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Sample records for fluorescence molecular tomography

  1. In Vivo Diffuse Optical Tomography and Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

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    Mingze Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse optical tomography (DOT and fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT are two attractive imaging techniques for in vivo physiological and psychological research. They have distinct advantages such as non-invasiveness, non-ionizing radiation, high sensitivity and longitudinal monitoring. This paper reviews the key components of DOT and FMT. Light propagation model, mathematical reconstruction algorithm, imaging instrumentation and medical applications are included. Future challenges and perspective on optical tomography are discussed.

  2. Dual-tracer background subtraction approach for fluorescent molecular tomography

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    Holt, Robert W.; El-Ghussein, Fadi; Davis, Scott C.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Leblond, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Diffuse fluorescence tomography requires high contrast-to-background ratios to accurately reconstruct inclusions of interest. This is a problem when imaging the uptake of fluorescently labeled molecularly targeted tracers in tissue, which can result in high levels of heterogeneously distributed background uptake. We present a dual-tracer background subtraction approach, wherein signal from the uptake of an untargeted tracer is subtracted from targeted tracer signal prior to image reconstruction, resulting in maps of targeted tracer binding. The approach is demonstrated in simulations, a phantom study, and in a mouse glioma imaging study, demonstrating substantial improvement over conventional and homogenous background subtraction image reconstruction approaches. PMID:23292612

  3. Laplacian manifold regularization method for fluorescence molecular tomography

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    He, Xuelei; Wang, Xiaodong; Yi, Huangjian; Chen, Yanrong; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Jingjing; He, Xiaowei

    2017-04-01

    Sparse regularization methods have been widely used in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) for stable three-dimensional reconstruction. Generally, ℓ1-regularization-based methods allow for utilizing the sparsity nature of the target distribution. However, in addition to sparsity, the spatial structure information should be exploited as well. A joint ℓ1 and Laplacian manifold regularization model is proposed to improve the reconstruction performance, and two algorithms (with and without Barzilai-Borwein strategy) are presented to solve the regularization model. Numerical studies and in vivo experiment demonstrate that the proposed Gradient projection-resolved Laplacian manifold regularization method for the joint model performed better than the comparative algorithm for ℓ1 minimization method in both spatial aggregation and location accuracy.

  4. Comparison of Regularization Methods in Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

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    Dianwen Zhu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In vivo fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT has been a popular functional imaging modality in research labs in the past two decades. One of the major difficulties of FMT lies in the ill-posed and ill-conditioned nature of the inverse problem in reconstructing the distribution of fluorophores inside objects. The popular regularization methods based on L2, L1 and total variation (TV norms have been applied in FMT reconstructions. The non-convex Lq(0 < q < 1 semi-norm and Log function have also been studied recently. In this paper, we adopt a uniform optimization transfer framework for these regularization methods in FMT and compare their individual, as well as the combined effects on both small, localized targets, such as tumors in the early stage, and large targets, such as liver. Numerical simulation studies and phantom experiments have been carried out, and we found that Lq with q near 1/2 performs the best in reconstructing small targets, while joint L2 and Log performs the best for large targets.

  5. Improved sparse reconstruction for fluorescence molecular tomography with L1/2 regularization.

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    Guo, Hongbo; Yu, Jingjing; He, Xiaowei; Hou, Yuqing; Dong, Fang; Zhang, Shuling

    2015-05-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is a promising imaging technique that allows in vivo visualization of molecular-level events associated with disease progression and treatment response. Accurate and efficient 3D reconstruction algorithms will facilitate the wide-use of FMT in preclinical research. Here, we utilize L1/2-norm regularization for improving FMT reconstruction. To efficiently solve the nonconvex L1/2-norm penalized problem, we transform it into a weighted L1-norm minimization problem and employ a homotopy-based iterative reweighting algorithm to recover small fluorescent targets. Both simulations on heterogeneous mouse model and in vivo experiments demonstrated that the proposed L1/2-norm method outperformed the comparative L1-norm reconstruction methods in terms of location accuracy, spatial resolution and quantitation of fluorescent yield. Furthermore, simulation analysis showed the robustness of the proposed method, under different levels of measurement noise and number of excitation sources.

  6. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography.

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    Swy, Eric R; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Shuboni, Dorela D; Latourette, Matthew T; Mallet, Christiane L; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P; Shapiro, Erik M

    2014-11-07

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ∼70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.

  7. Noncontact full-angle fluorescence molecular tomography system based on rotary mirrors.

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    Wang, Daifa; He, Jin; Qiao, Huiting; Li, Ping; Fan, Yubo; Li, Deyu

    2015-08-10

    We propose a novel noncontact fluorescence molecular tomography system that achieves full-angle capacity with the use of a new rotary-mirrors-based imaging head. In the imaging head, four plane mirrors are mounted on a rotating gantry to enable illumination and detection over 360°. In comparison with existing full-angle systems, our system does not require rotation of the specimen animal, a large and heavy light source (with scanning head), or a bulky camera (with filters and lens). The system design and implementation are described in detail. Both physical phantom and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the performance of the proposed system.

  8. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

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    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  9. Compensation of optical heterogeneity-induced artifacts in fluorescence molecular tomography: theory and in vivo validation.

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    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Adibi, Ali; Kempner, Joshua; Yared, Wael

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for reduction of image artifacts induced by the optical heterogeneities of tissue in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) through identification and compensation of image regions that evidence propagation of emission light through thin or low-absorption tunnels in tissue. The light tunneled as such contributes to the emission image as spurious components that might substantially overwhelm the desirable fluorescence emanating from the targeted lesions. The proposed method makes use of the strong spatial correlation between the emission and excitation images to estimate the tunneled components and yield a residual image that mainly consists of the signal due to the desirable fluorescence. This residual image is further refined using a coincidence mask constructed for each excitation-emission image pair. The coincidence mask is essentially a map of the "hot spots" that occur in both excitation and emission images, as such areas are often associated with tunneled emission. In vivo studies are performed on a human colon adenocarcinoma xenograft tumor model with subcutaneous tumors and a murine breast adenocarcinoma model with aggressive tumor cell metastasis and growth in the lungs. Results demonstrate significant improvements in the reconstructions achieved by the proposed method.

  10. MRI-guided fiber-based fluorescence molecular tomography for preclinical atherosclerosis imaging

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    Li, Baoqiang; Pouliot, Philippe; Lesage, Frederic

    2014-09-01

    Multi-modal imaging combining fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT) with MRI could provide information in these two modalities as well as optimize the recovery of functional information with MR-guidance. Here, we present a MRI-guided FMT system. An optical probe was designed consisting of a fiber plate on the top and bottom sides of the animal bed, respectively. In experiment, animal was installed between the two plates. Mounting fibers on each plate, transmission measuring could be conducted from both sides of the animal. Moreover, an accurate fluorescence reconstruction was achieved with MRI-derived anatomical guidance. The sensitivity of the FMT system was evaluated with a phantom showing that with long fibers, it was sufficient to detect 10nM Cy5.5 solution with ~28.5 dB in the phantom. The system was eventually used to image MMP activity involved in atherosclerosis with two ATX mice and two control mice. The reconstruction results were in agreement with ex vivo measurement.

  11. Self-prior strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography.

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    Zhou, Yuan; Chen, Maomao; Su, Han; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to propose a strategy for organ reconstruction in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) without prior information from other imaging modalities, and to overcome the high cost and ionizing radiation caused by the traditional structural prior strategy. The proposed strategy is designed as an iterative architecture to solve the inverse problem of FMT. In each iteration, a short time Fourier transform (STFT) based algorithm is used to extract the self-prior information in the space-frequency energy spectrum with the assumption that the regions with higher fluorescence concentration have larger energy intensity, then the cost function of the inverse problem is modified by the self-prior information, and lastly an iterative Laplacian regularization algorithm is conducted to solve the updated inverse problem and obtains the reconstruction results. Simulations and in vivo experiments on liver reconstruction are carried out to test the performance of the self-prior strategy on organ reconstruction. The organ reconstruction results obtained by the proposed self-prior strategy are closer to the ground truth than those obtained by the iterative Tikhonov regularization (ITKR) method (traditional non-prior strategy). Significant improvements are shown in the evaluation indexes of relative locational error (RLE), relative error (RE) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). The self-prior strategy improves the organ reconstruction results compared with the non-prior strategy and also overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional structural prior strategy. Various applications such as metabolic imaging and pharmacokinetic study can be aided by this strategy.

  12. Image reconstruction of fluorescent molecular tomography based on the tree structured Schur complement decomposition

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    Wang Jiajun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inverse problem of fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT often involves complex large-scale matrix operations, which may lead to unacceptable computational errors and complexity. In this research, a tree structured Schur complement decomposition strategy is proposed to accelerate the reconstruction process and reduce the computational complexity. Additionally, an adaptive regularization scheme is developed to improve the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Methods The global system is decomposed level by level with the Schur complement system along two paths in the tree structure. The resultant subsystems are solved in combination with the biconjugate gradient method. The mesh for the inverse problem is generated incorporating the prior information. During the reconstruction, the regularization parameters are adaptive not only to the spatial variations but also to the variations of the objective function to tackle the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Results Simulation results demonstrate that the strategy of the tree structured Schur complement decomposition obviously outperforms the previous methods, such as the conventional Conjugate-Gradient (CG and the Schur CG methods, in both reconstruction accuracy and speed. As compared with the Tikhonov regularization method, the adaptive regularization scheme can significantly improve ill-posedness of the inverse problem. Conclusions The methods proposed in this paper can significantly improve the reconstructed image quality of FMT and accelerate the reconstruction process.

  13. Direct reconstruction of pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography by the augmented Lagrangian method

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    Zhu, Dianwen; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Yue; Li, Changqing

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) has the potential to quantify physiological or biochemical information, known as pharmacokinetic parameters, which are important for cancer detection, drug development and delivery etc. To image those parameters, there are indirect methods, which are easier to implement but tend to provide images with low signal-to-noise ratio, and direct methods, which model all the measurement noises together and are statistically more efficient. The direct reconstruction methods in dynamic FMT have attracted a lot of attention recently. However, the coupling of tomographic image reconstruction and nonlinearity of kinetic parameter estimation due to the compartment modeling has imposed a huge computational burden to the direct reconstruction of the kinetic parameters. In this paper, we propose to take advantage of both the direct and indirect reconstruction ideas through a variable splitting strategy under the augmented Lagrangian framework. Each iteration of the direct reconstruction is split into two steps: the dynamic FMT image reconstruction and the node-wise nonlinear least squares fitting of the pharmacokinetic parameter images. Through numerical simulation studies, we have found that the proposed algorithm can achieve good reconstruction results within a small amount of time. This will be the first step for a combined dynamic PET and FMT imaging in the future.

  14. Effective and robust approach for fluorescence molecular tomography based on CoSaMP and SP3 model

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    Xiaowei He

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT allows the detection and quantification of various biological processes in small animals in vivo, which expands the horizons of pre-clinical research and drug development. Efficient three-dimensional (3D reconstruction algorithm is the key to accurate localization and quantification of fluorescent target in FMT. In this paper, 3D reconstruction of FMT is regarded as a sparse signal recovery problem and the compressive sampling matching pursuit (CoSaMP algorithm is adopted to obtain greedy recovery of fluorescent signals. Moreover, to reduce the modeling error, the simplified spherical harmonics approximation to the radiative transfer equation (RTE, more specifically SP3, is utilized to describe light propagation in biological tissues. The performance of the proposed reconstruction method is thoroughly evaluated by simulations on a 3D digital mouse model by comparing it with three representative greedy methods including orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP, stagewise OMP(StOMP, and regularized OMP (ROMP. The CoSaMP combined with SP3 shows an improvement in reconstruction accuracy and exhibits distinct advantages over the comparative algorithms in multiple targets resolving. Stability analysis suggests that CoSaMP is robust to noise and performs stably with reduction of measurements. The feasibility and reconstruction accuracy of the proposed method are further validated by phantom experimental data.

  15. Integrin-Targeted Hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography/X-ray Computed Tomography for Imaging Tumor Progression and Early Response in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

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    Ma, Xiaopeng; Phi Van, Valerie; Kimm, Melanie A; Prakash, Jaya; Kessler, Horst; Kosanke, Katja; Feuchtinger, Annette; Aichler, Michaela; Gupta, Aayush; Rummeny, Ernst J; Eisenblätter, Michel; Siveke, Jens; Walch, Axel K; Braren, Rickmer; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Wildgruber, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Integrins play an important role in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Therefore we aimed to evaluate a preclinical imaging approach applying ανβ3 integrin targeted hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography/X-ray Computed Tomography (FMT-XCT) for monitoring tumor progression as well as early therapy response in a syngeneic murine Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) model. Lewis Lung Carcinomas were grown orthotopically in C57BL/6 J mice and imaged in-vivo using a ανβ3 targeted near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) probe. ανβ3-targeted FMT-XCT was able to track tumor progression. Cilengitide was able to substantially block the binding of the NIRF probe and suppress the imaging signal. Additionally mice were treated with an established chemotherapy regimen of Cisplatin and Bevacizumab or with a novel MEK inhibitor (Refametinib) for 2 weeks. While μCT revealed only a moderate slowdown of tumor growth, ανβ3 dependent signal decreased significantly compared to non-treated mice already at one week post treatment. ανβ3 targeted imaging might therefore become a promising tool for assessment of early therapy response in the future. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 3D mouse shape reconstruction based on phase-shifting algorithm for fluorescence molecular tomography imaging system.

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    Zhao, Yue; Zhu, Dianwen; Baikejiang, Reheman; Li, Changqing

    2015-11-10

    This work introduces a fast, low-cost, robust method based on fringe pattern and phase shifting to obtain three-dimensional (3D) mouse surface geometry for fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) imaging. We used two pico projector/webcam pairs to project and capture fringe patterns from different views. We first calibrated the pico projectors and the webcams to obtain their system parameters. Each pico projector/webcam pair had its own coordinate system. We used a cylindrical calibration bar to calculate the transformation matrix between these two coordinate systems. After that, the pico projectors projected nine fringe patterns with a phase-shifting step of 2π/9 onto the surface of a mouse-shaped phantom. The deformed fringe patterns were captured by the corresponding webcam respectively, and then were used to construct two phase maps, which were further converted to two 3D surfaces composed of scattered points. The two 3D point clouds were further merged into one with the transformation matrix. The surface extraction process took less than 30 seconds. Finally, we applied the Digiwarp method to warp a standard Digimouse into the measured surface. The proposed method can reconstruct the surface of a mouse-sized object with an accuracy of 0.5 mm, which we believe is sufficient to obtain a finite element mesh for FMT imaging. We performed an FMT experiment using a mouse-shaped phantom with one embedded fluorescence capillary target. With the warped finite element mesh, we successfully reconstructed the target, which validated our surface extraction approach.

  17. Reconstruction algorithms based on l1-norm and l2-norm for two imaging models of fluorescence molecular tomography: a comparative study.

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    Yi, Huangjian; Chen, Duofang; Li, Wei; Zhu, Shouping; Wang, Xiaorui; Liang, Jimin; Tian, Jie

    2013-05-01

    Fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an important imaging technique of optical imaging. The major challenge of the reconstruction method for FMT is the ill-posed and underdetermined nature of the inverse problem. In past years, various regularization methods have been employed for fluorescence target reconstruction. A comparative study between the reconstruction algorithms based on l1-norm and l2-norm for two imaging models of FMT is presented. The first imaging model is adopted by most researchers, where the fluorescent target is of small size to mimic small tissue with fluorescent substance, as demonstrated by the early detection of a tumor. The second model is the reconstruction of distribution of the fluorescent substance in organs, which is essential to drug pharmacokinetics. Apart from numerical experiments, in vivo experiments were conducted on a dual-modality FMT/micro-computed tomography imaging system. The experimental results indicated that l1-norm regularization is more suitable for reconstructing the small fluorescent target, while l2-norm regularization performs better for the reconstruction of the distribution of fluorescent substance.

  18. Fluorescence Computed Tomography with Polychromatic Source Data

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    Miqueles, Eduardo; De Pierro, Alvaro R.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence computed tomography is a synchrotron imaging technique aiming at reconstructing the fluorescence emission within a sample object. For a polychromatic source hitting the object, the amount of fluorescence detected is defined by a linear equation. For the monochromatic case, the operator is a Generalized Attenuated Radon Transform (GART). The main goal is to reconstruct the density function, given the sinogram data and the weight function. An eficient iterative algorithm for the inversion of the GART was presented recently by the authors. This inversion can only be performed if the weight function is previously known, which means that μ = μ(·, epsilon) and λ are also known. For monochromatic XFCT (acronym for x-rays fluorescence computed tomography), the determination of λ is a dificult task, and we have considered the approximation λ ≈ μ, which is valid for low energies ranging from 3Kev to 10Kev. So, for solving our problem, the first step is to find μ given the polychromatic sinogram. There are different approaches for this in the literature. Recently, an elegant and efficient method for solving this problem was introduced, using a fixed point algorithm. Opposite to this, where μ(·, epsilon) needs to be computed for all epsilon in E, we claim that the integral of μ(·, epsilon) for all epsilon has a physical meaning and provides a good aproximation for the solution. Also we present fast algorithm for computations.

  19. Possible Radiation-Induced Damage to the Molecular Structure of Wooden Artifacts Due to Micro-Computed Tomography, Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence, and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic Techniques

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    Madalena Kozachuk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to ascertain whether radiation produced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, micro-computed tomography (μCT and/or portable handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF equipment might damage wood artifacts during analysis. Changes at the molecular level were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. No significant changes in FTIR spectra were observed as a result of μCT or handheld XRF analysis. No substantial changes in the collected FTIR spectra were observed when XPS analytical times on the order of minutes were used. However, XPS analysis collected over tens of hours did produce significant changes in the FTIR spectra.

  20. Multiple step algorithms for fluorescence -enhanced diffuse optical tomography; Algorithmes multi-etape pour la tomographie optique diffusive de fluorescence

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    Da Silva, A.; Planat-Chretien, A.; Dinten, J.M.; Gliere, A

    2004-07-01

    A discussion on recent works on diffusive inverse problems is presented with a special focus n three-dimensional shape-based imaging methods and their application to small animal imaging by fluorescence-enhanced Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT). Numerical approaches (Finite Element Method) for handling problems modelled by elliptic coupled PDEs is justified by the complexity of the geometry of the system but is known to be time-and memory-consuming. The use of an 'adjoint field technique' considerably speeds up the treatment and allows a full 3D resolution. Nevertheless, because of the ill-posing of the problem, the reconstruction scheme is sensitive to a priori knowledge on the parameters to be reconstructed. Multiple modality imaging techniques (DOT coupled with CT or MRI for example) is becoming of great interest for introducing a priori knowledge of the regions of interest (ROI) and justifies the use of shape-based methods that reduces the dimension of the system, by identifying a finite number of ROI (absorption, scattering and/or, in our case, fluorescent zones), and intrinsically regularizes the reconstruction of the desired parameters. This study led to the proposal of a multiple step, self regularized, reconstruction algorithm of the bio-distribution of molecular fluorescent probes specially designed for tumour targeting. We introduce the a priori knowledge of the ROI via a segmentation of the results performed with a first rough reconstruction of the fluorescent regions. The results are then refined along iterations of the segmentation/reconstruction scheme. Measurements were performed on calibrated objects (phantoms) as well as in vivo (nude mice) with a plane parallel plate tomographer using a CCD camera as a detection scheme. (authors)

  1. Multispectral guided fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles

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    Svenmarker, Pontus, E-mail: pontus.svenmarker@physics.umu.se [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Centre for Microbial Research (UCMR), Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Xu, Can T.; Liu, Haichun; Wu, Xia; Andersson-Engels, Stefan [Department of Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-02-17

    We report on improved image detectability for fluorescence diffuse optical tomography using upconverting nanoparticles doped with rare-earth elements. Core-shell NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@NaYF{sub 4} upconverting nanoparticles were synthesized through a stoichiometric method. The Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} sensitizer-activator pair yielded two anti-Stokes shifted fluorescence emission bands at 540 nm and 660 nm, here used to a priori estimate the fluorescence source depth with sub-millimeter precision. A spatially varying regularization incorporated the a priori fluorescence source depth estimation into the tomography reconstruction scheme. Tissue phantom experiments showed both an improved resolution and contrast in the reconstructed images as compared to not using any a priori information.

  2. Comprehensive phantom for interventional fluorescence molecular imaging.

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    Anastasopoulou, Maria; Koch, Maximilian; Gorpas, Dimitris; Karlas, Angelos; Klemm, Uwe; Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging has been considered for over a half-century as a modality that could assist surgical guidance and visualization. The administration of fluorescent molecules with sensitivity to disease biomarkers and their imaging using a fluorescence camera can outline pathophysiological parameters of tissue invisible to the human eye during operation. The advent of fluorescent agents that target specific cellular responses and molecular pathways of disease has facilitated the intraoperative identification of cancer with improved sensitivity and specificity over nonspecific fluorescent dyes that only outline the vascular system and enhanced permeability effects. With these new abilities come unique requirements for developing phantoms to calibrate imaging systems and algorithms. We briefly review herein progress with fluorescence phantoms employed to validate fluorescence imaging systems and results. We identify current limitations and discuss the level of phantom complexity that may be required for developing a universal strategy for fluorescence imaging calibration. Finally, we present a phantom design that could be used as a tool for interlaboratory system performance evaluation.

  3. Advances in tomography: probing the molecular architecture of cells.

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    Fridman, Karen; Mader, Asaf; Zwerger, Monika; Elia, Natalie; Medalia, Ohad

    2012-11-01

    Visualizing the dynamic molecular architecture of cells is instrumental for answering fundamental questions in cellular and structural biology. Although modern microscopy techniques, including fluorescence and conventional electron microscopy, have allowed us to gain insights into the molecular organization of cells, they are limited in their ability to visualize multicomponent complexes in their native environment. Cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) allows cells, and the macromolecular assemblies contained within, to be reconstructed in situ, at a resolution of 2-6 nm. By combining cryo-ET with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy approaches, it should be possible to localize proteins with high precision inside cells and so elucidate a more realistic view of cellular processes. Thus, cryo-ET may bridge the resolution gap between cellular and structural biology.

  4. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

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    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  5. Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine

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    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Rasmussen, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine. PMID:19021311

  6. Quantum process tomography by 2D fluorescence spectroscopy

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    Pachón, Leonardo A. [Grupo de Física Atómica y Molecular, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Marcus, Andrew H. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oregon Center for Optics, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403 (United States); Aspuru-Guzik, Alán [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Reconstruction of the dynamics (quantum process tomography) of the single-exciton manifold in energy transfer systems is proposed here on the basis of two-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (2D-FS) with phase-modulation. The quantum-process-tomography protocol introduced here benefits from, e.g., the sensitivity enhancement ascribed to 2D-FS. Although the isotropically averaged spectroscopic signals depend on the quantum yield parameter Γ of the doubly excited-exciton manifold, it is shown that the reconstruction of the dynamics is insensitive to this parameter. Applications to foundational and applied problems, as well as further extensions, are discussed.

  7. Depth-resolved imaging of colon tumor using optical coherence tomography and fluorescence laminar optical tomography (Conference Presentation)

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    Tang, Qinggong; Frank, Aaron; Wang, Jianting; Chen, Chao-wei; Jin, Lily; Lin, Jon; Chan, Joanne M.; Chen, Yu

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of neoplastic changes remains a critical challenge in clinical cancer diagnosis and treatment. Many cancers arise from epithelial layers such as those of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Current standard endoscopic technology is unable to detect those subsurface lesions. Since cancer development is associated with both morphological and molecular alterations, imaging technologies that can quantitative image tissue's morphological and molecular biomarkers and assess the depth extent of a lesion in real time, without the need for tissue excision, would be a major advance in GI cancer diagnostics and therapy. In this research, we investigated the feasibility of multi-modal optical imaging including high-resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) and depth-resolved high-sensitivity fluorescence laminar optical tomography (FLOT) for structural and molecular imaging. APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) mice model were imaged using OCT and FLOT and the correlated histopathological diagnosis was obtained. Quantitative structural (the scattering coefficient) and molecular imaging parameters (fluorescence intensity) from OCT and FLOT images were developed for multi-parametric analysis. This multi-modal imaging method has demonstrated the feasibility for more accurate diagnosis with 87.4% (87.3%) for sensitivity (specificity) which gives the most optimal diagnosis (the largest area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve). This project results in a new non-invasive multi-modal imaging platform for improved GI cancer detection, which is expected to have a major impact on detection, diagnosis, and characterization of GI cancers, as well as a wide range of epithelial cancers.

  8. Weighted filtered backprojection for quantitative fluorescence optical projection tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrell, A; Marias, K [BMI Laboratory, Institute of Computer Science, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, PO Box 1385, GR 711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Meyer, H; Ripoll, J [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, Vassilika Vouton, PO Box 1385, GR 711 10 Heraklion (Greece); Brady, M [Medical Vision Laboratory, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-21

    Reconstructing images from a set of fluorescence optical projection tomography (OPT) projections is a relatively new problem. Several physical aspects of fluorescence OPT necessitate a different treatment of the inverse problem to that required for non-fluorescence tomography. Given a fluorophore within the depth of field of the imaging system, the power received by the optical system, and therefore the CCD detector, is related to the distance of the fluorophore from the objective entrance pupil. Additionally, due to the slight blurring of images of sources positioned off the focal plane, the CCD image of a fluorophore off the focal plane is lower in intensity than the CCD image of an identical fluorophore positioned on the focal plane. The filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not take these effects into account and so cannot be expected to yield truly quantitative results. A full model of image formation is introduced which takes into account the effects of isotropic emission and defocus. The model is used to obtain a weighting function which is used in a variation of the FBP algorithm called weighted filtered backprojection (WFBP). This new algorithm is tested with simulated data and with experimental data from a phantom consisting of fluorescent microspheres embedded in an agarose gel.

  9. Joint reconstruction of x-ray fluorescence and transmission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zichao Wendy; Chen, Si; Hong, Young Pyo; Jacobsen, Chris; Leyffer, Sven; Wild, Stefan M

    2017-06-12

    X-ray fluorescence tomography is based on the detection of fluorescence x-ray photons produced following x-ray absorption while a specimen is rotated; it provides information on the 3D distribution of selected elements within a sample. One limitation in the quality of sample recovery is the separation of elemental signals due to the finite energy resolution of the detector. Another limitation is the effect of self-absorption, which can lead to inaccurate results with dense samples. To recover a higher quality elemental map, we combine x-ray fluorescence detection with a second data modality: conventional x-ray transmission tomography using absorption. By using these combined signals in a nonlinear optimization-based approach, we demonstrate the benefit of our algorithm on real experimental data and obtain an improved quantitative reconstruction of the spatial distribution of dominant elements in the sample. Compared with single-modality inversion based on x-ray fluorescence alone, this joint inversion approach reduces ill-posedness and should result in improved elemental quantification and better correction of self-absorption.

  10. Frequency domain fluorescence diffuse tomography of small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Anna G.; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Plehanov, Vladimir I.; Balalaeva, Irina V.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina A.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kleshnin, Michail S.

    2007-05-01

    Fluorescent compounds for selective cancer cell marking are used for development of novel medical diagnostic methods, investigation of the influence of external factors on tumor growth, regress and metastasis. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffusion tomography permit noninvasive monitoring of fluorescent-labeled tumor alterations deep in animal tissue. In this work, the results of preliminary experiments utilizing frequency-domain fluorescent diffusion tomography (FD FDT) experimental setup in small animal are presented. Low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm was used in the setup. The transilluminative planar configuration was used in the setup. A series of model experiments has been conducted and show good agreement between theoretical and experimental fluorescence intensity. Models of deep tumors were created by two methods: (1) glass capsules containing fluorophore solution were inserted into esophagus of small animals to simulate marked tumors; (2) a suspension of transfected HEΚ293-Turbo-RFP cells was subcutaneously injected to small animal. The conducted experiments have shown that FD FDT allows one to detect the presence of labeled tumor cells in small animals, to determine the volume of an experimental tumor, to perform 3D tumor reconstruction, as well as to conduct monitoring investigations. The obtained results demonstrate the potential capability of the FD FDT method for noninvasive whole-body imaging in cancer studies, diagnostics and therapy.

  11. Fluorescence based molecular in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents a modern research area that allows the in vivo study of molecular biological process kinetics using appropriate probes and visualization methods. This methodology may be defined- apart from the contrast media injection - as non-abrasive. In order to reach an in vivo molecular process imaging as accurate as possible the effects of the used probes on the biological should not be too large. The contrast media as important part of the molecular imaging can significantly contribute to the understanding of molecular processes and to the development of tailored diagnostics and therapy. Since more than 15 years PTB is developing optic imaging systems that may be used for fluorescence based visualization of tissue phantoms, small animal models and the localization of tumors and their predecessors, and for the early recognition of inflammatory processes in clinical trials. Cellular changes occur during many diseases, thus the molecular imaging might be of importance for the early diagnosis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Fluorescent dyes can be used as unspecific or also as specific contrast media, which allow enhanced detection sensitivity

  12. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references.

  13. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieman, F.J.

    1979-10-01

    An experimental apparatus for obtaining the optical spectra of molecular ions is described. The experimental technique includes the use of three dimensional ion trapping, laser induced fluorescence, and gated photon counting methods. The ions, which are produced by electron impact, are confined in a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap of cylindrical design. Because the quadrupole ion trap allows mass selection of the molecular ion desired for study, the analysis of the spectra obtained is greatly simplified. The ion trap also confines the ions to a region easily probed by a laser beam. 18 references

  14. In vivo quantification of fluorescent molecular markers in real-time by ratio Imaging for diagnostic screening and image-guided surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, A.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wilson, B. C.; Lilge, L.

    2007-01-01

    Future applications of "molecular diagnostic screening" and "molecular image-guided surgery" will demand images of molecular markers with high resolution and high throughput (similar to >= 30 frames/second). MRI, SPECT, PET, optical fluorescence tomography, hyper-spectral fluorescence imaging, and

  15. Molecular cytogenetics using fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, J.W.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Lucas, J.; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H-U.; Yu, Loh-Chung.

    1990-12-07

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific probes enables several new areas of cytogenetic investigation by allowing visual determination of the presence and normality of specific genetic sequences in single metaphase or interphase cells. in this approach, termed molecular cytogenetics, the genetic loci to be analyzed are made microscopically visible in single cells using in situ hybridization with nucleic acid probes specific to these loci. To accomplish this, the DNA in the target cells is made single stranded by thermal denaturation and incubated with single-stranded, chemically modified probe under conditions where the probe will anneal only with DNA sequences to which it has high DNA sequence homology. The bound probe is then made visible by treatment with a fluorescent reagent such as fluorescein that binds to the chemical modification carried by the probe. The DNA to which the probe does not bind is made visible by staining with a dye such as propidium iodide that fluoresces at a wavelength different from that of the reagent used for probe visualization. We show in this report that probes are now available that make this technique useful for biological dosimetry, prenatal diagnosis and cancer biology. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winn, J.S.

    1980-10-01

    Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions

  17. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations.

  18. Polarization of fluorescence: a probe of molecular autoionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroi, G.E.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Poliakoff, E.D.

    1983-01-01

    The polarization of fluorescence from excited-state molecular photoions provides a direct probe of the photoionization dynamics and the symmetry signatures of autoionizing resonances. Measurements on CO 2 and CS 2 are presented as examples

  19. Three-dimensional in vivo fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlu, Alper; Choe, Regine; Durduran, Turgut; Rosen, Mark A.; Schweiger, Martin; Arridge, Simon R.; Schnall, Mitchell D.; Yodh, Arjun G.

    2007-05-01

    We present three-dimensional (3D) in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT). To our knowledge, this work represents the first reported 3D fluorescence tomography of human breast cancer in vivo. In our protocol, the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously. Fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Phantom and in vivo studies confirm the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. Fluorescence images of breast tumors were in good agreement with those of MRI, and with DOT based on endogenous contrast. Tumorto- normal tissue contrast based on ICG fluorescence was two-to-four-fold higher than contrast based on hemoglobin and scattering parameters. In total the measurements demonstrate that FDOT of breast cancer is feasible and promising.

  20. Molecular Iodine Fluorescence Using a Green Helium-Neon Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J. Charles

    2011-01-01

    Excitation of molecular iodine vapor with a green (543.4 nm) helium-neon laser produces a fluorescence spectrum that is well suited for the upper-level undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory. Application of standard evaluation techniques to the spectrum yields ground electronic-state molecular parameters in good agreement with literature…

  1. Frequency domain diffuse fluorescence tomography for detection of deep lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netz, Uwe J.; Gersonde, Ingo; Toelsner, Jan; Illing, Gerd

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we present two-dimensional phantom measurements of fluorescence light distribution in the frequency domain and reconstruction of three-dimensional fluorophore distribution. An experimental set-up was built up with two dimensional laser scanning, intensity modulation with frequencies up to 1 GHz, and two-dimensional imaging of modulated fluorescence light. Stable phantoms were developed simulating mammary tissue to perform measurements in a backscattering geometry for a variety of cylindrical fluorescence sources with different diameters, fluorophore concentrations, and surface distances at different modulation frequencies. At first calculated fluorescence light distributions from Monte-Carlo simulations was compared to measured data. In a second step from tomographic data sets of calculated fluorescent light, three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of fluorophore distribution were performed. Finally three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of fluorophore distribution were performed from tomographic fluorescence measurements. We found good concurrence between measured and calculated fluorescence distribution. Synthetic and real tomographic reconstruction showed good localization but underestimated the depth of fluorophore distribution.

  2. Highly Selective Fluorescent Sensing of Proteins Based on a Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Nanosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescent molecularly imprinted nanosensor was obtained by grafting imprinted polymer onto the surface of multi-wall carbon nanotubes and post-imprinting treatment with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC. The fluorescence of lysozyme-imprinted polymer (Lys-MIP was quenched more strongly by Lys than that of nonimprinted polymer (NIP, which indicated that the Lys-MIP could recognize Lys. The resulted imprinted material has the ability to selectively sense a target protein, and an imprinting factor of 3.34 was achieved. The Lys-MIP also showed selective detection for Lys among other proteins such as cytochrome C (Cyt C, hemoglobin (HB and bovine serum albumin (BSA due to the imprinted sites in the Lys-MIP. This approach combines the high selectivity of surface molecular imprinting technology and fluorescence, and converts binding events into detectable signals by monitoring fluorescence spectra. Therefore, it will have further applications for Lys sensing.

  3. Gold nanoparticle cluster-plasmon-enhanced fluorescent silica core-shell nanoparticles for X-ray computed tomography-fluorescence dual-mode imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Nakamura, Michihiro; Miki, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Shuji; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2013-06-11

    Owing to the surface plasmon resonance-enhanced electromagnetic field, clustered gold nanoparticles-fluorescent silica core-shell nanoparticles became excited within the therapeutic window and fluoresced strongly in this window. The nanoparticles enabled tumor detection using fluorescence imaging and X-ray computed tomography.

  4. Exploiting Molecular Biology by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Francis; Fattinger, Christof

    Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal fluorophore. With fluorescence lifetimes in the microsecond range and fluorescence quantum yield of 0.4 some water soluble complexes of Ruthenium like modified Ru(sulfobathophenanthroline) complexes fulfill these properties. They are outstanding fluorescent labels for ultrasensitive assays as illustrated in two examples, in drug discovery and in point of care testing.We discuss the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of the most sensitive time-gated fluorescence assays. We reflect on how the imaging devices currently employed for readout of these assays might evolve in the future. Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal

  5. White light-informed optical properties improve ultrasound-guided fluorescence tomography of photoactive protoporphyrin IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brendan P.; DSouza, Alisha V.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Davis, Scott C.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-04-01

    Subsurface fluorescence imaging is desirable for medical applications, including protoporphyrin-IX (PpIX)-based skin tumor diagnosis, surgical guidance, and dosimetry in photodynamic therapy. While tissue optical properties and heterogeneities make true subsurface fluorescence mapping an ill-posed problem, ultrasound-guided fluorescence-tomography (USFT) provides regional fluorescence mapping. Here USFT is implemented with spectroscopic decoupling of fluorescence signals (auto-fluorescence, PpIX, photoproducts), and white light spectroscopy-determined bulk optical properties. Segmented US images provide a priori spatial information for fluorescence reconstruction using region-based, diffuse FT. The method was tested in simulations, tissue homogeneous and inclusion phantoms, and an injected-inclusion animal model. Reconstructed fluorescence yield was linear with PpIX concentration, including the lowest concentration used, 0.025 μg/ml. White light spectroscopy informed optical properties, which improved fluorescence reconstruction accuracy compared to the use of fixed, literature-based optical properties, reduced reconstruction error and reconstructed fluorescence standard deviation by factors of 8.9 and 2.0, respectively. Recovered contrast-to-background error was 25% and 74% for inclusion phantoms without and with a 2-mm skin-like layer, respectively. Preliminary mouse-model imaging demonstrated system feasibility for subsurface fluorescence measurement in vivo. These data suggest that this implementation of USFT is capable of regional PpIX mapping in human skin tumors during photodynamic therapy, to be used in dosimetric evaluations.

  6. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouizi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  7. Protein recognition by a pattern-generating fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pode, Zohar; Peri-Naor, Ronny; Georgeson, Joseph M.; Ilani, Tal; Kiss, Vladimir; Unger, Tamar; Markus, Barak; Barr, Haim M.; Motiei, Leila; Margulies, David

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescent molecular probes have become valuable tools in protein research; however, the current methods for using these probes are less suitable for analysing specific populations of proteins in their native environment. In this study, we address this gap by developing a unimolecular fluorescent probe that combines the properties of small-molecule-based probes and cross-reactive sensor arrays (the so-called chemical 'noses/tongues'). On the one hand, the probe can detect different proteins by generating unique identification (ID) patterns, akin to cross-reactive arrays. On the other hand, its unimolecular scaffold and selective binding enable this ID-generating probe to identify combinations of specific protein families within complex mixtures and to discriminate among isoforms in living cells, where macroscopic arrays cannot access. The ability to recycle the molecular device and use it to track several binding interactions simultaneously further demonstrates how this approach could expand the fluorescent toolbox currently used to detect and image proteins.

  8. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  9. Review of X-ray Tomography and X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shear, Trevor A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-16

    This literature review will focus on both laboratory and synchrotron based X-ray tomography of materials and highlight the inner workings of these instruments. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy will also be reviewed and applications of the tandem use of these techniques will be explored. The real world application of these techniques during the internship will also be discussed.

  10. Enhancing early bladder cancer detection with fluorescence-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. T.; Xie, T. Q.; Du, C. W.; Bastacky, S.; Meyers, S.; Zeidel, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    We report an experimental study of the possibility of enhancing early bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). After the intravesical instillation of a 10% solution of 5-aminolevulinic acid, simultaneous fluorescence imaging (excitation of 380-420 nm, emission of 620-700 nm) and OCT are performed on rat bladders to identify the photochemical and morphological changes associated with uroepithelial tumorigenesis. The preliminary results of our ex vivo study reveal that both fluorescence and OCT can identify early uroepithelial cancers, and OCT can detect precancerous lesions (e.g., hyperplasia) that fluorescence may miss. This suggests that a cystoscope combining 5-aminolevulinic acid fluorescence and OCT imaging has the potential to enhance the efficiency and sensitivity of early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  11. Time reversal optical tomography locates fluorescent targets in a turbid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binlin; Cai, W.; Gayen, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    A fluorescence optical tomography approach that extends time reversal optical tomography (TROT) to locate fluorescent targets embedded in a turbid medium is introduced. It uses a multi-source illumination and multi-detector signal acquisition scheme, along with TR matrix formalism, and multiple signal classification (MUSIC) to construct pseudo-image of the targets. The samples consisted of a single or two small tubes filled with water solution of Indocyanine Green (ICG) dye as targets embedded in a 250 mm × 250 mm × 60 mm rectangular cell filled with Intralipid-20% suspension as the scattering medium. The ICG concentration was 1μM, and the Intralipid-20% concentration was adjusted to provide ~ 1-mm transport length for both excitation wavelength of 790 nm and fluorescence wavelength around 825 nm. The data matrix was constructed using the diffusely transmitted fluorescence signals for all scan positions, and the TR matrix was constructed by multiplying data matrix with its transpose. A pseudo spectrum was calculated using the signal subspace of the TR matrix. Tomographic images were generated using the pseudo spectrum. The peaks in the pseudo images provided locations of the target(s) with sub-millimeter accuracy. Concurrent transmission TROT measurements corroborated fluorescence-TROT findings. The results demonstrate that TROT is a fast approach that can be used to obtain accurate three-dimensional position information of fluorescence targets embedded deep inside a highly scattering medium, such as, a contrast-enhanced tumor in a human breast.

  12. Sensitivity and accuracy of hybrid fluorescence-mediated tomography in deep tissue regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhain, Stefanie; Al Rawashdeh, Wa'el; Kiessling, Fabian; Gremse, Felix

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) enables noninvasive assessment of the three-dimensional distribution of near-infrared fluorescence in mice. The combination with micro-computed tomography (µCT) provides anatomical data, enabling improved fluorescence reconstruction and image analysis. The aim of our study was to assess sensitivity and accuracy of µCT-FMT under realistic in vivo conditions in deeply-seated regions. Accordingly, we acquired fluorescence reflectance images (FRI) and µCT-FMT scans of mice which were prepared with rectal insertions with different amounts of fluorescent dye. Default and high-sensitivity scans were acquired and background signal was analyzed for three FMT channels (670 nm, 745 nm, and 790 nm). Analysis was performed for the original and an improved FMT reconstruction using the µCT data. While FRI and the original FMT reconstruction could detect 100 pmol, the improved FMT reconstruction could detect 10 pmol and significantly improved signal localization. By using a finer sampling grid and increasing the exposure time, the sensitivity could be further improved to detect 0.5 pmol. Background signal was highest in the 670 nm channel and most prominent in the gastro-intestinal tract and in organs with high relative amounts of blood. In conclusion, we show that µCT-FMT allows sensitive and accurate assessment of fluorescence in deep tissue regions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Environment-sensitive behavior of fluorescent molecular rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodorakis Emmanuel A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular rotors are a group of fluorescent molecules that form twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT states upon photoexcitation. When intramolecular twisting occurs, the molecular rotor returns to the ground state either by emission of a red-shifted emission band or by nonradiative relaxation. The emission properties are strongly solvent-dependent, and the solvent viscosity is the primary determinant of the fluorescent quantum yield from the planar (non-twisted conformation. This viscosity-sensitive behavior gives rise to applications in, for example, fluid mechanics, polymer chemistry, cell physiology, and the food sciences. However, the relationship between bulk viscosity and the molecular-scale interaction of a molecular rotor with its environment are not fully understood. This review presents the pertinent theories of the rotor-solvent interaction on the molecular level and how this interaction leads to the viscosity-sensitive behavior. Furthermore, current applications of molecular rotors as microviscosity sensors are reviewed, and engineering aspects are presented on how measurement accuracy and precision can be improved.

  14. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Miyata

    Full Text Available Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10 under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases, photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical

  15. Molecular engineering and fluorescence for the detection of toxic cations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souchon, V.

    2007-11-01

    This work is a part of the 'Toxicologie Nucleaire Environnementale' program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb 2+ , Cd 2+ and Cs + in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used in experimental conditions close to biological media and new target compounds with amide functional groups were proposed. Many approaches were considered for the design of selective fluorescent sensors for cadmium. On the basis of literature results, many chelating compounds incorporating sulfur atoms were synthesized but showed no significant affinity towards cadmium. On the opposite, compounds functionalized with several pyridine-2'-yl-1,2,3-triazol fluorescent moieties linked to a β-cyclodextrin or a calix[4]arene showed good affinity for cadmium in methanol, but the selectivity was found to be insufficient. In contrast, very satisfying results in terms of both selectivity and sensitivity could be obtained with the commercial calcium sensor Rhod-5N in an aqueous medium at neutral pH. Lastly, micromolar detection limits for the selective detection of caesium were reached in an aqueous medium at neutral pH thanks to a new sulfonated fluorescent calixarene with two appended crown-ethers. An original complexation mechanism was proposed and validated by molecular modelling (DFT). (author)

  16. Fluorescence excitation studies of molecular photoionization in external electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Dehmer, J.L.; Parr, A.C.; Leroi, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Using molecular nitrogen as an example, we show that fluorescence excitation spectroscopy can be used to measure partial photoionization cross sections of free molecules in external electric fields. The production of the N 2 + (B 2 Σ/sub u/ + ) state was studied and the threshold for this process was found to shift linearly with the square root of the applied field. This behavior is compared with the hydrogenic case and with previously studied systems

  17. Object localization in the presence of a strong heterogeneous background in fluorescent tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Eftekhar, Ali A; Adibi, Ali

    2008-06-01

    We propose a method for object localization in fluorescent tomography (FT) in the presence of a highly heterogeneous background. Existing approaches typically assume a homogeneous background distribution; thus, they are incapable of accurately accounting for the more general case of an unconstrained, possibly heterogeneous, background. The proposed method iteratively solves the inverse problem over a solution space partitioned into a background subspace and an object subspace to simultaneously estimate the background and localize the target fluorescent objects. Simulation results of this algorithm applied to continuous-wave FT demonstrate effective localization of target objects in the presence of highly heterogeneous background distributions.

  18. A tumor-targeted polymer theranostics platform for positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koziolová, Eva; Goel, S.; Chytil, Petr; Janoušková, Olga; Barnhart, T. E.; Cai, W.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 30 (2017), s. 10906-10918 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers * positron emission tomography ( PET ) * fluorescence imaging Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  19. Imaging multimodalities for dissecting Alzheimer’s disease: advanced technologies of positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi eShimojo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations.

  20. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhalkar, H S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oliver, T [Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cao, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oldham, M [Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2007-04-21

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate

  1. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  2. Counting constituents in molecular complexes by fluorescence photon antibunching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fore, S; Laurence, T; Hollars, C; Huser, T

    2007-04-17

    Modern single molecule fluorescence microscopy offers new, highly quantitative ways of studying the systems biology of cells while keeping the cells healthy and alive in their natural environment. In this context, a quantum optical technique, photon antibunching, has found a small niche in the continuously growing applications of single molecule techniques to small molecular complexes. Here, we review some of the most recent applications of photon antibunching in biophotonics, and we provide a guide for how to conduct photon antibunching experiments at the single molecule level by applying techniques borrowed from time-correlated single photon counting. We provide a number of new examples for applications of photon antibunching to the study of multichromophoric molecules and small molecular complexes.

  3. Chemical point detection using differential fluorescence from molecularly imprinted polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestov, Dmitry; Anderson, John E.; Nelson, Jean; Tepper, Gary C.

    2004-12-01

    Fluorescence represents one of the most attractive approaches for chemical sensing due to the abundant light produced by most fluorophores, resulting in excellent detection sensitivity. However, the broad and overlapping emission spectra of target and background species have made it difficult to perform species identification in a field instrument because of the need to perform spectral decomposition and analysis. This paper describes a new chemical sensing strategy based on differential fluorescence measurements from molecularly imprinted polymers, which eliminates the need to perform any spectral analysis. Species identification is accomplished by measuring the differential light output from a pair of polymers-one imprinted to a target species and the other identical, but not imprinted. The imprinted polymer selectively concentrates the target molecule and controls the energy (wavelength) of the emitted fluorescence signal and the differential output eliminates common mode signals associated with non-specific background interference. Because no spectral analysis is required, the sensors can be made extremely small and require very little power. Preliminary performance parameters from a prototype sensor are presented and discussed.

  4. Free-space fluorescence tomography with adaptive sampling based on anatomical information from microCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Badea, Cristian T.; Hood, Greg; Wetzel, Arthur W.; Stiles, Joel R.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2010-02-01

    Image reconstruction is one of the main challenges for fluorescence tomography. For in vivo experiments on small animals, in particular, the inhomogeneous optical properties and irregular surface of the animal make free-space image reconstruction challenging because of the difficulties in accurately modeling the forward problem and the finite dynamic range of the photodetector. These two factors are fundamentally limited by the currently available forward models and photonic technologies. Nonetheless, both limitations can be significantly eased using a signal processing approach. We have recently constructed a free-space panoramic fluorescence diffuse optical tomography system to take advantage of co-registered microCT data acquired from the same animal. In this article, we present a data processing strategy that adaptively selects the optical sampling points in the raw 2-D fluorescent CCD images. Specifically, the general sampling area and sampling density are initially specified to create a set of potential sampling points sufficient to cover the region of interest. Based on 3-D anatomical information from the microCT and the fluorescent CCD images, data points are excluded from the set when they are located in an area where either the forward model is known to be problematic (e.g., large wrinkles on the skin) or where the signal is unreliable (e.g., saturated or low signal-to-noise ratio). Parallel Monte Carlo software was implemented to compute the sensitivity function for image reconstruction. Animal experiments were conducted on a mouse cadaver with an artificial fluorescent inclusion. Compared to our previous results using a finite element method, the newly developed parallel Monte Carlo software and the adaptive sampling strategy produced favorable reconstruction results.

  5. [Nondestructive imaging of elements distribution in biomedical samples by X-ray fluorescence computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qun; Deng, Biao; Lü, Wei-Wei; Du, Guo-Hao; Yan, Fu-Hua; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Xu, Hong-Jie

    2011-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography is a stimulated emission tomography that allows nondestructive reconstruction of the elements distribution in the sample, which is important for biomedical investigations. Owing to the high flux density and easy energy tunability of highly collimated synchrotron X-rays, it is possible to apply X-ray fluorescence CT to biomedical samples. Reported in the present paper, an X-ray fluorescence CT system was established at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility for the investigations of trace elements distribution inside biomedical samples. By optimizing the experiment setup, the spatial resolution was improved and the data acquisition process was obviously speeded up. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was introduced for the image reconstruction, which remarkably improved the imaging accuracy of element distributions. The developed system was verified by the test sample and medical sample respectively. The results showed that the distribution of interested elements could be imaged correctly, and the spatial resolution of 150 m was achieved. In conclusion, the developed system could be applied to the research on large-size biomedical samples, concerning imaging accuracy, spatial resolution and data collection time.

  6. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum. © 2014 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  8. Multiscale Humidity Visualization by Environmentally Sensitive Fluorescent Molecular Rotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanhua; Wang, Jianguo; Qiu, Zijie; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Leung, Nelson L C; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2017-12-01

    Building humidity sensors possessing the features of diverse-configuration compatibility, and capability of measurement of spatial and temporal humidity gradients is of great interest for highly integrated electronics and wearable monitoring systems. Herein, a visual sensing approach based on fluorescent imaging is presented, by assembling aggregation-induced-emission (AIE)-active molecular rotors into a moisture-captured network; the resulting AIE humidity sensors are compatible with diverse applications, having tunable geometries and desirable architectures. The invisible information of relative humidity (RH) is transformed into different fluorescence colors that enable direct observation by the naked eyes based on the twisted intramolecular charge-transfer effect of the AIE-active molecular rotors. The resulting AIE humidity sensors show excellent performance in terms of good sensitivity, precise quantitative measurement, high spatial-temporal resolution, and fast response/recovery time. Their multiscale applications, such as regional environmental RH detection, internal humidity mapping, and sensitive human-body humidity sensing are demonstrated. The proposed humidity visualization strategy may provide a new insight to develop humidity sensors for various applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Application of a wavelet-Galerkin method to the forward problem resolution in fluorescence diffuse optical tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landragin-Frassati, Anne; Bonnet, Stéphane; Da Silva, Anabela; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Georges, Didier

    2009-10-12

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography is a powerful tool for the investigation of molecular events in studies for new therapeutic developments. Here, the emphasis is put on the mathematical problem of tomography, which can be formulated in terms of an estimation of physical parameters appearing as a set of Partial Differential Equations (PDEs). The standard polynomial Finite Element Method (FEM) is a method of choice to solve the diffusion equation because it has no restriction in terms of neither the geometry nor the homogeneity of the system, but it is time consuming. In order to speed up computation time, this paper proposes an alternative numerical model, describing the diffusion operator in orthonormal basis of compactly supported wavelets. The discretization of the PDEs yields to matrices which are easily computed from derivative wavelet product integrals. Due to the shape of the wavelet basis, the studied domain is included in a regular fictitious domain. A validation study and a comparison with the standard FEM are conducted on synthetic data.

  10. Characterization of novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents for in vivo photoacoustic tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoui, Samir

    Photoacoustic tomography is a hybrid imaging modality that takes advantage of the high contrast of pure optical imaging and the high intrinsic resolution of ultrasound without the necessity of ionizing radiation. Photoacoustic imaging (PM) is neither purely optical nor purely acoustical in nature, but a combination of the two. It is fundamentally based on light excitation and ultrasonic detection. Photoacoustic imaging has been successful without the introduction of exogenous contrast agents; however, to image deeper regions of biological tissue, a contrast agent is necessary. Several types of photoacoustic contrast agents have been made available for diagnostic purposes; however, the majority of literature has focused on gold nanoparticle systems for which the surface-plasmon resonance effect is important. The only option currently available for molecular PM contrast agents is to choose an existing near infrared absorbing fluorescent probes with the hope that they may generate a substantial photoacoustic (PA) response. However, these dyes have been designed with an optimized fluorescence emission response and are not anticipated to generate an adequate photoacoustic response. This dissertation addresses this lack of precedence in the literature for understanding the mechanism of a photoacoustic signal generation from strongly absorbing dye molecules including BODIPY, cyanine and curcumin systems. This work represents preliminary efforts in bringing novel molecular photoacoustic contrast agents (MPACs) into the photoacoustic imaging arena. To this end, photoacoustic and optical Z-scan experiments, and quenching studies were employed to demonstrate correlation of photoacoustic emission enhancement with excited state absorption mechanisms. To investigate further the photoacoustic emission in a practical imaging setting, MPACs were imaged using a recently developed photoacoustic imaging tomography system which was constructed exclusively for the purpose of this study.

  11. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Second-Generation Triple Reporter for Bioluminescence, Micro–Positron Emission Tomography, and Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna H. Kesarwala

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence, positron emission tomography (PET, and fluorescence modalities are currently available for noninvasive imaging in vivo, each with its own merits. To exploit the combined strengths of each and facilitate multimodality imaging, we engineered a dual-reporter construct in which firefly luciferase (FLuc and a 12–amino acid nonstructural linker were fused in frame to the N-terminus of a mutant herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (mNLS-SR39TK kinetically enhanced for positron emission tomography (PET. Furthermore, a triple-reporter construct was developed in which monster green fluorescent protein (MGFP, a recently available enhanced fluorescent protein, was introduced into the fusion vector downstream of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES to allow analysis by fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry without compromising the specific activities of the upstream fusion components. FLuc bioluminescence was measured with a cooled charge-coupled device camera and mNLS-SR39TK activity by 9-[4-[18F]fluoro-3-(hydroxymethyl butyl guanine (18F-FHBG microPET or 3H-penciclovir net accumulation. Importantly, HeLa cells transiently transfected with the FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK-IRES-MGFP triple reporter retained the same specific activities of the FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK heteroenzyme and the individual unfused enzymes with no change in protein half-lives. The presence of the IRES-MGFP modestly decreased upstream heteroprotein expression. In living mice, somatic gene transfer of a ubiquitin promoter-driven FLuc-mNLS-SR39TK-IRES-MGFP plasmid showed a > 1,000-fold increase in liver photon flux and a > 2-fold increase in liver retention of 18F-FHBG by microPET compared with mice treated with control plasmid. Multifocal hepatocellular fluorescence was readily observed by standard confocal microscopy. This second-generation triple reporter incorporating enhanced components enables bioluminescence, PET, and fluorescence imaging of cells and living animals.

  13. Singular value decomposition metrics show limitations of detector design in diffuse fluorescence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblond, Frederic; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Pogue, Brian W

    2010-11-29

    The spatial resolution and recovered contrast of images reconstructed from diffuse fluorescence tomography data are limited by the high scattering properties of light propagation in biological tissue. As a result, the image reconstruction process can be exceedingly vulnerable to inaccurate prior knowledge of tissue optical properties and stochastic noise. In light of these limitations, the optimal source-detector geometry for a fluorescence tomography system is non-trivial, requiring analytical methods to guide design. Analysis of the singular value decomposition of the matrix to be inverted for image reconstruction is one potential approach, providing key quantitative metrics, such as singular image mode spatial resolution and singular data mode frequency as a function of singular mode. In the present study, these metrics are used to analyze the effects of different sources of noise and model errors as related to image quality in the form of spatial resolution and contrast recovery. The image quality is demonstrated to be inherently noise-limited even when detection geometries were increased in complexity to allow maximal tissue sampling, suggesting that detection noise characteristics outweigh detection geometry for achieving optimal reconstructions.

  14. Lq -Lp optimization for multigrid fluorescence tomography of small animals using simplified spherical harmonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edjlali, Ehsan; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2018-01-01

    We present the first Lq -Lp optimization scheme for fluorescence tomographic imaging. This is then applied to small animal imaging. Fluorescence tomography is an ill-posed, and in full generality, a nonlinear problem that seeks to image the 3D concentration distribution of a fluorescent agent inside a biological tissue. Standard candidates for regularization to deal with the ill-posedness of the image reconstruction problem include L1 and L2 regularization. In this work, a general Lq -Lp regularization framework (Lq discrepancy function - Lp regularization term) is introduced for fluorescence tomographic imaging. A method to calculate the gradient for this general framework is developed which allows evaluating the performance of different cost functions/regularization schemes in solving the fluorescence tomographic problem. The simplified spherical harmonics approximation is used to accurately model light propagation inside the tissue. Furthermore, a multigrid mesh is utilized to decrease the dimension of the inverse problem and reduce the computational cost of the solution. The inverse problem is solved iteratively using an lm-BFGS quasi-Newton optimization method. The simulations are performed under different scenarios of noisy measurements. These are carried out on the Digimouse numerical mouse model with the kidney being the target organ. The evaluation of the reconstructed images is performed both qualitatively and quantitatively using several metrics including QR, RMSE, CNR, and TVE under rigorous conditions. The best reconstruction results under different scenarios are obtained with an L1.5 -L1 scheme with premature termination of the optimization process. This is in contrast to approaches commonly found in the literature relying on L2 -L2 schemes.

  15. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  16. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography: benefits of using the time-resolved modality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducros, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography enables the three-dimensional reconstruction of fluorescence markers injected within a biological tissue, with light in the near infrared range. The simple continuous modality uses steady excitation light and operates from the measurements at different positions of the attenuation of the incident beam. This technique is low-cost, non-ionizing, and easy to handle, but subject to low resolution for thick tissues due to diffusion. Hopefully, the time-resolved modality, which provides the time of flight of any detected photon, could overcome this limitation and pave the way to clinical applications. This thesis aims at determining the best way to exploit the time resolved information and at quantifying the advantages of this modality over the standard continuous wave one. Model deviations must be carefully limited when ill-posed problems as fluorescence diffuse optical tomography are considered. As a result, we have first addressed the modelling part of the problem. We have shown that the photons density models to good approximation the measurable quantity that is the quantity measured by an actual acquisition set-up. Then, the moment-based reconstruction scheme has been thoroughly evaluated by means of a theoretical analysis of the moments properties. It was found that the moment-based approach requires high photon counts to be profitable compared to the continuous wave modality. Last, a novel wavelet-based approach, which enables an improved reconstruction quality, has been introduced. This approach has shown good ability to exploit the temporal information at lower photon counts. (author) [fr

  17. Multi-spectral and fluorescence diffuse optical tomography of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlu, Alper

    Multi-spectral and fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (DOT) techniques are explored and applied to image human breast cancer in vivo. Image reconstruction algorithms that utilize first and second order gradient information are described in detail. Breast DOT requires large computational memory and long run times. To this end, parallel computation techniques were developed appropriate to each reconstruction algorithm. A parallel plate DOT instrument developed for breast cancer imaging is described. The system relies heavily on continuous-wave (CW) transmission measurements and utilizes frequency domain (FD) measurements on the reemission side. However, traditional DOT image reconstruction methods based on CW measurements fail to separate tissue absorption and scattering uniquely. In this manuscript, multi-spectral DOT is shown to be capable of minimizing cross-talk and retrieving spectral parameters almost uniquely when the measurement wavelengths are optimized. A theoretical framework to select optimum wavelengths is provided, and tested with computer simulations. Results from phantom spectroscopy experiments and in vivo patient measurements support the notion that multi-spectral methods are superior to traditional DOT image reconstruction schemes. The same breast DOT instrument is improved and utilized to obtain the first in vivo images of human breast cancer based on fluorescence DOT (FDOT). To this end the fluorophore Indocyanine Green (ICG) is injected intravenously and fluorescence excitation and detection are accomplished in the soft-compression, parallel-plane, transmission geometry using laser sources at 786 nm and spectrally filtered CCD detection. Careful phantom and in vivo measurements are carried on to assure that the signals are due to ICG fluorescence, rather than tissue autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. An in vivo measurement protocol is designed to maximize the ICG contrast by acquiring full fluorescence tomographic scan during

  18. New hardware and workflows for semi-automated correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy/tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorb, Martin; Gaechter, Leander; Avinoam, Ori; Sieckmann, Frank; Clarke, Mairi; Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bykov, Yury S; Sonnen, Andreas F-P; Lihl, Reinhard; Briggs, John A G

    2017-02-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy allows features of interest defined by fluorescence signals to be located in an electron micrograph of the same sample. Rare dynamic events or specific objects can be identified, targeted and imaged by electron microscopy or tomography. To combine it with structural studies using cryo-electron microscopy or tomography, fluorescence microscopy must be performed while maintaining the specimen vitrified at liquid-nitrogen temperatures and in a dry environment during imaging and transfer. Here we present instrumentation, software and an experimental workflow that improves the ease of use, throughput and performance of correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. The new cryo-stage incorporates a specially modified high-numerical aperture objective lens and provides a stable and clean imaging environment. It is combined with a transfer shuttle for contamination-free loading of the specimen. Optimized microscope control software allows automated acquisition of the entire specimen area by cryo-fluorescence microscopy. The software also facilitates direct transfer of the fluorescence image and associated coordinates to the cryo-electron microscope for subsequent fluorescence-guided automated imaging. Here we describe these technological developments and present a detailed workflow, which we applied for automated cryo-electron microscopy and tomography of various specimens. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlated fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Cheri M; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hammonds, Jason E; Alonas, Eric; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Storms, Rachel E; Leon, Fredrick; Melikyan, Gregory B; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) combines spatiotemporal information from fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) with high-resolution structural data from cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). These technologies provide opportunities to bridge knowledge gaps between cell and structural biology. Here we describe our protocol for correlated cryo-fLM, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-ET (i.e., cryo-CLEM) of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells. Mammalian-derived cells are cultured on EM substrates, using optimized conditions that ensure that the cells are spread thinly across the substrate and are not physically disrupted. The cells are then screened by fLM and vitrified before acquisition of cryo-fLM and cryo-ET images, which is followed by data processing. A complete session from grid preparation through data collection and processing takes 5-15 d for an individual experienced in cryo-EM.

  20. X-ray Fluorescence Tomography of Aged Fluid-Catalytic-Cracking Catalyst Particles Reveals Insight into Metal Deposition Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalirai, Samanbir; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2015-01-01

    Microprobe X-ray fluorescence tomography was used to investigate metal poison deposition in individual, intact and industrially deactivated fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles at two differing catalytic life-stages. 3D multi-element imaging, at submicron resolution was achieved by using a

  1. Integration of X-ray micro tomography and fluorescence for applications on natural building stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewanckele, J; Cnudde, V; Pieters, K; Jacobs, P; Boone, M; Loo, D Van; De Witte, Y; Vlassenbroeck, J; Dierick, M; Masschaele, B; Hoorebeke, L Van

    2009-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an excellent, non-destructive analysis tool for characterising many different materials. In geosciences, 3D visualisation is becoming of prime importance in characterising internal structures of various rock types. It enables new approaches in petrophysical research of rock components, including pore and mineral distribution. Although CT provides a lot of information, this technique is limited concerning information on chemical element distribution. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) on the other hand is an excellent technique to obtain the missing information on chemical properties. At the recently established 'Centre for X-ray Tomography' of Ghent University (UGCT) a micro- and nanoCT scanner has been constructed. It is expected that by combination of high-resolution CT and XRF it will be possible to characterise the spatial mineral and element distribution. The combination of both techniques has been applied on natural building stones, in order to get a better insight into some geological parameters (porosity, pore structure, mineral distribution, colour, grain orientation, etc.). Afterwards, the integration of the Morpho+ software tool provides us a 3D quantification of the resulting data.

  2. Radiofrequency circuit design and performance evaluation for small animal frequency-domain NIR fluorescence optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darne, Chinmay; Zhu, Banghe; Lu, Yujie; Tan, I.-Chih; Rasmussen, John; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2011-02-01

    Herein we report on hardware development and evaluation for frequency-domain photon migration (FDPM) technique that is miniaturized for incorporation into a micro-CT gantry for hybrid CT/NIR/PET imaging. Immunity to endogenous optical properties and enhanced contrast associated with fluorophore lifetime is inherent to the FDPM measurements and enables unique opportunities for quantitative tomography when compared to the time independent (continuous wave) approach. A miniaturized radiofrequency (rf) circuitry has been developed in our laboratory for homodyne FDPM measurements that makes use of a single 100MHz oscillator to simultaneously launch optically modulated excitation light into a small animal as well as to modulate an NIR sensitive image intensifier for collection of fluorescent signals. The use of a single oscillator not only eliminates signal drift that otherwise results from the use of multiple oscillators individually driving both source and detector, but also reduces the circuit footprint for incorporation into the CT gantry. Herein, overall system performance parameters of signal-to-noise ratio, measurement precision, spatial resolution, modulation depth (ac/dc), excitation light rejection, and clinically relevant data acquisition times are presented for mouse phantom data. Image reconstruction of phantom data and integration of circuitry for hybrid CT/NIR/PET imaging is also presented towards the ultimate validation of NIR optical tomography using PET imaging as a "gold-standard" for quantification.

  3. Molecular Viscosity Sensors with Two Rotators for Optimizing the Fluorescence Intensity-Contrast Trade-Off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Heo, Jeongyun; Jeong, Chan-Uk; Lee, Gyeong-Hui; Kim, Sehoon; Yoon, Woojin; Yun, Hoseop; Park, Sung O; Kwak, Sang Kyu; Park, Sung-Ha; Kwon, O-Pil

    2018-02-26

    A series of fluorescent molecular rotors obtained by introducing two rotational groups ("rotators"), which exhibit different rotational and electron-donating abilities, are discussed. Whereas the control molecular rotor, PH, includes a single rotator (the widely used phenyl group), the PO molecular rotors consist of two rotators (a phenyl group and an alkoxy group), which exhibit simultaneous strongly electron-donating and easy rotational abilities. Compared with the control rotor PH, PO molecular rotors exhibited one order of magnitude higher quantum yield (fluorescence intensity) and simultaneously exhibited significantly higher fluorescence contrast. These properties are directly related to the strong electron-donating ability and low energy barrier of rotation of the alkoxy group, as confirmed by dynamic fluorescence experiments and quantum chemical calculations. The PO molecular rotors exhibited two fluorescence relaxation pathways, whereas the PH molecular rotor exhibited a single fluorescence relaxation pathway. Cellular fluorescence imaging with PO molecular rotors for mapping cellular viscosity was successfully demonstrated. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Spectral selective fluorescence molecular imaging with volume holographic imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlu Lv

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact volume holographic imaging (VHI method that can detect fluorescence objects located in diffusive medium in spectral selective imaging manner is presented. The enlargement of lateral field of view of the VHI system is realized by using broadband illumination and demagnification optics. Each target spectrum of fluorescence emitting from a diffusive medium is probed by tuning the inclination angle of the transmission volume holographic grating (VHG. With the use of the single transmission VHG, fluorescence images with different spectrum are obtained sequentially and precise three-dimensional (3D information of deep fluorescent objects located in a diffusive medium can be reconstructed from these images. The results of phantom experiments demonstrate that two fluorescent objects with a sub-millimeter distance can be resolved by spectral selective imaging.

  5. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...

  6. Instrumentation of Molecular Imaging on Site-Specific Targeting Fluorescent Peptide for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Ma, Lixin

    2012-02-01

    In this work we developed two biomedical imaging techniques for early detection of breast cancer. Both image modalities provide molecular imaging capability to probe site-specific targeting dyes. The first technique, heterodyne CCD fluorescence mediated tomography, is a non-invasive biomedical imaging that uses fluorescent photons from the targeted dye on the tumor cells inside human breast tissue. The technique detects a large volume of tissue (20 cm) with a moderate resolution (1 mm) and provides the high sensitivity. The second technique, dual-band spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, is a high-resolution tissue imaging modality. It uses a low coherence interferometer to detect coherent photons hidden in the incoherent background. Due to the coherence detection, a high resolution (20 microns) is possible. We have finished prototype imaging systems for the development of both image modalities and performed imaging experiments on tumor tissues. The spectroscopic/tomographic images show contrasts of dense tumor tissues and tumor necrotic regions. In order to correlate the findings from our results, a diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the tumors was performed using a small animal 7-Telsa MRI and demonstrated excellent agreement.

  7. X-ray nanoprobes and diffraction-limited storage rings: opportunities and challenges of fluorescence tomography of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Martin D; Ryan, Christopher G; Jacobsen, Chris J

    2014-09-01

    X-ray nanoprobes require coherent illumination to achieve optic-limited resolution, and so will benefit directly from diffraction-limited storage rings. Here, the example of high-resolution X-ray fluorescence tomography is focused on as one of the most voracious demanders of coherent photons, since the detected signal is only a small fraction of the incident flux. Alternative schemes are considered for beam delivery, sample scanning and detectors. One must consider as well the steps before and after the X-ray experiment: sample preparation and examination conditions, and analysis complexity due to minimum dose requirements and self-absorption. By understanding the requirements and opportunities for nanoscale fluorescence tomography, one gains insight into the R&D challenges in optics and instrumentation needed to fully exploit the source advances that diffraction-limited storage rings offer.

  8. Fundus auto fluorescence and spectral domain ocular coherence tomography in the early detection of chloroquine retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan B. Goodman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the sensitivity of spectral domain ocular coherence tomography (SD-OCT and fundus auto fluorescence (FAF images as a screening test to detect early changes in the retina prior to the onset of chloroquine retinopathy. Method: The study was conducted using patients taking chloroquine (CQ, referred by the Rheumatology Department to the Ophthalmology Department at Tygerberg Academic Hospital. Group A consisted of 59 patients on CQ for less than 5 years, and Group B consisted of 53 patients on CQ for more than 5 years. A 200 × 200 macula thickness map, 5-line raster SD-OCT on a Carl Zeiss Meditec Cirrus HD-OCT and FAF images on a Carl Zeiss Meditec Visucam 500 were recorded for 223 eyes. Images were reviewed independently, and then those of Groups A and B compared. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between Groups A and B. The criteria included the internal limiting membrane and the retinal pigment epithelium (ILM-RPE thickness, interdigitation zone integrity (p = 0.891, df = 1, χ² = 0.1876, ellipsoid zone integrity (p = 0.095, df = 2, χ² = 4.699 and FAF image irregularities (p = 0.479, df = 1, χ²= 4995978. Conclusion: The inclusion of SD-OCT and FAF as objective tests into the prescribed screening guidelines does not appear to simplify the detection of subclinical injury in patients on chloroquine treatment.

  9. Laboratory Scale X-ray Fluorescence Tomography: Instrument Characterization and Application in Earth and Environmental Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Brecht; Vermeulen, Bram; Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Janssen, Colin; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-03-15

    A new laboratory scale X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging instrument, based on an X-ray microfocus tube equipped with a monocapillary optic, has been developed to perform XRF computed tomography experiments with both higher spatial resolution (20 μm) and a better energy resolution (130 eV @Mn-K(α)) than has been achieved up-to-now. This instrument opens a new range of possible applications for XRF-CT. Next to the analytical characterization of the setup by using well-defined model/reference samples, demonstrating its capabilities for tomographic imaging, the XRF-CT microprobe has been used to image the interior of an ecotoxicological model organism, Americamysis bahia. This had been exposed to elevated metal (Cu and Ni) concentrations. The technique allowed the visualization of the accumulation sites of copper, clearly indicating the affected organs, i.e. either the gastric system or the hepatopancreas. As another illustrative application, the scanner has been employed to investigate goethite spherules from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, revealing the internal elemental distribution of these valuable distal ejecta layer particles.

  10. Molecular Imaging Probes for Positron Emission Tomography and Optical Imaging of Sentinel Lymph Node and Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhengtao

    Molecular imaging is visualizations and measurements of in vivo biological processes at the molecular or cellular level using specific imaging probes. As an emerging technology, biocompatible macromolecular or nanoparticle based targeted imaging probes have gained increasing popularities. Those complexes consist of a carrier, an imaging reporter, and a targeting ligand. The active targeting ability dramatically increases the specificity. And the multivalency effect may further reduce the dose while providing a decent signal. In this thesis, sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and cancer imaging are two research topics. The focus is to develop molecular imaging probes with high specificity and sensitivity, for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and optical imaging. The objective of this thesis is to explore dextran radiopharmaceuticals and porous silicon nanoparticles based molecular imaging agents. Dextran polymers are excellent carriers to deliver imaging reporters or therapeutic agents due to its well established safety profile and oligosaccharide conjugation chemistry. There is also a wide selection of dextran polymers with different lengths. On the other hand, Silicon nanoparticles represent another class of biodegradable materials for imaging and drug delivery. The success in fluorescence lifetime imaging and enhancements of the immune activation potency was briefly discussed. Chapter 1 begins with an overview on current molecular imaging techniques and imaging probes. Chapter 2 presents a near-IR dye conjugated probe, IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept. Fluorophore density was optimized to generate the maximum brightness. It was labeled with 68Ga and 99mTc and in vivo SLN mapping was successfully performed in different animals, such as mice, rabbits, dogs and pigs. With 99mTc labeled IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept, chapter 3 introduces a two-day imaging protocol with a hand-held imager. Chapter 4 proposed a method to dual radiolabel the IRDye 800CW-tilmanocept with both 68Ga and

  11. Iodinated silica/porphyrin hybrid nanoparticles for X-ray computed tomography/fluorescence dual-modal imaging of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Hayashi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles containing covalently linked iodine and a near-infrared (NIR fluorescence dye, namely porphyrin, have been synthesized through a one-pot sol–gel reaction. These particles are called iodinated silica/porphyrin hybrid nanoparticles (ISP HNPs. The ISP HNPs have both high X-ray absorption coefficient and NIR fluorescence. The ISP HNPs modified with folic acid (FA and polyethylene glycol (PEG, denoted as FA-PEG-ISP HNPs, enabled the successful visualization of tumors in mice by both X-ray computed tomography (CT and fluorescence imaging (FI. Thus, the FA-PEG-ISP HNPs are useful as contrast agents or probes for CT/FI dual-modal imaging.

  12. Molecularly imprinted fluorescent probe based on FRET for selective and sensitive detection of doxorubicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhifeng, E-mail: 897061147@qq.com [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Deng, Peihong; Li, Junhua [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China); Xu, Li [Department of Applied Chemistry, College of Materials and Energy, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Tang, Siping [College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Hengyang Normal University, Key Laboratory of Functional Organometallic Materials of Hunan Province University, Hengyang 421008 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • FRET-based molecularly imprinted probe for detection of doxorubicin was prepared. • The detection limit of the probe was 13.8 nM for doxorubicin. • The FRET-based probe had a higher selectivity for the template than ordinary MIMs. - Abstract: In this work, a new type of fluorescent probe for detection of doxorubicin has been constructed by the combined use of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technology and molecular imprinting technique (MIT). Using doxorubicin as the template, the molecularly imprinted polymer thin layer was fabricated on the surfaces of carbon dot (CD) modified silica by sol-gel polymerization. The excitation energy of the fluorescent donor (CDs) could be transferred to the fluorescent acceptor (doxorubicin). The FRET based fluorescent probe demonstrated high sensitivity and selectivity for doxorubicin. The detection limit was 13.8 nM. The fluorescent probe was successfully applied for detecting doxorubicin in doxorubicin-spiked plasmas with a recovery of 96.8–103.8%, a relative standard deviation (RSD) of 1.3–2.8%. The strategy for construction of FRET-based molecularly imprinted materials developed in this work is very promising for analytical applications.

  13. A study of molecular dynamics within liquid flows using fluorescence depolarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, A. J.; McCaffery, A. J.; Quintella, C. M.; Winkel, J. F.

    Molecular alignment within thin laminar jets of rhodamine 6G in solution in ethylene glycol has been investigated by measuring the depolarization of laser induced fluorescence. From measurements of a large number of points within the flow, we have built up maps of molecular alignment which display in detail the distribution and evolution of flow alignment. On the basis of these observations, we analyse the evolution of molecular alignment in terms of internal shear forces resulting from velocity distributions within liquid flows.

  14. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  15. Molecular quantification of genes encoding for green-fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felske, A; Vandieken, V; Pauling, B V

    2003-01-01

    A quantitative PCR approach is presented to analyze the amount of recombinant green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes in environmental DNA samples. The quantification assay is a combination of specific PCR amplification and temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). Gene quantification...... is provided by a competitively coamplified DNA standard constructed by point mutation PCR. A single base difference was introduced to achieve a suitable migration difference in TGGE between the original target DNA and the modified standard without altering the PCR amplification efficiency. This competitive...... PCR strategy is a highly specific and sensitive way to monitor recombinant DNA in environments like the efflux of a biotechnological plant....

  16. Molecular engineering and fluorescence for the detection of toxic cations; Ingenierie moleculaire et fluorescence pour la reconnaissance de cations toxiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, V

    2007-11-15

    This work is a part of the 'Toxicologie Nucleaire Environnementale' program which aims at studying the effects on the living of heavy metals or radionuclides involved in nuclear industry. Most particularly, it deals with the design of new fluorescent sensors for the selective detection of Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Cs{sup +} in biological media. Several fluorescent calixarenes possessing nitrogen atoms were synthesized and their properties as potential lead sensors were investigated. One of them could be used in experimental conditions close to biological media and new target compounds with amide functional groups were proposed. Many approaches were considered for the design of selective fluorescent sensors for cadmium. On the basis of literature results, many chelating compounds incorporating sulfur atoms were synthesized but showed no significant affinity towards cadmium. On the opposite, compounds functionalized with several pyridine-2'-yl-1,2,3-triazol fluorescent moieties linked to a {beta}-cyclodextrin or a calix[4]arene showed good affinity for cadmium in methanol, but the selectivity was found to be insufficient. In contrast, very satisfying results in terms of both selectivity and sensitivity could be obtained with the commercial calcium sensor Rhod-5N in an aqueous medium at neutral pH. Lastly, micromolar detection limits for the selective detection of caesium were reached in an aqueous medium at neutral pH thanks to a new sulfonated fluorescent calixarene with two appended crown-ethers. An original complexation mechanism was proposed and validated by molecular modelling (DFT). (author)

  17. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sihan Xue,1 Yao Wang,1 Mengxing Wang,2 Lu Zhang,1 Xiaoxia Du,2 Hongchen Gu,1 Chunfu Zhang1,31School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography (CT/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs. Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2 markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/C/fluorescence trimodal imaging.Keywords: multifunctional probe, SPIONs, mesoporous silica

  18. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  19. Sensitive determination of specific radioactivity of positron emission tomography radiopharmaceuticals by radio high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ryuji; Furutsuka, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2008-10-01

    A sensitive quality control method is often required in positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical analysis due to the high specific radioactivity of synthetic products. The applicability of a radio high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with fluorescence detection was evaluated for a wide variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In 29 different radiopharmaceuticals studied, 20 compounds exhibited native fluorescence. These properties enabled sensitive determination of their chemical masses by direct fluorimetric detection after separation by HPLC. For some substances, detection limits were below nanograms per milliliter level, at least 40 times better than current UV absorbance detection. Sufficient reproducibility and linearity were obtained for the analysis of pharmaceutical fluid. Post-column fluorimetric derivatization was also established for the quantitative determination of FDG and ClDG in [(18)F]FDG samples. These methods could be applied successfully to the analysis of PET radiopharmaceuticals with ultra-high specific radioactivity.

  20. Fluorescence depolarization as a probe of molecular dynamics within liquid jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, A. J.; McCaffery, A. J.; Quintella, C. M.

    Preliminary results are presented from a study of fluorescence depolarization within a thin laminar jet of rhodamine 6 G in ethylene glycol. A large number of polarization measurements taken across the jet have enabled us to build up a detailed polarization map of the liquid flow. Relating the degree of depolarization to molecular alignment caused by the presence of shear forces within the jet, we propose that this method may be used as a sensitive probe of the molecular dynamics of liquid flow.

  1. Optimized measurements of separations and angles between intra-molecular fluorescent markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Sung, Jongmin; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel, yet simple tool for the study of structure and function of biomolecules by extending two-colour co-localization microscopy to fluorescent molecules with fixed orientations and in intra-molecular proximity. From each colour-separated microscope image in a time-lapse movie...

  2. Exploring Fluorescence Antibunching in Solution To Determine the Stoichiometry of Molecular Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, Jan; Kaiser, K.; Gregor, I.; Bönigk, W.; Schmalzing, G.; Enderlain, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 79, - (2007), s. 4040-4049 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : exploring fluorescence antibunching * molecular complex es * biophysical methods Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.287, year: 2007

  3. Confirmation of molecular formulas of metallic complexes through X-ray fluorescence quantitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueiras, C.A.L.; Marques, E.V.; Machado, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrophotometry was employed to determined the metal content in a series of five transition element complexes (Mn, Ti, Zn, V). The results confirmed the molecular formulas of these complexes, already proposed on the basis of elemental microanalysis, solution condutimetry and other analytical methods. (C.L.B.) [pt

  4. Asymmetric molecular-orbital tomography by manipulating electron trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bincheng; Zhang, Qingbin; Zhu, Xiaosong; Lan, Pengfei; Rezvani, Seyed Ali; Lu, Peixiang

    2017-11-01

    We present a scheme for tomographic imaging of asymmetric molecular orbital based on high-order harmonic generation with a two-color orthogonally polarized multicycle laser field. With the two-dimensional manipulation of the electron trajectories, the electrons can recollide with the target molecule from two noncollinear directions, and then the dipole moment generated from the single direction can be obtained to reconstructed the asymmetric molecular orbital. The recollision is independent from the molecular structure and the angular dependence of the ionization rate in the external field. For this reason, this scheme can avoid the negative effects arising from the modification of the angle-dependent ionization rate induced by Stark shift and be applied to various molecules.

  5. Genome-wide functional analysis on the molecular mechanism of specifically biosynthesized fluorescence Eu complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Dong, Xiawei; Jiang, Xuerui; Jiang, Hui; Li, Chen-Zhong; Wang, Xuemei

    2017-09-22

    Fluorescence imaging as an attractive diagnostic technique is widely employed for early diagnosis of cancer. Self-biosynthesized fluorescent Eu complex in situ in Hela cells have realized specifically and accurately fluorescence imaging for cancer cells. But the molecular mechanism of the in situ biosynthesized process is still unclear. In order to reveal this mechanism, we have investigated whole-genome expression profiles with cDNA microarray, incubated with Eu solution in Hela cells for 24 h. Methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) assay and laser confocal fluorescence microscopy study showed the low cytotoxicity and specifically fluorescence imaging of Eu complex in Hela cells. It is observed that 563 up-regulated genes and 274 down-regulated genes were differentially expressed. Meanwhile, quantitative RT-PCR was utilized to measure the expression of some important genes, which validated the results of microarray data analysis. Besides, GO analysis showed that a wide range of differential expression functional genes involved in three groups, including cellular component, molecular function and cellular biological process. It was evident that some important biological pathways were apparently affected through KEGG pathway analysis, including focal adhesion pathway and PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3' -kinase)-Akt signaling pathway, which can influence glycolytic metabolism and NAD(P)H-oxidases metabolic pathway.

  6. Bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Durand, D. B.; Adler, H.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence-image-guided OCT (FIG-OCT) system is described, and its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity is examined in an animal bladder cancer model. Total 97 specimens were examined by fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of FIG-OCT is 100% and 93% respectively, compared to 79% and 53% for fluorescence imaging, while the OCT examination time has been dramatically decreased by 3~4 times. In combination of endoscopic OCT, FIG-OCT is a promising technique for effective early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  7. Histological validation of cone-beam computed tomography versus laser fluorescence and conventional diagnostic methods for occlusal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Elif; Sinanoglu, Alper

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the validity of visual (VE), radiological (RE), cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), and laser fluorescence (LFE) examination methods for the detection of the occlusal noncavitated caries in permanent posterior teeth. Two examiners assessed 121 selected sites on the occlusal surfaces of 44 molar teeth by visual (International Caries Assessment and Detection System II [ICDAS]), radiographic (bite-wing projection) cone-beam computed tomography, and laser fluorescence (DIAGNOdent Pen) examination methods. After a 1-week interval, each measurement was repeated by two examiners. Then, the teeth were sectioned, and histological evaluation was performed, which serves as the gold standard. The lesion depths were classified and correlated with the methods evaluated for validation. The intra- and inter-examiner reliability (sensitivity, specificity) and reproducibility of all examination methods were calculated using a weighted Cohen's κ statistic. The correlation between the examination methods was determined using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis indicating the area under the curve (AUC). CBCT exhibited excellent intra-examiner (0.76 for examiner 1, 0.78 for examiner 2) and fair to good inter-examiner (0.63 for the first, 0.64 for the second measurements) reproducibility. The intra-examiner reproducibility was excellent for the LFE method according to the weighted κ values of examiners 1 (0.90) and 2 (0.79). Among the combined methods, the highest AUC values (0.81-0.95) were obtained for the CBCT examination method performed by the two examiners at both the first and second measurements. Cone beam computed tomography showed better performance than other diagnostic methods.

  8. Antigen-dependent fluorescence response of anti-c-Myc Quenchbody studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yoshiharu; Okumura, Hisashi; Watanabe, Takayoshi; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    We performed metadynamics molecular dynamics simulations to reveal mechanism of antigen-dependent fluorescence response observed for site-specifically fluorescent-labeled single-chain antibody against c-Myc peptide antigen. We found that VH and VL bind with each other only when the antigen exists and that the fluorophore labeled at the N-terminus of VH interacts with Trp103 most stably. These results support the mechanism proposed from previous experiments: In the absence of antigen, Trp residues are partially exposed at the interface of VH and quench the fluorophore. In the presence of antigen, the Trp residues are buried between VH and VL , and the quenching is eliminated.

  9. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Already widely accepted in medicine, tomography can also be useful in industry. The theory behind tomography and a demonstration of the technique to inspect a motorcycle carburetor is presented. To demonstrate the potential of computer assisted tomography (CAT) to accurately locate defects in three dimensions, a sectioned 5 cm gate valve with a shrink cavity made visible by the sectioning was tomographically imaged using a Co-60 source. The tomographic images revealed a larger cavity below the sectioned surface. The position of this cavity was located with an in-plane and axial precision of approximately +-1 mm. The volume of the cavity was estimated to be approximately 40 mm 3

  10. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-soft X-ray tomography of adherent cells at European synchrotrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Duke, Elizabeth; Collinson, Lucy M

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) is a synchrotron-hosted imaging technique used to analyze the ultrastructure of intact, cryo-prepared cells. Correlation of cryo-fluorescence microscopy and cryo-SXT can be used to localize fluorescent proteins to organelles preserved close to native state. Cryo-correlative light and X-ray microscopy (cryo-CLXM) is particularly useful for the study of organelles that are susceptible to chemical fixation artifacts during sample preparation for electron microscopy. In our recent work, we used cryo-CLXM to characterize GFP-LC3-positive early autophagosomes in nutrient-starved HEK293A cells (Duke et al., 2013). Cup-shaped omegasomes were found to form at "hot-spots" on the endoplasmic reticulum. Furthermore, cryo-SXT image stacks revealed the presence of large complex networks of tubulated mitochondria in the starved cells, which would be challenging to model at this scale and resolution using light or electron microscopy. In this chapter, we detail the cryo-CLXM workflow that we developed and optimized for studying adherent mammalian cells. We show examples of data collected at the three European synchrotrons that currently host cryo-SXT microscopes, and describe how raw cryo-SXT datasets are processed into tomoX stacks, modeled, and correlated with cryo-fluorescence data to identify structures of interest. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Composite nanoparticle of Au and quantum dots for X-ray computed tomography and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Ji-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Quan; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Yan, Dong-Mei; Yao, Ming-Hao; Qin, Meng-Yao; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-01-01

    In this study, composite nanoparticles comprising Au nanoparticle and quantum dots were built and used for contrast-enhanced computed tomography imaging (CT) and fluorescence dual-mode imaging in vivo. The nanoparticle exhibited good monodispersity and good biocompatibility, and had excellent CT contrast-enhancement effect and fluorescence imaging capability. They were appropriate for being used as dual-mode imaging probe in vivo

  12. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Godin, Antoine G; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking. (paper)

  13. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  14. Automated microaxial tomography of cell nuclei after specific labelling by fluorescence in situ hybridisation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozubek, Michal; Skalníková, M.; Matula, Pe.; Bártová, Eva; Rauch, J.; Neuhaus, F.; Eipel, H.; Hasmann, M.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 33, 7-8 (2002), s. 655-665 ISSN 0968-4328 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : microaxial tomography * automated microscopy * high-resolution cytometry Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.537, year: 2002

  15. Molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Wen; Liu, Yongchao; Wang, Peng; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2017-03-01

    During the past two decades, two-photon microscopy (TPM), which utilizes two near-infrared photons as the excitation source, has emerged as a novel, attractive imaging tool for biological research. Compared with one-photon microscopy, TPM offers several advantages, such as lowering background fluorescence in living cells and tissues, reducing photodamage to biosamples, and a photobleaching phenomenon, offering better 3D spatial localization, and increasing penetration depth. Small-molecule-based two-photon fluorescent probes have been well developed for the detection and imaging of various analytes in biological systems. In this review, we will give a general introduction of molecular engineering of two-photon fluorescent probes based on different fluorescence response mechanisms for bioimaging applications during the past decade. Inspired by the desired advantages of small-molecule two-photon fluorescent probes in biological imaging applications, we expect that more attention will be devoted to the development of new two-photon fluorophores and applications of TPM in areas of bioanalysis and disease diagnosis.

  16. Comparative Phenotypical and Molecular Analyses of Arabidopsis Grown under Fluorescent and LED Light

    OpenAIRE

    Seiler, Franka; Soll, J?rgen; B?lter, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    Comparative analyses of phenotypic and molecular traits of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under standardised conditions is still a challenge using climatic devices supplied with common light sources. These are in most cases fluorescent lights, which have several disadvantages such as heat production at higher light intensities, an invariable spectral output, and relatively rapid “ageing”. This results in non-desired variations of growth conditions and lowers the comparability of data acquired ove...

  17. Breast Cancer Treatment in the Era of Molecular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Edelhauser, Gundula; Funovics, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging employs molecularly targeted probes to visualize and often quantify distinct disease-specific markers and pathways. Modalities like intravital confocal or multiphoton microscopy, near-infrared fluorescence combined with endoscopy, surface reflectance imaging, or fluorescence-mediated tomography, and radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are increasingly used for small animal high-throughput screeni...

  18. 3D imaging of vapour and liquid inclusions from the Mole Granite, Australia, using helical fluorescence tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cauzid, J. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)], E-mail: jean.cauzid@esrf.fr; Philippot, P. [Geobiosphere Actuelle et Primitive, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, CNRS and Universite Denis Diderot, Case 89, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bleuet, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Simionovici, A. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Somogyi, A. [Synchrotron Soleil, DiffAbs beamline, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Golosio, B. [Instituto di Matematica e Fisica, Universita di Sassari, 2 via Vienna, 07100 Sassari (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    World class Cu resources are concentrated in porphyry and epithermal ore deposits. Their formation remains partially understood, however, due to a lack of constraints on the partitioning properties of trace elements in general, and Cu in particular, between vapour and liquid phases evolved from boiling fluids at depth in the Earth's crust. Immiscible liquid and vapour fluid inclusions coexisting in a single quartz grain have been imaged in three dimensions by X-ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography (XFCT). Elemental spatial distributions confirm that Cu, and to a lesser extent As, partition into the vapour phase, whereas Mn, Fe, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Pb concentrate in the liquid inclusion. High resolution mapping of the vapour inclusions revealed that Cu is heterogeneously distributed at the scale of a single inclusion and is mostly concentrated as tiny daughter crystals.

  19. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  20. Co-registration of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) with positron emission tomography (PET) and development of multi-angle fDOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, X.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis concerns the image processing of fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT), following two axes: fDOT image co-registration with PET (positron emission tomography) image and improvement of fDOT image reconstructions using mirrors to collect additional projections. It is presented in two parts:In the first part, an automatic method to co-register the fDOT images with PET images has been developed to correlate all the information from each modality. This co-registration method is based on automatic detection of fiducial markers (FM) present in both modalities. The particularity of this method is the use of optical surface image obtained in fDOT imaging system, which serves to identify the Z position of FM in optical images. We tested this method on a model of mice bearing tumor xenografts of MEN2A cancer cells that mimic a human medullary thyroid carcinoma, after a double injection of radiotracer [ 18 F] 2-fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) for PET imaging and optical fluorescent infrared tracer Sentidye. With the accuracy of our method, we can demonstrate that the signal of Sentidye is present both in the tumor and surrounding vessels.The fDOT reconstruction image quality is degraded along the Z axis due to a limited number of projections for reconstruction. In the second part, the work is oriented towards a new method of fDOT image reconstruction with a new multi-angle data acquisition system in placing two mirrors on each side of the animal. This work was conducted in collaboration with the CS Department of University College London (UCL), a partner of the European project FMT-XCT. TOAST software developed by this team was used as source code for the reconstruction algorithm, and was modified to adapt to the concerned problem. After several tests on the adjustment of program parameters, we applied this method on a phantom that simulating the biological tissue and on mice. The results showed an improvement in the reconstructed image of a semi

  1. Challenges of Zinc-Specific Transrectal Fluorescence Tomography to Detect Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    x-ray--guided three-dimensional diffuse optical tomography of osteoarthritis in the finger joints," Journal of Biomedical Optics 13(4), 044006-10...digital.com to view the video that accompanies this article. The trajectory of a photon in a medium is analogous to that of a football : Catching the...catching a football between a quarterback and a wide receiver playing inside a cylindrical field (left-upper inset). Conversely, photon remission

  2. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  3. Optical coherence tomography and confocal fluorescence microscopy as a combined method for studying morphological changes in lung dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaertner, Maria; Cimalla, Peter; Knels, Lilla; Meissner, Sven; Schnabel, Christian; Kuebler, Wolfgang M.; Koch, Edmund

    2011-03-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a severe pulmonary disease leading to hypoxemia accompanied by a reduced compliance and partial edema of the lung. Most of the patients have to be ventilated to compensate for the lack of oxygen. The treatment is strongly connected with ventilator induced lung injury (VILI), which is believed to introduce further stress to the lung and changes in its elastic performance. A thorough understanding of the organs micro-structure is crucial to gain more insight into the course of the disease. Due to backscattering of near-infrared light, detailed description of lung morphology can be obtained using optical coherence tomography (OCT), a non-invasive, non-contact, high resolution and fast three-dimensional imaging technique. One of its drawbacks lies in the non-specificity of light distribution in relation to defined substances, like elastic biomolecules. Using fluorescence detection, these chemical components can be visualized by introducing specifically binding fluorophores. This study presents a combined setup for studying alveolar compliance depending on volume changes and elastic fiber distributions. Simultaneously acquired OCT and confocal fluorescence images allow an entire view into morphological rearrangements during ventilation for an ex vivo mouse model using continuous pulmonary airway pressure at different values.

  4. Molecular Dynamic Indicators of the Photoswitching Properties of Green Fluorescent Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyrnova, Daryna; Moeyaert, Benjamien; Michielssens, Servaas; Hofkens, Johan; Dedecker, Peter; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2015-09-10

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins (RSFPs) are highly useful probes for a range of applications including diffraction-unlimited fluorescence microscopy. It was previously shown that reversible photoswitching not only involves cis-trans isomerization and protonation-deprotonation of the chromophore but also results in a marked difference in β-barrel flexibility. In this work, we performed flexibility profiling and functional mode analysis (FMA) using molecular dynamics calculations to study how the flexibility of the RSFP β-barrel influences the photoswitching properties of several fluorescent proteins. We also used Partial Least-Squared (PLS) FMA to detect promising mutation sites for the modulation of photoswitching properties of RSFPs. Our results show that the flexibility of RSFP does depend on its state with a systematically higher flexibility in the dark state compared to the bright state. In particular our method highlights the importance of Val157 in Dronpa, which upon mutation yields a striking difference in the collective motions of the two mutants. Overall, we show that PLS-FMA yields information, complementary to static structures, that can guide the rational design of fluorescent proteins.

  5. Chiral alkylated-aniline as a noninvasive fluorescence sensor: Spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bidisha; Mukherjee, Chirantan Sen; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Muhammad, Maria Jones; Gladney, William; Armstrong, George

    2017-12-01

    Aniline, heterocyclic aromatic amines, and arylamines are known carcinogens. Recently aniline mustard has come into prominence as a novel anticancer agent. In this project, microwave irradiation has been used to synthesize an optically active alkylated aniline namely 2,6-dimethyl-4-(1-(p-tolyl)ethyl)aniline (abbreviated DMPA). The presence of quartet and doublet peaks in NMR and a single chromatogram in HPLC verified that the final product DMPA, prepared from the synthesis reactions, had no major impurities. By using a Lux chiral column in HPLC, two peaks have been detected in the chromatogram, which correspond to two enantiomers of the chiral aniline derivative. Fluorescence spectroscopic measurements on DMPA indicated conspicuous dependence of its emission behavior on the polarity (in terms of the empirical polarity parameter ET(30)) of the homogeneous solvents used, a property important for an optical sensor. The nature of the emission profiles, along with the relevant parameter namely wavelength at emission maximum (λemmax) is used to infer the distribution, binding and microenvironment of the DMPA molecules in human serum albumin protein (HSA). DMPA is weakly fluorescent in aqueous buffer medium, with a dramatic enhancement in the fluorescence emission in the presence of HSA. Molecular modeling studies have been carried out on the two enantiomers (R and S) of DMPA with HSA. The implications of these findings are examined in relation to the potentialities of DMPA as a novel fluorescence sensor for biological systems.

  6. Extensively Reversible Thermal Transformations of a Bistable, Fluorescence-Switchable Molecular Solid: Entry into Functional Molecular Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srujana, P; Radhakrishnan, T P

    2015-06-15

    Functional phase-change materials (PCMs) are conspicuously absent among molecular materials in which the various attributes of inorganic solids have been realized. While organic PCMs are primarily limited to thermal storage systems, the amorphous-crystalline transformation of materials like Ge-Sb-Te find use in advanced applications such as information storage. Reversible amorphous-crystalline transformations in molecular solids require a subtle balance between robust supramolecular assembly and flexible structural elements. We report novel diaminodicyanoquinodimethanes that achieve this transformation by interlinked helical assemblies coupled with conformationally flexible alkoxyalkyl chains. They exhibit highly reversible thermal transformations between bistable (crystalline/amorphous) forms, along with a prominent switching of the fluorescence emission energy and intensity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  8. Caffeine and sulfadiazine interact differently with human serum albumin: A combined fluorescence and molecular docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Sonu, Vikash K.; Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-01-01

    The interaction and binding behavior of the well-known drug sulfadiazine (SDZ) and psychoactive stimulant caffeine (CAF) with human serum albumin (HSA) was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. The quenching of protein fluorescence on addition of CAF is due to the formation of protein-drug complex in the ground state; whereas in case of SDZ, the experimental results were explained on the basis of sphere of action model. Although both these compounds bind preferentially in Sudlow's site 1 of the protein, the association constant is approximately two fold higher in case of SDZ (∼4.0 × 104 M-1) in comparison with CAF (∼9.3 × 102 M-1) and correlates well with physico-chemical properties like pKa and lipophilicity of the drugs. Temperature dependent fluorescence study reveals that both SDZ and CAF bind spontaneously with HSA. However, the binding of SDZ with the protein is mainly governed by the hydrophobic forces in contrast with that of CAF; where, the interaction is best explained in terms of electrostatic mechanism. Molecular docking calculation predicts the binding of these drugs in different location of sub-domain IIA in the protein structure.

  9. Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, C.J.; Keller, N.A.; Lupton, L.R.; Taylor, T.; Tonner, P.D.

    1984-10-01

    Tomography is a non-intrusive imaging technique being developed at CRNL as an industrial tool for generating quantitative cross-sectional density maps of objects. Of most interest is tomography's ability to: distinguish features within complex geometries where other NDT techniques fail because of the complexity of the geometry; detect/locate small density changes/defects within objects, e.g. void fraction measurements within thick-walled vessels, shrink cavities in castings, etc.; provide quantitative data that can be used in analyses, e.g. of complex processes, or fracture mechanics; and provide objective quantitative data that can be used for (computer-based) quality assurance decisions, thereby reducing and in some cases eliminating the present subjectivity often encountered in NDT. The CRNL program is reviewed and examples are presented to illustrate the potential and the limitations of the technology

  10. The one-sample PARAFAC approach reveals molecular size distributions of fluorescent components in dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wünsch, Urban; Murphy, Kathleen R.; Stedmon, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Molecular size plays an important role in dissolved organic matter (DOM) biogeochemistry, but its relationship with the fluorescent fraction of DOM (FDOM) remains poorly resolved. Here high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) was coupled to fluorescence emission-excitation (EEM......) spectroscopy in full spectral (60 emission and 34 excitation wavelengths) and chromatographic resolution (... distributions for individual fluorescence components obtained from independent data sets. Spectra extracted from allochthonous DOM were highly similar. Allochthonous and autochthonous DOM shared some spectra, but included unique components. In agreement with the supramolecular assembly hypothesis, molecular...

  11. Binding between Saikosaponin C and Human Serum Albumin by Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Molecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Cun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Saikosaponin C (SSC is one of the major active constituents of dried Radix bupleuri root (Chaihu in Chinese that has been widely used in China to treat a variety of conditions, such as liver disease, for many centuries. The binding of SSC to human serum albumin (HSA was explored by fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD, UV-vis spectrophotometry, and molecular docking to understand both the pharmacology and the basis of the clinical use of SSC/Chaihu. SSC produced a concentration-dependent quenching effect on the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA, accompanied by a blue shift in the fluorescence spectra. The Stern-Volmer equation showed that this quenching was dominated by static quenching. The binding constant of SSC with HSA was 3.72 × 103 and 2.99 × 103 L·mol−1 at 26 °C and 36 °C, respectively, with a single binding site on each SSC and HSA molecule. Site competitive experiments demonstrated that SSC bound to site I (subdomain IIA and site II (subdomain IIIA in HSA. Analysis of thermodynamic parameters indicated that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces were mostly responsible for SSC-HSA association. The energy transfer efficiency and binding distance between SSC and HSA was calculated to be 0.23 J and 2.61 nm at 26 °C, respectively. Synchronous fluorescence and CD measurements indicated that SSC affected HSA conformation in the SSC-HSA complex. Molecular docking supported the experimental findings in conformational changes, binding sites and binding forces, and revealed binding of SSC at the interface between subdomains IIA-IIB.

  12. 3D ion velocity distribution function measurement in an electric thruster using laser induced fluorescence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, P. Q.; Jarrige, J.; Cucchetti, E.; Cannat, F.; Packan, D.

    2017-09-01

    Measuring the full ion velocity distribution function (IVDF) by non-intrusive techniques can improve our understanding of the ionization processes and beam dynamics at work in electric thrusters. In this paper, a Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) tomographic reconstruction technique is applied to the measurement of the IVDF in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster. A setup is developed to move the laser axis along two rotation axes around the measurement volume. The fluorescence spectra taken from different viewing angles are combined using a tomographic reconstruction algorithm to build the complete 3D (in phase space) time-averaged distribution function. For the first time, this technique is used in the plume of a miniature Hall effect thruster to measure the full distribution function of the xenon ions. Two examples of reconstructions are provided, in front of the thruster nose-cone and in front of the anode channel. The reconstruction reveals the features of the ion beam, in particular on the thruster axis where a toroidal distribution function is observed. These findings are consistent with the thruster shape and operation. This technique, which can be used with other LIF schemes, could be helpful in revealing the details of the ion production regions and the beam dynamics. Using a more powerful laser source, the current implementation of the technique could be improved to reduce the measurement time and also to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the distribution function.

  13. The potential of L-shell X-ray fluorescence CT (XFCT) for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT (XFCT), a novel modality proposed for high-sensitivity high-resolution molecular imaging of probes labelled with a high atomic-number element, has been performed with high-energy K-shell X-rays. XFCT performed with low-energy L-shell X-rays could, in principle, result in an increase of XFCT imaging sensitivity; however, the significant L-shell X-ray attenuation limits its use for imaging of small objects. This commentary discusses the advantages and drawbacks of L-shell XFCT imaging.

  14. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Yang, Y [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Patterson, M [Hamilton Regional Cancer Ctr., Hamilton, ON (Canada); Wong, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Wang, K [Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  15. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-10-01

    To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the investigated range of 81-100 ke

  16. Improving x-ray fluorescence signal for benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography by incident x-ray spectrum optimization: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Nivedh; Jones, Bernard L.; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an accurate and comprehensive Monte Carlo (MC) model of an experimental benchtop polychromatic cone-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) setup and apply this MC model to optimize incident x-ray spectrum for improving production/detection of x-ray fluorescence photons from gold nanoparticles (GNPs). Methods: A detailed MC model, based on an experimental XFCT system, was created using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The model was validated by comparing MC results including x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and scatter photon spectra with measured data obtained under identical conditions using 105 kVp cone-beam x-rays filtered by either 1 mm of lead (Pb) or 0.9 mm of tin (Sn). After validation, the model was used to investigate the effects of additional filtration of the incident beam with Pb and Sn. Supplementary incident x-ray spectra, representing heavier filtration (Pb: 2 and 3 mm; Sn: 1, 2, and 3 mm) were computationally generated and used with the model to obtain XRF/scatter spectra. Quasimonochromatic incident x-ray spectra (81, 85, 90, 95, and 100 keV with 10 keV full width at half maximum) were also investigated to determine the ideal energy for distinguishing gold XRF signal from the scatter background. Fluorescence signal-to-dose ratio (FSDR) and fluorescence-normalized scan time (FNST) were used as metrics to assess results. Results: Calculated XRF/scatter spectra for 1-mm Pb and 0.9-mm Sn filters matched (r ≥ 0.996) experimental measurements. Calculated spectra representing additional filtration for both filter materials showed that the spectral hardening improved the FSDR at the expense of requiring a much longer FNST. In general, using Sn instead of Pb, at a given filter thickness, allowed an increase of up to 20% in FSDR, more prominent gold XRF peaks, and up to an order of magnitude decrease in FNST. Simulations using quasimonochromatic spectra suggested that increasing source x-ray energy, in the

  17. Temperature dependence of the anisotropy of fluorescence in ring molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, Pavel; Barvik, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    The time dependence of the anisotropy of fluorescence after an impulsive excitation in the molecular ring (resembling the B850 ring of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) is calculated. Fast fluctuations of the environment are simulated by dynamic disorder and slow fluctuations by uncorrelated static disorder. Without dynamic disorder modest degrees of static disorder are sufficient to cause the experimentally found initial drop of the anisotropy on a sub-100 fs time scale. In the present investigation we are comparing results for the time-dependent optical anisotropy of the molecular ring for four models of the uncorrelated static disorder: Gaussian disorder in the local energies (model A), Gaussian disorder in the transfer integrals (model B), Gaussian disorder in radial positions of molecules (model C) and Gaussian disorder in angular positions of molecules (model D). Both types of disorder-static and dynamic-are taken into account simultaneously

  18. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and molecular studies in infertile men with dysplasia of the fibrous sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccetti, Baccio; Collodel, Giulia; Gambera, Laura; Moretti, Elena; Serafini, Francesca; Piomboni, Paola

    2005-07-01

    To perform fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and molecular analysis in patients with the genetic sperm defect "dysplasia of the fibrous sheath" (DFS). Retrospective study. Regional Referral Center for Male Infertility, Siena, Italy. Twelve infertile patients with DFS sperm defects. Family history, lymphocytic karyotype, physical and hormonal assays, semen analysis. The DFS sperm phenotype was defined by light, fluorescent, and electron microscopy. Sperm chromosomal constitution was examined by FISH. Gene deletions were tested by polymerase chain reaction. The genetic sperm defect DFS was determined by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Immunofluorescence staining of A-kinase anchoring protein 4 (AKAP4) showed a moderate and diffuse signal, revealing a disorganized and incompletely assembled fibrous sheath. In 11 of 12 DFS patients, polymerase chain reaction for detecting the presence of partial sequence of AKAP4/AKAP3 binding regions gave positive results. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed in decondensed sperm nuclei with probes for chromosomes 18, X, and Y. The mean disomy frequency of chromosome 18 was in the normal range, whereas the mean disomy frequencies of sex chromosomes and diploidies were twice those of controls. These results should be considered when DFS sperm are used in assisted reproductive technology, owing to the high risk of transmission of chromosomal unbalance and of DFS sperm defects to male offspring.

  19. Comparative Phenotypical and Molecular Analyses of Arabidopsis Grown under Fluorescent and LED Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Franka; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2017-06-13

    Comparative analyses of phenotypic and molecular traits of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under standardised conditions is still a challenge using climatic devices supplied with common light sources. These are in most cases fluorescent lights, which have several disadvantages such as heat production at higher light intensities, an invariable spectral output, and relatively rapid "ageing". This results in non-desired variations of growth conditions and lowers the comparability of data acquired over extended time periods. In this study, we investigated the growth behaviour of Arabidopsis Col0 under different light conditions, applying fluorescent compared to LED lamps, and we conducted physiological as well as gene expression analyses. By changing the spectral composition and/or light intensity of LEDs we can clearly influence the growth behaviour of Arabidopsis and thereby study phenotypic attributes under very specific light conditions that are stable and reproducible, which is not necessarily given for fluorescent lamps. By using LED lights, we can also roughly mimic the sun light emission spectrum, enabling us to study plant growth in a more natural-like light set-up. We observed distinct growth behaviour under the different light regimes which was reflected by physiological properties of the plants. In conclusion, LEDs provide variable emission spectra for studying plant growth under defined, stable light conditions.

  20. Comparative Phenotypical and Molecular Analyses of Arabidopsis Grown under Fluorescent and LED Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franka Seiler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of phenotypic and molecular traits of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under standardised conditions is still a challenge using climatic devices supplied with common light sources. These are in most cases fluorescent lights, which have several disadvantages such as heat production at higher light intensities, an invariable spectral output, and relatively rapid “ageing”. This results in non-desired variations of growth conditions and lowers the comparability of data acquired over extended time periods. In this study, we investigated the growth behaviour of Arabidopsis Col0 under different light conditions, applying fluorescent compared to LED lamps, and we conducted physiological as well as gene expression analyses. By changing the spectral composition and/or light intensity of LEDs we can clearly influence the growth behaviour of Arabidopsis and thereby study phenotypic attributes under very specific light conditions that are stable and reproducible, which is not necessarily given for fluorescent lamps. By using LED lights, we can also roughly mimic the sun light emission spectrum, enabling us to study plant growth in a more natural-like light set-up. We observed distinct growth behaviour under the different light regimes which was reflected by physiological properties of the plants. In conclusion, LEDs provide variable emission spectra for studying plant growth under defined, stable light conditions.

  1. Deciphering the molecular architecture of membrane contact sites by cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Javier; Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén

    2017-09-01

    At membrane contact sites (MCS) two cellular membranes form tight appositions that play critical roles in fundamental phenomena such as lipid metabolism or Ca 2+ homeostasis. The interest for these structures has surged in recent years, bringing about the characterization of a plethora of MCS-resident molecules. How those molecules are structurally organized at MCS remains enigmatic, limiting our understanding of MCS function. Whereas such molecular detail is obscured by conventional electron microscopy sample preparation, cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET) allows high resolution imaging of cellular landscapes in close-to-native conditions. Here we briefly review the fundamentals of cryo-ET and how recent developments in this technique are beginning to unveil the molecular architecture of MCS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Contact Sites edited by Christian Ungermann and Benoit Kornmann. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Encapsulation of serotonin in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2010-06-01

    Serotonin is a physiologically important biogenic amine, deficiency of which leads to mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, infantile autism, and depression. Both β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its chemically substituted synthetic varieties (often possessing enhanced aqueous solubility and improved drug complexing abilities) are finding wide applications as drug delivery vehicles. Here we have studied the encapsulation of serotonin in β-CD and succinyl-2-hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (SHP-β-CD) by exploiting the intrinsic serotonin fluorescence. Enhanced fluorescence emission intensity (which increases by ˜18% and 34% in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) and anisotropy ( r) ( r = 0.075 and 0.1 in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) are observed in presence of the cyclodextrins. From the fluorescence data host-guest interaction with 1:1 stoichiometry is evident, the association constants ( K) being 126.06 M -1 and 461.62 M -1 for β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively. Additionally, molecular docking and semiempirical calculations have been carried out which provide, for the first time, detailed insights regarding the encapsulation process. In particular, it is evident that the indole ring is inserted within the β-CD cavity with the aliphatic amine side chain protruding towards the primary rim of the β-CD cavity. Docking calculations reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex. Semiempirical calculations indicate that formation of the 1:1 inclusion complex is energetically favorable which is consistent with the fluorescence data.

  3. Direct reconstruction in CT-analogous pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography: two-dimensional simulative and experimental validations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Zhang, Yanqi; Zhang, Limin; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2016-04-01

    We present a generalized strategy for direct reconstruction in pharmacokinetic diffuse fluorescence tomography (DFT) with CT-analogous scanning mode, which can accomplish one-step reconstruction of the indocyanine-green pharmacokinetic-rate images within in vivo small animals by incorporating the compartmental kinetic model into an adaptive extended Kalman filtering scheme and using an instantaneous sampling dataset. This scheme, compared with the established indirect and direct methods, eliminates the interim error of the DFT inversion and relaxes the expensive requirement of the instrument for obtaining highly time-resolved date-sets of complete 360 deg projections. The scheme is validated by two-dimensional simulations for the two-compartment model and pilot phantom experiments for the one-compartment model, suggesting that the proposed method can estimate the compartmental concentrations and the pharmacokinetic-rates simultaneously with a fair quantitative and localization accuracy, and is well suitable for cost-effective and dense-sampling instrumentation based on the highly-sensitive photon counting technique.

  4. Multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers in fluorescence/soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of nucleoplasmic reticulum and apoptosis in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Christoph; Werner, Stephan; Carregal-Romero, Susana; N. Malhas, Ashraf; G. Klupp, Barbara; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; C. Mettenleiter, Thomas; J. Vaux, David; J. Parak, Wolfgang; Schneider, Gerd; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography on flat sample holders is perfectly suited to study the uncompromised physiological status of adherent cells at its best possible preservation by imaging after fast cryo-immobilization. To understand the mechanism by which herpesviruses induce nucleoplasmic reticulum, i.e. invaginations of the nuclear envelope, during their egress from the host cell nucleus, morphologically similar structures found in laminopathies and after c...

  5. X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) imaging of gold nanoparticle-loaded objects using 110 kVp x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Seong-Kyun; Jones, Bernard L; Siddiqi, Arsalan K; Liu, Fang; Manohar, Nivedh; Cho, Sang Hyun

    2010-02-07

    A conventional x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) technique requires monochromatic synchrotron x-rays to simultaneously determine the spatial distribution and concentration of various elements such as metals in a sample. However, the synchrotron-based XFCT technique appears to be unsuitable for in vivo imaging under a typical laboratory setting. In this study we demonstrated, for the first time to our knowledge, the possibility of performing XFCT imaging of a small animal-sized object containing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) at relatively low concentrations using polychromatic diagnostic energy range x-rays. Specifically, we created a phantom made of polymethyl methacrylate plastic containing two cylindrical columns filled with saline solution at 1 and 2 wt% GNPs, respectively, mimicking tumors/organs within a small animal. XFCT scanning of the phantom was then performed using microfocus 110 kVp x-ray beam and cadmium telluride (CdTe) x-ray detector under a pencil beam geometry after proper filtering of the x-ray beam and collimation of the detector. The reconstructed images clearly identified the locations of the two GNP-filled columns with different contrast levels directly proportional to gold concentration levels. On the other hand, the current pencil-beam implementation of XFCT is not yet practical for routine in vivo imaging tasks with GNPs, especially in terms of scanning time. Nevertheless, with the use of multiple detectors and a limited number of projections, it may still be used to image some objects smaller than the current phantom size. The current investigation suggests several modification strategies of the current XFCT setup, such as the adoption of the quasi-monochromatic cone/fan x-ray beam and XFCT-specific spatial filters or pinhole detector collimators, in order to establish the ultimate feasibility of a bench-top XFCT system for GNP-based preclinical molecular imaging applications.

  6. A Far-ultraviolet Fluorescent Molecular Hydrogen Emission Map of the Milky Way Galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Young-Soo; Min, Kyoung-Wook [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seon, Kwang-Il; Han, Wonyong [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Edelstein, Jerry, E-mail: stspeak@gmail.com [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    We present the far-ultraviolet (FUV) fluorescent molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) emission map of the Milky Way Galaxy obtained with FIMS/SPEAR covering ∼76% of the sky. The extinction-corrected intensity of the fluorescent H{sub 2} emission has a strong linear correlation with the well-known tracers of the cold interstellar medium (ISM), including color excess E(B–V) , neutral hydrogen column density N (H i), and H α emission. The all-sky H{sub 2} column density map was also obtained using a simple photodissociation region model and interstellar radiation fields derived from UV star catalogs. We estimated the fraction of H{sub 2} ( f {sub H2}) and the gas-to-dust ratio (GDR) of the diffuse ISM. The f {sub H2} gradually increases from <1% at optically thin regions where E(B–V) < 0.1 to ∼50% for E(B–V)  = 3. The estimated GDR is ∼5.1 × 10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup −2} mag{sup −1}, in agreement with the standard value of 5.8 × 10{sup 21} atoms cm{sup −2} mag{sup −1}.

  7. Fluorescent Molecular Rotor-in-Paraffin Waxes for Thermometry and Biometric Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young-Jae; Dogra, Rubal; Cheong, In Woo; Kwak, Giseop

    2015-07-08

    Novel thermoresponsive sensor systems consisting of a molecular rotor (MR) and paraffin wax (PW) were developed for various thermometric and biometric identification applications. Polydiphenylacetylenes (PDPAs) coupled with long alkyl chains were used as MRs, and PWs of hydrocarbons having 16-20 carbons were utilized as phase-change materials. The PDPAs were successfully dissolved in the molten PWs and did not act as an impurity that prevents phase transition of the PWs. These PDPA-in-PW hybrids had almost the same enthalpies and phase-transition temperatures as the corresponding pure PWs. The hybrids exhibited highly reversible fluorescence (FL) changes at the critical temperatures during phase transition of the PWs. These hybrids were impregnated into common filter paper in the molten state by absorption or were encapsulated into urea resin to enhance their mechanical integrity and cyclic stability during repeated use. The wax papers could be utilized in highly advanced applications including FL image writing/erasing, an array-type thermo-indicator, and fingerprint/palmprint identification. The present findings should facilitate the development of novel fluorescent sensor systems for biometric identification and are potentially applicable for biological and biomedical thermometry.

  8. Positron emission tomography in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: Towards targeting of molecular pathological hallmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willekens, Stefanie M.A.; Weehaeghe, Donatienne van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Damme, Philip van [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Neurosciences, Experimental Neurology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium); VIB, Vesalius Research Center, Laboratory of Neurobiology, Leuven (Belgium); Laere, Koen van [University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); Leuven Research Institute for Neuroscience and Disease (LIND), Leuven (Belgium)

    2017-03-15

    During the past decades, extensive efforts have been made to expand the knowledge of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, clinical translation of this research, in terms of earlier diagnosis and improved therapy, remains challenging. Since more than 30% of motor neurons are lost when symptoms become clinically apparent, techniques allowing non-invasive, in vivo detection of motor neuron degeneration are needed in the early, pre-symptomatic disease stage. Furthermore, it has become apparent that non-motor signs play an important role in the disease and there is an overlap with cognitive disorders, such as frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Radionuclide imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), form an attractive approach to quantitatively monitor the ongoing neurodegenerative processes. Although [{sup 18}F]-FDG has been recently proposed as a potential biomarker for ALS, active targeting of the underlying pathologic molecular processes is likely to unravel further valuable disease information and may help to decipher the pathogenesis of ALS. In this review, we provide an overview of radiotracers that have already been applied in ALS and discuss possible novel targets for in vivo imaging of various pathogenic processes underlying ALS onset and progression. (orig.)

  9. A three-step reconstruction method for fluorescence molecular tomography based on compressive sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Yansong; Jha, Abhinav K.; Dreyer, Jakob K.

    2017-01-01

    effects could be exploited, traditional compressive-sensing methods cannot be directly applied as the system matrix in FMT is highly coherent. To overcome these issues, we propose and assess a three-step reconstruction method. First, truncated singular value decomposition is applied on the data to reduce...... considerable promise and will be tested using more realistic simulations and experimental setups....

  10. Molecular X-ray computed tomography of myelin in a rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, T H; Bech, M; Bunk, O; Menzel, A; Bouchet, A; Le Duc, G; Feidenhans'l, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2011-07-01

    In this work we demonstrate the feasibility of applying small-angle X-ray scattering computed tomography (SAXS-CT) for non-invasive molecular imaging of myelin sheaths in a rat brain. Our results show that the approach yields information on several quantities, including the relative myelin concentration, its periodicity, the total thickness of the myelin sheaths, and the relative concentration of cytoskeletal neurofilaments. For example the periodicity of the myelin sheaths varied in the range from 17.0 to 18.2 nm around an average of 17.6 (±0.3) nm. We believe that imaging, i.e., spatially resolved measuring these quantities could provide general means for understanding the relation to a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  12. Biochemical activity of a fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G: Molecular modeling, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masum, Abdulla; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Ghosh, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Karmakar, Parimal; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of CT DNA with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been studied using molecular docking, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic methods. From the study, it was illustrated that Rhodamine 6G binds to the minor groove of CT DNA. The binding was cooperative in nature. Circular voltametric study showed significant change in peak current and peak potential due to complexation. All the studies showed that the binding constant was in the order of 10 6 M -1 . Circular dichroic spectra showed significant conformational change on binding and DNA unwind during binding. Thermodynamic study showed that binding was favored by negative enthalpy and positive entropy change. From thermodynamic study it was also observed that several positive and negative free energies played significant role during binding and the unfavorable conformational free energy change was overcame by highly negative hydrophobic and salt dependent free energy changes. The experimental results were further validated using molecular docking study and the effect of structure on binding has been studied theoretically. From docking study it was found that the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds played a significant role during binding. The dye was absorbed by cell and this phenomenon was studied using fluorescent microscope. Cell survivability test showed that the dye active against Human Breast Cancer cells MDA-MB 468. ROS study showed that the activity is due to the production of reactive oxygen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Value of comparative genomic hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization for molecular diagnostics in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebisch, Peter; Viardot, Andreas; Bassermann, Nicole; Wendl, Christiane; Roth, Katrin; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Einsele, Hermann; Straka, Christian; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Döhner, Hartmut; Bentz, Martin

    2003-07-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities, such as 13q deletions, are emerging as important prognostic factors in multiple myeloma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using specific DNA probes is the technique most widely used for the determination of genomic aberrations in this disease. The utility of comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) for molecular diagnostics in plasma cell malignancies has not been systematically analysed. We investigated tumour samples of patients with multiple myeloma (n = 43) or plasma cell leukaemia (n = 3) using CGH and FISH with five DNA probes localized to chromosome bands 1p22, 6q21, 11q22-q23, 13q14 and 17p13. By CGH, the most frequent genomic changes were gains on chromosomes 1q, 9q and 11q, as well as losses on chromosomes 13q, 6q, Xp and Xq. By FISH, trisomy 11q was identified at a similar frequency to the 13q deletion (42%). Compared with FISH data, the sensitivity of CGH was 80.7% and the specificity was 97.5%. Thirty-two aberrations found by FISH were not identified by CGH, mostly as a result of the proportion of cells carrying the respective aberrations, or because of the limited spatial resolution of CGH. Our data indicate that, for clinical molecular diagnostics in multiple myeloma, FISH with a disease-specific DNA probe set is superior to CGH analysis.

  14. AURAMINE O AS POTENTIAL AMYLOID MARKER: FLUORESCENCE AND MOLECULAR DOCKING STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Vus

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The applicability of Auramine O to the detection and characterization of lysozyme and serum albumin amyloid fibrils has been assessed using the fluorimetric titration and molecular docking. The parameters of the dye binding to native and fibrillar proteins were estimated in terms of the Langmuir adsorption model. It was found that Auramine O displays the high affinity for amyloid fibrils, being of the same order of magnitude as that of the classical amyloid markers. The dye also showed greater fluorescence response to lysozyme fibrils and lower sensitivity to the native protein, than Thioflavin T. Furthermore, unlike Thioflavin T, Auramine O was able to detect the morphological differences between lysozyme and albumin fibrils due to the shifts in the position of the emission maxima of the fibril-incorporated fluorophore. The molecular docking studies revealed that Auramine O and Thioflavin T form the most stable complexes with the G54_L56/S60_W62 groove of lysozyme fibrils, running parallel to the fibril axis. The results obtained suggest the contribution of both hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions to the stabilization of the dye complexes with amyloid fibrils.

  15. Noninvasive imaging of multiple myeloma using near infrared fluorescent molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathi, Deep; Zhou, Haiying; Bollerman-Nowlis, Alex; Shokeen, Monica; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell malignancy characterized by monoclonal gammopathy and osteolytic bone lesions. Multiple myeloma is most commonly diagnosed in late disease stages, presenting with pathologic fracture. Early diagnosis and monitoring of disease status may improve quality of life and long-term survival for multiple myeloma patients from what is now a devastating and fatal disease. We have developed a near-infrared targeted fluorescent molecular probe with high affinity to the α4β1 integrin receptor (VLA-4)overexpressed by a majority of multiple myeloma cells as a non-radioactive analog to PET/CT tracer currently being developed for human diagnostics. A near-infrared dye that emits about 700 nm was conjugated to a high affinity peptidomimmetic. Binding affinity and specificity for multiple myeloma cells was investigated in vitro by tissue staining and flow cytometry. After demonstration of sensitivity and specificity, preclinical optical imaging studies were performed to evaluate tumor specificity in murine subcutaneous and metastatic multiple myeloma models. The VLA-4-targeted molecular probe showed high affinity for subcutaneous MM tumor xenografts. Importantly, tumor cells specific accumulation in the bone marrow of metastatic multiple myeloma correlated with GFP signal from transfected cells. Ex vivo flow cytometry of tumor tissue and bone marrow further corroborated in vivo imaging data, demonstrating the specificity of the novel agent and potential for quantitative imaging of multiple myeloma burden in these models.

  16. Aggregation of Oligoarginines at Phospholipid Membranes: Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Time-Dependent Fluorescence Shift, and Biomimetic Colorimetric Assays

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vazdar, Mario; Wernersson, Erik; Khabiri, Morteza; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Mann, E.; Kolusheva, S.; Jelinek, R.; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 39 (2013), s. 11530-11540 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12001; GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : cell penetrating peptides * oligoarginine * molecular dynamics * membranes * fluorescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  17. A quencher-free molecular beacon design based on pyrene excimer fluorescence using pyrene-labeled UNA (unlocked nucleic acid)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kasper Kannegård; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Kjems, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    A quencher-free molecular beacon capable of generating pyrene excimer fluorescence has been constructed using strategically positioned pyrene-UNA monomers. Hybridization of a fully complementary RNA target was accompanied by a pyrene excimer emission increase of more than 900%, and detection of R...... in living cells was demonstrated....

  18. Fluorescence- and capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based SSR DNA fingerprinting and a molecular identity database for the Louisiana sugarcane industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    A database of Louisiana sugarcane molecular identity has been constructed and is being updated annually using FAM or HEX or NED fluorescence- and capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based microsatellite (SSR) fingerprinting information. The fingerprints are PCR-amplified from leaf DNA samples of current ...

  19. Small animal optoacoustic tomography system for molecular imaging of contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Richard; Liopo, Anton; Ermilov, Sergey A.; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a new and improved Laser Optoacoustic Imaging System, LOIS-3D for preclinical research applications in small animal models. The advancements include (i) a new stabilized imaging module with a more homogeneous illumination of the mouse yielding a better spatial resolution (exogenous or endogenous optoacoustic contrast agents. As examples, we present in vivo experiments using phantoms and mice with and without tumor injected with contrast agents with indocyanine green (ICG). LOIS-3D was capable of detecting ~1-2 pmole of the ICG, in tissues with relatively low blood content. With its high sensitivity and excellent spatial resolution LOIS-3D is an advanced alternative to fluorescence and bioluminescence based modalities for molecular imaging in live mice.

  20. A critical study on the interactions of hesperitin with human hemoglobin: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Sandipan [Saroj Mohan Institute of Technology, Hooghly (India); Chaudhuri, Sudip; Pahari, Biswapathik [Biophysics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Taylor, Jasmine [Chemistry Department, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States); Sengupta, Pradeep K. [Biophysics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sengupta, Bidisha, E-mail: bsengupta@tougaloo.edu [Chemistry Department, Tougaloo College, Tougaloo, MS 39174 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Hesperitin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid abundant in citrus fruits is known to possess antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, hypolipidemic, vasoprotective and other important therapeutic properties. Here we have explored the interactions of hesperitin with normal human hemoglobin (HbA), using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, far UV circular dicroism (CD) spectroscopy, combined with molecular modeling computations. Specific interaction of the flavonoid with HbA is confirmed from flavonoid-induced static quenching which is evident from steady state fluorescence as well as lifetime data. Both temperature dependent fluorescence measurements and molecular docking studies reveal that apart from hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, electrostatic interactions also play crucial role in hesperitin-HbA interactions. Furthermore, electrostatic surface potential calculations indicate that the hesperitin binding site in HbA is intensely positive due to the presence of several lysine and histidine residues. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption spectra of hesperitin bound HbA indicates ground state complex formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding induces static quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of the tryptophan of HbA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential calculations were performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contrasting binding modes of hesperitin compared to other flavonoids were observed.

  1. A critical study on the interactions of hesperitin with human hemoglobin: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Sandipan; Chaudhuri, Sudip; Pahari, Biswapathik; Taylor, Jasmine; Sengupta, Pradeep K.; Sengupta, Bidisha

    2012-01-01

    Hesperitin, a ubiquitous bioactive flavonoid abundant in citrus fruits is known to possess antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, hypolipidemic, vasoprotective and other important therapeutic properties. Here we have explored the interactions of hesperitin with normal human hemoglobin (HbA), using steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, far UV circular dicroism (CD) spectroscopy, combined with molecular modeling computations. Specific interaction of the flavonoid with HbA is confirmed from flavonoid-induced static quenching which is evident from steady state fluorescence as well as lifetime data. Both temperature dependent fluorescence measurements and molecular docking studies reveal that apart from hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions, electrostatic interactions also play crucial role in hesperitin-HbA interactions. Furthermore, electrostatic surface potential calculations indicate that the hesperitin binding site in HbA is intensely positive due to the presence of several lysine and histidine residues. - Highlights: ► Absorption spectra of hesperitin bound HbA indicates ground state complex formation. ► Binding induces static quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of the tryptophan of HbA. ► Molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential calculations were performed. ► Contrasting binding modes of hesperitin compared to other flavonoids were observed.

  2. A Conjugate of Pentamethine Cyanine and 18F as a Positron Emission Tomography/Near-Infrared Fluorescence Probe for Multimodality Tumor Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Fei An

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The novel synthesis of a dual-modality, pentamethine cyanine (Cy5 fluorescent, 18F positron emission tomography (PET imaging probe is reported. The probe shows a large extinction coefficient and large quantum yield in the biologically transparent, near-infrared window (650–900 nm for in vivo fluorescent imaging. This fluorophore bears the isotope, 18F, giving a 18F-PET/near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF, bi-modal imaging probe, that combines the long-term stability of NIRF and the unlimited penetration depth of PET imaging. The bi-modal probe is labeled with 18F in a quick, one-step reaction, which is important in working with the rapid decay of 18F. The bi-modal probe bears a free carboxyl group, highlighting a PET/NIRF synthon that can be conjugated onto many advanced biomolecules for biomarker-specific in vivo dual-modal PET/NIR tumor imaging, confocal histology, and utility in multi-fluorophore, fluorescence-guided surgery. Its potential in vivo biocompatibility is explored in a quick proof-of-principal in vivo study. The dye is delivered to A549 xenograft flank-tumors to generate PET and NIRF signals at the tumor site. The tumor distribution is confirmed in ex vivo gamma counting and imaging. Pentamethine cyanine (Cy5 has the ability to preferentially accumulate in tumor xenografts. We substitute the PET/NIRF probe for Cy5, and explore this phenomenon.

  3. A Conjugate of Pentamethine Cyanine and18F as a Positron Emission Tomography/Near-Infrared Fluorescence Probe for Multimodality Tumor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Fei-Fei; Kommidi, Harikrishna; Chen, Nandi; Ting, Richard

    2017-06-07

    The novel synthesis of a dual-modality, pentamethine cyanine (Cy5) fluorescent, 18 F positron emission tomography (PET) imaging probe is reported. The probe shows a large extinction coefficient and large quantum yield in the biologically transparent, near-infrared window (650-900 nm) for in vivo fluorescent imaging. This fluorophore bears the isotope, 18 F, giving a 18 F-PET/near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF), bi-modal imaging probe, that combines the long-term stability of NIRF and the unlimited penetration depth of PET imaging. The bi-modal probe is labeled with 18 F in a quick, one-step reaction, which is important in working with the rapid decay of 18 F. The bi-modal probe bears a free carboxyl group, highlighting a PET/NIRF synthon that can be conjugated onto many advanced biomolecules for biomarker-specific in vivo dual-modal PET/NIR tumor imaging, confocal histology, and utility in multi-fluorophore, fluorescence-guided surgery. Its potential in vivo biocompatibility is explored in a quick proof-of-principal in vivo study. The dye is delivered to A549 xenograft flank-tumors to generate PET and NIRF signals at the tumor site. The tumor distribution is confirmed in ex vivo gamma counting and imaging. Pentamethine cyanine (Cy5) has the ability to preferentially accumulate in tumor xenografts. We substitute the PET/NIRF probe for Cy5, and explore this phenomenon.

  4. Evaluation of a radiative transfer equation and diffusion approximation hybrid forward solver for fluorescence molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Andersson-Engels, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    The solution of the forward problem in fluorescence molecular imaging strongly influences the successful convergence of the fluorophore reconstruction. The most common approach to meeting this problem has been to apply the diffusion approximation. However, this model is a first-order angular approximation of the radiative transfer equation, and thus is subject to some well-known limitations. This manuscript proposes a methodology that confronts these limitations by applying the radiative transfer equation in spatial regions in which the diffusion approximation gives decreased accuracy. The explicit integro differential equations that formulate this model were solved by applying the Galerkin finite element approximation. The required spatial discretization of the investigated domain was implemented through the Delaunay triangulation, while the azimuthal discretization scheme was used for the angular space. This model has been evaluated on two simulation geometries and the results were compared with results from an independent Monte Carlo method and the radiative transfer equation by calculating the absolute values of the relative errors between these models. The results show that the proposed forward solver can approximate the radiative transfer equation and the Monte Carlo method with better than 95% accuracy, while the accuracy of the diffusion approximation is approximately 10% lower.

  5. Determination of cadmium at ultra-trace levels by CPE-molecular fluorescence combined methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talio, Maria Carolina [Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (INQUISAL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Luconi, Marta O. [Area de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Masi, Adriana N. [Area de Bromatologia- Ensayo y Valoracion de Medicamentos, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (INQUISAL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Fernandez, Liliana P., E-mail: lfernand@unsl.edu.ar [Area de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, San Luis (Argentina); Instituto de Quimica de San Luis (INQUISAL-CONICET), Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    A highly sensitive micelle-mediated extraction methodology for the preconcentration and determination of trace levels of cadmium by molecular fluorescence has been developed. Metal was complexed with o-phenanthroline (o-phen) and eosin (eo) at pH 7.6 in buffer Tris medium and quantitatively extracted into a small volume of surfactant-rich phase of PONPE 7.5 after centrifugating. The chemical variables affecting cloud point extraction (CPE) were evaluated and optimized. The RSD for six replicates of cadmium determinations at 0.84 {mu}g L{sup -1} level was 1.17%. The linearity range using the preconcentration system was between 2.79 x 10{sup -3} {mu}g L{sup -1} and 2.81 {mu}g L{sup -1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. Under the optimal conditions, it obtained a LOD of 8.38 x 10{sup -4} {mu}g L{sup -1} and LOQ of 2.79 x 10{sup -3} {mu}g L{sup -1}. The method presented good sensitivity and selectivity and was applied to the determination of trace amounts of cadmium in commercially bottled mineral water, tap water and water well samples with satisfactory results. The proposed method is an innovative application of CPE-luminescence to metal analysis comparable in sensitivity and accuracy with atomic spectroscopies.

  6. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of photosynthetic toxicity of highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters to Scenedesmus obliquus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Goswami, Nirmal; Xie, Jianping; Zhang, Bo; He, Yiliang

    2017-11-27

    While the discovery of numerous attractive properties of silver at the nanoscale has increased their demand in many sectors including medicine, optics, sensing, painting and cosmetics, it has also raised wide public concerns about their effect on living organisms in aquatic environment. Despite the continuous effort to understand the various aspects of the toxicity of silver nanomaterials, the molecular level understanding on their cytotoxicity mechanism to biological organisms has remained unclear. Herein, we demonstrated the underlying mechanism of the photosynthetic toxicity against green algae namely, Scenedesmus obliquus by using an emerging silver nanomaterial, called silver nanoclusters (defined as r-Ag NCs). By exploiting the unique fluorescence properties of r-Ag NCs along with various other analytical/biological tools, we proposed that the photosynthetic toxicity of r-Ag NCs was largely attributed to the "joint-toxicity" effect of particulate form of r-Ag NCs and its released Ag + , which resulted in the disruption of the electron transport chain of light reaction and affected the content of key enzymes (RuBP carboxylase/ oxygenase) of Calvin cycle of algae cells. We believe that the present study can also be applied to the assessment of the ecological risk derived from other metal nanoparticles.

  7. Imaging molecular signatures for clinical detection of scleroderma in the hand by multispectral photoacoustic elastic tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yubin; Zhang, Lingyan; Li, Sushu; Han, Xinai; Yuan, Zhen

    2018-02-01

    Scleroderma (SD) is a rare autoimmune disease, which is divided into 2 categories: the localized SD and systemic SD. The localized SD mainly causes skin thickening of the fingers, whereas the systemic SD can further affect the blood vessels and internal organs. In this pilot study, the multispectral photoacoustic elastic tomography (PAET) imaging technique was used to recover the quantitative physiological and elastic properties of biological tissues for the diagnosis of SD. Three healthy subjects and 3 SD patients were recruited and clinically examined by a rheumatologist, and then their hand/fingers were scanned by both magnetic resonance imaging and our home-made photoacoustic imaging system. Physiological parameters including oxygen saturation (S T O 2 ), deoxy-hemoglobin (Hb) and oxy-hemoglobin (HbO 2 ) concentrations and mechanical properties such as bulk elastic modulus images were reconstructed using the developed PAET reconstruction method. Our imaging results demonstrated that the physiological and elastic parameters exhibit striking differences between the SD and normal fingers, indicating that these biomarkers can serve as molecular signatures for early detection of SD. These quantitative physiological properties and bulk modulus may also pave a new path for improved understanding the pathological mechanism of SD. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP, the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1, a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His. Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP. To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our

  9. Direct visualization of the reaction transformation and signal amplification in a DNA molecular machine with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eRen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, as a proof of concept, the signal amplification in an artificial DNA molecular machine was directly visualized via total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM. The molecular machine brought about obvious morphology change in DNA nanostructures as well as signal amplifications. On one hand, through a triggered and autonomically repeated RCA, a DNA nano-complex featuring a locked circular DNA template (serving as raw feed was converted into a long periodically repeated strand, i.e. the RCA products. Furthermore, this RCA was repeated in three controllable reaction phases, bring about progressive signal amplification. It was testified that the RCA products (presented as long thread-like fluorescent objects can be easily distinguished from the inputted DNA probes (presented as fluorescent dots, thus the transformation in reaction can be visualized. Also, by quantitive counting of the aforementioned fluorescence objects, the progress of the reaction through the phases, along with time, and over the lysozyme concentration can be demonstrated through TIRFM visualization. Overall, it was demonstrated that TIRFM is an efficient approach to quantitively visualize the biochemical processes at single-molecule level.

  10. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke; Xu, Liang; Wu, Daocheng

    2014-12-01

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5-9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  11. Bilayered near-infrared fluorescent nanoparticles based on low molecular weight PEI for tumor-targeted in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hao; Li, Ke [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China); Xu, Liang [The University of Kansas, Department of Molecular Biosciences (United States); Wu, Daocheng, E-mail: wudaocheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Xi’an Jiaotong University, Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Education Ministry, School of Life Science and Technology (China)

    2014-12-15

    To improve the tumor fluorescent imaging results in vivo, bilayered nanoparticles encapsulating a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3′,3′-tetramethylindotri-carbocyanine iodide (DiR) were prepared using low molecular weight stearic acid-grafted polyethyleneimine and hyaluronic acid (DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles), which were investigated as a novel NIR fluorescent nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted optical imaging. These nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), infrared (IR) spectra, UV-visual absorption, and fluorescent emission spectra. Their cytotoxicity in vitro and hepatotoxicity in vivo were tested by MTT assay and histological study, respectively. In vivo NIR fluorescence imaging of the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was performed using a Carestream imaging system. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles were sphere shaped with a diameter of approximately 50 nm according to the TEM images. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles had a low cytotoxicity in vitro according to the MTT assay and low hepatotoxicity in vivo as determined in histological studies. The fluorescent emission of DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles was stable in pH values of 5–9 in solution, with only slight blue-shifts of the emission maxima at the basic pH range. The DiR-PgSHA nanoparticles exhibited a substantial tumor-targeting ability in the optical imaging with the use of tumor-bearing mice. These results demonstrated that the DiR-PgSHA nanoparticle is an excellent biocompatible nano-probe for in vivo tumor-targeted NIR fluorescence imaging with a potential for clinical applications.

  12. Detection of trace tetracycline in fish via synchronous fluorescence quenching with carbon quantum dots coated with molecularly imprinted silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji; Lin, Zheng-Zhong; Nur, A.-Zha; Lu, Yan; Wu, Ming-Hui; Zeng, Jun; Chen, Xiao-Mei; Huang, Zhi-Yong

    2018-02-01

    A novel fluorescence-based sensor combining synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) with molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was fabricated with reverse microemulsion method. Tetracycline (TC), (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APTES), tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and carbon quantum dots (CDs) were used as template, functional monomer, cross-linker and signal sources respectively in the probe preparation. A synchronous fluorescence emission (λem) at 355 nm was observed for the prepared MIP-coated CDs (MIP@CDs) particles when the wavelength interval (Δλ) was set as 70 nm, and the synchronous fluorescence intensity could be rapidly and efficiently quenched by TC based on inner filter effect (IFE). The quenching efficiencies of synchronous fluorescence intensity was linearly fitted with tetracycline (TC) concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 50 μmol L- 1 with a detection limit (DL) of 9 nmol L- 1 (3σ, n = 9). The MIP@CDs was used as a probe to detect TC in fish samples with the recoveries ranging from 98.4% to 103.1% and the relative standard deviation less than 6.0%. The results illustrated that the as-prepared MIP@CDs could be applied to the detection of trace TC in fish samples with rapidity, high sensitivity and accuracy.

  13. Fluorescent angiography and optical coherence tomography with angiography of the ocular fundus in patients with "the wet" form of an age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virsta A.M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the informative value of fluorescent angiography (FA and optical coherence tomography with fundus angiography (angio-OCT in the diagnosis of "wet" form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Material and methods. The present study included 20 patients (20 eyes diagnosed with degeneration of macula and posterior pole of the eye, the "wet" form (late stage age-related macular degeneration, AREDS category 4. The study used machines: optical coherence tomography, Spectralis HRA+OCT (Heidelberg Engeneering, Germany, optical со- herence tomography-angiography CIRRUS HD-OCT MODEL 5000 (Carl Zeiss, Germany. Results. When conducting the FA, in 11 patients found the ill-defined zone of small leakage of dye in 7 patients revealed a clearly defined area of hyperfluorescence in the early phase, and marked leakage of dye in the late phase, 2 patients — uncertain indices. In connection with the received data questionable PHAGE in 11 patients, all were held angio-OCT, to clarify the localization of choroidal neovascularization (CNV. When performing angio-OCT in 11 patients revealed that "wet" form of AMD with occult choroidal neovascularization. In 7 patients there had been discovered classic CNV in 2 patients combined. Conclusion. Angio-OCT gives a clearer picture about the presence of a choroidal neovascular membrane that plays a significant role in determining the course of treatment of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration.

  14. Intravascular near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of atherosclerosis: toward coronary arterial visualization of biologically high-risk plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfon, Marcella A.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2010-01-01

    New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.

  15. Photolysis study of octyl p-methoxycinnamate loaded microemulsion by molecular fluorescence and chemometric approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Danielle Silva; Insausti, Matías; Band, Beatriz Susana Fernández; Grünhut, Marcos

    2018-02-01

    Octyl p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) is one of the most widely used sunscreen agents. However, the efficiency of OMC as UV filter over time is affected due to the formation of the cis-isomer which presents a markedly lower extinction coefficient (εcis = 12,600 L mol- 1 cm- 1 at 291 nm) than the original trans-isomer (εtrans = 24,000 L mol- 1 cm- 1 at 310 nm). In this work, a novel carrier for OMC based on an oil-in-water microemulsion is proposed in order to improve the photostability of this sunscreen. The formulation was composed of 29.2% (w/w) of a 3:1 mixture of ethanol (co-surfactant) and decaethylene glycol mono-dodecyl ether (surfactant), 1.5% (w/w) of oleic acid (oil phase) and 69.2% (w/w) of water. This microemulsion was prepared in a simple way, under moderate stirring at 25 °C and using acceptable, biocompatible and accessible materials for topical use. OMC was incorporated in the vehicle at a final concentration of 5.0% (w/w), taking into account the maximum permitted levels established by international norms. Then, a photolysis study of the loaded formulation was performed using a continuous flow system. The direct photolysis was monitored over time by molecular fluorescence. The recorded spectra data between 370 y 490 nm were analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm. The kinetic rate constants corresponding to the photolysis of the trans-OMC were calculated from the concentration profiles, resulting in 0.0049 s- 1 for the trans-OMC loaded microemulsion and 0.0131 s- 1 for the trans-OMC in aqueous media. These results demonstrate a higher photostability of the trans-OMC when loaded in the proposed vehicle with respect to the free trans-OMC in aqueous media.

  16. Iodine X-ray fluorescence computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector in conjunction with a cerium-target tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, Osahiko, E-mail: osahiko.hagiwara@gmail.co [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Watanabe, Manabu [The 3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Eiichi [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Nagao, Jiro [The 3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Shigehiro [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Onagawa, Jun [Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-8537 (Japan)

    2011-06-01

    An X-ray fluorescence computed tomography system (XRF-CT) is useful for determining the main atoms in objects. To detect iodine atoms without using a synchrotron, we developed an XRF-CT system utilizing a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and a cerium X-ray generator. CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. When cerium K-series characteristic X-rays are absorbed by iodine atoms in objects, iodine K fluorescence is produced from atoms and is detected by the CdTe detector. Next, event signals of X-ray photons are produced with the use of charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Iodine K{alpha} fluorescence is isolated using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted using a counter card. In energy-dispersive XRF-CT, the tube voltage and tube current were 70 kV and 0.40 mA, respectively, and the X-ray intensity was 115.3 {mu}Gy/s at a distance of 1.0 m from the source. The demonstration of XRF-CT was carried out by the selection of photons in an energy range from 27.5 to 29.5 keV with a photon-energy resolution of 1.2 keV.

  17. Multimodal Imaging of Integrin Receptor-Positive Tumors by Bioluminescence, Fluorescence, Gamma Scintigraphy, and Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Using a Cyclic RGD Peptide Labeled with a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Dye and a Radionuclide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Barry Edwards

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, particularly the αvβ3 heterodimers, play important roles in tumor-induced angiogenesis and invasiveness. To image the expression pattern of the αvβ3 integrin in tumors through a multimodality imaging paradigm, we prepared a cyclic RGDyK peptide analogue (LS308 bearing a tetraazamacrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N′, N″, N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA and a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR fluorescent dye cypate. The αvβ3 integrin binding affinity and the internalization properties of LS308 mediated by the αvβ3 integrin in 4t1luc cells were investigated by receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The in vivo distribution of 111In-labeled LS308 in a 4t1luc tumor-bearing mouse model was studied by fluorescence, bioluminescence, planar gamma, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The results show that LS308 has high affinity for αvβ3 integrin and internalized preferentially via the αvβ3 integrin-mediated endocytosis in 4t1luc cells. We also found that LS308 selectively accumulated in αvβ3-positve tumors in a receptor-specific manner and was visualized by the four imaging methods. Whereas the endogenous bioluminescence imaging identified the ensemble of the tumor tissue, the fluorescence and SPECT methods with the exogenous contrast agent LS308 reported the local expression of αvβ3 integrin. Thus, the multimodal imaging approach could provide important complementary diagnostic information for monitoring the efficacy of new antiangiogenic drugs.

  18. Comparison of molecular imprinted particles prepared using precipitation polymerization in water and chloroform for fluorescent detection of nitroaromatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stringer, R. Cody; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Grant, Sheila A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Imprinted polymers prepared using precipitation polymerization. → Comparison of chloroform and water as polymerization solvent. → Imprinted polymer doped with quantum dots for fluorescent sensor. → Fluorescent imprinted polymer used to detect nitroaromatic explosives. → Chloroform is ideal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatics. - Abstract: A comparative study was conducted to study the effects that two different polymerization solvents would have on the properties of imprinted polymer microparticles prepared using precipitation polymerization. Microparticles prepared in chloroform, which previous results indicated was the optimal solvent for molecular imprinting of nitroaromatic explosive compounds, were compared to water, which was hypothesized to decrease water swelling of the polymer and allow enhanced rebinding of aqueous template. The microparticles were characterized and were integrated into a fluorescence sensing mechanism for detection of nitroaromatic explosive compounds. The performance of the sensing mechanisms was compared to illustrate which polymerization solvent produced optimal imprinted polymer microparticles for detection of nitroaromatic molecules. Results indicated that the structures of microparticles synthesized in chloroform versus water varied greatly. Sensor performance studies showed that the microparticles prepared in chloroform had greater imprinting efficiency and higher template rebinding than those prepared in water. For detection of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, the chloroform-based fluorescent microparticles achieved a lower limit of detection of 0.1 μM, as compared to 100 μM for the water-based fluorescent microparticles. Detection limits for 2,4-dinitrotoluene, as well as time response studies, also demonstrated that the chloroform-based particles are more effective for detection of nitroaromatic compounds than water-based particles. These results illustrate that the enhanced chemical properties of

  19. Molecular Level Understanding of Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) Induced Sol-Gel Transition of Pluronic F127 Using Fisetin as a Fluorescent Molecular Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Jhili; Swain, Jitendriya; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2018-01-11

    The thermoreversible sol-gel transition of pluronic F127 is markedly altered even with addition of submicellar concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant. Multiple fluorescence parameters like fluorescence intensity, fluorescence anisotropy and fluorescence lifetime of both the prototropic forms (anion (A - *) and phototautomer FT*) of the photoprototropic fluorescent probe fisetin has been efficiently used to understand the molecular level properties like polarity and microviscosity of the PF127-SDS system as a function of temperature. The SDS-induced increase in the interfacial hydrophobicity level is seen to affect the sol-gel phase transition of PF127 (21-18 °C). The E T (30) polarity parameter value of anionic emission of fisetin suggests that there is a considerable decrease in the polarity of the PF127 medium with increase in temperature and with the addition of SDS. The microviscosity progressively increases from ∼5 mPa s (sol state, 10 °C) to ∼22.01 mPa s (gel state 35 °C) in aqueous solution of PF127. The variation in microviscosity with addition of SDS in PF127-SDS mixed system is significant in sol phase whereas in gel phase this variation is significantly less. Temperature dependent fluorescence lifetime of FT* indicates that there is heterogeneity in distribution of fisetin molecules at different domains of PF127. This work also show-cases the sensitivity of fisetin toward change in polarity and change in sol-gel transition temperature of copolymer PF127 with variation in temperature (both forward and reverse directions) and SDS.

  20. Optical detection of λ-cyhalothrin by core-shell fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers in Chinese spirits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jixiang; Gao, Lin; Han, Donglai; Pan, Jianming; Qiu, Hao; Li, Hongji; Wei, Xiao; Dai, Jiangdong; Yang, Jinghai; Yao, Hui; Yan, Yongsheng

    2015-03-11

    In this study, fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers (FMIPs), which were for the selective recognition and fluorescence detection of λ-cyhalothrin (LC), were synthesized via fluorescein 5(6)-isothiocyanate (FITC) and 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS)/SiO2 particles. The SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), UV-vis spectrophotometer (UV-vis), fluorescence spectrophotometer, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The as-synthesized SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs with an imprinted polymer film (thickness was about 100 nm) was demonstrated to be spherically shaped and had good monodispersity, high fluorescence intensity, and good selective recognition. Using fluorescence quenching as the detection tool, the largest fluorescence quenching efficiency (F0/F - 1) of SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs is close to 2.5 when the concentration of the LC is 1.0 μM L(-1). In addition, a linear relationship (F0/F - 1= 0.0162C + 0.0272) could be obtained covering a wide concentration range of 0-60 nM L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.9968 described by the Stern-Volmer equation. Moreover, the limit of detection (LOD) of the SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs was 9.17 nM L(-1). The experiment results of practical detection revealed that the SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs as an attractive recognition element was satisfactory for the determination of LC in Chinese spirits. Therefore, this study demonstrated the potential of SiO2@FITC-APTS@MIPs for the recognition and detection of LC in food.

  1. A simple and sensitive surface molecularly imprinted polymers based fluorescence sensor for detection of λ-Cyhalothrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunbo; Song, Zhilong; Pan, Jianming; Yan, Yongsheng; Cao, Zhijing; Wei, Xiao; Gao, Lin; Wang, Juan; Dai, Jiangdong; Meng, Minjia; Yu, Ping

    2014-07-01

    In this study, surface molecularly imprinted YVO4:Eu(3+) nanoparticles with molecular recognitive optosensing activity were successfully prepared by precipitation polymerization using λ-Cyhalothrin (LC) as template molecules, methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the polymerization precursors which could complex with template molecules, and the material has been characterized by SEM, TEM, FT-IR, XRD, TGA and so on. Meanwhile, the as-prepared core-shell structured nanocomposite (YVO4:Eu(3+)@MIPs), which was composed of lanthanide doped YVO4:Eu(3+) as fluorescent signal and surface molecular imprinted polymers as molecular selective recognition sites, could selectively and sensitively optosense the template molecules. After the experimental conditions were optimized, two linear relationship were obtained covering the concentration range of 2.0-10.0 μM and 10.0-90.0 μM, and the limit of detection (LOD) for LC was found to be 1.76 μM. Furthermore, a possible mechanism was put forward to explain the fluorescence quenching of YVO4:Eu(3+)@MIPs. More importantly, the obtained sensor was proven to be suitable for the detection of residues of LC in real examples. And the excellent performance of this sensor will facilitate future development of rapid and high-efficiency detection of LC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer as a selective fluorescence probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ton, Xuan-Anh; Acha, Victor; Bonomi, Paolo; Tse Sum Bui, Bernadette; Haupt, Karsten

    2015-02-15

    We have developed a disposable evanescent wave fiber optic sensor by coating a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescent signaling group on a 4-cm long polystyrene optical waveguide. The MIP is composed of a naphthalimide-based fluorescent monomer, which shows fluorescence enhancement upon binding with carboxyl-containing molecules. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and the mycotoxin citrinin were used as model analytes. The coating of the MIP was either performed ex-situ, by dip-coating the fiber with MIP particles synthesized beforehand, or in-situ by evanescent-wave photopolymerization on the fiber. The sensing element was interrogated with a fiber-coupled spectrofluorimeter. The fiber optic sensor detects targets in the low nM range and exhibits specific and selective recognition over structural analogs and non-related carboxyl-containing molecules. This technology can be extended to other carboxyl-containing analytes, and to a broader spectrum of targets using different fluorescent monomers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Determining the fate of fluorescent quantum dots on surface of engineered budding S. cerevisiae cell molecular landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Raghuraj S; Qureshi, Anjum; Niazi, Javed H

    2015-07-15

    In this study, we surface engineered living S. cerevisiae cells by decorating quantum dots (QDs) and traced the fate of QDs on molecular landscape of single mother cell through several generation times (progeny cells). The fate of QDs on cell-surface was tracked through the cellular division events using confocal microscopy and fluorescence emission profiles. The extent of cell-surface QDs distribution among the offspring was determined as the mother cell divides into daughter cells. Fluorescence emission from QDs on progeny cells was persistent through the second-generation time (~240min) until all of the progeny cells lost their cell-bound QDs during the third generation time (~360min). The surface engineered yeast cells were unaffected by the QDs present on their molecular landscapes and retained their normal cellular growth, architecture and metabolic activities as confirmed by their viability, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examinations and cytotoxicity tests, respectively. Our results demonstrated that QDs on mother cell landscape tend to distribute among its progeny cells that accompanied with concomitant reduction in QDs' fluorescence, which can be quantified. We suggest that surface engineered cells with QDs will enable investigating the cellular behavior and monitoring cell growth patterns as nanobiosensors for screening of drugs/chemicals at single cell level with fewer side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Binding analysis for interaction of diacetylcurcumin with β-casein nanoparticles by using fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular docking calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehranfar, Fahimeh; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Fani, Najme; Keyhanfar, Mehrnaz

    2013-11-01

    The interaction of diacetylcurcumin (DAC), as a novel synthetic derivative of curcumin, with bovine β-casein (an abundant milk protein that is highly amphiphilic and self assembles into stable micellar nanoparticles in aqueous solution) was investigated using fluorescence quenching experiments, Forster energy transfer measurements and molecular docking calculations. The fluorescence quenching measurements revealed the presence of a single binding site on β-casein for DAC with the binding constant value equals to (4.40 ± 0.03) × 104 M-1. Forster energy transfer measurements suggested that the distance between bound DAC and Trp143 residue is higher than the respective critical distance, hence, the static quenching is more likely responsible for fluorescence quenching other than the mechanism of non-radiative energy transfer. Our results from molecular docking calculations indicated that binding of DAC to β-casein predominantly occurred through hydrophobic contacts in the hydrophobic core of protein. Additionally, in vitro investigation of the cytotoxicity of free DAC and DAC-β-casein complex in human breast cancer cell line MCF7 revealed the higher cytotoxic effect of DAC-β-casein complex.

  5. Molecular Detection of Bladder Cancer by Fluorescence Microsatellite Analysis and an Automated Genetic Analyzing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarel Halachmi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the ability of an automated fluorescent analyzing system to detect microsatellite alterations, in patients with bladder cancer. We investigated 11 with pathology proven bladder Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC for microsatellite alterations in blood, urine, and tumor biopsies. DNA was prepared by standard methods from blood, urine and resected tumor specimens, and was used for microsatellite analysis. After the primers were fluorescent labeled, amplification of the DNA was performed with PCR. The PCR products were placed into the automated genetic analyser (ABI Prism 310, Perkin Elmer, USA and were subjected to fluorescent scanning with argon ion laser beams. The fluorescent signal intensity measured by the genetic analyzer measured the product size in terms of base pairs. We found loss of heterozygocity (LOH or microsatellite alterations (a loss or gain of nucleotides, which alter the original normal locus size in all the patients by using fluorescent microsatellite analysis and an automated analyzing system. In each case the genetic changes found in urine samples were identical to those found in the resected tumor sample. The studies demonstrated the ability to detect bladder tumor non-invasively by fluorescent microsatellite analysis of urine samples. Our study supports the worldwide trend for the search of non-invasive methods to detect bladder cancer. We have overcome major obstacles that prevented the clinical use of an experimental system. With our new tested system microsatellite analysis can be done cheaper, faster, easier and with higher scientific accuracy.

  6. Photolysis study of octyl p-methoxycinnamate loaded microemulsion by molecular fluorescence and chemometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Danielle Silva; Insausti, Matías; Band, Beatriz Susana Fernández; Grünhut, Marcos

    2018-02-15

    Octyl p-methoxycinnamate (OMC) is one of the most widely used sunscreen agents. However, the efficiency of OMC as UV filter over time is affected due to the formation of the cis-isomer which presents a markedly lower extinction coefficient (ε cis =12,600L mol -1 cm -1 at 291nm) than the original trans-isomer (ε trans =24,000L mol -1 cm -1 at 310nm). In this work, a novel carrier for OMC based on an oil-in-water microemulsion is proposed in order to improve the photostability of this sunscreen. The formulation was composed of 29.2% (w/w) of a 3:1 mixture of ethanol (co-surfactant) and decaethylene glycol mono-dodecyl ether (surfactant), 1.5% (w/w) of oleic acid (oil phase) and 69.2% (w/w) of water. This microemulsion was prepared in a simple way, under moderate stirring at 25°C and using acceptable, biocompatible and accessible materials for topical use. OMC was incorporated in the vehicle at a final concentration of 5.0% (w/w), taking into account the maximum permitted levels established by international norms. Then, a photolysis study of the loaded formulation was performed using a continuous flow system. The direct photolysis was monitored over time by molecular fluorescence. The recorded spectra data between 370 y 490nm were analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares algorithm. The kinetic rate constants corresponding to the photolysis of the trans-OMC were calculated from the concentration profiles, resulting in 0.0049s -1 for the trans-OMC loaded microemulsion and 0.0131s -1 for the trans-OMC in aqueous media. These results demonstrate a higher photostability of the trans-OMC when loaded in the proposed vehicle with respect to the free trans-OMC in aqueous media. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    experiences emphasize the high potential of this technology to provide a serious alternative to conventional fluorescence microscopy in routine pathology; representing a sustainable technological progress, this low-cost technology will clearly give direction also to the growing field of molecular pathology. * AFTER = Amplified Fluorescence by transmitted Excitation of Radiation

  8. Imaging breast adipose and fibroglandular tissue molecular signatures by using hybrid MRI-guided near-infrared spectral tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksby, Ben; Pogue, Brian W.; Jiang, Shudong; Dehghani, Hamid; Srinivasan, Subhadra; Kogel, Christine; Tosteson, Tor D.; Weaver, John; Poplack, Steven P.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2006-06-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided near-infrared spectral tomography was developed and used to image adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue of 11 normal female subjects, recruited under an institutional review board-approved protocol. Images of hemoglobin, oxygen saturation, water fraction, and subcellular scattering were reconstructed and show that fibroglandular fractions of both blood and water are higher than in adipose tissue. Variation in adipose and fibroglandular tissue composition between individuals was not significantly different across the scattered and dense breast categories. Combined MR and near-infrared tomography provides fundamental molecular information about these tissue types with resolution governed by MR T1 images. hemoglobin | magnetic resonance imaging | water | fat | oxygen saturation

  9. Molecular pathology in vulnerable carotid plaques: correlation with [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graebe, M; Pedersen, Sune Folke; Borgwardt, L

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Atherosclerosis is recognised as an inflammatory disease, and new diagnostic tools are warranted to evaluate plaque inflammatory activity and risk of cardiovascular events. We investigated [18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in vulnerable carotid plaques visualised by positron emission...... tomography (PET). Uptake was correlated to quantitative gene expression of known markers of inflammation and plaque vulnerability. METHODS: Ten patients with recent transient ischaemic attack and carotid artery stenosis (>50%) underwent combined FDG-PET and computed tomography angiography (CTA) the day...

  10. Simultaneous determination of acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol and caffeine using solid-phase molecular fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Julio Cesar L; Poppi, Ronei J

    2009-05-29

    This paper describes the determination of acetylsalicylic acid (ASA), paracetamol and caffeine in pharmaceutical formulations using solid-phase molecular fluorescence and second order multivariate calibration. This methodology is applicable even in the presence of unknown interferences and with spectral overlap of the components in the mixture. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) was used for model development, whose effectiveness was demonstrated by analysis of variance (ANOVA). Errors below 10% were obtained for all compounds using an external validation set. Benefits of the new procedures not included in the reference methods such as low cost, no need of sample preparation, simple and fast analysis using fluorescence spectrometer and no generation of waste, make this method very attractive, allowing for the simultaneous determination of compounds with good reproducibility and accuracy.

  11. Molecular characteristics of a fluorescent chemosensor for the recognition of ferric ion based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhen; Ran, Xia; Shi, Lili; Lou, Jie; Kuang, Yanmin; Guo, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Metal ion recognition is of great significance in biological and environmental detection. So far, there is very few research related to the ferric ion sensing based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivatives. In this work, we report a highly selective fluorescent "turn-off" sensor for Fe3 + ions and the molecular sensing characteristics based on an azobenzene derivative, N-(3,4,5-octanoxyphenyl)-N‧-4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azophenyl]1,3,4-oxadiazole (AOB-t8). The binding association constant was determined to be 6.07 × 103 M- 1 in ethanol and the stoichiometry ratio of 2:2 was obtained from Job's plot and MS spectra. The AOB-t8 might be likely to form the dimer structure through the chelation of ferric ion with the azobenzene moiety. Meanwhile, it was found that the photoisomerization property of AOB-t8 was regulated by the binding with Fe3 +. With the chelation of Fe3 +, the regulated molecular rigidity and the perturbed of electronic state and molecular geometry was suggested to be responsible for the accelerated isomerization of AOB-t8 to UV irradiation and the increased fluorescence lifetime of both trans- and cis-AOB-t8-Fe(III). Moreover, the reversible sensing of AOB-t8 was successfully observed by releasing the iron ion from AOB-t8-Fe(III) with the addition of citric acid.

  12. Investigation of the interaction between isomeric derivatives and human serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn; Dou, Huanjing; Yin, Yujing; Xie, Yuanzhe; Sun, Li; Liu, Chunmei; Dong, Jingjing; Huang, Gang; Zhu, Yanyan; Song, Chuanjun, E-mail: chjsong@zzu.edu.cn; Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, we have synthesized 9H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]indol-9-ones and the isomeric indeno[2,1-b]pyrrol-8-ones. The interactions of human serum albumin with series of isomeric derivatives have been studied by spectrophotometric methods. Results show the intrinsic fluorescence is quenched by the derivatives with a static quenching procedure. The thermodynamics parameters indicate that van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonds play a major role in the interactions. The results of synchronous fluorescence spectra demonstrate that the microenvironments of Trp residue of human serum albumin are disturbed by most derivatives. Thermodynamic results showed that the 9H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]indol-9-ones are stronger quenchers and bind to human serum albumin with the higher affinity than isomeric indeno[2,1-b]pyrrol-8-ones. The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects has been investigated. - Highlights: • The interactions between isomeric derivatives and HSA have been investigated. • Results reveal that 9H-pyrrolo[1,2-a]indol-9-ones are stronger quenchers for HSA. • Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces play major role in the binding process. • The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects has been investigated. • The binding study was also modeled by molecular docking.

  13. A matter of collection and detection for intraoperative and noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging: To see or not to see?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Rasmussen, John C.; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Although fluorescence molecular imaging is rapidly evolving as a new combinational drug/device technology platform for molecularly guided surgery and noninvasive imaging, there remains no performance standards for efficient translation of “first-in-humans” fluorescent imaging agents using these devices. Methods: The authors employed a stable, solid phantom designed to exaggerate the confounding effects of tissue light scattering and to mimic low concentrations (nM–pM) of near-infrared fluorescent dyes expected clinically for molecular imaging in order to evaluate and compare the commonly used charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems employed in preclinical studies and in human investigational studies. Results: The results show that intensified CCD systems offer greater contrast with larger signal-to-noise ratios in comparison to their unintensified CCD systems operated at clinically reasonable, subsecond acquisition times. Conclusions: Camera imaging performance could impact the success of future “first-in-humans” near-infrared fluorescence imaging agent studies. PMID:24506637

  14. Immunotargeting of Integrin α6β4 for Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography and Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging in a Pancreatic Cancer Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winn Aung MBBS, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore suitable imaging probes for early and specific detection of pancreatic cancer, we demonstrated that α6β4 integrin is a good target and employed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT or near-infrared (NIR imaging for immunotargeting. Expression levels of α6β4 were examined by Western blotting and flow cytometry in certain human pancreatic cancer cell lines. The human cell line BxPC-3 was used for α6β4-positive and a mouse cell line, A4, was used for negative counterpart. We labeled antibody against α6β4 with Indium-111 (111In or indocyanine green (ICG. After injection of 111In-labeled probe to tumor-bearing mice, biodistribution, SPECT, autoradiography (ARG, and immunohistochemical (IHC studies were conducted. After administration of ICG-labeled probe, in vivo and ex vivo NIR imaging and fluorescence microscopy of tumors were performed. BxPC-3 tumor showed a higher radioligand binding in SPECT and higher fluorescence intensity as well as a delay in the probe washout in NIR imaging when compared to A4 tumor. The biodistribution profile of 111In-labeled probe, ARG, and IHC confirmed the α6β4 specific binding of the probe. Here, we propose that α6β4 is a desirable target for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and that it could be detected by radionuclide imaging and NIR imaging using a radiolabeled or ICG-labeled α6β4 antibody.

  15. Full-field fan-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography system design with linear-array detectors and pinhole collimation: a rapid Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siyuan; Li, Liang; Li, Ruizhe; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-11-01

    We present the design concept and initial simulations for a polychromatic full-field fan-beam x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) device with pinhole collimators and linear-array photon counting detectors. The phantom is irradiated by a fan-beam polychromatic x-ray source filtered by copper. Fluorescent photons are stimulated and then collected by two linear-array photon counting detectors with pinhole collimators. The Compton scatter correction and the attenuation correction are applied in the data processing, and the maximum-likelihood expectation maximization algorithm is applied for the image reconstruction of XFCT. The physical modeling of the XFCT imaging system was described, and a set of rapid Monte Carlo simulations was carried out to examine the feasibility and sensitivity of the XFCT system. Different concentrations of gadolinium (Gd) and gold (Au) solutions were used as contrast agents in simulations. Results show that 0.04% of Gd and 0.065% of Au can be well reconstructed with the full scan time set at 6 min. Compared with using the XFCT system with a pencil-beam source or a single-pixel detector, using a full-field fan-beam XFCT device with linear-array detectors results in significant scanning time reduction and may satisfy requirements of rapid imaging, such as in vivo imaging experiments.

  16. Preliminary study on X-ray fluorescence computed tomography imaging of gold nanoparticles: Acceleration of data acquisition by multiple pinholes scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Tenta; Sunaguchi, Naoki; Seo, Seung-Jum; Hyodo, Kazuyuki; Zeniya, Tsutomu; Kim, Jong-Ki; Yuasa, Tetsuya

    2018-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have recently attracted attention in nanomedicine as novel contrast agents for cancer imaging. A decisive tomographic imaging technique has not yet been established to depict the 3-D distribution of GNPs in an object. An imaging technique known as pinhole-based X-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) is a promising method that can be used to reconstruct the distribution of GNPs from the X-ray fluorescence emitted by GNPs. We address the acceleration of data acquisition in pinhole-based XFCT for preclinical use using a multiple pinhole scheme. In this scheme, multiple projections are simultaneously acquired through a multi-pinhole collimator with a 2-D detector and full-field volumetric beam to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of the projections; this enables fast data acquisition. To demonstrate the efficacy of this method, we performed an imaging experiment using a physical phantom with an actual multi-pinhole XFCT system that was constructed using the beamline AR-NE7A at KEK. The preliminary study showed that the multi-pinhole XFCT achieved a data acquisition time of 20 min at a theoretical detection limit of approximately 0.1 Au mg/ml and at a spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  17. A search for molecular hydrogen fluorescence near 100 km. [excitation by solar extreme UV radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, P. D.; Takacs, P. Z.

    1975-01-01

    The fluorescence of H2 in the Lyman band system, excited by solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, provides a means for the optical detection of H2 in the upper atmosphere. In particular, the Ly beta line of hydrogen is nearly degenerate with the (6,0) P1 transition, and absorption in this line produces fluorescence in the v-prime = 6 progression, principally at 1265, 1366, 1462 and 1608 A. Absorption by O2 rapidly attenuates the Ly beta from an overhead sun below 100 km and also significantly attenuates the fluorescent radiation. Far-ultraviolet dayglow spectra from 1130 to 1510 A obtained from an Aerobee rocket experiment on 11 December 1972 give an upper limit for any H2 emission which is a factor of 5 higher than expected according to recent hydrogen models.

  18. Design and synthesis of a fluorescent molecular imprinted polymer for use in an optical fibre-based cocaine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Stephen P.; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Karim, Kal; Gascoine, Paul; Lacey, Richard; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we have developed chemical sensors using fibre optic-based techniques for the detection of Cocaine, utilising molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) containing fluorescein moieties as the signalling groups. Here, we report the computational design of a fluorophore which was incorporated into a MIP for the generation of a novel sensor that offers improved sensitivity for Cocaine with a detection range of 1-100μM. High selectivity for Cocaine over a suite of known Cocaine interferants (25μM) was also demonstrated by measuring changes in the intensity of fluorescence signals received from the sensor.

  19. Multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers in fluorescence/soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography of nucleoplasmic reticulum and apoptosis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, Christoph; Werner, Stephan; Carregal-Romero, Susana; Malhas, Ashraf N.; Klupp, Barbara G.; Guttmann, Peter; Rehbein, Stefan; Henzler, Katja; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence and soft X-ray cryo-microscopy/tomography on flat sample holders is perfectly suited to study the uncompromised physiological status of adherent cells at its best possible preservation by imaging after fast cryo-immobilization. To understand the mechanism by which herpesviruses induce nucleoplasmic reticulum, i.e. invaginations of the nuclear envelope, during their egress from the host cell nucleus, morphologically similar structures found in laminopathies and after chemical induction were investigated as a potentially more easily accessible model system. For example, anti-retroviral protease inhibitors like Saquinavir also induce invaginations of the nuclear membranes. With the help of newly designed multimodal nanoparticles as alignment and correlation markers, and by optimizing fluorescence cryo-microscopy data acquisition, an elaborate three-dimensional network of nucleoplasmic reticulum was demonstrated in nuclei of Saquinavir-treated rabbit kidney cells expressing a fluorescently labeled inner nuclear membrane protein. In part of the protease inhibitor-treated samples, nuclei exhibited dramatic ultrastructural changes indicative of programmed cell death/apoptosis. This unexpected observation highlights another unique feature of soft X-ray microscopy, i.e. high absorption contrast information not relying on labeled cellular components, at a 3D resolution of approximately 40 nm (half-pitch) and through a sample thickness of several micrometers. These properties make it a valuable part of the cell biology imaging toolbox to visualize the cellular ultrastructure in its completeness. - Highlights: • Nucleoplasmic reticulum was demonstrated in nuclei of Saquinavir-treated cells. • New polyelectrolyte-Qdot ® 605 coated gold beads were employed as fiducials. • Saquinavir can induce a strong apoptotic phenotype in the nucleus. • CryoXT is an auspicious imaging technique in apoptosis research

  20. Alignment of low-dose X-ray fluorescence tomography images using differential phase contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Pyo; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Que, Emily L; Bleher, Reiner; Vogt, Stefan; Woodruff, Teresa K; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence nanotomography provides unprecedented sensitivity for studies of trace metal distributions in whole biological cells. Dose fractionation, in which one acquires very low dose individual projections and then obtains high statistics reconstructions as signal from a voxel is brought together (Hegerl & Hoppe, 1976), requires accurate alignment of these individual projections so as to correct for rotation stage runout. It is shown here that differential phase contrast at 10.2 keV beam energy offers the potential for accurate cross-correlation alignment of successive projections, by demonstrating that successive low dose, 3 ms per pixel, images acquired at the same specimen position and rotation angle have a narrower and smoother cross-correlation function (1.5 pixels FWHM at 300 nm pixel size) than that obtained from zinc fluorescence images (25 pixels FWHM). The differential phase contrast alignment resolution is thus well below the 700 nm × 500 nm beam spot size used in this demonstration, so that dose fractionation should be possible for reduced-dose, more rapidly acquired, fluorescence nanotomography experiments.

  1. How to measure separation and angles between inter-molecular fluorescent markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    Structure and function of an individual biomolecule can be explored with minimum two fluorescent markers of different colors. Since the light of such markers can be spec- trally separated and imaged simultaneously, the markers can be colocalized. Here, we describe the method used for such two......-color colocalization microscopy. Then we extend it to fluorescent markers with fixed orientations and in intramolecular proximity. Our benchmarking of this extension produced two extra results: (a) we established short double-labeled DNA molecules as probes of 3D orientation of anything to which one can attach them...

  2. Fluorescence of reduced charge montmorillonite complexes with methylene blue: Experiments and molecular modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klika, Z.; Pustková, P.; Praus, P.; Kovář, P.; Pospíšil, M.; Malý, P.; Grygar, Tomáš; Kulhánková, L.; Čapková, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 339, č. 2 (2009), s. 416-423 ISSN 0021-9797 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : methylene blue * reduced charge montmorillonites * fluorescence Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 3.019, year: 2009

  3. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Fluorescence enhancement of the aflatoxin B{sub 1} by forming inclusion complexes with some cyclodextrins and molecular modeling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamohammadi, Mohammad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alizadeh, Naader [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Tarbiat Modarres University, P.O. Box 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: alizaden@modares.ac.ir

    2007-12-15

    The interaction between the aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) and three cyclodextrins, {alpha}-cyclodextrin ({alpha}-CD), {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) and heptakis-2,6-dimethyl-o-{beta}-cyclodextrin (ome-CD), was studied by spectrofluorescence technique. It was found that the inclusion association behavior occurs for the complexes of cyclodextrins with AFB{sub 1}. The fluorescence of AFB{sub 1} is generally enhanced in the complexes with cyclodextrins in aqueous solutions. The inclusion complex constants of the three types of cyclodextrins at different temperatures were evaluated from Benesi-Hildebrand plot and also by non-linear regression analysis. These cyclodextrins can only form the 1:1 (host:guest) inclusion complex in the studied temperature range of 20-50 deg. C. The enthalpy ({delta}H{sup o}) and entropy ({delta}S{sup o}) changes of complexation were extracted from the temperature dependency of complex formation constants (K). Temperature-dependent measurements showed that the association step is controlled by enthalpy-entropy compensation effect. The use of ome-CD generally resulted in the greatest fluorescence intensity. On the other hand, the discrepancy between the exhibited enhanced fluorescence and thermodynamic parameters ({delta}G{sup o}) is proposed to be different only by the orientation of the AFB{sub 1} within the cyclodextrin cavity. To find the most favorable structure, the geometry of complex was investigated by molecular modeling approach employing the semiemperical HF-SCF calculations.

  5. Fluorescence imaging of the lymph node uptake of proteins in mice after subcutaneous injection: molecular weight dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fang; Bhansali, Suraj G; Law, Wing Cheung; Bergey, Earl J; Prasad, Paras N; Morris, Marilyn E

    2012-07-01

    To use noninvasive fluorescence imaging to investigate the influence of molecular weight (MW) of proteins on the rate of loss from a subcutaneous (SC) injection site and subsequent uptake by the draining lymph nodes in mice. Bevacizumab (149 kDa), bovine serum albumin (BSA, 66 kDa), ovalbumin (44.3 kDa) or VEGF-C156S (23 kDa), labeled with the near infrared dye IRDye 680, were injected SC into the front footpad of SKH-1 mice. Whole body non-invasive fluorescence imaging was performed to quantitate the fluorescence signal at the injection site and in axillary lymph nodes. The half-life values, describing the times for 50% loss of proteins from the injection site, were 6.81 h for bevacizumab, 2.85 h for BSA, 1.57 h for ovalbumin and 0.31 h for VEGF-C156S. The corresponding axillary lymph node exposure, represented as the area of the % dose versus time curve, was 6.27, 5.13, 4.06 and 1.54% dose ∙ h, respectively. Our results indicate that the rate of loss of proteins from a SC injection site is inversely related to MW of proteins, while lymph node exposure is proportionally related to the MW of proteins in a mouse model.

  6. Investigation of three flavonoids binding to bovine serum albumin using molecular fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Shuyun; Yan Lili; Pang Bo; Wang Yu

    2012-01-01

    The three flavonoids including naringenin, hesperetin and apigenin binding to bovine serum albumin (BSA) at pH 7.4 was studied by fluorescence quenching, synchronous fluorescence and UV-vis absorption spectroscopic techniques. The results obtained revealed that naringenin, hesperetin and apigenin strongly quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA. The Stern-Volmer curves suggested that these quenching processes were all static quenching processes. At 291 K, the value and the order of the binding constant were K A n aringenin) =4.08x10 4 A(hesperetin) =5.40x10 4 ∼K A(apigenin) =5.32x10 4 L mol -1 . The main binding force between the flavonoid and BSA was hydrophobic and electrostatic force. According to the Foerster theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distances (r 0 ) were obtained as 3.36, 3.47 and 3.30 nm for naringenin-BSA, hesperetin-BSA and apigenin-BSA, respectively. The effect of some common ions such as Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Mg 2+ , Mn 2+ , Zn 2+ and Ca 2+ on the binding was also studied in detail. The competition binding was also performed. The apparent binding constant (K' A ) obtained suggested that one flavonoid had an obvious effect on the binding of another flavonoid to protein when they coexisted in BSA solution. - Highlights: → Quenchings of BSA fluorescence by the flavonoids was all static quenchings. → Synchronous fluorescence was applied to study the structural change of BSA. → Binding constant, binding site and binding force were determined. → Competition binding experiments were performed. → One flavonoid had an obvious effect on the binding of another one to BSA.

  7. The use of molecular fluorescent markers to monitor absorption and distribution of xenobiotics in a silkworm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansil, Natalia C; Li, Yang; Koh, Leng Duei; Peng, Teng Choon; Win, Khin Yin; Liu, Xiang Yang; Han, Ming-Yong

    2011-12-01

    The fate of xenobiotics in living organisms is determined by their in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. A convenient and scalable animal model of these biological processes is thus highly beneficial in understanding the effects of xenobiotics. Here we present a silkworm model to investigate the molecular properties-directed absorption, distribution and excretion of fluorescent compounds as model xenobiotics through introducing the compounds into the silkworm's diet and monitoring the resulting color and fluorescence in the silkworm's body. The efficient uptake of xenobiotics into silk has been further studied through quantitative analysis of the intrinsically colored and highly luminescent silk secreted by silkworm. Our findings provide first-hand insights to better understand the molecular properties that allow specific materials to be incorporated into silk while it is being produced in the silk gland. The use of resulting luminescent silk as scaffold for tissue engineering application has been demonstrated to clearly reveal the interaction of silk with cells. Furthermore, this new development also paves a way to produce various functional silk embedded with stimuli-sensitive dyes or drugs as novel biomaterials for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecularly imprinted polymer based on MWCNT-QDs as fluorescent biomimetic sensor for specific recognition of target protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Zhaoqiang [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Annie Bligh, S.W. [Department of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW (United Kingdom); Tao, Lei; Quan, Jing [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Nie, Huali, E-mail: niehuali@dhu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhu, Limin, E-mail: lzhu@dhu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Gong, Xiao [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2015-03-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted optosensing material based on multi-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dots (MWCNT-QDs) has been designed and synthesized for its high selectivity, sensitivity and specificity in the recognition of a target protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). Molecularly imprinted polymer coated MWCNT-QDs using BSA as the template (BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs) exhibits a fast mass-transfer speed with a response time of 25 min. It is found that the BSA as a target protein can significantly quench the luminescence of BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs in a concentration-dependent manner that is best described by a Stern–Volmer equation. The K{sub SV} for BSA is much higher than bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme, implying a highly selective recognition of the BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs to BSA. Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs decreases linearly with the increasing target protein BSA in the concentration range of 5.0 × 10{sup −7}–35.0 × 10{sup −7} M with a detection limit of 80 nM. - Highlights: • A novel fluorescent biomimetic sensor based on MWCNT-QDs was designed. • The sensor exhibited a fast mass-transfer speed with a response time of 25 min. • The sensor possessed a highly selective recognition to BSA.

  9. Molecularly imprinted polymer based on MWCNT-QDs as fluorescent biomimetic sensor for specific recognition of target protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Zhaoqiang; Annie Bligh, S.W.; Tao, Lei; Quan, Jing; Nie, Huali; Zhu, Limin; Gong, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A novel molecularly imprinted optosensing material based on multi-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dots (MWCNT-QDs) has been designed and synthesized for its high selectivity, sensitivity and specificity in the recognition of a target protein bovine serum albumin (BSA). Molecularly imprinted polymer coated MWCNT-QDs using BSA as the template (BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs) exhibits a fast mass-transfer speed with a response time of 25 min. It is found that the BSA as a target protein can significantly quench the luminescence of BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs in a concentration-dependent manner that is best described by a Stern–Volmer equation. The K SV for BSA is much higher than bovine hemoglobin and lysozyme, implying a highly selective recognition of the BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs to BSA. Under optimal conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of BMIP-coated MWCNT-QDs decreases linearly with the increasing target protein BSA in the concentration range of 5.0 × 10 −7 –35.0 × 10 −7 M with a detection limit of 80 nM. - Highlights: • A novel fluorescent biomimetic sensor based on MWCNT-QDs was designed. • The sensor exhibited a fast mass-transfer speed with a response time of 25 min. • The sensor possessed a highly selective recognition to BSA

  10. Molecular fluorescence enhancement in plasmonic environments: exploring the role of nonlocal effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tserkezis, Christos; Stefanou, Nikolaos; Wubs, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    strongly affected. In this respect, experimental measurements of fluorescence, the theoretical description of which requires a precise concurrent evaluation of far- and near-field properties of the system, constitute a novel, more sensitive probe for assessing the validity of state-of-the-art nonclassical...... in the nanoparticle vicinity. Here we explore the influence of hitherto disregarded nonclassical effects in the description of emitter-plasmon hybrids, focusing on the roles of metal nonlocal response and especially size-dependent plasmon damping. Through extensive modelling of metallic nanospheres and nanoshells...... coupled to dipole emitters, we show that within a purely classical description a remarkable fluorescence enhancement can be achieved. However, once departing from the local-response approximation, and particularly by implementing the recent generalised nonlocal optical response theory, which provides...

  11. A novel molecular Fluorescent technique for Imaging the Somatostatin Receptor 2 Using a DOTATOC Lanthanide Conjugate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rune Wiik; Prakash, Vineet; Stensballe, Allan

    for synaptophysin.                         RESULTS            It is feasible to usefully chelate Samarium and Europium to DOTATOC. There is a distinct higher fluorescent signal arising from the chelation of the two ions than by the DOTA functional group alone. The unparaffinated pancreatic tumor tissues demonstrate.......                       CLINICAL RELEVANCE/APPLICATION            We propose a method for the histopatholgical receptor verification using fluorescent DOTATOC imaging. This potentially permits  ex-vivo developmental platforms for DOTA-conjugated molecules.        ...

  12. Oxidation Changes Physical Properties of Phospholipid Bilayers: Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Molecular Simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beranová, Lenka; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2010), s. 6140-6144 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06063; GA AV ČR GEMEM/09/E006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : oxidized phospholipides * membranes * fluorescence spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.269, year: 2010

  13. Thioflavin T as a fluorescence probe for monitoring RNA metabolism at molecular and cellular levels

    OpenAIRE

    Sugimoto, Shinya; Arita-Morioka, Ken-ichi; Mizunoe, Yoshimitsu; Yamanaka, Kunitoshi; Ogura, Teru

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsically stochastic dynamics of mRNA metabolism have important consequences on gene regulation and non-genetic cell-to-cell variability; however, no generally applicable methods exist for studying such stochastic processes quantitatively. Here, we describe the use of the amyloid-binding probe Thioflavin T (ThT) for monitoring RNA metabolism in vitro and in vivo. ThT fluoresced strongly in complex with bacterial total RNA than with genomic DNA. ThT bound purine oligoribonucleotides pr...

  14. Investigation on the interactions of clenbuterol to bovine serum albumin and lysozyme by molecular fluorescence technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Shuyun; Pang, Bo; Wang, Tianjiao; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Wang

    2014-01-01

    Clenbuterol interacting with bovine serum albumin (BSA) or lysozyme (LYS) in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) was investigated by the fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The results indicated that clenbuterol quenched the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA and LYS via a static quenching procedure. The binding constants of clenbuterol with BSA and LYS were 1.16×10(3) and 1.49×10(3) L mol(-1) at 291 K. The values of ΔH and ΔS implied that hydrophobic and electrostatic interaction played a major role in stabilizing the complex (clenbuterol-BSA or clenbuterol-LYS). In the presence of Fe2+, Fe3+, Cu2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, or Zn2+, the binding constants of clenbuterol to BSA or LYS had no significant differences. The distances between the donor (BSA or LYS) and acceptor (clenbuterol) were 2.61 and 2.19 nm for clenbuterol-BSA and clenbuterol-LYS respectively. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectrometry was used to analyze the conformational changes of BSA and LYS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Diffuse Optical Tomography for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    subcontractor or subcontractor asserting the restriction is notified of such release, disclosure or use. This legend, together with the indications of...Specific examples are tumor Table 2: Peptide substrates synthesized in our lab (The dots indicate lysosomal endopeptidases that recognize the... Oleary , D. A. Boas, B. Chance et al., "Experimental Images of Heterogeneous Turbid Media By Frequency- Domain Diffusing-Photon Tomography," Optics Letters

  16. Applications of nucleoside-based molecular probes for the in vivo assessment of tumour biochemistry using positron emission tomography (PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard I. Wiebe

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Positron emission tomography (PET is a non-invasive nuclear imaging technique. In PET, radiolabelled molecules decay by positron emission. The gamma rays resulting from positron annihilation are detected in coincidence and mapped to produce three dimensional images of radiotracer distribution in the body. Molecular imaging with PET refers to the use of positron-emitting biomolecules that are highly specific substrates for target enzymes, transport proteins or receptor proteins. Molecular imaging with PET produces spatial and temporal maps of the target-related processes. Molecular imaging is an important analytical tool in diagnostic medical imaging, therapy monitoring and the development of new drugs. Molecular imaging has its roots in molecular biology. Originally, molecular biology meant the biology of gene expression, but now molecular biology broadly encompasses the macromolecular biology and biochemistry of proteins, complex carbohydrates and nucleic acids. To date, molecular imaging has focused primarily on proteins, with emphasis on monoclonal antibodies and their derivative forms, small-molecule enzyme substrates and components of cell membranes, including transporters and transmembrane signalling elements. This overview provides an introduction to nucleosides, nucleotides and nucleic acids in the context of molecular imaging.A tomografia por emissão de pósitrons (TEP é uma técnica de imagem não invasiva da medicina nuclear. A TEP utiliza moléculas marcadas com emissores de radiação beta positiva (pósitrons. As radiações gama medidas que resultam do aniquilamento dos pósitrons são detectadas por um sistema de coincidência e mapeadas para produzir uma imagem tridimensional da distribuição do radiotraçador no corpo. A imagem molecular com TEP refere-se ao uso de biomoléculas marcadas com emissor de pósitron que são substratos altamente específicos para alvos como enzimas, proteínas transportadoras ou receptores prot

  17. Molecularly Imprinted Core-Shell CdSe@SiO2/CDs as a Ratiometric Fluorescent Probe for 4-Nitrophenol Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingyue; Gao, Zhao; Yu, Yanjun; Su, Rongxin; Huang, Renliang; Qi, Wei; He, Zhimin

    2018-01-01

    4-Nitrophenol (4-NP) is a priority pollutant in water and is both carcinogenic and genotoxic to humans and wildlife even at very low concentrations. Thus, we herein fabricated a novel molecularly imprinted core-shell nanohybrid as a ratiometric fluorescent sensor for the highly sensitive and selective detection of 4-NP. This sensor was functioned by the transfer of fluorescence resonance energy between photoluminescent carbon dots (CDs) and 4-NP. This sensor was synthesized by linking organosilane-functionalized CDs to silica-coated CdSe quantum dots (CdSe@SiO2) via Si-O bonds. The nanohybrids were further modified by anchoring a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer on the ratiometric fluorescent sensor through a facile sol-gel polymerization method. The morphology, chemical structure, and optical properties of the resulting molecularly imprinted dual-emission fluorescent probe were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic analysis. The probe was then applied in the detection of 4-NP and exhibited good linearity between 0.051 and 13.7 μg/mL, in addition to a low detection limit of 0.026 μg/mL. Furthermore, the simplicity, reliability, high selectivity, and high sensitivity of the developed sensor demonstrate that the combination of MIPs and ratiometric fluorescence allows the preparation of excellent fluorescent sensors for the detection of trace or ultra-trace analytes.

  18. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to measure molecular autofluorescence in diabetic subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Cinthia Zanini

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) comprises a complex metabolic syndrome, caused by reduced or absent secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, leading to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia promotes glycation of proteins and, consequently, the appearance of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Currently, diabetic patients are monitored by determining levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The complications caused by hyperglycemia may be divided into micro and macrovascular complications, represented by retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease. Albumin (HSA) is the most abundant serum protein in the human body and is subject to glycation. The Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the precursor molecule of heme synthesis, structural component of hemoglobin. The in vitro and animals studies have indicated that hyperglycemia promotes a decrease in its concentration in erythrocytes. The fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely used in biomedical field. The autofluorescence corresponds to the intrinsic fluorescence present in some molecules, this being associated with the same structure. The aim of this study was to use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure levels of erythrocyte PpIX autofluorescence and AGE-HSA in diabetic and healthy subjects and compare them with levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. This study was conducted with 151 subjects (58 controls and 93 diabetics). Epidemiological data of patients and controls were obtained from medical records. For control subjects, blood glucose levels were obtained from medical records and levels of Hb1Ac obtained by using commercial kits. The determination of the PpIX autofluorescence was performed with excitation at 405 nm and emission at 632 nm. Determination of AGE-HSA was performed with excitation at 370 nm and emission at 455 nm. Approximately 50% of diabetic had micro and macrovascular lesions resulting from hyperglycemia. There were no significant differences in the PpIX emission intensity values

  19. Pentamethinium fluorescent probes: The impact of molecular structure on photophysical properties and subcellular localization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, T.; Rimpelová, S.; Králová, Jarmila; Záruba, K.; Kejík, Z.; Ruml, T.; Martásek, P.; Král, V.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 107, August 2014 (2014), s. 51-59 ISSN 0143-7208 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200100801; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/1291; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.01.05/2.1.00/01.00.30; GA MŠk(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.300/30.0060 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Pentamethinium salts * Fluorescent probes * Mitochondria * Cardiolipin Photostability * Organelle imaging Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.966, year: 2014

  20. Synthesis of molecularly imprinted dye-silica nanocomposites with high selectivity and sensitivity: Fluorescent imprinted sensor for rapid and efficient detection of τ-fluvalinate in vodka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyun; Wang, Jixiang; Cheng, Rujia; Sun, Lin; Dai, Xiaohui; Yan, Yongsheng

    2018-02-01

    An imprinted fluorescent sensor was fabricated based on SiO 2 nanoparticles encapsulated with a molecularly imprinted polymer containing allyl fluorescein. High fluorine cypermethirin as template molecules, methyl methacrylate as functional monomer, and allyl fluorescein as optical materials synthesized a core-shell fluorescent molecular imprinted sensor, which showed a high and rapid sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of τ-fluvalinate. The sensor presented appreciable sensitivity with a limit of 13.251 nM, rapid detection that reached to equilibrium within 3 min, great linear relationship in the relevant concentration range from 0 to 150 nM, and excellent selectivity over structural analogues. In addition, the fluorescent sensor demonstrated desirable regeneration ability (eight cycling operations). The molecularly imprinted polymers ensured specificity, while the fluorescent dyes provided the stabile sensitivity. Finally, an effective application of the sensor was implemented by the detection of τ-fluvalinate in real samples from vodka. The molecularly imprinted fluorescent sensor showed a promising potential in environmental monitoring and food safety. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Fluorescent bioaerosol particle, molecular tracer, and fungal spore concentrations during dry and rainy periods in a semi-arid forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Gosselin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosols pose risks to human health and agriculture and may influence the evolution of mixed-phase clouds and the hydrological cycle on local and regional scales. The availability and reliability of methods and data on the abundance and properties of atmospheric bioaerosols, however, are rather limited. Here we analyze and compare data from different real-time ultraviolet laser/light-induced fluorescence (UV-LIF instruments with results from a culture-based spore sampler and offline molecular tracers for airborne fungal spores in a semi-arid forest in the southern Rocky Mountains of Colorado. Commercial UV-APS (ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer and WIBS-3 (wideband integrated bioaerosol sensor, version 3 instruments with different excitation and emission wavelengths were utilized to measure fluorescent aerosol particles (FAPs during both dry weather conditions and periods heavily influenced by rain. Seven molecular tracers of bioaerosols were quantified by analysis of total suspended particle (TSP high-volume filter samples using a high-performance anion-exchange chromatography system with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD. From the same measurement campaign, Huffman et al. (2013 previously reported dramatic increases in total and fluorescent particle concentrations during and immediately after rainfall and also showed a strong relationship between the concentrations of FAPs and ice nuclei (Huffman et al., 2013; Prenni et al., 2013. Here we investigate molecular tracers and show that during rainy periods the atmospheric concentrations of arabitol (35.2 ± 10.5 ng m−3 and mannitol (44.9 ± 13.8 ng m−3 were 3–4 times higher than during dry periods. During and after rain, the correlations between FAP and tracer mass concentrations were also significantly improved. Fungal spore number concentrations on the order of 104 m−3, accounting for 2–5 % of TSP mass during dry periods and 17–23 % during rainy

  2. Quantifying the Assembly of Multicomponent Molecular Machines by Single-Molecule Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, E M; Subramanyam, S; Ghoneim, M; Washington, M Todd; Spies, M

    2016-01-01

    Large, dynamic macromolecular complexes play essential roles in many cellular processes. Knowing how the components of these complexes associate with one another and undergo structural rearrangements is critical to understanding how they function. Single-molecule total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful approach for addressing these fundamental issues. In this article, we first discuss single-molecule TIRF microscopes and strategies to immobilize and fluorescently label macromolecules. We then review the use of single-molecule TIRF microscopy to study the formation of binary macromolecular complexes using one-color imaging and inhibitors. We conclude with a discussion of the use of TIRF microscopy to examine the formation of higher-order (i.e., ternary) complexes using multicolor setups. The focus throughout this article is on experimental design, controls, data acquisition, and data analysis. We hope that single-molecule TIRF microscopy, which has largely been the province of specialists, will soon become as common in the tool box of biophysicists and biochemists as structural approaches have become today. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pentavalent antimony uptake pathway through erythrocyte membranes: molecular and atomic fluorescence approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Camila; López, Silvana; Aguilar, Luis; Mercado, Luis; Bravo, Manuel; Quiroz, Waldo

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies by our group have shown that Sb(V) is able to enter red blood cells in a dynamic process and is reduced to Sb(III) by glutathione. The present study aims to investigate a possible entry pathway for Sb(V) through the erythrocyte membrane. Applying fluorescence spectroscopy studies with Laurdan and diphenylhexatriene (DPH) probes, it was found that there was no interaction between Sb(V) and membrane lipids. By comparing the Sb(V) entry percentages through lipid vesicles and sealed erythrocyte membranes, it was found that Sb(V) required protein channels to pass through the membrane. The competitive inhibition results using HCO3 (-) and Cl(-) showed that the Sb(V) uptake rate through the membrane fell approximately 50-70 % until full inhibition was reached, which was possibly due to the inhibition of the anion exchanger 1 (AE1) channel. Finally, the fluorescence measurements with the 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein (5-IAF) probe showed that Sb(V) interacted with membrane protein SH groups during this process.

  4. FIB and MIP: understanding nanoscale porosity in molecularly imprinted polymers via 3D FIB/SEM tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neusser, G; Eppler, S; Bowen, J; Allender, C J; Walther, P; Mizaikoff, B; Kranz, C

    2017-10-05

    We present combined focused ion beam/scanning electron beam (FIB/SEM) tomography as innovative method for differentiating and visualizing the distribution and connectivity of pores within molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) and non-imprinted control polymers (NIPs). FIB/SEM tomography is used in cell biology for elucidating three-dimensional structures such as organelles, but has not yet been extensively applied for visualizing the heterogeneity of nanoscopic pore networks, interconnectivity, and tortuosity in polymers. To our best knowledge, the present study is the first application of this strategy for analyzing the nanoscale porosity of MIPs. MIPs imprinted for propranolol - and the corresponding NIPs - were investigated establishing FIB/SEM tomography as a viable future strategy complementing conventional isotherm studies. For visualizing and understanding the properties of pore networks in detail, polymer particles were stained with osmium tetroxide (OsO 4 ) vapor, and embedded in epoxy resin. Staining with OsO 4 provides excellent contrast during high-resolution SEM imaging. After optimizing the threshold to discriminate between the stained polymer matrix, and pores filled with epoxy resin, a 3D model of the sampled volume may be established for deriving not only the pore volume and pore surface area, but also to visualize the interconnectivity and tortuosity of the pores within the sampled polymer volume. Detailed studies using different types of cross-linkers and the effect of hydrolysis on the resulting polymer properties have been investigated. In comparison of MIP and NIP, it could be unambiguously shown that the interconnectivity of the visualized pores in MIPs is significantly higher vs. the non-imprinted polymer, and that the pore volume and pore area is 34% and approx. 35% higher within the MIP matrix. This confirms that the templating process not only induces selective binding sites, but indeed also affects the physical properties of such

  5. Efficient and Scalable Synthesis of 4-Carboxy-Pennsylvania Green Methyl Ester: A Hydrophobic Building Block for Fluorescent Molecular Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woydziak, Zachary R; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorinated fluorophores are valuable tools for studies of biological systems. However, amine-reactive single-isomer derivatives of these compounds are often very expensive. To provide an inexpensive alternative, we report a practical synthesis of 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester. Derivatives of this hydrophobic fluorinated fluorophore, a hybrid of the dyes Oregon Green and Tokyo Green, are often cell permeable, enabling labeling of intracellular targets and components. Moreover, the low pKa of Pennsylvania Green (4.8) confers bright fluorescence in acidic cellular compartments such as endosomes, enhancing its utility for chemical biology investigations. To improve access to the key intermediate 2,7-difluoro-3,6-dihydroxyxanthen-9-one, we subjected bis-(2,4,5-trifluorophenyl)methanone to iterative nucleophilic aromatic substitution by hydroxide on scales of > 40 g. This intermediate was used to prepare over 15 grams of pure 4-carboxy-Pennsylvania Green methyl ester in 28% overall yield without requiring chromatography. This compound can be converted into the amine reactive N -hydroxysuccinimidyl ester in essentially quantitative yield for the synthesis of a wide variety of fluorescent molecular probes.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation studies of dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation in photoactive yellow protein and green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Gnanasekaran, Ramachandran; Leitner, David

    2012-02-01

    The first step in the photocycle of many proteins involves conformational change of a chromophore or a charge transfer reaction following photoexcitation. To explore the response of the protein and solvent environment to photoexcitation of the chromophore in photoactive yellow protein (PYP) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the dielectric response and vibrational energy relaxation (VER) from the chromophore to the protein and solvent. In PYP the time scale of the protein response, mainly contributed by Tyr42 and Glu46, to photoexcitation appears prominently between 0.1 and 0.3 picoseconds. The frequency-dependent VER rate also reveals dynamic coupling between the chromophore and residues that hydrogen bond to it. Resonances in the VER rate appear at frequencies comparable to the oscillations observed in recent fluorescence decay studies. In GFP, which undergoes excited state proton transfer about 10 ps following photoexcitation that may be assisted by specific chromophore vibrations, both the protein and water molecules inside the β-barrel surrounding the chromophore mediate the dielectric response.

  7. Interactions of perfluorooctanoic acid and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid with serum albumins by native mass spectrometry, fluorescence and molecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Quan; Li, Zhixiong; Huang, Juan; Ma, Jieyao; Wang, Xian

    2018-05-01

    The binding information of perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) with bovine and human serum albumins was investigated and characterized in details by using a combination method of electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and molecular docking (MD). The ESI-MS analysis revealed that maximally eight PFOA or PFOS molecules could bind to serum albumins at high mole ratios of PFOA/PFOS. Association constants were measured by ESI-MS and suggested that PFOS had a better binding affinity than PFOA. PFOA and PFOS were likely to bind with serum albumins in more than one pocket. The CD data demonstrated that binding of PFOA and PFOS could change the conformation of serum albumins with decreasing α-helix content, which may affect the protein physiological function. The phenomenon of protein fluorescence quenching by the binding of PFOA and PFOS indicated that the hydrophobic pocket proximate to Trp 214 in human serum albumin might be one of the dominated binding sites. This assumption was further confirmed by MD simulation. Consistent to ESI-MS observation, MD results also displayed a stronger binding affinity of PFOS than PFOA according to the calculated binding free energy, which is probably ascribed to one more hydrogen bond formed in the PFOS-bound protein complexes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ALA-PpIX variability quantitatively imaged in A431 epidermoid tumors using in vivo ultrasound fluorescence tomography and ex vivo assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Flynn, Brendan P.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Anand, Sanjay; Maytin, Edward V.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-03-01

    Treatment monitoring of Aminolevunilic-acid (ALA) - Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC) calls for superficial and subsurface imaging techniques. While superficial imagers exist for this purpose, their ability to assess PpIX levels in thick lesions is poor; additionally few treatment centers have the capability to measure ALA-induced PpIX production. An area of active research is to improve treatments to deeper and nodular BCCs, because treatment is least effective in these. The goal of this work was to understand the logistics and technical capabilities to quantify PpIX at depths over 1mm, using a novel hybrid ultrasound-guided, fiber-based fluorescence molecular spectroscopictomography system. This system utilizes a 633nm excitation laser and detection using filtered spectrometers. Source and detection fibers are collinear so that their imaging plane matches that of ultrasound transducer. Validation with phantoms and tumor-simulating fluorescent inclusions in mice showed sensitivity to fluorophore concentrations as low as 0.025μg/ml at 4mm depth from surface, as presented in previous years. Image-guided quantification of ALA-induced PpIX production was completed in subcutaneous xenograft epidermoid cancer tumor model A431 in nude mice. A total of 32 animals were imaged in-vivo, using several time points, including pre-ALA, 4-hours post-ALA, and 24-hours post-ALA administration. On average, PpIX production in tumors increased by over 10-fold, 4-hours post-ALA. Statistical analysis of PpIX fluorescence showed significant difference among all groups; panalysis and results will be presented to illustrate variability and the potential for imaging these values at depth.

  9. Toward intravascular morphological and biochemical imaging of atherosclerosis with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Kim, Wihan; Serafino, Michael; Walton, Brian; Jo, Javier A.; Applegate, Brian E.

    2017-02-01

    We have shown in an ex vivo human coronary artery study that the biochemical information derived from FLIM interpreted in the context of the morphological information from OCT enables a detailed classification of human coronary plaques associated with atherosclerosis. The identification of lipid-rich plaques prone to erosion or rupture and associated with sudden coronary events can impact current clinical practice as well as future development of targeted therapies for "vulnerable" plaques. In order to realize clinical translation of intravascular OCT/FLIM we have had to develop several key technologies. A multimodal catheter endoscope capable of delivering near UV excitation for FLIM and shortwave IR for OCT has been fabricated using a ball lens design with a double clad fiber. The OCT illumination and the FLIM excitation propogate down the inner core while the large outer multimode core captures the fluorescence emission. To enable intravascular pullback imaging with this endoscope we have developed an ultra-wideband fiber optic rotary joint using the same double clad fiber. The rotary joint is based on a lensless design where two cleaved fibers, one fixed and one rotating, are brought into close proximity but not touching. Using water as the lubricant enabled operation over the near UV-shortwave IR range. Transmission over this bandwidth has been measured to be near 100% at rotational frequencies up to 147 Hz. The entire system has been assembled and placed on a mobile cart suitable for cath lab based imaging. System development, performance, and early ex vivo imaging results will be discussed.

  10. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, J. F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, Willem P Th M; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    PURPOSE: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. PROCEDURES: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  11. Hypoxia-Targeting Fluorescent Nanobodies for Optical Molecular Imaging of Pre-Invasive Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Aram S A; Adams, Arthur; Oliveira, Sabrina; Dorresteijn, Bram; El Khattabi, Mohamed; Vermeulen, Jeroen F.; van der Wall, Elsken; Mali, W.P.T.M.; Derksen, Patrick W B; van Diest, Paul J.; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a CAIX-specific nanobody conjugated to IRDye800CW for molecular imaging of pre-invasive breast cancer. Procedures: CAIX-specific nanobodies were selected using a modified phage display technology, conjugated site-specifically to IRDye800CW and evaluated

  12. Mapping molecular assemblies with fluorescence microscopy and object-based spatial statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagache, Thibault; Grassart, Alexandre; Dallongeville, Stéphane; Faklaris, Orestis; Sauvonnet, Nathalie; Dufour, Alexandre; Danglot, Lydia; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe

    2018-02-15

    Elucidating protein functions and molecular organisation requires to localise precisely single or aggregated molecules and analyse their spatial distributions. We develop a statistical method SODA (Statistical Object Distance Analysis) that uses either micro- or nanoscopy to significantly improve on standard co-localisation techniques. Our method considers cellular geometry and densities of molecules to provide statistical maps of isolated and associated (coupled) molecules. We use SODA with three-colour structured-illumination microscopy (SIM) images of hippocampal neurons, and statistically characterise spatial organisation of thousands of synapses. We show that presynaptic synapsin is arranged in asymmetric triangle with the 2 postsynaptic markers homer and PSD95, indicating a deeper localisation of homer. We then determine stoichiometry and distance between localisations of two synaptic vesicle proteins with 3D-STORM. These findings give insights into the protein organisation at the synapse, and prove the efficiency of SODA to quantitatively assess the geometry of molecular assemblies.

  13. In vivo photoacoustic tumor tomography using a quinoline-annulated porphyrin as NIR molecular contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Michael; Erfanzadeh, Mohsen; Zhou, Feifei; Zhu, Hua; Bornhütter, Tobias; Röder, Beate; Zhu, Quing; Brückner, Christian

    2017-01-25

    The synthesis and photophysical properties of a tetra-PEG-modified and freely water-soluble quinoline-annulated porphyrin are described. We previously demonstrated the ability of quinoline-annulated porphyrins to act as an in vitro NIR photoacoustic imaging (PAI) contrast agent. The solubility of the quinoline-annulated porphyrin derivative in serum now allowed the assessment of the efficacy of the PEGylated derivative as an in vivo NIR contrast agent for the PAI of an implanted tumor in a mouse model. A multi-fold contrast enhancement when compared to the benchmark dye ICG could be shown, a finding that could be traced to its photophysical properties (short triplet lifetimes, low fluorescence and singlet oxygen sensitization quantum yields). A NIR excitation wavelength of 790 nm could be used, fully taking advantage of the optical window of tissue. Rapid renal clearance of the dye was observed. Its straight-forward synthesis, optical properties with the possibility for further optical fine-tuning, nontoxicity, favorable elimination rates, and contrast enhancement make this a promising PAI contrast agent. The ability to conjugate the PAI chromophore with a fluorescent tag using a facile and general conjugation strategy was also demonstrated.

  14. Controllable molecular aggregation and fluorescence properties of 1,3,4-oxadiazole derivative

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Min

    2015-10-14

    The molecular self-assembly behaviour of 2,2’-Bis-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-bi-1,3,4-oxadiazole (BOXD-6) in solution, on surfaces and in bulk crystals, and its photo-physical properties were studied via a combination of experimental techniques and theoretical calculations. It is found that BOXD-6 molecules self-assemble into both H- and J-aggregates at moderate concentration (~10-4 M) and then transit to exclusive J-aggregates at higher concentration (~10-3 M) in tetrahydrofuran. In H-aggregation (α polymorph), BOXD-6 adopts a linear conformation and forms a one- dimensional layered structure; in J-aggregation (β polymorph), it adopts a Z-shaped conformation and form a more ordered two-dimensional layered structure. A π-stacking structure is observed in both cases, and adjacent molecules in the J-aggregation show larger displacement along the molecular long axis direction than that in H-aggregation. Although J-aggregates are almost the only component in concentrated solutions (10-3 M), both H- and J-aggregates can be obtained if concentrated solution is transformed onto substrates through a simple drop-casting method. Such a phase transition during film formation can be easily avoided by adding water as precipitator; a film with pure J-aggregates is then obtained. In order to get more information on molecular self-assembly, intermolecular interaction potential energy surfaces (PES) were evaluated via theoretical calculations at the DFT level (M062x/6-31G**). The PES not only confirm the molecular stacking structures found in crystals but also predict some other likely structures, which will be the target of future experiments.

  15. Carbon-11 and fluorine-18 chemistry devoted to molecular probes for imaging the brain with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, Frederic

    2013-01-01

    Exploration of the living human brain in real-time and in a noninvasive way was for centuries only a dream, made, however, possible today with the remarkable development during the four last decades of powerful molecular imaging techniques, and especially positron emission tomography (PET). Molecular PET imaging relies, from a chemical point of view, on the use and preparation of a positron-emitting radiolabelled probe or radiotracer, notably compounds incorporating one of two short-lived radionuclides fluorine-18 (T 1/2 : 109.8 min) and carbon-11 (T 1/2 : 20.38 min). The growing availability and interest for the radio-halogen fluorine-18 in radiopharmaceutical chemistry undoubtedly results from its convenient half-life and the successful use in clinical oncology of 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG). The special interest of carbon-11 is not only that carbon is present in virtually all biomolecules and drugs allowing therefore for isotopic labelling of their chemical structures but also that a given molecule could be radiolabelled at different functions or sites, permitting to explore (or to take advantage of) in vivo metabolic pathways. PET chemistry includes production of these short-lived radioactive isotopes via nuclear transmutation reactions using a cyclotron, and is directed towards the development of rapid synthetic methods, at the trace level, for the introduction of these nuclides into a molecule, as well as the use of fast purification, analysis and formulation techniques. PET chemistry is the driving force in molecular PET imaging, and this special issue of the Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals, which is strongly chemistry and radiochemistry-oriented, aims at illustrating, be it in part only, the state-of-the-art arsenal of reactions currently available and its potential for the research and development of specific molecular probes labelled with the positron emitters carbon-11 and fluorine-18,with optimal imaging

  16. Synaptic molecular imaging in spared and deprived columns of mouse barrel cortex with array tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Nicholas C; Collman, Forrest; Vogelstein, Joshua T; Burns, Randal; Smith, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    A major question in neuroscience is how diverse subsets of synaptic connections in neural circuits are affected by experience dependent plasticity to form the basis for behavioral learning and memory. Differences in protein expression patterns at individual synapses could constitute a key to understanding both synaptic diversity and the effects of plasticity at different synapse populations. Our approach to this question leverages the immunohistochemical multiplexing capability of array tomography (ATomo) and the columnar organization of mouse barrel cortex to create a dataset comprising high resolution volumetric images of spared and deprived cortical whisker barrels stained for over a dozen synaptic molecules each. These dataset has been made available through the Open Connectome Project for interactive online viewing, and may also be downloaded for offline analysis using web, Matlab, and other interfaces.

  17. NIR-Cyanine Dye Linker: a Promising Candidate for Isochronic Fluorescence Imaging in Molecular Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komljenovic, Dorde; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar; Ehemann, Volker; Pipkorn, Ruediger; Schrenk, Hans-Hermann; Debus, Jürgen; Braun, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Personalized anti-cancer medicine is boosted by the recent development of molecular diagnostics and molecularly targeted drugs requiring rapid and efficient ligation routes. Here, we present a novel approach to synthetize a conjugate able to act simultaneously as an imaging and as a chemotherapeutic agent by coupling functional peptides employing solid phase peptide synthesis technologies. Development and the first synthesis of a fluorescent dye with similarity in the polymethine part of the Cy7 molecule whose indolenine-N residues were substituted with a propylene linker are described. Methylating agent temozolomide is functionalized with a tetrazine as a diene component whereas Cy7-cell penetrating peptide conjugate acts as a dienophilic reaction partner for the inverse Diels-Alder click chemistry-mediated ligation route yielding a theranostic conjugate, 3-mercapto-propionic-cyclohexenyl-Cy7-bis-temozolomide-bromide-cell penetrating peptide. Synthesis route described here may facilitate targeted delivery of the therapeutic compound to achieve sufficient local concentrations at the target site or tissue. Its versatility allows a choice of adequate imaging tags applicable in e.g. PET, SPECT, CT, near-infrared imaging, and therapeutic substances including cytotoxic agents. Imaging tags and therapeutics may be simultaneously bound to the conjugate applying click chemistry. Theranostic compound presented here offers a solid basis for a further improvement of cancer management in a precise, patient-specific manner.

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymers prepared using protein-conjugated cleavable monomers followed by site-specific post-imprinting introduction of fluorescent reporter molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Yusuke; Sunayama, Hirobumi; Ooya, Tooru; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-10-04

    Molecularly imprinted polymers were prepared using a protein-conjugated disulfide cleavable monomer. After removing the protein by disulfide reduction, a thiol-reactive fluorophore was introduced into the thiol residue located only inside the imprinted cavity, resulting in specific transduction of the binding events into fluorescence spectral change.

  19. Synchrotron-based X-ray Fluorescence Microscopy in Conjunction with Nanoindentation to Study Molecular-Scale Interactions of Phenol–Formaldehyde in Wood Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph E. Jakes; Christopher G. Hunt; Daniel J. Yelle; Linda Lorenz; Kolby Hirth; Sophie-Charlotte Gleber; Stefan Vogt; Warren Grigsby; Charles R. Frihart

    2015-01-01

    Understanding and controlling molecular-scale interactions between adhesives and wood polymers are critical to accelerate the development of improved adhesives for advanced wood-based materials. The submicrometer resolution of synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) was found capable of mapping and quantifying infiltration of Br-labeled phenol−...

  20. Excitation and deexcitation of N2 molecular levels. Induced fluorescence by electrons and laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Fernandez-Mayoralas, A.

    1989-01-01

    The electron impact excitation followed by fluorescence induced by N 2 -laser absorption was used to study the lifetime of the lowest vibrational level of the B 3 π g electronic state of N 2 . The experimental result of this work is 13 + 1 μs. To measure the lifetime of B 3 π g (v=2,3,5,6,7,8) levels the delayed coincidence method by electron impact was use. The lifetime values were compared with recent experimental and theoretical results. The relative intensi-ties of 3 π g --- A 3 Σ Ω + system bands, in the range (6540-10500 A o ) was measured using a hollow cathode lamp as spectral source. The relative transition moments and its dependence versus the r-centroid was obtained. Total cross sections for electron scattering by N molecules in the range 600 - 5000 eV have been obtained from measurements of the attenuation of a linear electron beam. The results have been compared with available experimental cross sections and with theoretical calculations based on the first Born approximation. (Author)

  1. Illuminating the origins of spectral properties of green fluorescent proteins via proteochemometric and molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantasenamat, Chanin; Simeon, Saw; Owasirikul, Wiwat; Songtawee, Napat; Lapins, Maris; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S

    2014-10-15

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) has immense utility in biomedical imaging owing to its autofluorescent nature. In efforts to broaden the spectral diversity of GFP, there have been several reports of engineered mutants via rational design and random mutagenesis. Understanding the origins of spectral properties of GFP could be achieved by means of investigating its structure-activity relationship. The first quantitative structure-property relationship study for modeling the spectral properties, particularly the excitation and emission maximas, of GFP was previously proposed by us some years ago in which quantum chemical descriptors were used for model development. However, such simplified model does not consider possible effects that neighboring amino acids have on the conjugated π-system of GFP chromophore. This study describes the development of a unified proteochemometric model in which the GFP chromophore and amino acids in its vicinity are both considered in the same model. The predictive performance of the model was verified by internal and external validation as well as Y-scrambling. Our strategy provides a general solution for elucidating the contribution that specific ligand and protein descriptors have on the investigated spectral property, which may be useful in engineering novel GFP variants with desired characteristics. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Molecular engineering of a fluorescent bioprobe for sensitive and selective detection of amphibole asbestos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takenori Ishida

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy-based affinity assay could enable highly sensitive and selective detection of airborne asbestos, an inorganic environmental pollutant that can cause mesothelioma and lung cancer. We have selected an Escherichia coli histone-like nucleoid structuring protein, H-NS, as a promising candidate for an amphibole asbestos bioprobe. H-NS has high affinity to amphibole asbestos, but also binds to an increasingly common asbestos substitute, wollastonite. To develop a highly specific Bioprobe for amphibole asbestos, we first identified a specific but low-affinity amosite-binding sequence by slicing H-NS into several fragments. Second, we constructed a streptavidin tetramer complex displaying four amosite-binding fragments, resulting in the 250-fold increase in the probe affinity as compared to the single fragment. The tetramer probe had sufficient affinity and specificity for detecting all the five types of asbestos in the amphibole group, and could be used to distinguish them from wollastonite. In order to clarify the binding mechanism and identify the amino acid residues contributing to the probe's affinity to amosite fibers, we constructed a number of shorter and substituted peptides. We found that the probable binding mechanism is electrostatic interaction, with positively charged side chains of lysine residues being primarily responsible for the probe's affinity to asbestos.

  3. Nanoscopic description of biomembrane electrostatics: results of molecular dynamics simulations and fluorescence probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2009-08-01

    Electrostatic fields generated on and inside biological membranes are recognized to play a fundamental role in key processes of cell functioning. Their understanding requires an adequate description on the level of elementary charges and the reconstruction of electrostatic potentials by integration over all elementary interactions. Out of all the available research tools, only molecular dynamics simulations are capable of this, extending from the atomic to the mesoscopic level of description on the required time and space scale. A complementary approach is that offered by molecular probe methods, with the application of electrochromic dyes. Highly sensitive to intermolecular interactions, they generate integrated signals arising from electric fields produced by elementary charges at the sites of their location. This review is an attempt to provide a critical analysis of these two approaches and their present and potential applications. The results obtained by both methods are consistent in that they both show an extremely complex profile of the electric field in the membrane. The nanoscopic view, with two-dimensional averaging over the bilayer plane and formal separation of the electrostatic potential into surface (Psi(s)), dipole (Psi(d)) and transmembrane (Psi(t)) potentials, is constructive in the analysis of different functional properties of membranes.

  4. Detection of substrate binding of a collagen-specific molecular chaperone HSP47 in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Akira; Ishida, Yoshihito; Kubota, Hiroshi; Pack, Chan-Gi; Homma, Takayuki; Ito, Shinya; Araki, Kazutaka; Kinjo, Masataka; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2018-02-26

    Heat shock protein 47 kDa (HSP47), an ER-resident and collagen-specific molecular chaperone, recognizes collagenous hydrophobic amino acid sequences (Gly-Pro-Hyp) and assists in secretion of correctly folded collagen. Elevated collagen production is correlated with HSP47 expression in various diseases, including fibrosis and keloid. HSP47 knockdown ameliorates liver fibrosis by inhibiting collagen secretion, and inhibition of the interaction of HSP47 with procollagen also prevents collagen secretion. Therefore, a high-throughput system for screening of drugs capable of inhibiting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen would aid the development of novel therapies for fibrotic diseases. In this study, we established a straightforward method for rapidly and quantitatively measuring the interaction between HSP47 and collagen in solution using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The diffusion rate of HSP47 labeled with Alexa Fluor 488 (HSP47-AF), a green fluorescent dye, decreased upon addition of type I or III collagen, whereas that of dye-labeled protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) did not, indicating that specific binding of HSP47 to collagen could be detected using FCS. Using this method, we calculated the dissociation constant of the interaction between HSP47 and collagen. The binding ratio between HSP47-AF and collagen did not change in the presence of sodium chloride, confirming that the interaction was hydrophobic in nature. In addition, we observed dissociation of collagen from HSP47 at low pH and re-association after recovery to neutral pH. These observations indicate that this system is appropriate for detecting the interaction between HSP47 and collagen, and could be applied to high-throughput screening for drugs capable of suppressing and/or curing fibrosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Positron emission tomography molecular imaging of dopaminergic system in drug addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Haifeng; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) is involved in drug reinforcement, but its role in drug addiction remains unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the first technology used for the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic system in the living human brain. In this article, we reviewed the major findings of PET imaging studies on the involvement of DA in drug addiction, especially in heroin addiction. Furthermore, we summarized PET radiotracers that have been used to study the role of DA in drug addiction. To investigate presynaptic function in drug addiction, PET tracers have been developed to measure DA synthesis and transport. For the investigation of postsynaptic function, several radioligands targeting dopamine one (D1) receptor and dopamine two (D2) receptor are extensively used in PET imaging studies. Moreover, we also summarized the PET imaging findings of heroin addiction studies, including heroin-induced DA increases and the reinforcement, role of DA in the long-term effects of heroin abuse, DA and vulnerability to heroin abuse and the treatment implications. PET imaging studies have corroborated the role of DA in drug addiction and increase our understanding the mechanism of drug addiction. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Future aspects of cellular and molecular research in clinical voice treatment aspects of optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Mette; Mahmood, Sanila

    2015-02-01

    Focus is upon our clinical experience in a prospective cohort study on cure of dystonia where the mode of treatment was fexofenadine tablets and local budesonide inhaler in the larynx, and in a randomized controlled trial of lifestyle change related to acid provocation of food and habits in laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR). The advanced high-speed films is one new tool, another being optical coherence tomography (OCT), which should be used in the future in randomized controlled trials. We are focusing on OCT of the swallowing process in the oesophagaus and larynx as well as the vocal fold function. It can be shown on OCT how the layer of the vocal folds develop, possibly corresponding to hormonal and paediatric development. The arytenoid area in the larynx should also be focused upon with OCT in pathology. The thyroid function is related to voice and the swallowing function, both hormonally and pathoanatomically. We know too little about voice and thyroid hormones in an updated way as well as the outer anatomic supporting muscular structure of the larynx, related to thyroid immune degeneration and cysts. Also, here OCT analyses might be of value.

  7. Molecular architecture of axonemal microtubule doublets revealedby cryo-electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Haixin; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2006-05-22

    The axoneme, which forms the core of eukaryotic flagella and cilia, is one of the largest macromolecular machines with a structure that is largely conserved from protists to mammals. Microtubule doublets are structural components of axonemes containing a number of proteins besides tubulin, and are usually found in arrays of nine doublets arranged around two singlet microtubules. Coordinated sliding of adjacent doublets, which involves a host of other proteins in the axoneme, produces periodic beating movements of the axoneme. We have obtained a 3D density map of intact microtubule doublets using cryo-electron tomography and image averaging. Our map, with a resolution of about 3 nm, provides insights into locations of particular proteins within the doublets and the structural features of the doublets that define their mechanical properties. We identify likely candidates for several of these non-tubulin components of the doublets. This work offers novel insight on how tubulin protofilaments and accessory proteins attach together to form the doublets and provides a structural basis for understanding doublet function in axonemes.

  8. ICT-Isomerization-Induced Turn-On Fluorescence Probe with a Large Emission Shift for Mercury Ion: Application in Combinational Molecular Logic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, Sushil Ranjan; Mondal, Bijan; Vijaykumar, Gonela; Thakur, Arunabha

    2017-10-02

    A unique turn-on fluorescent device based on a ferrocene-aminonaphtholate derivative specific for Hg 2+ cation was developed. Upon binding with Hg 2+ ion, the probe shows a dramatic fluorescence enhancement (the fluorescence quantum yield increases 58-fold) along with a large red shift of 68 nm in the emission spectrum. The fluorescence enhancement with a red shift may be ascribed to the combinational effect of C═N isomerization and an extended intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) mechanism. The response was instantaneous with a detection limit of 2.7 × 10 -9 M. Upon Hg 2+ recognition, the ferrocene/ferrocenium redox peak was anodically shifted by ΔE 1/2 = 72 mV along with a "naked eye" color change from faint yellow to pale orange for this metal cation. Further, upon protonation of the imine nitrogen, the present probe displays a high fluorescence output due to suppression of the C═N isomerization process. Upon deprotonation using strong base, the fluorescence steadily decreases, which indicates that H + and OH - can be used to regulate the off-on-off fluorescence switching of the present probe. Density functional theory studies revealed that the addition of acid leads to protonation of the imine N (according to natural bond orbital analysis), and the resulting iminium proton forms a strong H-bond (2.307 Å) with one of the triazole N atoms to form a five-membered ring, which makes the molecule rigid; hence, enhancement of the ICT process takes place, thereby leading to a fluorescence enhancement with a red shift. The unprecedented combination of H + , OH - , and Hg 2+ ions has been used to generate a molecular system exhibiting the INHIBIT-OR combinational logic operation.

  9. Rapid molecular cytogenetic analysis of X-chromosomal microdeletions: Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for complex glycerol kinase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, K.C.; Lindsay, E.A.; McCabe, E.R.B. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-17

    Diagnosis of X-chromosomal microdeletions has relied upon the traditional methods of Southern blotting and DNA amplification, with carrier identification requiring time-consuming and unreliable dosage calculations. In this report, we describe rapid molecular cytogenetic identification of deleted DNA in affected males with the Xp21 contiguous gene syndrome (complex glycerol kinase deficiency, CGKD) and female carriers for this disorder. CGKD deletions involve the genes for glycerol kinase, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and/or adrenal hypoplasia congenita. We report an improved method for diagnosis of deletions in individuals with CGKD and for identification of female carriers within their families using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a cosmid marker (cosmid 35) within the glycerol kinase gene. When used in combination with an Xq control probe, affected males demonstrate a single signal from the control probe, while female carriers demonstrate a normal chromosome with two signals, as well as a deleted chromosome with a single signal from the control probe. FISH analysis for CGKD provides the advantages of speed and accuracy for evaluation of submicroscopic X-chromosome deletions, particularly in identification of female carriers. In addition to improving carrier evaluation, FISH will make prenatal diagnosis of CGKD more readily available. 17 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Quantification of evaporation induced error in atom probe tomography using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu Jian; Yao, Xupei; Zheng, Changxi; Duan, Wen Hui

    2017-11-01

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics was used to simulate the dynamics of atoms at the atom probe surface and five objective functions were used to quantify errors. The results suggested that before ionization, thermal vibration and collision caused the atoms to displace up to 1Å and 25Å respectively. The average atom displacements were found to vary between 0.2 and 0.5Å. About 9 to 17% of the atoms were affected by collision. Due to the effects of collision and ion-ion repulsion, the back-calculated positions were on average 0.3-0.5Å different from the pre-ionized positions of the atoms when the number of ions generated per pulse was minimal. This difference could increase up to 8-10Å when 1.5ion/nm 2 were evaporated per pulse. On the basis of the results, surface ion density was considered an important factor that needed to be controlled to minimize error in the evaporation process. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Rational molecular design towards Vis/NIR absorption and fluorescence by using pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY and its highly conjugated structures for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Soji; Iino, Taku; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2015-02-09

    Pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY (PPAB) developed in our recent study from diketopyrrolopyrrole by titanium tetrachloride-mediated Schiff-base formation reaction with heteroaromatic amines is a highly potential chromophore due to its intense absorption and fluorescence in the visible region and high fluorescence quantum yield, which is greater than 0.8. To control the absorption and fluorescence of PPAB, particularly in the near-infrared (NIR) region, further molecular design was performed using DFT calculations. This results in the postulation that the HOMO-LUMO gap of PPAB is perturbed by the heteroaromatic moieties and the aryl-substituents. Based on this molecular design, a series of new PPAB molecules was synthesized, in which the largest redshifts of the absorption and fluorescence maxima up to 803 and 850 nm, respectively, were achieved for a PPAB consisting of benzothiazole rings and terthienyl substituents. In contrast to the sharp absorption of PPAB, a PPAB dimer, which was prepared by a cross-coupling reaction of PPAB monomers, exhibited panchromatic absorption across the UV/Vis/NIR regions. With this series of PPAB chromophores in hand, a potential application of PPAB as an optoelectronic material was investigated. After identifying a suitable PPAB molecule for application in organic photovoltaic cells based on evaluation using time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, a maximized power conversion efficiency of 1.27 % was achieved. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Single particle and molecular assembly analysis of polyribosomes by single- and double-tilt cryo electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G. [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France); Afonina, Zhanna A. [Institute of Protein Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, 142290 Pushchino, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Klaholz, Bruno P., E-mail: klaholz@igbmc.fr [IGBMC (Institute of Genetics and of Molecular and Cellular Biology), Department of Integrative Structural Biology, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) UMR 7104/ Institut National de la Santé de la Recherche Médicale INSERM U964/ Université de Strasbourg, 1 rue Laurent Fries, 67404 Illkirch (France)

    2013-03-15

    Cryo electron tomography (cryo-ET) can provide cellular and molecular structural information on various biological samples. However, the detailed interpretation of tomograms reconstructed from single-tilt data tends to suffer from low signal-to-noise ratio and artefacts caused by some systematically missing angular views. While these can be overcome by sub-tomogram averaging, they remain limiting for the analysis of unique structures. Double-tilt ET can improve the tomogram quality by acquiring a second tilt series after an in-plane rotation, but its usage is not widespread yet because it is considered technically demanding and it is rarely used under cryo conditions. Here we show that double-tilt cryo-ET improves the quality of 3D reconstructions so significantly that even single particle analysis can be envisaged despite of the intrinsically low image contrast obtained from frozen-hydrated specimens. This is illustrated by the analysis of eukaryotic polyribosomes in which individual ribosomes were reconstructed using single-tilt, partial and full double-tilt geometries. The improved tomograms favour the faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging and allow a better 3D classification using multivariate statistical analysis. Our study of single particles and molecular assemblies within polysomes illustrates that the dual-axis approach is particularly useful for cryo applications of ET, both for unique objects and for structures that can be classified and averaged. - Highlights: ► Double-tilt cryo-ET improves 3D reconstructions thus making single particle analysis possible. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET data favour a faster convergence of iterative sub-tomogram averaging. ► Individual ribosomes were reconstructed from single-tilt, partial/ full double-tilt geometries. ► Double-tilt cryo-ET facilitates analysis of larger molecular assemblies such as in cell sections. ► Dual-axis cryo-ET is applicable to unique objects and to structures that can be

  13. Low molecular weight poly (2-dimethylamino ethylmethacrylate) polymers with controlled.positioned fluorescent labeling: Synthesis, characterization and in vitro interaction with human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flebus, Luca; Lombart, Francois; Sevrin, Chantal

    2015-01-01

    ) fluorescent labeled PDMAEMA of low molecular weight (Mw) (below 15 kDa), controlling the position and density of fluorescein.The second goal was to analyze the possible difference in uptake and subcellular distribution of this labeled FF polycation between human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and h...... to a minor cytotoxicity compared to the higher ones.As main conclusion this study highlights the similitude in cell trafficking of FF PDMAEMA and data previously reported for PDMAEMA/DNA complexes....

  14. Synthesis of new molecular probes radiolabelled with fluorine-18 for imaging neuro-inflammation with Positon Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medran-Navarrete, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this manuscript aims to describe the synthesis of new ligands of the translocation protein 18 kDa (TSPO), their in vitro evaluation and, for the most promising candidates, their isotopic radiolabelling with the short-lived positron emitter fluorine-18 (t 1/2 : 109.8 minutes). The ultimate goal of this work consists in developing new molecular probes, or bio-markers, for imaging neuro-inflammation in a non-invasive and atraumatic manor using Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Neuro-inflammatory processes have been identified in Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases, MS and various psychiatric pathologies. The radioligand of choice for imaging TSPO is currently [ 18 F]DPA-714, a pyr-azolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine radiolabelled with fluorine-18 which has been recently prepared in our laboratories. However, [ 18 F]DPA-714 undergoes a rapid in vivo loss of the radioactive fluorine by cleavage of the fluoro-alkoxy chain as demonstrated in metabolic studies. Therefore, my PhD project aimed to design and develop new structurally related analogues of DPA-714 where the linkage between the main backbone and the fluorine-18 would be reinforced. To this extent, nineteen compounds were prepared and their affinity towards the TSPO was evaluated. Two promising candidates, coded DPA-C5yne and CfO-DPA-714, were radiolabelled with fluorine-18 with good radiochemical yields (20-30 %) and high specific radioactivities (50-90 GBq/μmol). These radioligands were also evaluated by PET imaging at the preclinical stage and displayed equivalent or slightly improved results when compared to [ 18 F]DPA- 714. (author) [fr

  15. Influence of water chemistry and dissolved organic matter (DOM) molecular size on copper and mercury binding determined by multiresponse fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W B; Smith, D S; Guéguen, C

    2013-07-01

    The effects of water chemistry (i.e. pH and Ca(2+) concentration) dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration) and DOM quality (i.e. composition and molecular weight) on metal complexation were successfully investigated by a combination of tangential flow filtration, excitation-emission matrix fluorescence, parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), and fluorescence quenching on four freshwater samples and one extracted Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA). Two terrestrial and one microbial humic-like components were found in this study. Despite strong correlation between the Ryan-Weber model and the multiresponse model, the latter is more appropriate for the calculation of binding parameters in multiple-ligand DOM system. Decreasing pH from 6 to 4 significantly reduced logK-Cu(2+) from 5.22±0.24 to 4.60±0.30 at pH 6 and 4, respectively (pHigh molecular weight (>1kDa) DOM generally had higher logK and binding fluorophore abundance than bulk (unfractionated) and low molecular weight (<1kDa) DOM for both metals. This trend however was not always true for Hg(2+) where the binding parameters were quite variable. Overall the combined results provide evidence that binding parameters are not only affected by water chemistry, but also depend on DOM molecular weight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A-TEEMTM, a new molecular fingerprinting technique: simultaneous absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quatela, Alessia; Gilmore, Adam M.; Steege Gall, Karen E.; Sandros, Marinella; Csatorday, Karoly; Siemiarczuk, Alex; (Ben Yang, Boqian; Camenen, Loïc

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the new simultaneous absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method for rapid and effective characterization of the varying components from a mixture. The absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method uniquely facilitates correction of fluorescence inner-filter effects to yield quantitative fluorescence spectral information that is largely independent of component concentration. This is significant because it allows one to effectively monitor quantitative component changes using multivariate methods and to generate and evaluate spectral libraries. We present the use of this novel instrument in different fields: i.e. tracking changes in complex mixtures including natural water, wine as well as monitoring stability and aggregation of hormones for biotherapeutics.

  17. Dual fluorescent molecular substrates selectively report the activation, sustainability and reversibility of cellular PKB/Akt activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Duanwen; Bai, Mingfeng; Tang, Rui; Xu, Baogang; Ju, Xiaoming; Pestell, Richard G; Achilefu, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Using a newly developed near-infrared (NIR) dye that fluoresces at two different wavelengths (dichromic fluorescence, DCF), we discovered a new fluorescent substrate for Akt, also known as protein kinase B, and a method to quantitatively report this enzyme's activity in real time. Upon insulin activation of cellular Akt, the enzyme multi-phosphorylated a single serine residue of a diserine DCF substrate in a time-dependent manner, culminating in monophospho- to triphospho-serine products. The NIR DCF probe was highly selective for the Akt1 isoform, which was demonstrated using Akt1 knockout cells derived from MMTV-ErbB2 transgenic mice. The DCF mechanism provides unparalleled potential to assess the stimulation, sustainability, and reversibility of Akt activation longitudinally. Importantly, NIR fluorescence provides a pathway to translate findings from cells to living organisms, a condition that could eventually facilitate the use of these probes in humans.

  18. Fluorescence perturbation techniques to study mobility and molecular dynamics of proteins in live cells: FRAP, photoactivation, photoconversion, and FLIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancaud, Aurélien; Huet, Sébastien; Rabut, Gwénaël; Ellenberg, Jan

    2010-12-01

    The technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) was introduced in the mid-1970s to study the diffusion of biomolecules in living cells. For several years, it was used mainly by a small number of biophysicists who had developed their own photobleaching systems. Since the mid-1990s, FRAP has gained increasing popularity because of the conjunction of two factors: First, photobleaching techniques are easily implemented on confocal laser-scanning microscopes (CLSMs), and so FRAP has become available to anyone who has access to such equipment. Second, the advent of green fluorescent protein (GFP) has allowed easy fluorescent tagging of proteins and their observation in living cells. Thanks both to the versatility of modern CLSMs, which allow control of laser intensity at any point of the image, and to the development of new fluorescent probes, additional photoperturbation techniques have emerged during the last few years. After the photoperturbation event, one observes and then analyzes how the fluorescence distribution relaxes toward the steady state. Because the photochemical perturbation of suitable fluorophores is essentially irreversible, changes of fluorescence intensity in the perturbed and unperturbed regions are due to the exchange of tagged molecules between those regions. This article first discusses the materials required for performing FRAP experiments on a CLSM and the software for data analysis. It then describes general considerations on how to perform FRAP experiments as well as the necessary controls. Finally, different possible ways to analyze the data are presented.

  19. A curcumin-based molecular probe for near-infrared fluorescence imaging of tau fibrils in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Su; Seo, Yujin; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kim, Kyungdo; Kim, Yun Kyung; Choo, Hyunah; Chong, Youhoon

    2015-12-14

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of tau fibrils for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In order to develop a curcumin-based NIR fluorescent probe for tau fibrils, structural modification of the curcumin scaffold was attempted by combining the following rationales: the curcumin derivative should preserve its binding affinity to tau fibrils, and, upon binding to tau fibrils, the probe should show favorable fluorescence properties. To meet these requirements, we designed a novel curcumin scaffold with various aromatic substituents. Among the series, the curcumin derivative with a (4-dimethylamino-2,6-dimethoxy)phenyl moiety showed a significant change in its fluorescence properties (22.9-fold increase in quantum yield; Kd, 0.77 μM; λem, 620 nm; Φ, 0.32) after binding to tau fibrils. In addition, fluorescence imaging of tau-green fluorescent protein-transfected SHSY-5Y cells with confirmed that detected tau fibrils in live cells.

  20. Effect of Moderate UVC Irradiation on Bovine Serum Albumin and Complex with Antimetabolite 5-Fluorouracil: Fluorescence Spectroscopic and Molecular Modelling Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanmugavel Chinnathambi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of antimetabolite 5-fluorouracil (5FU with bovine serum albumin (BSA under UVC (253.7 nm irradiation was investigated in the present study using UV-Vis spectroscopy, steady state/time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The stability of protein was found to be very strong when BSA gets bind to 5FU and moreover it is compared with the free BSA under UVC irradiation. From the fluorescence spectroscopic study, the stability of the complex was found to acquire 2-fold stronger than free protein. From the molecular modelling studies, we came to know the hydrogen bonds between BSA and antimetabolite 5FU are strong, up to 70.4 J/m2 under UVC irradiation.

  1. Intramembranous bone healing process subsequent to tooth extraction in mice: micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Andreia Espindola; Repeke, Carlos Eduardo; Ferreira Junior, Samuel de Barros; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Oliveira, Rodrigo Cardoso; Assis, Gerson Francisco; Taga, Rumio; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray) characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0 h), the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7 d), characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa), cytokines (TNFα, IL-10), chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4), matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a) and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146) markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14 d), characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9), bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST) markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2). No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21 d) when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the

  2. Intramembranous bone healing process subsequent to tooth extraction in mice: micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia Espindola Vieira

    Full Text Available Bone tissue has a significant potential for healing, which involves a significant the interplay between bone and immune cells. While fracture healing represents a useful model to investigate endochondral bone healing, intramembranous bone healing models are yet to be developed and characterized. In this study, a micro-computed tomography, histomorphometric and molecular (RealTimePCRarray characterization of post tooth-extraction alveolar bone healing was performed on C57Bl/6 WT mice. After the initial clot dominance (0 h, the development of a provisional immature granulation tissue is evident (7 d, characterized by marked cell proliferation, angiogenesis and inflammatory cells infiltration; associated with peaks of growth factors (BMP-2-4-7,TGFβ1,VEGFa, cytokines (TNFα, IL-10, chemokines & receptors (CXCL12, CCL25, CCR5, CXCR4, matrix (Col1a1-2, ITGA4, VTN, MMP1a and MSCs (CD105, CD106, OCT4, NANOG, CD34, CD146 markers expression. Granulation tissue is sequentially replaced by more mature connective tissue (14 d, characterized by inflammatory infiltrate reduction along the increased bone formation, marked expression of matrix remodeling enzymes (MMP-2-9, bone formation/maturation (RUNX2, ALP, DMP1, PHEX, SOST markers, and chemokines & receptors associated with healing (CCL2, CCL17, CCR2. No evidences of cartilage cells or tissue were observed, strengthening the intramembranous nature of bone healing. Bone microarchitecture analysis supports the evolving healing, with total tissue and bone volumes as trabecular number and thickness showing a progressive increase over time. The extraction socket healing process is considered complete (21 d when the dental socket is filled by trabeculae bone with well-defined medullary canals; it being the expression of mature bone markers prevalent at this period. Our data confirms the intramembranous bone healing nature of the model used, revealing parallels between the gene expression profile and the

  3. Application of cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Zhao, Yanping; Zhang, Heming; Liu, Songhao

    2009-11-01

    The exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine offers advantages including good efficiency and smaller side-effects, however, the exact mechanisms have not been classified. A lot of literatures indicated the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations of skeletal muscle cells increased significantly during exercise-induced fatigue. This study is aimed to establish a rat skeletal muscle cell model of exercise-induced fatigue. We applied cytoplasmic Ca2+ fluorescence imaging techniques to study the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by Chinese medicine ginseng extract. In our research, the muscle tissues from the newborn 3 days rats were taken out and digested into cells. The cells were randomly divided into the ginseng extract group and the control group. The cells from the two groups were cultured in the medium respectively added 2mg/ml ginseng extract and 2mg/ml D-hanks solution. After differentiating into myotubes, the two groups of cells treated with a fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM were put on the confocal microscope and the fluorescence intensity of cells pre- and post- stimulation with dexamethasone were detected. It was found that cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations of the two groups of cells both increased post-stimulation, however, the increasing amplitude of fluorescence intensity of the ginseng extract group was significantly lower than that of the control group. In conclusion, stimulating the cells with dexamethasone is a kind of workable cell models of exercise-induced fatigue, and the molecular mechanisms of exercise-induced fatigue eliminated by ginseng extract may be connected to regulatating cytosolic free Ca2+ concentrations.

  4. A molecular imprinting-based turn-on Ratiometric fluorescence sensor for highly selective and sensitive detection of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Yu, Jialuo; Wu, Xiaqing; Fu, Junqing; Kang, Qi; Shen, Dazhong; Li, Jinhua; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-07-15

    A novel molecular imprinting-based turn-on ratiometric fluorescence sensor was constructed via a facile sol-gel polymerization for detection of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on the basis of photoinduced electron transfer (PET) by using nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) as detection signal source and quantum dots (QDs) as reference signal source. With the presence and increase of 2,4-D, the amine groups on the surface of QDs@SiO2 could bind with 2,4-D and thereby the NBD fluorescence intensities could be significantly enhanced since the PET process was inhibited, while the QDs maintained constant intensities. Accordingly, the ratio of the dual-emission intensities of green NBD and red QDs could be utilized for turn-on fluorescent detection of 2,4-D, along with continuous color changes from orange-red to green readily observed by the naked eye. The as-prepared fluorescence sensor obtained high sensitivity with a low detection limit of 0.14μM within 5min, and distinguished recognition selectivity for 2,4-D over its analogs. Moreover, the sensor was successfully applied to determine 2,4-D in real water samples, and high recoveries at three spiking levels of 2,4-D ranged from 95.0% to 110.1% with precisions below 4.5%. The simple, rapid and reliable visual sensing strategy would not only provide potential applications for high selective ultratrace analysis of complicated matrices, but also greatly enrich the research connotations of molecularly imprinted sensors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence in the gas phase: a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular spectroscopy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2017-11-01

    Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) extends the usual laser induced fluorescence technique by adding a second dimension, the wavelength at which excited states emit, thereby significantly enhancing the information that can be extracted. It allows overlapping absorption features, whether they arise from within the same molecule or from different molecules in a mixture, to be associated with their appropriate "parent" state and/or molecule. While the first gas phase version of the technique was published a decade ago, the technique is in its infancy, having been exploited by only a few groups to date. However, its potential in gas phase spectroscopy and dynamics is significant. In this article we provide an overview of the technique and illustrate its potential with examples, with a focus on those utilising high resolution in the dispersed fluorescence dimension.

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris( o -phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  7. Absorption and Fluorescence of PRODAN in Phospholipid Bilayers: A Combined Quantum Mechanics and Classical Molecular Dynamics Study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cwiklik, Lukasz; Aquino, A. J. A.; Vazdar, Mario; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Pittner, Jiří; Hof, Martin; Lischka, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 41 (2011), s. 11428-11437 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : fluorescence * density functional theory * charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.946, year: 2011

  8. Interactions between epinastine and human serum albumin: Investigation by fluorescence, UV-vis, FT-IR, CD, lifetime measurement and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Girish G.; Naik, Praveen N.; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A.; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T.

    2017-06-01

    The fluorescence quenching of human serum albumin (HSA) by epinastine hydrochloride (EPN) at pH 7.4 buffer was studied using absorption, fluorescence quenching, time-resolved, circular-dichroism, synchronous and molecular docking studies have been employed in the system. The fluorescence quenching study revealed that the static quenching mechanism was involved in the interaction of EPN with human serum albumin. The value number of binding sites, n, is close to unity, EPN-HSA, indicated the presence of a single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant value of EPN_HSA was observed to be 2.72 × 104 M-1 at 298 K. The spectral results attest that the binding of EPN-HSA induced conformational changes in the HSA. The metal ions viz., Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ were found to influence the binding of the EPN to HSA. Based on the Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (EPN) was found to be 4.33 nm. The circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of EPN decreased the α-helix content of serum albumin, which indicated conformation changes in HSA upon interaction with EPN.

  9. Bioresponsive and fluorescent hyaluronic acid-iodixanol nanogels for targeted X-ray computed tomography imaging and chemotherapy of breast tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yaqin; Wang, Xinhui; Wang, X.; Chen, J.; Meng, Fenghua; Deng, D.; Cheng, R.; Feijen, Jan; Zhong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanotheranostics is a rapidly growing field combining disease diagnosis and therapy, which ultimately may add in the development of ‘personalized medicine’. Here, we designed and developed bioresponsive and fluorescent hyaluronic acid-iodixanol nanogels (HAI-NGs) for targeted X-ray computed

  10. Enhancing molecular logic through modulation of temporal and spatial constraints with quantum dot-based systems that use fluorescent (Förster) resonance energy transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Algar, W. Russ; Hildebrandt, Niko; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2013-10-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) contain favorable photonic properties (e.g., resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts) that make them well-suited for fluorescence (Förster) resonance energy transfer (FRET) based applications including monitoring proteolytic activity, elucidating the effects of nanoparticles-mediated drug delivery, and analyzing the spatial and temporal dynamics of cellular biochemical processes. Herein, we demonstrate how unique considerations of temporal and spatial constraints can be used in conjunction with QD-FRET systems to open up new avenues of scientific discovery in information processing and molecular logic circuitry. For example, by conjugating both long lifetime luminescent terbium(III) complexes (Tb) and fluorescent dyes (A647) to a single QD, we can create multiple FRET lanes that change temporally as the QD acts as both an acceptor and donor at distinct time intervals. Such temporal FRET modulation creates multi-step FRET cascades that produce a wealth of unique photoluminescence (PL) spectra that are well-suited for the construction of a photonic alphabet and photonic logic circuits. These research advances in bio-based molecular logic open the door to future applications including multiplexed biosensing and drug delivery for disease diagnostics and treatment.

  11. Basic amphipathic model peptides: Structural investigations in solution, studied by circular dichroism, fluorescence, analytical ultracentrifugation and molecular modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangavel, C.; Sy, D.; Reynaud, J. A.

    1999-05-01

    A twenty amino acid residue long amphipathic peptide made of ten leucine and ten lysine residues and four derivatives, in which a tryptophan, as a fluorescent probe, is substituted for a leucine, are studied. The peptides in water are mainly in an unordered conformation (~90%), and undergo a two state reversible transition upon heating, leading to a partially helical conformation (cold denaturation). Time resolved fluorescence results show that fluorescence decay for the four Trp containing peptides is best described by triple fluorescence decay kinetics. In TFE/water mixture, peptides adopt a single α-helix conformation but the Leu-Trp9 substitution leads to an effective helix destabilizing effect. In salted media, the peptides are fully helical and present a great tendency to self associate by bringing the hydrophobic faces of helices into close contact. This proceeds in non-cooperative multisteps leading to the formation of α helix aggregates with various degrees of complexation. Using modelling, the relative hydrophobic surface areas accessible to water molecules in n-mer structures are calculated and discussed. Nous avons étudié un peptide amphipathique composé de dix lysine et dix leucine, ainsi que quatre dérivés comportant un résidu tryptophane pour les études par fluorescence. Dans l'eau, les peptides ne sont pas structurés (~90%), et se structurent partiellement en hélice α par chauffage (dénaturation froide). Les mesures de déclin de fluorescence font apparaître une cinétique à trois temps de vie. Dans un mélange eau/TFE, les peptides adoptent une conformation en hélice α, mais la substitution Leu-Trp9 possède un effet déstabilisant. En mileu salin, les peptides sont totalement hélicoïdaux et ont tendance à s'agréger de façon à regrouper leur face hydrophobe. Ce processus se fait en plusieurs étapes avec des agrégats de taille variable. L'existence de tels agrégats est discutée sur la base de la modélisation mol

  12. Evaluation of the interactions between human serum albumin (HSA and warfarin or diflunisal by using molecular fluorescence using two approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Amézqueta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Serum albumin is the main drug transporter of the bloodstream and contains two main binding sites:  Sudlow I or acidic drug binding site, and Sudlow II or benzodiazepine binding site. Warfarin, a well-known anticoagulant drug commonly used in the prevention of thrombosis and thromboembolism, binds to Sudlow I site, whereas non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as diflunisal bind preferentially to Sudlow II site.  Albumin is a fluorophore that modifies its fluorescence (quenching or enhancement effect when it is bound to a drug. The application of the double logarithm Stern-Volmer equation allows the calculation of the stoichiometry and the binding constant of the process. This procedure does not consider the possible interferences coming from the fluorescence of the drug though. Another strategy to evaluate the binding constants is to consider the whole spectrum, taking into account all the possible species in equilibrium; in this case we have used an extended version of the STAR program, which can deal with 300 spectra, each containing up to 300 data points. The aim of this work is to compare both approaches to evaluate the interaction between warfarin (Sudlow I and diflunisal (Sudlow II and HSA: the double logarithm Stern-Volmer equation and the STAR program.

  13. Evolution of molecular weight and fluorescence of effluent organic matter (EfOM) during oxidation processes revealed by advanced spectrographic and chromatographic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Mo; Wen, Qinxue; Ren, Nanqi

    2017-11-01

    Effluent organic matter (EfOM) is an emerging concern to receiving aquatic environment due to its refractory property. The degradation of EfOM in ozonation and other two advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), UV/H 2 O 2 and UV/persulfate (PS), was investigated in this study. Fluorescence spectra coupled with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and two-dimensional correlation gel permeation chromatography (2D-GPC) were used to track the evolution of EfOM during each oxidation process. Results showed that the degradation of EfOM indicated by dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV 254 and fluorescence components, fitted well with pseudo-first-order kinetic model during the oxidation processes. Ozonation showed higher degradation efficiency than AOPs, while UV/PS was more effective than UV/H 2 O 2 with equimolar oxidants dosage. Ozone and SO· 4 - were more reactive with terrestrial humic-like substances, while hydroxyl radical preferentially reacted with protein-like substances. Organic molecules with higher molecular weight (MW) were susceptible to ozone or radicals. Ozonation could transform higher MW (MW of 3510 and 575) organic matters into lower MW organic matters (MW of 294), while reductions of all the organics were observed in both AOPs. Due to the higher reaction rates between ozone and EfOM, ozonation maybe serve as a pre-treatment for AOPs to reduce the radical and energy consumption and improve mineralization of EfOM by AOPs. The decline in DOC, UV 254 , fluorescence and reduction in oxidants increased with the increase of oxidants dosage, and linear correlations among them were found during the ozonation and AOPs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of novel molecularly imprinted polymer - coated Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots for specific fluorescent recognition of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantada-Vázquez, María Pilar; Sánchez-González, Juan; Peña-Vázquez, Elena; Tabernero, María Jesús; Bermejo, Ana María; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2016-01-15

    Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots (QDs) coated with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) material selective toward cocaine and its metabolites have been prepared and applied to cocaine (COC) and metabolites assessment by spectrofluorimetry. Ultrasound irradiation (37kHz) was novelty used for performing the Mn-doped ZnS QDs synthesis as well as for preparing the QD based MIP-coated composite by precipitation polymerization (imprinting process). This fact allowed the synthesis to be accomplished in four hours. In addition, the use of ultrasound irradiation during MIP-QDs synthesis increased the homogeneity of the QDs size, and reduced nanoparticles agglomeration. MIP was synthesized using COC as a template molecule, ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) as a functional monomer, divinylbenzene (DVB) as a cross-linker, and 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as an initiator. The fluorescence of MIP-coated QDs was quenched by the template (COC) and also by metabolites from COC such as benzoylecgonine (BZE), and ecgonine methyl ester (EME). Quenching was not observed when performing experiments with non-imprinted polymer (NIP)-coated QDs; and also, fluorescence quenching of MIP-coated QDs was not observed by other drugs of abuse and metabolites (heroin and cannabis abuse). This fact indicates that the prepared material recognize only COC (template) and metabolites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular basis for pH sensitivity and proton transfer in green fluorescent protein: protonation and conformational substates from electrostatic calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharnagl, C; Raupp-Kossmann, R; Fischer, S F

    1999-10-01

    We performed a theoretical study to elucidate the coupling between protonation states and orientation of protein dipoles and buried water molecules in green fluorescent protein, a versatile biosensor for protein targeting. It is shown that the ionization equilibria of the wild-type green fluorescent protein-fluorophore and the internal proton-binding site E222 are mutually interdependent. Two acid-base transitions of the fluorophore occur in the presence of neutral (physiologic pH) and ionized (pH > 12) E222, respectively. In the pH-range from approximately 8 to approximately 11 ionized and neutral sites are present in constant ratio, linked by internal proton transfer. The results indicate that modulation of the internal proton sharing by structural fluctuations or chemical variations of aligning residues T203 and S65 cause drastic changes of the neutral/anionic ratio-despite similar physiologic fluorophore pK(a) s. Moreover, we find that dipolar heterogeneities in the internal hydrogen-bond network lead to distributed driving forces for excited-state proton transfer. A molecular model for the unrelaxed surrounding after deprotonation is discussed in relation to pathways providing fast ground-state recovery or slow stabilization of the anion. The calculated total free energy for excited-state deprotonation ( approximately 19 k(B)T) and ground-state reprotonation ( approximately 2 k(B)T) is in accordance with absorption and emission data (

  16. A precise and efficient detection of Beta-Cyfluthrin via fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers with ally fluorescein as functional monomer in agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hao; Gao, Lin; Wang, Jixiang; Pan, Jianming; Yan, Yongsheng; Zhang, Xifeng

    2017-02-15

    In this study, an effective and precise fluorescent molecularly imprinted polymers (FMIPs) for the determination of Beta-Cyfluthrin (BC) was synthesized via precipitation polymerization with SiO2 as the carrier, BC as the target molecule, ally fluorescein as the functional monomer, trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM) as the crosslinker. Moreover, the characteristic of material has been measured by FTIR, TEM, SEM, TGA, LSCM and fluorescence spectrophotometer. Average diameter and shell thickness of as-synthesized microspheres were 300nm and 50nm, respectively. An excellent linear relationship of SiO2-MPTMS@FMIPs with a correlation coefficient of 0.9919 could be gained covering a wide concentration range of 10.11-80nM described by the Stern-Volmer equation. The limit of detection (LOD) was evaluated with the equation LOD=3σ/S and was found to be 10.11nM. The study demonstrated that SiO2-MPTMS@FMIPs could improve the determination for BC and illustrated the good prospects of SiO2-MPTMS@FMIPs for BC detection in agricultural products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combined quantum-mechanical molecular mechanics calculations with NWChem and AMBER: Excited state properties of green fluorescent protein chromophore analogue in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirojsirikul, Teerapong [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Götz, Andreas W. [San Diego Supercomputer Center, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Weare, John [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; Walker, Ross C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla California 92093; GlaxoSmithKline, 1250 S. Collegeville Road Collegeville Pennsylvania 19426; Kowalski, Karol [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P. O. Box 999 Richland Washington 99352; Valiev, Marat [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P. O. Box 999 Richland Washington 99352

    2017-05-03

    Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is a widely used fluorescent biomarker for the study of biological systems. Our investigation is focused on providing a reliable theoretical description of the GFP chromophore, the photochemical properties of which can be influenced through both the surrounding protein environment and pH levels. In this work we are specifically addressing the effect of an aqueous solvation environment , where a number of experimental measurements have been performed. Our approach is based on a combined quantum mechanics molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methodology, which incorporates high level coupled cluster theory for the analysis of excited states. It also presents the first application of the newly developed NWChem/AMBER QM/MM interface. Using a systematic approach, which involves comparison of gas phase and aqueous results for different protonation states and conformations, we have resolved existing uncertainties regarding theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. We observe that the impact of aqueous environment on charged states generally results in blue shifts, but the magnitude of the effect is sensitive to charge state and conformation and can be rationalized based on charge movement into the area of higher/lower external electrostatic potentials. At neutral pH levels the experimentally observed absorption signal is most likely coming from the phenol protonated form. Our results also show that the high level coupled description is essential for proper description of excited states of GFP.

  18. Trihalomethanes (THMs) precursor fractions removal by coagulation and adsorption for bio-treated municipal wastewater: Molecular weight, hydrophobicity/hydrophily and fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qi; Yan, Han; Zhang, Feng; Xue, Nan; Wang, Yan; Chu, Yongbao; Gao, Baoyu

    2015-10-30

    Due to concerns over health risk of disinfection byproducts (DBPs), removal of trihalomethanes (THMs) precursor from bio-treated wastewater by coagulation and adsorption was investigated in this study. Ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and nonionic resins were applied to fractionate THMs precursor into various molecular weight (MW) fractions and hydrophobic/hydrophilic fractions. Characteristics of coagulated water and adsorbed water were evaluated by the three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. Results showed that coagulation and adsorption were suitable for removing different hydrophobic/hydrophilic and fluorescent fractions. Coagulation decreased THMs concentration in hydrophobic acids (HoA) fraction from 59 μg/L to 39 μg/L, while the lowest THMs concentration (9 μg/L) in hydrophilic substances (HiS) fraction was obtained in adsorbed water. However, both coagulation and adsorption were ineffective for removing fractions with MWadsorption processes could reduce THMs formation, some specific THMs formation potential (STHMFP) in residual dissolved organic matter (DOM) fractions increased in this study. Hydrophobic acid and hydrophilic fractions increased after coagulation treatment, and low MW and hydrophobic fractions increased after adsorption treatment. In addition, active carbon adsorbed more organic matter than coagulant, but brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in adsorbed water turned to the major THMs species after chlorination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III) Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Toshitada; Murayama, Saori; Tobita, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI=(Ip/If)) between the phosphorescence (Ip) and fluorescence (If) intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions (RI0/RI) was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III) complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the RI value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2) to that under normoxia (21% O2) was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2. PMID:26066988

  20. Determination of BPA, BPB, BPF, BADGE and BFDGE in canned energy drinks by molecularly imprinted polymer cleaning up and UPLC with fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Pasquale; Di Marco Pisciottano, Ilaria; Esposito, Francesco; Fasano, Evelina; Scognamiglio, Gelsomina; Mita, Gustavo Damiano; Cirillo, Teresa

    2017-04-01

    A new method for simultaneous determination of five bisphenols in canned energy drinks by UPLC with fluorescence detection, after clean up on molecularly imprinted polymers, is herein described. The method was validated at two concentration levels, calculating trueness, repeatability and within-laboratory reproducibility, specificity, linearity of detector response, the limits of quantifications and the limits of detection for each bisphenol. The method is specific, reliable and very sensitive, allowing for determination of bisphenol F diglycidyl ether (BFDGE), bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol B (BPB), bisphenol F (BPF) and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (BADGE) down to 0.50ng/mL; it was employed to determine contamination levels from these bisphenols in forty energy drinks of different brands, collected from the market in Naples. BPA was detected in 17 out of 40 samples (42.5%); in some energy drinks also BPF, BADGE and BFDGE were determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Near-infrared fluorescence molecular imaging of amyloid beta species and monitoring therapy in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueli; Tian, Yanli; Zhang, Can; Tian, Xiaoyu; Ross, Alana W.; Moir, Robert D.; Sun, Hongbin; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Moore, Anna; Ran, Chongzhao

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging has been widely applied to monitoring therapy of cancer and other diseases in preclinical studies; however, this technology has not been applied successfully to monitoring therapy for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Although several NIRF probes for detecting amyloid beta (Aβ) species of AD have been reported, none of these probes has been used to monitor changes of Aβs during therapy. In this article, we demonstrated that CRANAD-3, a curcumin analog, is capable of detecting both soluble and insoluble Aβ species. In vivo imaging showed that the NIRF signal of CRANAD-3 from 4-mo-old transgenic AD (APP/PS1) mice was 2.29-fold higher than that from age-matched wild-type mice, indicating that CRANAD-3 is capable of detecting early molecular pathology. To verify the feasibility of CRANAD-3 for monitoring therapy, we first used the fast Aβ-lowering drug LY2811376, a well-characterized beta-amyloid cleaving enzyme-1 inhibitor, to treat APP/PS1 mice. Imaging data suggested that CRANAD-3 could monitor the decrease in Aβs after drug treatment. To validate the imaging capacity of CRANAD-3 further, we used it to monitor the therapeutic effect of CRANAD-17, a curcumin analog for inhibition of Aβ cross-linking. The imaging data indicated that the fluorescence signal in the CRANAD-17–treated group was significantly lower than that in the control group, and the result correlated with ELISA analysis of brain extraction and Aβ plaque counting. It was the first time, to our knowledge, that NIRF was used to monitor AD therapy, and we believe that our imaging technology has the potential to have a high impact on AD drug development. PMID:26199414

  2. WHOLE CELL TOMOGRAPHY/MOLECULAR BIOLOGY/STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY: Affordable x-ray microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, James E.; Blackborow, Paul; Horne, Stephen J.; Gelb, Jeff

    2013-03-01

    Biological research spans 10 orders of magnitude from angstroms to meters. While electron microscopy can reveal structural details at most of these spatial length scales, transmission electron tomography only reliably reconstructs three-dimensional (3-D) volumes of cellular material with a spatial resolution between 1-5 nm from samples less than 500 nm thick1. Most biological cells are 2-30 times thicker than this threshold, which means that a cell must be cut into consecutive slices with each slice reconstructed individually in order to approximate the contextual information of the entire cell. Fortunately, due to a larger penetration depth2, X-ray computed tomography bypasses the need to physically section a cell and enables imaging of intact cells and tissues on the micrometer or larger scale with tens to hundreds of nanometer spatial resolution. While the technique of soft x-ray microscopy has been extensively developed in synchrotron facilities, advancements in laboratory x-ray source designs now increase its accessibility by supporting commercial systems suitable for a standard laboratory. In this paper, we highlight a new commercial compact cryogenic soft x-ray microscope designed for a standard laboratory setting and explore its capabilities for mesoscopic investigations of intact prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

  3. Investigation of molecular mechanisms of action of chelating drugs on protein-lipid model membranes by X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikova, N. N.; Zheludeva, S. I.; Koval'chuk, M. V.; Stepina, N. D.; Erko, A. I.; Yur'eva, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    Protein-lipid films based on the enzyme alkaline phosphatase were subjected to the action of chelating drugs, which are used for accelerating the removal of heavy metals from the human body, and the elemental composition of the resulting films was investigated. Total-reflection X-ray fluorescence measurements were performed at the Berlin Electron Storage Ring Company for Synchrotron Radiation (BESSY) in Germany. A comparative estimation of the protective effect of four drugs (EDTA, succimer, xydiphone, and mediphon) on membrane-bound enzymes damaged by lead ions was made. The changes in the elemental composition of the protein-lipid films caused by high doses of chelating drugs were investigated. It was shown that state-of-the-art X-ray techniques can, in principle, be used to develop new methods for the in vitro evaluation of the efficiency of drugs, providing differential data on their actions.

  4. Measurements of molecular carbon radical concentrations by saturated laser-induced fluorescence in hydrocarbon flames at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Michele; D'Apice, Massimo; Giammartini, Stefano; Magaldi, M.; Romano, G. P.

    2003-09-01

    The C2 abundance in flames at atmospheric pressure is reported for three fuel-rich combustion environments: acetylene/oxygen, Liquid Petroleum Gas (LPG)/air and methane/air flames. Measurements have been based on spectrographic and two-dimensional Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) of the Δv = -1 d3IIg-a3IIu band. The oxyacetylene flame was utilized to establish a comparison with literature data and absolute values, calibrated through Rayleigh scattering, were found to be distributed within the 1014 cm-3 range. The induced emission from two Bunsen flames fed with LPG/air or methane/air was also investigated. Accumulated acquisitions were necessary to detect small C2 quantities in the order of 1010 cm-3 concentrated on the flame front.

  5. Molecular Biomarkers, Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy and Computed Tomography as New Methodologies Applied in TREASURE Project to Predict the Quality of Pork and Pork Products from Local Pig Breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Lebret, Bénédicte; Pugliese, Carolina; Bozzi, Riccardo; Font-I-Furnols, Maria; Prevolnik Povše, Maja; Tomažin, Urška; Čandek-Potokar, Marjeta

    2017-01-01

    Emerging non-destructive technologies are of interest in meat sector science and industry since they allow the characterization of products and quality control throughout processing. Three diff erent new technologies described in this paper will be considered in the TREASURE project for the evaluation and prediction of quality of pork and processed products: molecular biomarkers, near-infra red spectroscopy (NIRS), and computed tomography (CT). Molecular biomarkers are single genes, or a set ...

  6. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  7. Functionalized polymeric nanoparticles loaded with indocyanine green as theranostic materials for targeted molecular near infrared fluorescence imaging and photothermal destruction of ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Baharak; Guerrero, Yadir; Bacon, Danielle; Kundra, Vikas; Vullev, Valentine I; Anvari, Bahman

    2014-09-01

    Ovarian cancer remains the deadliest malignancy of the female reproductive system. The ability to identify and destroy all ovarian tumor nodules may have a termendous impact on preventing tumor recurrence, and patient survival. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of a nano-structured system for combined near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging of human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) over-expression, as a biomarker of ovarian cancer cells, and photothermal destruction of these cells in vitro. The nano-structured system consists of the near infrared dye, indocyanine green (ICG), encapsulated within poly(allylamine) hydrochloride chains cross-linked ionically with sodium phosphate. The surface of the construct is functionalized by covalently attached polyethylene glycol, and monoclonal antibodies against HER2 using reducitve amination methods. We use dynamic light scattering, and absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy for phyiscal characterization of the constructs. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy are used to investigate molecular targeting and imaging capabilities of the constructs against SKOV3 and OVCAR3 ovarian cancer cell lines, which have relatively high and low expression levels of the HER2 receptor, respectively. Continuous NIR laser irradiation at 808 nm is used to investigating the utility of the constructs in mediating photothermal destruction of SKOV3 cells. Flow cytometry results indicate that the functionalized nano-constructs are more effective in targeting the HER2 receptor than non-encapsulated ICG and non-functionlaized constructs (P functionalized constructs in NIR imaging of HER2 overexpression. The functionalized nano-constructs are also capable of inducing a significantly greater increase in photothermal destruction of SKOV3 cells than free ICG and non-functionalized constructs (P functionalized with the monoclonal antibodies, as thernaostic materials for targted molecular NIR imaging of

  8. Environment sensitive fluorescent analogue of biologically active oxazoles differentially recognizes human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin: Photophysical and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Jyotirmay; Biswas, Suman; Chaudhuri, Ankur; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Chakraborty, Sibani; Das, Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    An environment sensitive fluorophore, 4-(5-(4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)oxazol-2-yl)benzoic acid (DMOBA), that closely mimics biologically active 2,5-disubstituited oxazoles has been designed to probe two homologous serum proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by means of photophysical and molecular modeling studies. This fluorescent analogue exhibits solvent polarity sensitive fluorescence due to an intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state. In comparison to water, the steady state emission spectra of DMOBA in BSA is characterized by a greater blue shift ( 10 nm) and smaller Stokes' shift ( 5980 cm- 1) in BSA than HSA (Stokes'shift 6600 cm- 1), indicating less polar and more hydrophobic environment of the dye in the former than the latter. The dye-protein binding interactions are remarkably stronger for BSA than HSA which is evident from higher value of the association constant for the DMOBA-BSA complex (Ka 5.2 × 106 M- 1) than the DMOBA-HSA complex (Ka 1.0 × 106 M- 1). Fӧrster resonance energy transfer studies revealed remarkably less efficient energy transfer (8%) between the donor tryptophans in BSA and the acceptor DMOBA dye than that (30%) between the single tryptophan moiety in HSA and the dye, which is consistent with a much larger distance between the donor (tryptophan)-acceptor (dye) pair in BSA (34.5 Å) than HSA (25.4 Å). Site specific competitive binding assays have confirmed on the location of the dye in Sudlow's site II of BSA and in Sudlow's site I of HSA, respectively. Molecular modeling studies have shown that the fluorescent analogue is tightly packed in the binding site of BSA due to strong steric complementarity, where, binding of DMOBA to BSA is primarily dictated by the van der Waals and hydrogen bonding interactions. In contrast, in HSA the steric complementarity is less significant and binding is primarily guided by polar interactions and van der Waals interactions appear to be less significant in the

  9. Evidence for the molecular-scale origin of the suppression of physical ageing in confined polymer: fluorescence and dielectric spectroscopy studies of polymer-silica nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priestley, Rodney D; Rittigstein, Perla; Broadbelt, Linda J; Fukao, Koji; Torkelson, John M

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the rate of physical ageing at room temperature in nanocomposites of silica (10-15 nm diameter) nanoparticles in poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The physical ageing rate was reduced by more than a factor of 20 in 0.4 vol% silica-PMMA nanocomposites relative to neat PMMA. The molecular-scale origin of this nearly complete arresting of physical ageing was investigated with dielectric spectroscopy. The strength of the β relaxation process was reduced by nearly 50% in the nanocomposite relative to neat PMMA. This reduced strength of the β process results from dipoles (ester groups) having hindered motions or being virtually immobile on the timescale being probed at a frequency of 100 Hz. This hindered mobility results from hydrogen bonding between PMMA ester side groups and hydroxyl units on the surface of the silica nanoparticles. In contrast, no reduction in physical ageing rate was observed upon addition of silica to polystyrene, which cannot form hydrogen bonds with the silica surfaces. Thus, the molecular origin of the suppressed physical ageing in silica-PMMA nanocomposites is the interfacial hydrogen bonding, which leads to a major reduction in the strength of the β process, i.e., the β process is largely responsible for the observed physical ageing

  10. Molecular shape, architecture, and size of P2X4 receptors determined using fluorescence resonance energy transfer and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark T; Fisher, James A; Fountain, Samuel J; Ford, Robert C; North, R Alan; Khakh, Baljit S

    2008-09-19

    P2X receptors are ATP-gated nonselective cation channels with important physiological roles. However, their structures are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the architecture of P2X receptors using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy and direct structure determination using electron microscopy. FRET efficiency measurements indicated that the distance between the C-terminal tails of P2X(4) receptors was 5.6 nm. Single particle analysis of purified P2X(4) receptors was used to determine the three-dimensional structure at a resolution of 21A; the orientation of the particle with respect to the membrane was assigned by labeling the intracellular C termini with 1.8-nm gold particles and the carbohydrate-rich ectodomain with lectin. We found that human P2X(4) is a globular torpedo-like molecule with an approximate volume of 270 nm(3) and a compact propeller-shaped ectodomain. In this structure, the distance between the centers of the gold particles was 6.1 nm, which closely matches FRET data. Thus, our data provide the first views of the architecture, shape, and size of single P2X receptors, furthering our understanding of this important family of ligand-gated ion channels.

  11. Molecular diagnosis of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: a comparison between reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Rocío; Llombart, Beatriz; M Pujol, Ramon; Fernández-Serra, Antonio; Sanmartín, Onofre; Toll, Agustí; Rubio, Luis; Segura, Sonia; Barranco, Carlos; Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Yébenes, Mireia; Salido, Marta; Traves, Víctor; Monteagudo, Carlos; Sáez, Empar; Hernández, Teresa; de Álava, Enrique; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio; Solé, Francesc; Guillén, Carlos; Espinet, Blanca; López-Guerrero, Jose A

    2011-07-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is characterized by the presence of the t(17;22)(q22;q13) that leads to the fusion of the COL1A1 and PDGFB genes. This translocation can be detected by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques. We have evaluated the usefulness of a dual color dual fusion FISH probe strategy for COL1A1/PDGFB detection in a series of 103 archival DFSPs and compared the obtained results with RT-PCR analyses. FISH and RT-PCR were carried out on paraffin embedded tissue samples. Regarding the RT-PCR approach, all COL1A1 exons and exon 2 of PDGFB were evaluated. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values were assessed considering the histological diagnosis as the gold standard. We also analyzed the relationship between the genetic findings and the clinicopathological variables of the tumors. The COL1A1/PDGFB translocation was detected in 93% of DFSP. Both techniques showed a similar specificity (100%), but FISH was more sensitive than RT-PCR (90% vs. 72%). Regarding, clinicopathological features, a higher percentage of positive cells detected by FISH was significantly associated with the fibrosarcomatous DFSP variant (P < 0.001). Interestingly, all CD34 negative DFSP (n = 5) were positive for COL1A1/PDGFB translocation by both techniques. In conclusion, the majority of DFSP harbor the COL1A1/PDGFB translocation and FISH technique should be recommended as a routine diagnostic tool, especially in cases showing unusual histopathological subtypes and/or immunohistochemical features. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Wide-field time-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM): Molecular snapshots of metabolic function in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Dhruv

    2008-12-01

    Steady-state fluorescence imaging is routinely employed to obtain physiological information but is susceptible to artifacts such as absorption and photobleaching. FLIM provides an additional source of contrast oblivious to these but is affected by factors such as pH, gases, and temperature. Here we focused on developing a resolution-enhanced FLIM system for quantitative oxygen sensing. Oxygen is one of the most critical components of metabolic machinery and affects growth, differentiation, and death. FLIM-based oxygen sensing provides a valuable tool for biologists without the need of alternate technologies. We also developed novel computational approaches to improve spatial resolution of FLIM images, extending its potential for thick tissue studies. We designed a wide-field time-domain UV-vis-NIR FLIM system with high temporal resolution (50 ps), large temporal dynamic range (750 ps -- 1 mus), short data acquisition/processing times (15 s) and noise-removal capability. Lifetime calibration of an oxygen-sensitive, ruthenium dye (RTDP) enabled in vivo oxygen level measurements (resolution = 8 muM, range = 1 -- 300 muM). Combining oxygen sensing with endogenous imaging allowed for the study of two key molecules (NADH and oxygen) consumed at the termini of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway in Barrett's adenocarcinoma columnar (SEG-1) cells and Esophageal normal squamous cells (HET-1). Starkly higher intracellular oxygen and NADH levels in living SEG-1 vs. HET-1 cells were detected by FLIM and attributed to altered metabolic pathways in malignant cells. We performed FLIM studies in microfluidic bioreactors seeded with mouse myoblasts. For these systems, oxygen concentrations play an important role in cell behavior and gene expression. Oxygen levels decreased with increasing cell densities and were consistent with simulated model outcomes. In single bioreactor loops, FLIM detected spatial heterogeneity in oxygen levels as high as 20%. We validated our calibration

  13. Molecular imaging: current status and emerging strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pysz, M.A.; Gambhir, S.S.; Willmann, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    In vivo molecular imaging has a great potential to impact medicine by detecting diseases in early stages (screening), identifying extent of disease, selecting disease- and patient-specific treatment (personalized medicine), applying a directed or targeted therapy, and measuring molecular-specific effects of treatment. Current clinical molecular imaging approaches primarily use positron-emission tomography (PET) or single photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT)-based techniques. In ongoing preclinical research, novel molecular targets of different diseases are identified and, sophisticated and multifunctional contrast agents for imaging these molecular targets are developed along with new technologies and instrumentation for multi-modality molecular imaging. Contrast-enhanced molecular ultrasound (US) with molecularly-targeted contrast microbubbles is explored as a clinically translatable molecular imaging strategy for screening, diagnosing, and monitoring diseases at the molecular level. Optical imaging with fluorescent molecular probes and US imaging with molecularly-targeted microbubbles are attractive strategies as they provide real-time imaging, are relatively inexpensive, produce images with high spatial resolution, and do not involve exposure to ionizing irradiation. Raman spectroscopy/microscopy has emerged as a molecular optical imaging strategy for ultrasensitive detection of multiple biomolecules/biochemicals with both in vivo and ex vivo versatility. Photoacoustic imaging is a hybrid of optical and US techniques involving optically-excitable molecularly-targeted contrast agents and quantitative detection of resulting oscillatory contrast agent movement with US. Current preclinical findings and advances in instrumentation, such as endoscopes and microcatheters, suggest that these molecular imaging methods have numerous potential clinical applications and will be translated into clinical use in the near future.

  14. Image Restoration for Fluorescence Planar Imaging with Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanxuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence planar imaging (FPI is failure to capture high resolution images of deep fluorochromes due to photon diffusion. This paper presents an image restoration method to deal with this kind of blurring. The scheme of this method is conceived based on a reconstruction method in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT with diffusion model. A new unknown parameter is defined through introducing the first mean value theorem for definite integrals. System matrix converting this unknown parameter to the blurry image is constructed with the elements of depth conversion matrices related to a chosen plane named focal plane. Results of phantom and mouse experiments show that the proposed method is capable of reducing the blurring of FPI image caused by photon diffusion when the depth of focal plane is chosen within a proper interval around the true depth of fluorochrome. This method will be helpful to the estimation of the size of deep fluorochrome.

  15. Use of αv Integrin Linked to Green Fluorescent Protein in Osteosarcoma Cells and Confocal Microscopy to Image Molecular Dynamics During Lung Metastasis in Nude Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tome, Yasunori; Yano, Shuya; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Mii, Sumiyuki; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Bouvet, Michael; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Kanaya, Fuminori; Hoffman, Robert M

    2016-08-01

    We report here imaging of the behavior of αv integrin linked to green fluorescent protein (GFP) in human osteosarcoma cells colonizing the lung of nude mice. 143B osteosarcoma cells expressing αv integrin-GFP were generated by transfection of an αv integrin-GFP fusion-gene vector pCMV-AC- ITGAV-GFP. In order to generate experimental lung metastases, 143B osteosarcoma cells (1×10(6)), stably expressing αv integrin-GFP, were injected intravenously via the tail vein. The osteosarcoma cells were transplanted orthotopically in the tibia of nude mice in order to generate spontaneous metastases. Lungs were harvested and imaged by confocal microscopy within 1 hour. In the experimental lung-metastasis model, extravasating and deformed osteosarcoma cells expressing αv integrin-GFP were observed. Pseudopodia of the osteosarcoma cells contained small puncta of αv integrin-GFP. In early-stage spontaneous lung metastasis, tumor emboli were observed in pulmonary vessels. At high magnification, small αv integrin-GFP puncta were observed in the tumor embolus. In late-stage spontaneous metastasis, tumor emboli were also observed in pulmonary vessels. Invading cancer cells with strong expression of αv integrin-GFP were observed at the margin of the tumor emboli. The results of this study demonstrate that molecular dynamics of αv integrin-GFP can be imaged in lung metastasis, which will allow further understanding of the role of αv integrin in this process. The results also suggest a general concept for imaging molecular behavior in vivo. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. Establishment of a new human pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma cell line, FU-MFH-2: molecular cytogenetic characterization by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and comparative genomic hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isayama Teruto

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH is one of the most frequent malignant soft tissue tumors in adults. Despite the considerable amount of research on MFH cell lines, their characterization at a molecular cytogenetic level has not been extensively analyzed. Methods and results We established a new permanent human cell line, FU-MFH-2, from a metastatic pleomorphic MFH of a 72-year-old Japanese man, and applied multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH, Urovysion™ FISH, and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH for the characterization of chromosomal aberrations. FU-MFH-2 cells were spindle or polygonal in shape with oval nuclei, and were successfully maintained in vitro for over 80 passages. The histological features of heterotransplanted tumors in severe combined immunodeficiency mice were essentially the same as those of the original tumor. Cytogenetic and M-FISH analyses displayed a hypotriploid karyotype with numerous structural aberrations. Urovysion™ FISH revealed a homozygous deletion of the p16INK4A locus on chromosome band 9p21. CGH analysis showed a high-level amplification of 9q31-q34, gains of 1p12-p34.3, 2p21, 2q11.2-q21, 3p, 4p, 6q22-qter, 8p11.2, 8q11.2-q21.1, 9q21-qter, 11q13, 12q24, 15q21-qter, 16p13, 17, 20, and X, and losses of 1q43-qter, 4q32-qter, 5q14-q23, 7q32-qter, 8p21-pter, 8q23, 9p21-pter, 10p11.2-p13, and 10q11.2-q22. Conclusion The FU-MFH-2 cell line will be a particularly useful model for studying molecular pathogenesis of human pleomorphic MFH.

  17. Fluorescence Titrations of Bio-relevant Complexes with DNA: Synthesis, Structural Investigation, DNA Binding/Cleavage, Antimicrobial and Molecular Docking Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, Thesingu Rajan; Subramanian, Ramasamy; Packianathan, Seemon; Raman, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, we attempted to develop new metal complexes (Cu(II), Co(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II)) of the imine ligand which was synthesized from 9,10-phenanthrenequinone and para-anisidine. With an intention to make the complexes most stable, very special chelating amino acid has been coordinated to the metal centre. The resultant metal complexes have been characterized by variety of techniques including FT-IR, UV-Vis., (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, powder XRD, EPR and mass spectral studies. The interaction of the complexes with DNA has been effectively examined and explored by fluorescence titration, UV-Vis absorption, viscometer titration, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry. Moreover, molecular docking analysis has been performed to understand the nature of binding of the complexes with DNA. These studies prove that CT DNA interaction of the complexes follows intercalation mode. The metal complexes exhibit effective cleavage of pUC19 DNA by an oxidative cleavage mechanism. The antimicrobial screening indicates that these complexes are good antimicrobial agents against various organisms.

  18. TH-AB-209-01: Making Benchtop X-Ray Fluorescence Computed Tomography (XFCT) Practical for in Vivo Imaging by Integration of a Dedicated High-Performance X-Ray Source in Conjunction with Micro-CT Functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, N; Cho, S; Reynoso, F

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To make benchtop x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XFCT) practical for routine preclinical imaging tasks with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) by deploying, integrating, and characterizing a dedicated high-performance x-ray source and addition of simultaneous micro-CT functionality. Methods: Considerable research effort is currently under way to develop a polychromatic benchtop cone-beam XFCT system capable of imaging GNPs by stimulation and detection of gold K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) photons. Recently, an ad hoc high-power x-ray source was incorporated and used to image the biodistribution of GNPs within a mouse, postmortem. In the current work, a dedicated x-ray source system featuring a liquid-cooled tungsten-target x-ray tube (max 160 kVp, ∼3 kW power) was deployed. The source was operated at 125 kVp, 24 mA. The tube’s compact dimensions allowed greater flexibility for optimizing both the irradiation and detection geometries. Incident x-rays were shaped by a conical collimator and filtered by 2 mm of tin. A compact “OEM” cadmium-telluride x-ray detector was implemented for detecting XRF/scatter spectra. Additionally, a flat panel detector was installed to allow simultaneous transmission CT imaging. The performance of the system was characterized by determining the detection limit (10-second acquisition time) for inserts filled with water/GNPs at various concentrations (0 and 0.010–1.0 wt%) and embedded in a small-animal-sized phantom. The phantom was loaded with 0.5, 0.3, and 0.1 wt% inserts and imaged using XFCT and simultaneous micro-CT. Results: An unprecedented detection limit of 0.030 wt% was experimentally demonstrated, with a 33% reduction in acquisition time. The reconstructed XFCT image accurately localized the imaging inserts. Micro-CT imaging did not provide enough contrast to distinguish imaging inserts from the phantom under the current conditions. Conclusion: The system is immediately capable of in vivo preclinical XFCT

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses the foundati......Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  20. An ultrasensitive and highly selective fluorescent and colorimetric chemosensor for citrate ions based on rhodamine B and its application as the first molecular security keypad lock based on phosphomolybdic acid and citrate inputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Baezzat, Mohammad-Reza; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Parhami, Abolfath; Hasanli, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Rhodamine B (Rh B ) has been developed as novel and efficient colorimetric and fluorometric chemosensor for citrate ions (Cit 3− ) in an absolutely aqueous media. The UV–vis absorption and fluorescent emission titrations experiments have been employed to study the sensing process. Rh B could act as an efficient “ON–OFF” fluorescent chemosensor for phosphomolybdic acid (PMA) based on an electron transfer (ET) process. Also (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− could operate as an “OFF–ON” fluorescent chemosensor for citrate ions based on a ligand substitution process. The chemosensor Rh B shows excellent fluorescence sensitivity and selectivity toward citrate in aqueous media, and displays ON–OFF–ON type fluorescence change with alternately adding PMA and citrate to the media along with reversible association–dissociation of the complex. The (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− can be applied to the quantification of citrate with a linear ranges covering from 0.053 to 0.83 and 0.08 to 1.6 µM by detection limits of 6.0 and 9.1 nM for fluorescence and colorimetric methods respectively. The keypad lock operation is particularly important, as the output of the system depends not only on the proper combination but also on the order of input signals, creating the correct password that can be used to “open” this molecular keypad lock through strong fluorescence emission at 575 nm. As a whole, its various logic gate properties may improve its impact for the development of new-generation “intelligence” digital devices. The ionic PMA and Cit 3− inputs to (Rh B + ) 3 .PMA 3− have been mimicked as a superimposed electronic molecular keypad lock. Also indicates that Rh B is suitable for the detection of Cit 3− ions in the biological environment. - Highlights: • Our probe is commercially available with good photostability and high quantum yield. • Both color and fluorescence change with long emission wavelength in aqueous media. • Characteristics of an ON

  1. Computerized Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirell, S.G.

    1979-01-01

    The physical bases of computerized tomography are presented, the following items being discussed:attenuation of a photon beam by an absorbent material, reconstruction algorithms and detection systems. Image statistics is also presented. The emission computerized tomography is discussed. Clinical results of computerized tomography are presented. (M.A.) [pt

  2. Ratiometric Molecular Probes Based on Dual Emission of a Blue Fluorescent Coumarin and a Red Phosphorescent Cationic Iridium(III Complex for Intracellular Oxygen Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshitada Yoshihara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ratiometric molecular probes RP1 and RP2 consisting of a blue fluorescent coumarin and a red phosphorescent cationic iridium complex connected by a tetra- or octaproline linker, respectively, were designed and synthesized for sensing oxygen levels in living cells. These probes exhibited dual emission with good spectral separation in acetonitrile. The photorelaxation processes, including intramolecular energy transfer, were revealed by emission quantum yield and lifetime measurements. The ratios (RI = (Ip /If between the phosphorescence (Ip and fluorescence (If intensities showed excellent oxygen responses; the ratio of RI under degassed and aerated conditions ( R I 0 MathType@MTEF@5@5@+= feaagKart1ev2aqatCvAUfeBSjuyZL2yd9gzLbvyNv2CaerbuLwBLn hiov2DGi1BTfMBaeXatLxBI9gBaerbd9wDYLwzYbItLDharqqtubsr 4rNCHbGeaGqiVCI8FfYJH8YrFfeuY=Hhbbf9v8qqaqFr0xc9pk0xbb a9q8WqFfeaY=biLkVcLq=JHqpepeea0=as0Fb9pgeaYRXxe9vr0=vr 0=vqpWqaaeaabiGaciaacaqabeaadaqaaqaaaOqaaabaaaaaaaaape GaamOua8aadaqhaaWcbaWdbiaadMeaa8aabaWdbiaaicdaaaaaaa@38D6@ / RI was 20.3 and 19.6 for RP1 and RP2. The introduction of the cationic Ir (III complex improved the cellular uptake efficiency compared to that of a neutral analogue with a tetraproline linker. The emission spectra of the ratiometric probes internalized into living HeLa or MCF-7 cells could be obtained using a conventional microplate reader. The complex RP2 with an octaproline linker provided ratios comparable to the ratiometric measurements obtained using a microplate reader: the ratio of the  value of RP2 under hypoxia (2.5% O2 to that under normoxia (21% O2 was 1.5 and 1.7 for HeLa and MCF-7 cells, respectively. Thus, the intracellular oxygen levels of MCF-7 cells could be imaged by ratiometric emission measurements using the complex RP2.

  3. Pittsburgh Compound B and AV-1451 positron emission tomography assessment of molecular pathologies of Alzheimer's disease in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Jennifer L; Ahlskog, J Eric; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Senjem, Matthew L; Spychalla, Anthony J; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Lowe, Val J; Josephs, Keith A

    2018-03-01

    Little is known about Alzheimer's disease molecular proteins, beta-amyloid and paired helical filament (PHF) tau, in progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). Recent techniques have been developed to allow for investigations of these proteins in PSP. We determined the frequency of beta-amyloid deposition in PSP, and whether beta-amyloid deposition in PSP is associated with PHF-tau deposition pattern, or clinical features. Thirty probable PSP participants underwent MRI, [ 18 F]AV-1451 PET and Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) PET. Apolipoprotein (APOE) genotyping was also performed. A global PiB standard-uptake value ratio (SUVR) was calculated. AV-1451 SUVRs were calculated for a set of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related regions and a set of PSP-related regions. Voxel-level analyses were conducted to assess for differences in AV-1451 uptake patterns and MRI atrophy between PiB(+) and PiB(-) cases compared to 60 normal PiB(-) controls. Statistical testing for correlations and associations between variables of interest were also performed. Twelve subjects (40%) showed beta-amyloid deposition. Higher PiB SUVR correlated with older age but not with AV-1451 SUVR in the AD- or PSP-related regions. Higher AV-1451 SUVR in AD-related regions was associated with higher AV-1451 SUVR in PSP-related regions. We found little evidence for beta-amyloid related differences in clinical metrics, proportion of APOE e4 carriers, pattern of AV-1451 uptake, or pattern of atrophy. Beta-amyloid deposition occurs in a relatively high proportion of PSP subjects. Unlike in Alzheimer's disease, however, there is little evidence that beta-amyloid, and PHF-tau, play a significant role in neurodegeneration in PSP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Introduction to fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Jameson, David M

    2014-01-01

    "An essential contribution to educating scientists in the principles of fluorescence. It will also be an important addition to the libraries of practitioners applying the principles of molecular fluorescence."-Ken Jacobson, Kenan Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill"An exquisite compendium of fluorescence and its applications in biochemistry enriched by a very exciting historical perspective. This book will become a standard text for graduate students and other scientists."-Drs. Zygmunt (Karol) Gryczynski and Ignacy Gryczynski, University of North Texas Health Science Center"… truly a masterwork, combining clarity, precision, and good humor. The reader, novice or expert, will be pleased with the text and will not stop reading. It is a formidable account of the fluorescence field, which has impacted the life sciences so considerably in the last 60 years."-Jerson L. Silva, M.D., Ph.D., Professor and Director, National Institute of Science and Tech...

  5. Development of novel emission tomography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Geng

    In recent years, small animals, such as mice and rats, have been widely used as subjects of study in biomedical research while molecular biology and imaging techniques open new opportunities to investigate disease model. With the help of medical imaging techniques, researchers can investigate underlying mechanisms inside the small animal, which are useful for both early diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Based on tracer principle single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has increased popularity in small animal imaging due to its higher spatial resolution and variety of single-photon emitting radionuclides. Since the image quality strongly depends on the detector properties, both scintillation and semiconductor detectors are under active investigation for high resolution X-ray and gamma ray photon detection. The desired detector properties include high intrinsic spatial resolution, high energy resolution, and high detection efficiency. In this thesis study, we have made extensive efforts to develop novel emission tomography system, and evaluate the use of both semiconductor and ultra-high resolution scintillation detectors for small animal imaging. This thesis work includes the following three areas. Firstly, we have developed a novel energy-resolved photon counting (ERPC) detector. With the benefits of high energy resolution, high spatial resolution, flexible detection area, and a wide dynamic range of 27--200keV, ERPC detector is well-suited for small animal SPECT applications. For prototype ERPC detector excellent imaging (˜350microm) and spectroscopic performance (4keV Co-57 122keV) has been demonstrated in preliminary study. Secondly, to further improve spatial resolution to hundred-micron level, an ultra-high resolution Intensified EMCCD (I-EMCCD) detector has been designed and evaluated. This detector consists of the newly developed electron multiplying CCD (EMCCD) sensor, columnar CsI(Tl) scintillator, and an electrostatic de-magnifier (DM) tube

  6. Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Isabel; Geleijns, Jacob

    After its clinical introduction in 1973, computed tomography developed from an x-ray modality for axial imaging in neuroradiology into a versatile three dimensional imaging modality for a wide range of applications in for example oncology, vascular radiology, cardiology, traumatology and even in interventional radiology. Computed tomography is applied for diagnosis, follow-up studies and screening of healthy subpopulations with specific risk factors. This chapter provides a general introduction in computed tomography, covering a short history of computed tomography, technology, image quality, dosimetry, room shielding, quality control and quality criteria.

  7. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  8. Molecular Basis for pH Sensitivity and Proton Transfer in Green Fluorescent Protein: Protonation and Conformational Substates from Electrostatic Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Scharnagl, C.; Raupp-Kossmann, R.; Fischer, S.F.

    1999-01-01

    We performed a theoretical study to elucidate the coupling between protonation states and orientation of protein dipoles and buried water molecules in green fluorescent protein, a versatile biosensor for protein targeting. It is shown that the ionization equilibria of the wild-type green fluorescent protein-fluorophore and the internal proton-binding site E222 are mutually interdependent. Two acid-base transitions of the fluorophore occur in the presence of neutral (physiologic pH) and ionize...

  9. Analysis of Biophysical, Optical and Genetic Diversity of DoD Coral Reef Communities Using Advanced Fluorescence and Molecular Biology Techniques (Addendum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Symbiodinium sp. as a bioindicator . 20 ii List of Figures 1. An example of the FIRe fluorescence transients. 6 2. Bench-top versions of the...dynoflagellates, Symbiodinium sp. as a bioindicator . Petroleum product Fv/Fm protocol Extended FIRe protocol Gasoline 87 AKI 300 ppm 30 ppm Kerosene...Gorbunov, and V. Fadeev (2010) - Phytoplankton as a fluorescent bioindicator of ecotoxicants in natural waters. - «SPIE Photonics Europe», 2010

  10. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunan Yang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, and positron emission tomography (PET. In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction.

  11. In vivo tomographic imaging of lung colonization of tumour in mouse with simultaneous fluorescence and X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Gao, Fuping; Wang, Mengjiao; Cao, Xu; Liu, Fei; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jianwen; Wang, Guangzhi; Bai, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive in vivo imaging of diffuse and wide-spread colonization within the lungs, rather than distinct solid primary tumors, is still a challenging work. In this work, a lung colonization mouse model bearing A549 human lung tumor was simultaneously scanned by a dual-modality fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) system in vivo. A two steps method which incorporates CT structural information into the FMT reconstruction procedure is employed to provide concurrent anatomical and functional information. By using the target-specific fluorescence agent, the fluorescence tomographic results show elevated fluorescence intensity deep within the lungs which is colonized with diffuse and wide-spread tumors. The results were confirmed with ex vivo fluorescence reflectance imaging and histological examination of the lung tissues. With FMT reconstruction combined with the CT information, the dual-modality FMT/micro-CT system is expected to offer sensitive and noninvasive imaging of diffuse tumor colonization within the lungs in vivo. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorná, Šárka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Vazdar, M.; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel; Hof, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 22 (2014), 22D516 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : fluorescence sfifts * Cationic lipids * Hydrogen bond networks Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  13. A study of the effect of molecular and aerosol conditions in the atmosphere on air fluorescence measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E. J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anzalone, A.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arisaka, K.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Baecker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J. J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Belletoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chudoba, J.; Chye, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colombo, E.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; Di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; DuVernois, M. A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferrer, F.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fleck, I.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fulgione, W.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrido, X.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Goggin, L. M.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gora, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutierrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Halenka, V.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebrero, G.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hussain, M.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jiraskova, S.; Kaducak, M.; Kampert, K. H.; Karova, T.; Kasper, P.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Kelley, J.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D. -H.; Krieger, A.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, K.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lautridou, P.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Maccarone, M. C.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, C.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Nhung, P. T.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nozka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschlaeger, J.; Olinto, A.; Oliva, P.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Selmi-Dei, D. Pakk; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pavlidou, V.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Ponce, V. H.; Pontz, M.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Redondo, A.; Revenu, B.; Rezende, F. A. S.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Riviere, C.; Rizi, V.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.

    The air fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is designed to perforin calorimetric measurements of extensive air showers created by Cosmic rays of above 10(18) eV. To correct these measurements for the effects introduced by atmospheric fluctuations, the Observatory contains a group

  14. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Mialocq, Jean-Claude

    2007-01-01

    This article addresses the evolution in time of light emitted by a molecular system after a brief photo-excitation. The authors first describe fluorescence from a photo-physical point of view and discuss the characterization of the excited state. Then, they explain some basic notions related to fluorescence characterization (lifetime and decays, quantum efficiency, so on). They present the different experimental methods and techniques currently used to study time-resolved fluorescence. They discuss basic notions of time resolution and spectral reconstruction. They briefly present some conventional methods: intensified Ccd cameras, photo-multipliers and photodiodes associated with a fast oscilloscope, and phase modulation. Other methods and techniques are more precisely presented: time-correlated single photon counting (principle, examples, and fluorescence lifetime imagery), streak camera (principle, examples), and optical methods like the Kerr optical effect (principle and examples) and fluorescence up-conversion (principle and theoretical considerations, examples of application)

  15. Collisional and radiative relaxation of the first excited states of rare gases. Energy transfer from argon excited atoms to different molecules and fluorescence of molecular xenon excited by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutuit-Fleischmann, Odile

    1978-01-01

    In the first section, the measurement of total deexcitation cross sections of the 3P 2,1,0 and 1 P 1 argon states by N 2 , H 2 , CO and SF 6 using a pulsed gas radiolysis technique and 600 keV electrons is discussed. The energy transfer from the resonant states 3 P 1 and 1 P 1 of argon (as excited selectively by synchrotron radiation) to the C 3 π u state of nitrogen has been studied in more detail. On the basis of these results, the different theoretical models for these reactions have been discussed. In the second section, the fluorescence of the second continuum of molecular xenon at around 1700 A, as excited by synchrotron radiation in the region of the 3P 1 1 S 0 resonance line at 1470 A, is considered. A short lived component of the fluorescence decay has been observed; this is attributed to emission at short interatomic distances from the high vibrational levels of Xe 2 + (O u + ). The emissions at the left turning point of the potential curve of the O u + state has been observed at λ > 2000 A. From these results, the potential curves for the states Xe 2 (O g + ) and Xe 2 * (O u + ) have been estimated and the Franck-Condon factors have also been calculated as a function of the wavelength of the fluorescence. (author) [fr

  16. Fluorescent Protein Approaches in Alpha Herpesvirus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Hogue

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the nearly two decades since the popularization of green fluorescent protein (GFP, fluorescent protein-based methodologies have revolutionized molecular and cell biology, allowing us to literally see biological processes as never before. Naturally, this revolution has extended to virology in general, and to the study of alpha herpesviruses in particular. In this review, we provide a compendium of reported fluorescent protein fusions to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and pseudorabies virus (PRV structural proteins, discuss the underappreciated challenges of fluorescent protein-based approaches in the context of a replicating virus, and describe general strategies and best practices for creating new fluorescent fusions. We compare fluorescent protein methods to alternative approaches, and review two instructive examples of the caveats associated with fluorescent protein fusions, including describing several improved fluorescent capsid fusions in PRV. Finally, we present our future perspectives on the types of powerful experiments these tools now offer.

  17. Structured illumination for 3D subdiffraction reconstruction of refractive-index and fluorescence (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2017-02-01

    Refractive-index (RI) is an inherent optical property of materials that can provide important biochemical and biophysical information about a biological sample. Optical-diffraction-tomography (ODT) is a current standard to obtain quantitative three-dimensional RI distributions, by measuring optical fields diffracted from the sample by rotated illumination beams. This method for ODT also synthetically enlarges the microscope's lateral spatial-frequency support, and thus images the RI distribution with lateral resolution beyond the microscope's coherent diffraction limit. Fluorescence microscopy offers a complementary set of biological insights by offering imaging capabilities with molecular specificity. Analogous to ODT, super-resolution fluorescence techniques can offer these insights at spatial resolutions beyond the microscope's incoherent diffraction limit. Unfortunately, such super-resolution techniques are generally incompatible with ODT and a generalized sub-diffraction technique has been difficult to find, which hinders a cohesive, high-resolution, multimodal analysis of biological samples. We experimentally introduce, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel, high resolution, optical system that uses structured illumination (SI) to enable 3D sub-diffraction resolution imaging for both fluorescence and RI. We demonstrate sub-diffraction resolution, multimodal SI imaging of HT29 and MCF7 cells fluorescently stained for F-actin, such that the 3D RI and fluorescent distributions may offer unique, but complementary, insights into the biological samples.

  18. Thermochromic Fluorescence from B18H20(NC5H5)(2): An Inorganic-Organic Composite Luminescent Compound with an Unusual Molecular Geometry

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Londesborough, Michael Geoffrey Stephen; Dolanský, Jiří; Cerdán, L.; Lang, Kamil; Jelínek, Tomáš; Oliva, J. M.; Hnyk, Drahomír; Roca-Sanjuan, D.; Frances-Monerris, A.; Martinčík, Jiří; Nikl, Martin; Kennedy, John David

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2017), č. článku UNSP 1600694. ISSN 2195-1071 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-09876S Institutional support: RVO:61388980 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : boranes * energy transfer * fluorescence * solar concentrators * thermochromicity Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry; BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry; Optics (including laser optics and quantum optics) (FZU-D) Impact factor: 6.875, year: 2016

  19. A mathematical model to determine molecular kinetic rate constants under non-steady state conditions using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Tanmay P; Ingber, Donald E

    2006-03-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analyses of binding and unbinding of molecules that interact with insoluble scaffolds, such as the cytoskeleton and nuclear matrix, in living cells commonly assume that this process is at equilibrium over the time scale of fluorescence recovery. This assumption breaks down for relatively fast intracellular processes like focal adhesion assembly at the leading edge of a migrating cell, or changes of transcriptional activation in the nucleus, that can occur in a matter of a few minutes. In this paper, we formulate a mathematical model that permits FRAP to be used to determine kinetic rate constants of molecules that interact with insoluble cellular structures under non-steady state conditions. We show that unlike steady state FRAP, fluorescence recovery time scales under these unsteady conditions are determined not only by unbinding rates, but also by the overall assembly and disassembly dynamics of the structural scaffold which supports these binding interactions. Experimental data from FRAP analysis and quantification of scaffold assembly dynamics may be combined and used with our mathematical model to estimate kinetic rate constants, as well as the apparent rate constant of scaffold assembly and disassembly.

  20. Membranes and Fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence spectrosc......Fluorescence spectroscopy-based techniques using conventional fluorimeters have been extensively applied since the late 1960s to study different aspects of membrane-related phenomena, i.e., mainly relating to lipid-lipid and lipid-protein (peptide) interactions. Even though fluorescence...... spectroscopy approaches provide very valuable structurally and dynamically related information on membranes, they generally produce mean parameters from data collected on bulk solutions of many vesicles and lack direct information on the spatial organization at the level of single membranes, a quality that can...... be provided by microscopy-related techniques. In this chapter, I will attempt to summarize representative examples concerning how microscopy (which provides information on membrane lateral organization by direct visualization) and spectroscopy techniques (which provides information about molecular interaction...

  1. Interaction between the Natural Components in Danhong Injection (DHI) with Serum Albumin (SA) and the Influence of the Coexisting Multi-Components on the SaB-BSA Binding System: Fluorescence and Molecular Docking Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jia; Zhang, Yingyue; Wang, Xingrui; Yan, Huo; Liu, Erwei; Gao, Xiumei

    2015-01-01

    Danhong injection (DHI) is a widely used Chinese Materia Medica standardized product for the clinical treatment of ischemic encephalopathy and coronary heart disease. The bindings of eight natural components in DHI between bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy technology and molecular docking. According to the results, the quenching process of salvianolic acid B and hydroxysafflor yellow A was a static quenching procedure through the analysis of quenching data by the Stern-Volmer equation, the modified Stern-Volmer equation, and the modified Scatchard equation. Meanwhile, syringin (Syr) enhanced the fluorescence of BSA, and the data were analyzed using the Lineweaver-Burk equation. Molecular docking suggested that all of these natural components bind to serum albumin at the site I location. Further competitive experiments of SaB confirmed the result of molecular docking studies duo to the displacement of warfarin by SaB. Base on these studies, we selected SaB as a research target because it presented the strongest binding ability to BSA and investigated the influence of the multi-components coexisting in DHI on the interaction between the components of the SaB-BSA binding system. The participation of these natural components in DHI affected the interaction between the components of the SaB-BSA system. Therefore, when DHI is used in mammals, SaB is released from serum albumin more quickly than it is used alone. This work would provide a new experiment basis for revealing the scientific principle of compatibility for Traditional Chinese Medicine. PMID:26035712

  2. Experimental, computational and chemometrics studies of BSA-vitamin B6 interaction by UV-Vis, FT-IR, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulation and hard-soft modeling methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Izadmanesh, Yahya; Aghaee, Elham; Ghasemi, Jahan B

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) with bovine serum albumin (BSA) is investigated under pseudo-physiological conditions by UV-Vis, fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of BSA was quenched by VB6, which was rationalized in terms of the static quenching mechanism. According to fluorescence quenching calculations, the bimolecular quenching constant (kq), dynamic quenching (KSV) and static quenching (KLB) at 310K were obtained. The efficiency of energy transfer and the distance between the donor (BSA) and the acceptor (VB6) were calculated by Foster's non-radiative energy transfer theory and were equal to 41.1% and 2.11nm. The collected UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra were combined into a row-and column-wise augmented matrix and resolved by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). MCR-ALS helped to estimate the stoichiometry of interactions, concentration profiles and pure spectra for three species (BSA, VB6 and VB6-BSA complex) existed in the interaction procedure. Based on the MCR-ALS results, using mass balance equations, a model was developed and binding constant of complex was calculated using non-linear least squares curve fitting. FT-IR spectra showed that the conformation of proteins was altered in presence of VB6. Finally, the combined docking and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to estimate the binding affinity of VB6 to BSA. Five-nanosecond MD simulations were performed on bovine serum albumin (BSA) to study the conformational features of its ligand binding site. From MD results, eleven BSA snapshots were extracted, at every 0.5ns, to explore the binding affinity (GOLD score) of VB6 using a docking procedure. MD simulations indicated that there is a considerable flexibility in the structure of protein that affected ligand recognition. Structural analyses and docking simulations indicated that VB6 binds to site I and GOLD score values depend on the conformations of both BSA and ligand

  3. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdollahpour, Nooshin; Asoodeh, Ahmad; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Chamani, JamshidKhan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  4. Separate and simultaneous binding effects of aspirin and amlodipine to human serum albumin based on fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling characterizations: A mechanistic insight for determining usage drugs doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahpour, Nooshin [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Asoodeh, Ahmad [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saberi, Mohammad Reza [Department of Medical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chamani, JamshidKhan, E-mail: chamani@ibb.ut.ac.ir [Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences, Mashhad Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-09-15

    The binding of aspirin (ASA) and amlodipine (AML) to human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution was investigated by multiple techniques such as fluorescence quenching, resonance light scattering (RLS), three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy, FT-IR and zeta-potential measurements in an aqueous solution at pH=7.4. For the protein-ligand association reaction, fluorescence measurements can give important clues as to the binding of ligands to proteins, e.g., the binding mechanism, binding mode, binding constants, binding sites, etc. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that ASA and AML could quench the HSA fluorescence spectra, and this quenching effect became more significant when both ASA and AML coexisted. The results pointed at the interaction between HSA and both drugs as ternary systems decreasing the binding constant and binding stability of the HSA-drug complex as a binary system. Therefore, by reducing the amount of drugs transported to their targets, the free drug concentration of the target would be reduced, lowering the efficacy of the drugs. It was demonstrated that there exists antagonistic behavior between the two drugs when it comes to binding of HSA. Furthermore, the fluorescence results also showed that the quenching mechanism of HSA-drug complexes as binary and ternary systems is a static procedure. The number of binding sites of HSA-ASA, (HSA-AML)ASA, HSA-AML and (HSA-ASA) AML were 1.31, 0.92, 1 and 0.93, respectively. Due to the existence of the antagonistic action between ASA and AML, the binding distance r was reduced. The results of synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that the antagonistic action between ASA and AML would alter the micro-environment around Trp and Tyr residues. Moreover, the simultaneous presence of ASA and AML during binding to HSA should be taken into account in multidrug therapy, as it induces the necessity of a monitoring therapy owing to the possible increase of uncontrolled toxic

  5. Use of fluorescence spectroscopy to measure molecular autofluorescence in diabetic subjects; Utilizacao da espectroscopia de fluorescencia para mensuramento de moleculas autofluorescentes em individuos diabeticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Cinthia Zanini

    2011-07-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) comprises a complex metabolic syndrome, caused by reduced or absent secretion of insulin by pancreatic beta cells, leading to hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia promotes glycation of proteins and, consequently, the appearance of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Currently, diabetic patients are monitored by determining levels of glucose and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). The complications caused by hyperglycemia may be divided into micro and macrovascular complications, represented by retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiovascular disease. Albumin (HSA) is the most abundant serum protein in the human body and is subject to glycation. The Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) is the precursor molecule of heme synthesis, structural component of hemoglobin. The in vitro and animals studies have indicated that hyperglycemia promotes a decrease in its concentration in erythrocytes. The fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique widely used in biomedical field. The autofluorescence corresponds to the intrinsic fluorescence present in some molecules, this being associated with the same structure. The aim of this study was to use fluorescence spectroscopy to measure levels of erythrocyte PpIX autofluorescence and AGE-HSA in diabetic and healthy subjects and compare them with levels of blood glucose and HbA1c. This study was conducted with 151 subjects (58 controls and 93 diabetics). Epidemiological data of patients and controls were obtained from medical records. For control subjects, blood glucose levels were obtained from medical records and levels of Hb1Ac obtained by using commercial kits. The determination of the PpIX autofluorescence was performed with excitation at 405 nm and emission at 632 nm. Determination of AGE-HSA was performed with excitation at 370 nm and emission at 455 nm. Approximately 50% of diabetic had micro and macrovascular lesions resulting from hyperglycemia. There were no significant differences in the PpIX emission intensity values

  6. Doppler Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T. R.

    I review the method of Doppler tomography which translates binary-star line profiles taken at a series of orbital phases into a distribution of emission over the binary. I begin with a discussion of the basic principles behind Doppler tomography, including a comparison of the relative merits of maximum entropy regularisation versus filtered back-projection for implementing the inversion. Following this I discuss the issue of noise in Doppler images and possible methods for coping with it. Then I move on to look at the results of Doppler Tomography applied to cataclysmic variable stars. Outstanding successes to date are the discovery of two-arm spiral shocks in cataclysmic variable accretion discs and the probing of the stream/magnetospheric interaction in magnetic cataclysmic variable stars. Doppler tomography has also told us much about the stream/disc interaction in non-magnetic systems and the irradiation of the secondary star in all systems. The latter indirectly reveals such effects as shadowing by the accretion disc or stream. I discuss all of these and finish with some musings on possible future directions for the method. At the end I include a tabulation of Doppler maps published in refereed journals.

  7. On the mechanism of non-radiative decay of blue fluorescent protein chromophore: New insight from the excited-state molecular dynamics simulations and potential energy calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Liu, Jian-Yong; Zhou, Pan-Wang

    2017-11-01

    A detailed theoretical investigation based on the ab initio on-the-fly surface hopping dynamics simulations and potential energy surfaces calculations has been performed to unveil the mechanism of the photoinduced non-adiabatic relaxation process of the isolated blue fluorescent protein (BFP) chromophore in gas phase. The data analysis presents that the dominant reaction coordinate of the BFP chromophore is driven by a rotation motion around the CC double bridging bond, which is in remarkable difference with a previous result which supports a Hula-Twist rotation pattern. Such behavior is consistent with the double bond rotation pattern of the GFP neutral chromophore. In addition, the dynamics simulations give an estimated decay time of 1.1 ps for the S1 state, which is agrees well with the experimental values measured in proteins. The present work offers a straightforward understanding for the decay mechanism of the BFP chromophore and suggestions of the photochemical properties of analogous protein chromophores. We hope the current work would be helpful for further exploration of the BFP photochemical and photophysical properties in various environments, and can provide guidance and prediction for rational design of the fluorescent proteins catering for different demands.

  8. FLUORESCENCE IN DISSOLVED FRACTIONS OF HUMAN ENAMEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HAFSTROMBJORKMAN, U; SUNDSTROM, F; TENBOSCH, JJ

    Fluorescence induced by laser light is useful in early detection of enamel caries. The present work studied the fluorescence emission pattern in dissolved human enamel and in different molecular weight fractions obtained after gel chromatography or dialysis followed by ultrafiltration. For

  9. Fluorescence Spectroscopy and its Applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    derstanding of the chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics of the excited molecule. This special issue contains eighteen articles dealing with many dif- ferent aspects of fluorescence spectroscopy and applications in chemistry, which I hope would be useful to both chemists and spectroscopists. I thank the Indian Academy ...

  10. Molecular evidence of Opisthorchis viverrini in infected bithyniid snails in the Lao People's Democratic Republic by specific hybridization probe-based real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer PCR method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sri-Aroon, Pusadee; Intapan, Pewpan M; Lohachit, Chantima; Phongsasakulchoti, Phunthira; Thanchomnang, Tongjit; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Hiscox, Alexandra; Phompida, Samlane; Sananikhom, Pany; Maleewong, Wanchai; Brey, Paul T

    2011-04-01

    Naturally occurring bithyniid snails, Bithynia siamensis goniomphalos (Prosobranchia: Bithyniidae), and their intermediate hosts were sampled from Khammouane Province, the Lao People's Democratic Republic, and the prevalence of the carcinogenic human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, was examined. The presence of O. viverrini cercariae in snails was examined by cercarial shedding test and then confirmed by specific hybridization probe-based real-time fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) PCR method. The real-time FRET PCR method is based on a fluorescence melting curve analysis of a hybrid between an amplicon produced from the pOV-A6 specific sequence (Genbank accession no. S80278), a 162-bp repeated sequence specific to O. viverrini, and specific fluorophore-labeled probes. Mean melting temperature of O. viverrini DNA from the cercariae and each of two positive snails by shedding test was 66.3 ± 0.1. The O. viverrini infection rate in snails was 2.47% (2/81) by cercarial shedding test but was 8.52% (4/47) by real-time FRET PCR method. The real-time FRET PCR method is rapid and effective in examining a large number of snail samples simultaneously. Validation using molecular evidence from this procedure provides another tool for surveying the prevalence of O. viverrini-infected snails in Southeast Asian countries.

  11. De novo design of chiral organotin cancer drug candidates: validation of enantiopreferential binding to molecular target DNA and 5'-GMP by UV-visible, fluorescence, (1)H and (31)P NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Farukh; Sharma, Girish Chandra; Sayeed, Fatima; Muddassir, Mohd; Tabassum, Sartaj

    2011-12-02

    N,N-bis[(R-/S-)-1-benzyl-2-ethoxyethane] tin (IV) complexes were synthesized by applying de novo design strategy by the condensation reaction of (R-/S-)2-amino-2-phenylethanol and dibromoethane in presence of dimethyltin dichloride and thoroughly characterized by elemental analysis, conductivity measurements, IR, ESI-MS, (1)H, (13)C and (119)Sn, multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and XRD study. Enantioselective and specific binding profile of R-enantiomer 1 in comparison to S-enantiomer 2 with ultimate molecular target CT-DNA was validated by UV-visible, fluorescence, circular dichroism, (1)H and (31)P NMR techniques. This was further corroborated well by interaction of 1 and 2 with 5'-GMP. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification and quantification of carbamate pesticides in dried lime tree flowers by means of excitation-emission molecular fluorescence and parallel factor analysis when quenching effect exists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, L; Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L A

    2014-04-11

    A non-separative, fast and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric method based on the second order calibration of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) was proposed for the determination of carbaryl, carbendazim and 1-naphthol in dried lime tree flowers. The trilinearity property of three-way data was used to handle the intrinsic fluorescence of lime flowers and the difference in the fluorescence intensity of each analyte. It also made possible to identify unequivocally each analyte. Trilinearity of the data tensor guarantees the uniqueness of the solution obtained through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), so the factors of the decomposition match up with the analytes. In addition, an experimental procedure was proposed to identify, with three-way data, the quenching effect produced by the fluorophores of the lime flowers. This procedure also enabled the selection of the adequate dilution of the lime flowers extract to minimize the quenching effect so the three analytes can be quantified. Finally, the analytes were determined using the standard addition method for a calibration whose standards were chosen with a D-optimal design. The three analytes were unequivocally identified by the correlation between the pure spectra and the PARAFAC excitation and emission spectral loadings. The trueness was established by the accuracy line "calculated concentration versus added concentration" in all cases. Better decision limit values (CCα), in x0=0 with the probability of false positive fixed at 0.05, were obtained for the calibration performed in pure solvent: 2.97 μg L(-1) for 1-naphthol, 3.74 μg L(-1) for carbaryl and 23.25 μg L(-1) for carbendazim. The CCα values for the second calibration carried out in matrix were 1.61, 4.34 and 51.75 μg L(-1) respectively; while the values obtained considering only the pure samples as calibration set were: 2.65, 8.61 and 28.7 μg L(-1), respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular recognition: Comparative study of a tunable host-guest system by using a fluorescent model system and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry on dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittelkow, M.; Nielsen, C.B.; Broeren, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Host-guest interactions between the periphery of adamantylurea-functionalized dendrimers (host) and ureido acetic acid derivatives (guest) were shown to be specific, strong and spatially well-defined. The binding becomes stronger when using phosphonic or sulfonic acid derivatives. In the present...... work we have quantified the binding constants for the host-guest interactions between two different host motifs and six different guest molecules. The host molecules, which resemble the periphery of a poly(propylene imine) dendrimer, have been fitted with an anthracene-based fluorescent probe. The two...... host motifs differ in terms of the length of the spacer between a tertiary amine and two ureido functionalities. The guest molecules all contain an acidic moiety (either a carboxylic acid, a phosphonic acid, or a sulfonic acid) and three of them also contain an ureido moiety capable of forming multiple...

  14. IPET and FETR: experimental approach for studying molecular structure dynamics by cryo-electron tomography of a single-molecule structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    Full Text Available The dynamic personalities and structural heterogeneity of proteins are essential for proper functioning. Structural determination of dynamic/heterogeneous proteins is limited by conventional approaches of X-ray and electron microscopy (EM of single-particle reconstruction that require an average from thousands to millions different molecules. Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET is an approach to determine three-dimensional (3D reconstruction of a single and unique biological object such as bacteria and cells, by imaging the object from a series of tilting angles. However, cconventional reconstruction methods use large-size whole-micrographs that are limited by reconstruction resolution (lower than 20 Å, especially for small and low-symmetric molecule (<400 kDa. In this study, we demonstrated the adverse effects from image distortion and the measuring tilt-errors (including tilt-axis and tilt-angle errors both play a major role in limiting the reconstruction resolution. Therefore, we developed a "focused electron tomography reconstruction" (FETR algorithm to improve the resolution by decreasing the reconstructing image size so that it contains only a single-instance protein. FETR can tolerate certain levels of image-distortion and measuring tilt-errors, and can also precisely determine the translational parameters via an iterative refinement process that contains a series of automatically generated dynamic filters and masks. To describe this method, a set of simulated cryoET images was employed; to validate this approach, the real experimental images from negative-staining and cryoET were used. Since this approach can obtain the structure of a single-instance molecule/particle, we named it individual-particle electron tomography (IPET as a new robust strategy/approach that does not require a pre-given initial model, class averaging of multiple molecules or an extended ordered lattice, but can tolerate small tilt-errors for high-resolution single

  15. Multiphoton tomography of astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Pietruszka, Anna; Bückle, Rainer; Gerlach, Nicole; Heinrich, Ulrike

    2015-03-01

    Weightlessness may impair the astronaut's health conditions. Skin impairments belong to the most frequent health problems during space missions. Within the Skin B project, skin physiological changes during long duration space flights are currently investigated on three European astronauts that work for nearly half a year at the ISS. Measurements on the hydration, the transepidermal water loss, the surface structure, elasticity and the tissue density by ultrasound are conducted. Furthermore, high-resolution in vivo histology is performed by multiphoton tomography with 300 nm spatial and 200 ps temporal resolution. The mobile certified medical tomograph with a flexible 360° scan head attached to a mechano-optical arm is employed to measure two-photon autofluorescence and SHG in the volar forearm of the astronauts. Modification of the tissue architecture and of the fluorescent biomolecules NAD(P)H, keratin, melanin and elastin are detected as well as of SHG-active collagen. Thinning of the vital epidermis, a decrease of the autofluoresence intensity, an increase in the long fluorescence lifetime, and a reduced skin ageing index SAAID based on an increased collagen level in the upper dermis have been found. Current studies focus on recovery effects.

  16. Prognostic significance of nondiagnostic molecular changes in urine detected by UroVysion fluorescence in situ hybridization during surveillance for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Carvell T; Litt, David B; Dolar, Sandra E; Ulchaker, James C; Jones, J Stephen; Brainard, Jennifer A

    2009-02-01

    To determine the outcomes for patients with nondiagnostic fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) (ie, or = 2 chromosomes (3, 7, or 17) in 4 cells, isolated loss of 9p21 in 12 cells, or isolated gains of only 1 chromosome in > or = 10% of cells. Most FISH-positive patients will develop recurrent urothelial carcinoma within 1 year. We compared the data from 149 patients with a nondiagnostic FISH result and > or = 30 months of follow-up with the data from patients with a negative FISH result from the same period. The time to conversion to a positive FISH result or the development of a bladder tumor was recorded. Patients with nondiagnostic FISH results had significantly greater rates of progression to positive FISH findings or the development of a bladder tumor than did patients with negative FISH findings. Most progression occurred within 1 year. Patients with nondiagnostic FISH results and concurrent negative cytology and cystoscopy had a very low risk of developing recurrent disease, similar to that found with truly negative FISH results. Nondiagnostic FISH results are related to a greater risk of progression to positive FISH results and tumor recurrence than those with negative FISH findings. However, after controlling for negative cytologic and cystoscopic status, a nondiagnostic FISH result does not appear to be an independent predictor of disease recurrence, and aggressive investigation is not warranted.

  17. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  18. Integration of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Steady-state Kinetics and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Gαi1 Distinguishes between the GTP Hydrolysis and GDP Release Mechanism*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Grit; Mann, Daniel; Kötting, Carsten; Gerwert, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Gα subunits are central molecular switches in cells. They are activated by G protein-coupled receptors that exchange GDP for GTP, similar to small GTPase activation mechanisms. Gα subunits are turned off by GTP hydrolysis. For the first time we employed time-resolved FTIR difference spectroscopy to investigate the molecular reaction mechanisms of Gαi1. FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful tool that monitors reactions label free with high spatio-temporal resolution. In contrast to common multiple turnover assays, FTIR spectroscopy depicts the single turnover GTPase reaction without nucleotide exchange/Mg2+ binding bias. Global fit analysis resulted in one apparent rate constant of 0.02 s−1 at 15 °C. Isotopic labeling was applied to assign the individual phosphate vibrations for α-, β-, and γ-GTP (1243, 1224, and 1156 cm−1, respectively), α- and β-GDP (1214 and 1134/1103 cm−1, respectively), and free phosphate (1078/991 cm−1). In contrast to Ras·GAP catalysis, the bond breakage of the β-γ-phosphate but not the Pi release is rate-limiting in the GTPase reaction. Complementary common GTPase assays were used. Reversed phase HPLC provided multiple turnover rates and tryptophan fluorescence provided nucleotide exchange rates. Experiments were complemented by molecular dynamics simulations. This broad approach provided detailed insights at atomic resolution and allows now to identify key residues of Gαi1 in GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange. Mutants of the intrinsic arginine finger (Gαi1-R178S) affected exclusively the hydrolysis reaction. The effect of nucleotide binding (Gαi1-D272N) and Ras-like/all-α interface coordination (Gαi1-D229N/Gαi1-D231N) on the nucleotide exchange reaction was furthermore elucidated. PMID:25979337

  19. Molecular-orbital studies via satellite-free x-ray fluorescence: Cl K absorption and K--valence-level emission spectra of chlorofluoromethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.; Jach, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption and emission measurements in the vicinity of the chlorine K edge of the three chlorofluoromethanes have been made using monochromatic synchrotron radiation as the source of excitation. By selectively tuning the incident radiation to just above the Cl 1s single-electron ionization threshold for each molecule, less complex x-ray-emission spectra are obtained. This reduction in complexity is attributed to the elimination of multielectron transitions in the Cl K shell, which commonly produce satellite features in x-ray emission. The resulting ''satellite-free'' x-ray-emission spectra exhibit peaks due only to electrons in valence molecular orbitals filling a single Cl 1s vacancy. These simplified emission spectra and the associated x-ray absorption spectra are modeled using straightforward procedures and compared with semiempirical ground-state molecular-orbital calculations. Good agreement is observed between the present experimental and theoretical results for valence-orbital energies and those obtained from ultraviolet photoemission, and between relative radiative yields determined both experimentally and theoretically in this work

  20. Positron emission tomography imaging of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Ganghua

    2001-01-01

    The merging of molecular biology and nuclear medicine is developed into molecular nuclear medicine. Positron emission tomography (PET) of gene expression in molecular nuclear medicine has become an attractive area. Positron emission tomography imaging gene expression includes the antisense PET imaging and the reporter gene PET imaging. It is likely that the antisense PET imaging will lag behind the reporter gene PET imaging because of the numerous issues that have not yet to be resolved with this approach. The reporter gene PET imaging has wide application into animal experimental research and human applications of this approach will likely be reported soon

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special ... the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT ...

  2. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics

  3. Fluorescence detection: SPIE volume 743

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menzel, E.R.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains proceedings arranged into four sessions. They are: Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques; Fluorescence in analysis and materials characterization; Fluorescence in medicine and biochemistry; and Fluorescence in criminalistics.

  4. Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Positron Emission Tomography - Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Positron emission tomography (PET) ... Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT)? What is Positron Emission Tomography – Computed Tomography (PET/CT) Scanning? Positron emission tomography, ...

  5. Intensifying screens in transaxial tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debelder, M.H.; Bollen, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    This patent claim by Agfa-Gevaert relates to a method for the production of transaxial tomographs, a combination of materials therefor and X-ray intensifying screens incorporating at least one reflecting element for use in transaxial tomography, wherein the exposure of a photographic silver halide emulsion material proceeds at an angle within the range of 2 0 to 10 0 in conjunction with an X-ray fluorescent intensifying screen including an ultra-violet and/or visible radiation reflective coating or sheet to increase the radiation output of the screen and to reduce the exposure time and radiation dose e.g. in medical X-ray applications. (author)

  6. Alternative methods for estimating common descriptors for QSAR studies of dyes and fluorescent probes using molecular modeling software. 2. Correlations between log P and the hydrophilic/lipophilic index, and new methods for estimating degrees of amphiphilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dapson, Richard W; Horobin, Richard W

    2013-11-01

    The log P descriptor, despite its usefulness, can be difficult to use, especially for researchers lacking skills in physical chemistry. Moreover this classic measure has been determined in numerous ways, which can result in inconsistant estimates of log P values, especially for relatively complex molecules such as fluorescent probes. Novel measures of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity (the Hydrophilic/Lipophilic Index, HLI) and amphiphilicity (hydrophilic/lipophilic indices for the head group and tail, HLIT and HLIHG, respectively) therefore have been devised. We compare these descriptors with measures based on log P, the standard method for quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) studies. HLI can be determined using widely available molecular modeling software, coupled with simple arithmetic calculations. It is based on partial atomic charges and is intended to be a stand-alone measure of hydrophilicity/lipophilicity. Given the wide application of log P, however, we investigated the correlation between HLI and log P using a test set of 56 fluorescent probes of widely different physicochemical character. Overall correlation was poor; however, correlation of HLI and log P for probes of narrowly specified charge types, i.e., non-ionic compounds, anions, conjugated cations, or zwitterions, was excellent. Values for probes with additional nonconjugated quaternary cations, however, were less well correlated. The newly devised HLI can be divided into domain-specific descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG in amphiphilic probes. Determinations of amphiphilicity, made independently by the authors using their respective methods, showed excellent agreement. Quantifying amphiphilicity from partial log P values of the head group (head group hydrophilicity; HGH) and tail (amphiphilicity index; AI) has proved useful for understanding fluorescent probe action. The same limitations of log P apply to HGH and AI, however. The novel descriptors, HLIT and HLIHG, offer analogous advantages

  7. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  8. Fluorescence properties of Neurospora tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramini, M; Lerch, K

    1982-01-01

    Some structural properties of Neurospora tyrosinase have been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy. The emission spectra observed for oxy-, deoxy-, met- and apo-tyrosinase and the Co2+-substituted form are indicative of a protein containing buried tryptophan residues. By using acrylamide and iodide, part of the emission is quenched, indicating heterogeneity in the tryptophan environment. Upon binding of Cu2+ or Co2+ to apo-tyrosinase, a marked decrease of the tryptophan quantum yield is observed. A further decrease in emission intensity results from the binding of molecular O2 to the deoxy form. The fluorescent probe 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonate binds to tyrosinase only when the metal ions are removed. Reconstitution of apo-tyrosinase with Cu2+ completely displaces the probe, suggesting that 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulphonate binds to apo-tyrosinase at the active site. The fluorescence properties of Neurospora tyrosinase are compared with those of haemocyanin. PMID:6215031

  9. Imaging prostate cancer: an update on positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter

    2010-01-01

    , and molecular imaging information. Developments in imaging technologies, specifically magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT), have improved the detection rate of prostate cancer. MRI has improved lesion detection and local staging. Furthermore, MRI...

  10. Hydrogen bonding plays a significant role in the binding of coomassie brilliant blue-R to hemoglobin: FT-IR, fluorescence and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Mritunjoy; Dolui, Sandip; Maiti, Nakul C

    2015-12-14

    An analog of coomassie brilliant blue-R (CBB-R) was recently found to act as an antagonist to ATP-sensitive purinergic receptors (P2X7R) and has potential to be used in medicine. With the aim of understanding its transportation and distribution through blood, in this investigation, we measured the binding parameters of CBB-R with bovine hemoglobin (BHG). The molecule specifically bound to a single binding site of the protein with a stoichiometric ratio of 1 : 1 and the observed binding constant Ka was 3.5, 2.5, 2.0 and 1.5 × 10(5) M(-1) at 20 °C, 27 °C, 37 °C and 45 °C, respectively. The measured respective ΔG(0) values of the binding at four temperatures were -30.45, -22.44, -18.04 and -11.95 kJ mol(-1). The ΔH(0) (change in enthalpy) and ΔS(0) (change in entropy) values were -23.6 kJ mol(-1) and -70.66 J mol(-1) respectively in the binding process. The negative value of ΔH(0) and ΔS(0) indicated that the binding of the molecule was thermodynamically favorable. The best energy structure in the molecular docking analysis revealed that CBB-R preferred to be intercalated in the cavity among the α2, β1 and β2 subunits and the binding location was 7.4 Å away from Trp37 in the β2 subunit. The binding of the molecule with the protein was stabilized by hydrogen bonds involving the side chain of two amino acid residues. The residues were Lys104 and Glu101 in the β2 subunit. The binding was further stabilized via hydrogen bond formation between the amide group of the peptide backbone (residue Tyr145 of the β1 subunit) and CBB-R. A shift of the amide I (-C=O stretching) band frequency of ∼8 cm(-1) to low energy was ascribed to the hydrogen bond interaction involving the polypeptide carbonyl of the protein and the CBB-R molecule. In addition, two π-cation interactions between Lys99 of the α2 subunit and Lys104 of the β2 subunit and CBB-R contributed favorably in the binding processes. No substantial change in the soret and Q absorption bands of BHG

  11. Fluorescent Probes and Fluorescence (Microscopy Techniques — Illuminating Biological and Biomedical Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor P. C. Drummen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence, the absorption and re-emission of photons with longer wavelengths, is one of those amazing phenomena of Nature. Its discovery and utilization had, and still has, a major impact on biological and biomedical research, since it enables researchers not just to visualize normal physiological processes with high temporal and spatial resolution, to detect multiple signals concomitantly, to track single molecules in vivo, to replace radioactive assays when possible, but also to shed light on many pathobiological processes underpinning disease states, which would otherwise not be possible. Compounds that exhibit fluorescence are commonly called fluorochromes or fluorophores and one of these fluorescent molecules in particular has significantly enabled life science research to gain new insights in virtually all its sub-disciplines: Green Fluorescent Protein. Because fluorescent proteins are synthesized in vivo, integration of fluorescent detection methods into the biological system via genetic techniques now became feasible. Currently fluorescent proteins are available that virtually span the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Concomitantly, fluorescence imaging techniques were developed, and often progress in one field fueled innovation in the other. Impressively, the properties of fluorescence were utilized to develop new assays and imaging modalities, ranging from energy transfer to image molecular interactions to imaging beyond the diffraction limit with super-resolution microscopy. Here, an overview is provided of recent developments in both fluorescence imaging and fluorochrome engineering, which together constitute the “fluorescence toolbox” in life science research.

  12. U-SPECT-BioFluo : An integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, M.N.; Kreuger, R.; Buckle, T.; Mahn, W.A.; Bunschoten, A.; Josephson, L.; Van Leeuwen, F.W.B.; Beekman, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a

  13. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  14. Understanding, improving and using green fluorescent proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubitt, A B; Heim, R; Adams, S R; Boyd, A E; Gross, L A; Tsien, R Y

    1995-11-01

    Green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) are presently attracting tremendous interest as the first general method to create strong visible fluorescence by purely molecular biological means. So far, they have been used as reporters of gene expression, tracers of cell lineage, and as fusion tags to monitor protein localization within living cells. However, the GFP originally cloned from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria has several nonoptimal properties including low brightness, a significant delay between protein synthesis and fluorescence development, and complex photoisomerization. Fortunately, the protein can be re-engineered by mutagenesis to ameliorate these deficiencies and shift the excitation and emission wavelengths, creating different colors and new applications.

  15. Riboflavin enhanced fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliut, Maria; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Leordean, Cosmin; Simon, Timea; Teodorescu, Cristian-Mihail; Astilean, Simion

    2013-10-01

    The improvement of graphene derivates' fluorescence properties is a challenging topic and very few ways were reported up to now. In this Letter we propose an easy method to enhance the fluorescence of highly reduced graphene oxide (rGO) through non-covalent binding to a molecular fluorophore, namely the riboflavin (Rb). While the fluorescence of Rb is quenched, the Rb - decorated rGO exhibits strong blue fluorescence and significantly increased fluorescence lifetime, as compared to its pristine form. The data reported here represent a promising start towards tailoring the optical properties of rGOs, having utmost importance in optical applications.

  16. Variation in radiotherapy target volume definition, dose to organs at risk and clinical target volumes using anatomic (computed tomography) versus combined anatomic and molecular imaging (positron emission tomography/computed tomography): intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered using a tomotherapy Hi Art machine: final results of the VortigERN study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, S; Frew, J; Mott, J; McCallum, H; Stevenson, P; Maxwell, R; Wilsdon, J; Kelly, C G

    2012-12-01

    Contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is the current standard for delineating tumours of the head and neck for radiotherapy. Although metabolic imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) has been used in recent years, the studies were non-confirmatory in establishing its routine role in radiotherapy planning in the modern era. This study explored the difference in gross tumour volume and clinical target volume definitions for the primary and nodal volumes when FDG PET/CT was used as compared with CECT in oropharyngeal cancer cases. Twenty patients with oropharyngeal cancers had a PET/CT scan in the treatment position after consent. Target volumes were defined on CECT scans by a consultant clinical oncologist who was blind to the PET scans. After obtaining inputs from a radiologist, another set of target volumes were outlined on the PET/CT data set. The gross and clinical target volumes as defined on the two data sets were then analysed. The hypothesis of more accurate target delineation, preventing geographical miss and comparative overlap volumes between CECT and PET/CT, was explored. The study also analysed the volumes of intersection and analysed whether there was any TNM stage migration when PET/CT was used as compared with CECT for planning. In 17 of 20 patients, the TNM stage was not altered when adding FDG PET information to CT. PET information prevented geographical miss in two patients and identified distant metastases in one case. PET/CT gross tumour volumes were smaller than CECT volumes (mean ± standard deviation: 25.16 cm(3) ± 35.8 versus 36.56 cm(3) ± 44.14; P standard deviation: CECT versus PET/CT 32.48 cm(3) ± 36.63 versus 32.21 cm(3) ± 37.09; P > 0.86) were not statistically different. Similarity and discordance coefficients were calculated and are reported. PET/CT as compared with CECT could provide more clinically relevant information and prevent geographical miss when used for radiotherapy planning for advanced oropharyngeal

  17. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  18. Molecular sensors and molecular logic gates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, N.; Bojinov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The rapid grow of nanotechnology field extended the concept of a macroscopic device to the molecular level. Because of this reason the design and synthesis of (supra)-molecular species capable of mimicking the functions of macroscopic devices are currently of great interest. Molecular devices operate via electronic and/or nuclear rearrangements and, like macroscopic devices, need energy to operate and communicate between their elements. The energy needed to make a device work can be supplied as chemical energy, electrical energy, or light. Luminescence is one of the most useful techniques to monitor the operation of molecular-level devices. This fact determinates the synthesis of novel fluorescence compounds as a considerable and inseparable part of nanoscience development. Further miniaturization of semiconductors in electronic field reaches their limit. Therefore the design and construction of molecular systems capable of performing complex logic functions is of great scientific interest now. In semiconductor devices the logic gates work using binary logic, where the signals are encoded as 0 and 1 (low and high current). This process is executable on molecular level by several ways, but the most common are based on the optical properties of the molecule switches encoding the low and high concentrations of the input guest molecules and the output fluorescent intensities with binary 0 and 1 respectively. The first proposal to execute logic operations at the molecular level was made in 1988, but the field developed only five years later when the analogy between molecular switches and logic gates was experimentally demonstrated by de Silva. There are seven basic logic gates: AND, OR, XOR, NOT, NAND, NOR and XNOR and all of them were achieved by molecules, the fluorescence switching as well. key words: fluorescence, molecular sensors, molecular logic gates

  19. Quasi-Molecular Fluorescence from Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    Chhowalla and co-workers11 reported thatmoderately reducedGO films excited in the ultraviolet emit broad blue emission attributed to such localized...OPTICAL MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES PHOTOCHEMISTRY SPECTROSCOPY Received 4 May 2011 Accepted 19 August 2011 Published 8 September 2011 Correspondence and

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses Computed tomography ( ... cross-sectional images generated during a CT scan can be reformatted in multiple planes, and can even ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT of the sinuses is primarily used ...

  2. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  3. Reviews in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2010-01-01

    This volume serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence spectroscopy. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications as well as includes authoritative analytical reviews.

  4. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the

  5. Review of muon tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Hanliang; Jiao Xiaojing

    2010-01-01

    As a new detection technology, Muon tomography has some potential benefits, such as being able to form a three- dimensional image, without radiation, low cost, fast detecting etc. Especially, muon tomography will play an important role in detecting nuclear materials. It introduces the theory of Muon tomography, its advantages and the Muon tomography system developed by decision sciences corporation and Los Alamos national laboratory. (authors)

  6. Spectral and Diffraction Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lionheart, William

    2016-01-01

    We discuss several cases of what we call "Rich Tomography" problems in which more data is measured than a scalar for each ray. We give examples of infra red spectral tomography and Bragg edge neutron tomography in which the data is insufficient. For diffraction tomography of strain for polycrystaline materials we give an explicit reconstruction procedure. We go on to describe a way to find six independent rotation axes using Pascal's theorem of projective geometry

  7. Multispectral optoacoustic and MRI coregistration for molecular imaging of orthotopic model of human glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attia, Amalina Binte Ebrahim; Ho, Chris Jun Hui; Chandrasekharan, Prashant; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Tay, Hui Chien; Burton, Neal C; Chuang, Kai-Hsiang; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Olivo, Malini

    2016-07-01

    Multi-modality imaging methods are of great importance in oncologic studies for acquiring complementary information, enhancing the efficacy in tumor detection and characterization. We hereby demonstrate a hybrid non-invasive in vivo imaging approach of utilizing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) for molecular imaging of glucose uptake in an orthotopic glioblastoma in mouse. The molecular and functional information from MSOT can be overlaid on MRI anatomy via image coregistration to provide insights into probe uptake in the brain, which is verified by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and histological validation. In vivo MSOT and MRI imaging of an orthotopic glioma mouse model injected with IRDye800-2DG. Image coregistration between MSOT and MRI enables multifaceted (anatomical, functional, molecular) information from MSOT to be overlaid on MRI anatomy images to derive tumor physiological parameters such as perfusion, haemoglobin and oxygenation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 24 selections. Some of the titles are: Positron Emission Tomography Instrumentation, Generator Systems for Positron Emitters, Reconstruction Algorithms, Cerebral Glucose Consumption: Methodology and Validation, Cerebral Blood Flow Tomography Using Xenon-133 Inhalation: Methods and Clinical Applications, PET Studies of Stroke, Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography, and Use of PET in Oncology

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Perfusion of the Head CT Angiography (CTA) Stroke Brain Tumors Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - Head Videos related to Computed Tomography ( ...

  10. Fluorescent nanothermometers for intracellular thermal sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Rosal, Blanca Del; Rodríguez, Emma Martín; Maestro, Laura Martínez; Haro-González, Patricia; Solé, José García

    2014-05-01

    The importance of high-resolution intracellular thermal sensing and imaging in the field of modern biomedicine has boosted the development of novel nanosized fluorescent systems (fluorescent nanothermometers) as the next generation of probes for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. This thermal mapping requires fluorescent nanothermometers with good biocompatibility and high thermal sensitivity in order to obtain submicrometric and subdegree spatial and thermal resolutions, respectively. This review describes the different nanosized systems used up to now for intracellular thermal sensing and imaging. We also include the later advances in molecular systems based on fluorescent proteins for thermal mapping. A critical overview of the state of the art and the future perspective is also included.

  11. Simultaneous measurements of fluorescence lifetimes, anisotropy, and FRAP recovery curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Alibhai, Dominic R.; Suhling, Klaus

    2011-02-01

    We present fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and fluorescence anisotropy imaging along with translational diffusion measurements of living cells labelled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) recorded in a single experiment. The experimental set-up allows for time and polarization-resolved fluorescence images to be measured in every frame of a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) series. We have validated the method using rhodamine 123 in homogeneous solution prior to measurements of living A431 cells labelled with cdc42-GFP, for which the FRAP recovery exhibits an immobile fraction and the rotational mobility of the protein is hindered while the fluorescence lifetime fairly homogeneous across the cell. By eliminating the need for sequential measurements to extract fluorescence lifetimes and molecular diffusion coefficients we remove artefacts arising from changes in sample morphology and excessive photobleaching during sequential experiments.

  12. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  13. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy in living Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krugten, Jaap; Peterman, Erwin J.G.

    2018-01-01

    Transportation of organelles and biomolecules is vital for many cellular processes. Single-molecule (SM) fluorescence microscopy can expose molecular aspects of the dynamics that remain unresolved in ensemble experiments. For example, trajectories of individual, moving biomolecules can reveal

  14. Electrofluorochromic systems : Molecules and materials exhibiting redox-switchable fluorescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Kutubi, Hanan; Zafarani, H. R.; Rassaei, Liza; Mathwig, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Electrofluorochromic molecules share the unique property that their fluorescence changes as a function of their oxidation state. This makes them interesting from a fundamental perspective as molecular dyads are designed and synthesized to tune the interplay of electrochemical and luminescent

  15. Fundamentals of fluorescence microscopy exploring life with light

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    This book starts at an introductory level and leads reader to the most advanced developments in fluorescence imaging and super-resolution techniques that have enabled the emergence of new disciplines such as nanobioimaging, multiphoton microscopy, photodynamic therapy, nanometrology and nanosensors. The interdisciplinary subject of fluorescence microscopy and imaging requires complete knowledge of imaging optics and molecular physics. So, this book approaches the subject by introducing optical imaging concepts before going deep into the advanced imaging systems and their applications. Molecular orbital theory forms the basis for understanding fluorescent molecules and thereby facilitates complete explanation of light-matter interaction at the geometrical focus. The two disciplines have some overlap since light controls the states of molecules and conversely, molecular states control the emitted light. These two mechanisms together determine essential fluorescence  factors and phenomena such as, molecular cro...

  16. Innovation and fusion of x-ray and optical tomography for mouse studies of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Cong, Wenxiang; Yang, Qingsong; Pian, Qi; Zhu, Shouping; Liang, Jimin; Barroso, Margarida; Intes, Xavier

    2016-10-01

    For early detection and targeted therapy, receptor expression profiling is instrumental to classifying breast cancer into sub-groups. In particular, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) expression has been shown to have both prognostic and predictive values. Recently, an increasingly more complex view of HER2 in breast cancer has emerged from genome sequencing that highlights the role of inter- and intra-tumor heterogeneity in therapy resistance. Studies on such heterogeneity demand high-content, high-resolution functional and molecular imaging in vivo, which cannot be achieved using any single imaging tool. Clearly, there is a critical need to develop a multimodality approach for breast cancer imaging. Since 2006, grating-based x-ray imaging has been developed for much-improved x-ray images. In 2014, the demonstration of fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) guided by x-ray grating-based micro-CT was reported with encouraging results and major drawbacks. In this paper, we propose to integrate grating-based x-ray tomography (GXT) and high-dimensional optical tomography (HOT) into the first-of-its-kind truly-fused GXT-HOT (pronounced as "Get Hot") system for imaging of breast tumor heterogeneity, HER2 expression and dimerization, and therapeutic response. The primary innovation lies in developing a brand-new high-content, high-throughput x-ray optical imager based on several contemporary techniques to have MRI-type soft tissue contrast, PET-like sensitivity and specificity, and micro-CT-equivalent resolution. This system consists of two orthogonal x-ray Talbot-Lau interferometric imaging chains and a hyperspectral time-resolved single-pixel optical imager. Both the system design and pilot results will be reported in this paper, along with relevant issues under further investigation.

  17. Turbocharging Quantum Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin J. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gamble, John King [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nielsen, Erik [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scholten, Travis L. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rudinger, Kenneth Michael [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Quantum tomography is used to characterize quantum operations implemented in quantum information processing (QIP) hardware. Traditionally, state tomography has been used to characterize the quantum state prepared in an initialization procedure, while quantum process tomography is used to characterize dynamical operations on a QIP system. As such, tomography is critical to the development of QIP hardware (since it is necessary both for debugging and validating as-built devices, and its results are used to influence the next generation of devices). But tomography suffers from several critical drawbacks. In this report, we present new research that resolves several of these flaws. We describe a new form of tomography called gate set tomography (GST), which unifies state and process tomography, avoids prior methods critical reliance on precalibrated operations that are not generally available, and can achieve unprecedented accuracies. We report on theory and experimental development of adaptive tomography protocols that achieve far higher fidelity in state reconstruction than non-adaptive methods. Finally, we present a new theoretical and experimental analysis of process tomography on multispin systems, and demonstrate how to more effectively detect and characterize quantum noise using carefully tailored ensembles of input states.

  18. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  19. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  20. single photon emission tomography and positron emission tomography - Part 1 (October 2012), Part 2 (October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buvat, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this lecture is to present the single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the positron emission tomography (PET) imaging techniques. Part 1 Content: 1 - Introduction: anatomic, functional and molecular imaging; 2 - Radiotracers: chemical and physical constraints, gamma photon emitters, positon emitters, radioisotopes production, emitters type and imaging techniques; 3 - Gamma cameras; 4 - Quantification in emission tomography: attenuation, scattering, un-stationary spatial resolution; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion. Part 2 content: 1 - Positon emitters; 2 - Positons detection: Coincidence detection (electronic collimation, PET detectors with gamma cameras, dedicated PET detectors, spectrometry); PET detectors type; time-of-flight PET; 2D PET; 3D PET; 3 - Quantification in emission tomography: detected events, attenuation, scattering, fortuitous coincidences, standardisation; 4 - Common SPECT and PET problems: partial volume effect, movement, tomographic reconstruction, calibration, dead time; 5 - Synthesis and conclusion

  1. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Computed tomography is regarded by many as a complicated union of sophisticated x-ray equipment and computer technology. This book overcomes these complexities. The rigid technicalities of the machinery and the clinical aspects of computed tomography are discussed including the preparation of patients, both physically and mentally, for scanning. Furthermore, the author also explains how to set up and run a computed tomography department, including advice on how the room should be designed

  2. X-ray fluorescence activities at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vegetables grown on these soils etc. were analysed with this set-up. 2. Experiments on basic physical problems. 2.1 L X-ray fluorescence cross-section measurements. X-ray fluorescence cross-section data are used as important inputs in atomic, molecular and medical physics and also in X-ray fluorescence technique.

  3. Label-free high-resolution 3-D imaging of gold nanoparticles inside live cells using optical diffraction tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doyeon; Oh, Nuri; Kim, Kyoohyun; Lee, SangYun; Pack, Chan-Gi; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2018-03-01

    Delivery of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) into live cells has high potentials, ranging from molecular-specific imaging, photodiagnostics, to photothermal therapy. However, studying the long-term dynamics of cells with GNPs using conventional fluorescence techniques suffers from phototoxicity and photobleaching. Here, we present a method for 3-D imaging of GNPs inside live cells exploiting refractive index (RI) as imaging contrast. Employing optical diffraction tomography, 3-D RI tomograms of live cells with GNPs are precisely measured for an extended period with sub-micrometer resolution. The locations and contents of GNPs in live cells are precisely addressed and quantified due to their distinctly high RI values, which was validated by confocal fluorescence imaging of fluorescent dye conjugated GNPs. In addition, we perform quantitative imaging analysis including the segmentations of GNPs in the cytosol, the volume distributions of aggregated GNPs, and the temporal evolution of GNPs contents in HeLa and 4T1 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular confocal laser endomicroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karstensen, John Gásdal; Klausen, Pia Helene; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    endoscope or via a needle guided by endoscopic ultrasound. The second system has a confocal microscope integrated into the distal part of an endoscope. By adding molecular probes like fluorescein conjugated antibodies or fluorescent peptides to this procedure (either topically or systemically administered...... during on-going endoscopy), a novel world of molecular evaluation opens up. The method of molecular CLE could potentially be used for estimating the expression of important receptors in carcinomas, subsequently resulting in immediate individualization of treatment regimens, but also for improving...... as future challenges of molecular CLE in gastrointestinal diseases....

  5. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gaoming [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin, E-mail: yjzheng@ntu.edu.sg [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Qiu, Yishen [Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2016-07-04

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  6. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  8. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H

    2007-01-01

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique

  10. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  11. Far-Field Fluorescence Nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hell, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    The resolution of a far-field optical microscopy is usually limited to d=λ/ λ( 2,α ) . - ( 2,α ) > 200 nm, with nα denoting the numerical aperture of the lens and λ the wavelength of light. While the diffraction barrier has prompted the invention of electron, scanning probe, and x-ray microscopy, the 3D-imaging of the interior of (live) cells requires the use of focused visible light. I will discuss new developments of optical microscopy that I anticipate to have a lasting impact on our understanding of living matter. Emphasis will be placed on physical concepts that have overcome the diffraction barrier in far-field fluorescence microscopy. To set the scene for future directions, I will show that all these concepts share a common strategy: exploiting selected states and transitions of the fluorescent marker to neutralize the limiting role of diffraction. The first viable concept of this kind was Stimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy where the spot diameter followsd λ/ λ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ) . - ( 2,α√1+I / I Is . - Is ); I / I Is . - Isis a measure of the strength with which the molecule is send from the fluorescent state to the dark ground state. For I / I Is . - Is->∞ it follows that d->0, meaning that the resolution that can, in principle, be molecular. The concept underlying STED microscopy can be expanded by employing other transitions that shuffle the molecule between a dark and a bright state, such as (i) shelving the fluorophore in a dark triplet state, and (ii) photoswitching between a `fluorescence activated' and a `fluorescence deactivated' conformational state. Examples for the latter include photochromic organic compounds, and fluorescent proteins which undergo a cis-trans photoisomerizations. Photoswitching provides ultrahigh resolution at ultralow light levels. Switching can be performed in an ensemble or individually in which case the image is assembled molecule by molecule at high resolution. By providing molecular

  12. Reviews in fluorescence 2007

    CERN Document Server

    Lakowicz, Joseph R; Geddes, Chris D

    2009-01-01

    This fourth volume in the Springer series summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough for professional researchers, yet also appealing to a wider audience of scientists in related fields.

  13. Novel biosensor system model based on fluorescence quenching by a fluorescent streptavidin and carbazole-labeled biotin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xianwei; Shinohara, Hiroaki; Miyatake, Ryuta; Hohsaka, Takahiro

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a novel molecular biosensor system model was designed by using a couple of the fluorescent unnatural mutant streptavidin and the carbazole-labeled biotin. BODIPY-FL-aminophenylalanine (BFLAF), a fluorescent unnatural amino acid was position-specifically incorporated into Trp120 position of streptavidin by four-base codon method. On the other hand, carbazole-labeled biotin was synthesized as a quencher for the fluorescent Trp120BFLAF mutant streptavidin. The fluorescence of fluorescent Trp120BFLAF mutant streptavidin was decreased as we expected when carbazole-labeled biotin was added into the mutant streptavidin solution. Furthermore, the fluorescence decrease of Trp120BFLAF mutant streptavidin with carbazole-labeled biotin (100 nM) was recovered by the competitive addition of natural biotin. This result demonstrated that by measuring the fluorescence quenching and recovery, a couple of the fluorescent Trp120BFLAF mutant streptavidin and the carbazole-labeled biotin were successfully applicable for quantification of free biotin as a molecular biosensor system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Effects of multispectral excitation on the sensitivity of molecular optoacoustic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzoumas, Stratis; Nunes, Antonio; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2015-08-01

    Molecular optoacoustic (photoacoustic) imaging typically relies on the spectral identification of absorption signatures from molecules of interest. To achieve this, two or more excitation wavelengths are employed to sequentially illuminate tissue. Due to depth-related spectral dependencies and detection related effects, the multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT) spectral unmixing problem presents a complex non-linear inversion operation. So far, different studies have showcased the spectral capacity of optoacoustic imaging, without however relating the performance achieved to the number of wavelengths employed. Overall, the dependence of the sensitivity and accuracy of optoacoustic imaging as a function of the number of illumination wavelengths has not been so far comprehensively studied. In this paper we study the impact of the number of excitation wavelengths employed on the sensitivity and accuracy achieved by molecular optoacoustic tomography. We present a quantitative analysis, based on synthetic MSOT datasets and observe a trend of sensitivity increase for up to 20 wavelengths. Importantly we quantify this relation and demonstrate an up to an order of magnitude sensitivity increase of multi-wavelength illumination vs. single or dual wavelength optoacoustic imaging. Examples from experimental animal studies are finally utilized to support the findings. In vivo MSOT imaging of a mouse brain bearing a tumor that is expressing a near-infrared fluorescent protein. (a) Monochromatic optoacoustic imaging at the peak excitation wavelength of the fluorescent protein. (b) Overlay of the detected bio-distribution of the protein (red pseudocolor) on the monochromatic optoacoustic image. (c) Ex vivo validation by means of cryoslicing fluorescence imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Fluorescence polarization immunoassay of ractopamine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, E A; Shpakova, N A; Zherdev, A V; Kiu, L; Xu, C; Eremin, S A; Dzantiev, B B

    2016-01-01

    A technique was developed for fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) of ractopamine, a toxic low molecular weight nonsteroidal growth regulator belonging to the most controlled contaminants of food products of animal origin. The assay is based on the competition between a sample containing ractopamine and ractopamine–fluorophore conjugate for binding to antibodies. The competition is monitored via changes in the degree of fluorescence polarization for plane-polarized excitation light, which differs for the free and antibody-bound forms of the conjugate. The optimal assay conditions were established, ensuring a high accuracy and minimal detection limit. The developed assay demonstrated a detection limit of 1 ng/mL and a range of detectable concentrations of 2.3–50 ng/mL, which met the requirements of sanitary control. The duration of the analysis was 10 min. The possible application of the developed FPIA was demonstrated with testing of turkey meat. The speed and simplicity of the proposed assay define its efficiency as a screening tool for safety of foods.

  16. Flame emission, atomic absorption and fluorescence spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horlick, G.

    1980-01-01

    Six hundred and thirty references are cited in this review. The information in the review is divided into 12 major areas: books, reviews, and bibliographies; fundamental studies in flames; developments in instrumentation; measurement techniques and procedure; flame emission spectrometry; flame atomic absorption spectrometry; flame molecular absorption spectrometry; electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectroscopy; hydride generation techniques; graphite furnace atomic emission spectrometry; atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and analytical comparisons

  17. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iio, Masahiro

    1982-01-01

    Utilization of positron emission tomography was reviewed in relation to construction and planned construction of small-size medical cyclotrons, planned construction of positron cameras and utilization of short-lived radionuclides. (Chiba, N.)

  18. Cardiac positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Ejmalian, G.

    2003-01-01

    Positron emission tomography is an intrinsically tool that provide a unique and unparalleled approach for clinicians and researchers to interrogate the heart noninvasively. The ability to label substances of physiological interest with positron-emitting radioisotopes has permitted insight into normal blood flow and metabolism and the alterations that occur with disease states. Positron emission tomography of the heart has evolved as a unique, noninvasive approach for the assessment of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and function. Because of the intrinsic quantitative nature of positron emission tomography measurements as well as the diverse compounds that can be labeled with positron- emitting radioisotopes, studies with positron emission tomography have provided rich insight into the physiology of the heart under diverse conditions

  19. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT scan, is a diagnostic medical test that, like ... imaging provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  20. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the removal of fluid from a localized infection ( abscess ). In patients with narrowing ( stenosis ) of the spine ... Survey Images × Image Gallery Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan) equipment View full size with caption Do ...

  1. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the limitations of CT Scanning of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, ... than regular radiographs (x-rays). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  2. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of CT of the Sinuses? What is CT (Computed Tomography) of the Sinuses? Computed ... nasal cavity by small openings. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT ...

  3. Computer tomography in otolaryngology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gradzki, J. (Akademia Medyczna, Poznan (Poland))

    1981-01-01

    The principles of design and the action of computer tomography which was applied also for the diagnosis of nose, ear and throat diseases are discussed. Computer tomography makes possible visualization of the structures of the nose, nasal sinuses and facial skeleton in transverse and eoronal planes. The method enables an accurate evaluation of the position and size of neoplasms in these regions and differentiation of inflammatory exudates against malignant masses. In otology computer tomography is used particularly in the diagnosis of pontocerebellar angle tumours and otogenic brain abscesses. Computer tomography of the larynx and pharynx provides new diagnostic data owing to the possibility of obtaining transverse sections and visualization of cartilage. Computer tomograms of some cases are presented.

  4. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... vessels. CT examinations are fast and simple; in emergency cases, they can reveal internal injuries and bleeding ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  5. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a stroke. a stroke, especially with a new technique called Perfusion CT. brain tumors. enlarged brain ... Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Computed Tomography (CT) - ...

  6. Informationally incomplete quantum tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Yong Siah; Řeháček, Jaroslav; Hradil, Zdenĕk

    2013-11-01

    In quantum-state tomography on sources with quantum degrees of freedom of large Hilbert spaces, inference of quantum states of light for instance, a complete characterization of the quantum states for these sources is often not feasible owing to limited resources. As such, the concepts of informationally incomplete state estimation becomes important. These concepts are ideal for applications to quantum channel/ process tomography, which typically requires a much larger number of measurement settings for a full characterization of a quantum channel. Some key aspects of both quantumstate and quantum-process tomography are arranged together in the form of a tutorial review article that is catered to students and researchers who are new to the field of quantum tomography, with focus on maximum-likelihood related techniques as instructive examples to illustrate these ideas.

  7. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Brain Tumors Radiation Therapy for Head and Neck Cancer Others American Stroke Association National Stroke Association ... Computer Tomography (CT) Safety During Pregnancy Head and Neck Cancer X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine ...

  8. Intracoronary optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Albuquerque, Felipe N; Sotomi, Yohei

    2017-01-01

    By providing valuable information about the coronary artery wall and lumen, intravascular imaging may aid in optimizing interventional procedure results and thereby could improve clinical outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT)...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  10. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tomography (CT) scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  11. Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal for the Electrical Impedance Tomography Technology (EITT) project is to develop a reliable portable, lightweight device providing two-dimensional...

  12. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the Head? What is CT Scanning of the Head? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? CT scanning of the head is typically ...

  13. Introduction to Seismic Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, Charlotte Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-21

    Tomography is a method of obtaining an image of a 3d object by observing the behavior of energy transmissions through the object. The image is obtained by Interrogating the object with Energy sources at a variety of Locations and observing the Object’s effects on the energy at a Variety of sensors. Tomography was first Used to build 3-dimensional Scans through Human bodies. These Are called computed Tomographic (ct) scans.

  14. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  15. Quantum Dot Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Nathaniel C.

    Molecular beacons have become an important fluorescent probe for sequence-specific DNA detection. To improve the sensitivity and robustness of molecular beacon assays, fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are now being used as the fluorescent moiety for molecular beacon synthesis. Multiple linkage strategies can be used for attaching molecular beacon DNA to QDs, and multiple quenchers, including gold particles, can be used for fluorescence quenching. Covalent attachment of QDs to DNA can be achieved through amide linkage, and affinity-based attachment can be achieved with streptavidin-biotin linkage. We have shown that these linkage strategies can be used to successfully create quantum dot molecular beacons that can be used in DNA detection assays with high specificity.

  16. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  17. Sensitive detection of fluorescence in western blotting by merging images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukari; Higa, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Harada, Akihito; Baba, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-01

    The western blotting technique is widely used to analyze protein expression levels and protein molecular weight. The chemiluminescence method is mainly used for detection due to its high sensitivity and ease of manipulation, but it is unsuitable for detailed analyses because it cannot be used to detect multiple proteins simultaneously. Recently, more attention has been paid to the fluorescence detection method because it is more quantitative and is suitable for the detection of multiple proteins simultaneously. However, fluorescence detection can be limited by poor image resolution and low detection sensitivity. Here, we describe a method to detect fluorescence in western blots using fluorescence microscopy to obtain high-resolution images. In this method, filters and fluorescent dyes are optimized to enhance detection sensitivity to a level similar to that of the chemiluminescence method.

  18. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies

  19. Fluorescence reporters for Hfq oligomerization and RNA annealing

    OpenAIRE

    Panja, Subrata; Woodson, Sarah A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a sensitive technique for detecting protein-protein, protein-RNA and RNA-RNA interactions, requiring only nanomolar concentrations of labeled components. Fluorescence anisotropy provides information about the assembly of multi-subunit proteins, while molecular beacons provide a sensitive and quantitative reporter for base pairing between complementary RNAs. Here we present a detailed protocol for labeling Hfq protein with cyanine 3-maleimide and dansyl chloride to...

  20. An Assessment of Early Response to Targeted Therapy via Molecular Imaging: A Pilot Study of 3′-deoxy-3′[(18F]-Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography 18F-FLT PET/CT in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorothymidine is a thymidine analog labeled with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine for positron emission tomography (18F-FLT-PET imaging. Thymidine is a nucleic acid that is used to build DNA. Fluorine-18 fluorothymidine (18F-FLT utilizes the same metabolic pathway as does thymidine but has a very low incidence of being incorporated into the DNA (<1%. 18F-FLT-PET could have a role in the evaluation of response to targeted therapy. We present here a pilot study where we investigated cellular metabolism and proliferation in patients with prostate cancer before and after targeted therapy. Seven patients with Stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, candidates for targeted therapy inhibiting the hepatocyte growth factor/tyrosine-protein kinase Met (HGF/C-MET pathway, were included in this study. The HGF/C-MET pathway is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and an evaluation of the inhibition of this pathway could be valuable. 18F-FLT was performed at baseline and within four weeks post-therapy. Tumor response was assessed semi-quantitatively and using visual response criteria. The range of SUVmax for 18F-FLT at baseline in the prostate varied from 2.5 to 4.2. This study demonstrated that 18F-FLT with positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-FLT PET/CT had only limited applications in the early response evaluation of prostate cancer. 18F-FLT PET/CT may have some utility in the assessment of response in lymph node disease. However, 18F-FLT PET/CT was not found to be useful in the evaluation of the prostate bed, metastatic skeletal disease, and liver disease.

  1. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  2. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  3. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-07-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein- and bio-orthogonal-based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging.

  4. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent molecules in living cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarkova, S A; Lloyd, C; Khaira, S K; Berk, D

    2003-01-01

    The possibilities of the method of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for studying the molecular dynamics in living cells are demonstrated. The method provides point measurements of extremely low concentrations of fluorescent molecules and their diffusion coefficients with a high time resolution in a microscopic volume, which is especially important in pharmacological investigations. A biological model of the interaction of liposomes with a cellular membrane is considered. The diffusion coefficients of fluorescent molecules are measured directly in the living cell cytoplasm. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Handbook of molecular plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Sala, Fabio Della

    2013-01-01

    While several reviews and books on surface nanophotonics and fluorescence spectroscopy are available, an updated focus on molecular plasmonics, including both theoretical methods and experimental aspects, is still lacking. This handbook is a comprehensive overview on the physics of the plasmon-emitter interaction, ranging from electromagnetism to quantum mechanics, from metal-enhanced fluorescence to surface-enhanced Raman scattering, from optical microscopy to synthesis of metal nanoparticles, filling the gap in the literature of this merging field. It allows experimentalists to have a solid

  6. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  7. Current perspectives in the use of molecular imaging to target surgical treatments for genitourinary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Francesco; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Gill, Inderbir S; Kaouk, Jihad H; Remzi, Mesut; Thompson, R Houston; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B; van der Poel, Henk G; Fornara, Paolo; Rassweiler, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Molecular imaging (MI) entails the visualisation, characterisation, and measurement of biologic processes at the molecular and cellular levels in humans and other living systems. Translating this technology to interventions in real-time enables interventional MI/image-guided surgery, for example, by providing better detection of tumours and their dimensions. To summarise and critically analyse the available evidence on image-guided surgery for genitourinary (GU) oncologic diseases. A comprehensive literature review was performed using PubMed and the Thomson Reuters Web of Science. In the free-text protocol, the following terms were applied: molecular imaging, genitourinary oncologic surgery, surgical navigation, image-guided surgery, and augmented reality. Review articles, editorials, commentaries, and letters to the editor were included if deemed to contain relevant information. We selected 79 articles according to the search strategy based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis criteria and the IDEAL method. MI techniques included optical imaging and fluorescent techniques, the augmented reality (AR) navigation system, magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography. Experimental studies on the AR navigation system were restricted to the detection and therapy of adrenal and renal malignancies and in the relatively infrequent cases of prostate cancer, whereas fluorescence techniques and optical imaging presented a wide application of intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. In most cases, image-guided surgery was shown to improve the surgical resectability of tumours. Based on the evidence to date, image-guided surgery has promise in the near future for multiple GU malignancies. Further optimisation of targeted imaging agents, along with the integration of imaging modalities, is necessary to further enhance intraoperative GU oncologic surgery. Copyright © 2013

  8. Electric field effects on fluorescence of the green fluorescent protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2008-05-01

    External electric field effects on state energy and photoexcitation dynamics have been examined for a mutant of UV-excited green fluorescent protein (GFPuv5) in a PVA film. The electrofluorescence spectrum of GFPuv5 is reproduced by a linear combination between the fluorescence spectrum and its second derivative spectrum, indicating the field-induced fluorescence quenching and the difference in electric dipole moment between the fluorescent state and the ground state. The direct measurements of the field-induced change in fluorescence decay show that the field-induced quenching results from the field-induced increase in the rate of the non-radiative process from the fluorescent state.

  9. Origins of fluorescence in evolved bacteriophytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Shyamosree; Auldridge, Michele E; Lehtivuori, Heli; Ihalainen, Janne A; Forest, Katrina T

    2014-11-14

    Use of fluorescent proteins to study in vivo processes in mammals requires near-infrared (NIR) biomarkers that exploit the ability of light in this range to penetrate tissue. Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are photoreceptors that couple absorbance of NIR light to photoisomerization, protein conformational changes, and signal transduction. BphPs have been engineered to form NIR fluorophores, including IFP1.4, Wi-Phy, and the iRFP series, initially by replacement of Asp-207 by His. This position was suggestive because its main chain carbonyl is within hydrogen-bonding distance to pyrrole ring nitrogens of the biliverdin chromophore, thus potentially functioning as a crucial transient proton sink during photoconversion. To explain the origin of fluorescence in these phytofluors, we solved the crystal structures of IFP1.4 and a comparison non-fluorescent monomeric phytochrome DrCBDmon. Met-186 and Val-288 in IFP1.4 are responsible for the formation of a tightly packed hydrophobic hub around the biliverdin D ring. Met-186 is also largely responsible for the blue-shifted IFP1.4 excitation maximum relative to the parent BphP. The structure of IFP1.4 revealed decreased structural heterogeneity and a contraction of two surface regions as direct consequences of side chain substitutions. Unexpectedly, IFP1.4 with Asp-207 reinstalled (IFPrev) has a higher fluorescence quantum yield (∼9%) than most NIR phytofluors published to date. In agreement, fluorescence lifetime measurements confirm the exceptionally long excited state lifetimes, up to 815 ps, in IFP1.4 and IFPrev. Our research helps delineate the origin of fluorescence in engineered BphPs and will facilitate the wide-spread adoption of phytofluors as biomarkers. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Concentrators using fluorescent substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashibara, M.; Tsukamoto, M. (Hitachi Seisakusho K.K., Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-01-01

    In luminescent concentrators - plates of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or other transparent material with a fluorescent compound dispersed within them - incident light is trapped and concentrated by internal reflection, and shifted to a longer wavelength, as it interacts with fluorescent particles. Experience with the use of luminescent concentrators for electricity generation in conjunction with solar cells, in solar heaters, in amplifiers for light intensity, in long-wave converters and in display panels is discussed. Solar energy conversion efficiencies of 4-5% have been obtained in generating systems combining concentrators containing Fluorol 555 or Rhodamin 6G with GaAs solar cells. (author).

  11. Fluorescence uranium determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez Cellini, R.; Crus Castillo, F. de la; Barrera Pinero, R.

    1960-01-01

    An equipment for analysis of uranium by fluorescence was developed in order to determine it at such a low concentration that it can not be determined by the most sensible analytical methods. this new fluorimeter was adapted to measure the fluorescence emitted by the phosphorus sodium fluoride-sodium carbonate-potasium carbonate-uranyl, being excited by ultraviolet light of 3,650 A the intensity of the light emitted was measure with a photomultiplicator RCA 5819 and the adequate electronic equipment. (Author) 19 refs

  12. Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography for evaluation of mediastinal lymph node staging of non-small-cell lung cancer in a tuberculosisendemic area: A 5-year prospective observational study.

  13. Ocean acoustic reverberation tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Robert A

    2015-12-01

    Seismic wide-angle imaging using ship-towed acoustic sources and networks of ocean bottom seismographs is a common technique for exploring earth structure beneath the oceans. In these studies, the recorded data are dominated by acoustic waves propagating as reverberations in the water column. For surveys with a small receiver spacing (e.g., ocean acoustic reverberation tomography, is developed that uses the travel times of direct and reflected waves to image ocean acoustic structure. Reverberation tomography offers an alternative approach for determining the structure of the oceans and advancing the understanding of ocean heat content and mixing processes. The technique has the potential for revealing small-scale ocean thermal structure over the entire vertical height of the water column and along long survey profiles or across three-dimensional volumes of the ocean. For realistic experimental geometries and data noise levels, the method can produce images of ocean sound speed on a smaller scale than traditional acoustic tomography.

  14. Practical Bayesian tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granade, Christopher; Combes, Joshua; Cory, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years, Bayesian methods have been proposed as a solution to a wide range of issues in quantum state and process tomography. State-of-the-art Bayesian tomography solutions suffer from three problems: numerical intractability, a lack of informative prior distributions, and an inability to track time-dependent processes. Here, we address all three problems. First, we use modern statistical methods, as pioneered by Huszár and Houlsby (2012 Phys. Rev. A 85 052120) and by Ferrie (2014 New J. Phys. 16 093035), to make Bayesian tomography numerically tractable. Our approach allows for practical computation of Bayesian point and region estimators for quantum states and channels. Second, we propose the first priors on quantum states and channels that allow for including useful experimental insight. Finally, we develop a method that allows tracking of time-dependent states and estimates the drift and diffusion processes affecting a state. We provide source code and animated visual examples for our methods.

  15. Fluorescence self-quenching of tetraphenylporphyrin in liquid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Mihir [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Nath, Sukhendu [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Hajra, Alakananda [Department of Chemistry, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Sinha, Subrata, E-mail: subratasinha67@rediffmail.com [Integrated Science Education and Research Centre, Siksha-Bhavana, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2013-09-15

    Self-quenching of the fluorescence emission of tetraphenylporphyrin at high concentrations in toluene at the ambient temperature (300 K) is discussed in detail based on steady state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements. The fluorescence self-quenching is mainly attributed to re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer process (homotransfer). The re-absorption effect is found to deform the fluorescence emission spectra significantly in energy positions as well as relative intensities of different peaks at high concentrations. Nearly ideal fluorescence emission spectra are observed at a concentration ∼10{sup −7} mol/L. Moreover, there is an apparent enhancement of the fluorescence lifetime value of tetraphenylporphyrin in toluene at high concentrations, especially on the blue side of the fluorescence emission spectra. To the best knowledge of the authors, this is the first detail report on the fluorescence self-quenching of porphyrins in liquid medium. This finding carries great importance in view of the widespread research on porphyrins in the fields of solar light harvesting, artificial photosynthesis, photodynamic therapy, etc. -- Highlights: • The effect of concentration on the fluorescence emission spectra of tetraphenylporphyrin (TPhP) in toluene at 300 K is investigated by using steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. • Both re-absorption effect and the Förster type resonance energy transfer are found to be responsible for the observed fluorescence self-quenching at high concentrations. • These investigations are extremely important in view of the extensive applications of porphyrins in the fabrication of molecular electronic devices, especially for solar and artificial photosynthetic devices, where highly concentrated porphyrins are often used for efficient light harvesting.

  16. Fluorescence lifetime based bioassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2017-12-01

    Fluorescence lifetime (FLT) is a robust intrinsic property and material constant of fluorescent matter. Measuring this important physical indicator has evolved from a laboratory curiosity to a powerful and established technique for a variety of applications in drug discovery, medical diagnostics and basic biological research. This distinct trend was mainly driven by improved and meanwhile affordable laser and detection instrumentation on the one hand, and the development of suitable FLT probes and biological assays on the other. In this process two essential working approaches emerged. The first one is primarily focused on high throughput applications employing biochemical in vitro assays with no requirement for high spatial resolution. The second even more dynamic trend is the significant expansion of assay methods combining highly time and spatially resolved fluorescence data by fluorescence lifetime imaging. The latter approach is currently pursued to enable not only the investigation of immortal tumor cell lines, but also specific tissues or even organs in living animals. This review tries to give an actual overview about the current status of FLT based bioassays and the wide range of application opportunities in biomedical and life science areas. In addition, future trends of FLT technologies will be discussed.

  17. Digital multilayer tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueber, C.; Klose, K.J.; Thelen, M.

    1991-01-01

    With digital multilayer tomography a sequence of projection images is recorded by an image intensifier television system and stored as digital data during a linear run of a layer sequence. Using this data record, tomograms of the examined body region can be computed for any layer thickness by shifts and superimposition of the single projections later at a digital workstation. The qualities of digital and conventional tomograms are basically comparable. A drawback of digital tomography is its lower local resolution (512 x 512 image matrix), advantages are a lower radiation exposure, a shorter patient examination time, and the facilities of digital image processing (later processing, archive setup, transmission). (orig.) [de

  18. Quantitative cardiac computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M.; Dueber, C.; Wolff, P.; Erbel, R.; Hoffmann, T.

    1985-06-01

    The scope and limitations of quantitative cardiac CT have been evaluated in a series of experimental and clinical studies. The left ventricular muscle mass was estimated by computed tomography in 19 dogs (using volumetric methods, measurements in two axes and planes and reference volume). There was good correlation with anatomical findings. The enddiastolic volume of the left ventricle was estimated in 22 patients with cardiomyopathies; using angiography as a reference, CT led to systematic under-estimation. It is also shown that ECG-triggered magnetic resonance tomography results in improved visualisation and may be expected to improve measurements of cardiac morphology.

  19. Photoacoustic-fluorescence in vitro flow cytometry for quantification of absorption, scattering and fluorescence properties of the cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedosekin, D. A.; Sarimollaoglu, M.; Foster, S.; Galanzha, E. I.; Zharov, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence flow cytometry is a well-established analytical tool that provides quantification of multiple biological parameters of cells at molecular levels, including their functional states, morphology, composition, proliferation, and protein expression. However, only the fluorescence and scattering parameters of the cells or labels are available for detection. Cell pigmentation, presence of non-fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles cannot be reliably quantified. Herewith, we present a novel photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry design for simple integration of absorbance measurements into schematics of conventional in vitro flow cytometers. The integrated system allow simultaneous measurements of light absorbance, scattering and of multicolor fluorescence from single cells in the flow at rates up to 2 m/s. We compared various combinations of excitation laser sources for multicolor detection, including simultaneous excitation of PA and fluorescence using a single 500 kHz pulsed nanosecond laser. Multichannel detection scheme allows simultaneous detection of up to 8 labels, including 4 fluorescent tags and 4 PA colors. In vitro PA-fluorescence flow cytometer was used for studies of nanoparticles uptake and for the analysis of cell line pigmentation, including genetically encoded melanin expression in breast cancer cell line. We demonstrate that this system can be used for direct nanotoxicity studies with simultaneous quantification of nanoparticles content and assessment of cell viability using a conventional fluorescent apoptosis assays.

  20. Statistical filtering in fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháň, Radek; Kapusta, Peter; Hof, Martin

    Roč. 406 , č. 20 (2014), s. 4797-4813 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Filtered fluorescence correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy * Fluorescence spectral correlation spectroscopy Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.436, year: 2014

  1. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  3. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  4. Who's who in fluorescence 2008

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2008-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's sixth Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working lives. This is a unique reference.

  5. Multislice computed tomography coronary angiography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Cademartiri (Filippo)

    2005-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Computed Tomography (CT) imaging is also known as "CAT scanning" (Computed Axial Tomography). Tomography is from the Greek word "tomos" meaning "slice" or "section" and "graphia" meaning "describing". CT was invented in 1972 by British engineer Godfrey Hounsfield

  6. Quantitative comparison of X-ray fluorescence microtomography setups: Standard and confocal collimator apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chukalina, M. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: marina@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Simionovici, A. [Laboratoire de Geophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, University of Grenoble, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: alexandre.simionovici@ujf-grenoble.fr; Zaitsev, S. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: zaitsev@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Vanegas, C.J. [Institute of Microelectronics Technology RAS, 142432, Chernogolovka, Moscow District (Russian Federation)], E-mail: vanegas@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru

    2007-07-15

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest for fluorescence spectroscopy, as provided by modern setups which allow 2D and 3D imaging of elemental distributions. Two directions are currently under development: the SR-based fluorescence tomography in polar scanning geometry, provided by the new generation of X-ray microprobes and the confocal scanning geometry, which can be fielded in both SR and laboratory environments. The new probes bring forth a new age in fluorescence spectrometry: high resolution, high intensity and high sensitivity which allow 3D elemental mapping of volumes. The major task now is the development of these complex tools into fully quantitative probes, reproducible and straightforward for general use. In this work we analyze two X-ray fluorescence microtomography techniques: an apparatus tomography using a confocal collimator for the data collection and a standard first generation Computed Tomography (CT) in the parallel scanning scheme. We calculate the deposited dose (amount of energy deposited and distributed in the sample during the data collection time) and find the conditions for the choice of the tomography scheme.

  7. Celebral computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofteroed, B.; Sortland, O.

    1985-01-01

    Indications for cerebral computerized tomography (CT) and the diagnostic results from this examination are evaluated in 127 children. Pathological changes were found in 31 children, mostly based on such indications as increasing head size, suspicion of brain tumor, cerebral paresis, delayed psychomotor development and epileptic seizures. A list of indications for CT in children is given

  8. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Head ...

  9. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Sinuses ...

  10. Positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paans, AMJ

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a method for determining biochemical and physiological processes in vivo in a quantitative way by using radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron emitting radionuclides as C-11, N-13, O-15 and F-18 and by measuring the annihilation radiation using a

  11. Geodetic SAR Tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Montazeri, Sina; Gisinger, Christoph; Hanssen, R.F.; Bamler, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a framework referred to as 'geodetic synthetic aperture radar (SAR) tomography' that fuses the SAR imaging geodesy and tomographic SAR inversion (TomoSAR) approaches to obtain absolute 3-D positions of a large amount of natural scatterers. The methodology is applied on

  12. Advances in neutron tomography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Up to now the interaction of the neutron spin with magnetic fields in samples has not been applied to imaging techniques despite the fact that it was proposed many years ago. About ten years ago neutron depolarization as imaging signal for neutron radiography or tomography was demonstrated and in principle it works.

  13. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Head

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special x-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  14. Computed Tomography (CT) -- Sinuses

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Computed tomography (CT) of the sinuses uses special x-ray equipment to evaluate the paranasal sinus cavities – hollow, ... is a diagnostic medical test that, like traditional x-rays, produces multiple images or pictures of the inside ...

  15. Optical Tomography in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim

    . JQSRT 113 (2012) 2222, 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2012.07.015] included in the PhD thesis as an attachment. The knowledge and experience gained in the PhD project is the first important step towards introducing the advanced optical tomography methods of combustion diagnostics developed in the project to future...

  16. Optical Coherence Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive imaging technique that provides real-time two- and three-dimensional images of scattering samples with micrometer resolution. Mapping the local reflectivity, OCT visualizes the morphology of the sample, in real time or at video rate. In addition...

  17. Computed tomography for radiographers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is directed towards giving radiographers an introduction to and basic knowledge of computerized tomography. The technical section discusses gantries and x-ray production, computer and disc drive image display, storage, artefacts quality assurance and design of departments. The clinical section includes patient preparation, radiotherapy planning, and interpretation of images from various areas of the anatomy. (U.K.)

  18. Computed tomography system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, T.W.; Blake, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to computed tomography and is particularly concerned with determining the CT numbers of zones of interest in an image displayed on a cathode ray tube which zones lie in the so-called level or center of the gray scale window. (author)

  19. Holography and tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.

    1997-01-01

    This session includes a collection of outlines of pertinent information, diagrams, graphs, electron micrographs, and color photographs pertaining to historical aspects and recent advances in the development of X-ray Gabor Holography. Many of the photographs feature or pertain to instrumentation used in holography, tomography, and cryo-holography

  20. EDITORIAL: Process Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mi

    2006-08-01

    Process tomography (PT) refers to a methodology by which the internal characteristics of process vessel reaction or pipeline flows are acquired from measurements on or outside the domain of interest in a non-invasive fashion. As a generic 'tool' PT is extremely useful in improving, for example, the modelling and design of many complex processes, in understanding the dynamic mechanisms of flowing and mixing of colloidal dispersions, and in multiphase flow phenomena, hydraulic transport and process control. Over two decades of research worldwide, PT has become a routine research tool in many research laboratories and is being accepted for process measurement and control in some industrial applications. This is the fourth special feature on process tomography after previous publications in this journal in 1996, 2001 and 2002. In this issue, recent developments in sensors, measurements and algorithms with new features for specific distinctive applications are addressed, such as the high temporal resolutions of 1000 frames/s and beyond obtained by both x-ray and impedance tomography for flow measurement and fast process reaction; interferometric tomography combining the Mach Zehnder interferometer and tomography to utilize the phase difference in propagation for visualization of particular features in a process and new three-dimensional image reconstruction algorithms in process applications. The important aspect of this issue is that it demonstrates current developments focusing on the improvement of performance at the temporal resolution, phase information and 3D algorithms for specific application. Looking back over two decades of research, we can see that the process tomography technique is maturing and its applications in industrial manufacture are being deployed as a result of the determined efforts of researchers worldwide. As Guest Editor of this special feature, I would like to thank my colleagues at the Virtual Centre for Industrial Process Tomography (VCIPT

  1. Who's who in fluorescence 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    The Journal of Fluorescence's third Who's Who directory publishes the names, contact details, specialty keywords, photographs, and a brief description of scientists employing fluorescence methodology and instrumentation in their working livesThe directory provides company contact details with a brief list of fluorescence-related products.

  2. Image calibration in fluorescence microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; van Rooij, G.J.; Hofstraat, J.W.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    A fluorescence image calibration method is presented based on the use of standardized uniformly fluorescing reference layers. It is demonstrated to be effective for the correction of non-uniform imaging characteristics across the image (shading correction) as well as for relating fluorescence

  3. Fluorescence spectroscopy of dental calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhmutov, D; Gonchukov, S; Sukhinina, A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fluorescence properties of dental calculus in comparison with the properties of adjacent unaffected tooth structure using both lasers and LEDs in the UV-visible range for fluorescence excitation. The influence of calculus color on the informative signal is demonstrated. The optimal spectral bands of excitation and registration of the fluorescence are determined

  4. Computational methods for molecular imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Kuangyu; Li, Shuo

    2015-01-01

    This volume contains original submissions on the development and application of molecular imaging computing. The editors invited authors to submit high-quality contributions on a wide range of topics including, but not limited to: • Image Synthesis & Reconstruction of Emission Tomography (PET, SPECT) and other Molecular Imaging Modalities • Molecular Imaging Enhancement • Data Analysis of Clinical & Pre-clinical Molecular Imaging • Multi-Modal Image Processing (PET/CT, PET/MR, SPECT/CT, etc.) • Machine Learning and Data Mining in Molecular Imaging. Molecular imaging is an evolving clinical and research discipline enabling the visualization, characterization and quantification of biological processes taking place at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living subjects. Computational methods play an important role in the development of molecular imaging, from image synthesis to data analysis and from clinical diagnosis to therapy individualization. This work will bring readers fro...

  5. APD detectors for biological fluorescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazeres, S.; Borrel, V.; Magenc, C.; Courrech, J.L.; Bazer-Bachi, R.

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a very convenient and widely used method for studying the molecular background of biological processes [L. Salome, J.L. Cazeil, A. Lopez, J.F. Tocanne, Eur. Biophys. J. 27 (1998) 391-402]. Chromophores are included in the structure under study and a flash of laser light induces fluorescence (Fluorescence Recovery After Photo-bleaching), the decay of which yields information on the polarity, the speed of rotation, and the speed of diffusion as well as on the temporal and spatial evolution of interactions between molecular species. The method can even be used to study living cells [J.F. Tocanne, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, Prog. Lipid Res. 33 (1994) 203-237, L. Cezanne, A. Lopez, F. Loste, G. Parnaud, O. Saurel, P. Demange, J.F. Tocanne, Biochemistry 38 (1999) 2779-2786]. This is classically performed with a PM-based system. For biological reasons a decrease of the excitation of the cells is highly desirable. Because the fluorescence response then becomes fainter a significant improvement in detector capability would be welcome. We present here results obtained with an Avalanche Photo Diode (APD)-based system. The small sensitive area of detection allows a very significant improvement in signal/noise ratio, improvement in gain, and the opening-up of a new parameter space. With these new detectors we can begin the study of information transmission between cells through morphine receptors. This work involves both electronics engineers and biophysicists, so results and techniques in both fields will be presented here

  6. Functional characterisation of metal(loid) processes in planta through the integration of synchrotron techniques and plant molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Erica; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Lombi, Enzo

    2012-04-01

    Functional characterisation of the genes regulating metal(loid) homeostasis in plants is a major focus for phytoremediation, crop biofortification and food security research. Recent advances in X-ray focussing optics and fluorescence detection have greatly improved the potential to use synchrotron techniques in plant science research. With use of methods such as micro X-ray fluorescence mapping, micro computed tomography and micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy, metal(loids) can be imaged in vivo in hydrated plant tissues at submicron resolution, and laterally resolved metal(loid) speciation can also be determined under physiologically relevant conditions. This article focuses on the benefits of combining molecular biology and synchrotron-based techniques. By using molecular techniques to probe the location of gene expression and protein production in combination with laterally resolved synchrotron techniques, one can effectively and efficiently assign functional information to specific genes. A review of the state of the art in this field is presented, together with examples as to how synchrotron-based methods can be combined with molecular techniques to facilitate functional characterisation of genes in planta. The article concludes with a summary of the technical challenges still remaining for synchrotron-based hard X-ray plant science research, particularly those relating to subcellular level research.

  7. Detection of diabetic foveal edema with biomicroscopy, fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography Detecção do edema foveal diabético com biomicroscopia, angiografia fluoresceínica e tomografia de coerência óptica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Zacarias Hannouche

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available To describe different techniques for the detection of diabetic foveal edema. A retrospective review of the detection of diabetic foveal edema. Noncontact lens biomicroscopy is relatively insensitive in mild foveal thickening apparent on optical coherence tomography. Optical coherence tomography measurements can detect early retinal damage in diabetic retinopathy patients.Descrever diferentes técnicas para detecção do edema foveal diabético. Uma revisão da detecção do edema foveal diabético. Biomicroscopia com lente de não contato é relativamente insensível em edema leve aparente na tomografia de coerência óptica. Tomografia de coerência óptica pode detectar precocemente o dano retiniano inicial em pacientes com retinopatia diabética.

  8. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    rodent disease models, in vivo endomicroscopy with appropriate fluorescent agents allowed examination of thrombosis formation, tumour microvasculature and liver metastases, diagnosis and staging of ulcerative colitis, liver necrosis and glomerulonephritis. Miniaturised confocal endomicroscopy allows rapid in vivo molecular and subsurface microscopy of normal and pathologic tissue at high resolution in small and large whole animal models. Fluorescein endomicroscopy has recently been introduced into the medical device market as a clinical imaging tool in GI endoscopy and is undergoing clinical evaluation in laparoscopic surgery. This medical usage is encouraging in-situ endomicroscopy as an important pre-clinical research tool to observe microscopic and molecular system biologic events in vivo in animal models for various human diseases.

  9. Fluorescent quantification of melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Bruno Pacheco; Matamá, Maria Teresa; Guimarães, Diana Isabel Pereira; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Melanin quantification is reportedly performed by absorption spectroscopy, commonly at 405 nm. Here, we propose the implementation of fluorescence spectroscopy for melanin assessment. In a typical in vitro assay to assess melanin production in response to an external stimulus, absorption spectroscopy clearly overvalues melanin content. This method is also incapable of distinguishing non-melanotic/amelanotic control cells from those that are actually capable of performing melanogenesis. Theref...

  10. Cone Beam X-Ray Luminescence Tomography Imaging Based on KA-FEM Method for Small Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongmei; Meng, Fanzhen; Zhao, Fengjun; Xu, Cao

    2016-01-01

    Cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography can realize fast X-ray luminescence tomography imaging with relatively low scanning time compared with narrow beam X-ray luminescence tomography. However, cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography suffers from an ill-posed reconstruction problem. First, the feasibility of experiments with different penetration and multispectra in small animal has been tested using nanophosphor material. Then, the hybrid reconstruction algorithm with KA-FEM method has been applied in cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography for small animals to overcome the ill-posed reconstruction problem, whose advantage and property have been demonstrated in fluorescence tomography imaging. The in vivo mouse experiment proved the feasibility of the proposed method.

  11. Benzobisoxazole cruciforms as fluorescent sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Musabbir A; Le, Ha T M; Miljanić, Ognjen Š

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cross-conjugated molecular cruciforms are intriguing platforms for optoelectronic applications. Their two intersecting π-conjugated arms allow independent modulation of the molecules' HOMO and LUMO levels and guarantee a well-defined optical response to analyte binding. In addition, the rigid cross-conjugated geometries of these molecules allow their organization in two- and three-dimensional space with long-range order, making them convenient precursors for the transition from solution-based to the more practical solid-state- and surface-based devices. Not surprisingly, a number of molecular cruciform classes have been explored because of these appealing properties. These include tetrakis(arylethynyl)benzenes, tetrastyrylbenzenes, distyrylbis(arylethynyl)benzenes, tetraalkynylethenes, biphenyl-based "swivel" cruciforms, and benzobisoxazole-based cruciforms. In this Account, we summarize our group's work on benzobisoxazole molecular cruciforms. The heterocyclic central core of these molecules forces their HOMOs to localize along the vertical bisethynylbenzene axis; the HOMO localization switches to the horizontal benzobisoxazole axis only in cases when that axis bears electron-rich 4-(N,N-dimethylamino)phenyl substituents and the vertical axis does not. In contrast, the LUMOs are generally delocalized across the entire molecule, and their localization occurs only in cruciforms with donor-acceptor substitution. Such spatially isolated frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) of the benzobisoxazole cruciforms make their response to protonation very predictable. Benzobisoxazole cruciforms are highly solvatochromic, and their fluorescence quantum yields reach 80% in nonpolar solvents. Solutions of cruciforms in different solvents change emission colors upon addition of carboxylic and boronic acid analytes. These changes are highly sensitive to the analyte structure, and the emission color responses permit qualitative discrimination among structurally closely

  12. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Lindhoud

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488, which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  13. Fluorescence of Alexa fluor dye tracks protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Antonie J W G; Borst, Jan Willem; van Mierlo, Carlo P M

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is an important tool for the characterization of protein folding. Often, a protein is labeled with appropriate fluorescent donor and acceptor probes and folding-induced changes in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) are monitored. However, conformational changes of the protein potentially affect fluorescence properties of both probes, thereby profoundly complicating interpretation of FRET data. In this study, we assess the effects protein folding has on fluorescence properties of Alexa Fluor 488 (A488), which is commonly used as FRET donor. Here, A488 is covalently attached to Cys69 of apoflavodoxin from Azotobacter vinelandii. Although coupling of A488 slightly destabilizes apoflavodoxin, the three-state folding of this protein, which involves a molten globule intermediate, is unaffected. Upon folding of apoflavodoxin, fluorescence emission intensity of A488 changes significantly. To illuminate the molecular sources of this alteration, we applied steady state and time-resolved fluorescence techniques. The results obtained show that tryptophans cause folding-induced changes in quenching of Alexa dye. Compared to unfolded protein, static quenching of A488 is increased in the molten globule. Upon populating the native state both static and dynamic quenching of A488 decrease considerably. We show that fluorescence quenching of Alexa Fluor dyes is a sensitive reporter of conformational changes during protein folding.

  14. Naturally occurring fluorescence in frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Carlos; Brunetti, Andrés E; Pedron, Federico N; Carnevale Neto, Fausto; Estrin, Darío A; Bari, Sara E; Chemes, Lucía B; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Lagorio, María G; Faivovich, Julián

    2017-04-04

    Fluorescence, the absorption of short-wavelength electromagnetic radiation reemitted at longer wavelengths, has been suggested to play several biological roles in metazoans. This phenomenon is uncommon in tetrapods, being restricted mostly to parrots and marine turtles. We report fluorescence in amphibians, in the tree frog Hypsiboas punctatus, showing that fluorescence in living frogs is produced by a combination of lymph and glandular emission, with pigmentary cell filtering in the skin. The chemical origin of fluorescence was traced to a class of fluorescent compounds derived from dihydroisoquinolinone, here named hyloins. We show that fluorescence contributes 18-29% of the total emerging light under twilight and nocturnal scenarios, largely enhancing brightness of the individuals and matching the sensitivity of night vision in amphibians. These results introduce an unprecedented source of pigmentation in amphibians and highlight the potential relevance of fluorescence in visual perception in terrestrial environments.

  15. TRANES analysis of the fluorescence of nile red in organized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    TRANES; TRES; fluorescence; nile red; solvent relaxation; organized molecular assemblies; solvation ... A polarity- and viscosity-sensitive dye such as nile red is used to probe the environmental properties around the site of .... Both the species are simultaneously excited giving rise to two emissive species A* and B*. A and ...

  16. Prenatal detection of aneuploidies using fluorescence in situ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is a powerful molecular cytogenetic technique which allows rapid detection of aneuploidies on interphase cells and metaphase spreads. The aim of the present study was to evaluate FISH as a tool in prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidies in high risk pregnancies in an Indian set up.

  17. Amplification-free liquid biopsy by fluorescence approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uhd, Jesper; Okholm, Anders; Kjems, Jargen

    2017-01-01

    Liquid biopsy is an attractive new paradigm of modern cancer research and clinical oncology. Synergy of fluorescence microscopy with mutation specific molecular probes is a method that we developed for the detection of tumor related circulating DNA, ctDNA. The present detection methods of ct...

  18. Mercury mass measurement in fluorescent lamps via neutron activation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Viererbl, L.; Vinš, M.; Lahodová, Z.; Fuksa, A.; Kučera, Jan; Koleska, M.; Voljanskij, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 116, NOV (2015), s. 56-59 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010237; GA MŠk LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : fluorescent lamp * mercury measurement * neutron activation analysis * research reactor Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.207, year: 2015

  19. Determination of experimental K-shell fluorescence yield for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    atom with an inner K shell vacancy can proceed by either the emission of X-ray photons or the ejection of ... fields such as atomic, molecular and radiation physics, X-ray fluorescence analysis, cancer therapy, medical .... of lines of different energies and intensities, the absorption correction coefficient is. Pramana – J. Phys.

  20. Positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Y.L.; Thompson, C.J.; Diksic, M.; Meyer, E.; Feindel, W.H.

    1984-01-01

    One of the most exciting new technologies introduced in the last 10 yr is positron emission tomography (PET). PET provides quantitative, three-dimensional images for the study of specific biochemical and physiological processes in the human body. This approach is analogous to quantitative in-vivo autoradiography but has the added advantage of permitting non-invasive in vivo studies. PET scanning requires a small cyclotron to produce short-lived positron emitting isotopes such as oxygen-15, carbon-11, nitrogen-13 and fluorine-18. Proper radiochemical facilities and advanced computer equipment are also needed. Most important, PET requires a multidisciplinary scientific team of physicists, radiochemists, mathematicians, biochemists and physicians. The most recent trends are reviewed in the imaging technology, radiochemistry, methodology and clinical applications of positron emission tomography. (author)

  1. Mathematical Methods in Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Alfred; Natterer, Frank

    1991-01-01

    The conference was devoted to the discussion of present and future techniques in medical imaging, including 3D x-ray CT, ultrasound and diffraction tomography, and biomagnetic ima- ging. The mathematical models, their theoretical aspects and the development of algorithms were treated. The proceedings contains surveys on reconstruction in inverse obstacle scat- tering, inversion in 3D, and constrained least squares pro- blems.Research papers include besides the mentioned imaging techniques presentations on image reconstruction in Hilbert spaces, singular value decompositions, 3D cone beam recon- struction, diffuse tomography, regularization of ill-posed problems, evaluation reconstruction algorithms and applica- tions in non-medical fields. Contents: Theoretical Aspects: J.Boman: Helgason' s support theorem for Radon transforms-a newproof and a generalization -P.Maass: Singular value de- compositions for Radon transforms- W.R.Madych: Image recon- struction in Hilbert space -R.G.Mukhometov: A problem of in- teg...

  2. Controllable tomography phase microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-03-01

    Tomography phase microscopy (TPM) is a new microscopic method that can quantitatively yield the volumetric 3D distribution of a sample's refractive index (RI), which is significant for cell biology research. In this paper, a controllable TPM system is introduced. In this system a circulatory phase-shifting method and piezoelectric ceramic are used which enable the TPM system to record the 3D RI distribution at a more controllable speed, from 1 to 40 fps, than in the other TPM systems reported. The resolution of the RI distribution obtained by this controllable TPM is much better than that in images recorded by phase contrast microscopy and interference tomography microscopy. The realization of controllable TPM not only allows for the application of TPM to the measurement of kinds of RI sample, but also contributes to academic and technological support for the practical use of TPM.

  3. Highly resolving computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtz, B.; Petersen, D.; Walter, E.

    1984-01-01

    With the development of highly-resolving devices for computerized tomography, CT diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column has gained increasing importance. As an ambulatory, non-invasive method it has proved in comparative studies to be at least equivalent to myelography in the detection of dislocations of inter-vertebral disks (4,6,7,15). Because with modern devices not alone the bones, but especially the spinal soft part structures are clearly and precisely presented with a resolution of distinctly below 1 mm, a further improvement of the results is expected as experience will increase. The authors report on the diagnosis of the lumbar vertebral column with the aid of a modern device for computerized tomography and wish to draw particular attention to the possibility of doing this investigation as a routine, and to the diagnostic value of secondary reconstructions. (BWU) [de

  4. Reinforced concrete tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariscotti, M.A.J.; Morixe, M.; Tarela, P.A.; Thieberger, P.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we describe the technique of reinforced concrete tomography, its historical background, recent technological developments and main applications. Gamma radiation sensitive plates are imprinted with radiation going through the concrete sample under study, and then processed to reveal the presence of reinforcement and defects in the material density. The three dimensional reconstruction, or tomography, of the reinforcement out of a single gammagraphy is an original development alternative to conventional methods. Re-bar diameters and positions may be determined with an accuracy of ± 1 mm 0.5-1 cm, respectively. The non-destructive character of this technique makes it particularly attractive in cases of inhabited buildings and diagnoses of balconies. (author) [es

  5. Use of anaerobic green fluorescent protein versus green fluorescent protein as reporter in lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landete, José M; Langa, Susana; Revilla, Concepción; Margolles, Abelardo; Medina, Margarita; Arqués, Juan L

    2015-08-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are commonly used in the production of fermented and probiotic foods. Development of molecular tools to discriminate the strains of interest from the endogenous microbiota in complex environments like food or gut is of high interest. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like chromophores strictly requires molecular oxygen for maturation of fluorescence, which restrict the study of microorganisms in low-oxygen environments. In this work, we have developed a noninvasive cyan-green fluorescent based reporter system for real-time tracking of LAB that is functional under anoxic conditions. The evoglow-Pp1 was cloned downstream from the promoters D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase and elongation factor Tu of Lactobacillus reuteri CECT925 using pNZ8048 and downstream of the lactococcal P1 promoter using pT1NX. The classical gfp was also cloned in pT1NX. These recombinant expression vectors were electroporated into Lactococccus, Lactobacillus, and Enterococcus strains with biotechnological and/or probiotic interests to assess and compare their functionality under different conditions of oxygen and pH. The expression was analyzed by imaging and fluorometric methods as well as by flow cytometry. We demonstrate that reporter systems pNZ:TuR-aFP and pT1-aFP are two versatile molecular markers for monitoring LAB in food and fecal environments without the potential problems caused by oxygen and pH limitations, which could be exploited for in vivo studies. Production of the fluorescent protein did not disturb any important physiological properties of the parental strains, such as growth rate, reuterin, or bacteriocin production.

  6. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-01-01

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented

  7. Coded aperture tomography revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizais, Y.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.; Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    Coded aperture (CA) Tomography never achieved wide spread use in Nuclear Medicine, except for the degenerate case of Seven Pinhole tomagraphy (7PHT). However it enjoys several attractive features (high sensitivity and tomographic ability with a statis detector). On the other hand, resolution is usually poor especially along the depth axis and the reconstructed volume is rather limited. Arguments are presented justifying the position that CA tomography can be useful for imaging time-varying 3D structures, if its major drawbacks (poor longitudinal resolution and difficulty in quantification) are overcome. Poor results obtained with 7PHT can be explained by both a very limited angular range sampled and a crude modelling of the image formation process. Therefore improvements can be expected by the use of a dual-detector system, along with a better understanding of its sampling properties and the use of more powerful reconstruction algorithms. Non overlapping multipinhole plates, because they do not involve a decoding procedure, should be considered first for practical applications. Use of real CA should be considered for cases in which non overlapping multipinhole plates do not lead to satisfactory solutions. We have been and currently are carrying out theoretical and experimental works, in order to define the factors which limit CA imaging and to propose satisfactory solutions for Dynamic Emission Tomography

  8. Positron emission tomography in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecomte, R.; Bentourkia, M.; Benard, F.

    2002-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography is a sophisticated molecular imaging technique, using a special scanner, that displays the functional status of tissues in the body at the cellular level (their metabolism). It is a diagnostic scan that provides the physician with information not available with traditional anatomic studies such as CT or MRI. PET can detect changes in cell function (disease) long before they are evident as physical (anatomic) changes seen on CT or MRI. In this way PET can add important information about many diseases allowing the physician to make a diagnosis often much earlier than with anatomic imaging techniques such as CT or MRI alone. In addition, in cases where an abnormality is noted on CT or MRI, PET can help differentiate benign changes from changes due to disease. PET scanning also typically images the entire body, unlike CT/MRI which is usually broken up into specific limited body section scans. All cells use glucose as an energy source but cancer cells use much more since they are growing much faster and out of control. This is the basis of imaging with F-18 FDG glucose, the radiotracer agent use in a PET oncology study. The abnormal, accelerated glucose used by cancer cells is detected by the PET scanner that processes the emissions from the F-18 FDG glucose by abnormally high levels of metabolism (tumor)

  9. Axial tomography in live cell laser microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Verena; Bruns, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Cremer, Christoph; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2017-09-01

    Single cell microscopy in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment is reported. Cells are grown in an agarose culture gel, located within microcapillaries and observed from different sides after adaptation of an innovative device for sample rotation. Thus, z-stacks can be recorded by confocal microscopy in different directions and used for illustration in 3-D. This gives additional information, since cells or organelles that appear superimposed in one direction, may be well resolved in another one. The method is tested and validated with single cells expressing a membrane or a mitochondrially associated green fluorescent protein, or cells accumulating fluorescent quantum dots. In addition, axial tomography supports measurements of cellular uptake and distribution of the anticancer drug doxorubicin in the nucleus (2 to 6 h after incubation) or the cytoplasm (24 h). This paper discusses that upon cell rotation an enhanced optical resolution in lateral direction compared to axial direction can be utilized to obtain an improved effective 3-D resolution, which represents an important step toward super-resolution microscopy of living cells.

  10. Multifunctional gold nanostars for molecular imaging and cancer therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yang; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Fales, Andrew M.; Register, Janna K.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonics-active gold nanoparticles offer excellent potential in molecular imaging and cancer therapy. Among them, gold nanostars (AuNS) exhibit cross-platform flexibility as multimodal contrast agents for macroscopic X-ray computer tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), as well as nanoprobes for photoacoustic tomography (PAT), two-photon photoluminescence (TPL), and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Their surfactant-free surface enab...

  11. Study of improving signal-noise ratio for fluorescence channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoqing; Li, Xin; Lou, Yue; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Ran; Yan, Debao; Zhao, Qi

    2017-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence(LIFS), which is one of most effective discrimination methods to identify the material at the molecular level by inducing fluorescence spectrum, has been popularized for its fast and accurate probe's results. According to the research, violet laser or ultraviolet laser is always used as excitation light source. While, There is no atmospheric window for violet laser and ultraviolet laser, causing laser attenuation along its propagation path. What's worse, as the laser reaching sample, part of the light is reflected. That is, excitation laser really react on sample to produce fluorescence is very poor, leading to weak fluorescence mingled with the background light collected by LIFS' processing unit, when it used outdoor. In order to spread LIFS to remote probing under the complex background, study of improving signal-noise ratio for fluorescence channel is a meaningful work. Enhancing the fluorescence intensity and inhibiting background light both can improve fluorescence' signal-noise ratio. In this article, three different approaches of inhibiting background light are discussed to improve the signal-noise ratio of LIFS. The first method is increasing fluorescence excitation area in the proportion of LIFS' collecting field by expanding laser beam, if the collecting filed is fixed. The second one is changing field angle base to accommodate laser divergence angle. The third one is setting a very narrow gating circuit to control acquisition circuit, which is shortly open only when fluorescence arriving. At some level, these methods all can reduce the background light. But after discussion, the third one is best with adding gating acquisition circuit to acquisition circuit instead of changing light path, which is effective and economic.

  12. Time-Resolved Fluorescence in Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been used clinically for treating various diseases including malignant tumors. The main advantages of PDT over traditional cancer treatments are attributed to the localized effects of the photochemical reactions by selective illumination, which then generate reactive oxygen species and singlet oxygen molecules that lead to cell death. To date, over- or under-treatment still remains one of the major challenges in PDT due to the lack of robust real-time dose monitoring techniques. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF provides fluorescence lifetime profiles of the targeted fluorophores. It has been demonstrated that TRF offers supplementary information in drug-molecular interactions and cell responses compared to steady-state intensity acquisition. Moreover, fluorescence lifetime itself is independent of the light path; thus it overcomes the artifacts given by diffused light propagation and detection geometries. TRF in PDT is an emerging approach, and relevant studies to date are scattered. Therefore, this review mainly focuses on summarizing up-to-date TRF studies in PDT, and the effects of PDT dosimetric factors on the measured TRF parameters. From there, potential gaps for clinical translation are also discussed.

  13. Fluorescent prey traps in carnivorous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, R; Johnson, A J; Sankar, S; Hussain, A A; Sathish Kumar, C; Sabulal, B

    2013-05-01

    Carnivorous plants acquire most of their nutrients by capturing ants, insects and other arthropods through their leaf-evolved biological traps. So far, the best-known attractants in carnivorous prey traps are nectar, colour and olfactory cues. Here, fresh prey traps of 14 Nepenthes, five Sarracenia, five Drosera, two Pinguicula species/hybrids, Dionaea muscipula and Utricularia stellaris were scanned at UV 366 nm. Fluorescence emissions of major isolates of fresh Nepenthes khasiana pitcher peristomes were recorded at an excitation wavelength of 366 nm. N. khasiana field pitcher peristomes were masked by its slippery zone extract, and prey capture rates were compared with control pitchers. We found the existence of distinct blue fluorescence emissions at the capture spots of Nepenthes, Sarracenia and Dionaea prey traps at UV 366 nm. These alluring blue emissions gradually developed with the growth of the prey traps and diminished towards their death. On excitation at 366 nm, N. khasiana peristome 3:1 CHCl3–MeOH extract and its two major blue bands showed strong fluorescence emissions at 430–480 nm. Masking of blue emissions on peristomes drastically reduced prey capture in N. khasiana pitchers. We propose these molecular emissions as a critical factor attracting arthropods and other visitors to these carnivorous traps. Drosera, Pinguicula and Utricularia prey traps showed only red chlorophyll emissions at 366 nm.

  14. Mesenteric panniculitis: computed tomography aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Luiza Beatriz Melo; Alves, Jose Ricardo Duarte; Marchiori, Edson; Pinheiro, Ricardo Andrade; Melo, Alessandro Severo Alves de; Noro, Fabio

    2001-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is an inflammatory process that represents the second stage of a rare progressive disease involving the adipose tissue of the mesentery. Imaging methods used in the diagnosis of mesenteric panniculitis include barium studies, ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Computed tomography is important for both, diagnosis and evaluation of the extension of the disease and treatment monitoring. Computed tomography findings may vary according to the stage of the disease and the amount of inflammatory material or fibrosis. There is also good correlation between the computed tomography and anatomical pathology findings. The authors studied 10 patients with mesenteric panniculitis submitted to computed tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging was also performed in one patient. In all patients, computed tomography revealed a heterogeneous mass in the mesentery with density of fat, interspersed with areas of soft tissue density and dilated vessels. (author)

  15. Fluorescent Silicon Clusters and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    von Haeften, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The fluorescence of silicon clusters is reviewed. Atomic clusters of silicon have been at the focus of research for several decades because of the relevance of size effects for material properties, the importance of silicon in electronics and the potential applications in bio-medicine. To date numerous examples of nanostructured forms of fluorescent silicon have been reported. This article introduces the principles and underlying concepts relevant for fluorescence of nanostructured silicon su...

  16. Development of a fluorescent cryocooler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Epstein, R.I.; Gosnell, T.R.; Mungan, C.E.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has demonstrated the physical principles for a new type of solid-state cryocooler based on anti-Stokes fluorescence. Design studies indicate that a vibration-free, low-mass ''fluorescent cryocooler'' could operate for years with efficiencies and cooling powers comparable to current commercial systems. This paper presents concepts for a fluorescent cryocooler, design considerations and expected performance

  17. Wavelength Mutations and Posttranslational Autoxidation of Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Roger; Prasher, Douglas C.; Tsien, Roger Y.

    1994-12-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria is an unusual protein with strong visible absorbance and fluorescence from a p-hydroxybenzylidene-imidazolidinone chromophore, which is generated by cyclization and oxidation of the protein's own Ser-Tyr-Gly sequence at positions 65-67. Cloning of the cDNA and heterologous expression of fluorescent protein in a wide variety of organisms indicate that this unique posttranslational modification must be either spontaneous or dependent only on ubiquitous enzymes and reactants. We report that formation of the final fluorophore requires molecular oxygen and proceeds with a time constant (≈4 hr at 22^circC and atmospheric pO_2) independent of dilution, implying that the oxidation does not require enzymes or cofactors. GFP was mutagenized and screened for variants with altered spectra. The most striking mutant fluoresced blue and contained histidine in place of Tyr-66. The availability of two visibly distinct colors should significantly extend the usefulness of GFP in molecular and cell biology by enabling in vivo visualization of differential gene expression and protein localization and measurement of protein association by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

  18. Energy transfer in (bio)molecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milder, Maaike Theresia Wilhelmina

    This thesis reports, using a variety of optical techniques, the energy transfer pathways in different potential building blocks for molecular electronic devices, namely an antenna, a molecular wire and fluorescent switches. Using pump-probe spectroscopy the time constants of these transfer processes

  19. Development of ultraviolet LED devices containing europium (III) complexes in fluorescence layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwanaga, Hiroki; Amano, Akio; Aiga, Fumihiko; Harada, Kohichi; Oguchi, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Relations between molecular structures of europium complexes and their luminescent properties were investigated. Europium complex with β-diketones and two different phosphine oxides 8 was highly soluble in fluorinated medium, and realized largest fluorescence intensities. The luminous intensity of ultraviolet light emitting diodes devices (LEDs) whose fluorescence layer consists of fluorinated polymer and 8 was over 200 mcd (20 mA). Fluorescence compounds of this type are promising for application in next-generation white LEDs. Moreover, we proposed a novel molecular design of europium complex with asymmetric diphosphine dioxide

  20. Scanning Microwave Induced Acoustic Tomography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Lihong V

    2002-01-01

    .... Specifically, our accomplishments include (1) an exact and an approximate time-domain reconstruction algorithm for thermoacoustic tomography in a spherical geometry was derived and published, (2...