibited a very broad band, 500 to 800 nm and sometimes two bands, depending on type of stone. Pure cholesterol shows three prominent fluorescence peaks at 513, 550, 583 nm along with two peaks at approximately 568 and 586 nm. Pure bilirubin shows prominent peak at 628 nm, without any Raman line. From fluorescence spectra different types of stones are identified. Different gallstones studied show a mixture of cholesterol and bilirubin types and the ratio of the two varies from one sample type to another.

  7. Plasmonics Enhanced Smartphone Fluorescence Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Qingshan

    2017-05-12

    Smartphone fluorescence microscopy has various applications in point-of-care (POC) testing and diagnostics, ranging from e.g., quantification of immunoassays, detection of microorganisms, to sensing of viruses. An important need in smartphone-based microscopy and sensing techniques is to improve the detection sensitivity to enable quantification of extremely low concentrations of target molecules. Here, we demonstrate a general strategy to enhance the detection sensitivity of a smartphone-based fluorescence microscope by using surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) created by a thin metal-film. In this plasmonic design, the samples are placed on a silver-coated glass slide with a thin spacer, and excited by a laser-diode from the backside through a glass hemisphere, generating surface plasmon polaritons. We optimized this mobile SEF system by tuning the metal-film thickness, spacer distance, excitation angle and polarization, and achieved ~10-fold enhancement in fluorescence intensity compared to a bare glass substrate, which enabled us to image single fluorescent particles as small as 50 nm in diameter and single quantum-dots. Furthermore, we quantified the detection limit of this platform by using DNA origami-based brightness standards, demonstrating that ~80 fluorophores per diffraction-limited spot can be readily detected by our mobile microscope, which opens up new opportunities for POC diagnostics and sensing applications in resource-limited-settings.

  8. Distance dependence of fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2009-09-01

    Deviations from the usual -6 dependence of the rate of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) on the distance between the donor and the acceptor have been a common scenario in the recent times. In this paper, we present a critical analysis of the distance dependence of FRET, and try to illustrate the non--6 type behaviour of the rate for the case of transfer from a localized electronic excitation on the donor, a dye molecule to three different energy acceptors with delocalized electronic excitations namely, graphene, a two-dimensional semiconducting sheet and the case of such a semiconducting sheet rolled to obtain a nanotube. We use simple analytic models to understand the distance dependence in each case.

  9. Enhancing molecule fluorescence with asymmetrical plasmonic antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guowei; Liu, Jie; Zhang, Tianyue; Shen, Hongming; Perriat, Pascal; Martini, Matteo; Tillement, Olivier; Gu, Ying; He, Yingbo; Wang, Yuwei; Gong, Qihuang

    2013-07-21

    We propose and justify by the finite-difference time-domain method an efficient strategy to enhance the spontaneous emission of a fluorophore with a multi-resonance plasmonic antenna. The custom-designed asymmetrical antenna consists of two plasmonic nanoparticles with different sizes and is able to couple efficiently to free space light through multiple localized surface plasmon resonances. This design simultaneously permits a large near-field excitation near the antenna as well as a high quantum efficiency, which results in an unusual and significant enhancement of the fluorescence of a single emitter. Such an asymmetrical antenna presents intrinsic advantages over single particle or dimer based antennas made using two identical nanostructures. This promising concept can be exploited in the large domain of light-matter interaction processes involving multiple frequencies.

  10. Thermal quenching of fluorescence in condensed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagos, Miguel; Paredes, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    Environmental factors strongly affect the features of the electromagnetic spectra of fluorescent compounds hosted by material media. The shape of the absorption and emission peaks, their characteristic asymmetry and breadth, the Stokes shift and quantum yield are generally temperature dependent and heavily influenced by both the local and extended physical properties of the medium. The theoretical method used before to obtain the lineshape function is extended here to other terms of the interaction energy between the optically sensitive orbital and the hosting medium, which become significant when the spectral feature is broad. An analytical expression for the temperature dependent decay rate by non-radiative processes is obtained by this way. Comparison with experiment on thermal quenching gives agreement within the experimental uncertainty. The solvent polarity, its protic or aprotic character, hydrogen bonds, proximity effects and presence of quenchers are expected to enter through the coupling constants of the corresponding energy terms.

  11. Local language

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monique Turkenburg

    2002-01-01

    Original title: Taal lokaal. Children of immigrants living in the Netherlands have for years had the opportunity to receive lessons in their mother tongue at primary school. Since 1998 this has been referred to as minority language teaching (OALT in Dutch), and has been the responsibility of local

  12. Development of near-infrared photoactivable phthalocyanine-loaded nanoparticles to kill tumor cells: An improved tool for photodynamic therapy of solid cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, Serena; Ramos-Romero, Sara; Dozza, Barbara; Guerra-Rebollo, Marta; Cattini, Luca; Ballestri, Marco; Dambruoso, Paolo; Guerrini, Andrea; Sotgiu, Giovanna; Varchi, Greta; Lucarelli, Enrico; Blanco, Jeronimo

    2016-10-01

    Conventional photodynamic therapy has shown to be beneficial in the treatment of a variety of tumors. However, one of its major limitations is the inadequate penetration depth of visible light. In order to overcome this constraint, we developed 80nm poly-methylmethacrylate core-shell fluorescent nanoparticles (FNP) loaded with the photosensitizer tetrasulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (Ptl). To demonstrate the efficacy of our Ptl@FNP we performed in vitro and in vivo studies using a human prostate tumor model. Our data reveal that Ptl@FNP are internalized by tumor cells, favour Ptl intracellular accumulation, and efficiently trigger cell death through the generation of ROS upon irradiation with 680nm light. When directly injected into tumors intramuscularly induced in SCID mice, Ptl@FNP upon irradiation significantly reduce tumor growth with higher efficiency than the bare Ptl. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the newly developed nanoparticles may be utilized as a delivery system for antitumor phototherapy in solid cancers.

  13. Fluorescence applications in molecular neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraska, Justin W; Zagotta, William N

    2010-04-29

    Macromolecules drive the complex behavior of neurons. For example, channels and transporters control the movements of ions across membranes, SNAREs direct the fusion of vesicles at the synapse, and motors move cargo throughout the cell. Understanding the structure, assembly, and conformational movements of these and other neuronal proteins is essential to understanding the brain. Developments in fluorescence have allowed the architecture and dynamics of proteins to be studied in real time and in a cellular context with great accuracy. In this review, we cover classic and recent methods for studying protein structure, assembly, and dynamics with fluorescence. These methods include fluorescence and luminescence resonance energy transfer, single-molecule bleaching analysis, intensity measurements, colocalization microscopy, electron transfer, and bimolecular complementation analysis. We present the principles of these methods, highlight recent work that uses the methods, and discuss a framework for interpreting results as they apply to molecular neurobiology.

  14. Lasing from fluorescent protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Heon Jeong; Gather, Malte C; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2014-12-15

    We investigated fluorescent protein crystals for potential photonic applications, for the first time to our knowledge. Rod-shaped crystals of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were synthesized, with diameters of 0.5-2 μm and lengths of 100-200 μm. The crystals exhibit minimal light scattering due to their ordered structure and generate substantially higher fluorescence intensity than EGFP or dye molecules in solutions. The magnitude of concentration quenching in EGFP crystals was measured to be about 7-10 dB. Upon optical pumping at 485 nm, individual EGFP crystals located between dichroic mirrors generated laser emission with a single-mode spectral line at 513 nm. Our results demonstrate the potential of protein crystals as novel optical elements for self-assembled, micro- or nano-lasers and amplifiers in aqueous environment.

  15. Microstructured Reactors Designed by Stereolithography and Characterized by Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corbel

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to define a structured and functionalized support for future biomedical applications (model of “low-density bioarray”. The experiments were carried out by using stereolithography process with a special SU-8 photoresist and the reproducibility of the method was studied by analyzing the surface profile of the support. Finally, a matrix of regular controlled sized wells was fabricated. Chemical reactions leading to covalent grafting were run to demonstrate that the inner surface of the wells remains still reactive after polymerization. The grafting of fluorophores with carboxylic functions activated by N-hydroxysuccinimide was studied as function of time, in order to determine the best reactions, conditions. Then, the grafting of two distinct fluorescent probes was led simultaneously inside the wells, showing the possibility of spatial localization of diverse reactions on the same support. The covalent and localized bindings were confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy analyses.

  16. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A.

    2016-02-03

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  17. Time- and spectrally resolved characteristics of flavin fluorescence in U87MG cancer cells in culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horilova, Julia; Cunderlikova, Beata; Marcek Chorvatova, Alzbeta

    2015-05-01

    Early detection of cancer is crucial for the successful diagnostics of its presence and its subsequent treatment. To improve cancer detection, we tested the progressive multimodal optical imaging of U87MG cells in culture. A combination of steady-state spectroscopic methods with the time-resolved approach provides a new insight into the native metabolism when focused on endogenous tissue fluorescence. In this contribution, we evaluated the metabolic state of living U87MG cancer cells in culture by means of endogenous flavin fluorescence. Confocal microscopy and time-resolved fluorescence imaging were employed to gather spectrally and time-resolved images of the flavin fluorescence. We observed that flavin fluorescence in U87MG cells was predominantly localized outside the cell nucleus in mitochondria, while exhibiting a spectral maximum under 500 nm and fluorescence lifetimes under 1.4 ns, suggesting the presence of bound flavins. In some cells, flavin fluorescence was also detected inside the cell nuclei in the nucleoli, exhibiting longer fluorescence lifetimes and a red-shifted spectral maximum, pointing to the presence of free flavin. Extra-nuclear flavin fluorescence was diminished by 2-deoxyglucose, but failed to increase with 2,4-dinitrophenol, the uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation, indicating that the cells use glycolysis, rather than oxidative phosphorylation for functioning. These gathered data are the first step toward monitoring the metabolic state of U87MG cancer cells.

  18. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudkovsky, Andrey A; Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N; Nikitin, Mikhail A; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Belousova, Anna; Reimer, James D; Berumen, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs) have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera) found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia) living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847) (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae). We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  19. Green Fluorescence of Cytaeis Hydroids Living in Association with Nassarius Gastropods in the Red Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Prudkovsky

    Full Text Available Green Fluorescent Proteins (GFPs have been reported from a wide diversity of medusae, but only a few observations of green fluorescence have been reported for hydroid colonies. In this study, we report on fluorescence displayed by hydroid polyps of the genus Cytaeis Eschscholtz, 1829 (Hydrozoa: Anthoathecata: Filifera found at night time in the southern Red Sea (Saudi Arabia living on shells of the gastropod Nassarius margaritifer (Dunker, 1847 (Neogastropoda: Buccinoidea: Nassariidae. We examined the fluorescence of these polyps and compare with previously reported data. Intensive green fluorescence with a spectral peak at 518 nm was detected in the hypostome of the Cytaeis polyps, unlike in previous reports that reported fluorescence either in the basal parts of polyps or in other locations on hydroid colonies. These results suggest that fluorescence may be widespread not only in medusae, but also in polyps, and also suggests that the patterns of fluorescence localization can vary in closely related species. The fluorescence of polyps may be potentially useful for field identification of cryptic species and study of geographical distributions of such hydroids and their hosts.

  20. Two-photon fluorescence probes for imaging of mitochondria and lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanggui; Chan, Pui Shan; Chan, Miu Shan; Li, King Fai; Lo, Pik Kwan; Mak, Nai Ki; Cheah, Kok Wai; Wong, Man Shing

    2013-04-28

    Novel biocompatible cyanines show not only a very large two-photon cross-section of up to 5130 GM at 910 nm in aqueous medium for high-contrast and -brightness two-photon fluorescence live cell imaging but also highly selective subcellular localization properties including localization of mitochondria and lysosomes.

  1. Fluorescence for high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Schultheiss, Niek G

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary schools. With the help of special designed scintillator detection stations, containing anthracene, cosmic rays can be detected. Fluorescence of anthracene is one of the topics discussed in these series of extra curricular lessons aimed at excellent pupils working on cosmic radiation within the HiSPARC - project.

  2. Multichromophoric sugar for fluorescence photoswitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Maisonneuve

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A multichromophoric glucopyranoside 2 bearing three dicyanomethylenepyran (DCM fluorophores and one diarylethene (DAE photochrome has been prepared by Cu(I-catalyzed alkyne–azide cycloaddition reaction. The fluorescence of 2 was switched off upon UV irradiation, in proportion with the open to closed form (OF to CF conversion extent of the DAE moiety. A nearly 100% Förster-type resonance energy transfer (FRET from all three DCM moieties to a single DAE (in its CF moiety was achieved. Upon visible irradiation, the initial fluorescence intensity was recovered. The observed photoswiching is reversible, with excellent photo resistance.

  3. Elemental analysis using a handheld X-Ray fluorescence spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groover, Krishangi D.; Izbicki, John

    2016-06-24

    The U.S. Geological Survey is collecting geologic samples from local stream channels, aquifer materials, and rock outcrops for studies of trace elements in the Mojave Desert, southern California. These samples are collected because geologic materials can release a variety of elements to the environment when exposed to water. The samples are to be analyzed with a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer to determine the concentrations of up to 27 elements, including chromium.

  4. Influence of surfactant structures in luminescence enhancement dynamics during nucleation and growth of aqueous ZnS nanoparticles and their photoactivation due to illumination with UV/visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, S.K., E-mail: skmehta@pu.ac.i [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 (India); Kumar, Sanjay [Department of Chemistry and Centre for Advanced Studies in Chemistry, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160 014 (India)

    2010-12-15

    Nanostructured semiconductor architectures have attractive optical properties mainly including bright photoluminescence (PL) resulting from the radiative recombination of charge carriers on surface states. Various approaches have been employed for the modification of surface states of these nanostructures to design new nanomaterials with enhanced PL primarily in aqueous medium to enable their applications in biological samples. Here, we report the varying efficiencies of three commercial surfactants viz. cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) and cetylpyridinium chloride (CPyC) on the dynamics of PL emission enhancement during initial growth and Ostwald ripening of ZnS nanoparticles (NPs). The counterion has been estimated to behave differently to govern the PL enhancement. The exceptionally high tendency of CPyC in PL enhancement has been assigned to participation of {pi}-electrons of pyridinium ring. The impact of UV-light in photoactivation of surfactant stabilized ZnS NPs has been utilized in exploring significance of surfactants in improving the surface emitting states in water soluble semiconductor NPs.

  5. Local Linearizability

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Andreas; Henzinger, Thomas A.; Holzer, Andreas; Kirsch, Christoph M.; Lippautz, Michael; Payer, Hannes; Sezgin, Ali; Sokolova, Ana; Veith, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The semantics of concurrent data structures is usually given by a sequential specification and a consistency condition. Linearizability is the most popular consistency condition due to its simplicity and general applicability. Nevertheless, for applications that do not require all guarantees offered by linearizability, recent research has focused on improving performance and scalability of concurrent data structures by relaxing their semantics. In this paper, we present local linearizability,...

  6. Two-plasmid vector system for independently controlled expression of green and red fluorescent fusion proteins in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzoska, Anthony J; Firth, Neville

    2013-05-01

    We have constructed a system for the regulated coexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and red fluorescent protein (RFP) fusions in Staphylococcus aureus. It was validated by simultaneous localization of cell division proteins FtsZ and Noc and used to detect filament formation by an actin-like ParM plasmid partitioning protein in its native coccoid host.

  7. Biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color encoder: modulation of fluorescence emission via DNA structural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Takahiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Yamada, Kenji; Ohno, Yuko; Tanida, Jun

    2014-07-01

    A biomolecule-to-fluorescent-color (B/F) encoder for optical readout of biomolecular information is proposed. In the B/F encoder, a set of fluorescence wavelengths and their intensity levels are used for coding of a biomolecular signal. A hybridization chain reaction of hairpin DNAs labeled with fluorescent reporters was performed to generate the fluorescence color codes. The fluorescence is modulated via fluorescence resonance energy transfer, which is controlled by DNA structural changes. The results demonstrate that fluorescent color codes can be configured based on two wavelengths and five intensities using the B/F encoder, and the assigned codes can be retrieved via fluorescence measurements.

  8. Best practices for fluorescence microscopy of the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan E.; Erb, Marcella L.; Pogliano, Joe; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This chapter deals with methods of monitoring the subcellular localization of proteins in single cells in the circadian model system Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. While genetic, biochemical and structural insights into the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator have flourished, difficulties in achieving informative subcellular imaging in cyanobacterial cells have delayed progress of the cell biology aspects of the clock. Here, we describe best practices for using fluorescent protein tags to monitor localization. Specifically we address how to vet fusion proteins and overcome challenges in microscopic imaging of very small autofluorescent cells. PMID:25662459

  9. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-11-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required.

  10. Fluorescence for high school students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultheiss, N.G.; Kool, T.W.

    2012-01-01

    In a not obligatory series of lessons for high school students in the Netherlands we discuss the fluorescence aspects of anthracene. These lessons were developed because HiSPARC (High school Project on Astrophysics Research with Cosmics) detection of cosmic rays are available for different secondary

  11. Development of Sealed Fluorescence Spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN; Hong-juan; ZHANG; Li-hua; LIU; Huan-liang; FAN; De-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In nuclear fuel reprocessing, the fluorescent analytical instrument can be used to analyze various trace elements, such as boron and thorium in uranium product. Due to the high radioactivity, strong acidity, fatal toxic and complex components of spent nuclear fuel reprocessing sample, analytical works become more difficult and instruments used can be damaged easier.

  12. A fluorescent probe for ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroni, D; Biavardi, E; Genovese, D; Rampazzo, E; Prodi, L; Dalcanale, E

    2015-08-18

    A nanostructure formed by the insertion in silica nanoparticles of a pyrene-derivatized cavitand, which is able to specifically recognize ecstasy in water, is presented. The absence of effects from interferents and an efficient electron transfer process occurring after complexation of ecstasy, makes this system an efficient fluorescent probe for this popular drug.

  13. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  14. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  15. Fluorescent Labeling of Nanometer Hydroxyapatite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan ZHANG; Yuan YUAN; Changsheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    A novel surface treatment method using 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (AMPTES), was developed to immobilize the fluorescein molecule on nano-HAP (nanometer hydroxyapatite) powders. By pretreating the nano-HAP powders surface with AMPTES, fluorescein, chosen on the basis of the chemical structure of the nano- HAP powders, could be bound to the nano-HAP powders surface. The chemical compositions of nano-HAP before and after being labeled were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The morphology, phase composition, and the fluorescence characteristics of the nano-HAP powders with and without staining were also investigated. The FTIR and XPS results revealed that fiuorescein had been successfully immobilized on the surface of AMPTES-bound nano-HAP powders via the acylamide bond formation between the -COOH of fluorescein and the -NH2 of AMPTES. The labeled nano-HAP powders possessed strong fluorescent intensity with a little deviation from the maximum emission wavelength of fluorescein. But the morphology and phase composition had no obvious alteration. Under fluorescence microscopy, the labeled nano-HAP powders., even after 24 h cell incubation, exhibited strong fluorescence.

  16. Elution of labile fluorescent dye from nanoparticles during biological use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziana Tenuta

    Full Text Available Cells act as extremely efficient filters for elution of unbound fluorescent tags or impurities associated with nanoparticles, including those that cannot be removed by extensive cleaning. This has consequences for quantification of nanoparticle uptake and sub-cellular localization in vitro and in vivo as a result of the presence of significant amount of labile dye even following extensive cleaning by dialysis. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE can be used to monitor the elution of unbound fluorescent probes from nanoparticles, either commercially available or synthesized in-house, and to ensure their complete purification for biological studies, including cellular uptake and sub-cellular localisation. Very different fluorescence distribution within cells is observed after short dialysis times versus following extensive dialysis against a solvent in which the free dye is more soluble, due to the contribution from free dye. In the absence of an understanding of the presence of residual free dye in (most labeled nanoparticle solutions, the total fluorescence intensity in cells following exposure to nanoparticle solutions could be mis-ascribed to the presence of nanoparticles through the cell, rather than correctly assigned to either a combination of free-dye and nanoparticle-bound dye, or even entirely to free dye depending on the exposure conditions (i.e. aggregation of the particles etc. Where all of the dye is nanoparticle-bound, the particles are highly localized in sub-cellular organelles, likely lysosomes, whereas in a system containing significant amounts of free dye, the fluorescence is distributed through the cell due to the free diffusion of the molecule dye across all cellular barriers and into the cytoplasm.

  17. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  18. A state space based approach to localizing single molecules from multi-emitter images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid, Milad R; Chao, Jerry; Ward, E Sally; Ober, Raimund J

    2017-01-28

    Single molecule super-resolution microscopy is a powerful tool that enables imaging at sub-diffraction-limit resolution. In this technique, subsets of stochastically photoactivated fluorophores are imaged over a sequence of frames and accurately localized, and the estimated locations are used to construct a high-resolution image of the cellular structures labeled by the fluorophores. Available localization methods typically first determine the regions of the image that contain emitting fluorophores through a process referred to as detection. Then, the locations of the fluorophores are estimated accurately in an estimation step. We propose a novel localization method which combines the detection and estimation steps. The method models the given image as the frequency response of a multi-order system obtained with a balanced state space realization algorithm based on the singular value decomposition of a Hankel matrix, and determines the locations of intensity peaks in the image as the pole locations of the resulting system. The locations of the most significant peaks correspond to the locations of single molecules in the original image. Although the accuracy of the location estimates is reasonably good, we demonstrate that, by using the estimates as the initial conditions for a maximum likelihood estimator, refined estimates can be obtained that have a standard deviation close to the Cramér-Rao lower bound-based limit of accuracy. We validate our method using both simulated and experimental multi-emitter images.

  19. Finding local order in cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Specific local arrangements of molecules are the structural fingerprints of important biological processes in cells and tissues but difficult to access experimentally. In the recent work by Bernhardt et al (2017 New J. Phys. 19 013012) such order on the nanometer scale has been investigated by in situ correlation of fluorescence-based cell visualization and nano-focused x-ray diffraction. This approach enables selective diffraction analysis guided by fluorescence imaging and opens new perspectives for the investigation of ordered nanostructures in living matter such as fiber bundles, membrane architectures, and newly-formed biominerals.

  20. Nanometer resolution imaging and tracking of fluorescent molecules with minimal photon fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Balzarotti, Francisco; Gwosch, Klaus C; Gynnå, Arvid H; Westphal, Volker; Stefani, Fernando D; Elf, Johan; Hell, Stefan W

    2016-01-01

    We introduce MINFLUX, a concept for localizing photon emitters in space. By probing the emitter with a local intensity minimum of excitation light, MINFLUX minimizes the fluorescence photons needed for high localization precision. A 22-fold reduction of photon detections over that required in popular centroid-localization is demonstrated. In superresolution microscopy, MINFLUX attained ~1 nm precision, resolving molecules only 6 nm apart. Tracking single fluorescent proteins by MINFLUX increased the temporal resolution and the localizations per trace by 100-fold, as demonstrated with diffusing 30S ribosomal subunits in living E. coli. Since conceptual limits have not been reached, we expect this localization modality to break new ground for observing the dynamics, distribution, and structure of macromolecules in living cells and beyond.

  1. Coexistence of Probe Conformations in Lipid Phases—A Polarized Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Urbančič, Iztok; Ljubetič, Ajasja; Arsov, Zoran; Štrancar, Janez

    2013-01-01

    Several well-established fluorescence methods depend on environment-sensitive probes that report about molecular properties of their local environment. For reliable interpretation of experiments, careful characterization of probes’ behavior is required. In this study, bleaching-corrected polarized fluorescence microspectroscopy with nanometer spectral peak position resolution was applied to characterize conformations of two alkyl chain-labeled 7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl phospholipids in...

  2. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for the tissue detection of bacterial pathogens associated with porcine infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik Elvang; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    sequences within intact cells. FISH allows direct histological localization of the bacteria in the tissue and thereby a correlation between the infection and the histopathological changes present. This chapter presents protocols for FISH identification of bacterial pathogens in fixed deparaffinized tissue......Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an efficient technique for the identification of specific bacteria in tissue of both experimental and spontaneous infections. The method detects specific sequences of nucleic acids by hybridization of fluorescently labeled probes to complementary target...

  3. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization for the Tissue Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Porcine Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Louise Kruse; Barington, Kristiane

    2015-01-01

    sequences within intact cells. FISH allows direct histological localization of the bacteria in the tissue and thereby a correlation between the infection and the histopathological changes present. This chapter presents protocols for FISH identification of bacterial pathogens in fixed deparaffinized tissue......Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is an efficient technique for the identification of specific bacteria in tissue of both experimental and spontaneous infections. The method detects specific sequences of nucleic acids by hybridization of fluorescently labeled probes to complementary target...

  4. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...

  5. NOVEL FLUORESCENT PROBES FOR THE DOPAMINE TRANSPORTER

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cha, J; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Adkins, Erica

    To enable visualization of the dopamine transporter (DAT) through fluorescence technologies we have synthesized a novel series of fluorescently tagged analogs of cocaine. Previous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies have demonstrated that the dopamine transporter (DAT) can tolerate...

  6. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  7. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  8. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Churmakov, D Y; Piletsky, S A; Greenhalgh, D A

    2003-01-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto- fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an effective depth.

  9. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churmakov, D Y [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Meglinski, I V [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Piletsky, S A [Institute of BioScience and Technology, Cranfield University, Silsoe, MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D A [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth.

  10. Photochromicity and fluorescence lifetimes of green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea and its mutants have gained widespread usage as an indicator of structure and function within cells. Proton transfer has been implicated in the complex photophysics of the wild-type molecule, exhibiting a protonated A species excited at 400 nm, and two deprotonated excited-state species I* and B* with red-shifted excitation similar to 475 nm. Photochromicity between the protonated and deprotonated species has been re...

  11. Synthesis and characterization of new fluorescent nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Tao; Xu Hun; Zhu Jun Zhang

    2008-01-01

    A novel kind of fluorescent nanoparticles (FNPs) has been prepared using a precipitation polymerization method.Methacrylic acid,trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate and azobisisobutyronitrile were used as functional-monomer,cross-linker and initiator,respectively.Compared with other fluorescent nanoparticles,the FNPs have the characteristics including low dye leakage and good photostability.The fluorescence microscopy imaging indicates that the FNPs can be used as fluorescent labels in bioanalysis.

  12. Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence in Paleontology

    OpenAIRE

    Kaye, Thomas G.; Falk, Amanda R.; Michael Pittman; Sereno, Paul C.; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Enpu Gong; Xing Xu; Yinan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence using ultraviolet (UV) light has seen increased use as a tool in paleontology over the last decade. Laser-stimulated fluorescence (LSF) is a next generation technique that is emerging as a way to fluoresce paleontological specimens that remain dark under typical UV. A laser's ability to concentrate very high flux rates both at the macroscopic and microscopic levels results in specimens fluorescing in ways a standard UV bulb cannot induce. Presented here are five paleontological c...

  13. Fluorescence tomography applied to prostate cancer diagnosis using white pulsed laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daures, A.; Boutet, J.; Hervé, L.; Sauze, R.; Puszka, A.; Heinrich, E.; Grenier, N.; Dinten, J. M.

    2013-03-01

    Prostate cancer diagnosis is based on PSA rate measurement and ultrasound guided biopsy. Recently criticized for its lack of specificity, new approaches are currently investigated: MRI, elastography, TEP, NIRS and Time Resolved (TR) fluorescence tomography. The advantage of TR fluorescence tomography relies on its good complementarity with the standard ultrasound protocol and on the possible localization of prostate tumors marked by specific probes. After a first TR system based on a bulky titanium-sapphire laser, we designed a new one taking advantage of a more compact white pulsed laser (supercontinuum). The improved compactness is now fully compatible with clinical environment. The light, filtered by two linear variable filters to select a 770+/-20 nm window, is driven to the transrectal probe which also collects the fluorescence light emitted by the marker. The signal is detected by photomultipliers connected to TCSPC boards. A reconstruction algorithm based on intensities and time of flight allows a fast localization of the fluorophore. We compared the performances of the new white laser system to the previous titanium-sapphire on prostate mimicking phantoms. The laser power delivered on the phantom by the new laser appeared to be suitable to fluorescence measurements, just below cutaneous maximum permitted exposure. The new system allowed us to localize fluorescent inclusions of a fluorescent nanoemulsion at fixed positions inside a prostate mimicking phantom.

  14. Quantification of local morphodynamics and local GTPase activity by edge evolution tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Tsukada

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Advances in time-lapse fluorescence microscopy have enabled us to directly observe dynamic cellular phenomena. Although the techniques themselves have promoted the understanding of dynamic cellular functions, the vast number of images acquired has generated a need for automated processing tools to extract statistical information. A problem underlying the analysis of time-lapse cell images is the lack of rigorous methods to extract morphodynamic properties. Here, we propose an algorithm called edge evolution tracking (EET to quantify the relationship between local morphological changes and local fluorescence intensities around a cell edge using time-lapse microscopy images. This algorithm enables us to trace the local edge extension and contraction by defining subdivided edges and their corresponding positions in successive frames. Thus, this algorithm enables the investigation of cross-correlations between local morphological changes and local intensity of fluorescent signals by considering the time shifts. By applying EET to fluorescence resonance energy transfer images of the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, we examined the cross-correlation between the local area difference and GTPase activity. The calculated correlations changed with time-shifts as expected, but surprisingly, the peak of the correlation coefficients appeared with a 6-8 min time shift of morphological changes and preceded the Rac1 or Cdc42 activities. Our method enables the quantification of the dynamics of local morphological change and local protein activity and statistical investigation of the relationship between them by considering time shifts in the relationship. Thus, this algorithm extends the value of time-lapse imaging data to better understand dynamics of cellular function.

  15. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  16. Characterization of natural fluorescence in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeziri, Salim; Ma, Guobin; Mincu, Niculae; Benyamin Seeyar, Anader; Khayat, Mario

    2008-02-01

    One important challenge for in-vivo imaging fluorescence in cancer research and related pharmaceutical studies is to discriminate the exogenous fluorescence signal of the specific tagged agents from the natural fluorescence. For mice, natural fluorescence is composed of endogenous fluorescence from organs like the skin, the bladder, etc. and from ingested food. The discrimination between the two kinds of fluorescence makes easy monitoring the targeted tissues. Generally, the amplitude of the fluorescence signal depends on the location and on the amount of injected fluorophore, which is limited in in-vivo experiments. This paper exposes some results of natural fluorescence analysis from in-vivo mice experiments using a time domain small animal fluorescence imaging system: eXplore Optix TM. Fluorescence signals are expressed by a Time Point Spread Function (TPSF) at each scan point. The study uses measures of similarity applied purposely to the TPSF to evaluate the discrepancy and/or the homogeneity of scanned regions of a mouse. These measures allow a classification scheme to be performed on the TPSF's based on their temporal shapes. The work ends by showing how the exogenous fluorescence can be distinguished from natural fluorescence by using the TPSF temporal shape.

  17. Demonstrating Fluorescence with Neon Paper and Plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birriel, Jennifer J.; Roe, Clarissa

    2015-01-01

    Several papers in this journal have dealt with the fluorescence in orange neon plastic, olive oil, and soda. In each case, the fluorescent emission was excited by either green or violet-blue laser light. In this paper, we examine the fluorescent emission spectra of so-called neon colored papers and plastic clipboards available in department and…

  18. Local Professionals for Local Market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Xiaojie

    2010-01-01

    @@ In the past three decades,the Chinese hotel industry has developed at a rapid pace,with the number of hotels-especially high star hotelsgrowing fast.In Beijing alone,there arc nearly 60 five-star hotels.With the development of the hotel industry.China has also begun to see the number of local hotel professionals,including senior managers,increase.Wen Xiaojie,Deputy General Manager and Owner's Representative of Sofitel Wanda Beijing,is among the most outstanding senior hotel managers.

  19. Fluorescence signatures of an iron-enriched phytoplankton community in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoge, Frank E.; Wayne Wright, C.; Swift, Robert N.; Yungel, James K.; Berry, Richard E.; Mitchell, Richard

    Laser-induced fluorescence profiles of chlorophyll and phycoerythrin pigments and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence acquired over an iron-enriched phytoplankton patch are compared to profiles made over adjacent, naturally occurring phytoplankton patches. A total of four airborne missions were flown during an 8 day period following the release of the iron-rich fertilizer. Analyses of the airborne laser-induced fluorescence profiles from the upper-ocean layer reveal: (1) Ship-dispersed iron enhances localized phytoplankton production in high-nutrient/low-chlorophyll regions such as found in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean. (2) The chlorophyll concentration within the iron-enriched phytoplankton patch exceeded levels of chlorophyll found in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches located outside the enriched region. (3) An increase in phycoerythrin fluorescence was observed within the enriched region in correspondence with the elevated chlorophyll fluorescence. However, the phycoerythrin/chlorophyll fluorescence ratio was lower within the enriched patch than in naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside of the enriched region. (4) No above-background chromorophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence was observed in the enriched patch. Elevated CDOM fluorescence was associated with some of the naturally occurring phytoplankton patches outside the enriched region, while other such phytoplankton patches showed no measurable increase in CDOM over background levels. (5) The surface layer manifestation of the patch was observed to be transported to the north and west in close agreement with the drogue positions. No elevated surface layer chlorophyll fluorescence was seen in the vicinity of the ship as it sampled the submerged fraction at the time of the 30 October and 1 November overflights. The phycoerythrin pigment fluorescence emission was insensitive to ambient cloud-induced downwelling irradiance variability, while at the

  20. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging study of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease after right ileocolonic resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Klein, Olivier; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1995-12-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Vasculitis is hypothesized but it was never demonstrated in vivo. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular mucosa perfusion using fluorescence imaging in 13 patients who had previously undergone eileocolonic resection and who agreed to participate in a prospective endoscopic study of anastomotic recurrence. This anastomotic recurrence rate is known to be high (73% after 1 year follow-up) and is characterized by ulcerations. The fluorescence study was started with an I.V. bolus injection of sodium fluorescein. The pre-anastomotic mucosa was endoscopically examined with blue light that stimulates fluorescein fluorescence. Fluorescence emission was recorded with an ultra-high-sensitivity camera connected to the endoscope via an interference filter (520 - 560 nm). A uniform fluorescence was observed a few seconds after the injection and lasted for 15 min in healthy subjects. In case of recurrence, the centers of the ulcerations displayed a very low fluorescence indicating localized ischemia. In contrast, the rims of the ulcers revealed brighter fluorescent images than those of normal mucosa. The anastomotic ulcerations of Crohn's disease recurrence exhibit a high fluorescence intensity at their margins indicating an increased mucosal blood flow and/or enhanced transcapillary diffusion. These findings support the hypothesis of a primary vasculitis in Crohn's disease.

  1. Polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of DNA-DAPI complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Gammon, Seth; Hazlett, Theodore; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2004-11-01

    We discuss the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the measurement of relatively slow rotations of large macromolecules in solution or attached to other macromolecular structures. We present simulations and experimental results to illustrate the range of rotational correlation times and diffusion times that the technique can analyze. In particular, we examine various methods to analyze the polarization fluctuation data. We have found that by first constructing the polarization function and then calculating the autocorrelation function, we can obtain the rotational motion of the molecule with very little interference from the lateral diffusion of the macromolecule, as long as the rotational diffusion is significantly faster than the lateral diffusion. Surprisingly, for common fluorophores the autocorrelation of the polarization function is relatively unaffected by the photon statistics. In our instrument, two-photon excitation is used to define a small volume of illumination where a few molecules are present at any instant of time. The measurements of long DNA molecules labeled with the fluorescent probe DAPI show local rotational motions of the polymers in addition to translation motions of the entire polymer. For smaller molecules such as EGFP, the viscosity of the solution must be increased to bring the relaxation due to rotational motion into the measurable range. Overall, our results show that polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can be used to detect fast and slow rotational motion in the time scale from microsecond to second, a range that cannot be easily reached by conventional fluorescence anisotropy decay methods.

  2. Molecular-sized fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Igor I.; Shiryaev, Andrey A.; Rendler, Torsten; Steinert, Steffen; Lee, Sang-Yun; Antonov, Denis; Vörös, Márton; Jelezko, Fedor; Fisenko, Anatolii V.; Semjonova, Lubov F.; Biskupek, Johannes; Kaiser, Ute; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Sildos, Ilmo; Hemmer, Philip. R.; Konov, Vitaly I.; Gali, Adam; Wrachtrup, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Doping of carbon nanoparticles with impurity atoms is central to their application. However, doping has proven elusive for very small carbon nanoparticles because of their limited availability and a lack of fundamental understanding of impurity stability in such nanostructures. Here, we show that isolated diamond nanoparticles as small as 1.6 nm, comprising only ~400 carbon atoms, are capable of housing stable photoluminescent colour centres, namely the silicon vacancy (SiV). Surprisingly, fluorescence from SiVs is stable over time, and few or only single colour centres are found per nanocrystal. We also observe size-dependent SiV emission supported by quantum-chemical simulation of SiV energy levels in small nanodiamonds. Our work opens the way to investigating the physics and chemistry of molecular-sized cubic carbon clusters and promises the application of ultrasmall non-perturbative fluorescent nanoparticles as markers in microscopy and sensing.

  3. Ruby fluorescence pressure scale: Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Bi, Yan; Xu, Ji-An

    2013-05-01

    Effect of non-hydrostatic stress on X-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) is studied. The pressure gradient in the sample chamber leads to the broadening of the diffraction peaks, which increase with the hkl index of the crystal. It is found that the difference between the determined d-spacing compressive ratio d/d0 and the real d-spacing compressive ratio dr/d0 is determined by the yield stress of the pressure transmitting media (if used) and the shear modulus of the sample. On the basis of the corrected experiment data of Mao et al. (MXB86), which was used to calibrate the most widely used ruby fluorescence scale, a new relationship of ruby fluorescence pressure scale is corrected, i.e., P = (1904/9.827)[(1 + Δλ/λ0)9.827-1].

  4. New Fluorescence Probes for Biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Jurek

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Steady state fluorescence measurements have been used for the investigation of interaction between the bovine serum albumin (BSA and fluorescence probes: 3-hydroxy-2,4- bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ6, 3-hydroxy- 2,4-bis[(3-methyl-1,3-benzothiazol-2(3H-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ7 and 3-hydroxy-2,4-bis[(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidenemethyl]cyclobut-2-en-1-one (SQ8. The binding constant between bovine serum albumin and squarine dyes has been determined by using both the Benesi-Hildebrand and Stern-Volmer equations. The negative value of free energy change indicates the existence of a spontaneous complexation process of BSA with squarine dyes.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopy for neoplasms control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratchenko, I. A.; Kristoforova, Yu. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.; Zakharov, V. P.

    2016-04-01

    Investigation of malignant skin tumors diagnosis was performed involving two setups for native tissues fluorescence control in visible and near infrared regions. Combined fluorescence analysis for skin malignant melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed. Autofluorescence spectra of normal skin and oncological pathologies stimulated by 457 nm and 785 nm lasers were registered for 74 skin tissue samples. Spectra of 10 melanomas and 27 basal cell carcinomas were registered ex vivo. Skin tumors analysis was made on the basis of autofluorescence spectra intensity and curvature for analysis of porphyrins, lipo-pigments, flavins and melanin. Separation of melanomas and basal cell carcinomas was performed on the basis of discriminant analysis. Overall accuracy of basal cell carcinomas and malignant melanomas separation in current study reached 86.5% with 70% sensitivity and 92.6% specificity.

  6. Sorting fluorescent nanocrystals with DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerion, Daniele; Parak, Wolfgang J.; Williams, Shara C.; Zanchet, Daniela; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2001-12-10

    Semiconductor nanocrystals with narrow and tunable fluorescence are covalently linked to oligonucleotides. These biocompounds retain the properties of both nanocrystals and DNA. Therefore, different sequences of DNA can be coded with nanocrystals and still preserve their ability to hybridize to their complements. We report the case where four different sequences of DNA are linked to four nanocrystal samples having different colors of emission in the range of 530-640 nm. When the DNA-nanocrystal conjugates are mixed together, it is possible to sort each type of nanoparticle using hybridization on a defined micrometer -size surface containing the complementary oligonucleotide. Detection of sorting requires only a single excitation source and an epifluorescence microscope. The possibility of directing fluorescent nanocrystals towards specific biological targets and detecting them, combined with their superior photo-stability compared to organic dyes, opens the way to improved biolabeling experiments, such as gene mapping on a nanometer scale or multicolor microarray analysis.

  7. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  8. FAMOUS. The fluorescence telescope prototype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Johannes; Bretz, Thomas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Lauscher, Markus; Middendorf, Lukas; Niggemann, Tim; Peters, Christine; Sommer, Dominik; Stephan, Maurice [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Auffenberg, Jan; Schaufel, Merlin [III. Physikalisches Institut B, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    One of the most successful techniques for the detection of air showers produced by ultra-high-energy cosmic rays are fluorescence telescopes. The light produced by de-exciting nitrogen in the atmosphere is typically detected by photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). This technique has been successfully used by the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina for many years. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) promise higher photon detection efficiencies than PMTs. This and other advantages motivate the construction of the fluorescence telescope prototype FAMOUS (First Auger Multi-pixel photon counter camera for the Observation of Ultra-high-energy air Showers) which makes use of SiPMs. In this talk we discuss the FAMOUS telescope with a new 64-pixel camera including power supply and DAQ.

  9. FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALA, JR; Gratton, E; PRENDERGAST, FG

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most ...

  10. Fluorescent compounds present in food

    OpenAIRE

    Soto Serrano, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Póster The food industry demands fast, reliable, cheap and reproducible methods for quality and process control. This bibliographic review work investigates florescence spectroscopy, a method that couldn’t be used in food until the recent technological advances, concretely front-face fluorescence and chemometric tools. This technology presents advantages as compared to classical methods like HPLC or capillary electrophoresis, which require qualified staff, sample preparation and are time-c...

  11. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  12. A low-toxic artificial fluorescent glycoprotein can serve as an efficient cytoplasmic labeling in living cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Jiangju; Liang, Dawei; Kong, Dan; Wu, Sufang; Yuan, Lan; Xiang, Yan; Jiang, Lei

    2015-03-06

    To maintain the virtue of good optical property and discard the dross of conventional fluorescent staining dyes, we provide a strategy for designing new fluorescent scaffolds. In this study, a novel fluorescent labeling glycoprotein (chitosan-poly-L-cysteine, CPC) was synthesized through graft copolymerization. CPC gives emission peak at 465-470 nm when excited at 386 nm. The submicro-scale CPC microspheres could be localized and persisted specifically in the cytoplasm of living cells, with strong blue fluorescence. Moreover, CPC was highly resistant to photo bleaching, the fluorescence was remained stable for up to 72 h as the cells grew and developed. The glycoprotein CPC was bio-compatible and in zero grade cytotoxicity as quantified by MTT assay. The fluorescent labeling process with our newly designed glycoprotein CPC is exceptionally efficient. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Localized Excitons in Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamska, Lyudmyla; Doorn, Stephen K.; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-03-01

    It has been historically known that unintentional defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may fully quench the fluorescence. However, some dopants may enhance the fluorescence by one order of magnitude thus turning the CNTs, which are excellent light absorbers, in good emitters. We have correlated the experimentally observed photoluminescence spectra to the electronic structure simulations. Our experiment reveals multiple sharp asymmetric emission peaks at energies 50-300 meV red-shifted from that of the lowest bright exciton peak. Our simulations suggest an association of these peaks with deep trap states tied to different specific chemical adducts. While the wave functions of excitons in undoped CNTs are delocalized, those of the deep-trap states are strongly localized and pinned to the dopants. These findings are consistent with the experimental observation of asymmetric broadening of the deep trap emission peaks, which can result from scattering of acoustic phonons on localized excitons. Our work lays the foundation to utilize doping as a generalized route for wave function engineering and direct control of carrier dynamics in SWCNTs toward enhanced light emission properties for photonic applications.

  14. Efeito dos métodos de fotoativação e de inserção sobre a dureza de resinas compostas Effect of the methods of photoactivation and insertion on the hardness of composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simonides Consani

    2002-12-01

    estatística entre os dois tipos de inserção. O Z100 mostrou similaridade estatística entre os métodos de fotoativação somente na inserção dupla, enquanto no Alert a similaridade estatística ocorreu na inserção única entre as ativações por duplo pulso e luz pulsátil.The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of methods of photoactivation and insertion on the Knoop hardness of the Z100 and Alert composite resins. The specimens were confected in cavities measuring 4 x 4 mm. The insertion of material was carried out by means of two methods: single-portion technique and insertion of two 2-mm-thick layers. When inserted in a single portion, the resin was compressed with a static load of 1 kgf on a glass slab recovered with a polyester strip, in order to remove the excess of material. After the removal of the glass slab and polyester strip, the materials were photoactivated by means of continuous light emitted by a XL 3000 unit with a light intensity of 520 mW/cm² for 40 seconds; double pulse, with light emission of 150 mW/cm² for 10 seconds, plus 30 seconds with light intensity of 520 mW/cm² emitted by a XL 3000 unit; and pulsatile light of 520 mW/cm² emitted by the Optilux 400 unit, turned on for 2 seconds and off for 2 seconds, during 60 seconds. The two layers of the material submitted to double insertion were photoactivated in the same conditions as the bulk-inserted material, and the excess of material was also removed from the second layer. After storage in a stove at 37ºC and 100% relative humidity for 24 hours, the specimens were embedded in polyester resin, trimmed and polished with sandpaper and diamond slurry. Knoop hardness was assessed in 4 depths with a HMV Shimadzu penetrometer under the load of 50 g during 30 seconds. The data submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed that Z100 presented greater hardness values; double insertion was better than single insertion; the hardness at the surface was smaller than that at the bottom of

  15. Interaction of fluorescent phospholipids with cyclodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denz, Manuela; Haralampiev, Ivan; Schiller, Sabine; Szente, Lajos; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel; Müller, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent analogs of phospholipids are often employed to investigate the structure and dynamics of lipids in membranes. Some of those studies have used cyclodextrins e.g., to modulate the lipid phase. However, the role of the fluorescence moiety of analogs for the interaction between cyclodextrins and fluorescent lipids has not been investigated so far in detail. Therefore, in the present study the interaction of various fluorescent phospholipid analogs with methylated α-, β- and γ- cyclodextrins was investigated. The analogs differed in their structure, in the length of the fatty acyl chain, in the position of the fluorescence group, and in the attached fluorescence moiety (7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl (NBD) or dipyrrometheneboron difluoride (BODIPY)). In aqueous buffer, cyclodextrins bind fluorescent lipids disturbing the organization of the analogs. When incorporated into lipid vesicles, analogs are selectively extracted from the membrane upon addition of cyclodextrins. The results show that the interaction of cyclodextrins with fluorescent phospholipids depends on the cyclodextrin species, the fluorescence moiety and the phospholipid structure. The presented data should be of interest for studies using fluorescent phospholipids and cyclodextrins, since the interaction between the fluorescence group and the cyclodextrin may interfere with the process(es) under study.

  16. Local Warming

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbei, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Using 55 years of daily average temperatures from a local weather station, I made a least-absolute-deviations (LAD) regression model that accounts for three effects: seasonal variations, the 11-year solar cycle, and a linear trend. The model was formulated as a linear programming problem and solved using widely available optimization software. The solution indicates that temperatures have gone up by about 2 degrees Fahrenheit over the 55 years covered by the data. It also correctly identifies the known phase of the solar cycle; i.e., the date of the last solar minimum. It turns out that the maximum slope of the solar cycle sinusoid in the regression model is about the same size as the slope produced by the linear trend. The fact that the solar cycle was correctly extracted by the model is a strong indicator that effects of this size, in particular the slope of the linear trend, can be accurately determined from the 55 years of data analyzed. The main purpose for doing this analysis is to demonstrate that it i...

  17. Rehydrate locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djokoto, E

    1997-11-01

    In 1991, in the northern region of Ghana, during the cholera epidemic, 10 rural health centers replied to a questionnaire regarding cholera case referrals. The results were as follows: 6 centers referred serious cases to hospitals, 2 did not receive patients because of fear of infection, and 2 received all patients. Although no patients admitted to the rural health centers died, many of the referred patients did. Of 14 cases referred to a hospital, 3 died in transit, 4 died at the hospital, and 7 survived. Deaths might be prevented if patients were treated promptly and locally with oral rehydration solutions based on cereals and rice; these are easy to prepare, superior to, and more available than standard oral rehydration salts (ORS). One mother walked 5 miles to a rural health post with her sick baby on her back, only to find that the dehydrated child had died on the way. During the 1991 cholera epidemic in Ghana, the author treated several patients in their homes; all recovered. Prompt and frequent rehydration in the home is the best treatment for diarrhea and cholera.

  18. Fluorescence Studies of Selected 2-Alkylaminopyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Low

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of 2-chloropyrimidine with methylamine, ethylamine and piperidine gave the corresponding 2-N-methylamino-, 2-N-ethylamino- and 2N- piperidinopyrimidines, respectively. The fluorescence properties of these alkylamino derivatives in chloroform, ethyl acetate, carbon tetrachloride, acetone, ether, ethanol and methanol were studied. All the alkylamino derivatives showed the highest fluorescence intensity in polar protic solvents; thus 2-N-methylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 377 nm when excited at 282 nm and 2-N-ethylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 375 nm, when excited at 286 nm showed the highest fluorescence in methanol. In ethanol, 2-N-piperidinopyrimidine showed a fluorescence peak at 403 nm when excited at 360 nm and in chloroform it fluoresced at 392 nm when excited at 356 nm.

  19. A new method for measuring concentration of a fluorescent tracer in bubbly gas-liquid flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddas, J. S.; Trägårdh, C.; Kovacs, T.; Östergren, K.

    2002-06-01

    A new experimental model, the two-tracer method (TTM), based on the planar laser-induced fluorescence technique (PLIF), is presented for the measurement of the local concentration of a fluorescent tracer in the liquid phase of a bubbly two-phase system. Light scattering and shading effects due to the bubbles were compensated for using the new model. The TTM results were found to give more accurate predictions of the local concentration than the normal PLIF method in a bubbly two-phase system.

  20. Origin of Fluorescence in 11-cis Locked Bovine Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricheva, Elena N; Gozem, Samer; Rinaldi, Silvia; Melaccio, Federico; Valentini, Alessio; Olivucci, Massimo

    2012-08-14

    The excited state lifetime of bovine rhodopsin (Rh) increases from ca. 100 fs to 85 ps when the C11═C12 bond of its chromophore is locked by a cyclopentene moiety (Rh5). To explain such an increase, we employed ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry to construct computer models of Rh and Rh5 and to investigate the shape of their excited state potential energy surfaces in a comparative way. Our results show that the observed Rh5 fluorescence (λmax(f) = 620 nm) is due to a previously unreported locally excited intermediate whose lifetime is controlled by a small energy barrier. The analysis of the properties and decay path of such an intermediate provides useful information for engineering rhodopsin variants with augmented fluorescence efficiencies.

  1. Ionic quenching of naphthalene fluorescence in sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Alessandra F; Fiedler, Haidi D; Nome, Faruk

    2011-03-31

    Micellar effects on luminescense of organic compounds or probes are well established, and here we show that quenching is highly favored in aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles, which concentrate a naphthalene probe and cations of lanthanides, transition metals, and noble metals. Interactions have been studied by steady state and time-resolved fluorescence in examining the fluorescence suppression of naphthalene by metal ions in anionic SDS micelles. The quenching is collisional and correlated with the unit charge and the reduction potential of the metal ion. The rate constants, calculated in terms of local metal ion concentrations, are close to the diffusion control limit in the interior of SDS micelles, where the microscopic viscosity decreases the transfer rate, following the Stokes-Einstein relation.

  2. Photoconversion of Lysotracker Red to a green fluorescent molecule

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eric C Freundt; Meggan Czapiga; Michael J Lenardo

    2007-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor: Lysotracker Red DND-99 (Invitrogen-Molecular Probes)is a fluorophore in the form of a conjugated multi-pyrrole ring structure containing a weakly basic amine that selectively accumulates in acidic compartments and exhibits red fluorescence(excitation:577 nm,emission:590 nm)(Figure 1A).It iS structurally related to Lvsotracker Green (Figure 1B)but has an additional pyrrole ring in conjugation with the primary structure,which produces a longer wavelength emission.Lysotracker Red is commonly used in multicolor imaging studies as a lysosomal marker to determine intracellular localization of a protein of interest by fluorescence and confocal microscopy[1-5] and is recommended by the manufacturer for this application.

  3. Fluorescence and Bioluminescence Imaging of Orthotopic Brain Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, Emilie; Moore, Alfred; Dixit, Suraj; Zhu, Yun; Broome, Ann-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Optical imaging strategies, such as fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging, are non-invasive, in vivo whole body imaging techniques utilized to study cancer. Optical imaging is widely used in preclinical work because of its ease of use and cost-friendliness. It also provides the opportunity to study animals and biological responses longitudinally over time. Important considerations include depth of tissue penetration, photon scattering, absorption and the choice of light emitting probe, all of which affect the resolution (image quality and data information) and the signal to noise ratio of the image. We describe how to use bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging to track a chemotherapeutic delivery nanocarrier conjugated with a fluorophore to determine its localization in vivo.

  4. Lyman-alpha Emission From Cosmic Structure I: Fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Kollmeier, Juna A; Davé, Romeel; Gould, Andrew; Katz, Neal; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi; Weinberg, David H

    2009-01-01

    We present predictions for the fluorescent Lyman-alpha emission signature arising from photoionized, optically thick structures in Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) cosmological simulations of a Lambda-CDM universe using a Monte Carlo Lyman-alpha radiative transfer code. We calculate the expected Lyman-alpha image and 2-dimensional spectra for gas exposed to a uniform ultraviolet ionizing background as well as gas exposed additionally to the photoionizing radiation from a local quasar, after correcting for the self-shielding of hydrogen. As a test of our numerical methods and for application to current observations, we examine simplified analytic structures that are uniformly or anisotropically illuminated. We compare these results with recent observations. We discuss future observing campaigns on large telescopes and realistic strategies for detecting fluorescence owing to the ambient metagalactic ionization and in regions close to bright quasars. While it will take hundreds of hours on the current genera...

  5. Mapping molecules in scanning far-field fluorescence nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Haisen; Keller, Jan; Haltmeier, Markus; Saka, Sinem K.; Schmied, Jürgen; Opazo, Felipe; Tinnefeld, Philip; Munk, Axel; Hell, Stefan W.

    2015-08-01

    In fluorescence microscopy, the distribution of the emitting molecule number in space is usually obtained by dividing the measured fluorescence by that of a single emitter. However, the brightness of individual emitters may vary strongly in the sample or be inaccessible. Moreover, with increasing (super-) resolution, fewer molecules are found per pixel, making this approach unreliable. Here we map the distribution of molecules by exploiting the fact that a single molecule emits only a single photon at a time. Thus, by analysing the simultaneous arrival of multiple photons during confocal imaging, we can establish the number and local brightness of typically up to 20 molecules per confocal (diffraction sized) recording volume. Subsequent recording by stimulated emission depletion microscopy provides the distribution of the number of molecules with subdiffraction resolution. The method is applied to mapping the three-dimensional nanoscale organization of internalized transferrin receptors on human HEK293 cells.

  6. Multibeam fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haichun; Xu, Can T; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2010-03-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is a biomedical imaging modality that can be used for localization and quantification of fluorescent molecules inside turbid media. In this ill-posed problem, the reconstruction quality is directly determined by the amount and quality of the information obtained from the boundary measurements. Regularly, more information can be obtained by increasing the number of excitation positions in an FDOT system. However, the maximum number of excitation positions is limited by the finite size of the excitation beam. In the present work, we demonstrate a method in FDOT to exploit the unique nonlinear power dependence of upconverting nanoparticles to further increase the amount of information in a raster-scanning setup by including excitation with two beams simultaneously. We show that the additional information can be used to obtain more accurate reconstructions.

  7. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy in planar membrane systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Jonathan; Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Wagner, Kerstin; Bagatolli, Luis A

    2010-07-01

    The feasibility of applying multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-related techniques in planar membrane systems, such as lipid monolayers at the air-water interface (named Langmuir films), is presented and discussed in this paper. The non-linear fluorescence microscopy approach, allows obtaining spatially and temporally resolved information by exploiting the fluorescent properties of particular fluorescence probes. For instance, the use of environmental sensitive probes, such as LAURDAN, allows performing measurements using the LAURDAN generalized polarization function that in turn is sensitive to the local lipid packing in the membrane. The fact that LAURDAN exhibit homogeneous distribution in monolayers, particularly in systems displaying domain coexistence, overcomes a general problem observed when "classical" fluorescence probes are used to label Langmuir films, i.e. the inability to obtain simultaneous information from the two coexisting membrane regions. Also, the well described photoselection effect caused by excitation light on LAURDAN allows: (i) to qualitative infer tilting information of the monolayer when liquid condensed phases are present and (ii) to provide high contrast to visualize 3D membranous structures at the film's collapse pressure. In the last case, computation of the LAURDAN GP function provides information about lipid packing in these 3D structures. Additionally, LAURDAN GP values upon compression in monolayers were compared with those obtained in compositionally similar planar bilayer systems. At similar GP values we found, for both DOPC and DPPC, a correspondence between the molecular areas reported in monolayers and bilayers. This correspondence occurs when the lateral pressure of the monolayer is 26+/-2 mN/m and 28+/-3 mN/m for DOPC and DPPC, respectively.

  8. Fluorescence diagnosis and photodynamic therapy of skin cancer with alasens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Evstifeev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment in patients with skin cancer using the method of photodynamic therapy (PDT with alasens are represented in the article. The study enrolled 25 patients with stage 1 tumor including 23 patients with previously untreated tumors and 2 – with recurrent disease. Superficial tumor was diagnosed in 17 patients and 8 patients had nodal tumor. Alasens was used locally as application of 20% ointment on involved skin area with 6h exposure. The PDT session was performed on a single occasion immediately after the end of exposure (power density of laser irradiation of 50–100 mW/cm2, light dose – 150–200 J/cm2. All patients had fluorescence diagnosis (FD prior to application of the ointment and before PDT. The results of FD showed that intensity of porphyrin fluorescence in tumor prior to administration of alasens had near no difference from intensity of porphyrin fluorescence in normal skin (12.5±0.7 and 10.0±0.7 r.u., respectively. Six hours after application of the ointment with alasens the fluorescence intensity of protoporphyrin IX increased almost 5-fold (59.7±5.3 r.u., the fluorescence intensity in normal skin remained near baseline level during the follow-up period (maximally 11.6±1.0 r.u.. Two months after PDT the complete tumor regression was confirmed in 21 patients, partial – in 3 and stabilization of tumor growth in 1 patient. In addition, patients with superficial disease had complete regression in 94.1% of cases and partial regression in 5.9% while for patients with nodal tumor – 62.5% and 25%, respectively, stabilization – in 12.5%. 

  9. Measurements of Fluorescent Bioaerosol Particles in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perring, A. E.; Emerson, J. B.; Fierer, N.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are of atmospheric interest due to their potential importance as cloud condensation and heterogeneous ice nuclei and because they represent a sizeable fraction of coarse mode aerosol in some locations. Relatively little data exists, however, regarding diurnal, seasonal and annual cycles of bioaerosols and the meteorological processes that control them. Newly developed real-time instrumentation allows for sensitive, high time resolution detection of fluorescent bioaerosols and is uniquely suited to address key uncertainties in the sources, distributions and behavior of these particles in the atmosphere. Here we present observations of ambient fluorescent biological aerosol made on the Front Range of Colorado using a custom-modified Wideband Integrated Bioaerosol Sensor (WIBS) during the summer and fall of 2013. The summertime measurements were made from the roof of the NOAA ESRL David Skaggs Research Center in Boulder and the fall measurements were made both at the surface and aloft at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tall Tower. We examine diurnal variations in loading and size distribution of fluorescent bioaerosol at the two locations. We also investigate the relationship between meteorological events and fluorescent bioaerosol. For example, we observe higher concentrations and markedly different number distributions associated with precipitation events. Simultaneous filter samples were collected for DNA sequencing and flow cytometry. To our knowledge this represents the first such comparison for the WIBS under ambient conditions and the microbial identification accomplished with the filters adds significantly to the analysis. This data set will provide useful insight into the sources, loadings and properties of fluorescent bioaerosol and the local and regional processes that drive them.

  10. Quantum Locality?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  11. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    CERN Document Server

    Bourg, N; Dupuis, G; Barroca, T; Bon, P; Lécart, S; Fort, E; Lévêque-Fort, S

    2014-01-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Herein we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called Supercritical Angle Fluorescence (SAF) can be captured using a hig-NA objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometer precision. We introduce a new technique for 3D nanoscopy that combines direct STochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy (dSTORM) imaging with dedicated detection of SAF emission. We demonstrate that our approach of a Direct Optical Nanoscopy with Axially Localized Detection (DONALD) yields a typical isotropic 3D localization precision of 20 nm.

  12. Fluorescence imaging spectrometer optical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiti, A.; Coppo, P.; Battistelli, E.

    2015-09-01

    The optical design of the FLuORescence Imaging Spectrometer (FLORIS) studied for the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) mission is discussed. FLEX is a candidate for the ESA's 8th Earth Explorer opportunity mission. FLORIS is a pushbroom hyperspectral imager foreseen to be embarked on board of a medium size satellite, flying in tandem with Sentinel-3 in a Sun synchronous orbit at a height of about 815 km. FLORIS will observe the vegetation fluorescence and reflectance within a spectral range between 500 and 780 nm. Multi-frames acquisitions on matrix detectors during the satellite movement will allow the production of 2D Earth scene images in two different spectral channels, called HR and LR with spectral resolution of 0.3 and 2 nm respectively. A common fore optics is foreseen to enhance by design the spatial co-registration between the two spectral channels, which have the same ground spatial sampling (300 m) and swath (150 km). An overlapped spectral range between the two channels is also introduced to simplify the spectral coregistration. A compact opto-mechanical solution with all spherical and plane optical elements is proposed, and the most significant design rationales are described. The instrument optical architecture foresees a dual Babinet scrambler, a dioptric telescope and two grating spectrometers (HR and LR), each consisting of a modified Offner configuration. The developed design is robust, stable vs temperature, easy to align, showing very high optical quality along the whole field of view. The system gives also excellent correction for transverse chromatic aberration and distortions (keystone and smile).

  13. Bioaerosol Analysis by Online Fluorescence Detection and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Alex; Pöhlker, Christopher; Treutlein, Bärbel; Pöschl, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Primary biological aerosol particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany, we used an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) to measure fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs), which can be regarded as viable bioaerosol particles representing a lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (concentration of coarse FBAPs was 3x10-2 cm-3, corresponding to 4% of total coarse particle number [1]. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was 1 ?g m-3, corresponding to 20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters, though a pronounced peak at 3 μm was essentially always observed. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around 1.5 μm, 5 μm, and 13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be explained by single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol filter samples. To our knowledge, however, this is the first study reporting continuous online measurements of bioaerosol particles over several months, a range of characteristic size distribution patterns, and a persistent bioaerosol peak at 3 μm. The measurement results confirm that PBAPs account for a

  14. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  15. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenkamp, Michel A.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Janus, Marleen M.; ten Cate, Jacob M.; de Soet, Johannes J.; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries. PMID:27997567

  16. Red and Green Fluorescence from Oral Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgenant, Catherine M C; Hoogenkamp, Michel A; Krom, Bastiaan P; Janus, Marleen M; Ten Cate, Jacob M; de Soet, Johannes J; Crielaard, Wim; van der Veen, Monique H

    2016-01-01

    Red and green autofluorescence have been observed from dental plaque after excitation by blue light. It has been suggested that this red fluorescence is related to caries and the cariogenic potential of dental plaque. Recently, it was suggested that red fluorescence may be related to gingivitis. Little is known about green fluorescence from biofilms. Therefore, we assessed the dynamics of red and green fluorescence in real-time during biofilm formation. In addition, the fluorescence patterns of biofilm formed from saliva of eight different donors are described under simulated gingivitis and caries conditions. Biofilm formation was analysed for 12 hours under flow conditions in a microfluidic BioFlux flow system with high performance microscopy using a camera to allow live cell imaging. For fluorescence images dedicated excitation and emission filters were used. Both green and red fluorescence were linearly related with the total biomass of the biofilms. All biofilms displayed to some extent green and red fluorescence, with higher red and green fluorescence intensities from biofilms grown in the presence of serum (gingivitis simulation) as compared to the sucrose grown biofilms (cariogenic simulation). Remarkably, cocci with long chain lengths, presumably streptococci, were observed in the biofilms. Green and red fluorescence were not found homogeneously distributed within the biofilms: highly fluorescent spots (both green and red) were visible throughout the biomass. An increase in red fluorescence from the in vitro biofilms appeared to be related to the clinical inflammatory response of the respective saliva donors, which was previously assessed during an in vivo period of performing no-oral hygiene. The BioFlux model proved to be a reliable model to assess biofilm fluorescence. With this model, a prediction can be made whether a patient will be prone to the development of gingivitis or caries.

  17. Screen for localized proteins in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay H Russell

    Full Text Available Precise localization of individual proteins is required for processes such as motility, chemotaxis, cell-cycle progression, and cell division in bacteria, but the number of proteins that are localized in bacterial species is not known. A screen based on transposon mutagenesis and fluorescence activated cell sorting was devised to identify large numbers of localized proteins, and employed in Caulobacter crescentus. From a sample of the clones isolated in the screen, eleven proteins with no previously characterized localization in C. crescentus were identified, including six hypothetical proteins. The localized hypothetical proteins included one protein that was localized in a helix-like structure, and two proteins for which the localization changed as a function of the cell cycle, suggesting that complex three-dimensional patterns and cell cycle-dependent localization are likely to be common in bacteria. Other mutants produced localized fusion proteins even though the transposon has inserted near the 5' end of a gene, demonstrating that short peptides can contain sufficient information to localize bacterial proteins. The screen described here could be used in most bacterial species.

  18. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  19. Evaluation of PpIX formation in Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia I (CIN) using widefield fluorescence images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbinatto, Fernanda M.; Inada, Natalia M.; Fortunato, Thereza C.; Lombardi, Welington; da Silva, Eduardo V.; Vollet Filho, José D.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2016-03-01

    Optical techniques has been described as auxiliary technology for screening of neoplasia because shows the potential for tissues differentiation in real-time and it is a noninvasive detection and safe. However, only endogenous fluorophores presents the lesion may be insufficient and needed of the administration of the fluorophores synthesized, such as, precursor molecule of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) induced by 5- aminolevulinic acid and your derivatives. Topical application of methylaminolevulinate (MAL), induces formation of the endogenous photosensitizer, PpIX in tissues where carcinogenesis has begun. The PpIX tend to accumulate in premalignant and malignant tissues and the illumination with light with appropriate wavelength beginning to excitation of PpIX fluorescence, which helps to localize PpIX-rich areas and identify potentially malignant tissues. The aim of the study is to evaluate the production of PpIX in the cervix with CIN I through of the fluorescence images captured after 1 hour of cream application. It was possible to visualize PpIX fluorescence in cervix and it was possible to observe the selectivity in fluorescence in squamous-columnar junction, which a pre-cancerous condition (CIN) and usually is localized. Through the image processing it was possible to quantify the increase of red fluorescence. For the CIN I the increase of red fluorescence was approximately of 4 times indicating a good PpIX formation.

  20. Optimization of fluorescent tools for cell biology studies in Gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria João Catalão

    Full Text Available The understanding of how Gram-positive bacteria divide and ensure the correct localization of different molecular machineries, such as those involved in the synthesis of the bacterial cell surface, is crucial to design strategies to fight bacterial infections. In order to determine the correct subcellular localization of fluorescent proteins in Streptococcus pneumoniae, we have previously described tools to express derivatives of four fluorescent proteins, mCherry, Citrine, CFP and GFP, to levels that allow visualization by fluorescence microscopy, by fusing the first ten amino acids of the S. pneumoniae protein Wze (the i-tag, upstream of the fluorescent protein. Here, we report that these tools can also be used in other Gram-positive bacteria, namely Lactococcus lactis, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis, possibly due to optimized translation rates. Additionally, we have optimized the i-tag by testing the effect of the first ten amino acids of other pneumococcal proteins in the increased expression of the fluorescent protein Citrine. We found that manipulating the structure and stability of the 5' end of the mRNA molecule, which may influence the accessibility of the ribosome, is determinant to ensure the expression of a strong fluorescent signal.