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Sample records for fluorescence lifetime distribution

  1. FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALA, JR; Gratton, E; PRENDERGAST, FG

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most ...

  2. Intracellular distribution of fluorescent copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes measured with fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, James L; James, Janine L; Henderson, Clare A; Price, Katherine A; Mot, Alexandra I; Buncic, Gojko; Crouch, Peter J; White, Jonathan M; White, Anthony R; Smith, Trevor A; Donnelly, Paul S

    2015-10-05

    The intracellular distribution of fluorescently labeled copper and zinc bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complexes was investigated in M17 neuroblastoma cells and primary cortical neurons with a view to providing insights into the neuroprotective activity of a copper bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex known as Cu(II)(atsm). Time-resolved fluorescence measurements allowed the identification of the Cu(II) and Zn(II) complexes as well as the free ligand inside the cells by virtue of the distinct fluorescence lifetime of each species. Confocal fluorescent microscopy of cells treated with the fluorescent copper(II)bis(thiosemicarbazonato) complex revealed significant fluorescence associated with cytoplasmic puncta that were identified to be lysosomes in primary cortical neurons and both lipid droplets and lysosomes in M17 neuroblastoma cells. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that the fluorescence signal emanating from the lipid droplets could be attributed to the copper(II) complex but also that some degree of loss of the metal ion led to diffuse cytosolic fluorescence that could be attributed to the metal-free ligand. The accumulation of the copper(II) complex in lipid droplets could be relevant to the neuroprotective activity of Cu(II)(atsm) in models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of the oxygen distribution in the skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieslinger, Dietmar; Draxler, Sonja; Puzon, Janusz; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    An instrument has been designed and implemented capable of mapping oxygen distribution in skin tissue over an area of several square centimeters with a spatial resolution of better than 1 mm and with a resolution in oxygen partial pressure of better than 5 torr. The measurement scheme is optical and is based on luminescence lifetime. It is non- invasive and avoids any patient contact with electrical parts. The instrument should be a valuable supplement to other clinical methods for monitoring microcirculation and peripheral oxygen supply.

  4. Stroboscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Mark D; Silvestre, Oscar R; Errington, Rachel J; Smith, Paul J; Matthews, Daniel R; Rees, Paul; Summers, Huw D

    2009-03-30

    We report a fluorescence lifetime imaging technique that uses the time integrated response to a periodic optical excitation, eliminating the need for time resolution in detection. A Dirac pulse train of variable period is used to probe the frequency response of the total fluorescence per pulse leading to a frequency roll-off that is dependent on the relaxation rate of the fluorophores. The technique is validated by demonstrating wide-field, realtime, lifetime imaging of the endocytosis of inorganic quantum dots by a cancer cell line. Surface charging of the dots in the intra-cellular environment produces a switch in the fluorescence lifetime from approximately 40 ns to technique offers lifetime based imaging at video rates with standard CCD cameras and has application in probing millisecond cell dynamics and in high throughput imaging assays.

  5. In vivo fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothdurft, Ralph E.; Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Akers, Walter; Ye, Yunpeng; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2009-03-01

    Local molecular and physiological processes can be imaged in vivo through perturbations in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) of optical imaging agents. In addition to providing functional information, FLT methods can quantify specific molecular events and multiplex diagnostic and prognostic information. We have developed a fluorescence lifetime diffuse optical tomography (DOT) system for in vivo preclinical imaging. Data is captured using a time-resolved intensified charge coupled device (ICCD) system to measure fluorescence excitation and emission in the time domain. Data is then converted to the frequency domain, and we simultaneously reconstruct images of yield and lifetime using an extension to the normalized Born approach. By using differential phase measurements, we demonstrate DOT imaging of short lifetimes (from 350 ps) with high precision (+/-5 ps). Furthermore, this system retains the efficiency, speed, and flexibility of transmission geometry DOT. We demonstrate feasibility of FLT-DOT through a progressive series of experiments. Lifetime range and repeatability are first measured in phantoms. Imaging of subcutaneous implants then verifies the FLT-DOT approach in vivo in the presence of inhomogeneous optical properties. Use in a common research scenario is ultimately demonstrated by imaging accumulation of a targeted near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent-labeled peptide probe (cypate-RGD) in a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor.

  6. Lifetime Resolved Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Peng; Berland, Keith

    2009-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) has been widely used investigate molecular dynamics and interactions in biological systems. FCS typically resolves the component species of a sample either through differences in diffusion coefficient or molecular brightness. Diffusion based assays currently have a major limitation which requires that the diffusion coefficients of component species in a sample must be substantially different in order to be resolved. This criterion is not met in many important cases, such as when molecules of similar molecular weight bind to each other. This limitation can be overcome, and resolution of FCS measurements enhanced, by combining FCS measurements with measurements of fluorescence lifetimes. By using of global analysis on simultaneously acquired FCS and lifetime data we show that we can dramatically enhance resolution in FCS measurements, and accurately resolve the concentration and diffusion coefficients of multiple sample components even when their diffusion coefficients are identical provided there is a difference in the lifetime of the component species. We show examples of this technique using both simulations and experiments. It is expected that this method will be of significance for binding assays studying molecular interactions.

  7. The modifier effects of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distribution of "N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide-bovine serum albumin" complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özyiğit, İbrahim Ethem; Karakuş, Emine; Pekcan, Önder

    2016-02-01

    Chymotrypsin and trypsin are the well known proteolytic enzymes, both of which are synthesized in the pancreas as their precursors - the inactive forms; chymotrypsinogen and trypsinogen - and then are released into the duodenum to cut proteins into smaller peptides. In this paper, the effects of activities of chymotrypsin and trypsin enzymes on fluorescence lifetime distributions of the substrat bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified with N-(1-pyrenyl)maleimide (PM) were examined. In the labeling study of BSA with PM, it is aimed to attach PM to the single free thiol (Cys34) and to all the free amine groups in accessible positions in order to produce excimers of pyrene planes of the possible highest amount to form the lifetime distributions in the widest range, that may show specifically distinguishing changes resulting from the activities of the proteases. The time resolved spectrofluorometer was used to monitor fluorescence decays, which were analyzed by using the exponential series method (ESM) to obtain the changes of lifetime distributions. After the exposure of the synthesized substrat PM-BSA to the enzymes, the fluorescence lifetime distributions exhibited different structures which were attributed to the different activities of the proteases.

  8. Use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for latent fingerprints detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chao, Zhi Xia; Seah, Leong K.; Murukeshan, Vadakke M.

    2005-04-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) in frequency domain enables the mapping of the spatial distribution of fluorescence lifetimes of a specimen. FLIM can provide unique information about fluorophores and hence is widely used in biology and for medical diagnostics. In this paper, a theoretical analysis for the fluorescence lifetime determination of latent fingerprint samples is described, which is followed by the feasibility study of using FLIM in frequency domain for latent fingerprints detection. Experiments are carried out with fingerprint on green paper substrate and postcard substrate treated with certain fluorescent powder. The total phase lag and demodulation factor are calculated to determine the lifetimes pixel by pixel. The resulting fluorescence lifetime image of fingerprint revealed an improvement in the contrast, and was able to detect the latent fingerprint clearly.

  9. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  10. Computing Battery Lifetime Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, L.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; Jongerden, M.R.

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetime depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  11. Computing Battery Lifetime Distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cloth, Lucia; Jongerden, Marijn R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.

    2007-01-01

    The usage of mobile devices like cell phones, navigation systems, or laptop computers, is limited by the lifetime of the included batteries. This lifetime depends naturally on the rate at which energy is consumed, however, it also depends on the usage pattern of the battery. Continuous drawing of a

  12. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this project is to develop, demonstrate, and deliver to NASA an innovative, portable, and power efficient Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer...

  13. High speed multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Reitsma, K.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    We report a spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging system based on time gated single photon detection with a fixed gate width of 200 ps and 7 spectral channels. Time gated systems can operate at high count rates but usually have large gate widths and sample only part of the fluorescence d

  14. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M.; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-01

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  15. Cubosomes for in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Stefania; Andolfi, Laura; Caltagirone, Claudia; Garrovo, Chiara; Falchi, Angela M; Lippolis, Vito; Lorenzon, Andrea; Macor, Paolo; Meli, Valeria; Monduzzi, Maura; Obiols-Rabasa, Marc; Petrizza, Luca; Prodi, Luca; Rosa, Antonella; Schmidt, Judith; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Murgia, Sergio

    2017-02-03

    Herein we provided the first proof of principle for in vivo fluorescence optical imaging application using monoolein-based cubosomes in a healthy mouse animal model. This formulation, administered at a non-cytotoxic concentration, was capable of providing both exogenous contrast for NIR fluorescence imaging with very high efficiency and chemospecific information upon lifetime analysis. Time-resolved measurements of fluorescence after the intravenous injection of cubosomes revealed that the dye rapidly accumulated mainly in the liver, while lifetimes profiles obtained in vivo allowed for discriminating between free dye or dye embedded within the cubosome nanostructure after injection.

  16. Fluorescence lifetimes: fundamentals and interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noomnarm, Ulai; Clegg, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence measurements have been an established mainstay of photosynthesis experiments for many decades. Because in the photosynthesis literature the basics of excited states and their fates are not usually described, we have presented here an easily understandable text for biology students in the style of a chapter in a text book. In this review we give an educational overview of fundamental physical principles of fluorescence, with emphasis on the temporal response of emission. Escape from the excited state of a molecule is a dynamic event, and the fluorescence emission is in direct kinetic competition with several other pathways of de-excitation. It is essentially through a kinetic competition between all the pathways of de-excitation that we gain information about the fluorescent sample on the molecular scale. A simple probability allegory is presented that illustrates the basic ideas that are important for understanding and interpreting most fluorescence experiments. We also briefly point out challenges that confront the experimenter when interpreting time-resolved fluorescence responses.

  17. Increasing precision of lifetime determination in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Wei; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2010-02-01

    The interest in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is increasing, as commercial FLIM modules become available for confocal and multi-photon microscopy. In biological FLIM applications, low fluorescence signals from samples can be a challenge, and this causes poor precision in lifetime. In this study, for the first time, we applied wavelet-based denoising methods in time-domain FLIM, and compared them with our previously developed total variation (TV) denoising methods. They were first tested using artificial FLIM images. We then applied them to lowlight live-cell images. The results demonstrated that our TV methods could improve lifetime precision multi-fold in FLIM images and preserve the overall lifetime and pre-exponential term values when improving local lifetime fitting, while wavelet-based methods were faster. The results here can enhance the precision of FLIM, especially for low-light and / or fast video-rate imaging, to improve current and rapidly emerging new applications of FLIM such as live-cell, in vivo whole-animal, or endoscopic imaging.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  19. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  20. Solid-State Camera System for Fluorescence Lifetime Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a well-established platform for biology and biomedical research (Chapter 2). Based on this platform, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been developed to measure fluorescence lifetimes, which are independent of fluorophore concentration and excitation inte

  1. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  2. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  3. Developing and Testing a Bayesian Analysis of Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needleman, Daniel J.

    2017-01-01

    FRET measurements can provide dynamic spatial information on length scales smaller than the diffraction limit of light. Several methods exist to measure FRET between fluorophores, including Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM), which relies on the reduction of fluorescence lifetime when a fluorophore is undergoing FRET. FLIM measurements take the form of histograms of photon arrival times, containing contributions from a mixed population of fluorophores both undergoing and not undergoing FRET, with the measured distribution being a mixture of exponentials of different lifetimes. Here, we present an analysis method based on Bayesian inference that rigorously takes into account several experimental complications. We test the precision and accuracy of our analysis on controlled experimental data and verify that we can faithfully extract model parameters, both in the low-photon and low-fraction regimes. PMID:28060890

  4. Modulated CMOS camera for fluorescence lifetime microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongtao; Holst, Gerhard; Gratton, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    Widefield frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FD-FLIM) is a fast and accurate method to measure the fluorescence lifetime of entire images. However, the complexity and high costs involved in construction of such a system limit the extensive use of this technique. PCO AG recently released the first luminescence lifetime imaging camera based on a high frequency modulated CMOS image sensor, QMFLIM2. Here we tested and provide operational procedures to calibrate the camera and to improve the accuracy using corrections necessary for image analysis. With its flexible input/output options, we are able to use a modulated laser diode or a 20 MHz pulsed white supercontinuum laser as the light source. The output of the camera consists of a stack of modulated images that can be analyzed by the SimFCS software using the phasor approach. The nonuniform system response across the image sensor must be calibrated at the pixel level. This pixel calibration is crucial and needed for every camera settings, e.g. modulation frequency and exposure time. A significant dependency of the modulation signal on the intensity was also observed and hence an additional calibration is needed for each pixel depending on the pixel intensity level. These corrections are important not only for the fundamental frequency, but also for the higher harmonics when using the pulsed supercontinuum laser. With these post data acquisition corrections, the PCO CMOS-FLIM camera can be used for various biomedical applications requiring a large frame and high speed acquisition.

  5. Angular distributions as lifetime probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dror, Jeff Asaf; Grossman, Yuval [Department of Physics, LEPP, Cornell University,Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2014-06-27

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  6. Angular Distributions as Lifetime Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Dror, Jeff Asaf

    2013-01-01

    If new TeV scale particles are discovered, it will be important to determine their width. There is, however, a problematic region, where the width is too small to be determined directly, and too large to generate a secondary vertex. For a collection of colored, spin polarized particles, hadronization depolarizes the particles prior to their decay. The amount of depolarization can be used to probe the lifetime in the problematic region. In this paper we apply this method to a realistic scenario of a top-like particle that can be produced at the LHC. We study how depolarization affects the angular distributions of the decay products and derive an equation for the distributions that is sensitive to the lifetime.

  7. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes part 1. Fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan free in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan free in polar, hydrophobic and mixture of polar-hydrophobic solvents were recorded along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). Analysis of the data show that emission of tryptophan occurs with two lifetimes in 100% polar and hydrophobic environments. The values of the two lifetimes are not the same in both environments while their populations (pre-exponentials values) are identical. Fluorescence lifetimes and pre-exponentials values do not change with the excitation wavelength and thus are independent of excitation energy. Our results indicate that tryptophan emission occurs from two specific sub-structures existing in the excited state. These sub-structures differ from those present in the ground states and characterize an internal property and/or organization of the tryptophan structure in the excited state. By sub-substructure, we mean here tryptophan backbone and its electronic cloud. In ethanol, three fluorescence lifetimes were measured; two lifetimes are very close to those observed in water (0.4-0.5 ns and 2-4 ns). Presence of a third lifetime for tryptophan in ethanol results from the interaction of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic dipoles or chemical functions of ethanol with the fluorophore.

  8. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  9. Fluorescence and fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) to characterize yeast strains by autofluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, H.; Goldys, E. M.; Ma, J.

    2006-02-01

    We characterised populations of wild type baking and brewing yeast cells using intrinsic fluorescence and fluorescence lifetime microscopy, in order to obtain quantitative identifiers of different strains. The cell autofluorescence was excited at 405 nm and observed within 440-540 nm range where strong cell to cell variability was observed. The images were analyzed using customised public domain software, which provided information on cell size, intensity and texture-related features. In light of significant diversity of the data, statistical methods were utilized to assess the validity of the proposed quantitative identifiers for strain differentiation. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was applied to confirm that empirical distribution functions for size, intensity and entropy for different strains were statistically different. These characteristics were followed with culture age of 24, 48 and 72 h, (the latter corresponding to a stationary growth phase) and size, and to some extent entropy, were found to be independent of age. The fluorescence intensity presented a distinctive evolution with age, different for each of the examined strains. The lifetime analysis revealed a short decay time component of 1.4 ns and a second, longer one with the average value of 3.5 ns and a broad distribution. High variability of lifetime values within cells was observed however a lifetime texture feature in the studied strains was statistically different.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, H.C.; Sanders, R.; Draaijer, A.; Ince, C.; Levine, Y.K.

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of the fluorescent probe ruthenium tris(2,2′-dipyridyl) dichloride hydrate (RTDP) for the quantitative imaging of oxygen in single cells was investigated utilizing fluorescence life-time imaging. The results indicate that the fluorescence behavior of RTDP in the presence of oxygen can

  11. Modelling lifetime data with multivariate Tweedie distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nor, Siti Rohani Mohd; Yusof, Fadhilah; Bahar, Arifah

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to measure the dependence between individual lifetimes by applying multivariate Tweedie distribution to the lifetime data. Dependence between lifetimes incorporated in the mortality model is a new form of idea that gives significant impact on the risk of the annuity portfolio which is actually against the idea of standard actuarial methods that assumes independent between lifetimes. Hence, this paper applies Tweedie family distribution to the portfolio of lifetimes to induce the dependence between lives. Tweedie distribution is chosen since it contains symmetric and non-symmetric, as well as light-tailed and heavy-tailed distributions. Parameter estimation is modified in order to fit the Tweedie distribution to the data. This procedure is developed by using method of moments. In addition, the comparison stage is made to check for the adequacy between the observed mortality and expected mortality. Finally, the importance of including systematic mortality risk in the model is justified by the Pearson's chi-squared test.

  12. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Quantum Dot Labeled DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Terry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dot (QD labeling combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is proposed as a powerful transduction technique for the detection of DNA hybridization events. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA microarray spots of hybridized QD labeled target indicated a characteristic lifetime value of 18.8 ns, compared to 13.3 ns obtained for spots of free QD solution, revealing that QD labels are sensitive to the spot microenvironment. Additionally, time gated detection was shown to improve the microarray image contrast ratio by 1.8, achieving femtomolar target sensitivity. Finally, lifetime multiplexing based on Qdot525 and Alexa430 was demonstrated using a single excitation-detection readout channel.

  13. Flow cytometric fluorescence lifetime analysis of DNA binding fluorochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crissman, Harry A.; Cui, H. H. (H. Helen); Steinkamp, J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Most flow cytometry (FCM) applications monitor fluorescence intensity to quantitate the various cellular parameters; however, the fluorescence emission also contains information relative to the fluorescence lifetime. Recent developments in FCM (Pinsky et al., 1993; Steinkamp & Crissman, 1993; Steinkamp et al., 1993), provide for the measurement of fluorescence lifetime which is also commonly referred to as fluorescence decay, or the time interval in which a fluorochrome remains in the excited state. Many unbound fluorochromes have characteristic lifetime values that are determined by their molecular structure; however, when the probe becomes bound, the lifetime value is influenced by a number of factors that affect the probe interaction with a target molecule. Monitoring the changes in the lifetime of the probe yields information relating to the molecular conformation, the functional state or activity of the molecular target. In addition, the lifetime values can be used as signatures to resolve the emissions of multiple fluorochrome labels with overlapping emission spectra that cannot be resolved by conventional FCM methodology. Such strategies can increase the number of fluorochrome combinations used in a flow cytometer with a single excitation source. Our studies demonstrate various applications of lifetime measurements for the analysis of the binding of different fluorochromes to DNA in single cells. Data presented in this session will show the utility of lifetime measurements for monitoring changes in chromatin structure associated with cell cycle progression, cellular differentiation, or DNA damage, such as induced during apoptosis. Several studies show that dyes with specificity for nucleic acids display different lifetime values when bound to DNA or to dsRNA. The Phase Sensitive Flow Cytometer is a multiparameter instrument, capable of performing lifetime measurements in conjunction with all the conventional FCM measurements. Future modifications of this

  14. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce...

  15. Digital analysis and sorting of fluorescence lifetime by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Jessica P; Naivar, Mark A; Freyer, James P

    2010-09-01

    Frequency-domain flow cytometry techniques are combined with modifications to the digital signal-processing capabilities of the open reconfigurable cytometric acquisition system (ORCAS) to analyze fluorescence decay lifetimes and control sorting. Real-time fluorescence lifetime analysis is accomplished by rapidly digitizing correlated, radiofrequency (RF)-modulated detector signals, implementing Fourier analysis programming with ORCAS' digital signal processor (DSP) and converting the processed data into standard cytometric list mode data. To systematically test the capabilities of the ORCAS 50 MS/sec analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and our DSP programming, an error analysis was performed using simulated light scatter and fluorescence waveforms (0.5-25 ns simulated lifetime), pulse widths ranging from 2 to 15 micros, and modulation frequencies from 2.5 to 16.667 MHz. The standard deviations of digitally acquired lifetime values ranged from 0.112 to >2 ns, corresponding to errors in actual phase shifts from 0.0142 degrees to 1.6 degrees. The lowest coefficients of variation (digital analysis system to a previous analog phase-sensitive flow cytometer demonstrated similar precision and accuracy on measurements of a range of fluorescent microspheres, unstained cells, and cells stained with three common fluorophores. Sorting based on fluorescence lifetime was accomplished by adding analog outputs to ORCAS and interfacing with a commercial cell sorter with a RF-modulated solid-state laser. Two populations of fluorescent microspheres with overlapping fluorescence intensities but different lifetimes (2 and 7 ns) were separated to approximately 98% purity. Overall, the digital signal acquisition and processing methods we introduce present a simple yet robust approach to phase-sensitive measurements in flow cytometry. The ability to simply and inexpensively implement this system on a commercial flow sorter will allow both better dissemination of this technology and better

  16. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  17. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  18. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors for anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichmann, Maria; Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1997-05-01

    Sensing of anions has been investigated using the fluorescence decaytime as the information carrier. The sensing mechanism is based on the coextraction of an anion and a proton, and the presence of a fluorophore with a rather long fluorescence decaytime inside the membrane to act as a pH indicator. The relevant theory is discussed shortly. As an example a sensor for nitrate is shown, and the influence of ionic additives on the working function has been investigated.

  19. Quasi-real-time fluorescence imaging with lifetime dependent contrast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Pei-Chi; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2011-08-01

    Conventional fluorescence lifetime imaging requires complicated algorithms to extract lifetimes of fluorophores and acquisition of multiple data points at progressively longer delay times to characterize tissues. To address diminishing signal-to-noise ratios at these progressively longer time delays, we report a time-resolved fluorescence imaging method, normalized fluorescence yield imaging that does not require the extraction of lifetimes. The concept is to extract the ``contrast'' instead of the lifetime value of the fluorophores by using simple mathematical algorithms. This process converts differences in decay times directly to different intensities. The technique was verified experimentally using a gated iCCD camera and an ultraviolet light-emitting diode light source. It was shown that this method can distinguish between chemical dyes (Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B) and biomedical samples, such as powders of elastin and collagen. Good contrast was obtained between fluorophores that varied by less than 6% in lifetime. Additionally, it was shown that long gate times up to 16 ns achieve good contrast depending upon the samples to be studied. These results support the feasibility of time-resolved fluorescence imaging without lifetime extraction, which has a potential clinical role in noninvasive real-time imaging.

  20. Imaging carious dental tissues with multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Yen; Lyu, Hong-Chou; Hsu, Chin-Ying Stephen; Chang, Chia-Seng; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, multiphoton excitation was utilized to image normal and carious dental tissues noninvasively. Unique structures in dental tissues were identified using the available multimodality (second harmonic, autofluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime analysis) without labeling. The collagen in dentin exhibits a strong second harmonic response. Both dentin and enamel emit strong autofluorescence that reveals in detail morphological features (such as dentinal tubules and enamel rods) and, despite their very similar spectral profiles, can be differentiated by lifetime analysis. Specifically, the carious dental tissue exhibits a greatly reduced autofluorescence lifetime, which result is consistent with the degree of demineralization, determined by micro-computed tomography. Our findings suggest that two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging may be a promising tool for diagnosing and monitoring dental caries. PMID:21326645

  1. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  2. Monitoring photosensitizer uptake using two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shu-Chi Allison; Diamond, Kevin R; Patterson, Michael S; Nie, Zhaojun; Hayward, Joseph E; Fang, Qiyin

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin(®) at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL) cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin(®) was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns) compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05).

  3. Monitoring Photosensitizer Uptake Using Two Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chi Allison Yeh, Kevin R. Diamond, Michael S. Patterson, Zhaojun Nie, Joseph E. Hayward, Qiyin Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT provides an opportunity for treatment of various invasive tumors by the use of a cancer targeting photosensitizing agent and light of specific wavelengths. However, real-time monitoring of drug localization is desirable because the induction of the phototoxic effect relies on interplay between the dosage of localized drug and light. Fluorescence emission in PDT may be used to monitor the uptake process but fluorescence intensity is subject to variability due to scattering and absorption; the addition of fluorescence lifetime may be beneficial to probe site-specific drug-molecular interactions and cell damage. We investigated the fluorescence lifetime changes of Photofrin® at various intracellular components in the Mat-LyLu (MLL cell line. The fluorescence decays were analyzed using a bi-exponential model, followed by segmentation analysis of lifetime parameters. When Photofrin® was localized at the cell membrane, the slow lifetime component was found to be significantly shorter (4.3 ± 0.5 ns compared to those at other locations (cytoplasm: 7.3 ± 0.3 ns; mitochondria: 7.0 ± 0.2 ns, p < 0.05.

  4. Measuring and sorting cell populations expressing isospectral fluorescent proteins with different fluorescence lifetimes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan Sands

    Full Text Available Study of signal transduction in live cells benefits from the ability to visualize and quantify light emitted by fluorescent proteins (XFPs fused to different signaling proteins. However, because cell signaling proteins are often present in small numbers, and because the XFPs themselves are poor fluorophores, the amount of emitted light, and the observable signal in these studies, is often small. An XFP's fluorescence lifetime contains additional information about the immediate environment of the fluorophore that can augment the information from its weak light signal. Here, we constructed and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants of Teal Fluorescent Protein (TFP and Citrine that were isospectral but had shorter fluorescence lifetimes, ∼ 1.5 ns vs ∼ 3 ns. We modified microscopic and flow cytometric instruments to measure fluorescence lifetimes in live cells. We developed digital hardware and a measure of lifetime called a "pseudophasor" that we could compute quickly enough to permit sorting by lifetime in flow. We used these abilities to sort mixtures of cells expressing TFP and the short-lifetime TFP variant into subpopulations that were respectively 97% and 94% pure. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using information about fluorescence lifetime to help quantify cell signaling in living cells at the high throughput provided by flow cytometry. Moreover, it demonstrates the feasibility of isolating and recovering subpopulations of cells with different XFP lifetimes for subsequent experimentation.

  5. Intracellular temperature mapping with a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Kohki; Inada, Noriko; Gota, Chie; Harada, Yoshie; Funatsu, Takashi; Uchiyama, Seiichi

    2012-02-28

    Cellular functions are fundamentally regulated by intracellular temperature, which influences biochemical reactions inside a cell. Despite the important contributions to biological and medical applications that it would offer, intracellular temperature mapping has not been achieved. Here we demonstrate the first intracellular temperature mapping based on a fluorescent polymeric thermometer and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The spatial and temperature resolutions of our thermometry were at the diffraction limited level (200 nm) and 0.18-0.58 °C. The intracellular temperature distribution we observed indicated that the nucleus and centrosome of a COS7 cell, both showed a significantly higher temperature than the cytoplasm and that the temperature gap between the nucleus and the cytoplasm differed depending on the cell cycle. The heat production from mitochondria was also observed as a proximal local temperature increase. These results showed that our new intracellular thermometry could determine an intrinsic relationship between the temperature and organelle function.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of boronate derivatives to determine glucose concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gable, J H

    2000-06-01

    A novel investigation into the fluorescence lifetimes of molecules, both established and newly designed, was performed. These molecules are the basis of a continuous, minimally invasive, glucose sensor based on fluorescence lifetime measurements. This sensor, if coupled with an automated insulin delivery device, would effectively create an artificial pancreas allowing for the constant monitoring and control of glucose levels in a person with diabetes. The proposed sensor includes a fluorescent molecule that changes its' fluorescence properties upon binding selectively and reversibly to glucose. One possible sensor molecule is N-methyl-N-(9-methylene anthryl)-2-methylenephenylboronic acid (AB). The fluorescence intensity of AB was shown to change in response to changing glucose concentrations. (James, 1994) James proposed that when glucose binds to AB the fluorescence intensity increases due to an enhancement of the N{yields}B dative bond which prevents photoinduced electron transfer (PET). PET from the amine (N) to the fluorophore (anthracene) quenches the fluorescence. The dative bond between the boron and the amine can prevent PET by involving the lone pair of electrons on the amine in interactions with the boron rather than allowing them to be transferred to the fluorophore. Results of this research show the average fluorescence lifetime of AB also changes with glucose concentration. It is proposed that fluorescence is due to two components: (1) AB with an enhanced N{yields}B interaction, and no PET, and (2) AB with a weak N{yields}B interaction, resulting in fluorescence quenching by PET. Lifetime measurements of AB as a function of both the pH of the solvent and glucose concentration in the solution were made to characterize this two component system and investigate the nature of the N{yields}B bond. Measurements of molecules similar to AB were also performed in order to isolate behavior of specific AB constituents. These molecules are 9

  7. Photon budget analysis for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Young, I.T.; De Jong, J.G.S.

    2011-01-01

    We have constructed a mathematical model to analyze the photon efficiency of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The power of the light source needed for illumination in a FLIM system and the signal-to-noise ratio of the detector have led us to a photon “budget.” These

  8. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of nanodiamonds in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung; Hsu, Tsung-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Jui-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy (NV-) center in bulk diamond is a photostable fluorophore with a radiative lifetime of 11.6 ns at room temperature. The lifetime substantially increases to ~20 ns for diamond nanoparticles (size ~ 100 nm) suspended in water due to the change in refractive index of the surrounding medium of the NV- centers. This fluorescence decay time is much longer than that (typically 1 - 4 ns) of endogenous and exogenous fluorophores commonly used in biological imaging, making it possible to detect NV--containing nanodiamonds in vivo at the single particle level by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We demonstrate the feasibility of this approach using Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) as a model organism.

  9. Use of multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate skin pigmentation in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancik, Yuri; Favre, Amandine; Loy, Chong Jin; Zvyagin, Andrei V.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-02-01

    There is a growing body of literature showing the usefulness of multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in situ characterization of skin constituents and the ensuing development of noninvasive diagnostic tools against skin diseases. Melanin and pigmentation-associated skin cancers constitute some of the major applications. We show that MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used to measure changes in cutaneous melanin concentration and that these can be related to the visible skin color. Melanin in the skin of African, Indian, Caucasian, and Asian volunteers is detected on the basis of its emission wavelength and fluorescence lifetimes in solution and in a melanocyte-keratinocyte cell culture. Fluorescence intensity is used to characterize the melanin content and distribution as a function of skin type and depth into the skin (stratum granulosum and stratum basale). The measured fluorescence intensities in given skin types agree with melanin amounts reported by others using biopsies. Our results suggest that spatial distribution of melanin in skin can be studied using MPT and fluorescence lifetime imaging, but further studies are needed to ascertain that the method can resolve melanin amount in smaller depth intervals.

  10. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Free and Protein-Bound NADH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    We introduce a methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image and not on the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. This represents a challenging case for lifetime imaging because the NADH decay times are just 0.4 and 1.0 ns in the free and bound states, respectively. In the present apparatus, lifetime images are created from a series of phase-sensitive images obtained with a gain-modulated image intensifier and recorded with a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The intensifier gain is modulated at the light-modulation frequency or a harmonic thereof. A series of stationary phase-sensitive images, each obtained with various phase shifts of the gain-modulation signal, is used to determine the phase angle or modulation of the emission at each pixel, which is in essence the lifetime image. We also describe an imaging procedure that allows specific decay times to be suppressed, allowing in this case suppression of the emission from either free or bound NADH. Since the fluorescence lifetimes of probes are known to be sensitive to numerous chemical and physical factors such as pH, oxygen, temperature, cations, polarity, and binding to macromolecules, this method allows imaging of the chemical or property of interest in macroscopic and microscopic samples. The concept of FLIM appears to have numerous potential applications in the biosciences.

  11. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R., et al.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device des

  12. Fluorescence-lifetime-based sensors using inhomogeneous waveguiding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Kieslinger, Dietmar; Trznadel, Karolina; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1996-12-01

    Most intrinsic fiberoptic sensors are based on the evanescent-wave scheme, where the evanescent field of modes guided in a fiber reaches out into a chemically sensitive coating. In the commonly used multimode waveguides, the evanescent field contains only a small part of the total energy, however, thus making evanescent-wave sensors rather insensitive. Combining a transparent substrate and a transparent sensing layer of rather similar refractive index into a common waveguiding structure produces an inhomogeneous waveguide, where a large portion of the total energy transverses the sensing layer. This yields much superior sensor performance. The transmission through a waveguide is subject to various disturbing influences. Thus it is advantageous to combine the inhomogeneous waveguiding approach with a measuring scheme that is not prone to those disturbances. Such a scheme is available with fluorescence lifetime-based sensors. The fluorescence lifetime of an indicator incorporated into the sensing layer is changed by the presence of the respective analyte. This lifetime is independent of the transmission through the waveguide. Thus inhomogeneous waveguiding together with fluorescence lifetime measurement paves the way for optical chemical sensors with high analyte sensitivity and immunity to external disturbances.

  13. Investigations on exponential lifetime measurements for fluorescence thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernicola, V. C.; Rosso, L.; Galleano, R.; Sun, T.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2000-07-01

    Lifetime-based methods have been, on the whole, one of the most successful schemes for fiber optic temperature sensing, using fluorescent materials whose response is intensity independent. Several approaches for determining the fluorescence lifetime, and with that the measurand, have been investigated. An experimental comparison of direct and indirect measurement methods, i.e., involving actual signals from representative optical media instead of simply using Monte Carlo simulations, has been carried out. Direct fitting methods, including Marquardt, log-fit and Prony, were used to estimate the fluorescence lifetime of a Cr3+:YAG-based sensor system and the results were compared. An agreement to better than 0.5% between Marquardt and log-fit algorithms and an agreement of about 1.5% between Marquardt and Prony approaches was found. Thus, a temperature reproducibility, of 0.5 and 1.2 °C, respectively, can be obtained with the Cr3+:YAG sensor system. An indirect measurement approach based on a phase-locked (analog-to-digital signal processor) (A-DSP) was also tested. It was found that when the A-DSP output is used to estimate the lifetime, it performs only slightly better than using direct fitting methods. On the contrary, when the whole A-DSP sensor system was directly calibrated against temperature, the measurement accuracy improves by at least a factor of 10.

  14. UV fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum and magnesium nanoapertures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshan; Jiao, Xiaojin; Peterson, Eric M.; Harris, Joel M.; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Blair, Steve

    2016-09-01

    Ultra-violet (UV) fluorescence lifetime modification by aluminum (Al) and magnesium (Mg) nanoapertures are reported in this manuscript. Nanoapertures with diameter ranging from 30nm to 90nm are fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB). Largest lifetime reduction are observed for apertures with smallest diameters and undercuts into glass substrate. For Al nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 5.30×, larger than perviously reported 3.50×.1 For Mg nanoapertures, largest lifetime reduction is 6.90×, which is the largest lifetime reduction of UV fluorescence dye reported so far in literature. The dependence of count rate per molecule (CRM) on aperture size and undercut is also investigated, revealing that CRM increases with increasing undercut, however, the CRM is small (less than 2) for the entire range of aperture size and undercut we investigated. FDTD simulation were conducted and in order to favorably compare experimental results with simulated results, it is critical to take into account the exact shape and material properties of the nano aperture. Simulation results revealed the fundamental difference between Al and Mg nano aperture under 266nm illumination-Mg nano aperture presents a waveguide mode in which the maximum field enhancement and Purcell factor is within the nano aperture instead of on the surface which is the case for Al nano aperture.

  15. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N.; Wientjes, Emilie; Amerongen, van Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was ac

  16. Photochromicity and fluorescence lifetimes of green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    The green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the bioluminescent jellyfish Aequorea and its mutants have gained widespread usage as an indicator of structure and function within cells. Proton transfer has been implicated in the complex photophysics of the wild-type molecule, exhibiting a protonated A species excited at 400 nm, and two deprotonated excited-state species I* and B* with red-shifted excitation similar to 475 nm. Photochromicity between the protonated and deprotonated species has been re...

  17. Family of fluorescence lifetime sensors for environmental purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1995-09-01

    A family of indicators has been developed for measuring different analytes, all the indicators being derivatives of the same chemical compound and having identical spectral and lifetime properties. The indicators show an absorption accessible to low-cost light sources, a large Stokes shift, and a long fluorescence decay time. All indicators can be excited at the same excitation wavelength, monitored at the same emission wavelength, and measured within the same time range. This opens the possibility for a compact lifetime-based instrument for water monitoring.

  18. Fluorescent Protein Based FRET Pairs with Improved Dynamic Range for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobin George Abraham

    Full Text Available Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET using fluorescent protein variants is widely used to study biochemical processes in living cells. FRET detection by fluorescence lifetime measurements is the most direct and robust method to measure FRET. The traditional cyan-yellow fluorescent protein based FRET pairs are getting replaced by green-red fluorescent protein variants. The green-red pair enables excitation at a longer wavelength which reduces cellular autofluorescence and phototoxicity while monitoring FRET. Despite the advances in FRET based sensors, the low FRET efficiency and dynamic range still complicates their use in cell biology and high throughput screening. In this paper, we utilized the higher lifetime of NowGFP and screened red fluorescent protein variants to develop FRET pairs with high dynamic range and FRET efficiency. The FRET variations were analyzed by proteolytic activity and detected by steady-state and time-resolved measurements. Based on the results, NowGFP-tdTomato and NowGFP-mRuby2 have shown high potentials as FRET pairs with large fluorescence lifetime dynamic range. The in vitro measurements revealed that the NowGFP-tdTomato has the highest Förster radius for any fluorescent protein based FRET pairs yet used in biological studies. The developed FRET pairs will be useful for designing FRET based sensors and studies employing Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM.

  19. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of membrane lipid order with a ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilin, Vasyl; Glushonkov, Oleksandr; Herdly, Lucas; Klymchenko, Andrey; Richert, Ludovic; Mely, Yves

    2015-05-19

    To monitor the lateral segregation of lipids into liquid-ordered (Lo) and -disordered (Ld) phases in lipid membranes, environment-sensitive dyes that partition in both phases but stain them differently have been developed. Of particular interest is the dual-color F2N12S probe, which can discriminate the two phases through the ratio of its two emission bands. These bands are associated with the normal (N(∗)) and tautomer (T(∗)) excited-state species that result from an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer. In this work, we investigated the potency of the time-resolved fluorescence parameters of F2N12S to discriminate lipid phases in model and cell membranes. Both the long and mean lifetime values of the T(∗) form of F2N12S were found to differ by twofold between Ld and Lo phases as a result of the restriction in the relative motions of the two aromatic moieties of F2N12S imposed by the highly packed Lo phase. This differed from the changes in the ratio of the two emission bands between the two phases, which mainly resulted from the decreased hydration of the N(∗) form in the Lo phase. Importantly, the strong difference in lifetimes between the two phases was preserved when cholesterol was added to the Ld phase. The two phases could be imaged with high contrast by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) on giant unilamellar vesicles. FLIM images of F2N12S-labeled live HeLa cells confirmed that the plasma membrane was mainly in the Lo-like phase. Furthermore, the two phases were found to be homogeneously distributed all over the plasma membrane, indicating that they are highly mixed at the spatiotemporal resolution of the FLIM setup. Finally, FLIM could also be used to sensitively monitor the change in lipid phase upon cholesterol depletion and apoptosis.

  20. Dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging based on acousto-optic deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Peng, Xiao; Qi, Jing; Gao, Jian; Fan, Shunping; Wang, Qi; Qu, Junle; Niu, Hanben

    2014-11-01

    We report a dynamic fluorescence lifetime imaging (D-FLIM) system that is based on a pair of acousto-optic deflectors for the random regions of interest (ROI) study in the sample. The two-dimensional acousto-optic deflector devices are used to rapidly scan the femtosecond excitation laser beam across the sample, providing specific random access to the ROI. Our experimental results using standard fluorescent dyes in live cancer cells demonstrate that the D-FLIM system can dynamically monitor the changing process of the microenvironment in the ROI in live biological samples.

  1. Normalized fluorescence lifetime imaging for tumor identification and margin delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Adria J.; Papour, Asael; Bhargava, Siddharth; Taylor, Zach; Grundfest, Warren S.; Stafsudd, Oscar M.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a technique that has been proven to produce quantitative and qualitative differentiation and identification of substances with good specificity and sensitivity based on lifetime extracted information. This technique has shown the ability to also differentiate between a wide range of tissue types to identify malignant from benign tissue in vivo and ex vivo. However, the complexity, long duration and effort required to generate this information has limited the adoption of these techniques in a clinical setting. Our group has developed a time-resolved imaging system (patent pending) that does not require the extraction of lifetimes or use of complex curve fitting algorithms to display the needed information. The technique, entitled Lifetime Fluorescence Imaging (LFI, or NoFYI), converts fluorescence lifetime decay information directly into visual contrast. Initial studies using Fluorescein and Rhodamine-B demonstrated the feasibility of this approach. Subsequent studies demonstrated the ability to separate collagen and elastin powders. The technique uses nanosecond pulsed UV LEDs at 375 nm for average illumination intensities of ~4.5 μW on the tissue surface with detection by a gated CCD camera. To date, we have imaged 11 surgical head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and brain cancer biopsy specimens including 5 normal and 6 malignant samples. Images at multiple wavelengths clearly demonstrate differentiation between benign and malignant tissue, which was later confirmed by histology. Contrast was obtained between fluorophores with 35 μm spatial resolution and an SNR of ~30 dB allowing us to clearly define tumor margins in these highly invasive cancers. This method is capable of providing both anatomical and chemical information for the pathologist and the surgeon. These results suggest that this technology has a possible role in identifying tumors in tissue specimens and detecting tumor margins during procedures.

  2. Refractive Index Sensing of Green Fluorescent Proteins in Living Cells Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manen, van Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; Berg, van den Timo K.; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91phox, which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase

  3. Evaluation of actinic cheilitis using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Cosci, Alessandro; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Takahama, Ademar; Souza Azevedo, Rebeca; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Actinic cheilitis is a potentially malignant disorder that mostly affects the vermilion border of the lower lip and can lead to squamous cell carcinoma. Because of its heterogeneous clinical aspect, it is difficult to indicate representative biopsy area. Late diagnosis is a limiting factor of therapeutic possibilities available to treat oral cancer. The diagnosis of actinic cheilitis is mainly based on clinical and histopathological analysis and it is a time consuming procedure to get the results. Information about the organization and chemical composition of the tissues can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy techniques without the need for biopsy. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and allow a quick and non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries and to help clinicians with the early diagnosis of actinic cheilitis. This study aims to evaluate the fluorescence lifetime parameters at the discrimination of three degrees of epithelial dysplasia, the most important predictor of malignant development, described in up to 100% of actinic cheilitis cases.

  4. Effect of refractive index on the fluorescence lifetime of green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregidgo, Carolyn; Levitt, James A; Suhling, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    The average fluorescence lifetime of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in solution is a function of the refractive index of its environment. We report that this is also the case for GFP-tagged proteins in cells. Using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC)-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a confocal scanning microscope, images of GFP-tagged proteins in cells suspended in different refractive index media are obtained. It is found that the average fluorescence lifetime of GFP decreases on addition of glycerol or sucrose to the media in which the fixed cells are suspended. The inverse GFP lifetime is proportional to the refractive index squared. This is the case for GFP-tagged major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins with the GFP located inside the cytoplasm, and also for GPI-anchored GFP that is located outside the cell membrane. The implications of these findings are discussed with regard to total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) techniques where the change in refractive index is crucial in producing an evanescent wave to excite fluorophores near a glass interface. Our findings show that the GFP fluorescence lifetime is shortened in TIRF microscopy in comparison to confocal microscopy.

  5. pH Dependence of the Fluorescence Lifetime of FAD in Solution and in Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nobuhiro Ohta; Takakazu Nakabayashi; Masataka Kinjo; Md. Serajul Islam; Masato Honma

    2013-01-01

    We have studied physiological parameters in a living cell using fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous chromophores. In this study, pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), that is a significant cofactor exhibiting autofluorescence, has been investigated in buffer solution and in cells. The fluorescence lifetime of FAD remained unchanged with pH 5 to 9 in solution. However, the fluorescence lifetime in HeLa cells was found to decrease with increasi...

  6. pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of FAD in solution and in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Serajul; Honma, Masato; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Kinjo, Masataka; Ohta, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-18

    We have studied physiological parameters in a living cell using fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous chromophores. In this study, pH dependence of the fluorescence lifetime of flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), that is a significant cofactor exhibiting autofluorescence, has been investigated in buffer solution and in cells. The fluorescence lifetime of FAD remained unchanged with pH 5 to 9 in solution. However, the fluorescence lifetime in HeLa cells was found to decrease with increasing intracellular pH, suggesting that pH in a single cell can be estimated from the fluorescence lifetime imaging of FAD without adding exogenous fluorescent probes.

  7. A hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe for skin cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beule, P. A. A.; Dunsby, C.; Galletly, N. P.; Stamp, G. W.; Chu, A. C.; Anand, U.; Anand, P.; Benham, C. D.; Naylor, A.; French, P. M. W.

    2007-12-01

    The autofluorescence of biological tissue can be exploited for the detection and diagnosis of disease but, to date, its complex nature and relatively weak signal levels have impeded its widespread application in biology and medicine. We present here a portable instrument designed for the in situ simultaneous measurement of autofluorescence emission spectra and temporal decay profiles, permitting the analysis of complex fluorescence signals. This hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime probe utilizes two ultrafast lasers operating at 355 and 440nm that can excite autofluorescence from many different biomolecules present in skin tissue including keratin, collagen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), and flavins. The instrument incorporates an optical fiber probe to provide sample illumination and fluorescence collection over a millimeter-sized area. We present a description of the system, including spectral and temporal characterizations, and report the preliminary application of this instrument to a study of recently resected (skin lesions, illustrating its potential for skin cancer detection and diagnosis.

  8. Bessel beam fluorescence lifetime tomography of live embryos (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dongli; Peng, Leilei

    2016-03-01

    Optical tomography allows isotropic 3D imaging of embryos. Scanning-laser optical tomography (SLOT) has superior light collecting efficiency than wide-field optical tomography, making it ideal for fluorescence imaging of live embryos. We previously reported an imaging system that combines SLOT with a novel Fourier-multiplexed fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) technique named FmFLIM-SLOT. FmFLIM-SLOT performs multiplexed FLIM-FRET readout of multiple FRET sensors in live embryos. Here we report a recent effort on improving the spatial resolution of the FmFLIM-SLOT system in order to image complex biochemical processes in live embryos at the cellular level. Optical tomography has to compromise between resolution and the depth of view. In SLOT, the commonly-used focused Gaussian beam diverges quickly from the focal plane, making it impossible to achieve high resolution imaging in a large volume specimen. We thus introduce Bessel beam laser-scanning tomography, which illuminates the sample with a spatial-light-modulator-generated Bessel beam that has an extended focal depth. The Bessel beam is scanned across the whole specimen. Fluorescence projection images are acquired at equal angular intervals as the sample rotates. Reconstruction artifacts due to annular-rings of the Bessel beam are removed by a modified 3D filtered back projection algorithm. Furthermore, in combination of Fourier-multiplexing fluorescence lifetime imaging (FmFLIM) method, the Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT system is capable of perform 3D lifetime imaging of live embryos at cellular resolution. The system is applied to in-vivo imaging of transgenic Zebrafish embryos. Results prove that Bessel FmFLIM-SLOT is a promising imaging method in development biology research.

  9. Application of hyperspectral fluorescence lifetime imaging to tissue autofluorescence: arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, C. B.; Benninger, R. K. P.; de Beule, P.; Requejo-Isidro, J.; Elson, D. S.; Dunsby, C.; Munro, I.; Neil, M. A.; Sandison, A.; Sofat, N.; Nagase, H.; French, P. M. W.; Lever, M. J.

    2005-08-01

    Tissue contains many natural fluorophores and therefore by exploiting autofluorescence, we can obtain information from tissue with less interference than conventional histological techniques. However, conventional intensity imaging is prone to artifacts since it is an absolute measurement. Fluorescence lifetime and spectral measurements are relative measurements and therefore allow for better measurements. We have applied FLIM and hyperspectral FLIM to the study of articular cartilage and its disease arthritis. We have analyzed normal human articular cartilage and cartilage which was in the early stages of disease. In this case, it was found that FLIM was able to detect changes in the diseased tissue that were not detectable with the conventional diagnosis. Specifically, the fluorescence lifetimes (FL) of the cells were different between the two samples. We have also applied hyperspectral FLIM to degraded cartilage through treatment with interleukin-1. In this case, it was found that there was a shift in the emission spectrum with treatment and that the lifetime had also increased. We also showed that there was greater contrast between the cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM) at longer wavelengths.

  10. Fluorescence lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystals and organic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabolle, Markus; Kapusta, Peter; Nann, Thomas; Shu, Xu; Ziegler, Jan; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2009-09-15

    The potential of semiconducting nanocrystals or so-called quantum dots (QDs) for lifetime multiplexing has not been investigated yet, despite the increasing use of QDs in (bio)analytical detection, biosensing, and fluorescence imaging and the obvious need for simple and cost-effective tools and strategies for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes or events. This is most likely related to their multiexponential decay behavior as for multiplex chromophores, typically monoexponential decay kinetics are requested. The fluorescence decay kinetics of various mixtures of a long-lived, multiexponentially decaying CdSe QD and a short-lived organic dye were analyzed, and a model was developed for the quantification of these labels from the measured complex decay kinetics as a first proof-of-concept for the huge potential of these labels for lifetime multiplexing. In a second step, we evaluated the potential of mixtures of two types of QDs, varying in constituent material to realize distinguishable, yet multiexponential decay kinetics and similar absorption and emission spectra. Strategies for lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystalline labels were derived on the basis of these measurements.

  11. The Use of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Lifetime to Assess Phytoplankton Physiology within a River-Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie M.; Miller, Richard L.; Redalje, Donald G.; Fernandez, Salvador M.

    2002-01-01

    Chlorophyll a fluorescence lifetime was measured for phytoplankton populations inhabiting the three physical zones surrounding the Mississippi River's terminus in the Gulf of Mexico. Observations of river discharge volume, nitrate + nitrite, silicate, phosphate, PAR (Photosynthetically Active Radiation) diffuse attenuation within the water column, salinity, temperature, SPM, and chl a concentration were used to characterize the distribution of chl fluorescence lifetime within a given region within restricted periods of time. 33 stations extending from the Mississippi River plume to the shelf break of the Louisiana coast were surveyed for analysis of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime during two cruises conducted March 31 - April 6, 2000, and October 24 - November 1, 2000. At each station, two to three depths were chosen for fluorescence lifetime measurement to represent the vertical characteristics of the water column. Where possible, samples were taken from just below the surface and from just above and below the pycnocline. All samples collected were within the 1% light level of the water column (the euphotic zone). Upon collection, samples were transferred to amber Nalgene bottles and left in the dark for at least 15 minutes to reduce the effects of non-photochemical quenching and to insure that photosynthetic reaction centers were open. Before measurements within the phase fluorometer were begun, the instrument was allowed to warm up for no less than one hour.

  12. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging with a single diamond NV center

    CERN Document Server

    Beams, Ryan; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  13. Bloodstain age analysis: toward solid state fluorescent lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kevin; Zhegalova, Natalia; Achilefu, Samuel; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2013-03-01

    One of the most pressing unsolved challenges in forensic science is the determination of time since deposition (TSD) of bloodstains at crime scenes. Despite a number of high profile cases over the past couple hundred years involving controversy over TSD methods, no reliable quantitative method has been established. We present here an approach that has yet to be explored by forensic scientist: measuring the fluorescence lifetime of solid-state blood. Such a method would allow for on-site measurements of bloodstains utilizing the appropriate device, and would allow for rapid results returned in real-time to investigators.

  14. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime imaging in biosciences: technologies and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raluca NIESNER; Karl-Heinz GERICKE

    2008-01-01

    The biosciences require the development of methods that allow a non-invasive and rapid investigation of biological systems. In this aspect, high-end imaging tech-niques allow intravital microscopy in real-time, providing information on a molecular basis. Far-field fluorescence imaging techniques are some of the most adequate methods for such investigations. However, there are great differences between the common fluorescence imaging techniques, i.e., wide-field, confocal one-photon and two-photon microscopy, as far as their applicability in diverse bioscientific research areas is concerned. In the first part of this work, we briefly compare these techniques. Standard methods used in the biosciences, i.e., steady-state techniques based on the analy-sis of the total fluorescence signal originating from the sam-ple, can successfully be employed in the study of cell, tissue and organ morphology as well as in monitoring the macro-scopic tissue function. However, they are mostly inadequate for the quantitative investigation of the cellular function at the molecular level. The intrinsic disadvantages of steady-state techniques are countered by using time-resolved tech-niques. Among these fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is currently the most common. Different FLIM principles as well as applications of particular relevance for the biosci-ences, especially for fast intravital studies are discussed in this work.

  16. Effect of surface modification on semiconductor nanocrystal fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2011-04-04

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, namely, quantum dots (QDs), present a set of unique photoluminescence properties, which has led to increased interest in using them as advantageous alternatives to conventional organic dyes. Many applications of QDs involve surface modification to enhance the solubility or biocompatibility of the QDs. One of the least exploited properties of QDs is the very long photoluminescence lifetime that usually has complex kinetics owing to the effect of quantum confinement. Herein, we describe the effect of different surface modifications on the photoluminescence decay kinetics of QDs. The different surface modifications were carefully chosen to provide lipophilic or water-soluble QDs with either positive or negative surface net charges. We also survey the effect on the QD lifetime of several ligands that interact with the QD surface, such as organic chromophores or fluorescent proteins. The results obtained demonstrate that time-resolved fluorescence is a useful tool for QD-based sensing to set the basis for the development of time-resolved-based nanosensors.

  17. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-04-15

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme, in human myeloid PLB-985 cells and showed by high-resolution confocal fluorescence microscopy that GFP-Rac2 and GFP-gp91(phox) are targeted to the cytosol and to membranes, respectively. Frequency-domain FLIM experiments on these PLB-985 cells resulted in average fluorescence lifetimes of 2.70 ns for cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and 2.31 ns for membrane-bound GFP-gp91(phox). By comparing these lifetimes with a calibration curve obtained by measuring GFP lifetimes in PBS/glycerol mixtures of known refractive index, we found that the local refractive indices of cytosolic GFP-Rac2 and membrane-targeted GFP-gp91(phox) are approximately 1.38 and approximately 1.46, respectively, which is in good correspondence with reported values for the cytosol and plasma membrane measured by other techniques. The ability to measure the local refractive index of proteins in living cells by FLIM may be important in revealing intracellular spatial heterogeneities within organelles such as the plasma and phagosomal membrane.

  18. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotr...

  19. Breast cancer margin delineation with fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer E.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Darrow, Morgan; Unger, Jakob; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The current standard of care for early stages of breast cancer is breast-conserving surgery (BCS). BCS involves a lumpectomy procedure, during which the tumor is removed with a rim of normal tissue-if cancer cells found in that rim of tissue, it is called a positive margin and means part of the tumor remains in the breast. Currently there is no method to determine if cancer cells exist at the margins of lumpectomy specimens aside from time-intensive histology methods that result in reoperations in up to 38% of cases. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) to measure time-resolved autofluorescence from N=13 ex vivo human breast cancer specimens (N=10 patients undergoing lumpectomy or mastectomy) and compared our results to histology. Tumor (both invasive and ductal carcinoma in situ), fibrous tissue, fat and fat necrosis have unique fluorescence signatures. For instance, between 500-580 nm, fluorescence lifetime of tumor was shortest (4.7 +/- 0.4 ns) compared to fibrous tissue (5.5 +/- 0.7 ns) and fat (7.0 +/- 0.1 ns), P<0.05 (ANOVA). These differences are due to the biochemical properties of lipid, nicotineamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and collagen fibers in the fat, tumor and fibrous tissue, respectively. Additionally, the FLIm data is augmented to video of the breast tissue with image processing algorithms that track a blue (450 nm) aiming beam used in parallel with the 355 nm excitation beam. This allows for accurate histologic co-registration and in the future will allow for three-dimensional lumpectomy surfaces to be imaged for cancer margin delineation.

  20. Online multispectral fluorescence lifetime values estimation and overlay onto tissue white-light video frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging has been shown to be a robust technique for biochemical and functional characterization of tissues and to present great potential for intraoperative tissue diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. We report a technique for real-time mapping of fluorescence parameters (i.e. lifetime values) onto the location from where the fluorescence measurements were taken. This is achieved by merging a 450 nm aiming beam generated by a diode laser with the excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and by continuously imaging the region of interest with a color CMOS camera. The interrogated locations are then extracted from the acquired frames via color-based segmentation of the aiming beam. Assuming a Gaussian profile of the imaged aiming beam, the segmentation results are fitted to ellipses that are dynamically scaled at the full width of three automatically estimated thresholds (50%, 75%, 90%) of the Gaussian distribution's maximum value. This enables the dynamic augmentation of the white-light video frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. A fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples were used to evaluate this method with motorized and hand-held scanning measurements. At 640x512 pixels resolution the area of interest augmented with fluorescence decay parameters can be imaged at an average 34 frames per second. The developed method has the potential to become a valuable tool for real-time display of optical spectroscopy data during continuous scanning applications that subsequently can be used for tissue characterization and diagnosis.

  1. Time-resolved microspectrofluorometry and fluorescence lifetime imaging of photosensitizers using picosecond pulsed diode lasers in laser scanning microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Matthias; Meier, Thomas; Steiner, Rudolf; Dolp, Frank; Erdmann, Rainer; Ortmann, Uwe; Rück, Angelika

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of two different photosensitizers in single cells, in detail mTHPC and 5-ALA induced PPIX, which are currently clinically used in photodynamic therapy. The fluorescence lifetime of the drugs was determined in the cells from time-gated spectra as well as single photon counting, using a picosecond pulsed diode laser for fluorescence excitation. The diode laser, which emits pulses at 398 nm with 70 ps full width at half maximum duration, was coupled to a confocal laser scanning microscope. For time-resolved spectroscopy a setup consisting of a Czerny Turner spectrometer and a MCP-gated and -intensified CCD camera was used. Time-gated spectra within the cells were acquired by placing the laser beam in "spot scan" mode. In addition, a time-correlated single photon counting module was used to determine the fluorescence lifetime from single spots and to record lifetime images. The fluorescence lifetime of mTHPC decreased from 7.5 to 5.5 ns during incubation from 1 to 6 h. This decrease was probably attributed to enhanced formation of aggregates during incubation. Fluorescence lifetime imaging showed that longer lifetimes were correlated with accumulation in the cytoplasm in the neighborhood of the cell nucleus, whereas shorter lifetimes were found in the outer cytoplasm. For cells that were incubated with 5-ALA, a fluorescence lifetime of 7.4 ns was found for PPIX; a shorter lifetime at 3.6 ns was probably attributed to photoproducts and aggregates of PPIX. In contrast from fluorescence intensity images alone, different fluorescence species could not be distinguished. However, in the lifetime image a structured fluorescence distribution in the cytoplasm was correlated with the longer lifetime and probably coincides with mitochondria. In conclusion, picosecond diode lasers coupled to a laser scanning microscope equipped with appropriate detection units allows time-resolved spectroscopy and lifetime imaging

  2. Multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of biliverdins and their protein-associated complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chin-Jie; Wu, Cheng-Ham; Liu, Tzu-Ming

    2012-03-01

    To investigate whether endogenous biliverdins can serve as a fluorescence metabolic marker in cancer diagnosis, we measured their multiphoton fluorescence spectra and lifetimes with femtosecond Cr:forsterite laser. Excited at 1230nm, the two-photon fluorescence of biliverdins peaks around 670nm. The corresponding lifetime (catabolism in human cells or tissues.

  3. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  4. Timing and Operating Mode Design for Time-Gated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Liu; Xinwei Wang; Yan Zhou; Yuliang Liu

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state fluorence imaging and time-resolved fluorescence imaging are two important areas in fluorescence imaging research. Fluorescence lifetime imaging is an absolute measurement method which is independent of excitation laser intensity, fluorophore concentration, and photobleaching compared to fluorescence intensity imaging techniques. Time-gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can provide high resolution and high imaging frame during mature FLIM methods. An abstract ti...

  5. A Universal Lifetime Distribution for Multi-Species Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Murase, Yohsuke; Ito, Nobuyasu; Rikvold, Per Arne

    2015-01-01

    Lifetime distributions of social entities, such as enterprises, products, and media contents, are one of the fundamental statistics characterizing the social dynamics. To investigate the lifetime distribution of mutually interacting systems, simple models having a rule for additions and deletions of entities are investigated. We found a quite universal lifetime distribution for various kinds of inter-entity interactions, and it is well fitted by a stretched-exponential function with an exponent close to 1/2. We propose a "modified Red-Queen" hypothesis to explain this distribution. We also review empirical studies on the lifetime distribution of social entities, and discussed the applicability of the model.

  6. Applying fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanabe, Satoshi; Araki, Yoshie; Uchimura, Tomohiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy was applied to evaluate the efficacy of anticancer drugs. A decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in apoptotic cancer cells stained by SYTO 13 dye was detected after treatment with antitumor antibiotics such as doxorubicin or epirubicin. It was confirmed that the change in fluorescence lifetime occurred earlier than morphological changes in the cells. We found that the fluorescence lifetime of the nucleus in the cells treated with epirubicin decreased more rapidly than that of the cells treated with doxorubicin. This implies that epirubicin was more efficacious than doxorubicin in the treatment of cancer cells. The change in fluorescence lifetime was, however, not indicated when the cells were treated with cyclophosphamide. The decrease in fluorescence lifetime was associated with the processes involving caspase activation and chromatin condensation. Therefore, this technique would provide useful information about apoptotic cells, particularly in the early stages.

  7. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy for breast cancer margins assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Zhang, Yanhong; Bold, Richard; Marcu, Laura

    2015-03-01

    During breast conserving surgery (BCS), which is the preferred approach to treat most early stage breast cancers, the surgeon attempts to excise the tumor volume, surrounded by thin margin of normal tissue. The intra-operative assessment of cancerous areas is a challenging procedure, with the surgeon usually relying on visual or tactile guidance. This study evaluates whether time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) presents the potential to address this problem. Point TRFS measurements were obtained from 19 fresh tissue slices (7 patients) and parameters that characterize the transient signals were quantified via constrained least squares deconvolution scheme. Fibrotic tissue (FT, n=69), adipose tissue (AT, n=76), and invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC, n=27) were identified in histology and univariate statistical analysis, followed by multi-comparison test, was applied to the corresponding lifetime data. Significant differentiation between the three tissue types exists at 390 nm and 500 nm bands. The average lifetime is 3.23+/-0.74 ns for AT, 4.21+/-0.83 ns for FT and 4.71+/-0.35 ns (ptissue in real-time and assess tumor margins.

  8. Analysis of human aorta using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Damiani, Gislaine; Adur, J.; Ferro, D. P.; Adam, R. L.; Pelegati, V.; Thomáz, A.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, K.

    2012-03-01

    The use of photonics has improved our understanding of biologic phenomena. For the study of the normal and pathologic architecture of the aorta the use of Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF) and Second Harmonic Generation showed interesting details of morphologic changes of the elastin-collagen architecture during aging or development of hypertension in previous studies. In this investigation we tried to apply fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for the morphologic analysis of human aortas. The aim of our study was to use FLIM in non-stained formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples of the aorta ascendants in hypertensive and normotensive patients of various ages, examining two different topographical regions. The FLIM-spectra of collagen and elastic fibers were clearly distinguishable, thus permitting an exact analysis of unstained material on the microscopic level. Moreover the FLIM spectrum of elastic fibers revealed variations between individual cases, which indicate modifications on a molecular level and might be related to FLIM age or diseases states and reflect modifications on a molecular level.

  9. Note: Rapid measurement of fluorescence lifetimes using SiPM detection and waveform sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, H.-M.; Souris, J. S.; Kim, H.-J.; Cheng, S.-H.; Chen, L.; Lo, L.-W.; Chen, C.-T.; Kao, C.-M.

    2017-09-01

    In fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, fluorescence lifetime measurement—assessing the average time fluorophores spend in their excited state before returning to their ground state—offers a number of advantages over quantifying fluorescence intensities that include resistance to photo-bleaching and independence from fluorophore concentration, excitation intensity, and measurement methodology. Despite growing interest, fluorescence lifetime techniques frequently mandate relatively complex instrumentation, slow data acquisition rates, and significant data analyses. In this work, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring fluorescence lifetimes using off-the-shelf analog silicon photomultipliers and switched-capacitor array waveform sampling techniques, with precision matching that of much larger and more elaborate commercial instruments.

  10. A modified phasor approach for analyzing time-gated fluorescence lifetime images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fereidouni, F.; Esposito, A.; Blab, G.; Gerritsen, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging is a versatile tool that permits mapping the biochemical environment in the cell. Among various fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques, timecorrelated single photon counting and time-gating methods have been demonstrated to be very efficient and robust for the imaging

  11. Combination of a spinning disc confocal unit with frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Goedhart, J.; Kremers, G.J.; Manders, E.M.M.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is an established technique to determine fluorescence lifetimes. Disadvantage of wide-field imaging is that measurements are compromised by out-of-focus blur. Conventional scanning confocal typically means long

  12. Studying Biological Tissue with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Microscopy, Endoscopy, and Complex Decay Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jan; Elson, Daniel S.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Lee, K. C. Benny; Vlandas, Alexis; Gambaruto, Giovanni L.; Léveque-Fort, Sandrine; Lever, M. John; Tadrous, Paul J.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Wallace, Andrew L.; Sandison, Ann; Watson, Tim F.; Alvarez, Fernando; French, Paul M. W.

    2003-06-01

    We have applied fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the autofluorescence of different kinds of biological tissue in vitro , including animal tissue sections and knee joints as well as human teeth, obtaining two-dimensional maps with functional contrast. We find that fluorescence decay profiles of biological tissue are well described by the stretched exponential function (StrEF), which can represent the complex nature of tissue. The StrEF yields a continuous distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be extracted with an inverse Laplace transformation, and additional information is provided by the width of the distribution. Our experimental results from FLIM microscopy in combination with the StrEF analysis indicate that this technique is ready for clinical deployment, including portability that is through the use of a compact picosecond diode laser as the excitation source. The results obtained with our FLIM endoscope successfully demonstrated the viability of this modality, though they need further optimization. We expect a custom-designed endoscope with optimized illumination and detection efficiencies to provide significantly improved performance.

  13. Early-photon guided reconstruction method for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Zhang; Chuangjian Cai; Yanlu Lv; Jianwen Luo

    2016-01-01

    A reconstruction method guided by early-photon fluorescence yield tomography is proposed for time-domain fluorescence lifetime tomography (FLT) in this study.The method employs the early-arriving photons to reconstruct a fluorescence yield map,which is utilized as a priori information to reconstruct the FLT via all the photons along the temporal-point spread functions.Phantom experiments demonstrate that,compared with the method using all the photons for reconstruction of fluorescence yield and lifetime maps,the proposed method can achieve higher spatial resolution and reduced crosstalk between different targets without sacrificing the quantification accuracy of lifetime and contrast between heterogeneous targets.

  14. Non-invasive imaging of skin cancer with fluorescence lifetime imaging using two photon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalay, Rakesh; Talbot, Clifford; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten; Warren, Sean; Neil, Mark A. A.; French, Paul M. W.; Chu, Anthony; Stamp, Gordon W.; Dunsby, Christopher

    2011-07-01

    Multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) using two photon microscopy as a non-invasive technique for the diagnosis of skin lesions is described. Skin contains fluorophores including elastin, keratin, collagen, FAD and NADH. This endogenous contrast allows tissue to be imaged without the addition of exogenous agents and allows the in vivo state of cells and tissues to be studied. A modified DermaInspect® multiphoton tomography system was used to excite autofluorescence at 760 nm in vivo and on freshly excised ex vivo tissue. This instrument simultaneously acquires fluorescence lifetime images in four spectral channels between 360-655 nm using time-correlated single photon counting and can also provide hyperspectral images. The multispectral fluorescence lifetime images were spatially segmented and binned to determine lifetimes for each cell by fitting to a double exponential lifetime model. A comparative analysis between the cellular lifetimes from different diagnoses demonstrates significant diagnostic potential.

  15. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging of Nile red for measurements of intracellular polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, James A.; Chung, Pei-Hua; Suhling, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Spectrally resolved confocal microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging have been used to measure the polarity of lipid-rich regions in living HeLa cells stained with Nile red. The emission peak from the solvatochromic dye in lipid droplets is at a shorter wavelength than other, more polar, stained internal membranes, and this is indicative of a low polarity environment. We estimate that the dielectric constant, ɛ, is around 5 in lipid droplets and 25<ɛ<40 in other lipid-rich regions. Our spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data show that intracellular Nile red exhibits complex, multiexponential fluorescence decays due to emission from a short lifetime locally excited state and a longer lifetime intramolecular charge transfer state. We measure an increase in the average fluorescence lifetime of the dye with increasing emission wavelength, as shown using phasor plots of the FLIM data. We also show using these phasor plots that the shortest lifetime decay components arise from lipid droplets. Thus, fluorescence lifetime is a viable contrast parameter for distinguishing lipid droplets from other stained lipid-rich regions. Finally, we discuss the FLIM of Nile red as a method for simultaneously mapping both polarity and relative viscosity based on fluorescence lifetime measurements.

  16. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  17. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  18. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  19. Optimum maintenance strategy under uncertainty in the lifetime distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Bram; Klingenberg, Warse; Teunter, Ruud; Tinga, Tiedo

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining the optimal maintenance strategy for a machine given its lifetime distribution has been studied extensively. Solutions to this problem are outlined in the academic literature, prescribed in professional handbooks, implemented in reliability engineering software systems and

  20. Optimum maintenance strategy under uncertainty in the lifetime distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, de Bram; Klingenberg, Warse; Teunter, Ruud; Tinga, Tiedo

    2015-01-01

    The problem of determining the optimal maintenance strategy for a machine given its lifetime distribution has been studied extensively. Solutions to this problem are outlined in the academic literature, prescribed in professional handbooks, implemented in reliability en

  1. Fluorescence lifetime-based biosensing of zinc: Origin of the broad dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R B; Patchan, M W

    1995-06-01

    Fluorescence lifetime-based chemical sensors have recently been described for applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and bioprocess control. These sensors transduce the level of the analyte as a change in the apparent fluorescence lifetime of an indicator phase. We have previously developed a wavelength-ratiometric fluorescence biosensor for zinc based on binding of zinc and dansylamide to apo-carbonic anhydrase which exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity. We demonstrate that the apo-carbonic anhydrase/dansylamide indicator system is very well suited for lifetime-based sensing, with a subnanomolar detection limit and greater than 1000-fold dynamic range. The theoretical basis for the wide dynamic range is discussed.

  2. Improved maximum entropy method for the analysis of fluorescence spectroscopy data: evaluating zero-time shift and assessing its effect on the determination of fluorescence lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; de Nicola, Sergio

    2015-12-21

    A new algorithm based on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is proposed for recovering both the lifetime distribution and the zero-time shift from time-resolved fluorescence decay intensities. The developed algorithm allows the analysis of complex time decays through an iterative scheme based on entropy maximization and the Brent method to determine the minimum of the reduced chi-squared value as a function of the zero-time shift. The accuracy of this algorithm has been assessed through comparisons with simulated fluorescence decays both of multi-exponential and broad lifetime distributions for different values of the zero-time shift. The method is capable of recovering the zero-time shift with an accuracy greater than 0.2% over a time range of 2000 ps. The center and the width of the lifetime distributions are retrieved with relative discrepancies that are lower than 0.1% and 1% for the multi-exponential and continuous lifetime distributions, respectively. The MEM algorithm is experimentally validated by applying the method to fluorescence measurements of the time decays of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD).

  3. Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy: advanced studies of fluorescence dynamics, lifetime imaging, clinical sensing, two-photon excitation, and light quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Kusba, Jozef; Akkaya, Engin; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1994-08-01

    The Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS) is a multi-user facility providing state of the art time-resolved fluorescence instrumentation and software for scientists, whose research can be enhanced by such experimental data. The CFS is a national center, supported by the National Center for Research Resources Division of the National Institutes of Health, and in part by the National Science Foundation. Both time-domain (TD) and frequency- domain (FD) measurements (10 MHz to 10 Ghz) are available, with a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths (UV to NIR). The data can be used to recover distances and site-to-site diffusion in protein, interactions between macromolecules, accessibility of fluorophores to quenchers, and the dynamic properties of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids. Current software provides for analysis of multi-exponential intensity and anisotropy decays, lifetime distribution, distance distributions for independent observation of fluorescence donors and acceptors, transient effects in collisional quenching, phase-modulation spectra and time-resolved emission spectra. Most programs provide for global analysis of multiple data sets obtained under similar experimental conditions. Data can be analyzed on-site by connection with the CFS computers through the internet. During six years of operation we have established scientific collaborations with over 30 academic and industrial groups in the United States. These collaborations have resulted in 63 scientific papers.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of intrinsically unstructured proteins: application to α-synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Sarah; Kluba, Malgorzata; Meuvis, Jessika; Engelborghs, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Lifetimes of fluorescent states and their fluorescence intensities are strictly coupled and very sensitive to the environment of the fluorophores. The advantage of measuring lifetimes, next to intensities, comes from the fact that it can reveal heterogeneity and dynamic properties of this environment. In this way lifetime analysis can be used to characterize static and dynamic conformational properties and heterogeneity of fluorescent groups in different areas of a protein and as a function of time for an evolving protein. The phenomena that determine the lifetime of a label are its intrinsic properties, dynamic quenching by neighboring groups, exposure to the solvent, as well as Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between different groups. The basic principles of these fluorescence phenomena can be found extensively described in the excellent book of Lakowicz (Principles of fluorescence spectroscopy, 3rd edn. Springer, New York, 2006). The fluorescent groups involved are either natural amino acid side chains like tryptophan (Trp) or tyrosine (Tyr), or fluorescent labels covalently engineered into the protein. Even a single fluorescent group can show indications of heterogeneity in the local environment. If several natural fluorescent groups are present, the properties of the individual groups can be separated using site-directed mutagenesis, and additivity of their contributions can be analyzed (Engelborghs, Spectrochim Acta A Mol Biomol Spectrosc 57(11):2255-2270, 2001). If no fluorescent group is naturally present, site-directed mutagenesis can be used to introduce either a fluorescent amino acid or a cysteine allowing chemical labeling.

  5. Fluorescence optimisation and lifetime studies of fingerprints treated with magnetic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L K; Dinish, U S; Phang, W F; Chao, Z X; Murukeshan, V M

    2005-09-10

    Fluorescence study plays a significant role in fingerprint detection when conventional chemical enhancement methods fail. The basic properties of fluorescence emission such as colour, intensity and lifetime could be well exploited in the detection of latent fingerprints under steady state and in dynamic methods. This paper describes a systematic study of fluorescence emission intensity from fingerprint samples treated with different magnetic powders. Understanding of suitable excitation wavelength required for getting maximum fluorescence emission intensity could be beneficial when selecting the appropriate fluorescent powders for the fingerprint detection. Lifetime study of fingerprints treated with various magnetic powders was also carried out. The importance of lifetime study is well explained through the time-resolved (TR) imaging of fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Results from the TR imaging study revealed an improvement in the fingerprint image contrast. This is significant when the print is deposited on fluorescing background and its emission wavelength is close to that of treated fingerprint.

  6. Frequency domain fluorescence lifetime microwell-plate platform for respirometry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, M. R.; Yale, G.; Van Ryckeghem, A.; Porterfield, D. M.

    2010-04-01

    Traditionally micro-well plate based platforms used in biology utilize fluorescence intensity based methods to measure processes of biological relevance. However, fluorescence intensity measurements suffer from calibration drift due to a variety of factors. Photobleaching and self-quenching of the fluorescent dyes cause the intensity signal to drop over the lifetime of sensor immobilized inside the well. Variation in turbidity of the sample during the course of the measurement affects the measured fluorescence intensity. In comparison, fluorescence lifetime measurements are not significantly affected by these factors because fluorescence lifetime is a physico-chemical property of the fluorescent dye. Reliable and inexpensive frequency domain fluorescence lifetime instrumentation platforms are possible because the greater tolerance for optical alignment, and because they can be performed using inexpensive light sources such as LEDs. In this paper we report the development of a frequency domain fluorescence lifetime well-plate platform utilizing an oxygen sensitive transition-metal ligand complex fluorophore with a lifetime in the microsecond range. The fluorescence lifetime dye is incorporated in a polymer matrix and immobilized on the base of micro-well of a 60 well micro-well plate. Respiration measurements are performed in both aqueous and non-aqueous environment. Respirometry measurements were recorded from single Daphnia magna egg in hard water. Daphnia is an aquatic organism, important in environmental toxicology as a standard bioassay and early warning indicator for water quality monitoring. Also respirometry measurements were recorded from Tribolium castaneum eggs, which are common pests in the processed flour industry. These eggs were subjected to mitochondrial electron transport chain inhibitor such as potassium cyanide (KCN) and its effects on egg respiration were measured in real-time.

  7. Molecular Fluorescence Lifetime Fluctuations: On the Possible Role of Conformational Effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vallée, R.A.L.; Vancso, G.J.; Hulst, van N.F.; Calbert, J.-P.; Cornil, J.; Brédas, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    The radiative lifetime of single 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'- etramethylindodicarbocyanine molecules, embedded in a polymer thin film, has been characterized. At room temperature the chemically identical molecules exhibit strong fluctuations in their fluorescence lifetime. The possible conformational

  8. Monitoring of labeled antisense oligonucleotides within living cells by using a multifrequency phase/modulation approach for fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocisova, E.; Sureau, F.; Praus, P.; Rosenberg, I.; Stepanek, J.; Turpin, P.-Y.

    2003-06-01

    A multifrequency phase/modulation method has been developed for our UV confocal laser microspectrofluorimeter (modulation frequency 1-200 MHz) for fluorescence lifetime measurements. This technique enables excited state lifetimes of mixed fluorescent components to be resolved and the fluorescence spectral contribution of each species to be determined without using any model spectra. This approach is very efficient for analyzing intracellular multicomponent fluorescence signals. Our effort is focused on the elucidation of the intracellular behavior of synthetic modified oligonucleotides - potential drugs for antisense and/or antigene strategies of curing viral and malignant diseases. A novel type single stranded dT 15 oligomer analogue containing isopolar, non-isosteric, phosphonate-based internucleotide linkages (3'-O-P-CH 2-O-5'), labeled with tetramethylrhodamine dye at the 3'-end, has been utilized. This method, along with fluorescence micro-imaging, was used to monitor uptake, distribution and stability of our modified oligonucleotide inside living cells. Binding to Escort™ vector leads to an homogeneous intracellular distribution of fluorescent labeled oligonucleotide, including nucleus staining, while point distribution only is achieved for its free form.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime plate reader: resolution and precision meet high-throughput.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Karl J; Peterson, Kurt C; Muretta, Joseph M; Higgins, Sutton E; Gillispie, Gregory D; Thomas, David D

    2014-11-01

    We describe a nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectrometer that acquires fluorescence decay waveforms from each well of a 384-well microplate in 3 min with signal-to-noise exceeding 400 using direct waveform recording. The instrument combines high-energy pulsed laser sources (5-10 kHz repetition rate) with a photomultiplier and high-speed digitizer (1 GHz) to record a fluorescence decay waveform after each pulse. Waveforms acquired from rhodamine or 5-((2-aminoethyl)amino) naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid dyes in a 384-well plate gave lifetime measurements 5- to 25-fold more precise than the simultaneous intensity measurements. Lifetimes as short as 0.04 ns were acquired by interleaving with an effective sample rate of 5 GHz. Lifetime measurements resolved mixtures of single-exponential dyes with better than 1% accuracy. The fluorescence lifetime plate reader enables multiple-well fluorescence lifetime measurements with an acquisition time of 0.5 s per well, suitable for high-throughput fluorescence lifetime screening applications.

  10. Determination of biological activity from fluorescence-lifetime measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Hartmann, P.

    2015-03-01

    The importance of fluorescence lifetime measurement as an optical analysis tool is growing. Many applications already exist in order to determine the fluorescence lifetime, but the majority of these require the addition of fluorescence-active substances to enable measurements. Every usage of such foreign materials has an associated risk. This paper investigates the use of auto-fluorescing substances in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) as a risk free alternative to fluorescence-active substance enabled measurements. The experimental setup uses a nitrogen laser with a pulse length of 350 ps and a wavelength of 337 nm. The excited sample emits light due to fluorescence of NADH/NADPH and collagen. A fast photodiode collects the light at the output of an appropriate high-pass edge-filter at 400 nm. Fluorescence lifetimes can be determined from the decay of the measurement signals, which in turn characterizes the individual materials and their surrounding environment. Information about the quantity of the fluorescence active substances can also be measured based on the received signal intensity. The correlation between the fluorescence lifetime and the metabolic state of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated and is presented here.

  11. In vivo multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumor tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantelhardt, Sven R; Kalasauskas, Darius; König, Karsten; Kim, Ella; Weinigel, Martin; Uchugonova, Aisada; Giese, Alf

    2016-05-01

    High resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging differentiates glioma from adjacent brain in native tissue samples ex vivo. Presently, multiphoton tomography is applied in clinical dermatology and experimentally. We here present the first application of multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging for in vivo imaging on humans during a neurosurgical procedure. We used a MPTflex™ Multiphoton Laser Tomograph (JenLab, Germany). We examined cultured glioma cells in an orthotopic mouse tumor model and native human tissue samples. Finally the multiphoton tomograph was applied to provide optical biopsies during resection of a clinical case of glioblastoma. All tissues imaged by multiphoton tomography were sampled and processed for conventional histopathology. The multiphoton tomograph allowed fluorescence intensity- and fluorescence lifetime imaging with submicron spatial resolution and 200 picosecond temporal resolution. Morphological fluorescence intensity imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging of tumor-bearing mouse brains and native human tissue samples clearly differentiated tumor and adjacent brain tissue. Intraoperative imaging was found to be technically feasible. Intraoperative image quality was comparable to ex vivo examinations. To our knowledge we here present the first intraoperative application of high resolution multiphoton tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging of human brain tumors in situ. It allowed in vivo identification and determination of cell density of tumor tissue on a cellular and subcellular level within seconds. The technology shows the potential of rapid intraoperative identification of native glioma tissue without need for tissue processing or staining.

  12. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (≈100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins.

  13. A New Lifetime Distribution with Bathtube and Unimodal Hazard Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga, Gladys D. C.; Louzada-Neto, Francisco; Cancho, Vicente G.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper we propose a new lifetime distribution which accommodate bathtub-shaped, unimodal, increasing and decreasing hazard function. Some special particular cases are derived, including the standard Weibull distribution. Maximum likelihood estimation is considered for estimate the tree parameters present in the model. The methodology is illustrated in a real data set on industrial devices on a lite test.

  14. Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, R. M.; Drachev, V. P.; Liu, Z.;

    2008-01-01

    Enhanced fluorescence is observed from dye molecules interacting with optical nanoantenna arrays. Elliptical gold dimers form individual nanoantennae with tunable plasmon resonances depending upon the geometry of the two particles and the size of the gap between them. A fluorescent dye, Rhodamine...

  15. Time-domain measurement of fluorescence lifetime variation with pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Alan G.; Power, Sarah; Glynn, Thomas J.; Morrison, John J.

    2001-07-01

    Advances in the design and miniaturization of the lasers and electronics required for Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) measurement of fluorescence lifetime have simplified the use of the time domain method. We have assembled a compact portable system that is capable of measuring lifetimes down to approximately 200 ps (with deconvolution) and that can operate at a range of excitation and emission wavelengths. The excitation sources are pulsed LEDs and laser diodes with a maximum pulse rate of 40 MHz and are easily interchanged. Furthermore, the development of violet and blue GaN LEDs and laser diodes is expanding the range of fluorophores available for fluorescence lifetime measurement of ion concentrations. pH sensitive fluorophores have a wide range of biological and clinical applications. The use of fluorescence lifetime rather than intensity to measure pH has a number of advantages including the reduction of effects due to the photobleaching, scattering, and intensity variations in the excitation source. Using our compact TCSPC instrumentation we have measured the dependence of fluorescence lifetimes on pH for a range of dyes in phosphate buffer over the physiologically important range of 6.0 to 8.0. Most dyes exhibit only a small variation in lifetime (pH range; however, acridine exhibits a large variation in lifetime and hence shows promise as a pH indicator.

  16. Assessing the photoaging process at sun exposed and non-exposed skin using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito Nogueira, Marcelo; Kurachi, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Photoaging is the skin premature aging due to exposure to ultraviolet light, which damage the collagen, elastin and can induce alterations on the skin cells DNA, and, then, it may evolve to precancerous lesions, which are widely investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime. The fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime analysis has been presented as a technique of great potential for biological tissue characterization at optical diagnostics. The main targeted fluorophores are NADH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide), which have free and bound states, each one with different average lifetimes. The average lifetimes for free and bound NADH and FAD change according to tissue metabolic alterations and may contribute to a non-invasive clinical investigation of injuries such as skin lesions. These lesions and the possible areas where they may develop can be interrogated using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy taking into account the variability of skin phototypes and the changes related to melanin, collagen and elastin, endogenous fluorophores which have emissions that spectrally overlap to the NADH and FAD emission. The objective of this study is to assess the variation on fluorescence lifetimes of normal skin at sun exposed and non-exposed areas and associate this variation to the photoaging process.

  17. Ruby fluorescence lifetime measurements for temperature determinations at high (p, T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes D.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Winkler, Björn

    2012-06-01

    The lifetime of the ruby R1 fluorescence line was measured as a function of pressure (up to about 20 GPa) and temperature (550 K) in an externally heated diamond anvil cell (DAC). At constant temperatures, the lifetime is increasing linearly with increasing pressure. The slope of the pressure dependence is constant up to a temperature of 450 K and it is decreasing at higher temperatures. At constant pressure, the lifetime is exponentially decreasing with increasing temperature. The (p, T)-dependence can be parametrized by the combination of a linear and an exponential function. This allows an accurate p, T-determination by the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy using Sm2+-doped strontium tetraborate and lifetime measurements of ruby, as the energy of the Sm2+ fluorescence is nearly temperature-independent.

  18. Quantitative mapping of aqueous microfluidic temperature with sub-degree resolution using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Emmelyn M; Iwai, Kaoru; Uchiyama, Seiichi; de Silva, A Prasanna; Magennis, Steven W; Jones, Anita C

    2010-05-21

    The use of a water-soluble, thermo-responsive polymer as a highly sensitive fluorescence-lifetime probe of microfluidic temperature is demonstrated. The fluorescence lifetime of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) labelled with a benzofurazan fluorophore is shown to have a steep dependence on temperature around the polymer phase transition and the photophysical origin of this response is established. The use of this unusual fluorescent probe in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) enables the spatial variation of temperature in a microfluidic device to be mapped, on the micron scale, with a resolution of less than 0.1 degrees C. This represents an increase in temperature resolution of an order of magnitude over that achieved previously by FLIM of temperature-sensitive dyes.

  19. Visualizing heterogeneity of photosynthetic properties of plant leaves with two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iermak, Ievgeniia; Vink, Jochem; Bader, Arjen N; Wientjes, Emilie; van Amerongen, Herbert

    2016-09-01

    Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) was used to analyse the distribution and properties of Photosystem I (PSI) and Photosystem II (PSII) in palisade and spongy chloroplasts of leaves from the C3 plant Arabidopsis thaliana and the C4 plant Miscanthus x giganteus. This was achieved by separating the time-resolved fluorescence of PSI and PSII in the leaf. It is found that the PSII antenna size is larger on the abaxial side of A. thaliana leaves, presumably because chloroplasts in the spongy mesophyll are "shaded" by the palisade cells. The number of chlorophylls in PSI on the adaxial side of the A. thaliana leaf is slightly higher. The C4 plant M. x giganteus contains both mesophyll and bundle sheath cells, which have a different PSI/PSII ratio. It is shown that the time-resolved fluorescence of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells can be analysed separately. The relative number of chlorophylls, which belong to PSI (as compared to PSII) in the bundle sheath cells is at least 2.5 times higher than in mesophyll cells. FLIM is thus demonstrated to be a useful technique to study the PSI/PSII ratio and PSII antenna size in well-defined regions of plant leaves without having to isolate pigment-protein complexes.

  20. Study of plant fluorescence prop erties based on laser-induced chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging technology%基于激光诱导叶绿素荧光寿命成像技术的植物荧光特性研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万文博; 华灯鑫; 乐静; 闫哲; 周春艳

    2015-01-01

    Plant fluorescence is a susceptible signal in plant fluorescence remote sensing detection. In order to solve this problem, a technique for plant chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging is presented to evaluate living status for plant growth and environmental monitoring. A concave lens is used to expand laser beam at a wavelength of 355 nm, and the living plant is exposed in this laser light source to excite chlorophyll fluorescence. And the chlorophyll fluorescence signals are detected by an intensification charge coupled device. Time resolved measurement method is used in this article, so that every time the same fluorescence signals can be excited by the same laser pulse. Meanwhile, the delay time needed for triggering intensification charge coupled device should be changed consecutively, and the whole discrete fluorescence signal can be obtained. The discrete fluorescence signals from the particular location points of the plant are fitted. An improved method of forward iterative deconvolution is used to retrieve the corresponding fluorescence lifetime, and the high-precision fluorescence lifetime can be obtained. Furthermore, the fluorescence lifetime values at all the location points are retrieved to obtain the distribution map of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime. This method can give the chlorophyll fluorescence image efficiently. The distribution map of fluorescence lifetime can more effectively reflect the plant chlorophyll concentration than the fluorescence intensity image does. The physical property of chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime from living plants has been studied preliminarily, indicating that the plant physiological status is related to its fluorescence lifetime to a certain extent; and the chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment have a subtle and complex correlation. In the future, the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime and plant environment will be expected to study with the cooperation of biophysicist.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using a single photon avalanche diode array sensor (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargocki, Piotr M.; Spence, David J.; Goldys, Ewa M.; Charbon, Edoardo; Bruschini, Claudio E.; Antalović, Ivan Michel; Burri, Samuel

    2017-02-01

    Single photon detectors allows us work with the weakest fluorescence signals. Single photon arrays, combined with ps-controlled gating allow us to create image maps of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be used for in-vivo discrimination of tissue activity. Here we present fluorescence lifetime imaging using the `SwissSPAD' sensor, a 512-by-128-pixel array of gated single photon detectors, fabricated in a standard high-voltage 0.35 μm CMOS process. We present a protocol for spatially resolved lifetime measurements where the lifetime can be retrieved for each pixel. We demonstrate the system by imaging patterns of Fluorescein and Rhodamine B on test slides, as well as measuring mixed samples to retrieve both components of the decay lifetime. The single photon sensitivity of the sensor creates a valuable instrument to perform live cell or live animal (in vivo) measurements of the weak autofluorescent signals, for example distinguishing unlabelled free and bound NADH. Our ultimate goal is to create a real time fluorescence lifetime imaging system, possibly integrated into augmented reality goggles, which could allow immediate discrimination of in vivo tissues.

  2. The use of DAPI fluorescence lifetime imaging for investigating chromatin condensation in human chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estandarte, Ana Katrina; Botchway, Stanley; Lynch, Christophe; Yusuf, Mohammed; Robinson, Ian

    2016-08-16

    Chromatin undergoes dramatic condensation and decondensation as cells transition between the different phases of the cell cycle. The organization of chromatin in chromosomes is still one of the key challenges in structural biology. Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), a technique which utilizes a fluorophore's fluorescence lifetime to probe changes in its environment, was used to investigate variations in chromatin compaction in fixed human chromosomes. Fixed human metaphase and interphase chromosomes were labeled with the DNA minor groove binder, DAPI, followed by measurement and imaging of the fluorescence lifetime using multiphoton excitation. DAPI lifetime variations in metaphase chromosome spreads allowed mapping of the differentially compacted regions of chromatin along the length of the chromosomes. The heteromorphic regions of chromosomes 1, 9, 15, 16, and Y, which consist of highly condensed constitutive heterochromatin, showed statistically significant shorter DAPI lifetime values than the rest of the chromosomes. Differences in the DAPI lifetimes for the heteromorphic regions suggest differences in the structures of these regions. DAPI lifetime variations across interphase nuclei showed variation in chromatin compaction in interphase and the formation of chromosome territories. The successful probing of differences in chromatin compaction suggests that FLIM has enormous potential for application in structural and diagnostic studies.

  3. Improved Fluorescent Protein Contrast and Discrimination by Optically Controlling Dark State Lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M

    2017-02-16

    Modulation and optical control of photoswitchable fluorescent protein (PS-FP) dark state lifetimes drastically improves sensitivity and selectivity in fluorescence imaging. The dark state population of PS-FPs generates an out-of-phase fluorescence component relative to the sinusoidally modulated 488 nm laser excitation. Because this apparent phase advanced emission results from slow recovery to the fluorescent manifold, we hasten recovery and, therefore, modulation frequency by varying coillumination intensity at 405 nm. As 405 nm illumination regenerates the fluorescent ground state more rapidly than via thermal recovery, we experimentally demonstrate that secondary illumination can control PS-FPs dark state lifetime to act as an additional dimension for discriminating spatially and spectrally overlapping emitters. This experimental combination of out of phase imaging after optical modulation (OPIOM) and synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe) optically controls the fluorescent protein dark state lifetimes for improved time resolution, with the resulting modulation-based selective signal recovery being quantitatively modeled. The combined experimental results and quantitative numerical simulations further demonstrate the potential of SAFIRe-OPIOM for wide-field biological imaging with improved speed, sensitivity, and optical resolution over other modulation-based fluorescence microscopies.

  4. 3D printed miniaturized spectral system for tissue fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe F.

    2016-04-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g. type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes like wound healing and fibrosis. Collagens exhibit autofluorescence when excited by ultra-violet light, distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Therefore, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system for collagens as a non-invasive probe for monitoring tissue in wound healing and scarring applications. A sine modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain (FD) fluorescence lifetime measurements under different wavelengths bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387nm, 409nm and 435nm. To achieve the minute scale of optomechanics, we employed a stereolithography based 3D printer with types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes.

  5. High-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy by analog mean-delay method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Youngjae; Kim, Donguk; Yang, Wenzhong; Kim, Dug Y.

    2010-02-01

    We have demonstrated the high-speed confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) by analog mean-delay (AMD) method. The AMD method is a new signal processing technique for calculation of fluorescence lifetime and it is very suitable for the high-speed confocal FLIM with good accuracy and photon economy. We achieved the acquisition speed of 7.7 frames per second for confocal FLIM imaging. Here, the highest photon detection rate for one pixel was larger than 125 MHz and averaged photon detection rate was more than 62.5 MHz. Based on our system, we successfully obtained a sequence of confocal fluorescence lifetime images of RBL-2H3 cell labeled with Fluo-3/AM and excited by 4αPDD (TRPV channel agonist) within one second.

  6. Exciton-polaron quenching in organic thin-film transistors studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Baunegaard With; Leißner, Till; Osadnik, Andreas

    Organic semiconductors show great potential in electronic and optical applications. However, a major challenge is the degradation of the semiconductor materials that cause a reduction in device performance. Here, we present our investigations of Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFT) based...... that correlates with the local charge density indicates a pronounced exciton quenching by the injected charges. Subsequent FLIM measurements on previously biased OTFT devices show a general decrease in fluorescence lifetime suggesting degradation of the organic semiconductor. This is correlated with the results...... on the material 5,5-bis(naphthyl)-2,20-bithiophene (NaT2). These types of OTFT have previously been shown to have light emitting properties. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) has been used to investigate the exciton-polaron quenching in biased OTFTs. A clear reduction in fluorescence lifetime...

  7. A corrected likelihood approach for the nonlinear transformation model with application to fluorescence lifetime measurements using exponential mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebafka, Tabea; Roueff, François; Souloumiac, Antoine

    2010-01-01

    A fast and efficient estimation method is proposed that compensates the distortion in nonlinear transformation models. A likelihood-based estimator is developed that can be computed by an EM-type algorithm. The consistency of the estimator is shown and its limit distribution is provided. The new estimator is particularly well suited for fluorescence lifetime measurements, where only the shortest arrival time of a random number of emitted fluorescence photons can be detected and where arrival times are often modeled by a mixture of exponential distributions. The method is evaluated on real and synthetic data. Compared to currently used methods in fluorescence, the new estimator should allow a reduction of the acquisition time of an order of magnitude.

  8. Temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetime of a fluorescent polymeric thermometer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), labeled by polarity and hydrogen bonding sensitive 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, Chie; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Ohwada, Tomohiko

    2008-03-13

    Fluorescent molecular thermometers showing temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes enable thermal mapping of small spaces such as a microchannel and a living cell. We report the temperature-dependent fluorescence lifetimes of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA), which is a random copolymer of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) and an environment-sensitive fluorescent monomer (DBD-AA) containing a 4-sulfamoyl-7-aminobenzofurazan structure. The average fluorescence lifetime of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) in aqueous solution increased from 4.22 to 14.1 ns with increasing temperature from 30 to 35 degrees C. This drastic change in fluorescence lifetime (27% increase per 1 degrees C) is the sharpest ever reported. Concentration independency, one of the advantages of fluorescence lifetime measurements, was seen in average fluorescence lifetime (13.7 +/- 0.18 ns) of poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) at 33 degrees C over a wide concentration range (0.005-1 w/v%). With increasing temperature, polyNIPAM units in poly(NIPAM-co-DBD-AA) change their structure from an extended form to a globular form, providing apolar and aprotic environments to the fluorescent DBD-AA units. Consequently, the environment-sensitive DBD-AA units translate the local environmental changes into the extension of the fluorescence lifetime. This role of the DBD-AA units was revealed by a study of solvent effects on fluorescence lifetime of a model environment-sensitive fluorophore.

  9. Time-domain microfluidic fluorescence lifetime flow cytometry for high-throughput Förster resonance energy transfer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedbal, Jakub; Visitkul, Viput; Ortiz-Zapater, Elena; Weitsman, Gregory; Chana, Prabhjoat; Matthews, Daniel R; Ng, Tony; Ameer-Beg, Simon M

    2015-02-01

    Sensing ion or ligand concentrations, physico-chemical conditions, and molecular dimerization or conformation change is possible by assays involving fluorescent lifetime imaging. The inherent low throughput of imaging impedes rigorous statistical data analysis on large cell numbers. We address this limitation by developing a fluorescence lifetime-measuring flow cytometer for fast fluorescence lifetime quantification in living or fixed cell populations. The instrument combines a time-correlated single photon counting epifluorescent microscope with microfluidics cell-handling system. The associated computer software performs burst integrated fluorescence lifetime analysis to assign fluorescence lifetime, intensity, and burst duration to each passing cell. The maximum safe throughput of the instrument reaches 3,000 particles per minute. Living cells expressing spectroscopic rulers of varying peptide lengths were distinguishable by Förster resonant energy transfer measured by donor fluorescence lifetime. An epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulation assay demonstrated the technique's capacity to selectively quantify EGF receptor phosphorylation in cells, which was impossible by measuring sensitized emission on a standard flow cytometer. Dual-color fluorescence lifetime detection and cell-specific chemical environment sensing were exemplified using di-4-ANEPPDHQ, a lipophilic environmentally sensitive dye that exhibits changes in its fluorescence lifetime as a function of membrane lipid order. To our knowledge, this instrument opens new applications in flow cytometry which were unavailable due to technological limitations of previously reported fluorescent lifetime flow cytometers. The presented technique is sensitive to lifetimes of most popular fluorophores in the 0.5-5 ns range including fluorescent proteins and is capable of detecting multi-exponential fluorescence lifetime decays. This instrument vastly enhances the throughput of experiments involving fluorescence

  10. Fluorescence-lifetime identification of biological agents using deep ultraviolet light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitta, P.; Kurilcik, N.; Jursenas, S.; Zukauskas, A.; Bakienė, E.; Zhang, J.; Katona, T.; Bilenko, Y.; Lunev, A.; Hu, X.; Deng, J.; Gaska, R.

    2005-10-01

    Recently developed deep-UV light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are already used in prototype fluorescence sensors for detection of hazardous biological agents. However, increasing of the sensor ability of discrimination against common interferents requires further development of measurement technique. In particular, LED-based fluorescence lifetime measurements are to be considered as a technique supplementary to fluorescence spectral and excitation measurements. Here we report on application of UVTOP® series deep-UV LEDs developed by Sensor Electronic Technology, Inc. for real-time measurements of fluorescence lifetime in the frequency domain. LEDs with the wavelengths of 280 nm (targeted to protein excitation) and 340 nm (for excitation of coenzymes NADH and flavins) were used. The output of the LEDs was harmonically modulated at frequencies up to 100 MHz and fluorescence lifetime on the nanosecond and subnanosecond scale was estimated by measuring the phase angle of the fluorescence signal in respect of the LED output. Dual-wavelength LED-based phase-resolved measurement technique was tested for discrimination of B. globigii against a variety of interferents such as diesel fuel, paper, cotton, dust, etc. We conclude that fluorescence phase measurements have potential to improve the discrimination ability of the "detect-to-warn" optical bioparticle sensors.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  12. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  13. Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging to investigate cell metabolism in malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rück, Angelika; Hauser, Carmen; Mosch, Simone; Kalinina, Sviatlana

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence-guided diagnosis of tumor tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results interfere with the outcome. Improvement through observation of cell metabolism might offer the solution, but needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. With respect to this, spectrally resolved multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging was investigated to analyze cell metabolism in metabolic phenotypes of malignant and nonmalignant oral mucosa cells. The time-resolved fluorescence characteristics of NADH were measured in cells of different origins. The fluorescence lifetime of bound and free NADH was calculated from biexponential fitting of the fluorescence intensity decay within different spectral regions. The mean lifetime was increased from nonmalignant oral mucosa cells to different squamous carcinoma cells, where the most aggressive cells showed the longest lifetime. In correlation with reports in the literature, the total amount of NADH seemed to be less for the carcinoma cells and the ratio of free/bound NADH was decreased from nonmalignant to squamous carcinoma cells. Moreover for squamous carcinoma cells a high concentration of bound NADH was found in cytoplasmic organelles (mainly mitochondria). This all together indicates that oxidative phosphorylation and a high redox potential play an important role in the energy metabolism of these cells.

  14. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of metabolic status in mesenchymal stem cell during adipogenic differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, A. V.; Dudenkova, V. V.; Shirmanova, M. V.; Bystrova, A. S.; Zagaynova, E. V.

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive imaging of cell metabolism is a valuable approach to assess the efficacy of stem cell therapy and understand the tissue development. In this study we analyzed metabolic trajectory of the mesenchymal stem cells (MCSs) during differentiation into adipocytes by measuring fluorescence lifetimes of free and bound forms of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Undifferentiated MSCs and MSCs on the 5, 12, 19, 26 days of differentiation were imaged on a Zeiss 710 microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) system B&H (Germany). Fluorescence of NAD(P)H and FAD was excited at 750 nm and 900 nm, respectively, by a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and detected in a range 455-500 nm and 500-550 nm, correspondingly. We observed the changes in the NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence lifetimes and their relative contributions in the differentiated adipocytes compare to undifferentiated MSCs. Increase of fluorescence lifetimes of the free and bound forms of NAD(P)H and the contribution of protein-bound NAD(P)H was registered, that can be associated with a metabolic switch from glycolysis to oxidative phosphorylation and/or synthesis of lipids in adipogenically differentiated MSCs. We also found that the contribution of protein-bound FAD decreased during differentiation. After carrying out appropriate biochemical measurements, the observed changes in cellular metabolism can potentially serve to monitor stem cell differentiation by FLIM.

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  16. [The analysis of sinusoidal modulated method used for measuring fluorescence lifetime].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying; Huang, Shi-hua

    2007-12-01

    This paper has built a system with a sinusoidal modulated LED as the excitation source. Such exciter was used upon the sample Eu2 L'3 x nH2O (L' = C4H4O4). Both the excitation light and the 5Do-7F2 emission of Eu3+ ion were measured. Fluorescence lifetime, which approximate to 0.680 ms, can then be obtained from the measured excitation and fluorescence waveforms by non-linear least square curve fitting based on the principle of phase-shift measurement of fluorescence lifetime. Data processing methods considering respectively the high order harmonics in the modulation and multi-exponential decay of the fluorescence were discussed. A method of utilizing Fourier series expandedness to amendatory the result was put forward. Accordingly, the applicability for phase-shift method was expanded as well as a more exact result was acquired.

  17. The Gray Institute 'open' high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, P R; Tullis, I D C; Pierce, G P; Newman, R G; Prentice, J; Rowley, M I; Matthews, D R; Ameer-Beg, S M; Vojnovic, B

    2013-08-01

    We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this 'open' design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam 'end-stations' at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Microscopy published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Acceptance sampling reliability test plans for alpha distributed lifetime

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Maroof A.; Islam, H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Determining the acceptability of any product, reliability sampling plans are used. In this paper, reliability sampling plans for truncated life test are developed when the lifetimes of a test follow an alpha distribution. The sampling plan proposed here can save the test time in practical situations. Sampling plans are established through an algorithm. Moreover, some tables are provided for the proposed sampling plans so that proposed method can be used conveniently for the practitioner. Oper...

  19. Real-time fluorescence lifetime actuation for cell sorting using a CMOS SPAD silicon photomultiplier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Francescopaolo Mattioli Della; Nedbal, Jakub; Tyndall, David; Krstajić, Nikola; Li, David Day-Uei; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Henderson, Robert K

    2016-02-15

    Time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) is a fundamental fluorescence lifetime measurement technique offering high signal to noise ratio (SNR). However, its requirement for complex software algorithms for histogram processing restricts throughput in flow cytometers and prevents on-the-fly sorting of cells. We present a single-point digital silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) detector accomplishing real-time fluorescence lifetime-activated actuation targeting cell sorting applications in flow cytometry. The sensor also achieves burst-integrated fluorescence lifetime (BIFL) detection by TCSPC. The SiPM is a single-chip complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) sensor employing a 32×32 single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) array and eight pairs of time-interleaved time to digital converters (TI-TDCs) with a 50 ps minimum timing resolution. The sensor's pile-up resistant embedded center of mass method (CMM) processor accomplishes low-latency measurement and thresholding of fluorescence lifetime. A digital control signal is generated with a 16.6 μs latency for cell sorter actuation allowing a maximum cell throughput of 60,000 cells per second and an error rate of 0.6%.

  20. Fluorescence lifetime biosensing with DNA microarrays and a CMOS-SPAD imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraud, G.; Schulze, H.; Li, D.U.; Bachmann, T.T.; Crain, J.; Tyndall, D.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.; Arlt, J.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime of dye molecules is a sensitive reporter on local microenvironment which is generally independent of fluorophores concentration and can be used as a means of discrimination between molecules with spectrally overlapping emission. It is therefore a potentially powerful multiplexe

  1. Fluorescence lifetime of emitters with broad homogeneous linewidths modified in opal photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolaev, Ivan S.; Lodahl, Peter; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics of spontaneous emission from dye molecules embedded in opal photonic crystals. Fluorescence lifetimes of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye were measured as a function of both optical frequency and crystal lattice parameter of the polystyrene opals. Due to the broad homogene...

  2. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of lipids during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Sik; Won, Young Jae; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is becoming a big health problem in these days. Since increased body weight is due to increased number and size of the triglyceride-storing adipocytes, many researchers are working on differentiation conditions and processes of adipocytes. Adipocytes also work as regulators of whole-body energy homeostasis by secreting several proteins that regulate processes as diverse as haemostasis, blood pressure, immune function, angiogenesis and energy balance. 3T3-L1 cells are widely used cell line for studying adipogenesis because it can differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype under appropriate conditions. In this paper, we propose an effective fluorescence lifetime imaging technique which can easily distinguish lipids in membrane and those in lipid droplets. Nile red dyes are attached to lipids in 3T3-L1 cells. Fluorescence lifetime images were taken for 2 week during differentiation procedure of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes. We used 488 nm pulsed laser with 5MHz repetition rate and emission wavelength is 520 nm of Nile Red fluorescent dye. Results clearly show that the lifetime of Nile red in lipid droplets are smaller than those in cell membrane. Our results suggest that fluorescence lifetime imaging can be a very powerful tool to monitor lipid droplet formation in adipocytes from 3T3-L1 cells.

  3. Towards sensitive, high-throughput, biomolecular assays based on fluorescence lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioanna Skilitsi, Anastasia; Turko, Timothé; Cianfarani, Damien; Barre, Sophie; Uhring, Wilfried; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Léonard, Jérémie

    2017-09-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence detection for robust sensing of biomolecular interactions is developed by implementing time-correlated single photon counting in high-throughput conditions. Droplet microfluidics is used as a promising platform for the very fast handling of low-volume samples. We illustrate the potential of this very sensitive and cost-effective technology in the context of an enzymatic activity assay based on fluorescently-labeled biomolecules. Fluorescence lifetime detection by time-correlated single photon counting is shown to enable reliable discrimination between positive and negative control samples at a throughput as high as several hundred samples per second.

  4. Constraining the lifetime and opening angle of quasars using fluorescent Ly a emission: the case of Q0420-388

    CERN Document Server

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Rakic, Olivera; Worseck, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    A toy model is developed to understand how the spatial distribution of fluorescent emitters in the vicinity of bright quasars could be affected by the geometry of the quasar bi-conical radiation field and by the quasar lifetime. We then compare the predictions of this model to a sample of high equivalent width Ly a emitters (EW0 > 100 A) that were identified in a deep narrow-band 36x36 arcmin2 image centered on the luminous quasar Q0420-388. These are identified to the edge of the field and show some evidence of an azimuthal asymmetry on the sky of the type expected if the quasar is radiating in a bipolar cone. If these sources are being fluorescently illuminated by the quasar, then the two most distant sources require a lifetime of at least 15 Myr for an opening angle of 60 degrees or more, increasing to more than 40 Myr if the opening angle is reduced to a minimum 30 degrees. The overall distribution of all of the sources across the field gives best fit lifetimes in the range 20 < t < 50 Myr for openi...

  5. Evidence for covalent binding of epicocconone with proteins from synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetimes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debashis Panda; Anindya Datta

    2007-03-01

    Synchronous fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopic studies that reveal the interaction of epicocconone with human serum albumin is significantly different from its interaction with surfactant assemblies. This observation, along with steady-state fluorescence data, indicates groundstate interaction between the fluorophore epicocconone and the protein. Similarity in fluorescence properties with the adduct of the fluorophore with -butylamine indicates that bonding occurs at the Nterminus of the protein.

  6. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan;

    2016-01-01

    In-memory caching of intermediate data and eager combining of data in shuffle buffers have been shown to be very effective in minimizing the re-computation and I/O cost in distributed data processing systems like Spark and Flink. However, it has also been widely reported that these techniques would...... create a large amount of long-living data objects in the heap, which may quickly saturate the garbage collector, especially when handling a large dataset, and hence would limit the scalability of the system. To eliminate this problem, we propose a lifetime-based memory management framework, which......, by automatically analyzing the user-defined functions and data types, obtains the expected lifetime of the data objects, and then allocates and releases memory space accordingly to minimize the garbage collection overhead. In particular, we present Deca, a concrete implementation of our proposal on top of Spark...

  7. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan;

    2016-01-01

    , by automatically analyzing the user-defined functions and data types, obtains the expected lifetime of the data objects, and then allocates and releases memory space accordingly to minimize the garbage collection overhead. In particular, we present Deca, a concrete implementation of our proposal on top of Spark......In-memory caching of intermediate data and eager combining of data in shuffle buffers have been shown to be very effective in minimizing the re-computation and I/O cost in distributed data processing systems like Spark and Flink. However, it has also been widely reported that these techniques would...... create a large amount of long-living data objects in the heap, which may quickly saturate the garbage collector, especially when handling a large dataset, and hence would limit the scalability of the system. To eliminate this problem, we propose a lifetime-based memory management framework, which...

  8. Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚祎

    2004-01-01

    @@ 继ESPN刊出同名杂志之后,2003年赫斯特公司(Hearst Corp.)和迪斯尼(Walt Disney Co.)的合作促成了一本新杂志的诞生:(Lifetime),其目标读者是成百万收看同名有线电视网节目的妇女们.

  9. Real-Time Visualization of Tissue Surface Biochemical Features Derived From Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, Dimitris; Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R; Marcu, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Fiber based fluorescence lifetime imaging has shown great potential for intraoperative diagnosis and guidance of surgical procedures. Here we describe a novel method addressing a significant challenge for the practical implementation of this technique, i.e., the real-time display of the quantified biochemical or functional tissue properties superimposed on the interrogated area. Specifically, an aiming beam (450 nm) generated by a continuous-wave laser beam was merged with the pulsed fluorescence excitation light in a single delivery/collection fiber and then imaged and segmented using a color-based algorithm. We demonstrate that this approach enables continuous delineation of the interrogated location and dynamic augmentation of the acquired frames with the corresponding fluorescence decay parameters. The method was evaluated on a fluorescence phantom and fresh tissue samples. Current results demonstrate that 34 frames per second can be achieved for augmenting videos of 640 × 512 pixels resolution. Also we show that the spatial resolution of the fluorescence lifetime map depends on the tissue optical properties, the scanning speed, and the frame rate. The dice similarity coefficient between the fluorescence phantom and the reconstructed maps was estimated to be as high as 93%. The reported method could become a valuable tool for augmenting the surgeon's field of view with diagnostic information derived from the analysis of fluorescence lifetime data in real-time using handheld, automated, or endoscopic scanning systems. Current method provides also a means for maintaining the tissue light exposure within safety limits. This study provides a framework for using an aiming beam with other point spectroscopy applications.

  10. A fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe using photonic crystal fiber for nanoscale thermometry based on fluorescence-lifetime measurement of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Takuro; Taguchi, Yoshihiro; Saiki, Toshiharu; Nagasaka, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called fluorescence near-field optics thermal nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN). Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se quantum dots (QDs). For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF). The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  11. A Fusion-Spliced Near-Field Optical Fiber Probe Using Photonic Crystal Fiber for Nanoscale Thermometry Based on Fluorescence-Lifetime Measurement of Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiharu Saiki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel nanoscale temperature-measurement method using fluorescence in the near-field called Fluorescence Near-field Optics Thermal Nanoscopy (Fluor-NOTN. Fluor-NOTN enables the temperature distributions of nanoscale materials to be measured in vivo/in situ. The proposed method measures temperature by detecting the temperature dependent fluorescence lifetimes of Cd/Se Quantum Dots (QDs. For a high-sensitivity temperature measurement, the auto-fluorescence generated from a fiber probe should be reduced. In order to decrease the noise, we have fabricated a novel near-field optical-fiber probe by fusion-splicing a photonic crystal fiber (PCF and a conventional single-mode fiber (SMF. The validity of the novel fiber probe was assessed experimentally by evaluating the auto-fluorescence spectra of the PCF. Due to the decrease of auto-fluorescence, a six- to ten-fold increase of S/N in the near-field fluorescence lifetime detection was achieved with the newly fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe. Additionally, the near-field fluorescence lifetime of the quantum dots was successfully measured by the fabricated fusion-spliced near-field optical fiber probe at room temperature, and was estimated to be 10.0 ns.

  12. A chloride ion nanosensor for time-resolved fluorimetry and fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J; Orte, Angel; Hall, Elizabeth A H; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M; Talavera, Eva M

    2012-03-21

    In this work, the first CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD) photoluminescence lifetime based chloride ion nanosensor is reported. The acridinium dication lucigenin was self-assembled on the surface of negatively charged mercaptopropionic acid capped QDs to achieve QD-lucigenin conjugates. Upon attachment, a drastic decrease of the photoluminescence lifetime of both QD nanoparticles and lucigenin is observed by virtue of a charge transfer mechanism. Since lucigenin is a chloride-sensitive indicator dye, the photoluminescence decay of QD-lucigenin conjugates changes by adding chloride ion. The photoluminescence lifetime of the QDs in the conjugate increases after reacting with Cl(-), but also shows a concomitant decrease in the lucigenin lifetime immobilized on the surface. The photoluminescence lifetime of QD-lucigenin nanosensors shows a linear response in the Cl(-) concentration range between 0.5 and 50 mM. Moreover, the ratio τ(ave)(QD)/τ(ave)(luc) can be used as an analytical signal since the lifetime ratio presents a linear response in the same Cl(-) concentration range. The system also shows good selectivity towards most of the main anions and molecules that can be found in biological fluids. These nanosensors have been satisfactorily applied for Cl(-) determination in simulated intracellular media with high sensitivity and high selectivity. Finally, we demonstrate the potential application of the proposed nanosensor in confocal fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These results show the promising application of the QD-lucigenin nanosensors in FLIM, particularly for intracellular sensing, with the invaluable advantages of the time-resolved fluorescence techniques.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of endogenous molecules in live mouse cancer models (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svindrych, Zdenek; Wang, Tianxiong; Hu, Song; Periasamy, Ammasi

    2017-02-01

    NADH and FAD are important endogenous fluorescent coenzymes participating in key enzymatic reactions of cellular metabolism. While fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD have been used to determine the redox state of cells and tissues, this simple approach breaks down in the case of deep-tissue intravital imaging due to depth- and wavelength-dependent light absorption and scattering. To circumvent this limitation, our research focuses on fluorescence lifetimes of two-photon excited NADH and FAD emission to study the metabolic state of live tissues. In our custom-built scanning microscope we combine tunable femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser (operating at 740 nm for NADH excitation and 890 nm for FAD excitation), two GaAsP hybrid detectors for registering individual fluorescence photons and two Becker and Hickl time correlator boards for high precision lifetime measurements. Together with our rigorous FLIM analysis approach (including image segmentation, multi-exponential decay fitting and detailed statistical analysis) we are able to detect metabolic changes in cancer xenografts (human pancreatic cancer MPanc96 cells injected subcutaneously into the ear of an immunodeficient nude mouse), relative to surrounding healthy tissue. Advantageously, with the same instrumentation we can also take high-resolution and high-contrast images of second harmonic signal (SHG) originating from collagen fibers of both the healthy skin and the growing tumor. The combination of metabolic measurements (NADH and FAD lifetime) and morphological information (collagen SHG) allows us to follow the tumor growth in live mouse model and the changes in tumor microenvironment.

  14. Dynamic noninvasive monitoring of renal function in vivo by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Akers, Walter J.; Berezin, Mikhail Y.; Lee, Hyeran; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-03-01

    Kidneys normally filter the blood of excess salts and metabolic products, such as urea, while retaining plasma proteins. In diseases such as multiple myeloma and diabetes mellitus, the renal function is compromised and protein escapes into the urine. In this study, we present the use of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLI) to image excess serum protein in urine (proteinuria). The near-infrared fluorescent dye LS-288 has distinct lifetimes when bound to protein versus free in solution, providing contrast between the protein-rich viscera and the mostly protein-free bladder. FLI with LS-288 in mice revealed that fluorescence lifetime (FLT) differences in the bladder relative to surrounding tissues was due to the fractional contributions of the bound and unbound dye molecules. The FLT of LS-288 decreased in the case of proteinuria while fluorescence intensity was unchanged. The results show that FLI can be useful for the dynamic imaging of protein-losing nephropathy due to diabetes mellitus and other renal diseases and suggest the potential use of the FLI to distinguish tumors from fluid-filled cysts in the body.

  15. Protein-protein interaction analysis in single microfluidic droplets using FRET and fluorescence lifetime detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Christian; Retzbach, Heiko; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-07-21

    Herein, we demonstrate the feasibility of a protein-protein interaction analysis and reaction progress monitoring in microfluidic droplets using FRET and microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurements. The fabrication of microdroplet chips using soft- and photolithographic techniques is demonstrated and the resulting chips reliably generate microdroplets of 630 pL and 6.71 nL at frequencies of 7.9 and 0.75 Hz, respectively. They were used for detection of protein-protein interactions in microdroplets using a model system of Alexa Fluor 488 labelled biotinylated BSA, Alexa Fluor 594 labelled streptavidin and unlabelled chicken egg white avidin. These microchips could be used for quantitative detection of avidin and streptavidin in microdroplets in direct and competitive assay formats with nanomolar detection limits, corresponding to attomole protein amounts. Four droplets were found to be sufficient for analytical determination. Fluorescence intensity ratio and fluorescence lifetime measurements were performed and compared for microdroplet FRET determination. A competitive on-chip binding assay for determination of unlabelled avidin using fluorescence lifetime detection could be performed within 135 s only.

  16. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  18. Fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy in multiple-scattering environments: an application to biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerussi, Albert E.; Gratton, Enrico; Fantini, Sergio

    1999-07-01

    Over the past few years, there has been significant research activity devoted to the application of fluorescence spectroscopy to strongly scattering media, where photons propagate diffusely. Much of this activity focused on fluorescence as a source of contrast enhancement in optical tomography. Our efforts have emphasized the quantitative recovery of fluorescence parameters for spectroscopy. Using a frequency-domain diffusion-based model, we have successfully recovered the lifetime, the absolute quantum yield, the fluorophore concentration, and the emission spectrum of the fluorophore, as well as the absorption and the reduced scattering coefficients at the emission wavelength of the medium in different measurements. In this contribution, we present a sensitive monitor of the binding between ethidium bromide and bovine cells in fresh milk. The spectroscopic contrast was the approximately tenfold increase in the ethidium bromide lifetime upon binding to DNA. The measurement clearly demonstrated that we could quantitatively measure the density of cells in the milk, which is an application vital to the tremendous economic burden of bovine subclinical mastitis detection. Furthermore, we may in principle use the spirit of this technique as a quantitative monitor of the binding of fluorescent drugs inside tissues. This is a first step towards lifetime spectroscopy in tissues.

  19. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging monitors binding of specific probes to cancer biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Ardeshirpour

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in choosing a treatment strategy for cancer is characterization of biomarkers in cancer cells. Particularly, recent advances in Monoclonal Antibodies (MAB as primary-specific drugs targeting tumor receptors show that their efficacy depends strongly on characterization of tumor biomarkers. Assessment of their status in individual patients would facilitate selection of an optimal treatment strategy, and the continuous monitoring of those biomarkers and their binding process to the therapy would provide a means for early evaluation of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention. In this study we have demonstrated for the first time in live animals that the fluorescence lifetime can be used to detect the binding of targeted optical probes to the extracellular receptors on tumor cells in vivo. The rationale was that fluorescence lifetime of a specific probe is sensitive to local environment and/or affinity to other molecules. We attached Near-InfraRed (NIR fluorescent probes to Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 (HER2/neu-specific Affibody molecules and used our time-resolved optical system to compare the fluorescence lifetime of the optical probes that were bound and unbound to tumor cells in live mice. Our results show that the fluorescence lifetime changes in our model system delineate HER2 receptor bound from the unbound probe in vivo. Thus, this method is useful as a specific marker of the receptor binding process, which can open a new paradigm in the "image and treat" concept, especially for early evaluation of the efficacy of the therapy.

  20. Time Truncated Testing Strategy using Multiple Testers: Lognormal Distributed Lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itrat Batool Naqvi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, group acceptance sampling plan proposed by Aslam et al. (2011 is reconsidered when the lifetime variant of the test item follows lognormal distribution. The optimal plan parameters are obtained by considering various pre-specified parameters. The plan parameters are obtained using the non-linear optimization solution using two points approach. The advantage of the proposed plan is discussed over the existing plan using the single point approach and the proposed plan is more efficient than the existing plan.

  1. Efficacy of photodynamic therapy against larvae of Aedes aegypti: confocal microscopy and fluorescence-lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, L. M.; Pratavieira, S.; Inada, N. M.; Kurachi, C.; Corbi, J.; Guimarães, F. E. G.; Bagnato, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Recently a few demonstration on the use of Photodynamic Reaction as possibility to eliminate larvae that transmit diseases for men has been successfully demonstrated. This promising tool cannot be vastly used due to many problems, including the lake of investigation concerning the mechanisms of larvae killing as well as security concerning the use of photosensitizers in open environment. In this study, we investigate some of the mechanisms in which porphyrin (Photogem) is incorporated on the Aedes aegypti larvae previously to illumination and killing. Larvae at second instar were exposed to the photosensitizer and after 30 minutes imaged by a confocal fluorescence microscope. It was observed the presence of photosensitizer in the gut and at the digestive tract of the larva. Fluorescence-Lifetime Imaging showed greater photosensitizer concentration in the intestinal wall of the samples, which produces a strong decrease of the Photogem fluorescence lifetime. For Photodynamic Therapy exposition to different light doses and concentrations of porphyrin were employed. Three different light sources (LED, Fluorescent lamp, Sun light) also were tested. Sun light and fluorescent lamp shows close to 100% of mortality after 24 hrs. of illumination. These results indicate the potential use of photodynamic effect against the LARVAE of Aedes aegypti.

  2. High-Speed Fluorescence Microscopy: Lifetime Imaging in the Biomedical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Ammasi; Wang, Xue F.; Wodnick, Pawel; Gordon, Gerald W.; Kwon, Seongwook; Diliberto, Pamela A.; Herman, Brian

    1995-02-01

    The ability to observe the behavior of living cells and tissues provides unparalleled access to information regarding the organization and dynamics of complex cellular structures. While great strides have been made over the past 30 to 40 years in the design and application of a variety of novel optical microscopic techniques, until recently, it has not been possible to image biological phenomena that occur over very short time periods (nanosecond to millisecond) or over short distances (10 to 1000 [Angstrom capital A, ring]). However, the recent combination of (1) very rapidly gated and sensitive image intensifiers and (2) the ability to deliver fluorescence excitation energy to intact living biological specimens in a pulsed or sinusoidally modulated fashion has allowed such measurements to become a reality through the imaging of the lifetimes of fluorescent molecules. This capability has resulted in the ability to observe the dynamic organization and interaction of cellular components on a spatial and temporal scale previously not possible using other microscopic techniques. This paper discusses the implementation of a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (FLIM) and provides a review of some of the applications of such an instrument. These include measurements of receptor topography and subunit interactions using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), fluorescence anisotropy of phospholipids in cell membranes, cytosolic free calcium (Ca2+)i and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in clinical cervicovaginal smears.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime measurement with confocal endomicroscopy for direct analysis of tissue biochemistry in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjae Won

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Confocal endomicroscopy is a powerful tool for in vivo real-time imaging at cellular resolution inside a living body without tissue resection. Microscopic fluorescence lifetime measurement can provide information about localized biochemical conditions such as pH and the concentrations of oxygen and calcium. We hypothesized that combining these techniques could assist accurate cancer discrimination by providing both biochemical and morphological information. We designed a dual-mode experimental setup for confocal endomicroscopic imaging and fluorescence lifetime measurement and applied it to a mouse xenograft model of activated human pancreatic cancer generated by subcutaneous injection of AsPC-1 tumor cells. Using this method with pH-sensitive sodium fluorescein injection, we demonstrated discrimination between normal and cancerous tissues in a living mouse. With further development, this method may be useful for clinical cancer detection.

  4. Use of Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) as a Timer of Cell Cycle S Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkelman, Irina A; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Foley, Tara; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of thymidine analogues in replicating DNA, coupled with antibody and fluorophore staining, allows analysis of cell proliferation, but is currently limited to monolayer cultures, fixed cells and end-point assays. We describe a simple microscopy imaging method for live real-time analysis of cell proliferation, S phase progression over several division cycles, effects of anti-proliferative drugs and other applications. It is based on the prominent (~ 1.7-fold) quenching of fluorescence lifetime of a common cell-permeable nuclear stain, Hoechst 33342 upon the incorporation of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) in genomic DNA and detection by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We show that quantitative and accurate FLIM technique allows high-content, multi-parametric dynamic analyses, far superior to the intensity-based imaging. We demonstrate its uses with monolayer cell cultures, complex 3D tissue models of tumor cell spheroids and intestinal organoids, and in physiological study with metformin treatment.

  5. Differentiating quiescent cancer cell populations in heterogeneous samples with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaster, Tiffany M.; Walsh, Alex J.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2016-03-01

    Measurement of relative fluorescence intensities of NAD(P)H and FAD with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) allows metabolic characterization of cancerous populations and correlation to treatment response. However, quiescent populations of cancer cells introduce heterogeneity to the tumor and exhibit resistance to standard therapies, requiring a better understanding of this influence on treatment outcome. Significant differences were observed between proliferating and quiescent cell populations upon comparison of respective redox ratios (pFAD lifetimes (p<0.05) across monolayers and in mixed samples. These results demonstrate that metabolic activity may function as a marker for separation and characterization of proliferating and quiescent cancer cells within mixed samples, contributing to comprehensive investigation of heterogeneity-dependent drug resistance.

  6. Hardware-friendly bi-exponential fluorescence lifetime imaging algorithms and phasor approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David; Chen, Yu

    2015-07-01

    A newly developed hardware-friendly non-iterative fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) analysis method was verified in an FPGA chip. Its performances were also demonstrated on two-photon FLIM images of gold nanorods (GNRs)-Cy5 labelled Hela cells. The results obtained by the proposed method can be presented in a polor plot to be compared to the widely used phasor (Phasor) approach. Combining our method with Phasor will be very useful in FLIM analysis.

  7. Three-dimensional printed miniaturized spectral system for collagen fluorescence lifetime measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Luwei; Koslakiewicz, Ronald; Mahmoud, Mohamad; Fahs, Mehdi; Liu, Rui; Lo, Joe Fujiou

    2016-07-01

    Various types of collagens, e.g., type I and III, represent the main load-bearing components in biological tissues. Their composition changes during processes such as wound healing and fibrosis. When excited by ultraviolet light, collagens exhibit autofluorescence distinguishable by their unique fluorescent lifetimes across a range of emission wavelengths. Here, we designed a miniaturized spectral-lifetime detection system as a noninvasive probe for monitoring tissue collagen compositions. A sine-modulated LED illumination was applied to enable frequency domain fluorescence lifetime measurements under three wavelength bands, separated via a series of longpass dichroics at 387, 409, and 435 nm. We employed a lithography-based three-dimensional (3-D) printer with modeling to simulate the effect of thermal (from LED) and mechanical (from handling) strain on the optical system. The geometry was further optimized with ray tracing to form the final 3-D printed structure. Using this device, the phase shift and demodulation of collagen types were measured, where the separate spectral bands enhanced the differentiation of their lifetimes. This system represents a low cost, handheld probe for clinical tissue monitoring applications.

  8. A simple model for skewed species-lifetime distributions

    KAUST Repository

    Murase, Yohsuke

    2010-06-11

    A simple model of a biological community assembly is studied. Communities are assembled by successive migrations and extinctions of species. In the model, species are interacting with each other. The intensity of the interaction between each pair of species is denoted by an interaction coefficient. At each time step, a new species is introduced to the system with randomly assigned interaction coefficients. If the sum of the coefficients, which we call the fitness of a species, is negative, the species goes extinct. The species-lifetime distribution is found to be well characterized by a stretched exponential function with an exponent close to 1/2. This profile agrees not only with more realistic population dynamics models but also with fossil records. We also find that an age-independent and inversely diversity-dependent mortality, which is confirmed in the simulation, is a key mechanism accounting for the distribution. © IOP Publishing Ltd and Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.

  9. A comparative study of metabolic state of stem cells during osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Cellular metabolic state can serve as a biomarker to indicate the differentiation potential of stem cells into other specialized cell lineages. In this study, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was applied to determine the fluorescence lifetime and the amounts of the auto-fluorescent metabolic co-factor reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to elucidate the cellular metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation processes. 2P-FLIM provides the free to protein-bound NADH ratio which can serve as the indicator of cellular metabolic state. We measured NADH fluorescence lifetime at 0, 7, and 14 days after hMSCs were induced for either osteogenesis or adipogenesis. In both cases, the average fluorescence lifetime increased significantly at day 14 (P stem cells into other specialized cell lineages.

  10. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  11. Temperature and bath gas composition dependence of effective fluorescence lifetimes of toluene excited at 266 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, S.; Dreier, T.; Schulz, C.

    2011-05-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of gas-phase toluene upon picosecond excitation at 266 nm were investigated as a function of temperature (296-1074 K) and bath gas composition (varying amounts of N 2, O 2, and CO 2) at 1 bar total pressure with a temporal resolution of 50 ps. In the investigated temperature range the effective fluorescence lifetime drops with increasing temperature from 46 ± 3 ns to 0.05 ± 0.01 ns in N 2 and CO 2. In the presence of O 2 at constant temperature the lifetimes also decrease significantly (e.g., from 46 ± 3 ns without O 2 to 0.63 ± 0.05 ns in air at room temperature), whereas lifetimes are independent on the CO 2 concentration. The implications of the results for the existing phenomenological model of predicting temporally integrated fluorescence intensities in toluene [W. Koban, J.D. Koch, R.K. Hanson, C. Schulz, Appl. Phys. B 80 (2005) 777] are discussed.

  12. Shifts in the fluorescence lifetime of EGFP during bacterial phagocytosis measured by phase-sensitive flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyan; Houston, Kevin D.; Houston, Jessica P.

    2017-01-01

    Phase-sensitive flow cytometry (PSFC) is a technique in which fluorescence excited state decay times are measured as fluorescently labeled cells rapidly transit a finely focused, frequency-modulated laser beam. With PSFC the fluorescence lifetime is taken as a cytometric parameter to differentiate intracellular events that are challenging to distinguish with standard flow cytometry. For example PSFC can report changes in protein conformation, expression, interactions, and movement, as well as differences in intracellular microenvironments. This contribution focuses on the latter case by taking PSFC measurements of macrophage cells when inoculated with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-expressing E. coli. During progressive internalization of EGFP-E. coli, fluorescence lifetimes were acquired and compared to control groups. It was hypothesized that fluorescence lifetimes would correlate well with phagocytosis because phagosomes become acidified and the average fluorescence lifetime of EGFP is known to be affected by pH. We confirmed that average EGFP lifetimes consistently decreased (3 to 2 ns) with inoculation time. The broad significance of this work is the demonstration of how high-throughput fluorescence lifetime measurements correlate well to changes that are not easily tracked by intensity-only cytometry, which is affected by heterogeneous protein expression, cell-to-cell differences in phagosome formation, and number of bacterium engulfed.

  13. From morphology to clinical pathophysiology: multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging at patients' bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mess, Christian; Zens, Katharina; Gorzelanny, Christian; Metze, Dieter; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.; Huck, Volker

    2017-02-01

    Application of multiphoton microscopy in the field of biomedical research and advanced diagnostics promises unique insights into the pathophysiology of skin diseases. By means of multiphoton excitation, endogenous biomolecules like NADH, collagen or elastin show autofluorescence or second harmonic generation. Thus, these molecules provide information about the subcellular morphology, epidermal architecture and physiological condition of the skin. To gain a deeper understanding of the linkage between cellular structure and physiological processes, non-invasive multiphotonbased intravital tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) were combined within the scopes of inflammatory skin, chronic wounds and drug delivery in clinical application. The optical biopsies generated via MPT were morphologically analyzed and aligned with classical skin histology. Because of its subcellular resolution, MPT provided evidence of a redistribution of mitochondria in keratinocytes, indicating an altered cellular metabolism. Independent morphometric algorithms reliably showed a perinuclear accumulation in lesional skin in contrast to an even distribution in healthy skin. Confirmatively, MPT-FLIM showed an obvious metabolic shift in lesions. Moreover, detection of the onset and progression of inflammatory processes could be achieved. The feasibility of primary in vivo tracking of applied therapeutic agents further broadened our scope: We examined the permeation and subsequent distribution of agents directly visualized in patientś skin in short-term repetitive measurements. Furthermore, we performed MPT-FLIM follow-up investigations in the long-term course of therapy. Therefore, clinical MPT-FLIM application offers new insights into the pathophysiology and the individual therapeutic course of skin diseases, facilitating a better understanding of the processes of inflammation and wound healing.

  14. Fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the biochemical composition of atherosclerotic plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Jennifer; Sun, Yinghua; Saroufeem, Ramez; Hatami, Nisa; Fishbein, Michael C.; Marcu, Laura

    2011-09-01

    This study investigates the ability of a flexible fiberoptic-based fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique to resolve biochemical features in plaque fibrotic cap associated with plaque instability and based solely on fluorescence decay characteristics. Autofluorescence of atherosclerotic human aorta (11 autopsy samples) was measured at 48 locations through two filters, F377: 377/50 and F460: 460/60 nm (center wavelength/bandwidth). The fluorescence decay dynamic was described by average lifetime (τ) and four Laguerre coefficients (LECs) retrieved through a Laguerre deconvolution technique. FLIM-derived parameters discriminated between four groups [elastin-rich (ER), elastin and macrophage-rich (E+M), collagen-rich (CR), and lipid-rich (LR)]. For example, τF377 discriminated ER from CR (R = 0.84); τF460 discriminated E+M from CR and ER (R = 0.60 and 0.54, respectively); LEC-1F377 discriminated CR from LR and E+M (R = 0.69 and 0.77, respectively); P 87% (all cases) and sensitivity as high as 86%. Current results demonstrate for the first time that clinically relevant features (e.g., ratios of lipid versus collagen versus elastin) can be evaluated with a flexible-fiber based FLIM technique without the need for fluorescence intensity information or contrast agents.

  15. Photon efficiency optimization in time-correlated single photon counting technique for fluorescence lifetime imaging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Lior; Fixler, Dror

    2013-06-01

    In time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) systems, the maximum signal throughput is limited by the occurrence of pile-up and other effects. In many biological applications that exhibit high levels of fluorescence intensity (FI), pile-up-related distortions yield serious distortions in the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) calculation as well as significant decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Recent developments that allow the use of high-repetition-rate light sources (in the range of 50-100 MHz) in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) experiments enable minimization of pile-up-related distortions. However, modern TCSPC configurations that use high-repetition-rate excitation sources for FLIM suffer from dead-time-related distortions that cause unpredictable distortions of the FI signal. In this study, the loss of SNR is described by F- value as it is typically done in FLIM systems. This F-value describes the relation of the relative standard deviation in the estimated FLT to the relative standard deviation in FI measurements. Optimization of the F-value allows minimization of signal distortion, as well as shortening of the acquisition time for certain samples. We applied this method for Fluorescein, Rhodamine B, and Erythrosine fluorescent solutions that have different FLT values (4 ns, 1.67 ns, and 140 ps, respectively).

  16. Silica nanodisks as platforms for fluorescence lifetime-based sensing of pH

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhasree Banerjee; Anjali Dhir; Tuseeta Banerjee; Avinash Kumar Singh; Anindya Datta

    2011-11-01

    Core-shell conjugates of silica nanodisks and fluorescent dyes have been prepared. Rhodamine B, the reference, has been attached to the core, by surface functionalization of the pristine SNDs. Then, a layer of silica has been deposited on the composite nanodisks. Finally, the surface has been functionalized with fluorescein in one case and protoporphyrin IX in the other. These dyes exhibit pH-dependent fluorescence properties. The nanoconjugates are found to sense the pH of the medium, through systematic variation of the fluorescence intensity ratios of the reporter dye at the surface and the reference dye at the core. Moreover, the fluorescence lifetimes and corresponding amplitudes of the reporter dyes have been found to be reliable parameters for assessing the pH of the medium, even though the variation in lifetimes of fluorescein is rather small. In case of protoporphyrin, however, this variation is significantly large. Besides, the change in amplitudes is prominent in acidic as well as alkaline solutions. The temporal parameters can thus be used to ascertain the pH of the medium, when used in conjunction with each other.

  17. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based cyanide sensitive probes for physiological safeguard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badugu, Ramachandram [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Lakowicz, Joseph R. [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: lakowicz@cfs.umbi.umd.edu; Geddes, Chris D. [Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States) and Institute of Fluorescence and Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Medical Biotechnology Center, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, 725 West Lombard Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)]. E-mail: chris@cfs.umbi.umd.edu

    2004-09-20

    We characterize six new fluorescent probes that show both intensity and lifetime changes in the presence of free uncomplexed aqueous cyanide, allowing for fluorescence based cyanide sensing up to physiological safeguard levels, i.e. <30 {mu}M. One of the probes, m-BMQBA, shows a {approx}15-fold reduction in intensity and a {approx}10% change in mean lifetime at this level. The response of the new probes is based on their ability to bind the cyanide anion through a boronic acid functional group, changing from the neutral form of the boronic acid group R-B(OH){sub 2} to the anionic R-B{sup -}(CN){sub 3} form, a new cyanide binding mechanism which we have recently reported. The presence of an electron deficient quaternary heterocyclic nitrogen nucleus, and the electron rich cyanide bound form, provides for the intensity changes observed. We have determined the disassociation constants of the probes to be in the range {approx}15-84 {mu}M{sup 3}. In addition we have synthesized control compounds which do not contain the boronic acid moiety, allowing for a rationale of the cyanide responses between the probe isomers to be made. The lifetime of the cyanide bound probes are significantly shorter than the free R-B(OH){sub 2} probe forms, providing for the opportunity of lifetime based cyanide sensing up to physiologically lethal levels. Finally, while fluorescent probes containing the boronic acid moiety have earned a well-deserved reputation for monosaccharide sensing, we show that strong bases such as CN{sup -} and OH{sup -} preferentially bind as compared to glucose, enabling the potential use of these probes for cyanide safeguard and determination in physiological fluids, especially given that physiologies do not experience any notable changes in pH.

  18. LCP- LIFETIME COST AND PERFORMANCE MODEL FOR DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lifetime Cost and Performance (LCP) Model was developed to assist in the assessment of Photovoltaic (PV) system design options. LCP is a simulation of the performance, cost, and revenue streams associated with distributed PV power systems. LCP provides the user with substantial flexibility in specifying the technical and economic environment of the PV application. User-specified input parameters are available to describe PV system characteristics, site climatic conditions, utility purchase and sellback rate structures, discount and escalation rates, construction timing, and lifetime of the system. Such details as PV array orientation and tilt angle, PV module and balance-of-system performance attributes, and the mode of utility interconnection are user-specified. LCP assumes that the distributed PV system is utility grid interactive without dedicated electrical storage. In combination with a suitable economic model, LCP can provide an estimate of the expected net present worth of a PV system to the owner, as compared to electricity purchased from a utility grid. Similarly, LCP might be used to perform sensitivity analyses to identify those PV system parameters having significant impact on net worth. The user describes the PV system configuration to LCP via the basic electrical components. The module is the smallest entity in the PV system which is modeled. A PV module is defined in the simulation by its short circuit current, which varies over the system lifetime due to degradation and failure. Modules are wired in series to form a branch circuit. Bypass diodes are allowed between modules in the branch circuits. Branch circuits are then connected in parallel to form a bus. A collection of buses is connected in parallel to form an increment to capacity of the system. By choosing the appropriate series-parallel wiring design, the user can specify the current, voltage, and reliability characteristics of the system. LCP simulation of system performance is site

  19. Relationship between the Fluorescence Lifetime of Chlorophyll 'a' and Primary Productivity within the Mississippi River Plume and Adjacent Shelf Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie; Miller, Richard L.; Fernandez, Salvador M.; McKee, Brent A.

    2000-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity have been widely used to estimate phytoplankton biomass. However, because the fluorescence quantum yield of chlorophyll a in vivo can be highly variable, measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity cannot be directly correlated with phytoplankton biomass and do not provide information on the physiological state of the phytoplankton under study. Conversely, lifetime-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence provide a framework in which photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton can be analyzed according to phytoplankton physiology. Along with the measurement of primary production and ambient nutrient concentrations within the Mississippi River plume in the northern Gulf of Mexico, phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes were measured using a Fluorescence Lifetime Phytoplankton Analyzer (developed under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research contract to Ciencia, Inc.). Variability of fluorescence lifetimes within the plume can be used as a background from which to interpret variations in the maximum quantum yield of photochemistry. The extent to which nutrient and effluent loading in this dynamic coastal area affect the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton will be presented as a function of phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes.

  20. Relationship between the Fluorescence Lifetime of Chlorophyll 'a' and Primary Productivity within the Mississippi River Plume and Adjacent Shelf Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Callie; Miller, Richard L.; Fernandez, Salvador M.; McKee, Brent A.

    2000-01-01

    In situ measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity have been widely used to estimate phytoplankton biomass. However, because the fluorescence quantum yield of chlorophyll a in vivo can be highly variable, measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence intensity cannot be directly correlated with phytoplankton biomass and do not provide information on the physiological state of the phytoplankton under study. Conversely, lifetime-based measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence provide a framework in which photosynthetic rates of phytoplankton can be analyzed according to phytoplankton physiology. Along with the measurement of primary production and ambient nutrient concentrations within the Mississippi River plume in the northern Gulf of Mexico, phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes were measured using a Fluorescence Lifetime Phytoplankton Analyzer (developed under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research contract to Ciencia, Inc.). Variability of fluorescence lifetimes within the plume can be used as a background from which to interpret variations in the maximum quantum yield of photochemistry. The extent to which nutrient and effluent loading in this dynamic coastal area affect the photosynthetic performance of phytoplankton will be presented as a function of phytoplankton fluorescence lifetimes.

  1. Advances in frequency-domain fluorometry, gigahertz instrumentation, time-dependent photomigration, and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Nowaczyk, Kazimierz; Johnson, Michael L.

    1992-02-01

    During the past seven years, there have been remarkable advances in the frequency-domain method for measurement of time-resolved emission or light scattering. In this presentation we describe the recent extension of the frequency range to 10 GHz using a specially designed microchannel plate PMT. Experimental data will be shown for measurement of picosecond rotational diffusion and for sub-picosecond resolution of time delays. The resolution of ps to ns timescale processes is not obtained at the expense of sensitivity or is it shown by measurements on the intrinsic tryptophan emission from hemoglobin. We also describe a time- resolved reflectance imaging experiment on a scattering medium containing an absorbing object. Time-resolved imaging of the back-scattered light is realized by means of a RF-phase- sensitive camera, synchronized to the laser pulses. By processing the stored images, a final image can be created, the contrast of which is based only on time differences of the back- scattered photons. This image reveals the presence and position of the absorber within the scattering medium. And finally, we describe a new methodology, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), in which the contrast depends on the fluorescence lifetime at each point in a two-dimensional image, and not the local concentration and/or intensity of the fluorophore. We used FLIM to create lifetime images of NADH when free in solution and when bound to malate dehydrogenase. FLIM has numerous potential applications in cell biology and imaging.

  2. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime technique for surgical imaging, guidance and augmented reality (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    The surgeon's limited ability to accurately delineate the tumor margin during surgical interventions is one key challenge in clinical management of cancer. New methods for guiding tumor resection decisions are needed. Numerous studies have shown that tissue autofluorescence properties have the potential to asses biochemical features associates with distinct pathologies in tissue and to distinguish various cancers from normal tissues. However, despite these promising reports, autofluorescence techniques were sparsely adopted in clinical settings. Moreover, when adopted they were primarily used for pre-operative diagnosis rather than guiding interventions. To address this need, we have researched and engineered instrumentation that utilizes label-free fluorescence lifetime contrast to characterize tissue biochemical features in vivo in patients and methodologies conducive to real-time (few seconds) diagnosis of tissue pathologies during surgical procedures. This presentation overviews clinically-compatible multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging techniques developed in our laboratory and their ability to operate as stand-alone tools, integrated in a biopsy needle and in conjunction with the da Vinci surgical robot. We present pre-clinical and clinical studies in patients that demonstrate the potential of these techniques for intraoperative assessment of brain tumors and head and neck cancer. Current results demonstrate that intrinsic fluorescence signals can provide useful contrast for delineation distinct types of tissues including tumors intraoperatively. Challenges and solutions in the clinical implementation of these techniques are discussed.

  4. Multiphoton microscopy, fluorescence lifetime imaging and optical spectroscopy for the diagnosis of neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skala, Melissa Caroline

    2007-12-01

    Cancer morbidity and mortality is greatly reduced when the disease is diagnosed and treated early in its development. Tissue biopsies are the gold standard for cancer diagnosis, and an accurate diagnosis requires a biopsy from the malignant portion of an organ. Light, guided through a fiber optic probe, could be used to inspect regions of interest and provide real-time feedback to determine the optimal tissue site for biopsy. This approach could increase the diagnostic accuracy of current biopsy procedures. The studies in this thesis have characterized changes in tissue optical signals with carcinogenesis, increasing our understanding of the sensitivity of optical techniques for cancer detection. All in vivo studies were conducted on the dimethylbenz[alpha]anthracene treated hamster cheek pouch model of epithelial carcinogenesis. Multiphoton microscopy studies in the near infrared wavelength region quantified changes in tissue morphology and fluorescence with carcinogenesis in vivo. Statistically significant morphological changes with precancer included increased epithelial thickness, loss of stratification in the epithelium, and increased nuclear diameter. Fluorescence changes included a statistically significant decrease in the epithelial fluorescence intensity per voxel at 780 nm excitation, a decrease in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, an electron donor in oxidative phosphorylation), and an increase in the fluorescence lifetime of protein-bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD, an electron acceptor in oxidative phosphorylation) with precancer. The redox ratio (fluorescence intensity of FAD/NADH, a measure of the cellular oxidation-reduction state) did not significantly change with precancer. Cell culture experiments (MCF10A cells) indicated that the decrease in protein-bound NADH with precancer could be due to increased levels of glycolysis. Point measurements of diffuse reflectance and fluorescence spectra in

  5. A CMOS image sensor with draining only modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Yasutomi, Keita; Takasawa, Taishi; Itoh, Shinya; Kawahito, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging is becoming a powerful tool in biology. A charge-domain CMOS Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) chip using a pinned photo diode (PPD) and the pinned storage diode (PSD) with different depth of potential wells has been previously developed by the authors. However, a transfer gate between PPD and PSD causes charge transfer noise due to traps at the channel surface. This paper presents a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with draining only modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging, which removes the transfer gate between PPD and PSD. The time windowing is done by draining with a draining gate only, which is attached along the carrier path from PPD to PSD. This allows us to realize a trapping less charge transfer between PPD and PSD, leading to a very low-noise time-resolved signal detection. A video-rate CMOS FLIM chip has been fabricated using 0.18μm standard CMOS pinned diode image sensor process. The pixel consists of a PPD, a PSD, a charge draining gate (TD), a readout transfer gate (TX) between the PSD and the floating diffusion (FD), a reset transistor and a source follower amplifier transistor. The pixel array has 200(Row) x 256(Column) pixels and the pixel pitch is 7.5μm. Fundamental characteristics of the implemented CMOS FLIM chip are measured. The signal intensity of the PSD as a function of the TD gate voltage is also measured. The ratio of the signal for the TD off to the signal for the TD on is 212 : 1.

  6. Nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging of an optical antenna with a single diamond NV center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beams, Ryan; Smith, Dallas; Johnson, Timothy W; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Novotny, Lukas; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2013-08-14

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as artificially engineered quantum dots or naturally occurring defects in solids, are being investigated for applications ranging from quantum information science and optoelectronics to biomedical imaging. Recently, these same systems have also been studied from the perspective of nanoscale metrology. In this letter, we study the near-field optical properties of a diamond nanocrystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy center. We find that the nitrogen vacancy center is a sensitive probe of the surrounding electromagnetic mode structure. We exploit this sensitivity to demonstrate nanoscale fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with a single nitrogen vacancy center by imaging the local density of states of an optical antenna.

  7. A Single-Photon Avalanche Diode Array for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Eric; Charbon, Edoardo; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2008-11-21

    We describe the design, characterization, and demonstration of a fully integrated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager for use in time-resolved fluorescence imaging. The imager consists of a 64-by-64 array of active SPAD pixels and an on-chip time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) and calibrated interpolators. The imager can perform both standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) and an alternative gated-window detection useful for avoiding pulse pile-up when measuring bright signal levels. To illustrate the use of the imager, we present measurements of the decay lifetimes of fluorescent dyes of several types with a timing resolution of 350 ps.

  8. Determining a fluorophore's transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-11-11

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin's model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  9. Spectral and lifetime fluorescence imaging microscopies: new modalities of multiphoton microscopy applied to tissue or cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, D; Gaborit, N; Grossin, L; Riquelme, B; Gigant-Huselstein, C; De Isla, N; Gillet, P; Netter, P; Stoltz, J F

    2004-01-01

    Spectral and multiphoton imaging is the preferred approach for non-invasive study allowing deeper penetration to image molecular processes in living cells. But currently available fluorescence microscopic techniques based on fluorescence intensity, such as confocal or multiphoton excitation, cannot provide detailed quantitative information about the dynamic of complex cellular structure (molecular interaction). Due to the variation of the probe concentration, photostability, cross-talking, its effects cannot be distinguished in simple intensity images. Therefore, Time Resolved fluorescence image is required to investigate molecular interactions in biological systems. Fluorescence lifetimes are generally absolute, sensitive to environment, independent of the concentration of the probe and allow the use of probes with overlapping spectra but that not have the same fluorescence lifetime. In this work, we present the possibilities that are opened up by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy, firstly to collect images based on fluorescence lifetime contrast of GFP variants used as a reporter of gene expression in chondrocytes and secondly, to measure molecular proximity in erythrocyte (glycophorin/membrane) by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FLIM-FRET).

  10. New insights in the interpretation of tryptophan fluorescence : origin of the fluorescence lifetime and characterization of a new fluorescence parameter in proteins: the emission to excitation ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2007-07-01

    Origin of tryptophan fluorescence is still up to these days a quiz which is not completely solved. Fluorescence emission properties of tryptophan within proteins are in general considered as the result of fluorophore interaction within its environment. For example, a low fluorescence quantum yield is supposed to be the consequence of an important fluorophore-environment interaction. However, are we sure that the fluorophore has been excited upon light absorption? What if fluorophore excitation did not occur as the result of internal conformation specific to the fluorophore environment? Are we sure that all absorbed energy is used for the excitation process? Fluorescence lifetimes of Trp residues are considered to originate from rotamers or conformers resulting from the rotation of the indole ring within the peptide bonds. However, how can we explain the fact that in most of the proteins, the two lifetimes 0.5 and 3 ns, attributed to the conformers, are also observed for free tryptophan in solution? The present work, performed on free tryptophan and tyrosine in solution and on different proteins, shows that absorption and excitation spectra overlap but their intensities at the different excitation wavelengths are not necessarily equal. Also, we found that fluorescence emission intensities recorded at different excitation wavelengths depend on the intensities at these excitation wavelengths and not on the optical densities. Thus, excitation is not equal to absorption. In our interpretation of the data, we consider that absorbed photons are not necessary used only for the excitation, part of them are used to reorganize fluorophore molecules in a new state (excited structure) and another part is used for the excitation process. A new parameter that characterizes the ratio of the number of emitted photons over the real number of photons used to excite the fluorophore can be defined. We call this parameter, the emission to excitation ratio. Since our results were

  11. Nuclear uptake of ultrasmall gold-doxorubicin conjugates imaged by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Shastry, Sathvik; Bradforth, Stephen E.; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in Dox-resistant cancers.Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) has been used to image free and encapsulated doxorubicin (Dox) uptake into cells, since interaction of Dox with DNA leads to a characteristic lifetime change. However, none of the reported Dox conjugates were able to enter cell nuclei. In this work, we use FLIM to show nuclear uptake of 2.7 nm mean diameter Au nanoparticles conjugated to Dox. The pattern of labelling differed substantially from what was seen with free Dox, with slower nuclear entry and stronger cytoplasmic labelling at all time points. As the cells died, the pattern of labelling changed further as intracellular structures disintegrated, consistent with association of Au-Dox to membranes. The patterns of Au distribution and intracellular structure changes were confirmed using electron microscopy, and indicate different mechanisms of cytotoxicity with stable Au-Dox conjugates compared to Dox alone. Such conjugates are promising tools for overcoming resistance in

  12. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana eBurdikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g. pH, redox potential due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM. In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  13. Measurement of pH micro-heterogeneity in natural cheese matrices by fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdikova, Zuzana; Svindrych, Zdenek; Pala, Jan; Hickey, Cian D; Wilkinson, Martin G; Panek, Jiri; Auty, Mark A E; Periasamy, Ammasi; Sheehan, Jeremiah J

    2015-01-01

    Cheese, a product of microbial fermentation may be defined as a protein matrix entrapping fat, moisture, minerals and solutes as well as dispersed bacterial colonies. The growth and physiology of bacterial cells in these colonies may be influenced by the microenvironment around the colony, or alternatively the cells within the colony may modify the microenvironment (e.g., pH, redox potential) due to their metabolic activity. While cheese pH may be measured at macro level there remains a significant knowledge gap relating to the degree of micro-heterogeneity of pH within the cheese matrix and its relationship with microbial, enzymatic and physiochemical parameters and ultimately with cheese quality, consistency and ripening patterns. The pH of cheese samples was monitored both at macroscopic scale and at microscopic scale, using a non-destructive microscopic technique employing C-SNARF-4 and Oregon Green 488 fluorescent probes. The objectives of this work were to evaluate the suitability of these dyes for microscale pH measurements in natural cheese matrices and to enhance the sensitivity and extend the useful pH range of these probes using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). In particular, fluorescence lifetime of Oregon Green 488 proved to be sensitive probe to map pH micro heterogeneity within cheese matrices. Good agreement was observed between macroscopic scale pH measurement by FLIM and by traditional pH methods, but in addition considerable localized microheterogeneity in pH was evident within the curd matrix with pH range between 4.0 and 5.5. This technique provides significant potential to further investigate the relationship between cheese matrix physico-chemistry and bacterial metabolism during cheese manufacture and ripening.

  14. Fluorescence lifetimes of tryptophan: structural origin and relation with So --> 1Lb and So --> 1La transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Jihad René

    2009-11-01

    We measured fluorescence lifetimes of L-Tryptophan dissolved in de-ionized water and in ethanol in the absence and the presence of high progesterone concentrations. The hormone absorbs between 220 and 280 with a peak around 250 nm, while its absorption is equal to zero beyond 280 nm. Tryptophan excitation spectrum recorded in presence of progesterone shows that the S(o) --> 1L(a) transition is completely abolished while the S(o) --> 1L(b) transition is not affected. Emission of L-tryptophan in water occurs with two fluorescence lifetimes, 0.40 and 2.8 ns. In ethanol, three fluorescence lifetimes equal to around 0.2, 1.8 and 4.8 ns were observed. Addition of progesterone to the medium does not affect any of the fluorescence lifetimes indicating clearly that both transitions could induce tryptophan excitation and that recorded fluorescence lifetimes could be assigned to sub-structures generated in the excited state.

  15. A CTRW-based model of time-resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging in a turbid medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Victor; Gandjbakhche, Amir H; Hassan, Moinuddin; Pajevic, Sinisa; Weiss, George H

    2010-12-01

    We develop an analytic model of time-resolved fluorescent imaging of photons migrating through a semi-infinite turbid medium bounded by an infinite plane in the presence of a single stationary point fluorophore embedded in the medium. In contrast to earlier models of fluorescent imaging in which photon motion is assumed to be some form of continuous diffusion process, the present analysis is based on a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) on a simple cubic lattice, the object being to estimate the position and lifetime of the fluorophore. Such information can provide information related to local variations in pH and temperature with potential medical significance. Aspects of the theory were tested using time-resolved measurements of the fluorescence from small inclusions inside tissue-like phantoms. The experimental results were found to be in good agreement with theoretical predictions provided that the fluorophore was not located too close to the planar boundary, a common problem in many diffusive systems.

  16. Steam-sterilizable, fluorescence lifetime-based sensing film for dissolved carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q; Randers-Eichhorn, L; Lakowicz, J R; Rao, G

    1998-01-01

    An autoclavable sensing film was developed for monitoring dissolved CO2. The sensing film, based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), consisted of a fluorescent donor, an acceptor, and a quaternary ammonium hydroxide, which were doped in a two-component silicone film. As no aqueous solution was used in the sensing film matrix, the sensing film was unaffected by osmotic pressure. Fluorescence lifetime was selected as the sensing parameter, and measured in frequency domain using phase fluorometry. Upon exposure to 20% CO2-saturated water, a 43 degrees increase in phase angle was observed at 100 MHz. The process was fully reversible when the sensing film was exposed to nitrogen-saturated water. The estimated response and recovery times for 90% signal change were 1 min (for a step change from 0 to 6.7% CO2-saturated water) and 1.5 min (for a step change from 6.7 to 3.3% CO2-saturated water). When used for on-line monitoring of dissolved CO2 produced by a culture of Escherichia coli, the sensing film showed a similar trend to that obtained from off-line measurements using a wet chemistry analyzer.

  17. Development of a Multi-modal Tissue Diagnostic System Combining High Frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging with Lifetime Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yang; Stephens, Douglas N.; Park, Jesung; Sun, Yinghua; Marcu, Laura; Cannata, Jonathan M.; Shung, K. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    We report the development and validate a multi-modal tissue diagnostic technology, which combines three complementary techniques into one system including ultrasound backscatter microscopy (UBM), photoacoustic imaging (PAI), and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TR-LIFS). UBM enables the reconstruction of the tissue microanatomy. PAI maps the optical absorption heterogeneity of the tissue associated with structure information and has the potential to provide functional imaging of the tissue. Examination of the UBM and PAI images allows for localization of regions of interest for TR-LIFS evaluation of the tissue composition. The hybrid probe consists of a single element ring transducer with concentric fiber optics for multi-modal data acquisition. Validation and characterization of the multi-modal system and ultrasonic, photoacoustic, and spectroscopic data coregistration were conducted in a physical phantom with properties of ultrasound scattering, optical absorption, and fluorescence. The UBM system with the 41 MHz ring transducer can reach the axial and lateral resolution of 30 and 65 μm, respectively. The PAI system with 532 nm excitation light from a Nd:YAG laser shows great contrast for the distribution of optical absorbers. The TR-LIFS system records the fluorescence decay with the time resolution of ~300 ps and a high sensitivity of nM concentration range. Biological phantom constructed with different types of tissues (tendon and fat) was used to demonstrate the complementary information provided by the three modalities. Fluorescence spectra and lifetimes were compared to differentiate chemical composition of tissues at the regions of interest determined by the coregistered high resolution UBM and PAI image. Current results demonstrate that the fusion of these techniques enables sequentially detection of functional, morphological, and compositional features of biological tissue, suggesting potential applications in diagnosis of tumors

  18. FPGA-based multi-channel fluorescence lifetime analysis of Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-09-22

    We report a fast non-iterative lifetime data analysis method for the Fourier multiplexed frequency-sweeping confocal FLIM (Fm-FLIM) system [Opt. Express 22, 10221 (2014)]. The new method, named R-method, allows fast multi-channel lifetime image analysis in the system's FPGA data processing board. Experimental tests proved that the performance of the R-method is equivalent to that of single-exponential iterative fitting, and its sensitivity is well suited for time-lapse FLIM-FRET imaging of live cells, for example cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level imaging with GFP-Epac-mCherry sensors. With the R-method and its FPGA implementation, multi-channel lifetime images can now be generated in real time on the multi-channel frequency-sweeping FLIM system, and live readout of FRET sensors can be performed during time-lapse imaging.

  19. Carrier Lifetimes in Fluorescent 6H-SiC for LEDs Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivickas, Vytautas; Gulbinas, Karolis; Jokubavičius, Valdas

    Recently it was shown a new approach based on all-semiconductor material technology which is composed with a near ultra-violet GaN LED excitation source and fluorescent silicon carbide (f-6H-SiC) substrate which generates a visible broad spectral light by N and B dopants and an efficient donor...... to acceptor pair recombination [1,2]. This combination can achieve higher electric-light conversion efficiency and high color rendering in comparison with today’s used blue GaN LED based and phosphors. The devices are promising candidates for general lightning applications and may obtain stability....../reproducibility, and potentially low cost in high performance LEDs. However, there are still many problems to obtain best optimization for f-6H-SiC material since neither carrier transport, nor the carrier recombination is known in such co-doped carbides. From the existing data of carrier lifetimes in the SiC materials...

  20. Fluorescence lifetime and acrylamide quenching studies of the interactions between troponin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavis, P C; Gowell, E; Tao, T

    1984-08-28

    Fluorescence lifetime and acrylamide quenching studies were carried out to characterize the interactions between the subunits of troponin under various conditions of metal ion binding. Troponin C was labeled at Cys-98 with N-(iodoacetyl)-N'-(5-sulfo-1-naphthyl)ethylenediamine. In the presence of Ca2+, the fluorescence decay of labeled troponin C (TnC*) was monoexponential, lifetime tau = 15.5 ns and quenching rate constant kq = 2.97 X 10(8) M-1 s-1. In the absence of Ca2+, the decay was resolvable into a major component with tau = 11.9 ns and a minor component with tau = 20.5 ns, with corresponding values of kq = 4.80 X 10(8) and 0.66 X 10(8) M-1 s-1, respectively. Upon the binding of either troponin I (TnI) or troponin T (TnT) in the presence of Ca2+, tau increased to approximately 18 ns, and kq decreased to approximately 0.8 X 10(8) M-1 s-1. For the Ca2+ form of the TnC*-TnI-TnT ternary complex, values of tau = 17.6 ns and kq = 1.73 X 10(8) M-1 s-1 were obtained. These values did not vary significantly when Ca2+ was removed, or when Mg2+ replaced Ca2+. These findings were interpreted as follows: the region around Cys-98 of TnC* adopts a looser conformation upon the removal of Ca2+ from the high-affinity sites. Both TnI and TnT bind to TnC* in the region containing Cys-98. The probe is shielded from the solvent to a greater extent in the binary complexes than in the ternary complex.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. In vivo wound healing diagnosis with second harmonic and fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Gitanjal; Wu, Wei-Wen; Kao, Fu-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Skin wounds heal when a series of cell lineages are triggered, followed by collagen deposition, to reconstruct damaged tissues. This study evaluates the regeneration of collagen and change in cellular metabolic rate in vivo during wound healing in rats, with second harmonic generation (SHG) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy respectively. The metabolic rate of cells is reflected through the lifetime of the autofluorescence from the co-enzyme protein, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, due to its change in the relative concentration of bound and free forms. A higher than normal cellular metabolic rate is observed during the first week of healing, which decreases gradually after eight days of wound formation. SHG signal intensity change indicates the net degradation of collagen during the inflammatory phase, and net regeneration begins on day five. Eventually, the quantity of collagen increases gradually to form a scar tissue as the final product. Importantly, this work demonstrates the feasibility of an in vivo imaging approach for a normal wound on rat skin, which has the potential to supplement the noninvasive clinical diagnosis of wounds.

  2. Persistent luminescence nanoprobe for biosensing and lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis via time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Lei, Jianping; Liu, Jintong; Ma, Fengjiao; Ju, Huangxian

    2015-10-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence technique can reduce the short-lived background luminescence and auto-fluorescence interference from cells and tissues by exerting the delay time between pulsed excitation light and signal acquisition. Here, we prepared persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) to design a universal time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) platform for biosensing, lifetime imaging of cell apoptosis and in situ lifetime quantification of intracellular caspase-3. Three kinds of PLNPs-based nanoprobes are assembled by covalently binding dye-labeled peptides or DNA to carboxyl-functionalized PLNPs for the efficient detection of caspase-3, microRNA and protein. The peptides-functionalized nanoprobe is also employed for fluorescence lifetime imaging to monitor cell apoptosis, which shows a dependence of cellular fluorescence lifetime on caspase-3 activity and thus leads to an in situ quantification method. This work provides a proof-of-concept for PLNPs-based TR-FRET analysis and demonstrates its potential in exploring dynamical information of life process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Fluorescence Characteristics and Lifetime Images of Photosensitizers of Talaporfin Sodium and Sodium Pheophorbide a in Normal and Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamlesh Awasthi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime images of talaporfin sodium and sodium-pheophorbide a, which can be regarded as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, were measured in normal and cancer cells. The reduction of the fluorescence intensity by photoirradiation was observed for both photosensitizers in both cells, but the quenching rate was much faster in cancer cells than in normal cells. These results are explained in terms of the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species via photoexcitation of these photosensitizers in cancer cells. The fluorescence lifetimes of both photosensitizers in cancer cells are different from those in normal cells, which originates from the different intracellular environments around the photosensitizers between normal and cancer cells.

  4. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene, E-mail: i.mueller-harvey@reading.ac.uk [Chemistry and Biochemistry Laboratory, Food Production and Quality Research Division, School of Agriculture, Policy and Development, University of Reading, P O Box 236, Reading RG6 6AT (United Kingdom); Feucht, Walter, E-mail: walter.feucht@gmail.com [Department of Plant Sciences, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Polster, Juergen, E-mail: j.polster@wzw.tum.de [Department of Physical Biochemistry, Technical University of Munich (TUM), Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan (WZW), D-85354 Freising (Germany); Trnkova, Lucie, E-mail: lucie.trnkova@uhk.cz [University of Hradec Kralove, Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Rokitanskeho 62, 50003 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Burgos, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.burgos@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Parker, Anthony W., E-mail: tony.parker@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Botchway, Stanley W., E-mail: stan.botchway@stfc.ac.uk [Central Laser Facility, Research Complex at Harwell, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell-Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) technique for flavanols overcomes autofluorescence interference in cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plant flavanols differed in their lifetimes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dissolved and bound flavanols revealed contrasting lifetime changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique will allow studying of flavanol trafficking in live cells. - Abstract: Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were {approx}1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime ({tau}{sub 2} = 1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there

  5. Two-photon excitation with pico-second fluorescence lifetime imaging to detect nuclear association of flavanols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Harvey, Irene; Feucht, Walter; Polster, Juergen; Trnková, Lucie; Burgos, Pierre; Parker, Anthony W; Botchway, Stanley W

    2012-03-16

    Two-photon excitation enabled for the first time the observation and measurement of excited state fluorescence lifetimes from three flavanols in solution, which were ~1.0 ns for catechin and epicatechin, but <45 ps for epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG). The shorter lifetime for EGCG is in line with a lower fluorescence quantum yield of 0.003 compared to catechin (0.015) and epicatechin (0.018). In vivo experiments with onion cells demonstrated that tryptophan and quercetin, which tend to be major contributors of background fluorescence in plant cells, have sufficiently low cross sections for two-photon excitation at 630 nm and therefore do not interfere with detection of externally added or endogenous flavanols in Allium cepa or Taxus baccata cells. Applying two-photon excitation to flavanols enabled 3-D fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and showed that added EGCG penetrated the whole nucleus of onion cells. Interestingly, EGCG and catechin showed different lifetime behaviour when bound to the nucleus: EGCG lifetime increased from <45 to 200 ps, whilst catechin lifetime decreased from 1.0 ns to 500 ps. Semi-quantitative measurements revealed that the relative ratios of EGCG concentrations in nucleoli associated vesicles: nucleus: cytoplasm were ca. 100:10:1. Solution experiments with catechin, epicatechin and histone proteins provided preliminary evidence, via the appearance of a second lifetime (τ(2)=1.9-3.1 ns), that both flavanols may be interacting with histone proteins. We conclude that there is significant nuclear absorption of flavanols. This advanced imaging using two-photon excitation and biophysical techniques described here will prove valuable for probing the intracellular trafficking and functions of flavanols, such as EGCG, which is the major flavanol of green tea.

  6. Open Source High Content Analysis Utilizing Automated Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Frederik; Kelly, Douglas J; Warren, Sean C; Alibhai, Dominic; West, Lucien; Kumar, Sunil; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Munro, Ian; Garcia, Edwin; McGinty, James; Talbot, Clifford; Serwa, Remigiusz A; Thinon, Emmanuelle; da Paola, Vincenzo; Murray, Edward J; Stuhmeier, Frank; Neil, Mark A A; Tate, Edward W; Dunsby, Christopher; French, Paul M W

    2017-01-18

    We present an open source high content analysis instrument utilizing automated fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) for assaying protein interactions using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) based readouts of fixed or live cells in multiwell plates. This provides a means to screen for cell signaling processes read out using intramolecular FRET biosensors or intermolecular FRET of protein interactions such as oligomerization or heterodimerization, which can be used to identify binding partners. We describe here the functionality of this automated multiwell plate FLIM instrumentation and present exemplar data from our studies of HIV Gag protein oligomerization and a time course of a FRET biosensor in live cells. A detailed description of the practical implementation is then provided with reference to a list of hardware components and a description of the open source data acquisition software written in µManager. The application of FLIMfit, an open source MATLAB-based client for the OMERO platform, to analyze arrays of multiwell plate FLIM data is also presented. The protocols for imaging fixed and live cells are outlined and a demonstration of an automated multiwell plate FLIM experiment using cells expressing fluorescent protein-based FRET constructs is presented. This is complemented by a walk-through of the data analysis for this specific FLIM FRET data set.

  7. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  8. Measurement of radiative lifetime in atomic samarium using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization signals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A C Sahoo; M L Shah; P K Mandal; A K Pulhani; G P Gupta; Vas Dev; B M Suri

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we report the investigations of lifetime measurement of odd-parity energy level 19009.52 cm-1 of Sm I using simultaneous detection of laser-induced fluorescence and laserinduced photoionization signals employing pump–probe technique. To the best of our knowledge, this is for the first time that the results obtained using laser-induced fluorescence and photoionization techniques have been compared with each other. The obtained results match well with those reported in the literature.

  9. Support vector machine based classification and mapping of atherosclerotic plaques using fluorescence lifetime imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatakdawala, Hussain; Gorpas, Dimitris S.; Bec, Julien; Ma, Dinglong M.; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Bishop, John W.; Marcu, Laura

    2016-02-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels involves distinct pathological changes in the vessel wall. These changes manifest in the formation of a variety of plaque sub-types. The ability to detect and distinguish these plaques, especially thin-cap fibroatheromas (TCFA) may be relevant for guiding percutaneous coronary intervention as well as investigating new therapeutics. In this work we demonstrate the ability of fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) derived parameters (lifetime values from sub-bands 390/40 nm, 452/45 nm and 542/50 nm respectively) for generating classification maps for identifying eight different atherosclerotic plaque sub-types in ex vivo human coronary vessels. The classification was performed using a support vector machine based classifier that was built from data gathered from sixteen coronary vessels in a previous study. This classifier was validated in the current study using an independent set of FLIm data acquired from four additional coronary vessels with a new rotational FLIm system. Classification maps were compared to co-registered histological data. Results show that the classification maps allow identification of the eight different plaque sub-types despite the fact that new data was gathered with a different FLIm system. Regions with diffuse intimal thickening (n=10), fibrotic tissue (n=2) and thick-cap fibroatheroma (n=1) were correctly identified on the classification map. The ability to identify different plaque types using FLIm data alone may serve as a powerful clinical and research tool for studying atherosclerosis in animal models as well as in humans.

  10. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  11. Distribution Network Design for Fixed Lifetime Perishable Products: A Model and Solution Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Firoozi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many distribution networks deal with the distribution and storage of perishable products. However, distribution network design models are largely based on assumptions that do not consider time limitations for the storage of products within the network. This study develops a model for the design of a distribution network that considers the short lifetime of perishable products. The model simultaneously determines the network configuration and inventory control decisions of the network. Moreover, as the lifetime is strictly dependent on the storage conditions, the model develops a trade-off between enhancing storage conditions (higher inventory cost to obtain a longer lifetime and selecting those storage conditions that lead to shorter lifetimes (less inventory cost. To solve the model, an efficient Lagrangian relaxation heuristic algorithm is developed. The model and algorithm are validated by sensitivity analysis on some key parameters. Results show that the algorithm finds optimal or near optimal solutions even for large-size cases.

  12. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Peters, Sven; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX) for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay) to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX’s applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation. PMID:26192624

  13. Discrimination of defects in III-V semiconductors by positron lifetime distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Z Q; Wang, S J

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical Laplace inversion technique and maximum entropy method are utilized to extract continuous positron lifetime distribution in semiconductors. The result is used to discriminate the native vacancy-type defects in as-grown GaAs and In P with different conduction type. Direct evidence of shallow positron traps were also observed in ion-implanted p-In P. It is demonstrated that the lifetime distribution can give us more detailed information on the native defects.

  14. Confirmation of temperature independence in the fluorescence lifetime of the 3P 0 → 3F 2 transition in praseodymium-doped fluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thinh B.; Vella, Vince; Baxter, Greg W.; Collins, Stephen F.; Newman, Peter J.; MacFarlane, Douglas R.

    2006-05-01

    The dependence of the fluorescence lifetime from the 3P0 → 3F2 transition in praseodymium-doped fluoride glass as a function of dopant concentration and temperature was investigated. It was found that the fluorescence lifetime at the concentration of 7000 ppm was constant with temperature, confirming the prediction of temperature independence in the lifetime for this transition in Pr3+-doped ZBLAN glass.

  15. Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ Redox Visualized in Brain Slices by Two-Photon Fluorescence Lifetime Biosensor Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongeon, Rebecca; Venkatachalam, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aim: Cytosolic NADH-NAD+ redox state is central to cellular metabolism and a valuable indicator of glucose and lactate metabolism in living cells. Here we sought to quantitatively determine NADH-NAD+ redox in live cells and brain tissue using a fluorescence lifetime imaging of the genetically-encoded single-fluorophore biosensor Peredox. Results: We show that Peredox exhibits a substantial change in its fluorescence lifetime over its sensing range of NADH-NAD+ ratio. This allows changes in cytosolic NADH redox to be visualized in living cells using a two-photon scanning microscope with fluorescence lifetime imaging capabilities (2p-FLIM), using time-correlated single photon counting. Innovation: Because the lifetime readout is absolutely calibrated (in nanoseconds) and is independent of sensor concentration, we demonstrate that quantitative assessment of NADH redox is possible using a single fluorophore biosensor. Conclusion: Imaging of the sensor in mouse hippocampal brain slices reveals that astrocytes are typically much more reduced (with higher NADH:NAD+ ratio) than neurons under basal conditions, consistent with the hypothesis that astrocytes are more glycolytic than neurons. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 553–563. PMID:26857245

  16. Alterations in cerebral metabolism observed in living rodents using fluorescence lifetime microscopy of intrinsic NADH (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Sakadžić, Sava; Sutin, Jason; Wu, Weicheng; Fu, Buyin; Boas, David A.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring cerebral energy metabolism at a cellular level is essential to improve our understanding of healthy brain function and its pathological alterations. In this study, we resolve specific alterations in cerebral metabolism utilizing minimally-invasive 2-Photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (2P-FLIM) measurements of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence, collected in vivo from anesthetized rats and mice. Time-resolved lifetime measurements enables distinction of different components contributing to NADH autofluorescence. These components reportedly represent different enzyme-bound formulations of NADH. Our observations from this study confirm the hypothesis that NADH FLIM can identify specific alterations in cerebral metabolism. Using time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) equipment and a custom-built multimodal imaging system, 2-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) was performed in cerebral tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. Multi-exponential fits for NADH fluorescence lifetimes indicate 4 distinct components, or 'species.' We observed distinct variations in the relative proportions of these components before and after pharmacological-induced impairments to several reactions involved in anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic oxidative metabolism. Classification models developed with experimental data correctly predict the metabolic impairments associated with bicuculline-induced focal seizures in separate experiments. Compared to traditional intensity-based NADH measurements, lifetime imaging of NADH is less susceptible to the adverse effects of overlying blood vessels. Evaluating NADH measurements will ultimately lead to a deeper understanding of cerebral energetics and its pathology-related alterations. Such knowledge will likely aid development of therapeutic strategies for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's disease, and stroke.

  17. Low-pressure effective fluorescence lifetimes and photo-physical rate constants of one- and two-ring aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzler, Thorsten; Faust, Stephan; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-12-01

    One- and two-ring aromatics such as toluene and naphthalene are frequently used molecular tracer species in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging diagnostics. Quantifying LIF signal intensities requires knowledge of the photo-physical processes that determine the fluorescence quantum yield. Collision-induced and intramolecular energy transfer processes in the excited electronic state closely interact under practical conditions. They can be separated through experiments at variable low pressures. Effective fluorescence lifetimes of gaseous toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, anisole, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene diluted in CO2 were measured after picosecond laser excitation at 266 nm and time-resolved detection of fluorescence intensities. Measurements in an optically accessible externally heated cell between 296 and 475 K and 0.010-1 bar showed that effective fluorescence lifetimes generally decrease with temperature, while the influence of the bath-gas pressure depends on the respective target species and temperature. The results provide non-radiative and fluorescence rate constants and experimentally validate the effect of photo-induced cooling.

  18. A New Lifetime Distribution and Its Power Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar M. Sarhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New one-parameter and two-parameter distributions are introduced in this paper. The failure rate of the one-parameter distribution is unimodal (upside-down bathtub, while the failure rate of the two-parameter distribution can be decreasing, increasing, unimodal, increasing-decreasing-increasing, or decreasing-increasing-decreasing, depending on the values of its two parameters. The two-parameter distribution is derived from the one-parameter distribution by using a power transformation. We discuss some properties of these two distributions, such as the behavior of the failure rate function, the probability density function, the moments, skewness, and kurtosis, and limiting distributions of order statistics. Maximum likelihood estimation for the two-parameter model using complete samples is investigated. Different algorithms for generating random samples from the two new models are given. Applications to real data are discussed and compared with the fit attained by some one- and two-parameter distributions. Finally, a simulation study is carried out to investigate the mean square error of the maximum likelihood estimators, the coverage probability, and the width of the confidence intervals of the unknown parameters.

  19. Evaluation of the oxidative stress of psoriatic fibroblasts based on spectral two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapsokalyvas, Dimitrios; Barygina, Victoria; Cicchi, Riccardo; Fiorillo, Claudia; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2013-02-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease of the skin characterized by hyperkeratosis, hyperproliferation of the epidermis, inflammatory cell accumulation and increased dilatation of dermal papillary blood vessels. Metabolic activity is increased in the epidermis and the dermis. Oxidative stress is high mainly due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) originating from the skin environment and cellular metabolism. We employed a custom multiphoton microscope coupled with a FLIM setup to image primary culture fibroblast cells from perilesional and lesional psoriatic skin in-vitro. Twophoton excited fluorescence images revealed the morphological differences between healthy and psoriatic fibroblasts. Based on the spectral analysis of the NADH and FAD components the oxidative stress was assessed and found to be higher in psoriatic cells. Furthermore the fluorescence lifetime properties were investigated with a TCSPC FLIM module. Mean fluorescence lifetime was found to be longer in psoriatic lesional cells. Analysis of the fast (τ1) and slow (τ2) decay lifetimes revealed a decrease of the ratio of the contribution of the fast (α1) parameter to the contribution of the slow (α2) parameter. The fluorescence in the examined part of the spectrum is attributed mainly to NADH. The decrease of the ratio (α1)/ (α2) is believed to correlate strongly with the anti-oxidant properties of NADH which can lead to the variation of its population in high ROS environment. This methodology could serve as an index of the oxidative status in cells and furthermore could be used to probe the oxidative stress of tissues in-vivo.

  20. Distributions of lifetime and maximum size of abortive clathrin-coated pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anand; Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Nossal, Ralph

    2012-09-01

    Clathrin-mediated endocytosis is a complex process through which eukaryotic cells internalize nutrients, antigens, growth factors, pathogens, etc. The process occurs via the formation of invaginations on the cell membrane, called clathrin-coated pits (CCPs). Over the years, much has been learned about the mechanism of CCP assembly, but a complete understanding of the assembly process still remains elusive. In recent years, using fluorescence microscopy, studies have been done to determine the statistical properties of CCP formation. In this paper, using a recently proposed coarse-grained, stochastic model of CCP assembly [Banerjee, Berezhkovskii, and Nossal, Biophys. J.BIOJAU0006-349510.1016/j.bpj.2012.05.010 102, 2725 (2012)], we suggest new ways of analyzing such experimental data. To be more specific, we derive analytical expressions for the distribution of maximum size of abortive CCPs, and the probability density of their lifetimes. Our results show how these functions depend on the kinetic and energetic parameters characterizing the assembly process, and therefore could be useful in extracting information about the mechanism of CCP assembly from experimental data. We find excellent agreement between our analytical results and those obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the assembly process.

  1. Parallelized TCSPC for dynamic intravital fluorescence lifetime imaging: quantifying neuronal dysfunction in neuroinflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Leo Rinnenthal

    Full Text Available Two-photon laser-scanning microscopy has revolutionized our view on vital processes by revealing motility and interaction patterns of various cell subsets in hardly accessible organs (e.g. brain in living animals. However, current technology is still insufficient to elucidate the mechanisms of organ dysfunction as a prerequisite for developing new therapeutic strategies, since it renders only sparse information about the molecular basis of cellular response within tissues in health and disease. In the context of imaging, Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET is one of the most adequate tools to probe molecular mechanisms of cell function. As a calibration-free technique, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is superior for quantifying FRET in vivo. Currently, its main limitation is the acquisition speed in the context of deep-tissue 3D and 4D imaging. Here we present a parallelized time-correlated single-photon counting point detector (p-TCSPC (i for dynamic single-beam scanning FLIM of large 3D areas on the range of hundreds of milliseconds relevant in the context of immune-induced pathologies as well as (ii for ultrafast 2D FLIM in the range of tens of milliseconds, a scale relevant for cell physiology. We demonstrate its power in dynamic deep-tissue intravital imaging, as compared to multi-beam scanning time-gated FLIM suitable for fast data acquisition and compared to highly sensitive single-channel TCSPC adequate to detect low fluorescence signals. Using p-TCSPC, 256×256 pixel FLIM maps (300×300 µm(2 are acquired within 468 ms while 131×131 pixel FLIM maps (75×75 µm(2 can be acquired every 82 ms in 115 µm depth in the spinal cord of CerTN L15 mice. The CerTN L15 mice express a FRET-based Ca-biosensor in certain neuronal subsets. Our new technology allows us to perform time-lapse 3D intravital FLIM (4D FLIM in the brain stem of CerTN L15 mice affected by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and, thereby, to truly quantify

  2. Investigation of the Co-Dependence of Morphology and Fluorescence Lifetime in a Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrimpf, Waldemar; Ossato, Giulia; Hirschle, Patrick; Wuttke, Stefan; Lamb, Don C

    2016-07-01

    Porous materials, due to their large surface-to-volume ratio, are important for a broad range of applications and are the subject of intense research. Most studies investigate the bulk properties of these materials, which are not sensitive to the effect of heterogeneities within the sample. Herein, a new strategy based on correlative fluorescence lifetime imaging and scanning electron microscopy is presented that allows the detection and localization of those heterogeneities, and connects them to morphological and structural features of the material. By applying this method to a dye-modified metal-organic framework (MOF), two independent fluorescence quenching mechanisms in the MOF scaffold are identified and quantified. The first mechanism is based on quenching via amino groups, while the second mechanism is influenced by morphology. Furthermore, a similar correlation between the inherent luminescence lifetime and the morphology of the unmodified MOF structure is demonstrated.

  3. CMOS image sensor with lateral electric field modulation pixels for fluorescence lifetime imaging with sub-nanosecond time response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuo; Seo, Min-Woong; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yasutomi, Keita; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a time-resolved CMOS image sensor with a high-speed lateral electric field modulation (LEFM) gating structure for time domain fluorescence lifetime measurement. Time-windowed signal charge can be transferred from a pinned photodiode (PPD) to a pinned storage diode (PSD) by turning on a pair of transfer gates, which are situated beside the channel. Unwanted signal charge can be drained from the PPD to the drain by turning on another pair of gates. The pixel array contains 512 (V) × 310 (H) pixels with 5.6 × 5.6 µm2 pixel size. The imager chip was fabricated using 0.11 µm CMOS image sensor process technology. The prototype sensor has a time response of 150 ps at 374 nm. The fill factor of the pixels is 5.6%. The usefulness of the prototype sensor is demonstrated for fluorescence lifetime imaging through simulation and measurement results.

  4. Lifetime-Based Memory Management for Distributed Data Processing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Lu; Shi, Xuanhua; Zhou, Yongluan

    2016-01-01

    In-memory caching of intermediate data and eager combining of data in shuffle buffers have been shown to be very effective in minimizing the re-computation and I/O cost in distributed data processing systems like Spark and Flink. However, it has also been widely reported that these techniques would...

  5. Fluorescence lifetime FRET imaging of receptor-ligand complexes in tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudkouskaya, Alena; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier; Mazurkiewicz, Joseph E.; Barroso, Margarida

    2017-02-01

    To guide the development of targeted therapies with improved efficacy and accelerated clinical acceptance, novel imaging methodologies need to be established. Toward this goal, fluorescence lifetime Förster resonance energy transfer (FLIM-FRET) imaging assays capitalize on the ability of antibodies or protein ligands to bind dimerized membrane bound receptors to measure their target engagement levels in cancer cells. Conventional FLIM FRET microscopy has been widely applied at visible wavelengths to detect protein-protein interactions in vitro. However, operation at these wavelengths restricts imaging quality and ability to quantitate lifetime changes in in vivo small animal optical imaging due to high auto-fluorescence and light scattering. Here, we have analyzed the uptake of iron-bound transferrin (Tf) probes into human breast cancer cells using FLIM-FRET microscopy in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) range. The development of NIR FLIM FRET microscopy allows for the use of quantitative lifetime-based molecular assays to measure drug-target engagement levels at multiple scales: from in vitro microscopy to in vivo small animal optical imaging (macroscopy). This novel approach can be extended to other receptors, currently targeted in oncology. Hence, lifetime-based molecular imaging can find numerous applications in drug delivery and targeted therapy assessment and optimization.

  6. Room-temperature fluorescence lifetime of pseudoisocyanine (PIC) J excitons with various aggregate morphologies in relation to microcavity polariton formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Yuki; Saitoh, Keita; Oda, Masaru; Tani, Toshiro

    2012-01-01

    The results of room-temperature fluorescence lifetime measurements are reported for the excitation of J aggregates (Js) of pseudoisocyanine chloride (PIC-Cl) prepared in potassium polyvinyl sulfate (PVS) polymer thin films, their aqueous solutions, and NaCl aqueous solutions. Variations of the microscopic morphologies of the aggregates were investigated. The results show that fluorescence decay features correlated to the morphology change. The observed fluorescence lifetime and quantum efficiency of PIC J aggregates (PIC-Js) in a NaCl aqueous solution were 310 ps and 28%, respectively. The lifetime of the fibril-shaped macroaggregates prepared in PVS thin films was below the instrumental time resolution of 5 ps, and the efficiency decreased to below 3%. The results indicate that PIC-Js prepared with PVS polymers have an increased nonradiative contribution to the excitation deactivation process. In particular, macro-Js with isolated fibril-shaped structures revealed nonradiative pathway(s) that are closely associated to the specific packaging morphology of the constituent meso-Js. The possibility of a destructive effect on the formation of cavity-polaritons is also discussed.

  7. Study on the effect of deposition rate and concentration of Eu on the fluorescent lifetime of CsI: Tl thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijun; Guo, Lina; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Qianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong; Zhong, Zhiyong

    2017-06-01

    Although there are many new scintillators being developed recently, CsI: Tl is still very efficient among them. The fluorescent lifetime is a very important parameter of CsI: Tl thin film and two series of experiments have been conducted to learn about it. Our experiments, however, have demonstrated that the deposition rate and the codoping of Eu2+ will significantly influence its fluorescent lifetime. In order to increase the efficiency of the imaging system, we intend to obtain a higher fluorescent lifetime for CsI: Tl thin film by controlling these two conditions.

  8. Absorption, steady-state fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime, and 2D self-assembly properties of engineered fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins of Geobacillus stearothermophilus NRS 2004/3a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainz, Birgit; Steiner, Kerstin; Möller, Marco; Pum, Dietmar; Schäffer, Christina; Sleytr, Uwe B; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2010-01-11

    S-layer fusion protein technology was used to design four different fluorescent fusion proteins with three different GFP mutants and the red fluorescent protein mRFP1. Their absorption spectra, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime were investigated as a function of pH. It was found that fluorescence intensities and lifetime of the GFP mutant S-layer fusion proteins decreased about 50% between pH 6 and pH 5. The spectral properties of the red S-layer fusion protein were minimally affected by pH variations. These results were compared with His-tagged reference fluorescent proteins, demonstrating that the S-layer protein did not change the general spectral properties of the whole fusion protein. In addition, the pK(a) values of the fluorescent S-layer fusion proteins were calculated. Finally, it was shown that the S-layer fusion proteins were able to self-assemble forming 2D nanostructures of oblique p2 symmetry with lattice parameters of about a = 11 nm, b = 14 nm, and gamma = 80 degrees . The fluorescence tag did not hinder the natural self-assembly process of the S-layer protein. The combination of the fluorescence properties and the self-assembly ability of the engineered fusion proteins make them a promising tool to generate biomimetic surfaces for future applications in nanobiotechnology at a wide range of pH.

  9. Fluorescence lifetime and UV-Vis spectroscopy to evaluate the interactions between quercetin and its yeast microcapsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham-Hoang, Bao-Ngoc; Winckler, Pascale; Waché, Yves

    2017-09-09

    Quercetin is a fragile bioactive compound. Several works have tried to preserve it by encapsulation but the form of encapsulation (mono- or supra-molecular structure, tautomeric form), though important for stability and bioavailability, remains unknown. The present work aims at developing a fluorescence lifetime technique to evaluate the structure of quercetin during encapsulation in a vector capsule that has already proven efficiency, yeast cells. Molecular stabilization was observed during a four-month storage period. The time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) technique was used to evaluate the interaction between quercetin molecules and the yeast capsule. The various tautomeric forms, as identified by UV-Vis spectroscopy, resulted in various lifetimes in TCSPC, although they varied also with the buffer environment. Quercetin in buffer exhibited a three-to-four longer long time after 24 h (changing from 6-7 to 18-23 ns), suggesting an aggregation of molecules. In yeast microcapsules, the long-time population exhibited a longer lifetime (around 27 ns) from the beginning and concerned about 20% of molecules compared to dispersed quercetin. This shows that lifetime analysis can show the monomolecular instability of quercetin in buffer and the presence of interactions between quercetin molecules and their microcapsules. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. On modeling of lifetime data using two-parameter Gamma and Weibull distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanker, Rama; Shukla, Kamlesh Kumar; Shanker, Ravi; Leonida, Tekie Asehun

    2016-01-01

    The analysis and modeling of lifetime data are crucial in almost all applied sciences including medicine, insurance, engineering, behavioral sciences and finance, amongst others. The main objective of this paper is to have a comparative study of two-parameter gamma and Weibull distributions for mode

  11. A characterization of marginal distributions of (possibly dependent) lifetime variables which right censor each other

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bedford, T.; Meilijson, I.

    1997-01-01

    It is well known that the joint distribution of a pair of lifetime variables $X_1$ and $X_2$ which right censor each other cannot be specified in terms of the subsurvival functions $$P(X_2 > X_1 > x), \\quad P(X_1 > X_2 > x)$ \\quad \\text{and} \\quad $P(X_1 = X_2 > x)$$ without additional assumptions s

  12. Simple Derivation of the Lifetime and the Distribution of Faces for a Binary Subdivision Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hayashi, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The iterative random subdivision of rectangles is used as a generation model of networks in physics, computer science, and urban planning. However, these researches were independent. We consider some relations in them, and derive fundamental properties for the average lifetime depending on birth-time and the balanced distribution of rectangle faces.

  13. A Rotational BODIPY Nucleotide: An Environment-Sensitive Fluorescence-Lifetime Probe for DNA Interactions and Applications in Live-Cell Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Dmytro; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Cebecauer, Marek; Hof, Martin; Hocek, Michal

    2016-01-04

    Fluorescent probes for detecting the physical properties of cellular structures have become valuable tools in life sciences. The fluorescence lifetime of molecular rotors can be used to report on variations in local molecular packing or viscosity. We used a nucleoside linked to a meso-substituted BODIPY fluorescent molecular rotor (dC(bdp)) to sense changes in DNA microenvironment both in vitro and in living cells. DNA incorporating dC(bdp) can respond to interactions with DNA-binding proteins and lipids by changes in the fluorescence lifetimes in the range 0.5-2.2 ns. We can directly visualize changes in the local environment of exogenous DNA during transfection of living cells. Relatively long fluorescence lifetimes and extensive contrast for detecting changes in the microenvironment together with good photostability and versatility for DNA synthesis make this probe suitable for analysis of DNA-associated processes, cellular structures, and also DNA-based nanomaterials.

  14. Two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with sub-nanosecond pulses and a high analog bandwidth signal detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Hakert, Hubertus; Weng, Daniel; Huber, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) are powerful imaging techniques in bio-molecular science. The need for elaborate light sources for TPEF and speed limitations for FLIM, however, hinder an even wider application. We present a way to overcome this limitations by combining a robust and inexpensive fiber laser for nonlinear excitation with a fast analog digitization method for rapid FLIM imaging. The applied sub nanosecond pulsed laser source is synchronized to a high analog bandwidth signal detection for single shot TPEF- and single shot FLIM imaging. The actively modulated pulses at 1064nm from the fiber laser are adjustable from 50ps to 5ns with kW of peak power. At a typically applied pulse lengths and repetition rates, the duty cycle is comparable to typically used femtosecond pulses and thus the peak power is also comparable at same cw-power. Hence, both types of excitation should yield the same number of fluorescence photons per time on average when used for TPEF imaging. However, in the 100ps configuration, a thousand times more fluorescence photons are generated per pulse. In this paper, we now show that the higher number of fluorescence photons per pulse combined with a high analog bandwidth detection makes it possible to not only use a single pulse per pixel for TPEF imaging but also to resolve the exponential time decay for FLIM. To evaluate the performance of our system, we acquired FLIM images of a Convallaria sample with pixel rates of 1 MHz where the lifetime information is directly measured with a fast real time digitizer. With the presented results, we show that longer pulses in the many-10ps to nanosecond regime can be readily applied for TPEF imaging and enable new imaging modalities like single pulse FLIM.

  15. Size effect on strength and lifetime probability distributions of quasibrittle structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zdeněk P Bažant; Jia-Liang Le

    2012-02-01

    Engineering structures such as aircraft, bridges, dams, nuclear containments and ships, as well as computer circuits, chips and MEMS, should be designed for failure probability < $10^{-6}-10^{-7}$ per lifetime. The safety factors required to ensure it are still determined empirically, even though they represent much larger and much more uncertain corrections to deterministic calculations than do the typical errors of modern computer analysis of structures. The empirical approach is sufficient for perfectly brittle and perfectly ductile structures since the cumulative distribution function (cdf) of random strength is known, making it possible to extrapolate to the tail from the mean and variance. However, the empirical approach does not apply to structures consisting of quasibrittle materials, which are brittle materials with inhomogeneities that are not negligible compared to structure size. This paper presents a refined theory on the strength distribution of quasibrittle structures, which is based on the fracture mechanics of nanocracks propagating by activation energy controlled small jumps through the atomic lattice and an analytical model for the multi-scale transition of strength statistics. Based on the power law for creep crack growth rate and the cdf of material strength, the lifetime distribution of quasibrittle structures under constant load is derived. Both the strength and lifetime cdfs are shown to be sizeand geometry-dependent. The theory predicts intricate size effects on both the mean structural strength and lifetime, the latter being much stronger. The theory is shown to match the experimentally observed systematic deviations of strength and lifetime histograms of industrial ceramics from the Weibull distribution.

  16. Determining a fluorophore’s transition dipole moment from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solvents of varying refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Pei-Hua; Tregidgo, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-12-01

    The transition dipole moment of organic dyes PM546 and rhodamine 123 is calculated from fluorescence lifetime measurements in solutions of different refractive index. A model proposed by Toptygin et al (2002 J. Phys. Chem. B 106 3724-34) provides a relationship between the radiative rate constant and refractive index of the solvent, and allows the electronic transition dipole moments to be found: it is (7.1  ±  1.1) D for PM546 which matches that found in the literature, and (8.1  ±  0.1) D for rhodamine 123. Toptygin’s model goes further in predicting the shape of the fluorescent dye and here we predict the shape of PM546 and rhodamine 123 to be ellipsoidal.

  17. Signal peptide peptidase (SPP dimer formation as assessed by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM in intact cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyborg Andrew C

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal peptide peptidase (SPP is an intramembrane cleaving protease identified by its cleavage of several type II membrane signal peptides. Conservation of intramembrane active site residues demonstrates that SPP, SPP family members, and presenilins (PSs make up a family of intramembrane cleaving proteases. Because SPP appears to function without additional protein cofactors, the study of SPP may provide structural insights into the mechanism of intramembrane proteolysis by this biomedically important family of proteins. Previous studies have shown that SPP isolated from cells appears to be a homodimer, but some evidence exists that in vitro SPP may be active as a monomer. We have conducted additional experiments to determine if SPP exists as a monomer or dimer in vivo. Results Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM can be is used to determine intra- or intermolecular interactions by fluorescently labeling epitopes on one or two different molecules. If the donor and acceptor fluorophores are less than 10 nm apart, the donor fluorophore lifetime shortens proportionally to the distance between the fluorophores. In this study, we used two types of fluorescence energy transfer (FRET pairs; cyan fluorescent protein (CFP with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP or Alexa 488 with Cy3 to differentially label the NH2- or COOH-termini of SPP molecules. A cell based SPP activity assay was used to show that all tagged SPP proteins are proteolytically active. Using FLIM we were able to show that the donor fluorophore lifetime of the CFP tagged SPP construct in living cells significantly decreases when either a NH2- or COOH-terminally YFP tagged SPP construct is co-transfected, indicating close proximity between two different SPP molecules. These data were then confirmed in cell lines stably co-expressing V5- and FLAG-tagged SPP constructs. Conclusion Our FLIM data strongly suggest dimer formation between two separate SPP proteins

  18. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Hille, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR) and Asante Calcium Green (ACG) for two-photon (2P)-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+)-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D) of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns) and long (2.44 ns) decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+)-free and Ca(2+)-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D) of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+)]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+) indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  19. Asante Calcium Green and Asante Calcium Red--novel calcium indicators for two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Jahn

    Full Text Available For a comprehensive understanding of cellular processes and potential dysfunctions therein, an analysis of the ubiquitous intracellular second messenger calcium is of particular interest. This study examined the suitability of the novel Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes Asante Calcium Red (ACR and Asante Calcium Green (ACG for two-photon (2P-excited time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Both dyes displayed sufficient 2P fluorescence excitation in a range of 720-900 nm. In vitro, ACR and ACG exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay behavior and the two decay time components in the ns-range could be attributed to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound dye species. The amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay time changed in a Ca(2+-dependent way, unraveling in vitro dissociation constants K(D of 114 nM and 15 nM for ACR and ACG, respectively. In the presence of bovine serum albumin, the absorption and steady-state fluorescence behavior of ACR was altered and its biexponential fluorescence decay showed about 5-times longer decay time components indicating dye-protein interactions. Since no ester derivative of ACG was commercially available, only ACR was evaluated for 2P-excited fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM in living cells of American cockroach salivary glands. In living cells, ACR also exhibited a biexponential fluorescence decay with clearly resolvable short (0.56 ns and long (2.44 ns decay time components attributable to the Ca(2+-free and Ca(2+-bound ACR species. From the amplitude-weighted average fluorescence decay times, an in situ K(D of 180 nM was determined. Thus, quantitative [Ca(2+]i recordings were realized, unraveling a reversible dopamine-induced [Ca(2+]i elevation from 21 nM to 590 nM in salivary duct cells. It was concluded that ACR is a promising new Ca(2+ indicator dye for 2P-FLIM recordings applicable in diverse biological systems.

  20. Incorporating a piperidinyl group in the fluorophore extends the fluorescence lifetime of click-derived cyclam-naphthalimide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mingfeng; Ast, Sandra; Yu, Qun; Lo, Anthony T S; Flehr, Roman; Todd, Matthew H; Rutledge, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Ligands incorporating a tetraazamacrocycle receptor, a 'click'-derived triazole and a 1,8-naphthalimide fluorophore have proven utility as probes for metal ions. Three new cyclam-based molecular probes are reported, in which a piperidinyl group has been introduced at the 4-position of the naphthalimide fluorophore. These compounds have been synthesized using the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition and their photophysical properties studied in detail. The alkylamino group induces the expected red-shift in absorption and emission spectra relative to the simple naphthalimide derivatives and gives rise to extended fluorescence lifetimes in aqueous buffer. The photophysical properties of these systems are shown to be highly solvent-dependent. Screening the fluorescence responses of the new conjugates to a wide variety of metal ions reveals significant and selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of copper(II), yet no fluorescence enhancement with zinc(II) as observed previously for the simple naphthalimide derivatives. Reasons for this different behaviour are proposed. Cytotoxicity testing shows that these new cyclam-triazole-dye conjugates display little or no toxicity against either DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells or MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, suggesting a potential role for these and related systems in biological sensing applications.

  1. Incorporating a piperidinyl group in the fluorophore extends the fluorescence lifetime of click-derived cyclam-naphthalimide conjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingfeng Yu

    Full Text Available Ligands incorporating a tetraazamacrocycle receptor, a 'click'-derived triazole and a 1,8-naphthalimide fluorophore have proven utility as probes for metal ions. Three new cyclam-based molecular probes are reported, in which a piperidinyl group has been introduced at the 4-position of the naphthalimide fluorophore. These compounds have been synthesized using the copper(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne Huisgen cycloaddition and their photophysical properties studied in detail. The alkylamino group induces the expected red-shift in absorption and emission spectra relative to the simple naphthalimide derivatives and gives rise to extended fluorescence lifetimes in aqueous buffer. The photophysical properties of these systems are shown to be highly solvent-dependent. Screening the fluorescence responses of the new conjugates to a wide variety of metal ions reveals significant and selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of copper(II, yet no fluorescence enhancement with zinc(II as observed previously for the simple naphthalimide derivatives. Reasons for this different behaviour are proposed. Cytotoxicity testing shows that these new cyclam-triazole-dye conjugates display little or no toxicity against either DLD-1 colon carcinoma cells or MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells, suggesting a potential role for these and related systems in biological sensing applications.

  2. Study of thioflavin-T immobilized in porous silicon and the effect of different organic vapors on the fluorescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutter, Tanya; Amdursky, Nadav; Gepshtein, Rinat; Elliott, Stephen R; Huppert, Dan

    2011-06-21

    Steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques have been employed to study the fluorescence properties of thioflavin-T (ThT) adsorbed on oxidized porous silicon (PSi) surfaces, with an average pore size of ∼10 nm. We found that the average fluorescence decay time of ThT, when it is adsorbed on the PSi surface, is rather long, τ(av) = 1.3 ns. We attribute this relatively long emission lifetime to the effect of the immobilization of ThT on the PSi surface, which inhibit the rotation of the aniline with respect to the benzothiazole moieties of ThT. We also measured the fluorescence properties of ThT in PSi samples in equilibrium with vapors of several liquids, such as methanol, acetonitrile, and water. We found that the fluorescence intensity drops by a factor of 10, and the average decay time, measured by a time-correlated single-photon counting technique, decreases by a factor of 3. We explain these results in terms of liquid condensation of the vapors in the PSi pores, which leads to partial dissolution of the ThT molecules in the liquid pools.

  3. Novel aspects of fluorescence lifetime for molecules positioned close to metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussenegg, F. R.; Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Reinisch, H.; Riegler, M.

    1987-10-01

    On metal surfaces with submicroscopic corrugations, surface-enhanced optical processes can be observed. Results obtained by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dye molecules in the proximity (0-50 nm) of silver islands films are reported. It is demonstrated how the rather complex dependence of the integral fluorescence intensity on the distance dye-islands, can be resolved in the contributions of different mechanisms by analysing the fluorescence decay curves at various distances. It turns out, that the enhancement of absorption influences only the peak fluorescence intensity without changing the decay time, while the enhancement of emission and dissipative losses reduces the decay time. Thus time-resolved spectroscopy opens the possibility to test theoretical concepts on surface enhancement and provides basic data for tailoring molecule-metal structures with well-defined surface-enhancement properties.

  4. Estimation of lifetime distributions on 1550-nm DFB laser diodes using Monte-Carlo statistic computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshayes, Yannick; Verdier, Frederic; Bechou, Laurent; Tregon, Bernard; Danto, Yves; Laffitte, Dominique; Goudard, Jean Luc

    2004-09-01

    High performance and high reliability are two of the most important goals driving the penetration of optical transmission into telecommunication systems ranging from 880 nm to 1550 nm. Lifetime prediction defined as the time at which a parameter reaches its maximum acceptable shirt still stays the main result in terms of reliability estimation for a technology. For optoelectronic emissive components, selection tests and life testing are specifically used for reliability evaluation according to Telcordia GR-468 CORE requirements. This approach is based on extrapolation of degradation laws, based on physics of failure and electrical or optical parameters, allowing both strong test time reduction and long-term reliability prediction. Unfortunately, in the case of mature technology, there is a growing complexity to calculate average lifetime and failure rates (FITs) using ageing tests in particular due to extremely low failure rates. For present laser diode technologies, time to failure tend to be 106 hours aged under typical conditions (Popt=10 mW and T=80°C). These ageing tests must be performed on more than 100 components aged during 10000 hours mixing different temperatures and drive current conditions conducting to acceleration factors above 300-400. These conditions are high-cost, time consuming and cannot give a complete distribution of times to failure. A new approach consists in use statistic computations to extrapolate lifetime distribution and failure rates in operating conditions from physical parameters of experimental degradation laws. In this paper, Distributed Feedback single mode laser diodes (DFB-LD) used for 1550 nm telecommunication network working at 2.5 Gbit/s transfer rate are studied. Electrical and optical parameters have been measured before and after ageing tests, performed at constant current, according to Telcordia GR-468 requirements. Cumulative failure rates and lifetime distributions are computed using statistic calculations and

  5. Lifetime Fluorescence and Raman Imaging for Detection of Wound Failure and Heterotopic Ossification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    5–8]. HO also arises in spinal injuries, severe burns and in the surgical beds resulting from orthopedic surgery complications [1,6,9,10]. The...P. V. Butte, B. K. Pikul, A. Hever, W. H. Yong, K. L. Black, and L. Marcu, "Diagnosis of meningioma by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

  6. A low cost fluorescence lifetime measurement system based on SPAD detectors and FPGA processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franch, N.; Alonso, O.; Canals, J.; Vilà, A.; Dieguez, A.

    2017-02-01

    This work presents a low cost fluorescence life time measurement system, aimed at carrying out fast diagnostic tests through label detection in a portable system so it can be used in a medical consultation, within a short time span. The system uses Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC), measuring the arrival time of individual photons and building a histogram of those times, showing the fluorescence decay of the label which is characteristic of each fluorescent substance. The system is implemented using a Xilinx FPGA which controls the experiment and includes a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) to perform measurements with a resolution in the order of tenths of picoseconds. Also included are a laser diode and the driving electronics to generate short pulses as well as a HV-CMOS implemented Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) as a high gain sensor. The system is entirely configurable so it can easily be adapted to the target label molecule and measurement needs. The histogram is constructed within the FPGA and can then be read as convenient. Various performance parameters are also shown, as well as experimental measurements of a quantum dot fluorescence decay as a proof of concept.

  7. Estimating the Upper Limit of Lifetime Probability Distribution, Based on Data of Japanese Centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanayama, Nobutane; Sibuya, Masaaki

    2016-08-01

    In modern biology, theories of aging fall mainly into two groups: damage theories and programed theories. If programed theories are true, the probability that human beings live beyond a specific age will be zero. In contrast, if damage theories are true, such an age does not exist, and a longevity record will be eventually destroyed. In this article, for examining real state, a special type of binomial model based on the generalized Pareto distribution has been applied to data of Japanese centenarians. From the results, it is concluded that the upper limit of lifetime probability distribution in the Japanese population has been estimated 123 years.

  8. The Gray Institute ‘open’ high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, PR; TULLIS, IDC; PIERCE, GP; Newman, RG; PRENTICE, J; Rowley, MI; Matthews, DR; AMEER-BEG, SM; Vojnovic, B

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this ‘open’ design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a c...

  9. In vivo and in vitro investigations of retinal fluorophores in age-related macular degeneration by fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Schenke, S.; Mata, N.; Eitner, A.; Schweitzer, D.

    2009-02-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). However, a deeper understanding of the generation of single compounds contributing to the lipofuscin as well as of the role of other fluorophores such as FAD, glycated proteins, and collagen needs their discrimination by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). FLIM at the ocular fundus is performed using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with a picosecond laser source (448nm or 468nm respectively, 100ps, 80 MHz repetition rate) and dual wavelength (490-560nm and 560-7600nm) time-correlated single photon counting. A three-exponential fit of the fluorescence decay revealed associations of decay times to anatomical structures. Disease-related features are identified from alterations in decay times and-amplitudes. The in-vivo investigations in patients were paralleled by experiments in an organ culture of the porcine ocular fundus. Photo-oxidative stress was induced by exposure to blue light (467nm, 0.41 mW/mm2). Subsequent analysis (fluorescence microscopy, HPLC, LC-MS) indicated the accumulation of the pyridinium bis-retinoid A2E and its oxidation products as well as oxidized phospholipids. These compounds contribute to the tissue auto-fluorescence and may play a key role in the pathogenesis of AMD. Thus, FLIM observation at the ocular fundus in vivo enhances our knowledge on the etiology of AMD and may become a diagnostic tool.

  10. Single Cell Assay for Molecular Diagnostics and Medicine: Monitoring Intracellular Concentrations of Macromolecules by Two-photon Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pliss, Artem; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Kuzmin, Andrey; Wang, Yan; Qu, Junle; Li, Yuee; Prasad, Paras N

    2015-01-01

    Molecular organization of a cell is dynamically transformed along the course of cellular physiological processes, pathologic developments or derived from interactions with drugs. The capability to measure and monitor concentrations of macromolecules in a single cell would greatly enhance studies of cellular processes in heterogeneous populations. In this communication, we introduce and experimentally validate a bio-analytical single-cell assay, wherein the overall concentration of macromolecules is estimated in specific subcellular domains, such as structure-function compartments of the cell nucleus as well as in nucleoplasm. We describe quantitative mapping of local biomolecular concentrations, either intrinsic relating to the functional and physiological state of a cell, or altered by a therapeutic drug action, using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). The proposed assay utilizes a correlation between the fluorescence lifetime of fluorophore and the refractive index of its microenvironment varying due to changes in the concentrations of macromolecules, mainly proteins. Two-photon excitation in Near-Infra Red biological transparency window reduced the photo-toxicity in live cells, as compared with a conventional single-photon approach. Using this new assay, we estimated average concentrations of proteins in the compartments of nuclear speckles and in the nucleoplasm at ~150 mg/ml, and in the nucleolus at ~284 mg/ml. Furthermore, we show a profound influence of pharmaceutical inhibitors of RNA synthesis on intracellular protein density. The approach proposed here will significantly advance theranostics, and studies of drug-cell interactions at the single-cell level, aiding development of personal molecular medicine.

  11. Label-free separation of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiating progenies by phasor fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringari, Chiara; Sierra, Robert; Donovan, Peter J.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-04-01

    We develop a label-free optical technique to image and discriminate undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) from their differentiating progenies in vitro. Using intrinsic cellular fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) and phasor analysis to obtain hESC metabolic signatures. We identify two optical biomarkers to define the differentiation status of hESCs: Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and lipid droplet-associated granules (LDAGs). These granules have a unique lifetime signature and could be formed by the interaction of reactive oxygen species and unsaturated metabolic precursor that are known to be abundant in hESC. Changes in the relative concentrations of these two intrinsic biomarkers allow for the discrimination of undifferentiated hESCs from differentiating hESCs. During early hESC differentiation we show that NADH concentrations increase, while the concentration of LDAGs decrease. These results are in agreement with a decrease in oxidative phosphorylation rate. Single-cell phasor FLIM signatures reveal an increased heterogeneity in the metabolic states of differentiating H9 and H1 hESC colonies. This technique is a promising noninvasive tool to monitor hESC metabolism during differentiation, which can have applications in high throughput analysis, drug screening, functional metabolomics and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

  12. Observational Constraints on Quasar Black Hole Mass Distributions, Eddington Ratio Distributions, and Lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan, X.

    2010-01-01

    I will present the black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad line quasars in the SDSS DR3. We employ a powerful Bayesian statistical technique that corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates. We find evidence that the most massive black hole appeared as quasars...... earlier in the universe, and that most quasars are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit. I will also present constraints on the quasar lifetime and maximum black hole mass, derived from the mass functions....

  13. Observational Constraints on Quasar Black Hole Mass Distributions, Eddington Ratio Distributions, and Lifetimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Fan, X.

    2010-01-01

    I will present the black hole mass function (BHMF) of broad line quasars in the SDSS DR3. We employ a powerful Bayesian statistical technique that corrects for incompleteness and the statistical uncertainty in the mass estimates. We find evidence that the most massive black hole appeared as quasars...... earlier in the universe, and that most quasars are not radiating at or near the Eddington limit. I will also present constraints on the quasar lifetime and maximum black hole mass, derived from the mass functions....

  14. Lifetime Autler-Townes Splitting of Dressed Multi-order Fluorescence in Pr3+:YSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available For first time, we study primary and secondary Autler-Townes (AT splitting of multi-order fluorescence (FL in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL signals are controlled by changing power, detuning, and polarization of single and double dressing in a heteronuclear-like molecule system of Pr+3:YSO. The primary and secondary AT-splitting is caused by double cascaded dressing in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL in time domain is more sensitive than that of in spectral domain. Such results have potential applications in quantum communication and optical information processing on photonic chip.

  15. Lifetime Autler-Townes Splitting of Dressed Multi-order Fluorescence in Pr3+:YSO

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Ali; Changbiao Li; Abdulkhaleq Hasan; Garuma Abdisa; Zongchen Liu; Feng Ma; Yanpeng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    For first time, we study primary and secondary Autler-Townes (AT) splitting of multi-order fluorescence (FL) in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL signals are controlled by changing power, detuning, and polarization of single and double dressing in a heteronuclear-like molecule system of Pr+3:YSO. The primary and secondary AT-splitting is caused by double cascaded dressing in time domain. The AT-splitting of multi-order FL in time domain is more sensitive than that of in spectral...

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of DAPI-stained nuclei as a novel diagnostic tool for the detection and classification of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahav, Gilad; Hirshberg, Abraham; Salomon, Ophira; Amariglio, Ninette; Trakhtenbrot, Luba; Fixler, Dror

    2016-07-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) and B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (B-ALL) are the most common type of leukaemia in adults and children, respectively. Today, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the standard for detecting chromosomal aberrations that reflect adverse and favorable outcome. This study revealed a new, simple, and fast diagnostic tool to detect pathological cells by measuring and imaging the fluorescence lifetime (FLT) using FLT imaging microscopy (FLIM) of the peripheral blood (PB) cells of B-CLL samples that were labeled with the DNA binder, DAPI. The FLT of DAPI in healthy individuals was found to be 2.66 ± 0.12 ns. In contrast, PB cells of B-CLL and BM cells of B-ALL patients were characterized by a specific group distribution of the FLT values. The FLT of DAPI was divided into four subgroups, relative to 2.66 ns: short+, normal, prolonged, and prolonged+. These alterations could be related to different chromatin arrangements of B-CLL and B-ALL interphase nuclei. Notably, extremely long FLT of nuclear DAPI correlate with the presence of extra chromosome 12, while moderate increases compared to normal characterize the deletion of p53. Such correlations potentially enable a FLT-based rapid automatic diagnosis and classification of B-CLL even when the frequency of genetic and chromosomal abnormalities is low. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  17. The Gray Institute ‘open’ high-content, fluorescence lifetime microscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARBER, PR; TULLIS, IDC; PIERCE, GP; NEWMAN, RG; PRENTICE, J; ROWLEY, MI; MATTHEWS, DR; AMEER-BEG, SM; VOJNOVIC, B

    2013-01-01

    Summary We describe a microscopy design methodology and details of microscopes built to this ‘open’ design approach. These demonstrate the first implementation of time-domain fluorescence microscopy in a flexible automated platform with the ability to ease the transition of this and other advanced microscopy techniques from development to use in routine biology applications. This approach allows easy expansion and modification of the platform capabilities, as it moves away from the use of a commercial, monolithic, microscope body to small, commercial off-the-shelf and custom made modular components. Drawings and diagrams of our microscopes have been made available under an open license for noncommercial use at http://users.ox.ac.uk/~atdgroup. Several automated high-content fluorescence microscope implementations have been constructed with this design framework and optimized for specific applications with multiwell plates and tissue microarrays. In particular, three platforms incorporate time-domain FLIM via time-correlated single photon counting in an automated fashion. We also present data from experiments performed on these platforms highlighting their automated wide-field and laser scanning capabilities designed for high-content microscopy. Devices using these designs also form radiation-beam ‘end-stations’ at Oxford and Surrey Universities, showing the versatility and extendibility of this approach. PMID:23772985

  18. Estimation of customer lifetime value of a health insurance with interest rates obeying uniform distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyawan, A.; Pasaribu, U. S.; Henintyas, Permana, D.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays some firms, including insurer firms, think that customer-centric services are better than product-centric ones in terms of marketing. Insurance firms will try to attract as many new customer as possible while maintaining existing customer. This causes the Customer Lifetime Value (CLV) becomes a very important thing. CLV are able to put customer into different segments and calculate the present value of a firm's relationship with its customer. Insurance customer will depend on the last service he or she can get. So if the service is bad now, then customer will not renew his contract though the service is very good at an erlier time. Because of this situation one suitable mathematical model for modeling customer's relationships and calculating their lifetime value is Markov Chain. In addition, the advantages of using Markov Chain Modeling is its high degree of flexibility. In 2000, Pfeifer and Carraway states that Markov Chain Modeling can be used for customer retention situation. In this situation, Markov Chain Modeling requires only two states, which are present customer and former ones. This paper calculates customer lifetime value in an insurance firm with two distinctive interest rates; the constant interest rate and uniform distribution of interest rates. The result shows that loyal customer and the customer who increase their contract value have the highest CLV.

  19. Multimodal optical setup for nonlinear and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies: improvement on a commercial confocal inverted microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegati, V. B.; Adur, J.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Baratti, M. O.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    In this work we proposed and built a multimodal optical setup that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Olympus FV300) to include nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). The NLO microscopies included two-photon fluorescence (TPFE), Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Third Harmonic Generation (THG). The whole system, including FLIM, used only one laser source composed of an 80 MHz femtosecond laser. The commercial Ti:sapphire lasers can be tuned up to 690-1040 nm bringing the THG signal to the 350 nm region where most microscope optics do not work. However, the third harmonic is only generated at the sample, meaning that we only have to take care of the collection optics. To do that we used a remote photomultiplier to acquire the THG signal at the 310-350 nm wavelength window. After performing the tests to guarantee that we are observing actually SHG/THG signals we than used this system to acquire multimodal images of several biological samples, from epithelial cancer to vegetables. The ability to see the collagen network together with the cell nuclei proved to be important for cancer tissues diagnosis. Moreover, FLIM provides information about the cell metabolism, also very important for cancer cell processes.

  20. Analysis of energy metabolism of HeLa cancer cells in vitro and in vivo using fluorescence lifetime microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria; Shirmanova, Marina; Dudenkova, Varvara; Druzhkova, Irina; Shumilova, Anastasia; Zagaynova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to study energy metabolism in human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cells in vitro and in vivo using two-photon FLIM. Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence lifetimes of free and protein-bound forms of NAD(P)H and FAD and their relative contributions. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize tissue structure. Cellular metabolism was analyzed in cancer cells co-cultured with human fibroblasts and in tumor xenografts transplanted to nude mice. In the HeLa-huFB co-culture we observed a metabolic shift from OXPHOS toward glycolysis in cancer cells, and from glycolysis to OXPHOS in fibroblasts, starting from Day 2 of co-culturing. In the tumor tissue we detected metabolic heterogeneity with more glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells in the stroma-rich zones. The results of the study are of a great importance for understanding metabolic behavior of tumors and for development of anticancer drugs targeted to metabolic pathways.

  1. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  2. High-efficiency integrated readout circuit for single photon avalanche diode arrays in fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, G; Cominelli, A; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, lifetime measurements by means of the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) technique have led to a significant breakthrough in medical and biological fields. Unfortunately, the many advantages of TCSPC-based approaches come along with the major drawback of a relatively long acquisition time. The exploitation of multiple channels in parallel could in principle mitigate this issue, and at the same time it opens the way to a multi-parameter analysis of the optical signals, e.g., as a function of wavelength or spatial coordinates. The TCSPC multichannel solutions proposed so far, though, suffer from a tradeoff between number of channels and performance, and the overall measurement speed has not been increased according to the number of channels, thus reducing the advantages of having a multichannel system. In this paper, we present a novel readout architecture for bi-dimensional, high-density Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays, specifically designed to maximize the throughput of the whole system and able to guarantee an efficient use of resources. The core of the system is a routing logic that can provide a dynamic connection between a large number of SPAD detectors and a much lower number of high-performance acquisition channels. A key feature of our smart router is its ability to guarantee high efficiency under any operating condition.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy in type 2 diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, Dietrich; Deutsch, Lydia; Klemm, Matthias; Jentsch, Susanne; Hammer, Martin; Peters, Sven; Haueisen, Jens; Müller, Ulrich A.; Dawczynski, Jens

    2015-06-01

    The time-resolved autofluorescence of the eye is used for the detection of metabolic alteration in diabetic patients who have no signs of diabetic retinopathy. One eye from 37 phakic and 11 pseudophakic patients with type 2 diabetes, and one eye from 25 phakic and 23 pseudophakic healthy subjects were included in the study. After a three-exponential fit of the decay of autofluorescence, histograms of lifetimes τi, amplitudes αi, and relative contributions Qi were statistically compared between corresponding groups in two spectral channels (490diabetic patients and age-matched controls (p450 ps, and the shift of τ3 from ˜3000 to 3700 ps in ch1 of diabetic patients when compared with healthy subjects indicate an increased production of free flavin adenine dinucleotide, accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGE), and, probably, a change from free to protein-bound reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide at the fundus. AGE also accumulated in the crystalline lens.

  4. High-efficiency integrated readout circuit for single photon avalanche diode arrays in fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, G.; Cominelli, A.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, lifetime measurements by means of the Time Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) technique have led to a significant breakthrough in medical and biological fields. Unfortunately, the many advantages of TCSPC-based approaches come along with the major drawback of a relatively long acquisition time. The exploitation of multiple channels in parallel could in principle mitigate this issue, and at the same time it opens the way to a multi-parameter analysis of the optical signals, e.g., as a function of wavelength or spatial coordinates. The TCSPC multichannel solutions proposed so far, though, suffer from a tradeoff between number of channels and performance, and the overall measurement speed has not been increased according to the number of channels, thus reducing the advantages of having a multichannel system. In this paper, we present a novel readout architecture for bi-dimensional, high-density Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) arrays, specifically designed to maximize the throughput of the whole system and able to guarantee an efficient use of resources. The core of the system is a routing logic that can provide a dynamic connection between a large number of SPAD detectors and a much lower number of high-performance acquisition channels. A key feature of our smart router is its ability to guarantee high efficiency under any operating condition.

  5. Group Acceptance Sampling Plan for Lifetime Data Using Generalized Pareto Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a group acceptance sampling plan (GASP is introduced for the situations when lifetime of the items follows the generalized Pareto distribution. The design parameters such as minimum group size and acceptance number are determined when the consumer’s risk and the test termination time are specified. The proposed sampling plan is compared with the existing sampling plan. It is concluded that the proposed sampling plan performs better than the existing plan in terms of minimum sample size required to reach the same decision.

  6. New approximate solutions per unit of time for periodically checked systems with different lifetime distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rodrigues Dias

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Systems with different lifetime distributions, associated with increasing, decreasing, constant, and bathtub-shaped hazard rates, are examined in this paper. It is assumed that a failure is only detected if systems are inspected. New approximate solutions for the inspection period and for the expected duration of hidden faults are presented, on the basis of the assumption that only periodic and perfect inspections are carried out. By minimizing total expected cost per unit of time, on the basis of numerical results and a range of comparisons, the conclusion is drawn that these new approximate solutions are extremely useful and simple to put into practice.

  7. Anomalous power law distribution of total lifetimes of branching processes: application to earthquake aftershock sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saichev, A; Sornette, D

    2004-10-01

    We consider a general stochastic branching process, which is relevant to earthquakes, and study the distributions of global lifetimes of the branching processes. In the earthquake context, this amounts to the distribution of the total durations of aftershock sequences including aftershocks of arbitrary generation number. Our results extend previous results on the distribution of the total number of offspring (direct and indirect aftershocks in seismicity) and of the total number of generations before extinction. We consider a branching model of triggered seismicity, the epidemic-type aftershock sequence model, which assumes that each earthquake can trigger other earthquakes ("aftershocks"). An aftershock sequence results in this model from the cascade of aftershocks of each past earthquake. Due to the large fluctuations of the number of aftershocks triggered directly by any earthquake ("productivity" or "fertility"), there is a large variability of the total number of aftershocks from one sequence to another, for the same mainshock magnitude. We study the regime where the distribution of fertilities mu is characterized by a power law approximately 1/ mu(1+gamma) and the bare Omori law for the memory of previous triggering mothers decays slowly as approximately 1/ t(1+theta;) , with 0aftershock lifetimes scales as approximately 1/ t(1+theta;/gamma) when the average branching ratio is critical (n=1) . The coefficient 1aftershocks with mainshock magnitude m (productivity), with 0.5distribution of fertilities and the critical nature of the branching cascade process. In the subcritical case n<1 , the crossover from approximately 1/ t(1+theta;/gamma) at early times to approximately 1/ t(1+theta;) at longer times is described. More generally, our results apply to any stochastic

  8. Fluorescence lifetimes of tyrosine residues in cytochrome c'' as local probes to study protein unfolding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Melinda; Santos, Raquel; Paci, Emanuele; Santos, Helena; Maçanita, António L

    2009-04-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used to show that multiple tyrosine residues of a protein can serve as localized probes of structural changes during thermal unfolding. Cytochrome c'' from Methylophilus methylotrophus, which has four tyrosine residues, was chosen as a model protein. The procedure involved, first, the assignment of the experimental decay times to the tyrosine residues, followed by the interpretation of the changes in the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients with temperature. We found that the fluorescence decays of cytochrome c'' are double-exponential from 23 to 80 degrees C, with decay times much shorter than those of the parent compound N-acetyl-tyrosinamide; this quenching was ascribed to dipole-dipole energy transfer from the tyrosine residues to the heme. The tyrosine-heme distances (R) and theoretical decay times, tau(comp), were estimated for each tyrosine residue. The analysis of the simulated decay generated with tau(comp), showed that a double-exponential fit is sufficient to describe the four decay times with two pre-exponential coefficients close to values observed from the experimental decay. Therefore, the decay times at 23 degrees C could be assigned to the individual tyrosine residues as tau(1) to Tyr-10 and Tyr-23 (at 20.3 A) and tau(2) to Tyr-12 and Tyr-115 (at 12-14 A). On the basis of this assignment and MD simulations, the temperature dependence of the decay times and pre-exponential coefficients suggest that upon unfolding, Tyr-12 is displaced from the heme, with loss of the structure of alpha-helix I. Moreover, Tyr-115 remains close to the heme and the structure in this region of the protein is not altered significantly. Altogether the data support the view that the protein core, comprising the heme and the four alpha-helices II to V, is clearly more stable than the remaining region that includes alpha-helix I and the loop between residues 19-27.

  9. Preparation and properties of Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate transparent glass-ceramic with long fluorescence lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Ruilin; Wang, Jinlong; Zhang, Liaolin; Liu, Chunxiao; Wei, Wei [Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Nanjing (China)

    2016-07-15

    Nd{sup 3+}:SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals embedded fluorophosphate glass-ceramics were prepared by the melt quenching and subsequent thermal treatment method. The formation of SrAlF{sub 5} nanocrystals in the glass was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the glass-ceramics increased with the increase of size of nanocrystals. Importantly, by controlling growth of nanocrystals, an obvious enhancement of lifetime (725 μs) emerged in the glass-ceramics heat-treated at 510 C and the transmittance can reach to 72.2 % at 1049 nm. The enhanced fluorescence intensity and lifetime were ascribed to the comfortable local environment to the Nd{sup 3+} ion and scattering of the nanoparticle embedded into the glass matrix. (orig.)

  10. Energy-Efficient Distributed Lifetime Optimizing Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕伟杰; 白栋霖

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a sensing model for the coverage analysis of wireless sensor networks is provided. Using this model and Monte Carlo method, the ratio of private range to sensing range required to obtain the desired cover-age can be derived considering the scale of deployment area and the number of sensor nodes. Base on the coverage analysis, an energy-efficient distributed node scheduling scheme is proposed to prolong the network lifetime while maintaining the desired sensing coverage, which does not need the geographic or neighbor information of nodes. The proposed scheme can also handle uneven distribution, and it is robust against node failures. Theoretical and simulation results demonstrate its efficiency and usefulness.

  11. A dual-modality optical coherence tomography and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy system for simultaneous morphological and biochemical tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jesung; Jo, Javier A; Shrestha, Sebina; Pande, Paritosh; Wan, Qiujie; Applegate, Brian E

    2010-07-16

    Most pathological conditions elicit changes in the tissue optical response that may be interrogated by one or more optical imaging modalities. Any single modality typically only furnishes an incomplete picture of the tissue optical response, hence an approach that integrates complementary optical imaging modalities is needed for a more comprehensive non-destructive and minimally-invasive tissue characterization. We have developed a dual-modality system, incorporating optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), that is capable of simultaneously characterizing the 3-D tissue morphology and its biochemical composition. The Fourier domain OCT subsystem, at an 830 nm center wavelength, provided high-resolution morphological volumetric tissue images with an axial and lateral resolution of 7.3 and 13.4 µm, respectively. The multispectral FLIM subsystem, based on a direct pulse-recording approach (upon 355 nm laser excitation), provided two-dimensional superficial maps of the tissue autofluorescence intensity and lifetime at three customizable emission bands with 100 µm lateral resolution. Both subsystems share the same excitation/illumination optical path and are simultaneously raster scanned on the sample to generate coregistered OCT volumes and FLIM images. The developed OCT/FLIM system was capable of a maximum A-line rate of 59 KHz for OCT and a pixel rate of up to 30 KHz for FLIM. The dual-modality system was validated with standard fluorophore solutions and subsequently applied to the characterization of two biological tissue types: postmortem human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, and in vivo normal and cancerous hamster cheek pouch epithelial tissue.

  12. Lifetime earnings patterns, the distribution of future Social Security benefits, and the impact of pension reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, B; Burtless, G; Steuerle, E

    2000-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of Social Security reform on current and future workers, it is essential to accurately characterize the initial situations of representative workers affected by reform. For the purpose of analyzing typical reforms, the most important characteristic of a worker is the level and pattern of his or her preretirement earnings. Under the current system, pensions are determined largely by the level of the workers' earnings averaged over their work life. However, several reform proposals would create individual retirement accounts for which the pension would depend on the investment accumulation within the account. Thus, the pension would also depend on the timing of the contributions into the account and hence on the exact shape of the worker's lifetime earnings profile. Most analysis of the distributional impact of reform has focused, however, on calculating benefit changes among a handful of hypothetical workers whose relative earnings are constant over their work life. The earnings levels are not necessarily chosen to represent the situations of workers who have typical or truly representative earnings patterns. Consequently, the results of such analysis can be misleading, especially if reform involves introducing a fundamentally new kind of pension formula. This article presents two broad approaches to creating representative earnings profiles for policy evaluation. First, we use standard econometric methods to predict future earnings for a representative sample of workers drawn from the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP). Our statistical estimates are based on a simple representation of typical career earnings paths and a fixed-effect statistical specification. Because our estimation file contains information on each worker's annual earnings from 1951 through 1996 as reported in the Social Security Administration's earnings files, we have a record (though an incomplete one) of the actual earnings that will be used to

  13. Real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging system with a 32 × 32 0.13μm CMOS low dark-count single-photon avalanche diode array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, D.U.; Arlt, J.; Richardson, J.; Walker, R.; Buts, A.; Stoppa, D.; Charbon, E.; Henderson, R.

    2010-01-01

    A compact real-time fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) system based on an array of low dark count 0.13μm CMOS singlephoton avalanche diodes (SPADs) is demonstrated. Fast background-insensitive fluorescence lifetime determination is achieved by use of a recently proposed algorithm called

  14. Label-free fluorescence lifetime and second harmonic generation imaging microscopy improves quantification of experimental renal fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Suman; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Montford, John; Dvornikov, Alexander; Lehman, Allison; Orlicky, David J; Nemenoff, Raphael; Gratton, Enrico; Levi, Moshe; Furgeson, Seth

    2016-11-01

    All forms of progressive renal diseases develop a final pathway of tubulointerstitial fibrosis and glomerulosclerosis. Renal fibrosis is usually quantified using histological staining, a process that is time-consuming and pathologist dependent. Here we develop a fast and operator-independent method to measure fibrosis utilizing the murine unilateral ureteral obstruction model which manifests a time-dependent fibrotic increase in obstructed kidneys while the contralateral kidneys are used as controls. After ureteral obstruction, kidneys were analyzed at 7, 14, and 21 days. Fibrosis was quantified using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and second harmonic generation (SHG) in a Deep Imaging via Enhanced photon Recovery deep tissue imaging microscope. This microscope was developed for deep tissue along with second and third harmonic generation imaging and has extraordinary sensitivity toward harmonic generation. SHG data suggest the presence of more fibrillar collagen in the obstructed kidneys. The combination of short-wavelength FLIM and SHG analysis results in a robust assessment procedure independent of observer interpretation and let us create criteria to quantify the extent of fibrosis directly from the image. Thus, the FLIM-SHG technique shows remarkable improvement in quantification of renal fibrosis compared to standard histological techniques. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quasars Are Not Light-Bulbs: Testing Models of Quasar Lifetimes with the Observed Eddington Ratio Distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Hopkins, Philip F

    2008-01-01

    We use the observed distribution of Eddington ratios as a function of supermassive black hole (BH) mass to constrain models of AGN lifetimes and lightcurves. Given the observed AGN luminosity function, a model for AGN lifetimes (time above a given luminosity) translates directly to a predicted Eddington ratio distribution. Models for self-regulated BH growth, in which feedback produces a 'blowout' decay phase after some peak luminosity (shutting down accretion) make specific predictions for the lifetimes distinct from those expected if AGN are simply gas starved (without feedback) and very different from simple phenomenological 'light bulb' models. Present observations of the Eddington ratio distribution, spanning 5 decades in Eddington ratio, 3 in BH mass, and redshifts z=0-1, agree with the predictions of self-regulated models, and rule out 'light-bulb', pure exponential, and gas starvation models at high significance. We compare the Eddington ratio distributions at fixed BH mass and fixed luminosity (both ...

  16. Hole size distributions in cardo-based polymer membranes deduced from the lifetimes of ortho-positronium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Kinomura, A.; Kazama, S.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Nagai, Y.; Haraya, K.; Mohamed, H. F. M.; O'Rourke, B. E.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R.

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the free volume size distributions of the cardo-based polymer membranes, where ortho-positronium (o-Ps) undergoes pick-off annihilation, the o-Ps lifetime distributions were analyzed by the LT9 programme. It was found that the cardo-based polysulfone membrane has much narrower o-Ps lifetime/hole size distributions than the cardo-based polyimide membranes with the 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl)hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) moiety. Further, the lifetime/hole size distributions of the cardo-based polymer membranes are appreciably broadened with increasing temperature. This suggests that in these membranes there are holes not only of different sizes but also of different thermal expansion coefficients. It is also shown that in a membrane with a wider hole size distribution the average o-Ps lifetime tends to be longer than would be expected from the correlation between the o-Ps lifetime and the total free volume for common polymers.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy analysis of defects in multi-tube physical vapor transport grown Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Andreas; Veale, Matthew C.; Wilson, Matthew D.; Seller, Paul; Botchway, Stanley W. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Bell, Steven J. [Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Duarte, Diana D. [Science and Technology Facility Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Detector Development Group and Central Laser Facility, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Choubey, Ashutosh; Halliday, Douglas [Department of Physics, Durham University, Rochester Building, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-15

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is the material of choice for high-energy room-temperature X-ray and γ-ray detectors. However, the performance of pixelated detectors is greatly influenced by the quality of CZT. Crystal defects and impurities are one source of shallow and deep level traps for charge carriers. Fluorescence lifetime of the recombination of optically excited charges may indicate the presence and type of defects and impurities in CZT. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is used to examine the excited-state lifetime in CZT fabricated by different growth methods and conditions. The FLIM set-up analyzes luminescence emitted from the sample following photo excitation. Samples were optically excited above band gap with a pulsed laser (590 nm) for raster scanning a 220 x 165 μm{sup 2} sample area. In-situ room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) and FLIM were recorded simultaneously. In order to analyze the FLIM data, two dominant charge carrier decay processes (τ{sub 1}, τ{sub 2}) were identified. The luminescence signal decays with a rapid lifetime of τ{sub 1} ∼ 50-200 ps, and a large variety of long-lifetime components τ{sub 2} were found in the range of 225-900 ps. CZT grown by multi-tube physical vapor transport (MTPVT) showed extremely long-lived recombination decay times up to 3.5 ns in the vicinity of the interface at growth start. Further away from this interface, the recombination lifetime was in the typical range of fast transitions similar to those found in detector-grade CZT fabricated by travelling heater method. Crystalline material quality strongly influences FLIM lifetime. Time-resolved transients of MTPVT-grown CZT compared with industry-leading detector grade CZT (dots: measured data; lines: fitted exponential decay curves). (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Synthesis and Characterisation of Photo-Cross-Linkable Liquid Crystalline Poly(n-[n′-flurobenzoylstyryloxy]alkylmethacrylates and Their Fluorescence Lifetime Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study on photo-cross-linkable polymer containing pendant chalcone moiety exhibiting liquid crystalline as well as fluorescence lifetime properties in detail. The photoresponsive polymers were prepared, and their structure has been characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, and UV-Visible spectroscopy. The photo-cross-linking behavior of polymers has been studied by UV-Visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. UV spectral studies revealed that the polymers follow 2π+2π cyclo addition reactions when they undergo photo-cross-linking under the influence of UV-light. Number and weight average molecular weight of the polymers were determined by Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC and polydispersity index value near to 1.5. The thermal and thermooxidative stability of the polymers were determined by Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA. Thermal transitions were studied by DSC, and presence of mesophases was identified at 147 and 126∘C by hot stage polarized light optical microscopy (HPOM. Fluorescence lifetime measurements using the time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC method reveal that the average lifetime values decrease from 5.94 ns to 5.32 ns on UV-irradiation were discussed in detail.

  19. Photophysics of cyanine dyes adsorbed onto surfaces. Sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements of 3,3'-diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide and photoisomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Ferreira, L.; Oliveira, A.; Henbest, K. [and others

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the experiment entitled 'Photophysics of Cyanine dyes on Surfaces'; carried out at the Central Laser Facility (CLF) from the 6th to the 20th January 1997. The experiment, funded by the Framework IV Large-Scale Facilities Access Scheme, was proposed by Prof. L.F. Vieira Ferreira, Centro de Quimica-Fisica Molecular, Complexo 1, IST, 1096 Lisboa Codex, Portugal, and carried out by visiting researchers from the Institute. They were supported by researchers from the Central Laser Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. Experimental results: The photo physics of 3,3'-Diethyloxadicarbocyanine iodide (DODCI) adsorbed onto swollen microcrystalline cellulose was investigated. Two fluorescence emissions band have been observed and assigned. One was due to singlet excited momers and a second new emission, seen at high laser fluences, was due to the formation of a photoisomer. The DODCI stays entrapped between the polymer chains and nonradiative pathways for deactivation are reduced, the lifetimes of the excited states were measured using time resolved fluorescence lifetimes techniques. The fluorescence lifetimes of the excited states are longer lived in a swollen cellulose matrix. The photoisomer emission especially lives an order of magnitude longer than in homogeneous media.

  20. Study of intracellular delivery of doxorubicin from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging and confocal Raman microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Gabriela; Qiu, Yuan; Murray, Richard A; Moya, Sergio E

    2013-02-01

    The intracellular delivery of Doxorubicin (Dox) from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles stabilised with bovine serum albumin, in HepG2 cells, is studied via flow cytometry, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) and cell viability studies. Flow cytometry shows that the initial uptake of PLGA and Dox follow the same kinetics. However, following 8 h of incubation, the fluorescence intensity and cellular uptake of Dox decreases, while in the case of PLGA both parameters remain constant. FLIM shows the presence of a single-lifetime species, with a lifetime of 1.15 ns when measured inside the cells. Cell viability decreases by approximately 20% when incubated for 24 h with PLGA loaded with Dox, with a particle concentration of 100 µg · mL(-1). At the single-cell level, CRM shows changes in the bands from DNA and proteins in the cell nucleus when incubated with PLGA loaded with Dox. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. A New Estimation Model of IC Interconnect Lifetime Based on Uniform Defect Distribution Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAOTianxu; DUANXuchao; HAOYue; MAPeijun

    2004-01-01

    Defect, which exists throughout IC manufacturing process, is one of the important factors affecting IC interconnection lifetime. In this paper, a new failure model of IC interconnection is proposed based on analysis of the awdlable lifetime estimation models of IC interconnect lifetime. Many factors, such as the sizes of the defect, wire width, wire length and so on, are considered in this new model. The simulation results show that defect has a great influence on IC's interconnect lifetime, and the larger the defect size, the greater the influence. The new model can be used in an IC design to estimate electromigration loss related to the IC missing material defect and to some other factors.

  2. Segmenting Intracellular Distribution Images Derived by Fluorescent Dyes Using a Potts Model Hamiltonian

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Dandan; Ronhovde, Peter; Bloch, Sharon; Achilefu, Samuel; Nussinov, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    We apply a multiresolution community detection algorithm to perform unsupervised segmentation of complex intracellular signals derived using fluorescent dyes. In our earlier work, when applying our method to benchmarks, our algorithm was shown to be one of the best and to be especially suited to the detection of camouflage images. In the current manuscript, we have explored this algorithm in a more complex scenario. The current image processing problem is framed as identifying clusters with respective average fluorescent lifetimes (FLTs) against a background or "solvent" in fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) images derived using NIR fluorescent dyes. We have identified significant multiresolution structures using replica correlations in these images, where such correlations are manifested by information theoretic overlaps of the independent solutions ("replicas") attained using the proposed algorithm from different starting points. Our method is more efficient than a well-known image segmentation...

  3. Size-effects on energy relaxation and excited-species desorption in krypton clusters: Fluorescence lifetime measurements with 10 eV laser excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A. V.; Museur, L.; Castex, M. C.

    1997-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements of KrN clusters (N¯=2-2000) have been carried out using intense 10 eV laser excitation near 3P2 metastable atomic energy level. Two principal groups of electronically excited dimers Kr2* have been found in desorption: dimers, loosely bound near the (3P2+1S0) dissociation limit, ejected from cooled clusters and dimers undergoing vibrational relaxation from hot clusters. The desorption is principally terminated when N¯⩾50 at./cluster. The relaxation kinetics seems to converge to the properties of a solid state for 102⩽N¯⩽103 at./cluster. A variation of the Kr2*(1u/0u-) radiative lifetime, from 264 ns (in gas phase) to 440 ns (N¯=102), has been found. An equilibrium cluster temperature of 57 K has been calculated from this τ(N) dependence.

  4. Relation between proteins tertiary structure, tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes and tryptophan S(o)→(1)L(b) and S(o)→(1)L(a) transitions. Studies on α1-acid glycoprotein and β-lactoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, Jihad René

    2011-05-01

    We measured fluorescence lifetimes and fluorescence spectra (excitation and emission) of tryptophan residues of α(1)-acid glycoprotein (three Trp residues) and β-lactoglobulin (two Trp residues) in absence and presence of 450 μM progesterone. Progesterone binds only to α(1)-acid glycoprotein. In absence of progesterone, each of the two proteins displays three fluorescence lifetimes. Addition of progesterone induces a partial inhibition of the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition without affecting fluorescence lifetimes. The same experiments performed in presence of denatured proteins in 6 M guanidine show that addition of progesterone inhibits partially the S(o) → (1)L(a) transition and its peak is 15 nm shifted to the red compared to that obtained for native proteins. However, the S(o) → (1)L(b) transition position peak is not affected by protein denaturation. Thus, the tertiary structure of the protein plays an important role by modulating the tryptophan electronic transitions. Fluorescence emission decay recorded in absence and presence of progesterone yields three fluorescence lifetimes whether proteins are denatured or not. Thus, protein tertiary structure is not responsible for the presence of three fluorescence lifetimes. These characterize tryptophan substructures reached at the excited states and which population (pre-exponential values) depend on the tryptophan residues interaction with their microenvironment(s) and thus on the global conformation of the protein.

  5. 基于荧光寿命机理的光纤温度传感器研究%Fiber Temperature Sensor Based on Fluorescent Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江小峰; 李亚东; 李欣; 夏添艺; 林春

    2015-01-01

    为了实现恶劣环境下温度的测量,设计了一种基于荧光寿命机理的光纤温度传感系统.温度传感系统选用415 nm LED作为光源,以稀土荧光材料Y2 O2 S:Eu作为温度敏感材料,通过探测放大器和信号采集模块测量了敏感材料的荧光寿命,并由荧光寿命与温度的单调关系最终实现了温度的测量.采用油浴加热的方法进行温度实验,实验结果表明,温度传感系统在25~80℃实现了温度的测量,分辨率为0.5℃.%In order to achieve the measurement of temperature in harsh environments, a fiber temperature sensor system based on the fluorescent lifetime was designed. 415 nm LED was selected as the light source and a rare earth material Y2 O2 S:Eu was selected as the sensitive material. Finally, the fluorescence lifetime of sensitive material was measured by a probe amplifier and signal acquisition module and temperature measurements were realized due to the monotonic relationship between the fluorescence lifetime and temperature. Temperature experiments were carried out using an oil bath heating method, and the experimental results showed that: the temperature measurement can be realized in the range of 25 ~80 ℃ and the temperature sensor has an average resolution of 0 . 5 ℃.

  6. Statistical inference for the lifetime performance index based on generalised order statistics from exponential distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali Ahmadi, Mohammad; Doostparast, Mahdi; Ahmadi, Jafar

    2015-04-01

    In manufacturing industries, the lifetime of an item is usually characterised by a random variable X and considered to be satisfactory if X exceeds a given lower lifetime limit L. The probability of a satisfactory item is then ηL := P(X ≥ L), called conforming rate. In industrial companies, however, the lifetime performance index, proposed by Montgomery and denoted by CL, is widely used as a process capability index instead of the conforming rate. Assuming a parametric model for the random variable X, we show that there is a connection between the conforming rate and the lifetime performance index. Consequently, the statistical inferences about ηL and CL are equivalent. Hence, we restrict ourselves to statistical inference for CL based on generalised order statistics, which contains several ordered data models such as usual order statistics, progressively Type-II censored data and records. Various point and interval estimators for the parameter CL are obtained and optimal critical regions for the hypothesis testing problems concerning CL are proposed. Finally, two real data-sets on the lifetimes of insulating fluid and ball bearings, due to Nelson (1982) and Caroni (2002), respectively, and a simulated sample are analysed.

  7. Two-photon spectral fluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation imaging of the porcine cornea with a 12-femtosecond laser microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; Morgado, António Miguel; König, Karsten

    2016-03-01

    Five dimensional microscopy with a 12-fs laser scanning microscope based on spectrally resolved two-photon autofluorescence lifetime and second-harmonic generation (SHG) imaging was used to characterize all layers of the porcine cornea. This setup allowed the simultaneous excitation of both metabolic cofactors, NAD(P)H and flavins, and their discrimination based on their spectral emission properties and fluorescence decay characteristics. Furthermore, the architecture of the stromal collagen fibrils was assessed by SHG imaging in both forward and backward directions. Information on the metabolic state and the tissue architecture of the porcine cornea were obtained with subcellular resolution, and high temporal and spectral resolutions.

  8. Assessing solvent effects on the singlet excited state lifetime of uracil derivatives: A femtosecond fluorescence upconversion study in alcohols and D{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, Thomas [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: thomas.gustavsson@cea.fr; Banyasz, Akos [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sarkar, Nilmoni [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, WB (India); Markovitsi, Dimitra [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/DRECAM/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453, CEA/Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Improta, Roberto [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita Federico II, Complesso Universitario Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Istituto Biostrutture e Bioimmagini/CNR, V. Mezzocannone 6 - 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2008-06-23

    The excited state lifetimes of uracil, thymine and 5-fluorouracil have been measured using femtosecond UV fluorescence upconversion in various protic and aprotic polar solvents. The fastest decays are observed in acetonitrile and the slowest in aqueous solution while those observed in alcohols are intermediate. No direct correlation with macroscopic solvent parameters such as polarity or viscosity is found, but hydrogen bonding is one key factor affecting the fluorescence decay. It is proposed that the solvent modulates the relative energy of two close-lying electronically excited states, the bright {pi}{pi}* and the dark n{pi}* states. This relative energy gap controls the non-radiative relaxation of the {pi}{pi}* state through a conical intersection close to the Franck-Condon region competing with the ultrafast internal conversion to the ground state. In addition, an inverse isotope effect is observed in D{sub 2}O where the decays are faster than in H{sub 2}O.

  9. Frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging system (pco.flim) based on a in-pixel dual tap control CMOS image sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Robert; Holst, Gerhard A.

    2015-03-01

    The luminescence lifetime as a beneficial analytical parameter is known for many years and is well described by a large variety of publications. Many instruments including 2D measuring systems with cameras have been developed and applied in the past years. However, since the current instrumentation to perform either time- or frequency-domain lifetime measurements is rather complex, new developments in CMOS image sensor technology have achieved to create new image sensors, which can efficiently be integrated into easier-to-handle luminescence lifetime measuring systems. The principle of these modulatable CMOS image sensors, while initially being designed for distance measurements, shows a clear analogy to frequency-domain FLIM measurements, which was proven by researchers [1, 2]. Based on this principle a new CMOS image sensor has been developed, integrated into a camera system and has been investigated within a research project. The image sensor has a resolution of 1024 × 1024 pixels with a 5.6 μm pitch and can be modulated up to 50 MHz. First measurements show an effective dynamic range of larger than 1:1024 (corresponding to 10 bit dynamic). The maximum frame rate is in the range of 90 frames/s in dual-tap mode, resulting in an effective lifetime image frame rate for realistic measurements of approximately 22 frames/s. The camera system pco.flim, featuring that image sensor, generates all required modulation signals from 5 kHz to 50 MHz (sinusoidal and rectangular). It performs advanced pixel correction to generate linear and high-quality images, while the basic lifetime image processing is done in the computer. The modulation frequency can be freely adjusted within the specified range. The characteristics of the camera systems are presented, and first results are discussed using different representations of the data like for example the phasor approach [3], which has been established to provide a more global view to pixelwise fluorescence lifetime data and

  10. Wake Effects on Lifetime Distribution in DFIG-based Wind Farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Dao; Su, Chi

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing size of the wind farms, the impact of the wake effect on the energy yields and lifetime consumption of wind turbine can no longer be neglected. In this paper, the affecting factors like the wind speed and wind direction are investigated in terms of the single wake and multiple...

  11. Angular distributions and lifetime differences in B$_{s}$ --> J/$\\psi\\phi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Dighe, A S; Lipkin, Harry Jeannot; Rosner, Jonathan L; Dighe, Amol S; Dunietz, Isard; Lipkin, Harry J; Rosner, Jonathan L

    1995-01-01

    The strange B meson B_s \\equiv \\bar b s and its charge-conjugate \\bar B_s \\equiv b \\bar s are expected to mix with one another in such a way that the mass eigenstates B_s^H (``heavy'') and B_s^L (``light'') may have a perceptible lifetime difference of up to 40\\%, with the CP-even eigenstate being shorter-lived. A simple transversity analysis permits one to separate the CP-even and CP-odd components of B_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi, and thus to determine the lifetime difference. The utility of a similar analysis for B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*0} is noted.

  12. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Churmakov, D Y; Piletsky, S A; Greenhalgh, D A

    2003-01-01

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto- fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an effective depth.

  13. Analysis of skin tissues spatial fluorescence distribution by the Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Churmakov, D Y [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Meglinski, I V [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Piletsky, S A [Institute of BioScience and Technology, Cranfield University, Silsoe, MK45 4DT (United Kingdom); Greenhalgh, D A [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2003-07-21

    A novel Monte Carlo technique of simulation of spatial fluorescence distribution within the human skin is presented. The computational model of skin takes into account the spatial distribution of fluorophores, which would arise due to the structure of collagen fibres, compared to the epidermis and stratum corneum where the distribution of fluorophores is assumed to be homogeneous. The results of simulation suggest that distribution of auto-fluorescence is significantly suppressed in the near-infrared spectral region, whereas the spatial distribution of fluorescence sources within a sensor layer embedded in the epidermis is localized at an 'effective' depth.

  14. Interaction of poxvirus intracellular mature virion proteins with the TPR domain of kinesin light chain in live infected cells revealed by two-photon-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeshtadi, Ananya; Burgos, Pierre; Stubbs, Christopher D; Parker, Anthony W; King, Linda A; Skinner, Michael A; Botchway, Stanley W

    2010-12-01

    Using two-photon-induced fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we corroborate an interaction (previously demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid domain analysis) of full-length vaccinia virus (VACV; an orthopoxvirus) A36 protein with the cellular microtubule motor protein kinesin. Quenching of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), fused to the C terminus of VACV A36, by monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed), fused to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of kinesin, was observed in live chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or wild-type fowlpox virus (FWPV; an avipoxvirus), and the excited-state fluorescence lifetime of EGFP was reduced from 2.5 ± 0.1 ns to 2.1 ± 0.1 ns due to resonance energy transfer to mDsRed. FWPV does not encode an equivalent of intracellular enveloped virion surface protein A36, yet it is likely that this virus too must interact with kinesin to facilitate intracellular virion transport. To investigate possible interactions between innate FWPV proteins and kinesin, recombinant FWPVs expressing EGFP fused to the N termini of FWPV structural proteins Fpv140, Fpv168, Fpv191, and Fpv198 (equivalent to VACV H3, A4, p4c, and A34, respectively) were generated. EGFP fusions of intracellular mature virion (IMV) surface protein Fpv140 and type II membrane protein Fpv198 were quenched by mDsRed-TPR in recombinant FWPV-infected cells, indicating that these virion proteins are found within 10 nm of mDsRed-TPR. In contrast, and as expected, EGFP fusions of the IMV core protein Fpv168 did not show any quenching. Interestingly, the p4c-like protein Fpv191, which demonstrates late association with preassembled IMV, also did not show any quenching.

  15. A New Finite Interval Lifetime Distribution Model for Fitting Bathtub-Shaped Failure Rate Curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper raised a new four-parameter fitting model to describe bathtub curve, which is widely used in research on components’ life analysis, then gave explanation of model parameters, and provided parameter estimation method as well as application examples utilizing some well-known lifetime data. By comparative analysis between the new model and some existing bathtub curve fitting model, we can find that the new fitting model is very convenient and its parameters are clear; moreover, this model is of universal applicability which is not only suitable for bathtub-shaped failure rate curves but also applicable for the constant, increasing, and decreasing failure rate curves.

  16. Inter-Dye Distance Distributions Studied by a Combination of Single-Molecule FRET-Filtered Lifetime Measurements and a Weighted Accessible Volume (wAV Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Höfig

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET is an important tool for studying the structural and dynamical properties of biomolecules. The fact that both the internal dynamics of the biomolecule and the movements of the biomolecule-attached dyes can occur on similar timescales of nanoseconds is an inherent problem in FRET studies. By performing single-molecule FRET-filtered lifetime measurements, we are able to characterize the amplitude of the motions of fluorescent probes attached to double-stranded DNA standards by means of flexible linkers. With respect to previously proposed experimental approaches, we improved the precision and the accuracy of the inter-dye distance distribution parameters by filtering out the donor-only population with pulsed interleaved excitation. A coarse-grained model is employed to reproduce the experimentally determined inter-dye distance distributions. This approach can easily be extended to intrinsically flexible proteins allowing, under certain conditions, to decouple the macromolecule amplitude of motions from the contribution of the dye linkers.

  17. Effects of the Energy Error Distribution of Fluorescence Telescopes on the UHECR energy spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Washington; de Souza, Vitor; 10.1016/j.astropartphys.2007.04.010

    2008-01-01

    The measurement of the ultra high energy cosmic ray (UHECR) spectrum is strongly affected by uncertainties on the reconstructed energy. The determination of the presence or absence of the GZK cutoff and its position in the energy spectrum depends not only on high statistics but also on the shape of the energy error distribution. Here we determine the energy error distribution for fluorescence telescopes, based on a Monte Carlo simulation. The HiRes and Auger fluorescence telescopes are simulated in detail. We analyze the UHECR spectrum convolved with this energy error distribution. We compare this spectrum with one convolved with a lognormal error distribution as well as with a Gaussian error distribution. We show that the energy error distribution for fluorescence detectors can not be represented by these known distributions. We conclude that the convolved energy spectrum will be smeared but not enough to affect the GZK cutoff detection. This conclusion stands for both HiRes and Auger fluorescence telescopes...

  18. Technical Testing of Deep-UV Solid-State Sources for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurements in the Frequency Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    circuits. Depending on the level of fluorescence signal, either standard color -glass optical filters or more expensive custom-designed interference...acids (derivatives of tyrosine and tryptophan), coenzymes NADH and riboflavin as well as dipicolinic acid (DPA) were used for the analysis of the...Roth GmbH, Karlsruhe, Germany), N- acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATA), ovalbumin, collagen and elastin (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO), riboflavin (Reanal

  19. Comparative study of the fatty acid binding process of a new FABP from Cherax quadricarinatus by fluorescence intensity, lifetime and anisotropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayao Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are small cytosolic proteins, largely distributed in invertebrates and vertebrates, which accomplish uptake and intracellular transport of hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. Although long chain fatty acids play multiple crucial roles in cellular functions (structural, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, the precise functions of FABPs, especially those of invertebrate species, remain elusive. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel FABP family member, Cq-FABP, from the hepatopancreas of red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. We report the characterization of fatty acid-binding affinity of Cq-FABP by four different competitive fluorescence-based assays. In the two first approaches, the fluorescent probe 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS, a binder of internal cavities of protein, was used either by directly monitoring its fluorescence emission or by monitoring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring between the single tryptophan residue of Cq-FABP and ANS. The third and the fourth approaches were based on the measurement of the fluorescence emission intensity of the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid probe or the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of a fluorescently labeled fatty acid (BODIPY-C16, respectively. The four methodologies displayed consistent equilibrium constants for a given fatty acid but were not equivalent in terms of analysis. Indeed, the two first methods were complicated by the existence of non specific binding modes of ANS while BODIPY-C16 and cis-parinaric acid specifically targeted the fatty acid binding site. We found a relationship between the affinity and the length of the carbon chain, with the highest affinity obtained for the shortest fatty acid, suggesting that steric effects primarily influence the interaction of fatty acids in the binding cavity of Cq-FABP. Moreover, our results show that the binding affinities

  20. Formation of Gel-like Nanodomains in Cholesterol-Containing Sphingomyelin or Phosphatidylcholine Binary Membrane As Examined by Fluorescence Lifetimes and (2)H NMR Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Lönnfors, Max; Nyholm, Thomas K M; Slotte, J Peter; Murata, Michio

    2015-12-29

    In this study, we measured the time-resolved fluorescence of trans-parinaric acid (tPA), steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene (DPH), and (2)H NMR of 10,10-d2-stearoyl lipids in stearoyl sphingomyelin with cholesterol (SSM/Chol) and l-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine with Chol (PSPC/Chol) binary membranes. The results suggest that the membrane order obtained from the fluorescence experiments shows a similar temperature dependency as those of the (2)H NMR data. More importantly, the time-resolved fluorescence data implied the presence of at least two types of domains, cholesterol-poor gel-like domains (CPGLD) and cholesterol-enriched liquid-ordered (Lo) domains. These domains appear on a nano-to-micro second time scale for both SSM-Chol and PSPC-Chol membranes. The relative size of the gel-like domain was also estimated from the temperature-dependent lifetime measurements and (2)H NMR spectral changes. The results imply that the size of the gel-like domains is very small, probably on the nanometer scale, and smaller in SSM-Chol membrane than those in PSPC-Chol bilayers, which could account for the higher thermal stability of SM-Chol membranes. The present study demonstrates that gel-like nanodomains occur in SM-Chol binary membrane even with Chol content of over 33 mol %, which has been thought to consist exclusively of Lo phase, implying that not only Lo domains but also gel-like nanodomains are important for formation of lipid-ordered phase in SM-Chol and PC-Chol membranes.

  1. Ideal Molecular Design of Blue Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescent Emitter for High Efficiency, Small Singlet-Triplet Energy Splitting, Low Efficiency Roll-Off, and Long Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Ryun; Choi, Jeong Min; Lee, Chil Won; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-09-07

    Highly efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters, 5-(2-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (oBFCzTrz), 5-(3-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (mBFCzTrz), and 5-(4-(4,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)phenyl)-5H-benzofuro[3,2-c]carbazole (pBFCzTrz), were synthesized to study the effects of ortho-, meta-, and para- linkages between donor and acceptor moieties. oBFCzTrz having ortho- linked donor and acceptor moieties showed smaller singlet-triplet energy gap, shorter excited state lifetime, and higher photoluminescence quantum yield than mBFCzTrz and pBFCzTrz which are interconnected by meta- and para- positions. The TADF device using oBFCzTrz as a blue emitter exhibited high external quantum efficiency over 20%, little efficiency roll-off, and long device lifetime.

  2. Exploiting p-Type Delayed Fluorescence in Hybrid White OLEDs: Breaking the Trade-off between High Device Efficiency and Long Lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Deqiang; Duan, Lian

    2016-09-01

    Despite that the majority of practical organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) still rely on blue fluorophors with low triplet (T1) for creating blue light, hybrid white OLEDs based on low T1 blue fluorophors are still much lagged behind in power efficiency. Here, "ideal" hybrid WOLEDs with recorded efficiency as well as low roll-off, good color-stability and long lifetime were realized by utilizing the bipolar mixed materials as the host of green phosphor as well as the spacer to reduce T1 trap, while blue fluorophors with p-type delayed fluorescence to recycle the trapped T1. An electron transport material with both high electron mobility and good exciton confinement ability was used to boost the TTA efficiency. Hybrid WOLEDs with maximum current efficiency, external quantum efficiency and power efficiency of 49.6 cd/A, 19.1%, and 49.3 lm/W, respectively, together with a high color rendering index of 80 and a half lifetime of over 7000 h at an initial luminescence of 1000 cd/m(2) were realized, manifesting the high potential of the strategy.

  3. Nonlinear spectral and lifetime management in upconversion nanoparticles by controlling energy distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Deng, Renren; Xie, Xiaoji; Huang, Ling; Liu, Xiaogang

    2016-03-28

    Optical tuning of lanthanide-doped upconversion nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention over the past decade because this development allows the advance of new frontiers in energy conversion, materials science, and biological imaging. Here we present a rational approach to manipulating the spectral profile and lifetime of lanthanide emission in upconversion nanoparticles by tailoring their nonlinear optical properties. We demonstrate that the incorporation of energy distributors, such as surface defects or an extra amount of dopants, into a rare-earth-based host lattice alters the decay behavior of excited sensitizers, thus markedly improving the emitters' sensitivity to excitation power. This work provides insight into mechanistic understanding of upconversion phenomena in nanoparticles and also enables exciting new opportunities of using these nanomaterials for photonic applications.

  4. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging of Physiological Free Cu(II) Levels in Live Cells with a Cu(II)-Selective Carbonic Anhydrase-Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCranor, Bryan J.; Szmacinski, Henryk; Zeng, Hui Hui; Stoddard, A.K.; Hurst, Tamiika; Fierke, Carol A.; Lakowicz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Copper is a required trace element that plays key roles in a number of human enzymes, such that copper deficiency or genetic defects in copper transport lead to serious or fatal disease. Rae, et al., had famously predicted that free copper ion levels in the cell cytoplasm were extremely low, typically too low to be observable. We recently developed a variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase II for sensing metal ions that exhibits 25-fold better selectivity for Cu(II) over Zn(II) than the wild type protein, enabling us to accurately measure Cu(II) in the presence of ordinary cellular (picomolar) concentrations of free zinc. We inserted a fluorescent labeled Cu(II)-specific variant of human apocarbonic anhydrase into PC-12 cells and found that the levels are indeed extremely low (in the femtomolar range). We imaged the free Cu(II) levels in living cells by means of frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime microscopy. Implications of this finding are discussed. PMID:24671220

  5. 26 CFR 1.401(a)(9)-2 - Distributions commencing during an employee's lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... extending beyond the life expectancy of the employee or the joint life and last survivor expectancy of the... from a profit-sharing plan over a period not exceeding the joint life and last survivor expectancy of A... beginning date, or must be distributed, beginning not later than the required beginning date, over the...

  6. Physical Selectivity of Molecularly Imprinted polymers evaluated through free volume size distributions derived from Positron Lifetime Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2015-06-01

    The technique of imprinting molecules of various sizes in a stable structure of polymer matrix has derived multitudes of applications. Once the template molecule is extracted from the polymer matrix, it leaves behind a cavity which is physically (size and shape) and chemically (functional binding site) compatible to the particular template molecule. Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) is a well known technique to measure cavity sizes precisely in the nanoscale and is not being used in the field of MIPs effectively. This method is capable of measuring nanopores and hence suitable to understand the physical selectivity of the MIPs better. With this idea in mind, we have prepared molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) with methacrylicacid (MAA) as monomer and EGDMA as cross linker in different molar ratio for three different size template molecules, viz. 4-Chlorophenol (4CP)(2.29 Å), 2-Nephthol (2NP) (3.36 Å) and Phenolphthalein (PP) (4.47Å). FTIR and the dye chemical reactions are used to confirm the complete extraction of the template molecules from the polymer matrix. The free volume size and its distribution have been derived from the measured o-Ps lifetime spectra. Based on the free volume distribution analysis, the percentage of functional cavities for the three template molecules are determined. Percentage of functional binding cavities for 4-CP molecules has been found out to be 70.2% and the rest are native cavities. Similarly for 2NP it is 81.5% and nearly 100% for PP. Therefore, PALS method proves to be very precise and accurate for determining the physical selectivity of MIPs.

  7. Anomalous Power Law Distribution of Total Lifetimes of Branching Processes Relevant to Earthquakes

    CERN Document Server

    Saichev, A

    2004-01-01

    We consider a branching model of triggered seismicity, the ETAS (epidemic-type aftershock sequence) model which assumes that each earthquake can trigger other earthquakes (``aftershocks''). An aftershock sequence results in this model from the cascade of aftershocks of each past earthquake. Due to the large fluctuations of the number of aftershocks triggered directly by any earthquake (``productivity'' or ``fertility''), there is a large variability of the total number of aftershocks from one sequence to another, for the same mainshock magnitude. We study the regime where the distribution of fertilities $\\mu$ is characterized by a power law $\\sim 1/\\mu^{1+\\gamma}$ and the bare Omori law for the memory of previous triggering mothers decays slowly as $\\sim 1/t^{1+\\theta}$, with $0 < \\theta <1$ relevant for earthquakes. Using the tool of generating probability functions and a quasistatic approximation which is shown to be exact asymptotically for large durations, we show that the density distribution of to...

  8. Dynamic measurement of fluorescent proteins spectral distribution on virus infected cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ja-Yun; Wu, Ming-Xiu; Kao, Chia-Yun; Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Hsu, I.-Jen

    2006-09-01

    We constructed a dynamic spectroscopy system that can simultaneously measure the intensity and spectral distributions of samples with multi-fluorophores in a single scan. The system was used to monitor the fluorescence distribution of cells infected by the virus, which is constructed by a recombinant baculoviruses, vAcD-Rhir-E, containing the red and green fluorescent protein gene that can simultaneously produce dual fluorescence in recombinant virus-infected Spodoptera frugiperda 21 cells (Sf21) under the control of a polyhedrin promoter. The system was composed of an excitation light source, a scanning system and a spectrometer. We also developed an algorithm and fitting process to analyze the pattern of fluorescence distribution of the dual fluorescence produced in the recombinant virus-infected cells. All the algorithm and calculation are automatically processed in a visualized scanning program and can monitor the specific region of sample by calculating its intensity distribution. The spectral measurement of each pixel was performed at millisecond range and the two dimensional distribution of full spectrum was recorded within several seconds. We have constructed a dynamic spectroscopy system to monitor the process of virus-infection of cells. The distributions of the dual fluorescence were simultaneously measured at micrometer resolution.

  9. A precise Boltzmann distribution law for the fluorescence intensity ratio of two thermally coupled levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Feng; Zhao, Hua; Cai, Wei; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-06-01

    Noncontact monitoring temperature is very important in modern medicine, science, and technologies. The fluorescence intensity ratio (FIR) technique based on the Boltzmann distribution law exhibits excellent application potential, but the observed FIR deviates from the Boltzmann distribution law in the low temperature range. We propose a fluorescence intensity ratio relation FIR* = ηFIR by introducing a quantity η representing thermal population degree, which can be obtained from measured fluorescence decay curves of the upper emitting level. Using Eu3+ as an example, the method is confirmed that the deviated FIR is able to be corrected and return to follow the Boltzmann law.

  10. A New Distributed Algorithm for Improved Coverage and Increased Lifetime in Sensor Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Xiaoyu

    2009-01-01

    In "spot-sensing" applications of sensor networks, each node makes measurements (such as temperature or humidity) at the precise location of the node and there is no concept of a sensing radius as in "area-sensing" applications such as surveillance or target tracking. While most coverage problems in the research literature have addressed area-sensing applications, this paper introduces a new coverage problem that is more meaningful to spot-sensing applications. In such cases, an improved quality of coverage is implied by (i) a smaller average distance between points in the region to their respective nearest active nodes and (ii) a more even distribution of these distances. New metrics are developed for these two aspects of quality of coverage and theoretical bounds are derived. A new distributed algorithm is presented for each node to determine if and when it should sense or sleep to conserve energy while also preserving quality of coverage. Simulation results show that the algorithm introduced here achieves ...

  11. Time-dependent pressure distribution in microstructured shocked materials using fluorescent dye probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, Alexandr; Christensen, James M.; Dlott, Dana D.

    2017-01-01

    We have used fluorescent probes for time-resolved microscopy of shocked particulate media. By embedding rhodamine 6G (R6G) dye in silica nano- and micro-particles, we have created superemissive ultrafast pressure probes. We used silica-embedded dye particles to obtain stroboscopic fluorescence images of shocked sand-like media. Shock effects on microstructured media and micropressure distributions can be determined from shock-induced emission intensity loss, with high time and space resolution.

  12. Distribution of lifetimes of kinetochore-microtubule attachments:interplay of energy landscape, molecular motors and microtubule (de-)polymerization

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Ajeet K; Chowdhury, Debashish

    2013-01-01

    Before a cell divides into two daughter cells, the chromosomes are replicated resulting in two sister chromosomes embracing each other. Each sister chromosome is bound to a separate proteinous structure, called kinetochore (kt), that captures the tip of a filamentous protein, called microtubule (MT). Two oppositely oriented MTs pull the two kts attached to two sister chromosomes thereby pulling the two sisters away from each other. Here we theoretically study an even simpler system, namely an isolated kt coupled to a single MT; this system mimics an {\\it in-vitro} experiment where a single kt-MT attachment is reconstituted using purified extracts from budding yeast. Our models not only account for the experimentally observed "catch-bond-like" behavior of the kt-MT coupling, but also make new predictions on the probability distribution of the lifetimes of the attachments. In principle, our new predictions can be tested by analyzing the data collected in the {\\it in-vitro} experiments provided the experiment is...

  13. Global trends in the fluorescence characteristics and distribution of marine dissolved organic matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Linda; Stedmon, Colin; Kragh, Theis

    2011-01-01

    A fraction of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is able to fluoresce. This ability has been used in the present study to investigate the characteristics and distribution of different DOM fractions. A unique global dataset revealed seven different fluorescent fractions of DOM: two humic-like, four...... in the surface layer indicate the quantitative importance of photochemical degradation as a sink of the humic-like compounds. In the dark ocean (below 200 m), significant linear relationships between humic-like DOM fluorescence and microbial activity (apparent oxygen utilization, NO3- and PO43-) were found....... These observations imply a link to dark ocean microbial remineralization and indicate that the major source of humic-like compounds is microbial turnover of organic matter. The results of the present study show that the distribution of the humic-like DOM fractions is a balance between supply from continental run off...

  14. Estimation of multiexponential fluorescence decay parameters using compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sejung; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a microscopic imaging technique to present an image of fluorophore lifetimes. It circumvents the problems of typical imaging methods such as intensity attenuation from depth since a lifetime is independent of the excitation intensity or fluorophore concentration. The lifetime is estimated from the time sequence of photon counts observed with signal-dependent noise, which has a Poisson distribution. Conventional methods usually estimate single or biexponential decay parameters. However, a lifetime component has a distribution or width, because the lifetime depends on macromolecular conformation or inhomogeneity. We present a novel algorithm based on a sparse representation which can estimate the distribution of lifetime. We verify the enhanced performance through simulations and experiments.

  15. A non-Gaussian distribution quantifies distances measured with fluorescence localization techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Churchman, L.S.; Flyvbjerg, H.; Spudich, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    When single-molecule fluorescence localization techniques are pushed to their lower limits in attempts to measure ever-shorter distances, measurement errors become important to understand. Here we describe the non-Gaussian distribution of measured distances that is the key to proper interpretation...

  16. Measuring Lifetime Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hoy; Buhong Zheng

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an axiomatic framework for measuring life time poverty over multiple periods. For an individual, we argue that lifetime poverty is influenced by both the snapshot poverty of each period and the poverty level of the "permanent" lifetime consumption; it is also influenced by how poverty spells are distributed over the life time. Two obvious candidates for aggregation are to aggregate over time and then across individuals, or vice versa. For a society, we consider a path-inde...

  17. Er3+ infrared fluorescence affected by spatial distribution synchronicity of Ba2+ and Er3+ in Er3+-doped BaO–SiO2 glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsunobu Masuno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glasses with the composition xBaO–(99.9 − xSiO2–0.1ErO3/2 (0 ≤x ≤ 34.9 were fabricated by a levitation technique. The glasses in the immiscibility region were opaque due to chemical inhomogeneity, while the other glasses were colorless and transparent. The scanning electron microscope observations and electron probe microanalysis scan profiles revealed that more Er3+ ions were preferentially distributed in the regions where more Ba2+ ions existed in the chemically inhomogeneous glasses. The synchronicity of the spatial distributions of the two ions initially increased with increasing x and then decreased when the Ba2+ concentration exceeded a certain value. The peak shape and lifetime of the fluorescence at 1.55 μm depended on x as well as the spatial distribution of both ions. These results indicate that although ErOn polyhedra are preferentially coordinated with Ba2+ ions and their local structure is affected by the coordination of Ba2+, there is a maximum in the amount of Ba2+ ions that can coordinate ErOn polyhedra since the available space for Ba2+ ions is limited. These findings provide us with efficient ways to design the chemical composition of glasses with superior Er3+ fluorescence properties for optical communication network systems.

  18. Dose distribution calculation for in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, R. G. [Universidad de la Frontera, Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Av. Francisco Salazar 1145, Temuco 4811230, Araucania (Chile); Lozano, E. [Instituto Nacional del Cancer, Unidad de Fisica Medica, Av. Profesor Zanartu 1010, Santiago (Chile); Valente, M., E-mail: figueror@ufro.cl [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Ravadavia 1917, C1033AAJ, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-08-01

    In-vivo X-ray fluorescence constitutes a useful and accurate technique, worldwide established for constituent elementary distribution assessment. Actually, concentration distributions of arbitrary user-selected elements can be achieved along sample surface with the aim of identifying and simultaneously quantifying every constituent element. The method is based on the use of a collimated X-ray beam reaching the sample. However, one common drawback for considering the application of this technique for routine clinical examinations was the lack of information about associated dose delivery. This work presents a complete study of the dose distribution resulting from an in-vivo X-ray fluorescence scanning for quantifying biohazard materials on human hands. Absorbed dose has been estimated by means of dosimetric models specifically developed to this aim. In addition, complete dose distributions have been obtained by means of full radiation transport calculations in based on stochastic Monte Carlo techniques. A dedicated subroutine has been developed using the Penelope 2008 main code also integrated with dedicated programs -Mat Lab supported- for 3 dimensional dose distribution visualization. The obtained results show very good agreement between approximate analytical models and full descriptions by means of Monte Carlo simulations. (Author)

  19. 基于同步扫描相机的荧光寿命测量系统研究%A fluorescence lifetime spectrometer based on a synchroscan streak camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵永红; 李恒; 王岩; 屈军乐; 牛憨笨

    2009-01-01

    建立一台基于同步扫描相机的双光子激发荧光寿命显微测量系统,同步扫描相机的重复工作频率为76 MHz,利用钛宝石飞秒激光器作为光源,通过可调延时器和标准具对扫描相机的时间分辨率、扫描速度以及非线性等进行标定.该系统的时间分辨率为9 ps,非线性小于4%,量程为2.8 ns.测量了荧光染料Rose Bengal(RsB)的荧光衰减曲线,通过最小二乘法对荧光的衰减曲线进行拟合,得到RsB的荧光寿命为763 ps,与标准荧光染料对比一致.%A two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime spectrometer based on a synchroscan streak camera was presented. The spectrometer was calibrated using a Titanium: Sapphire femtosecond laser in conjunction with a custom-made synchronized streak circuit, tunable delay generator and a set of etalons. Experimental results show that the temporal resolution of this spectrometer is 9 ps, nonlinearity is less than 4% , and the sweep range is 2. 8 ns. Fluorescence decay profile of fluorescent dye Rose Bengal ( RsB) is recorded with the spectrometer. Nonlinear least square fitting of the decay profile gives that the lifetime of RsB is 763 ps, consistent with standard fluorescence dyes.

  20. QSO Lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Martini, P

    2003-01-01

    The QSO lifetime t_Q is one of the most fundamental quantities for understanding black hole and QSO evolution, yet it remains uncertain by several orders of magnitude. If t_Q is long, then only a small fraction of galaxies went through a luminous QSO phase. In contrast, a short lifetime would require most galaxies today to have undergone a QSO phase in their youth. The current best estimates or constraints on t_Q from black hole demographics and the radiative properties of QSOs vary from at least 10^6 to 10^8 years. This broad range still allows both possibilities: that QSOs were either a rare or a common stage of galaxy evolution. These constraints also do not rule out the possibility that QSO activity is episodic, with individual active periods much shorter than the total active lifetime. In the next few years a variety of additional observational constraints on the lifetimes of QSOs will become available, including clustering measurements and the proximity effect. These new constraints can potentially dete...

  1. Light-sheet fluorescence imaging to localize cardiac lineage and protein distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yichen; Lee, Juhyun; Ma, Jianguo; Sung, Kevin; Yokota, Tomohiro; Singh, Neha; Dooraghi, Mojdeh; Abiri, Parinaz; Wang, Yibin; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Nakano, Atsushi; Nguyen, Thao P.; Fei, Peng; Hsiai, Tzung K.

    2017-02-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) serves to advance developmental research and regenerative medicine. Coupled with the paralleled advances in fluorescence-friendly tissue clearing technique, our cardiac LSFM enables dual-sided illumination to rapidly uncover the architecture of murine hearts over 10 by 10 by 10 mm3 in volume; thereby allowing for localizing progenitor differentiation to the cardiomyocyte lineage and AAV9-mediated expression of exogenous transmembrane potassium channels with high contrast and resolution. Without the steps of stitching image columns, pivoting the light-sheet and sectioning the heart mechanically, we establish a holistic strategy for 3-dimentional reconstruction of the “digital murine heart” to assess aberrant cardiac structures as well as the spatial distribution of the cardiac lineages in neonates and ion-channels in adults.

  2. Elemental distribution images in prostate samples by X-ray fluorescence microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, G.R. [Non-destructive Testing, Corrosion and Welding Laboratory, PEMM/COPPE/UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rocha, H.S. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Physics Institute-Stated University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lima, I. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lopes, R.T., E-mail: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, PEN/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, 21.941-972, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    An X-ray transmission microtomography (CT) system combined with an X-ray fluorescence microtomography (XRF{mu}CT) system was implemented in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), in order to determine the elemental distribution in prostate samples aiming at establishing a correlation between the concentration of some elements and the characteristics and pathology of the tissues. The CT images were reconstructed using a filtered-back projection algorithm and the XRF{mu}CT images were reconstructed using a filtered-back projection algorithm with absorption corrections. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we evaluated prostate tissues by microtomography imaging techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elemental distribution of iron, copper and zinc was obtained in each sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The great advantage of this technique is the visualization in three-dimension. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The elemental distribution visualization was obtained without damaging the material.

  3. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore in silica and PVA thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    in silica thin films and PVA films were studied by means of steady-state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. We have found that the azadioxatriangulenium entrapped in silica thin film has a wider fluorescence lifetime distribution (Lorentzian distribution), lower fluorescence efficiencies, shorter....... In contrast to the PVA matrices, the porous silica films allow restricted rotations of Azadioxatriangulenium molecules, which result in faster and complex fluorescence anisotropy decays suggesting energy migration among dye molecules....

  4. Breeding resource distribution affects selection gradients on male phenotypic traits: experimental study on lifetime reproductive success in the bitterling fish (Rhodeus amarus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Martin; Ondracková, Markéta; Bryjová, Anna; Smith, Carl; Bryja, Josef

    2009-02-01

    The spatial distribution of breeding resources can have pronounced demographic and evolutionary consequences. We used 20 experimental groups of the bitterling (Rhodeus amarus), an annual fish with a promiscuous, resource-based mating system, and extended breeding season to investigate how the spatial distribution (clumped or regular) of bitterling oviposition sites (live freshwater mussels) affected offspring production, variation in reproductive success, and directional selection on phenotypic traits over their entire reproductive lifetime. We did not detect any effect of resource distribution on offspring production or variation in reproductive success among individual fish, although variation between replicates was higher with a clumped distribution. This finding is discussed with regard to the incidence of alternative mating behaviors (sneaking) within the limitations imposed by our experimental design. Breeding resource distribution had a significant effect on selection on male phenotypic traits. Stronger directional selection on traits associated with intrasexual competition for fertilizations, gonad mass (an indicator of sperm competition), and the extent of red, carotenoid-based pigment in the iris (an index of dominance status), was detected with a clumped resource distribution. With a regular resource distribution, a stronger positive selection on male body size was detected. We discuss the implications of our results for natural populations.

  5. Mapping element distributions in plant tissues using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Erica; de Jonge, Martin D; Kopittke, Peter M; Lombi, Enzo

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is allowing substantial advances in several disciplines of plant science by allowing the in situ examination of elements within plant tissues. Continual improvements in detector speed, sensitivity, and resolution are increasing the diversity of questions that can be addressed using this technique, including the in situ analysis of elements (such as nutrients or toxicants) within fresh and hydrated tissues. Here, we describe the general principles for designing and conducting experiments for the examination of elemental distributions in plant material using micro-XRF.

  6. Simultaneous confocal fluorescence microscopy and optical coherence tomography for drug distribution and tissue integrity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Matthew T.; LaCroix, Jeffrey; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Wax, Adam

    2011-03-01

    The effectiveness of microbicidal gels, topical products developed to prevent infection by sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, is governed by extent of gel coverage, pharmacokinetics of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs), and integrity of vaginal epithelium. While biopsies provide localized information about drug delivery and tissue structure, in vivo measurements are preferable in providing objective data on API and gel coating distribution as well as tissue integrity. We are developing a system combining confocal fluorescence microscopy with optical coherence tomography (OCT) to simultaneously measure local concentrations and diffusion coefficients of APIs during transport from microbicidal gels into tissue, while assessing tissue integrity. The confocal module acquires 2-D images of fluorescent APIs multiple times per second allowing analysis of lateral diffusion kinetics. The custom Fourier domain OCT module has a maximum a-scan rate of 54 kHz and provides depth-resolved tissue integrity information coregistered with the confocal fluorescence measurements. The combined system is validated by imaging phantoms with a surrogate fluorophore. Time-resolved API concentration measured at fixed depths is analyzed for diffusion kinetics. This multimodal system will eventually be implemented in vivo for objective evaluation of microbicide product performance.

  7. Lead tolerance and cellular distribution in Elsholtzia splendens using synchrotron radiation micro-X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Tian, Shengke [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Science, Indian River Research and Education Center, Fort Pierce, FL 34945 (United States); Lu, Lingli; Shohag, M.J.I.; Liao, Haibing [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Yang, Xiaoe, E-mail: xyang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Environment Remediation and Ecosystem Health, College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elsholtzia splendens had a good ability of lead tolerance and accumulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb was mostly restricted to the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pb and Ca shared most similar distribution patterns in E. splendens. - Abstract: Hydroponic experiments were conducted to investigate the tolerance and spatial distribution of lead (Pb) in Elsholtzia splendens-a copper (Cu) accumulator plant using synchrotron-based micro-X-ray fluorescence. According to chlorophyll concentration and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, E. splendens displayed certain tolerance at 100 {mu}M Pb treatment. Lead concentration in roots, stems and leaves of E. splendens reached 45,183.6, 1657.6, and 380.9 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. Pb was mostly accumulated in the roots, and there were also high concentrations of Pb been transported into stems and leaves. Micro-XRF analysis of the stem and leaf cross section revealed that Pb was mostly restricted in the vascular bundles and epidermis tissues of both stem and leaf of E. splendens. The correlation between distribution of K, Ca, Zn and Pb were analyzed. There were significant positive correlations (P < 0.01) among Pb and Ca, K, Zn distribution both in stem and leaf of E. splendens. However, among the three elements, Ca shared the most similar distribution pattern and the highest correlation coefficients with Pb in both stem and leaf cross section of E. splendens. This suggests that Ca may play an important role in Pb accumulation in stem and leaf of E. splendens.

  8. Relationship between fluorescence characteristics and molecular weight distribution of natural dissolved organic matter in Lake Hongfeng and Lake Baihua, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the most interesting and difficult problems in recent years due to its important functions in the ecological and environmental system and the complexity of its chemical composition and structure. It is well accepted that fluorescence characteristics and molecular weight distribution are two important parameters in the DOM characterization. However, the relationship between them is still unknown. In this study, fluorescence and molecular weight distribution of DOM in Lake Hongfeng, Lake Baihua and their rivers, and their relationship were investigated using the combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and high-performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) with on-line UV absorbance and fluorescence detectors. The results show that there were two obvious humic-like fluorescence peaks (Peaks A and B) in DOM from lake water. But there was another obvious protein-like fluorescence peak (Peak C) in DOM from river water. The humic-like fluorescence material consisted of DOM fraction with smaller molecular weight, ranging from 1.0 to 3.0 kDa, while the protein-like fluorescence material mainly consisted of DOM fraction with MW larger than 2.0 kDa. The calculation of MW using HPSEC was related to the UV absorbance wavelength chosen.

  9. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  10. Spatiotemporal analysis of endocytosis and membrane distribution of fluorescent sterols in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wüstner, Daniel; Faergeman, Nils J

    2008-01-01

    Distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the plasma membrane as well as internalization pathways for sterol from the cell surface are of great cell biological interest. Here, UV-sensitive wide field microscopy of the intrinsically fluorescent sterols, dehydroergosterol (DHE) and cholestatrienol...... (CTL) combined with advanced image analysis were used to study spatiotemporal sterol distribution in living macrophages, adipocytes and fibroblasts. Sterol endocytosis was directly visualized by time-lapse imaging and noise-robust tracking revealing confined motion of DHE containing vesicles in close...... proximity to the cell membrane. Spatial surface intensity patterns of DHE as well as that of the lipid marker DiIC12 being assessed by statistical image analysis persisted over several minutes in cells having a constant overall curvature. Sites of sterol endocytosis appeared indistinguishable from other...

  11. Time-dependent whole-body fluorescence tomography of probe bio-distributions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Sachin V.; Bloch, Sharon R.; Achilefu, Samuel; Culver, Joseph P.

    2005-04-01

    We present a fast scanning fluorescence optical tomography system for imaging the kinetics of probe distributions through out the whole body of small animals. Configured in a plane parallel geometry, the system scans a source laser using a galvanometer mirror pair (τswitch~1ms) over flexible source patterns, and detects excitation and emission light using a high frame rate low noise, 5 MHz electron multiplied charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera. Phantom studies were used to evaluate resolution, linearity, and sensitivity. Time dependent (δt=2.2 min.) in vivo imaging of mice was performed following injections of a fluorescing probe (indocyanine green). The capability to detect differences in probe delivery route was demonstrated by comparing an intravenous injection, versus an injection into a fat pocket (retro orbital injection). Feasibility of imaging the distribution of tumor-targeted molecular probes was demonstrated by imaging a breast tumor-specific near infrared polypeptide in MDA MB 361 tumor bearing nude mice. A tomography scan, at 24 hour post injection, revealed preferential uptake in the tumor relative to surrounding tissue.

  12. Dual Lifetimes for Complexes between Glutathione-S-transferase (hGSTA1-1) and Product-like Ligands Detected by Single-Molecule Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, John R; Lanni, Frederick; Rule, Gordon S

    2017-08-08

    Single-molecule fluorescence techniques were used to characterize the binding of products and inhibitors to human glutathione S-transferase A1-1 (hGSTA1-1). The identification of at least two different bound states for the wild-type enzyme suggests that there are at least two conformations of the protein, consistent with the model that ligand binding promotes closure of the carboxy-terminal helix over the active site. Ligand induced changes in ensemble fluorescence energy transfer support this proposed structural change. The more predominant state in the ensemble of single molecules shows a significantly faster off-rate, suggesting that the carboxy-terminal helix is delocalized in this state, permitting faster exit of the bound ligand. A point mutation (I219A), which is known to interfere with the association of the carboxy-terminal helix with the enzyme, shows increased rates of interconversion between the open and closed state. Kinematic traces of fluorescence from single molecules show that a single molecule readily samples a number of different conformations, each with a characteristic off-rate.

  13. Interactions between epinastine and human serum albumin: Investigation by fluorescence, UV-vis, FT-IR, CD, lifetime measurement and molecular docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariga, Girish G.; Naik, Praveen N.; Chimatadar, Shivamurti A.; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T.

    2017-06-01

    The fluorescence quenching of human serum albumin (HSA) by epinastine hydrochloride (EPN) at pH 7.4 buffer was studied using absorption, fluorescence quenching, time-resolved, circular-dichroism, synchronous and molecular docking studies have been employed in the system. The fluorescence quenching study revealed that the static quenching mechanism was involved in the interaction of EPN with human serum albumin. The value number of binding sites, n, is close to unity, EPN-HSA, indicated the presence of a single class of binding site for the drug in protein. The binding constant value of EPN_HSA was observed to be 2.72 × 104 M-1 at 298 K. The spectral results attest that the binding of EPN-HSA induced conformational changes in the HSA. The metal ions viz., Ca2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Ni2+ and Zn2+ were found to influence the binding of the EPN to HSA. Based on the Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding average distance, r, between the donor (HSA) and acceptor (EPN) was found to be 4.33 nm. The circular dichroism data revealed that the presence of EPN decreased the α-helix content of serum albumin, which indicated conformation changes in HSA upon interaction with EPN.

  14. Steady-State Fluorescence and Lifetime Emission Study of pH-Sensitive Probes Based on i-motif Forming Oligonucleotides Single and Double Labeled with Pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dembska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytosine-rich nucleic acids undergo pH-stimulated structural transitions leading to formation of an i-motif architecture at an acidic pH. Thus, i-motifs are good foundation for designing simple pH-sensitive fluorescent probes. We report here steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies of pyrene-labeled probes based on RET sequence: C4GC4GC4GC4TA (RET21, AC4GC4GC4GC4TA (RET21A and C4GC4GC4GC4T (RET20. Comparative studies with single- and double-labeled i-motif probes were carried out. For each probe, we have measured fluorescence spectra and decays for emission wavelength of 390 nm over a wide range of pH (from 4.0 to 8.0. Effect of the oligonucleotide sequence and the number of pyrene labels on the spectral characteristics of probes were discussed.

  15. Upgrading the GSI beamline microscope with a confocal fluorescence lifetime scanner to monitor charged particle induced chromatin decondensation in living cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdollahi, Elham; Taucher-Scholz, Gisela [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Durante, Marco [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, Darmstadt University of Technology, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Jakob, Burkhard, E-mail: B.Jakob@gsi.de [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    We report the upgrade of the GSI beamline microscope coupled to the linear accelerator UNILAC by a confocal FLIM scanner utilizing time correlated single photon counting technique (TCSPC). The system can now be used to address the radiation induced chromatin decondensation in more detail and with higher sensitivity compared to intensity based methods. This decondensation of heterochromatic areas is one of the early DNA damage responses observed after charged particle irradiation and might facilitate the further processing of the induced lesions. We describe here the establishment of different DNA dyes as chromatin compaction probes usable for quantification of the DNA condensation status in living cells utilizing lifetime imaging. In addition, we find an evidence of heterochromatic chromatin decondensation in ion irradiated murine chromocenters detected after subsequent fixation using FLIM measurements.

  16. Polarized fluorescent emission in uniaxial liquid crystals. The effect of intramolecular energy transfer and rotational Brownian motion on measurements of the orientational distribution function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapoy, Larry Lawrence; DuPré, Donald B.

    1978-01-01

    An expression is derived for the anisotropic fluorescent emission in uniaxial liquid crystals where fluorescent sites governed by an initial nonrandom distribution of orientations are subject to rotational Brownian motion. The possibility of nonparallelism of absorption and emission oscillators...

  17. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Colvin

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2-3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region.

  18. Visualizing Metal Content and Intracellular Distribution in Primary Hippocampal Neurons with Synchrotron X-Ray Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that metal dyshomeostasis plays an important role in human neurodegenerative diseases. Although distinctive metal distributions are described for mature hippocampus and cortex, much less is known about metal levels and intracellular distribution in individual hippocampal neuronal somata. To solve this problem, we conducted quantitative metal analyses utilizing synchrotron radiation X-Ray fluorescence on frozen hydrated primary cultured neurons derived from rat embryonic cortex (CTX) and two regions of the hippocampus: dentate gyrus (DG) and CA1. Comparing average metal contents showed that the most abundant metals were calcium, iron, and zinc, whereas metals such as copper and manganese were less than 10% of zinc. Average metal contents were generally similar when compared across neurons cultured from CTX, DG, and CA1, except for manganese that was larger in CA1. However, each metal showed a characteristic spatial distribution in individual neuronal somata. Zinc was uniformly distributed throughout the cytosol, with no evidence for the existence of previously identified zinc-enriched organelles, zincosomes. Calcium showed a peri-nuclear distribution consistent with accumulation in endoplasmic reticulum and/or mitochondria. Iron showed 2–3 distinct highly concentrated puncta only in peri-nuclear locations. Notwithstanding the small sample size, these analyses demonstrate that primary cultured neurons show characteristic metal signatures. The iron puncta probably represent iron-accumulating organelles, siderosomes. Thus, the metal distributions observed in mature brain structures are likely the result of both intrinsic neuronal factors that control cellular metal content and extrinsic factors related to the synaptic organization, function, and contacts formed and maintained in each region. PMID:27434052

  19. A fluorescence lifetime-based binding assay for acetylpolyamine amidohydrolases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD) ligand probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyners, Christian; Wawrzinek, Robert; Krämer, Andreas; Hinz, Steffen; Wessig, Pablo; Meyer-Almes, Franz-Josef

    2014-08-01

    High-throughput assays for drug screening applications have to fulfill particular specifications. Besides the capability to identify even compounds with low potency, one of the major issues is to minimize the number of false-positive hits in a screening campaign in order to reduce the logistic effort for the subsequent cherry picking and confirmation procedure. In this respect, fluorescence lifetime (FLT) appears as an ideal readout parameter that is supposed to be robust against autofluorescent and light-absorbing compounds, the most common source of systematic false positives. The extraordinary fluorescence features of the recently discovered [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3] benzodioxole dyes were exploited to develop an FLT-based binding assay with exceptionally robust readout. The assay setup was comprehensively validated and shown to comply not only with all requirements for a powerful high-throughput screening assay but also to be suitable to determine accurate binding constants for inhibitors against enzymes of the histone deacetylase family. Using the described binding assay, the first inhibitors against three members of this enzyme family from Pseudomonas aeruginosa were identified. The compounds were characterized in terms of potency and selectivity profile. The novel ligand probe should also be applicable to other homologues of the histone deacetylase family that are inhibited by N-hydroxy-N'-phenyloctandiamide.

  20. Distribution of albumin in the normal monkey eye as revealed by Evans blue fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radius, R L; Anderson, D R

    1980-03-01

    Since intravenously injected Evans blue binds irreversibly to serum albumin, its distribution reflects albumin exchange between the intravascular and extravascular tissue compartments. In histologic specimens examined by fluorescence, microscopy, extravasated Evans blue--albumin complex was identified within the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork of normal monkey eyes. In eyes fixed by intra-arterial perfusion of fixative, no dye was identified in the choroid, retina, or optic nerve. With immersion fixation, however, some extravasation was seen in the choroid and adjacent optic nerve. In some specimens, the optic nerve was stained not only with material apparently leaking from the choroid but also from a breakdown of the blood-brain barrier in the major disc vasculature during the interval before fixative penetrates into the tissue. Perfusion fixation must be used to avoid this artifact, and freezing techniques would be even better.

  1. Magneto-fluorescent hybrid of dye and SPION with ordered and radially distributed porous structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Madhulekha; Deb, Pritam

    2014-04-01

    We have reported the development of a silica based magneto-fluorescent hybrid of a newly synthesized dye and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with ordered and radially distributed porous structure. The dye is synthesized by a novel yet simple synthetic approach based on Michael addition between dimer of glutaraldehyde and oleylamine molecule. The surfactant used for phase transformation of the dye from organic to aqueous phase, also acts as a structure directing agent for the porous structure evolution of the hybrid with radial distribution. The evolution of the radially distributed pores in the hybrids can be attributed to the formation of rod-like micelles containing nanoparticles, for concentration of micelles greater than critical micelle concentration. A novel water extraction method is applied to remove the surfactants resulting in the characteristic porous structure of the hybrid. Adsorption isotherm analysis confirms the porous nature of the hybrids with pore diameter ∼2.4 nm. A distinct modification in optical and magnetic property is observed due to interaction of the dye and SPION within the silica matrix. The integration of multiple structural components in the so developed hybrid nanosystem results into a potential agent for multifunctional biomedical application.

  2. In-vitro and in-vivo detection of p53 by fluorescence lifetime on a hybrid FITC-gold nanosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, L.; Freddi, S.; D'Alfonso, L.; Collini, M.; Gorletta, T.; Soddu, S.; Chirico, G.

    2010-02-01

    P53 is a tumor suppressor used as marker for early cancer diagnosis and prognosis. We have studied constructs based on gold nanoparticles (NPs) decorated with specific anti-p53 antibodies and with a fluoresceine derivative, FITC. The interaction of gold surface plasmons with fluorophores bound within few nanometers from the surface, likely induces changes in the fluorophore excited state lifetime. Indeed we found previously that this parameter follows linearly the p53 concentration in solutions (in vitro conditions) up to 200-400 pM, depending on the size of the NP, with a 5 pM uncertainty. We have evaluated here the nanosensor specificity for p53 by testing it in-vitro against bovine serum albumine, beta-lactolglobulin and lysozyme. Moreover, the titration of total cell extracts from p53+/+ or p53-/- cells with the p53antibody decorated gold NPs, indicates that this construct can also be used to detect the presence of p53 in total cell extracts and it will be therefore a valuable tool also for in vivo screening.

  3. Study on fluorescence absolute quantum yield and lifetime of europium complexes by doping yttrium%掺杂钇的铕稀土配合物的荧光绝对量子产率和寿命的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费邦忠; 陶栋梁; 张宏; 崔玉民; 张坤; 王永忠; 杨森林; 鲁仕梅

    2016-01-01

    A series of Co-luminescence EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen were synthesized in anhydrous ethanol by using Eu3+and Y3+as central ions and 2-Thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as ligands. IR spectra of the ligand TTA and EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen were determined. The absolute fluorescence quantum yields and average fluorescence lifetimes of europium complexes undergo great change after the europium complexes are doped Y into. With the Y content increasing, the absolute quantum yields of EuxY1- x(TTA)3phen first increase and then decrease, and the average fluorescence lifetimes of EuxY1- x (TTA)3phen become shorter in a wave-like pattern. These results indicate that Y-doped results in intramolecular microstructure change of EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen, which results in change of intramolecular energy transfer system of EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen.%在无水乙醇中,利用Eu3+和Y3+作为中心离子,α-噻吩甲酰三氟丙酮(TTA)和1,10-邻菲啰啉(phen)作为配体制备了一系列共发光稀土配合物EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen,并对TTA和EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen进行了红外表征。掺杂钇的铕配合物与没掺杂钇相比,荧光绝对量子产率和平均寿命都发生了很大变化,随着钇含量的增大,EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen的荧光绝对量子产率先增大,然后减小,而平均寿命则以波动方式逐渐减小,说明钇的掺杂改变了EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen的分子微观结构,从而改变了EuxY1-x(TTA)3phen的能量传递方式。

  4. Family of lifetime sensors for medical purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippitsch, Max E.; Draxler, Sonja

    1995-05-01

    A family of indicators has been developed for fluorescence lifetime-based measurement of oxygen, pH, carbon dioxide, and potassium, all the indicators being derivatives of the same chemical compound and having identical spectral and lifetime properties. The indicators show an absorption accessible to low- cast light sources, a large Stokes shift, and long fluorescence decay time. all indicators can be excited at the same excitation wavelength, monitored at the same emission wavelength, and measured within the same time range. This opens the possibility of building a compact lifetime-based instrument to simultaneously measure blood gases and cations.

  5. Visualizing double-stranded RNA distribution and dynamics in living cells by dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Xiaofei [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310036 (China); Deng, Ping; Cui, Hongguang [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada); Wang, Aiming, E-mail: aiming.wang@agr.gc.ca [Southern Crop Protection and Food Research Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, London, Ontario N5V 4T3 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is an important type of RNA that plays essential roles in diverse cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms and a hallmark in infections by positive-sense RNA viruses. Currently, no in vivo technology has been developed for visualizing dsRNA in living cells. Here, we report a dsRNA binding-dependent fluorescence complementation (dRBFC) assay that can be used to efficiently monitor dsRNA distribution and dynamics in vivo. The system consists of two dsRNA-binding proteins, which are fused to the N- and C-terminal halves of the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Binding of the two fusion proteins to a common dsRNA brings the split YFP halves in close proximity, leading to the reconstitution of the fluorescence-competent structure and restoration of fluorescence. Using this technique, we were able to visualize the distribution and trafficking of the replicative RNA intermediates of positive-sense RNA viruses in living cells. - Highlights: • A live-cell imaging system was developed for visualizing dsRNA in vivo. • It uses dsRNA binding proteins fused with two halves of a fluorescent protein. • Binding to a common dsRNA enables the reporter to become fluorescent. • The system can efficiently monitor viral RNA replication in living cells.

  6. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    OpenAIRE

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; PRAKASH, KIRTI; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA mino...

  7. [Using atomic fluorescence spectrometry to study the spatial distribution of As and Hg in orchard soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xi-Mei; Lü, Chun-Yan; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Xi-Cun

    2014-02-01

    Aqua regia digestion, double channels-atomic fluorescence spectrometry method was used to determine the concentrations of As and Hg in orchard soils of Qixia City - the main apple production area of Shandong province. Validate The detection limitation, accuracy and precision of the method were validated, the spatial distribution was analyzed, and the characteristics of As and Hg pollution in Qixia orchard soils were assessed. The results showed that the range of As concentration in Qixia soils is between 2.79 and 20.93 mg x kg(-1), the average concentration is 10.59 mg x kg(-1), the range of Hg concentration in Qixia soil is between 0.01 and 0.79 mg x kg(-1), the average concentration is 0.12 mg x kg(-1). The variation of As concentration in soils is small, whereas that of Hg concentration is large. Frequency distribution graphics of As and Hg showed that the concentration of As in soils is according with the normal distribution approximately and the concentrations are mostly between 7 and 15 mg x kg(-1), the concentration of Hg in soil isn't according with the normal distribution and the concentrations are mostly between 0.03 and 0.21 mg x kg(-1). The correlations between the concentrations of As or Hg in soils and the nutrient are not significant and there is no significant correlation even between As and Hg. Based on the environmental technical terms for green food production area, the As concentration in orchard soil of Qixia City is at clean level, but there are 4.76% of sample points with Hg pollution index exceeding 1, and this should be attracted the attention of the administrators.

  8. Feasibility analysis of an epidermal glucose sensor based on time-resolved fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katika, Kamal M.; Pilon, Laurent

    2007-06-01

    The goal of this study is to test the feasibility of using an embedded time-resolved fluorescence sensor for monitoring glucose concentration. Skin is modeled as a multilayer medium with each layer having its own optical properties and fluorophore absorption coefficients, lifetimes, and quantum yields obtained from the literature. It is assumed that the two main fluorophores contributing to the fluorescence at these excitation and emission wavelengths are nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)H and collagen. The intensity distributions of excitation and fluorescent light in skin are determined by solving the transient radiative transfer equation by using the modified method of characteristics. The fluorophore lifetimes are then recovered from the simulated fluorescence decays and compared with the actual lifetimes used in the simulations. Furthermore, the effect of adding Poissonian noise to the simulated decays on recovering the lifetimes was studied. For all cases, it was found that the fluorescence lifetime of NADH could not be recovered because of its negligible contribution to the overall fluorescence signal. The other lifetimes could be recovered to within 1.3% of input values. Finally, the glucose concentrations within the skin were recovered to within 13.5% of their actual values, indicating a possibility of measuring glucose concentrations by using a time-resolved fluorescence sensor.

  9. Nucleic acid distribution pattern in avian erythrocytes and mammalian lymphocytes: comparative studies by fluorescence microscopy and digital imaging analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isitor, G N; Asgarali, Z; Pouching, K

    2008-12-01

    Nucleated erythrocytes of healthy domestic chicken and ducks, and lymphocytes of healthy Sprague Dawley rats were evaluated for nucleic acid distribution pattern, employing light and fluorescence microscopy procedures, as well as digital imaging analytical methods. The results demonstrate a unique organization of nuclear DNA of mature chicken and duck erythrocytes, as well as immature duck erythrocytes, as delineated spherical nuclear bodies that mostly corresponded with euchromatin zones of the cells in routine Wright-stain blood smears. The nuclear DNA of the rat lymphocytes, on the other hand, was observed as a more diffuse green fluorescing nuclear areas, with punctate variably-sized diffuse areas of RNA red fluorescence. RNA red color fluorescence was also evident in the narrow cytoplasm of the lymphocytes, especially in large lymphocytes, in comparison with the cytoplasm of the mature avian erythrocytes that completely lacked any nucleic acid fluorescence. Nuclear RNA fluorescence was lacking in the mature chicken erythrocytes, compared with those of the mature and immature duck erythrocytes as well as lymphocytes of both avian and rats blood. The significance of these findings lies in the establishment of normal benchmarks for the nuclear and cytoplasmic nucleic acid pattern in eukaryotic cells. These normal benchmarks become valuable in rapid diagnostic situations associated with pathologies, such as the presence of viral nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies that can alter the nucleic acid pattern of the host cells, and in conditions of cellular abnormal protein aggregations. Variability of cellular nucleic acid pattern can also aid in prognostic assessments of neoplastic conditions.

  10. The Distribution of Elements in 48 Canine Compact Bone Types Using Handheld X-Ray Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nganvongpanit, Korakot; Buddhachat, Kittisak; Piboon, Promporn; Klinhom, Sarisa

    2016-11-01

    A major question when we talk about the elements in the bone is whether all bones contain the same elements. To answer this question, this study was designed for determination of the elemental levels in 48 various canine compact bones using handheld X-ray fluorescence technique. From a total of 26 elements that could be detected, only 13 elements were found in all 48 bones. The sternum and os penis were significantly different from the other bones in that they contained the highest number of elements. The ratio of Ca and P was significantly different when comparing certain bones: there was a higher Ca/P ratio in the patella (right), calcaneus (right and left), and sternum compared with a lower ratio in the radius (left), rib (left), phalanx (left forelimb), and carpus (left). These results are the first to demonstrate that different types of bones have different elemental profiles, even for major elements such as Ca and P. Moreover, the Ca/P ratio was also different between bone types. This data is important for the selection of bones appropriate to the element studied. In addition, the results proved that the elements were not equally distributed in every bone in the body.

  11. Element distribution in the brain sections of rats measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N. Q.; Zhang, F.; Wang, X. F.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Chai, Z. F.; Huang, Y. Y.; He, W.; Zhao, X. Q.; Zuo, A. J.; Yang, R.

    2004-02-01

    The concentration of trace elements in brain sections was measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence. The relative concentration was calculated by means of the normalization of Compton scattering intensity approximately 22 keV, after the normalization for collecting time of X-ray spectrum and the counting of the ion chamber, and subtracting the contribution of the polycarbonate film for supporting sample. Furthermore, the statistical evaluation of the element distribution in various regions of the brain sections of the 20-day-old rats was tested. For investigating the distribution of elements in the brain of iodine deficient rats, Wistar rats were fed with iodine deficient diet and deionized water (ID group). The rats were fed the same iodine deficient diet, but drank KIO 3 solution as control (CT group). The results showed that the contents of calcium (Ca) in thalamus (TH) and copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) in cerebral cortex (CX) of ID rats were significantly lower than that of control rats, while the contents of phosphor (P), sulfur (S), potassium (K), rubidium (Rb), bromine (Br), chlorine (Cl), zinc (Zn), Ca and Cu of ID in hippocampus (H) and the contents of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in cerebral cortex of ID rats were significantly higher. Especially, the difference of Br, Cl, Zn and Ca in H between ID and CT was more significant. The contents of all elements measured in H were higher than (or equal to) CX and/or TH for both groups, except low Cl of the control rats. Furthermore Zn and Cu contents along the hippocampal fissure in both groups were 1.5 ( Ptimes higher than in hippocampus, respectively. Considering the results of cluster analysis our study shows that the marked alterations in the spatial distribution of Zn and Ca of ID rats brain during brain development stages. In addition, the effect of the perfusion with 0.9% NaCl solution before taking brain on the distribution of elements in the brain sections was observed and discussed.

  12. Classic maximum entropy recovery of the average joint distribution of apparent FRET efficiency and fluorescence photons for single-molecule burst measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Matthew S; Gull, Stephen F; Johnson, Carey K

    2012-04-05

    We describe a method for analysis of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) burst measurements using classic maximum entropy. Classic maximum entropy determines the Bayesian inference for the joint probability describing the total fluorescence photons and the apparent FRET efficiency. The method was tested with simulated data and then with DNA labeled with fluorescent dyes. The most probable joint distribution can be marginalized to obtain both the overall distribution of fluorescence photons and the apparent FRET efficiency distribution. This method proves to be ideal for determining the distance distribution of FRET-labeled biomolecules, and it successfully predicts the shape of the recovered distributions.

  13. Fluorescent matter in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. Part 1: method of measurement and near-surface distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determann, S.; Reuter, R.; Wagner, P.; Willkomm, R.

    1994-04-01

    Fluorescence spectra of organic matter in seawater were measured during the cruise ANT-VIII/7 of R.V. Polarsterm through the South and North Atlantic from Capetown (RSA) to Bremerhaven (Germany). The data are calibrated by normalization to the water Raman scatter band which allows their quantification without the need of fluorescence standards. Spectral structures are found which can be related to tryptophan and tyrosine-like substances, and to gelbstoff. Their distribution in the eastern Atlantic is discussed and compared with other hydrographic parameters.

  14. Pb distribution in bones from the Franklin expedition: synchrotron X-ray fluorescence and laser ablation/mass spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Ronald Richard; Naftel, Steven; Macfie, Sheila; Jones, Keith; Nelson, Andrew [The University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Synchrotron micro-X-ray Fluorescence has been used to map the metal distribution in selected bone fragments representative of remains associated with the Franklin expedition. In addition, laser ablation mass spectroscopy using a 25 {mu}m diameter circular spot was employed to compare the Pb isotope distributions in small regions within the bone fragments. The X-ray Fluorescence mapping shows Pb to be widely distributed in the bone while the Pb isotope ratios obtained by laser ablation within small areas representative of bone with different Pb exchange rates do not show statistically significant differences. These results are inconsistent with the hypothesis that faulty solder seals in tinned meat were the principle source of Pb in the remains of the expedition personnel. (orig.)

  15. On the vertical distribution of boundary layer halogens over coastal Antarctica: implications for O3, HOx, NOx and the Hg lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional chemical transport model has been developed to investigate the vertical gradients of bromine and iodine compounds in the Antarctic coastal boundary layer (BL. The model has been applied to interpret recent year-round observations of iodine and bromine monoxides (IO and BrO at Halley Station, Antarctica. The model requires an equivalent I atom flux of ~1010 molecule cm−2 s−1 from the snowpack in order to account for the measured IO levels, which are up to 20 ppt during spring. Using the current knowledge of gas-phase iodine chemistry, the model predicts significant gradients in the vertical distribution of iodine species. However, recent ground-based and satellite observations of IO imply that the radical is well-mixed in the Antarctic boundary layer, indicating a longer than expected atmospheric lifetime for the radical. This can be modelled by including photolysis of the higher iodine oxides (I2O2, I2O3, I2O4 and I2O5, and rapid recycling of HOI and INO3 through sea-salt aerosol. The model also predicts significant concentrations (up to 25 ppt of I2O5 in the lowest 10 m of the boundary layer. Heterogeneous chemistry involving sea-salt aerosol is also necessary to account for the vertical profile of BrO. Iodine chemistry causes a large increase (typically more than 3-fold in the rate of O3 depletion in the BL, compared with bromine chemistry alone. Rapid entrainment of O3 from the free troposphere appears to be required to account for the observation that on occasion there is little O3 depletion at the surface in the presence of high concentrations of IO and BrO. The halogens also cause significant changes to the vertical profiles of OH and HO2 and the NO2/NO ratio. The average Hg0 lifetime against oxidation is also predicted to be about 10 h during springtime. An important result from the model is that very large fluxes of iodine precursors into the boundary layer are required to account for the observed levels of IO. The

  16. On the vertical distribution of boundary layer halogens over coastal Antarctica: implications for O3, HOx, NOx and the Hg lifetime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A one-dimensional chemical transport model has been developed to investigate the vertical gradients of bromine and iodine compounds in the Antarctic coastal boundary layer. The model has been applied to interpret recent year-round observations of iodine and bromine monoxides (IO and BrO at Halley Station, Antarctica. The model requires an equivalent I atom flux of ~109 molecule cm−2 s−1 from the snowpack in order to account for the measured IO levels, which are up to 20 ppt during spring. Using the current knowledge of gas-phase iodine chemistry, the model predicts significant gradients in the vertical distribution of iodine species. However, recent ground-based and satellite observations of IO imply that the radical is well-mixed in the boundary layer, indicating a longer than expected atmospheric lifetime for the radical. This can be modelled by including photolysis of the higher iodine oxides (I2O2, I2O3, I2O4 and I2O5, and rapid recycling of HOI and INO3 through sea-salt aerosol. The model also predicts significant concentrations (up to 25 ppt of I2O5 in the lowest 10 m of the boundary layer, which could lead to the formation of ultrafine iodine oxide aerosols. Heterogeneous chemistry involving sea-salt aerosol is also necessary to account for the vertical profile of BrO. Iodine chemistry causes a large increase (typically more than 3-fold in the rate of O3 depletion in the BL, compared with bromine chemistry alone. Rapid entrainment of O3 from the free troposphere is required to account for the observation that on occasion there is little O3 depletion at the surface in the presence of high concentrations of IO and BrO. The halogens also cause significant changes to the vertical profiles of HO and HO2 and the NO2/NO ratio. The average Hg0 lifetime against oxidation is also predicted to be about 10 h during springtime. Overall, our results show that halogens profoundly influence the oxidizing capacity of the Antarctic troposphere.

  17. Time-resolved fluorescence analysis of the mobile flavin cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Petra A W Van Den Berg; Koert Grever; Arie Van Hoek; Willem J H Van Berkel; Antonie J W G Visser

    2007-03-01

    Conformational heterogeneity of the FAD cofactor in -hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) was investigated with time-resolved polarized flavin fluorescence. For binary enzyme/substrate (analogue) complexes of wild-type PHBH and Tyr222 mutants, crystallographic studies have revealed two distinct flavin conformations; the `in’ conformation with the isoalloxazine ring located in the active site, and the `out’ conformation with the isoalloxazine ring disposed towards the protein surface. Fluorescence-lifetime analysis of these complexes revealed similar lifetime distributions for the `in’ and `out’ conformations. The reason for this is twofold. First, the active site of PHBH contains various potential fluorescence-quenching sites close to the flavin. Fluorescence analysis of uncomplexed PHBH Y222V and Y222A showed that Tyr222 is responsible for picosecond fluorescence quenching free enzyme. In addition, other potential quenching sites, including a tryptophan and two tyrosines involved in substrate binding, are located nearby. Since the shortest distance between these quenching sites and the isoalloxazine ring differs only little on average, these aromatic residues are likely to contribute to fluorescence quenching. Second, the effect of flavin conformation on the fluorescence lifetime distribution is blurred by binding of the aromatic substrates: saturation with aromatic substrates induces highly efficient fluorescence quenching. The flavin conformation is therefore only reflected in the small relative contributions of the longer lifetimes.

  18. Concentrations, size distributions and temporal variations of fluorescent biological aerosol particles in southern tropical India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsan, Aswathy; Krishna R, Ravi; CV, Biju; Huffman, Alex; Poschl, Ulrich; Gunthe, Sachin

    2015-04-01

    Biological aerosols constitute a wide range of dead and alive biological materials and structures that are suspended in the atmosphere. They play an important role in the atmospheric physical, chemical and biological processes and health of living being by spread of diseases among humans, plants, and, animals. The atmospheric abundance, sources, physical properties of PBAPs as compared to non-biological aerosols, however, is poorly characterized. The Indian tropical region, where large fraction of the world's total population is residing, experiences a distinctive meteorological phenomenon by means of Indian Summer Monsoon (IMS). Thus, the properties and characteristics of biological aerosols are also expected to be very diverse over the Indian subcontinent depending upon the seasons. Here we characterize the number concentration and size distribution of Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAP) at a high altitude continental site, Munnar (10.09 N, 77.06 E; 1605 m asl) in South India during the South-West monsoon, which constitute around 80 percent of the annual rainfall in Munnar. Continuous three months measurements (from 01 June 2014 to 21 Aug 2104) FBAPs were carried out at Munnar using Ultra Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UVAPS) during IMS. The mean number and mass concentration of coarse FBAP averaged over the entire campaign was 1.7 x 10-2 cm-3 and 0.24 µg m-3 respectively, which corresponds to 2 percent and 6 percent of total aerosol particle number and mass concentration. In agreement to other previous measurements the number size distribution of FBAP also peaks at 3.2 micron indicating the strong presence of fungal spores. This was also supported by the Scanning Electron Microscopic analysis of bioaerosols on filter paper. They also displayed a strong diurnal cycle with maximum concentration occurring at early morning hours. During periods of heavy and continuous rain where the wind is consistently blowing from South-West direction it was

  19. Bimodal Distribution and Fluorescence Response of Environment-Sensitive Probes in Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Duportail, Guy; Demchenko, Alexander P.; Mély, Yves

    2004-01-01

    A remarkable heterogeneity is often observed in the spectroscopic properties of environment-sensitive fluorescence probes in phospholipid bilayers. To explain its origin, we provided a detailed investigation of the fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of 4′-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (probe F) in bilayer vesicles with the variations of fatty acid composition, polar heads, temperature, and cholesterol content. Probe F, due to excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, exhibits t...

  20. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  1. Remote UV Fluorescence Lifetime Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In-situ studies of the rocks, minerals, and soil on the Moon's surface provide a wealth of information during field geology and the mining phase for planetary...

  2. 利用基于扫描相机的荧光寿命成像显微技术研究细胞周期%Study on Cell Cycle Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopic System Based on a Streak Camera

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王岩; 赵羚伶; 陈同生; 许改霞; Artem Pliss; Tymish Y.Ohulchanskyy; Paras N.Prasad; 屈军乐; 牛憨笨

    2011-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime of the HeLa cells which are transfected with green fluorescent proteins during the cell cycle is investigated using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopic system based on a streak camera.Experimental results show that fluorescence lifetime of HeLa cells is between 2.50 ns and 3.00 ns during different processes of cell cycle. The fluorescence lifetime of the mitosis cell drops to 2.82 ns from 2.86 ns within one hour,and it further drops to 2.78 ns from 2.82 ns during the roughly eight hours of the pre-DNA-synthetic phase (Glphase). The difference of the fluorescence lifetime implies that the macromolecular concentration in the nucleoplasm of the cell nucleus changes throughout the cell cycle, the study of which is significant to the understanding of macromolecular processes, kinetics and concentrations in the nucleoplasm of the cell nucleus throughout the cell cycle, as well as the regulation of cell cycles.%利用基于扫描相机的荧光寿命成像显微系统,以细胞周期为模型,研究转染绿色荧光蛋白的HeLa细胞的荧光寿命.结果表明,处于周期内不同进程的细胞的荧光寿命为2.50~3.00 ns.处于分裂期的细胞的荧光寿命在1 h内从2.86 ns下降到2.82 ns;在DNA合成前期的8 h内,荧光寿命从2.82 ns下降到2.78 ns.荧光寿命的差异反映了细胞周期中核浆内大分子浓度的变化,对了解细胞周期的分子机制有一定的意义.

  3. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  4. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Zurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until "bleached". This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes.

  5. Single molecule localization microscopy of the distribution of chromatin using Hoechst and DAPI fluorescent probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander T; Prakash, Kirti; Lee, Hyun-Keun; Żurek-Biesiada, Dominika J; Best, Gerrit; Hagmann, Martin; Dobrucki, Jurek W; Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2014-01-01

    Several approaches have been described to fluorescently label and image DNA and chromatin in situ on the single-molecule level. These superresolution microscopy techniques are based on detecting optically isolated, fluorescently tagged anti-histone antibodies, fluorescently labeled DNA precursor analogs, or fluorescent dyes bound to DNA. Presently they suffer from various drawbacks such as low labeling efficiency or interference with DNA structure. In this report, we demonstrate that DNA minor groove binding dyes, such as Hoechst 33258, Hoechst 33342, and DAPI, can be effectively employed in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) with high optical and structural resolution. Upon illumination with low intensity 405 nm light, a small subpopulation of these molecules stochastically undergoes photoconversion from the original blue-emitting form to a green-emitting form. Using a 491 nm laser excitation, fluorescence of these green-emitting, optically isolated molecules was registered until “bleached”. This procedure facilitated substantially the optical isolation and localization of large numbers of individual dye molecules bound to DNA in situ, in nuclei of fixed mammalian cells, or in mitotic chromosomes, and enabled the reconstruction of high-quality DNA density maps. We anticipate that this approach will provide new insights into DNA replication, DNA repair, gene transcription, and other nuclear processes. PMID:25482122

  6. Application of CORSIKA Simulation Code to Study Lateral and Longitudinal Distribution of Fluorescence Light in Cosmic Ray Extensive Air Showers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Bagheri; Pantea Davoudifar; Gohar Rastegarzadeh; Milad Shayan

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, we used CORSIKA code to understand the characteristics of cosmic ray induced showers at extremely high energy as a function of energy, detector distance to shower axis, number, and density of secondary charged particles and the nature particle producing the shower. Based on the standard properties of the atmosphere, lateral and longitudinal development of the shower for photons and electrons has been investigated. Fluorescent light has been collected by the detector for protons, helium, oxygen, silicon, calcium and iron primary cosmic rays in different energies. So we have obtained a number of electrons per unit area, distance to the shower axis, shape function of particles density, percentage of fluorescent light, lateral distribution of energy dissipated in the atmosphere and visual field angle of detector as well as size of the shower image. We have also shown that location of highest percentage of fluorescence light is directly proportional to atomic number of elements. Also we have shown when the distance from shower axis increases and the shape function of particles density decreases severely. At the first stages of development, shower axis distance from detector is high and visual field angle is small; then with shower moving toward the Earth, angle increases. Overall, in higher energies, the fluorescent light method has more efficiency. The paper provides standard calibration lines for high energy showers which can be used to determine the nature of the particles.

  7. Computing lifetimes for battery-powered devices

    OpenAIRE

    Jongerden, Marijn; Haverkort, Boudewijn

    2010-01-01

    The battery lifetime of mobile devices depends on the usage pattern of the battery, next to the discharge rate and the battery capacity. Therefore, it is important to include the usage pattern in battery lifetime computations. We do this by combining a stochastic workload, modeled as a continuous-time Markov model, with a well-known battery model. For this combined model, we provide new algorithms to efficiently compute the expected lifetime and the distribution and expected value of the deli...

  8. Reliable measurement of E. coli single cell fluorescence distribution using a standard microscope set-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Marilisa; Bandiera, Lucia; Pasini, Alice; Bevilacqua, Alessandro; Gherardi, Alessandro; Furini, Simone; Giordano, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Quantifying gene expression at single cell level is fundamental for the complete characterization of synthetic gene circuits, due to the significant impact of noise and inter-cellular variability on the system's functionality. Commercial set-ups that allow the acquisition of fluorescent signal at single cell level (flow cytometers or quantitative microscopes) are expensive apparatuses that are hardly affordable by small laboratories. A protocol that makes a standard optical microscope able to acquire quantitative, single cell, fluorescent data from a bacterial population transformed with synthetic gene circuitry is presented. Single cell fluorescence values, acquired with a microscope set-up and processed with custom-made software, are compared with results that were obtained with a flow cytometer in a bacterial population transformed with the same gene circuitry. The high correlation between data from the two experimental set-ups, with a correlation coefficient computed over the tested dynamic range > 0.99, proves that a standard optical microscope- when coupled with appropriate software for image processing- might be used for quantitative single-cell fluorescence measurements. The calibration of the set-up, together with its validation, is described. The experimental protocol described in this paper makes quantitative measurement of single cell fluorescence accessible to laboratories equipped with standard optical microscope set-ups. Our method allows for an affordable measurement/quantification of intercellular variability, whose better understanding of this phenomenon will improve our comprehension of cellular behaviors and the design of synthetic gene circuits. All the required software is freely available to the synthetic biology community (MUSIQ Microscope flUorescence SIngle cell Quantification).

  9. Autofluorescence lifetime variation in the cuticle of the bedbug Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The decay time of the fluorescence of excited molecules, called fluorescence lifetime, can provide information about the cuticle composition additionally to widely used spectral characteristics. We compared autofluorescence lifetimes of different cuticle regions in the copulatory organ of females of the bedbug, Cimex lectularius. After two-photon excitation at 720 nm, regions recently characterised as being rich in resilin showed a longer bimodal distribution of the mean autofluorescence lifetime τm (tau-m) at 0.4 ns and 1.0-1.5 ns, while resilin-poor sites exhibited a unimodal pattern with a peak around 0.8 ns. The mean lifetime, and particularly its second component, can be useful to distinguish resilin-rich from resilin-poor parts of the cuticle. The few existing literature data suggest that chitin is unlikely responsible for the main autofluorescent component observed in the resilin-poor areas in our study and that melanin requires further scrutiny. Autofluorescence lifetime measurements can help to characterise properties of the arthropod cuticle, especially when coupled with multiphoton excitation to allow for deeper tissue penetration.

  10. Accurate study of FosPeg® distribution in a mouse model using fluorescence imaging technique and fluorescence white monte carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used for quantitative in vivo assessment of drug concentration. Light attenuation in tissue is compensated for through Monte-Carlo simulations. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity, directly proportional to the drug concentration, could be obtained....

  11. Gonadoblastomas in 45,X/46,XY mosaicism: analysis of Y chromosome distribution by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iezzoni, J C; Von Kap-Herr, C; Golden, W L; Gaffey, M J

    1997-08-01

    Gonadoblastomas are composed of nests of neoplastic germ cells and sex cord derivatives surrounded by ovarian-type stroma. These tumors are found almost exclusively in persons with gonadal dysgenesis associated with a Y chromosome or Y chromosome fragment, and accordingly, the Y chromosome has been implicated in gonadoblastoma oncogenesis. To evaluate this association, we used two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific probes to determine the distribution of the X and Y chromosomes in the tumor nests and surrounding stromal cells in paraffin tissue sections of three gonadoblastomas in two patients with gonadal dysgenesis and 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. Statistical analysis of the data from the fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated that in all three gonadoblastomas, the proportion of nuclei with a Y chromosome signal was significantly higher in the tumor cells than in the nontumoral cells of the surrounding stroma (P<.001). These results suggest that Y chromosome material participates in gonadoblastoma tumorigenesis.

  12. Intracellular distribution of cowpea mosaic virus movement protein as visualised by green fluorescent protein fusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gopinath, K.; Bertens, P.; Pouwels, J.; Marks, H.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Wellink, J.E.; Kammen, van A.

    2003-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) derivatives expressing movement protein (MP) green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (MP:GFP) were used to study the intracellular targeting and localization of the MP in cowpea protoplasts and plants. In protoplasts, a virus coding for a wild type MP:GFP (MPfGFP) induced

  13. Analysis of simulated fluorescence intensities decays by a new maximum entropy method algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is proposed for recovering the lifetime distribution in time-resolved fluorescence decays. The procedure is based on seeking the distribution that maximizes the Skilling entropy function subjected to the chi-squared constraint χ(2) ~ 1 through iterative linear approximations, LU decomposition of the Hessian matrix of the lagrangian problem and the Golden Section Search for backtracking. The accuracy of this algorithm has been investigated through comparisons with simulated fluorescence decays both of narrow and broad lifetime distributions. The proposed approach is capable to analyse datasets of up to 4,096 points with a discretization ranging from 100 to 1,000 lifetimes. A good agreement with non linear fitting estimates has been observed when the method has been applied to multi-exponential decays. Remarkable results have been also obtained for the broad lifetime distributions where the position is recovered with high accuracy and the distribution width is estimated within 3%. These results indicate that the procedure proposed generates MEM lifetime distributions that can be used to quantify the real heterogeneity of lifetimes in a sample.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Ródenas, Airán [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Benayas, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.benayas@emt.inrs.ca [Departamento de Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid 28049 (Spain); Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre – Énergie Matériaux et Télécommunications, 1650, Boul. Lionel Boulet Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc [Departament de Química Física i Inorgànica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Tarragona 43007 (Spain); Kar, Ajoy K. [Institute of Photonics and Quantum Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-14

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  15. Fluorescence imaging of lattice re-distribution on step-index direct laser written Nd:YAG waveguide lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Mendívil, Jon; Ródenas, Airán; Benayas, Antonio; Aguiló, Magdalena; Diaz, Francesc; Pérez Delgado, Alberto; Lifante, Ginés; Jaque, Daniel; Kar, Ajoy K.

    2015-01-01

    The laser performance and crystalline micro-structural properties of near-infrared step-index channel waveguides fabricated inside Neodymium doped YAG laser ceramics by means of three-dimensional sub-picosecond pulse laser direct writing are reported. Fluorescence micro-mapping of the waveguide cross-sections reveals that an essential crystal lattice re-distribution has been induced after short pulse irradiation. Such lattice re-distribution is evidenced at the waveguide core corresponding to the laser written refractive index increased volume. The waveguides core surroundings also present diverse changes including slight lattice disorder and bi-axial strain fields. The step-index waveguide laser performance is compared with previous laser fabricated waveguides with a stress-optic guiding mechanism in absence of laser induced lattice re-distribution.

  16. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  17. Lifetimes of Machinery and Equipment. Evidence from Dutch Manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erumban, Abdul Azeez

    2006-01-01

    This paper estimates service lifetimes for capital assets in Dutch manufacturing industries, using information on asset retirement patterns. A Weibull distribution function is estimated using a nonlinear regression technique to derive service lifetimes for three selected asset types: transport equip

  18. Laser-induced fluorescence measurement of the ion-energy-distribution function in a collisionless reconnection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, A; Fox, W; Egedal, J; Grulke, O; Klinger, T

    2005-12-02

    Observations in space and laboratory plasmas suggest magnetic reconnection as a mechanism for ion heating and formation of non-Maxwellian ion velocity distribution functions (IVDF). Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the IVDF parallel to the X line of a periodically driven reconnection experiment are presented. A time-resolved analysis yields the evolution of the IVDF within a reconnection cycle. It is shown that reconnection causes a strong increase of the ion temperature, where the strongest increase is found at the maximum reconnection rate. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that ion heating is a consequence of the in-plane electric field that forms around the X line in response to reconnection.

  19. Investigation of Real-Time Two-Dimensional Visualization of Fuel Spray Liquid/Vapor Distribution via Exciplex Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-30

    computer * In- house software I g I 06-10-72-12 15 [Gaussian mode]. The intensity distribution was observed and analyzed by capturing the frontal and...points of the exciplex coff ,ponents ar,.’ the 4uel at one atr,:soreire. and therety to reduce the ttendenc’y of the componeritz t:, e~:~ C;4eertia!l...fluorescence position. The cuvette is slow, and only a fraction of the M* initially formed chamber was heated with flowing house air, which had

  20. Binomial distribution-based quantitative measurement of multiple-acceptors fluorescence resonance energy transfer by partially photobleaching acceptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Yu, Huaina; Zhang, Jianwei; Chen, Tongsheng

    2014-06-01

    We report that binomial distribution depending on acceptor photobleaching degree can be used to characterize the proportions of various kinds of FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer) constructs resulted from partial acceptor photobleaching of multiple-acceptors FRET system. On this basis, we set up a rigorous quantitation theory for multiple-acceptors FRET construct named as Mb-PbFRET which is not affected by the imaging conditions and fluorophore properties. We experimentally validate Mb-PbFRET with FRET constructs consisted of one donor and two or three acceptors inside living cells on confocal and wide-field microscopes.

  1. Wireless Sensor Networks for Smart Grid Applications: A Case Study on Link Reliability and Node Lifetime Evaluations in Power Distribution Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Gurkan Tuna; V. Cagri Gungor; Kayhan Gulez

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in embedded systems and wireless sensor networks (WSNs) made it possible to realize low-cost monitoring and automation systems for smart grids. This paper presents opportunities and design challenges of WSNs for smart grid applications. WSN-based smart grid applications have been introduced, and some WSN standards and communication protocols have been discussed for smart grid applications. Importantly, node lifetime and link reliability in wireless sensor networking for smart ...

  2. Experimental Investigation of Excited-State Lifetimes in Atomic Ytterbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, C.J.; Budker, D.; Commins, E.D.; DeMille, D.; Freedman, S.J.; Nguyen, A.-T.; Shang, S.-Q.; /UC, Berkeley; Zolotorev, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-15

    Lifetimes of 21 excited states in atomic Yb were measured using time-resolved fluorescence detection following pulsed laser excitation. The lifetime of the 4f{sup 14}5d6s {sup 3}D{sub 1} state, which is of particular importance for a proposed study of parity nonconservation in atoms, was measured to be 380(30) ns.

  3. Stochastic Analysis of Orbital Lifetimes of Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Washito; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cornelius, David

    2008-01-01

    A document discusses (1) a Monte-Carlo-based methodology for probabilistic prediction and analysis of orbital lifetimes of spacecraft and (2) Orbital Lifetime Monte Carlo (OLMC)--a Fortran computer program, consisting of a previously developed long-term orbit-propagator integrated with a Monte Carlo engine. OLMC enables modeling of variances of key physical parameters that affect orbital lifetimes through the use of probability distributions. These parameters include altitude, speed, and flight-path angle at insertion into orbit; solar flux; and launch delays. The products of OLMC are predicted lifetimes (durations above specified minimum altitudes) for the number of user-specified cases. Histograms generated from such predictions can be used to determine the probabilities that spacecraft will satisfy lifetime requirements. The document discusses uncertainties that affect modeling of orbital lifetimes. Issues of repeatability, smoothness of distributions, and code run time are considered for the purpose of establishing values of code-specific parameters and number of Monte Carlo runs. Results from test cases are interpreted as demonstrating that solar-flux predictions are primary sources of variations in predicted lifetimes. Therefore, it is concluded, multiple sets of predictions should be utilized to fully characterize the lifetime range of a spacecraft.

  4. Detection of Fluorescence from Single Chlorophyll a Molecules Absorbed on Glass Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Dong-Mei; HUANG Zheng-Xi; XIA An-Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the single molecule spectroscopy of chlorophyll a molecules on glass surface in N2-saturated environment. The basic photodynamic parameters of chlorophyll a molecules, such as fluorescence lifetime,survival time before photobleaching, on-time, and off-time, are reported. A four-level model is employed to describe the possible dynamics and photobleaching of chlorophyll a upon excitation. Broad distributions in fluorescence lifetimes and survival times are mainly due to the heterogeneities of both molecular conformation and local environment.

  5. Evaluation of near infrared fluorescent labeling of monoclonal antibodies as a tool for tissue distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Kip P; Rock, Brooke M; Kwon, Gayle K; Balthasar, Joseph P; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Wienkers, Larry C; Rock, Dan A

    2014-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) behavior of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is influenced by target-mediated drug disposition, off-target effects, antidrug antibody-mediated clearance, and interaction with fragment-crystallizable domain (Fc) receptors such as neonatal Fc receptor. All of these interactions hold the potential to impact mAb biodistribution. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes offer an approach complementary to radionuclides to characterize drug disposition. Notably, the use of FDA-approved IRDye800 (IR800; LI-COR, Lincoln, NE) as a protein-labeling agent in preclinical work holds the potential for quantitative tissue analysis. Here, we tested the utility of the IR800 dye as a quantitative mAb tracer during pharmacokinetic analysis in both plasma and tissues using a model mouse monoclonal IgG1 (8C2) labeled with ≤1.5 molecules of IR800. The plasma PK parameters derived from a mixture of IR800-8C2 and 8C2 dosed intravenously to C57BL/6 mice at 8 mg/kg exhibited a large discrepancy in exposure depending on the method of quantitation [CLplasma = 8.4 ml/d per kilogram (NIR fluorescence detection) versus 2.5 ml/d per kilogram (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay)]. The disagreement between measurements suggests that the PK of 8C2 is altered by addition of the IR800 dye. Additionally, direct fluorescence analysis of homogenized tissues revealed several large differences in IR800-8C2 tissue uptake when compared with a previously published study using [(125)I]8C2, most notably an over 4-fold increase in liver concentration. Finally, the utility of IR800 in combination with whole body imaging was examined by comparison of IR800-8C2 levels observed in animal sagittal cross-sections to those measured in homogenized tissues. Our results represent the first PK analysis in both mouse plasma and tissues of an IR800-mAb conjugate and suggest that mAb disposition is significantly altered by IR800 conjugation to 8C2.

  6. Trace element distribution in human teeth by x-ray fluorescence spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Oprea, Cristiana; Gustova, Marina V; Oprea, Ioan A; Buzguta, Violeta L

    2014-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRFS) was used as a multielement method of evaluation of individual whole human tooth or tooth tissues for their amounts of trace elements. Measurements were carried out on human enamel, dentine, and dental cementum, and some differences in tooth matrix composition were noted. In addition, the elemental concentrations determined in teeth from subjects of different ages, nutritional states, professions and gender, living under various environmental conditions and dietary habits, were included in a comparison by multivariate statistical analysis (MVSA) methods. By factor analysis it was established that inorganic components of human teeth varied consistently with their source in the tissue, with more in such tissue from females than in that from males, and more in tooth incisor than in tooth molar.

  7. Development of a measurement technique for ion distribution in an extended nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazoe, Yutaka; Mawatari, Kazuma; Sugii, Yasuhiko; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2011-11-01

    Ion behavior confined in extended nanospace (10(1)-10(3) nm) is important for nanofluidics and nanochemistry with dominant surface effects. In this paper, we developed a new measurement technique of ion distribution in the nanochannel by super-resolution-laser-induced fluorescence. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy was used to achieve a spatial resolution of 87 nm higher than the diffraction limit. Fluorescein was used for ratiometric measurement of pH with two excitation wavelengths. The pH profile in a 2D nanochannel of 410 nm width and 405 nm depth was successfully measured at an uncertainty of 0.05. The excess protons, showing lower pH than the bulk, nonuniformly distributed in the nanochannel to cancel the negative charge of glass wall, especially when the electric double layer is thick compared to the channel size. The present study first revealed the ion distribution near the surface or in the nanochannel, which is directly related to the electric double layer. In addition, the obtained proton distribution is important to understand the nanoscale water structure between single molecules and continuum phase. This technique will greatly contribute to understanding the basic science in nanoscale and interfacial dynamics, which are strongly required to develop novel miniaturized systems for biochemical analysis and further applications.

  8. Study of the distribution of actinides in human tissues using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergucht, Eva; Samber, Bjoern de; Izmer, Andrei; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Vanhaecke, Frank [Ghent Univ. (Belgium). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Appel, Karen [DESY-Photo Science, Hamburg (Germany); Tolmachev, Sergei [Washington State Univ., Richland WA (United States). College of Pharmacy

    2015-02-15

    This study aims at evaluating the capabilities of synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (SR micro-XRF) for qualitative and semi-quantitative elemental mapping of the distribution of actinides in human tissues originating from individuals with documented occupational exposure. The investigated lymph node tissues were provided by the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) and were analyzed following appropriate sample pre-treatment. Semi-quantitative results were obtained via calibration by external standards and demonstrated that the uranium concentration level in the detected actinide hot spots reaches more than 100 μg/g. For the plutonium hot spots, concentration levels up to 31 μg/g were found. As illustrated by this case study on these unique samples, SR micro-XRF has a high potential for this type of elemental bio-imaging owing to its high sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and non-destructive character.

  9. Distribution characteristics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria in the Typha latifolia constructed wetlands using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Li; Inamori, Ryuhei; Gui, Ping; Xu, Kai-qin; Kong, Hai-nan; Matsumura, Masatoshi; Inamori, Yuhei

    2005-01-01

    A molecular biology method, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), in which the pre-treatment was improved in allusion to the media of the constructed wetlands (CW), e.g. the soil and the grit, was used to investigate the vertical distribution characteristics of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) quantity and the relation with oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) in the Typha latifolia constructed wetlands under three different loadings in summer from May to September. Results showed that the quantity of the AOB decreased in the Typha latifolia CW with the increase of vertical depth. However, the AOB quantity was 2-4 times the quantity of the control in the root area. Additionally, ORP in the rhizosphere was found to be higher than other areas, which showed that Typha latifolia CW was in an aerobic state in summer when using simulated non-point sewage at the rural area of Taihu Lake in China and small town combined sewage.

  10. Monitoring the RNA distribution in human embryonic stem cells using Raman micro-spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falamas, A.; Kalra, S.; Chis, V.; Notingher, I.

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the intracellular distribution of nucleic acids in human embryonic stem cells. Raman micro-spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging investigations were employed to obtain high-spatial resolution maps of nucleic acids. The DNA Raman signal was identified based on the 782 cm-1 band, while the RNA characteristic signal was detected based on the 813 cm-1 fingerprint band assigned to O-P-O symmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, principal components analysis was performed and nucleic acids characteristic Raman signals were identified in the data set, which were plotted at each position in the cells. In this manner, high intensity RNA signal was identified in the cells nucleolus and cytoplasm, while the nucleus presented a much lower signal.

  11. Visualization of Structured Packing with Laser Induced Fluorescence Technique:Two-Dimensional Measurement of Liquid Concentration Distribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伯潭; 申言同; 张会书; 刘春江; 唐忠利; 袁希钢

    2016-01-01

    A method of using laser induced fluorescence(LIF)technique was applied to two-dimensional meas-urement of the liquid concentration distribution in the 250Y structured packing sheet. The experimental structured packing sheet was made of perspex so that the laser could pass through it. The visualization of the distribution of the liquid concentration in the structured packing sheet was realized. The calibration of the thickness and liquid concentration was carried out firstly and the regression formulaI=kcd was acquired, in which concentrationc and the liquid film thicknessd were both considered. Then the liquid feed of uniform tracer(rhodamine)concentration entered the perspex structured packing from the top under different spraying densities. The corresponding thickness of liquid film on the packing was calculated. Finally, tracer(rhodamine)with a high concentration was injected only at one fixed point of the structured packing under different spraying densities of the liquid. With the known liquid film thickness, the concentration distribution of the tracer can be calculated inside the structured packing sheet.

  12. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Roberts

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples.

  13. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Visser, N.V.; Amerongen, van H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and ex

  14. Investigation of mineral distribution in bone by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy after tibolone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Rio de Janeiro State Univ., Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy; Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Carvalho, A.C.B.; Henriques, H.N.; Guzman-Silva, M.A. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Pathology; Sales, E.; Lopes, R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Granjeiro, J.M. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    2011-07-01

    Tibolone is a synthetic steroid with estrogenic, androgenic, and progestagenic properties used for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone shows almost no action on breast and endometrium, which are target-organs for estrogens and progesterone activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution of calcium and zinc minerals in the femoral head of ovariectomized rat in order to evaluate the effects of the long-term administration of tibolone. For that purpose X-ray microfluorescence was used with synchrotron radiation imaging technique which was performed at Brazilian Light Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, SP. Minerals were not homogeneously distributed in trabecular bone areas; a higher concentration of calcium in the trabecular regions at femoral heads was found in ovariectomized and tibolone-treated rats compared to ovariectomized and control groups. (orig.)

  15. The Use of Ex Vivo Whole-organ Imaging and Quantitative Tissue Histology to Determine the Bio-distribution of Fluorescently Labeled Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Jeremy W D; Bidwell, Gene L

    2016-12-24

    Fluorescent labeling is a well-established process for examining the fate of labeled molecules under a variety of experimental conditions both in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent probes are particularly useful in determining the bio-distribution of administered large molecules, where the addition of a small-molecule fluorescent label is unlikely to affect the kinetics or bio-distribution of the compound. A variety of methods exist to examine bio-distribution that vary significantly in the amount of effort required and whether the resulting measurements are fully quantitative, but using multiple methods in conjunction can provide a rapid and effective system for analyzing bio-distributions. Ex vivo whole-organ imaging is a method that can be used to quickly compare the relative concentrations of fluorescent molecules within tissues and between multiple types of tissues or treatment groups. Using an imaging platform designed for live-animal or whole-organ imaging, fluorescence within intact tissues can be determined without further processing, saving time and labor while providing an accurate picture of the overall bio-distribution. This process is ideal in experiments attempting to determine the tissue specificity of a compound or for the comparison of multiple different compounds. Quantitative tissue histology on the other hand requires extensive further processing of tissues in order to create a quantitative measure of the labeled compounds. To accurately assess bio-distribution, all tissues of interest must be sliced, scanned, and analyzed relative to standard curves in order to make comparisons between tissues or groups. Quantitative tissue histology is the gold standard for determining absolute compound concentrations within tissues. Here, we describe how both methods can be used together effectively to assess the ability of different administration methods and compound modifications to target and deliver fluorescently labeled molecules to the central nervous

  16. Lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive outdoor study of polymer solar cells and modules for duration of one year was conducted. Different sample geometries and encapsulations were employed in order to study the spread in the lifetimes. The study is a complimentary report to previous work that focused on indoor ageing...... tests. Comparison of the indoor and outdoor lifetimes was performed by means of the o-diagram, which constitutes the initial steps towards establishing a method for predicting the lifetime of an organic photovoltaic device under real operational conditions based on a selection of accelerated indoor...

  17. Design of a compact, low-price, lifetime measuring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.; Moeller, Reinhard; Tafeit, Erwin

    1994-08-01

    The technical requirements for a small, rugged, and moderately- priced device for measuring fluorescence lifetimes have been investigated. The suitability and performance of various lifetime measuring schemes were compared. Based on these investigations a compact time-domain instrument was developed allowing measurement of fluorescence decays with a time resolution well below 1 ns. A semiconductor laser (frequency-doubled, if necessary) is used as a light source. Detection is done with a miniaturized photomultiplier. In favorable cases measurement of a fluorescent decay curve is accomplished within less than one minute.

  18. Lifetime-based sensing:  influence of the microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, S; Lippitsch, M E

    1996-03-01

    The influence of the microenvironment on the fluorescence behavior of indicator molecules is investigated. A model is developed to describe the fluorescence decay of indicator molecules in a nonuniform medium. Its consequences for fluorescence lifetime-based chemical sensors are discussed and verified in two examples, namely, a pH sensor using a pyrene compound in a hydrogel and a ruthenium complex for oxygen sensing embedded in a polystyrene membrane.

  19. Intracellular Monitoring of AS1411 Aptamer by Time-Resolved Microspectrofluorimetry and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kočišová, Eva; Praus, Petr; Bok, Jiří; Bonneau, Stéphanie; Sureau, Franck

    2015-09-01

    Time-resolved microspectrofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy imaging-two complementary fluorescence techniques-provide important information about the intracellular distribution, level of uptake and binding/interactions inside living cell of the labeled molecule of interest. They were employed to monitor the "fate" of AS1411 aptamer labeled by ATTO 425 in human living cells. Confocal microspectrofluorimeter adapted for time-resolved intracellular fluorescence measurements by using a phase-modulation principle with homodyne data acquisition was employed to obtain emission spectra and to determine fluorescence lifetimes in U-87 MG tumor brain cells and Hs68 non-tumor foreskin cells. Acquired spectra from both the intracellular space and the reference solutions were treated to observe the aptamer localization and its interaction with biological structures inside the living cell. The emission spectra and the maximum emission wavelengths coming from the cells are practically identical, however significant lifetime lengthening was observed for tumor cell line in comparison to non-tumor one.

  20. Two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave approach: Accurate and self-consistent computations of positron lifetimes and momentum distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktor, Julia; Jomard, Gérald; Torrent, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Many techniques have been developed in the past in order to compute positron lifetimes in materials from first principles. However, there is still a lack of a fast and accurate self-consistent scheme that could handle accurately the forces acting on the ions induced by the presence of the positron. We will show in this paper that we have reached this goal by developing the two-component density functional theory within the projector augmented-wave (PAW) method in the open-source code abinit. This tool offers the accuracy of the all-electron methods with the computational efficiency of the plane-wave ones. We can thus deal with supercells that contain few hundreds to thousands of atoms to study point defects as well as more extended defects clusters. Moreover, using the PAW basis set allows us to use techniques able to, for instance, treat strongly correlated systems or spin-orbit coupling, which are necessary to study heavy elements, such as the actinides or their compounds.

  1. Gated Detection Measurements of Phosphorescence Lifetimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yordan Kostov

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available A low-cost, gated system for measurements of phosphorescence lifetimes is presented. An extensive description of the system operating principles and metrological characteristics is given. Remarkably, the system operates without optical filtering of the LED excitation source. A description of a practical system is also given and its performance is discussed. Because the device effectively suppresses high-level background fluorescence and scattered light, it is expected to find wide-spread application in bioprocess, environmental and biomedical fields.

  2. The Number of Accumulated Photons and the Quality of Stimulated Emission Depletion Lifetime Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Aleem [Ames Laboratory; Lesoine, Michael D [Ames Laboratory; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal [Ames Laboratory; Petrich, Jacob W [Ames Laboratory; Smith, Emily A [Ames Laboratory

    2014-03-03

    Time binning is used to increase the number of photon counts in the peak channel of stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime decay curves to determine how it affects the resulting lifetime image. The fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 594 phalloidin, bound to F-actin is probed in cultured S2 cells at a spatial resolution of ~40 nm. This corresponds to a tenfold smaller probe volume compared to confocal imaging, and a reduced number of photons contributing to the signal. Pixel-by-pixel fluorescence lifetime measurements and error analysis show that an average of 40 ± 30 photon counts in the peak channel with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is enough to calculate a reliable fluorescence lifetime from a single exponential fluorescence decay. No heterogeneity in the actin cytoskeleton in different regions of the cultured cells was measured in the 40- to 400-nm spatial regime.

  3. Investigation of Essential Element Distribution in the Equine Metacarpophalangeal Joint using a Synchrotron Radiation Micro X-Ray Fluorescence Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaabar, Wejdan; Gundogdu, O.; Tzaphlidou, M.; Janousch, M.; Attenburrow, D.; Bradley, D. A.

    2008-05-01

    In articular cartilage, Ca, P, K and S are among some of the well known co-factors of the metalloproteinases enzymatic family, the latter playing a pivotal role in the growth and degeneration of the collagenous bone-cartilage interface of articulating joints. Current study forms part of a larger investigation concerning the distribution of these and other key elements in such media. For the purpose of evaluating these low atomic number elements (Z⩽20), use was made of the capabilities of the LUCIA Station, located at the synchrotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Using an incident radiation energy of 4.06 keV, a synchrotron radiation micro x-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF) technique was applied in examining the distribution of the essential elements Ca, P, K and S in the bone-cartilage interface of both healthy and diseased (osteoarthritic) areas of an equine metacarpophalangeal joint. The SR-μXRF mappings and line profile patterns have revealed remarkable changes in both the pattern and absolute distributions of these elements, agreeing with the findings of others. The elemental presence shown in the individual area scans encompassing the lesion each reflect the visibly abraded outer surface of the cartilage and change in shape of the bone surface. One of the area scans for the bone-cartilage interface shows a marked change in both the pattern and absolute elemental presence for all three elements compared to that observed at two other scan sites. The observation of change in bone cartilage composition around the surface of the articulating joint is thought to be novel, the variation being almost certainly due to the differing weight-bearing role of the subchondral bone at each location.

  4. Development of low-energy x-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis using a laser plasma x-ray source and multilayer optics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuik, R.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Fledderus, H.; Andreev, S. S.; Shamov, E. A.; Zuev, S. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.; F. Bijkerk,

    1999-01-01

    A new technique is presented for low-energy X-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis of low-Z elements at micrometer spatial resolutions. The technique is based on the use of a laser plasma X-ray source and spherically curved multilayer optics. A large collimator is used to focus the light fro

  5. Lumazine Protein from the Bioluminescent Bacterium Photobacterium Phosphoreum: A Fluorescence Study of the Protein-Ligand Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.J.W.G.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The changes of fluorescence spectral distribution, polarization, and lifetime of the lumazine protein from Photobacterium phosphoreum can be interpreted in terms of an equilibrium between the protein and its dissociated prosthetic group 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1′-D-ribityl)lumazine. The equilibrium is

  6. Lumazine Protein from the Bioluminescent Bacterium Photobacterium Phosphoreum: A Fluorescence Study of the Protein-Ligand Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.J.W.G.; Lee, J.

    1980-01-01

    The changes of fluorescence spectral distribution, polarization, and lifetime of the lumazine protein from Photobacterium phosphoreum can be interpreted in terms of an equilibrium between the protein and its dissociated prosthetic group 6,7-dimethyl-8-(1′-D-ribityl)lumazine. The equilibrium is rapid

  7. Lifetime Measurement for 6snp Rydberg States of Barium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Li; WANG Lei; YANG Hai-Feng; LIU Xiao-Jun; LIU Hong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    @@ We present a simple and efficient method for measuring the atomic lifetimes in order of tens of microseconds and demonstrate it in the lifetime determination of barium Rydberg states.This method extracts the lifetime information from the time-of-flight spectrum directly, which is much more efficient than other methods such as the time-delayed field ionization and the traditional laser induced fluorescence.The lifetimes determined with our method for barium Rydberg 6snp(n=37-59)series are well coincident with the values deduced from the absolute oscillator strengths of barium which were given in the literature [J.Phys.B 14(1981)4489, 29(1996)655]on experiments.%We present a simple and efficient method for measuring the atomic lifetimes in order of tens of microseconds and demonstrate it in the lifetime determination of barium Rydberg states. This method extracts the lifetime information from the time-of-flight spectrum directly, which is much more efficient than other methods such as the time-delayed field ionization and the traditional laser induced fluorescence. The lifetimes determined with our method for barium Rydberg 6snp (n=37-59) series are well coincident with the values deduced from the absolute oscillator strengths of barium which were given in the literature [J. Phys. B 14 (1981) 4489, 29 (1996) 655] onexperiments.

  8. A new methodology for measurement of sludge residence time distribution in a paddle dryer using X-ray fluorescence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlou, Christophe; Milhé, Mathieu; Sauceau, Martial; Arlabosse, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Drying is a necessary step before sewage sludge energetic valorization. Paddle dryers allow working with such a complex material. However, little is known about sludge flow in this kind of processes. This study intends to set up an original methodology for sludge residence time distribution (RTD) measurement in a continuous paddle dryer, based on the detection of mineral tracers by X-ray fluorescence. This accurate analytical technique offers a linear response to tracer concentration in dry sludge; the protocol leads to a good repeatability of RTD measurements. Its equivalence to RTD measurement by NaCl conductivity in sludge leachates is assessed. Moreover, it is shown that tracer solubility has no influence on RTD: liquid and solid phases have the same flow pattern. The application of this technique on sludge with different storage duration at 4 °C emphasizes the influence of this parameter on sludge RTD, and thus on paddle dryer performances: the mean residence time in a paddle dryer is almost doubled between 24 and 48 h of storage for identical operating conditions.

  9. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: application to model antifouling coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodes, L R; Dennington, S P; Schuppe, H; Wharton, J A; Bakker, M; Klijnstra, J W; Stokes, K R

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu₂O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to these coatings for quantification of organic biocide and pigment distribution. Total leaching of the biocide from the novel copolymer binder was observed within 6 months of rotor immersion, compared to 35% from the pMMA coating. In pontoon immersions, 61% of the additive was lost from the pMMA coating, and 53% from the erodible binder. Profiles of FD content in the binders revealed an accelerated loss of additive from the surface of the CDP resulting from rosin degradation, compared to even depletion from pMMA. In all samples, release of the biocide was inhibited beyond the Cu₂O front, corresponding to the leached layer in samples where Cu₂O release occurred.

  10. Distribution of toxic elements in teeth treated with amalgam using μ-energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, M.; Ferreira, C.; Carvalho, M. L.; Santos, J. P.; Pessanha, S.

    2016-08-01

    Over the years, the presence of mercury in amalgam fillings has raised some safety concerns. Amalgam is one of the most commonly used tooth fillings and contains approximately 50% of elemental mercury and 50% of other metals, mostly silver, tin and copper. Amalgam can release small amounts of mercury vapor over time, and patients can absorb these vapors by inhaling or ingesting them. In this study, 10 human teeth treated with dental amalgam were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) to study the diffusion of its constituents, Ag, Cu, Sn and Hg. The used EDXRF setup, makes use of a polycapillary lens to focus radiation up to 25 μm allowing the mapping of the elemental distribution in the samples. Quantification was performed using the inbuilt software based on the Fundamental Parameters method for bulk samples, considering a hydroxyapatite matrix. The teeth were longitudinally cut and each slice was scanned from the surface enamel to the inner region (dentin and pulp cavity). Mercury concentration profiles show strong levels of this element close to the amalgam region, decreasing significantly in the dentin, and increasing again up to 40,000 μg·g- 1 in the cavity were the pulp used to exist when the tooth was vital.

  11. Charm Lifetimes and Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, H W K

    2002-01-01

    A review of the latest results on charm lifetimes and D-mixing is presented. The e+e- collider experiments are now able to measure charm lifetimes quite precisely, however comparisons with the latest results from fixed-target experiments show that possible systematic effects could be evident. The new D-mixing results from the B-factories have changed the picture that is emerging. Although the new world averaged value of y_CP is now consistent with zero, there is still a very interesting and favoured scenario if the strong phase difference between the Doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed and the Cabibbo-flavoured D0 -> Kpi decay is large.

  12. Biotin and biotin analogues specifically modify the fluorescence decay of avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, G; Pugliese, L; Rosato, N; Toma, L; Bolognesi, M; Finazzi-Agrò, A

    1994-09-30

    Avidin, a basic tetrameric glycoprotein, isolated from hen egg-white, binds up to four molecules of biotin with exceptionally high affinity. The presence of tryptophanyl residues in the active site pointed out the opportunity of correlating the protein fluorescence with biotin binding. We have performed both steady state and dynamic fluorescence experiments using biotin or biotin-derived molecules (biotinamine, diaminobiotin and iminobiotin) as ligands. The fluorescence decay data can only be fitted by two continuous distributions of lifetimes which may reflect the presence of static or dynamic microheterogeneity in the environment of the tryptophan residues. We observed that the binding of biotin, biotinamine and iminobiotin reduces the widths of both distributions to discrete lifetimes thus indicating a more homogenous environment for the emitting tryptophan residues. Instead, the binding of diaminobiotin, which lacks the imidazolone ring, affects one lifetime distribution only. The binding of biotin also affects the rotational correlation time of avidin, which becomes shorter, suggesting a more compact structure of the ligated protein. The utility of analyzing the fluorescence in terms of distributions appears to be further warranted.

  13. Our Allotted Lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    1977-01-01

    It is suggested that measured by the internal clock of heartbeats or breathing, all mammals live a similar lifespan. This is based on the fact that mammals, regardless of size, breathe about 200 million times in their lifetime at a rate of 1 breath for every 4 heartbeats. (AJ)

  14. A non-regenerative model of a redundant repairable system: bounds for the unavailability and asymptotical insensitivity to the lifetime distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor N. Kovalenko

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate steady state reliability parameters of an F:r-out-of-N redundant repairable system with m(1≤m≤r−1 repair channels in light traffic conditions. Such a system can also be treated as a closed queueing network of a simple kind. It includes two nodes, with infinite number of channels and m channels, respectively. Each of the N customers pass cyclically from one node to the other; the service time distributions are of a general form for both the nodes.

  15. Gastrointestinal tract distribution of Salmonella enteritidis in orally infected mice with a species-specific fluorescent quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify and understand the regular distribution pattern and primary penetration site for Salmonella enteritidis (S. enteritidis) in the gastrointestinal tract.METHODS: Based on the species-specific DNA sequence of S. enteritidis from GenBank, a species-specific real-time, fluorescence-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR) was developed for the detection of S.enteritidis. We used this assay to detect genomic DNA of S. enteritidis in the gastrointestinal tract, including duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, colon, rectum,esophagus and stomach, from mice after oral infection.RESULTS: S. enteritidis was consistently detected in all segments of the gastrointestinal tract. The jejunum and ileum were positive at 8 h post inoculation, and the final organ to show a positive result was the stomach at 18 h post inoculation. The copy number of S. enteritidis DNA in each tissue reached a peak at 24-36 h post inoculation,with the jejunum, ileum and cecum containing high concentrations of S. enteritidis, whereas the duodenum,colon, rectum, stomach and esophagus had low concentrations. S. enteritidis began to decrease and vanished at 2 d post inoculation, but it was still present up to 5 d post inoculation in the jejunum, ileum and cecum, without causing apparent symptoms. By 5 d post inoculation, the cecum had significantly higher numbers of S. enteritidis than any of the other areas (P < 0.01),and this appeared to reflect its function as a repository for S. enteritidis.CONCLUSION: The results provided significant data for clarifying the pathogenic mechanism of S. enteritidis in the gastrointestinal tract, and showed that the jejunum,ileum and cecum are the primary sites of invasion in normal mice after oral infection. This study will help to further understanding of the mechanisms of action of S.enteritidis.

  16. Positronium lifetime in polymers

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, Abel

    2004-01-01

    A model describing the relationship between the ortho--positronium lifetime and the volume of a void, located in a synthetic zeolite, is analyzed. Our idea, which allows us to take into account the effects of temperature, comprises the introduction of a non--hermitian term in the Hamiltonian, which accounts for the annihilation of the ortho--positronium. The predictions of the present model are also confronted against an already known experimental result.

  17. Application of fluorescence and PARAFAC to assess vertical distribution of subsurface hydrocarbons and dispersant during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Wilson G; Riemer, Daniel D; Zika, Rod G

    2013-05-01

    We evaluated the use of excitation and emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factorial analysis (PARAFAC) modeling techniques for monitoring crude oil components in the water column. Four of the seven derived PARAFAC loadings were associated with the Macondo crude oil components. The other three components were associated with the dispersant, an unresolved component and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The fluorescence of the associated benzene and naphthalene-like components of crude oil exhibited a maximum at ∼1200 m. The maximum fluorescence of the component associated with the dispersant (i.e., Corexit EC9500A) was observed at the same depth. The plume observed at this depth was attributed to the dispersed crude oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Results demonstrate the application of EEM and PARAFAC to simultaneously monitor selected PAH, dispersant-containing and humic-like fluorescence components in the oil spill region in the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. Measurement of the Bs0 lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskulic, D.; de Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Minard, M.-N.; Odier, P.; Pietrzyk, B.; Ariztizabal, F.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Gaitan, V.; Garrido, Ll.; Martinez, M.; Mattison, T.; Orteu, S.; Pacheco, A.; Padilla, C.; Pascual, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Farilla, A.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Marinelli, N.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Romano, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Zito, G.; Chai, Y.; Hu, H.; Huang, D.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, D.; Xu, R.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Bonvicini, G.; Boudreau, J.; Casper, D.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Ganis, G.; Gay, C.; Girone, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Harvey, J.; Hilgart, J.; Jacobsen, R.; Jost, B.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Maggi, M.; Markou, C.; Mato, P.; Meinhard, H.; Minten, A.; Miquel, R.; Moser, H.-G.; Palazzi, P.; Pater, J. R.; Perlas, J. A.; Perrodo, P.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Rothberg, J.; Ruan, T.; Saich, M.; Schlatter, D.; Schmelling, M.; Sefkow, F.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Veenhof, R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wasserbaech, S.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wildish, T.; Witzeling, W.; Wotschack, J.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Bardadin-Otwinowska, M.; Barres, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Saadi, F.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Johnson, S. D.; Møllerud, R.; Nilsson, B. S.; Kyriakis, A.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Badier, J.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Fouque, G.; Passalacqua, L.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Tanaka, R.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Veitch, E.; Focardi, E.; Moneta, L.; Parrini, G.; Corden, M.; Delfino, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Levinthal, D.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Cerutti, F.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Salomone, S.; Colrain, P.; Ten Have, I.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; Maitland, W.; Morton, W. T.; Raine, C.; Reeves, P.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Smith, M. G.; Thompson, A. S.; Thorn, S.; Turnbull, R. M.; Brandl, B.; Braun, O.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hepp, V.; Karger, C.; Kluge, E. E.; Maumary, Y.; Putzer, A.; Rensch, B.; Stahl, A.; Tittel, K.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Cattaneo, M.; Colling, D. J.; Dornan, P. J.; Hassard, J. F.; Lieske, N. M.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Patton, S.; Payne, D. G.; Phillips, M. J.; San Martin, G.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Wright, A. G.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Vogl, R.; Bowdery, C. K.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jackson, D.; Keemer, N. R.; Nuttall, M.; Patel, A.; Sloan, T.; Snow, S. W.; Whelan, E. P.; Galla, A.; Greene, A. M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Raab, J.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Schmidt, H.; Walther, S. M.; Wanke, R.; Wolf, B.; Bencheikh, A. M.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Drinkard, J.; Etienne, F.; Nicod, D.; Payre, P.; Ross, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schwemling, P.; Talby, M.; Adlung, S.; Assmann, R.; Bauer, C.; Blum, W.; Brown, D.; Cattaneo, P.; Dehning, B.; Dietl, H.; Dydak, F.; Frank, M.; Halley, A. W.; Jakobs, K.; Lauber, J.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Richter, R.; Schröder, J.; Schwarz, A. S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; Stierlin, U.; Stiegler, U.; Denis, R. St.; Wolf, G.; Alemany, R.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Janot, P.; Kimfn 19, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Musolino, G.; Schune, M.-H.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Abbaneo, D.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; Dell'Orso, R.; Ferrante, I.; Fidecaro, F.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Mannelli, E. B.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzo, G.; Sanguinetti, G.; Spagnolo, P.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.; Valassi, A.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Walsh, J.; Betteridge, A. P.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Johnson, D. L.; March, P. V.; Medcalf, T.; Mir, Ll. M.; Quazi, I. S.; Strong, J. A.; Bertin, V.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Duarte, H.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Marx, B.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Rosowsky, A.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Si Mohand, D.; Vallage, B.; Johnson, R. P.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Wear, J.; Babbage, W.; Booth, C. N.; Buttar, C.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Dawson, I.; Thompson, L. F.; Barberio, E.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Lutters, G.; Rivera, F.; Schäfer, U.; Smolik, L.; Bosisio, L.; Della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Pitis, L.; Ragusa, F.; Bellantoni, L.; Chen, W.; Conway, J. S.; Feng, Z.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y. S.; Grahl, J.; Harton, J. L.; Hayes, O. J.; Nachtman, J. M.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Schmitt, M.; Scott, I.; Sharma, V.; Shi, Z. H.; Turk, J. D.; Walsh, A. M.; Weber, F. V.; Lan Wu, Sau; Wu, X.; Zheng, M.; Zobernig, G.; Aleph Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The lifetime of the Bs0 has been measured in a data sample of 8890000 hadronic events recorded with the ALEPH detector at LEP. After background subtraction 30.8 ± 6.9 events are attributed to the semileptonic decay of the Bs0 to a Ds- and an opposite-sign lepton. A maximum-likelihood fit to the distribution of the proper times of these events yields a Bs0 lifetime of τBs = 1.92 -0.35+0.45 ± 0.04 ps.

  19. The Sprint to Lifetime Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    Describes the trend in high school physical education programs toward lifetime sports, defined by the author as physical activities that will serve the interests of students for a lifetime. Included are a special report on program costs and a model of a performance-based lifetime sports program. (Author/DN)

  20. Lifetimes of machinery and equipment : evidence from Dutch manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erumban, 27675

    2008-01-01

    This paper estimates service lifetimes for capital assets in Dutch manufacturing industries, using information on asset retirement patterns. A Weibull distribution function is estimated using a non-linear regression technique to derive service lifetimes for three selected asset types: transport equi

  1. On random age and remaining lifetime for populations of items

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finkelstein, M.; Vaupel, J.

    2015-01-01

    We consider items that are incepted into operation having already a random (initial) age and define the corresponding remaining lifetime. We show that these lifetimes are identically distributed when the age distribution is equal to the equilibrium distribution of the renewal theory. Then we...... develop the population studies approach to the problem and generalize the setting in terms of stationary and stable populations of items. We obtain new stochastic comparisons for the corresponding population ages and remaining lifetimes that can be useful in applications. Copyright (c) 2014 John Wiley...

  2. Measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The mean lifetime of the \\tau lepton is measured in a sample of 25700 \\tau pairs collected in 1992 with the ALEPH detector at LEP. A new analysis of the 1-1 topology events is introduced. In this analysis, the dependence of the impact parameter sum distribution on the daughter track momenta is taken into account, yielding improved precision compared to other impact parameter sum methods. Three other analyses of the one- and three-prong \\tau decays are updated with increased statistics. The measured lifetime is 293.5 \\pm 3.1 \\pm 1.7 \\fs. Including previous (1989--1991) ALEPH measurements, the combined \\tau lifetime is 293.7 \\pm 2.7 \\pm 1.6 \\fs.

  3. The vertical distribution of the fluorescence of the photosynthetic pigments in Kaliningrad Bay of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solov'yev, A. N.

    2010-12-01

    The annual (2004-2006) series of probing using a multichannel filter-fluorimeter from the water's surface to the bottom at fixed sites in Kaliningrad Bay and the adjacent areas were carried out. The following parameters were recorded: the water turbidity and temperature, the intensity of the fluorescence of the photosynthetic pigment (excitation at 450 nm, detection band 675-820 nm), and the intensity of the background fluorescence of the dissolved organic matter. The high levels of "red fluorescence" presumably related to the presence of photosynthetic bacterioplankton, live phytoplankton, or their mixture (which demands further biological identification) annually registered in the aphotic zone of the water column represent specific feature of the obtained data.

  4. Distribution of fluorescence decay times for 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate in human oxyhemoglobin A1b solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazdou, A. S.; Sobchuk, A. N.; Syakhovich, V. E.; Bokut, O. S.; Kvasyuk, E. I.; Bushuk, B. A.; Bokut, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied complex formation between molecules of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and the major form (A1) and a minor form (Ab) of hemoglobin. The contribution of the longlived component f3 to the kinetic curves for fluorescence decay in HbA1b solutions is 0.021-0.036, which indicates a dramatic decrease (compared with HbA1) in the accessibility of the central cavity of HbA1b for binding 1,8-ANS. Disappearance of the long-lived component f3 in the fluorescence decay kinetics of 1,8-ANS in HbA1b solutions in the presence of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) suggests that the regulatory region of HbA1b is completely inaccessible for interaction both with the negatively charged molecules of the probe and with natural regulators of the transport function for this form of the heme protein.

  5. Use of co-loaded Fluo-3 and Fura Red fluorescent indicators for studying the cytosolic Ca(2+)concentrations distribution in living plant tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walczysko, P; Wagner, E; Albrechtová, J T

    2000-07-01

    A method for visualisation of cytosolic [Ca(2+)] distribution was applied to living plant tissue. A mixture of the fluorescent probes Fluo-3 and Fura Red was used. The emitted fluorescence was scanned simultaneously in two channels with a laser-scanning confocal microscope and rationing was performed. The homogeneity of the Fluo-3/Fura Red concentration ratio throughout the tissue after AM-ester loading was proven. In vitro calibration permitted conversion of Fluo-3/Fura Red fluorescence ratios to [Ca(2+)] values. Apparent K(D)of 286 nM, R(min)of 0.43 and R(max)of 18 were calculated. The in vivo determination of extreme ratio values was performed by permeabilizing the plasmalemma for Ca(2+)with a ionophore and manipulating the extracellular [Ca(2+)]. The resultant R(minv)of 1.33 and R(maxv)of 2.69 for vegetative apices, and R(mini)of 1.26 and R(maxi)of 3.45 for apices induced to flowering, suggested incomplete equalization of extra- and intracellular Ca(2+)levels in these experiments. In Chenopodium rubrum, the cytosolic [Ca(2+)] patterns of apical tissue obtained using Fluo-3 and Fura Red were significantly different between vegetative apices and apices after photoperiodic flower induction. This methodological approach may also be helpful for studying cytosolic [Ca(2+)] distribution in other living plant tissues. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  6. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  7. Lifetimes and HQE

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Kolya Uraltsev was one of the inventors of the Heavy Quark Expansion (HQE), that describes inclusive weak decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks and in particular lifetimes. Besides giving a pedagogic introduction to the subject, we review the development and the current status of the HQE, which just recently passed several non-trivial experimental tests with an unprecedented precision. In view of many new experimental results for lifetimes of heavy hadrons, we also update several theory predictions: $\\tau (B^+) / \\tau (B_d) = 1.04^{+0.05}_{-0.01} \\pm 0.02 \\pm 0.01$, $\\tau (B_s) / \\tau (B_d) = 1.001 \\pm 0.002$, $\\tau (\\Lambda_b)/ \\tau (B_d) = 0.935 \\pm 0.054$ and $\\bar {\\tau} (\\Xi_b^0) / \\bar{\\tau} (\\Xi_b^+) = 0.95 \\pm 0.06$. The theoretical precision is currently strongly limited by the unknown size of the non-perturbative matrix elements of four-quark operators, which could be determined with lattice simulations.

  8. Fluorescence histochemical study of the localisation and distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondok, A A; Botros, K G; el-Mohandes, E A

    1988-10-01

    The distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites has been studied in chicken spinal cord and cerebellum using a fluorescent analogue of propranolol, 9-amino-acridin-propranolol (9-AAP). In the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord, beta-adrenoceptor sites were concentrated on cell bodies of alpha-motor neurons of the dorsolateral and ventrolateral nuclear groups of the ventral horn. In the thoracic region, they were present on cell bodies of the preganglionic sympathetic nucleus (dorsal commissural nucleus). In the dorsal horn, the receptor sites were present mainly on cell bodies of columna dorsalis magnocellularis. Sparse distribution of fluorescence was present in other regions of the gray matter. In the cerebellum, a dense distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites was observed on Purkinje cell bodies and their apical dendrites. Sparse distribution of receptor sites was present on fine ramifications of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. Receptor sites were absent in the granule cell layer and the white matter. These observations indicate that alpha-motor neurons, preganglionic sympathetic neurons, neurons of columna dorsalis magnocellularis, and Purkinje cells are adrenoceptive, while granule cells are non-adrenoceptive.

  9. Fluorescence microscopy techniques for quantitative evaluation of organic biocide distribution in antifouling paint coatings: Application to model antifouling coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goodes, L.R.; Dennington, S.P.; Schuppe, H.; Wharton, J.A.; Bakker, M.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Stokes, K.R.

    2012-01-01

    A test matrix of antifouling (AF) coatings including pMMA, an erodible binder and a novel trityl copolymer incorporating Cu 2O and a furan derivative (FD) natural product, were subjected to pontoon immersion and accelerated rotor tests. Fluorescence and optical microscopy techniques were applied to

  10. Ubiquitous distribution of fluorescent protein in muscles of four species and two subspecies of eel (genus Anguilla)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AKI FUNAHASHI; TAKAO ITAKURA; ABEER A. I. HASSANIN; MASAHARU KOMATSU; SEIICHI HAYASHI; YOSHIO KAMINISHI

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the localization of fluorescent protein (FP) was characterized in the muscles of four species and two subspecies of eels Anguilla anguilla, A. australis, A. bicolor bicolor (b.), A. bicolor pacifica (p.) and A. mossambica in addition tothe previously reported A. japonica. The open reading frame of each eel FP was 417 bp encoding 139 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences among the four species and two subspecies exhibited 91.4–100% identity, and belonged to the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) family. The gene structure of eel FPs in A. japonica, A. anguilla, A. australis, A. bicolor b., A. bicolor p. and A. mossambica have four exons and three introns, and were common to that of FABP family. The apo eel FPs expressed by Escherichia coli with recombinant eel FP genes were analysed for the fluorescent properties in the presenceof bilirubin. The excitation and emission spectra of holo eel FPs had the maximum wavelengths of 490–496 and 527–530 nm, respectively. The holo eel FPs indicated that the fluorescent intensities were stronger in A. japonica and A. bicolor than in A. mossambica, A. australis and A. anguilla. The comparison of amino acid sequences revealed two common substitutions in A.mossambica, A. australis and A. anguilla with weak fluorescent intensity.

  11. Macroscopic fluorescence imaging: a novel technique to monitor retention and distribution of injected microspheres in an experimental model of ischemic heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Martens

    Full Text Available The limited effectiveness of cardiac cell therapy has generated concern regarding its clinical relevance. Experimental studies show that cell retention and engraftment are low after injection into ischemic myocardium, which may restrict therapy effectiveness significantly. Surgical aspects and mechanical loss are suspected to be the main culprits behind this phenomenon. As current techniques of monitoring intramyocardial injections are complex and time-consuming, the aim of the study was to develop a fast and simple model to study cardiac retention and distribution following intramyocardial injections. For this purpose, our main hypothesis was that macroscopic fluorescence imaging could adequately serve as a detection method for intramyocardial injections.A total of 20 mice underwent ligation of the left anterior descending artery (LAD for myocardial infarction. Fluorescent microspheres with cellular dimensions were used as cell surrogates. Particles (5 × 10(5 were injected into the infarcted area of explanted resting hearts (Ex vivo myocardial injetions EVMI, n = 10 and in vivo into beating hearts (In vivo myocardial injections IVMI, n = 10. Microsphere quantification was performed by fluorescence imaging of explanted organs. Measurements were repeated after a reduction to homogenate dilutions. Cardiac microsphere retention was 2.78 × 10(5 ± 0.31 × 10(5 in the EVMI group. In the IVMI group, cardiac retention of microspheres was significantly lower (0.74 × 10(5 ± 0.18 × 10(5; p<0.05. Direct fluorescence imaging revealed venous drainage through the coronary sinus, resulting in a microsphere accumulation in the left (0.90 × 10(5 ± 0.20 × 10(5 and the right (1.07 × 10(5 ± 0.17 × 10(5 lung. Processing to homogenates involved further particle loss (p<0.05 in both groups.We developed a fast and simple direct fluorescence imaging method for biodistribution analysis which enabled the quantification of fluorescent microspheres after

  12. Experimental and theoretical lifetimes and transition probabilities in Sb I

    CERN Document Server

    Hartman, Henrik; Engström, Lars; Lundberg, Hans; Palmeri, Patrick; Quinet, Pascal; Biémont, Emile; 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.052512

    2010-01-01

    We present experimental atomic lifetimes for 12 levels in Sb I, out of which seven are reported for the first time. The levels belong to the 5p$^2$($^3$P)6s $^{2}$P, $^{4}$P and 5p$^2$($^3$P)5d $^{4}$P, $^{4}$F and $^{2}$F terms. The lifetimes were measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence. In addition, we report new calculations of transition probabilities in Sb I using a Multiconfigurational Dirac-Hartree-Fock method. The physical model being tested through comparisons between theoretical and experimental lifetimes for 5d and 6s levels. The lifetimes of the 5d $^4$F$_{3/2, 5/2, 7/2}$ levels (19.5, 7.8 and 54 ns, respectively) depend strongly on the $J$-value. This is explained by different degrees of level mixing for the different levels in the $^4$F term.

  13. Extreme fluctuations and the finite lifetime of the turbulent state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenfeld, Nigel; Guttenberg, Nicholas; Gioia, Gustavo

    2010-03-01

    We argue that the transition to turbulence is controlled by large amplitude events that follow extreme distribution theory. The theory suggests an explanation for recent observations of the turbulent state lifetime which exhibit superexponential scaling behavior with Reynolds number.

  14. Measurement of the lifetime of the tau lepton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alpat, B.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, V. P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Antreasyan, D.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Banicz, K.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Baschirotto, A.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Blaising, J. J.; Blyth, S. C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boucham, A.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Branson, J. G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brock, I. C.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Buytenhuijs, A.; Cai, X. D.; Campanelli, M.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chan, A.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A. P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; de La Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boeck, H.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Denes, P.; Denotaristefani, F.; Dibitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dorne, I.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Dutta, S.; Easo, S.; Efremenko, Yu.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Fenyi, B.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J. H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gau, S. S.; Gentile, S.; Gerald, J.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldstein, J.; Gong, Z. F.; Gougas, A.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hartmann, B.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Hervé, A.; van Hoek, W. C.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S. R.; Hu, G.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jin, B. N.; Jones, L. W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, D.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kim, Y. G.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, A.; Kirkby, D.; Kirkby, J.; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Korolko, I.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraemer, R. W.; Krenz, W.; Kuijten, H.; Kunin, A.; de Guevara, P. Ladron; Landi, G.; Lapoint, C.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Laurikainen, P.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, K. Y.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, E.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Lieb, E.; Lin, W. T.; Linde, F. L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z. A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, W.; Lu, Y. S.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W. G.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Mangla, S.; Marchesini, P.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; McNally, D.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; von der Mey, M.; Mi, Y.; Mihul, A.; van Mil, A. J. W.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moore, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulik, T.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Muheim, F.; Nagy, E.; Nahn, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Ostonen, R.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Park, H. K.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Peach, D.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petrak, S.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Pinto, J. C.; Piroué, P. A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Produit, N.; Prokofiev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, B. C.; Riles, K.; Rind, O.; Ro, S.; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Roe, B. P.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosselet, Ph.; van Rossum, W.; Roth, S.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. E.; Sarkar, S.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schäfer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schoeneich, B.; Scholz, N.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shukla, J.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Soulimov, V.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Strauch, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Susinno, G. F.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Tang, X. W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonisch, F.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tully, C.; Tuchscherer, H.; Tung, K. L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; van de Walle, R. T.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vivargent, M.; Völkert, R.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, J. C.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wu, S. X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xu, J.; Xu, Z. Z.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yao, X. Y.; Ye, J. B.; Yeh, S. C.; You, J. M.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, G. Y.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.

    1996-02-01

    The lifetime of the tau lepton is measured using data collected in 1994 by the L3 detector at LEP. The precise track position information of the Silicon Microvertex Detector is exploited. The tau lepton lifetime is determined from the signed impact parameter distribution for 30 322 tau decays into one charged particle and from the decay length distribution for 3891 tau decays into three charged particles. Combining the two methods we obtain ττ = 290.1 +/- 4.0 fs.

  15. Controls on the distribution of fluorescent dissolved organic matter during an under-ice algal bloom in the western Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Wilson G.; Weiss, Elliot L.; Schieber, Brian; Greg Mitchell, B.

    2017-07-01

    In this study we used fluorescence excitation and emission matrix spectroscopy, hydrographic data, and a self-organizing map (SOM) analysis to assess the spatial distribution of labile and refractory fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) for the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas at the time of a massive under-ice phytoplankton bloom during early summer 2011. Biogeochemical properties were assessed through decomposition of water property classes and sample classification that employed a SOM neural network-based analysis which classified 10 clusters from 269 samples and 17 variables. The terrestrial, humic-like component FDOM (ArC1, 4.98 ± 1.54 Quinine Sulfate Units (QSU)) and protein-like component FDOM (ArC3, 1.63 ± 0.88 QSU) were found to have elevated fluorescence in the Lower Polar Mixed Layer (LPML) (salinity 29.56 ± 0.76). In the LPML water mass, the observed contribution of meteoric water fraction was 17%, relative to a 12% contribution from the sea ice melt fraction. The labile ArC3-protein-like component (2.01 ± 1.92 QSU) was also observed to be elevated in the Pacific Winter Waters mass, where the under-ice algal bloom was observed ( 40-50 m). We interpreted these relationships to indicate that the accumulation and variable distribution of the protein-like component on the shelf could be influenced directly by sea ice melt, transport, and mixing processes and indirectly by the in situ algal bloom and microbial activity. ArC5, corresponding to what is commonly considered marine humic FDOM, indicated a bimodal distribution with high values in both the freshest and saltiest waters. The association of ArC5 with deep, dense salty water is consistent with this component as refractory humic-like FDOM, whereas our evidence of a terrestrial origin challenges this classic paradigm for this component.

  16. Preclinical evaluation of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled cetuximab as a potential tool for fluorescence-guided surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccomano, Mara; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Napp, Joanna

    2016-11-15

    The high rate of recurrence in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) could be reduced by supporting the surgeons in discriminating healthy from diseased tissues with intraoperative fluorescence-guidance. Here, we studied the suitability of Cetuximab, a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), near-infrared (NIR) fluorescently labeled as a new tool for fluorescence-guided surgery. Distribution and binding of systemically injected Cetuximab Alexa Fluor 647 conjugate (Cetux-Alexa-647) and the co-injected control human IgG Alexa Fluor 750 conjugate (hIgG-Alexa-750) was studied over 48 h by NIR fluorescence imaging in mice bearing human orthotopic AsPC-1 and MIA PaCa-2 PDAC tumors. Cetux-Alexa-647, but not the control hIgG-Alexa-750 fluorescence, was specifically detected in vivo in both primary pancreatic tumors with maximum fluorescence intensities at 24 h, and in metastases of AsPC-1 tumors as small as 1 mm. Lifetime analysis and NIR fluorescence microscopy of tumor sections confirmed the binding specificity of Cetux-Alexa-647 to PDAC cells. Comparable results were obtained with Cetuximab conjugated to Alexa Fluor 750 dye (Cetux-Alexa-750). Fluorescence-guided dissection, performed 24 h after injection of Cetuximab conjugated to IRDye 800CW (Cetux-800CW), enabled a real-time delineation of AsPC-1 tumor margins, and small metastases. Odyssey scans revealed that only the vital part of the tumor, but not the necrotic part was stained with Cetux-800CW. NIR fluorescently labeled Cetuximab may be a promising tool that can be applied for fluorescence-guided surgery to visualize tumor margins and metastatic sites in order to allow a precise surgical resection.

  17. Lifetime-weighted photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbrich, A.; Shao, P.; Shi, W.; Zemp, Roger J.

    2016-12-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging has been utilized to quantify the lifetime profile of exogenous agents using a series of pump-probe pulses with a varying time delay; however, current techniques typically lead to long acquisition times which are sensitive to motion and cause absorption or photobleaching. We introduce a technique called lifetime-weighted imaging, which uses only three laser pulses to preferentially weight signals from chromophores with long lifetimes (including exogenous contrast agents with triplet excited states such as methylene blue and porphyrins) while nulling chromophores with short picosecond- to nanosecond-scale lifetimes (including hemoglobin). This technique detects the PA signal from a probe pulse either with or without a pump pulse. By subtracting the probe-only signal from the pump-present probe signal, we effectively eliminate signals from chromophores with short lifetimes while preserving PA signals from chromophores with long-lifetimes. We demonstrate the oxygen-dependent lifetime of both methylene blue and porphyrin-lipids and demonstrate both ground-state recovery and excited-state lifetime-weighted imaging. Lifetime-weighted PA imaging may have applications in many molecular imaging application including: photodynamic therapy dosimetry guidance and oxygen sensing.

  18. Energy Savings Lifetimes and Persistence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, Ian M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schiller, Steven R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Todd, Annika [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Billingsley, Megan A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Goldman, Charles A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwartz, Lisa C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This technical brief explains the concepts of energy savings lifetimes and savings persistence and discusses how program administrators use these factors to calculate savings for efficiency measures, programs and portfolios. Savings lifetime is the length of time that one or more energy efficiency measures or activities save energy, and savings persistence is the change in savings throughout the functional life of a given efficiency measure or activity. Savings lifetimes are essential for assessing the lifecycle benefits and cost effectiveness of efficiency activities and for forecasting loads in resource planning. The brief also provides estimates of savings lifetimes derived from a national collection of costs and savings for electric efficiency programs and portfolios.

  19. Copulas Between Wealth and Lifetime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Dongyan

    2009-01-01

    The life insurance industry is very interested in how a person's lifetime is related to his wealth with financial advisors interested in how even a person's portfolio choice affects his lifetime. This paper presents a statistical analysis combined with intuitive relationships between lifetime and wealth. Key properties of this relationship are given and then various copulas are analyzed to see whether they have these properties. Other advantages and disadvantages of these copulas for describing the dependence are stated. The results show that some copulas are not appropriate for relating lifetime and wealth, including the Gaussian family.

  20. A coupled radiative transfer and diffusion approximation model for the solution of the forward problem and the a-priori fluorophore distribution estimation in fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorpas, D.; Yova, D.; Politopoulos, K.

    2009-02-01

    Although fluorescence imaging has been applied in tumour diagnosis from the early 90s, just the last few years it has met an increasing scientific interest due to the advances in the biophotonics field and the combined technological progress of the acquisition and computational systems. In addition there are expectations that fluorescence imaging will be further developed and applied in deep tumour diagnosis in the years to come. However, this evolving field of imaging sciences has still to encounter important challenges. Among them is the expression of an accurate forward model for the solution of the reconstruction problem. The scope of this work is to introduce a three dimensional coupled radiative transfer and diffusion approximation model, applicable on the fluorescence imaging. Furthermore, the solver incorporates the super-ellipsoid models and sophisticated image processing algorithms to additionally provide a-priori estimation about the fluorophores distribution, information that is very important for the solution of the inverse problem. Simulation experiments have proven that the proposed methodology preserves the accuracy levels of the radiative transfer equation and the time efficacy of the diffusion approximation, while in the same time shows extended success on the registration between acquired and simulated images.

  1. Distribution and Spectroscopy of Green Fluorescent Protein and Acyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acytransferase in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, R. C.; Mahtani, H.; Lu, X.; Chang, T. Y.; Malak, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is thought to significantly participate in the pathway of cholesterol esterification that underlies the pathology of artherosclerosis. This enzyme is a membrane protein known to be preferentially bound within the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, from which location it esterifies cholesterol derived from low density lipoprotein. Cultures of insect cells were separately infected with baculovirus containing the gene for green fluroescent protein (GFP) and with baculovirus containing tandem genes for GFP and ACAT. These infected cultures expressed GFP and the fusion protein GCAT, respectively, with maximum expression occurring on the fourth day after infection. Extraction of GFP- and of GCAT-expressing cells with urea and detergent resulted in recovery of fluorescent protein in aqueous solution. Fluorescence spectra at neutral pH were identical for both GFP and GCAT extracts in aqueous solution, indicating unperturbed tertiary structure for the GFP moiety within GCAT. In a cholesterol esterification assay, GCAT demonstrated ACAT activity, but with less efficiency compared to native ACAT. It was hypothesized that the membrane protein ACAT would lead to differences in localization of GCAT compared to GFP within the respective expressing insect cells. The GFP marker directly and also within the fusion protein GCAT was accordingly used as the intracellular probe that was fluorescently analyzed by the new biophotonics technique of hyperspectral imaging. In that technique, fluorescence imaging was obtained from two dimensional arrays of cells, and regions of interest from within those images were then retrospectively analyzed for the emission spectra that comprises the image. Results of hyperspectral imaging of insect cells on day 4 postinfection showed that GCAT was preferentially localized to the cytoplasm of these cells compared to GFP. Furthermore, the emission spectra obtained for the localized GCAT displayed a peak

  2. Distribution and Spectroscopy of Green Fluorescent Protein and Acyl-CoA: Cholesterol Acytransferase in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, R. C.; Mahtani, H.; Lu, X.; Chang, T. Y.; Malak, H.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) is thought to significantly participate in the pathway of cholesterol esterification that underlies the pathology of artherosclerosis. This enzyme is a membrane protein known to be preferentially bound within the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian cells, from which location it esterifies cholesterol derived from low density lipoprotein. Cultures of insect cells were separately infected with baculovirus containing the gene for green fluroescent protein (GFP) and with baculovirus containing tandem genes for GFP and ACAT. These infected cultures expressed GFP and the fusion protein GCAT, respectively, with maximum expression occurring on the fourth day after infection. Extraction of GFP- and of GCAT-expressing cells with urea and detergent resulted in recovery of fluorescent protein in aqueous solution. Fluorescence spectra at neutral pH were identical for both GFP and GCAT extracts in aqueous solution, indicating unperturbed tertiary structure for the GFP moiety within GCAT. In a cholesterol esterification assay, GCAT demonstrated ACAT activity, but with less efficiency compared to native ACAT. It was hypothesized that the membrane protein ACAT would lead to differences in localization of GCAT compared to GFP within the respective expressing insect cells. The GFP marker directly and also within the fusion protein GCAT was accordingly used as the intracellular probe that was fluorescently analyzed by the new biophotonics technique of hyperspectral imaging. In that technique, fluorescence imaging was obtained from two dimensional arrays of cells, and regions of interest from within those images were then retrospectively analyzed for the emission spectra that comprises the image. Results of hyperspectral imaging of insect cells on day 4 postinfection showed that GCAT was preferentially localized to the cytoplasm of these cells compared to GFP. Furthermore, the emission spectra obtained for the localized GCAT displayed a peak

  3. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  4. Strain-induced effects in colloidal quantum dots: lifetime measurements and blinking statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veilleux, V; Lachance-Quirion, D; Landry, D B; Allen, C Ni [Centre d' optique, photonique et laser (COPL), 2375 rue de la Terrasse, Universite Laval, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada); Dore, K [Centre de Recherche Universite Laval Robert-Giffard (CRULRG), 2601, de la Canardiere, QC, G1J 2G3 (Canada); Charette, P G, E-mail: claudine.allen@phy.ulaval.ca [Centre d' optique, photonique et laser (COPL), Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, J1K 2R1 (Canada)

    2010-04-02

    A series of samples of CdSe/ Cd{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S core/shell quantum dots have been synthesized in order to measure the influence of lattice-mismatch-induced strain on the photoluminescence (PL) and blinking behaviour. The PL spectra show a significant variation of the fluorescence wavelength even though the colloidal quantum dots (cQDs) are similar in size. The PL excitation spectra show a gradual splitting of the first exciton level as the proportion of Zn is increased in the shell and as the shell grows. On the other hand, blinking studies clearly demonstrate a significant dependence on the amount of Zn present in the shell. Distributions of on and off times go from the usual power-law distributions to power-law distributions with exponential cut-offs. These cut-offs become increasingly pronounced as the proportion of Zn increases. We interpret these results in the framework of diffusion-controlled electron transfer. Exciton relaxation lifetime measurements strongly suggest that lattice mismatch is responsible for a greater number of defects in core/shell cQDs. Therefore, strain and lattice mismatch are shown to be parameters of significant importance for the electronic structure of nanocrystals, influencing the photoluminescence, exciton relaxation lifetime and blinking behaviour.

  5. Lifetime of Mechanical Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leland, K.

    1999-07-01

    The gas plant at Kaarstoe was built as part of the Statpipe gas transport system and went on stream in 1985. In 1993 another line was routed from the Sleipner field to carry condensate, and the plant was extended accordingly. Today heavy additional supply- and export lines are under construction, and the plant is extended more than ever. The main role of the factory is to separate the raw gas into commercial products and to pump or ship it to the markets. The site covers a large number of well-known mechanical equipment. This presentation deals with piping, mechanical and structural disciplines. The lifetime of mechanical equipment is often difficult to predict as it depends on many factors, and the subject is complex. Mechanical equipment has been kept in-house, which provides detailed knowledge of the stages from a new to a 14 years old plant. The production regularity has always been very high, as required. The standard of the equipment is well kept, support systems are efficient, and human improvisation is extremely valuable.

  6. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  7. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  8. Lifetime Improvement by Battery Scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Schmitt, Jens B.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of their batteries. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to

  9. Lifetime improvement by battery scheduling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerden, M.R.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.

    The use of mobile devices is often limited by the lifetime of its battery. For devices that have multiple batteries or that have the option to connect an extra battery, battery scheduling, thereby exploiting the recovery properties of the batteries, can help to extend the system lifetime. Due to the

  10. Radiative Lifetime Measurements of Even-Parity Levels of Singly Ionized Erbium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huai-Liang(徐淮良); JIANG Hong-Mei(蒋红梅); LIU Qian(刘倩); JIANG Zhan-Kui(蒋占魁); S.Svanberg

    2004-01-01

    Radiative lifetime measurements were performed by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technique for eight even-parity levels of the astrophysically importantion Er+ over the energy range from 33753 to 55317 cm-1.Free erbium ions were generated by a laser-induced plasma. A narrow bandwidth UV laser pulse (1 ns) was employed to populate selectively the short-lived upper levels, and the lifetime value were evaluated from the time-resolved fluorescence signals. The lifetimes reported fall in the range of 3-35 ns with the experimental accuracy 5-8%.

  11. Quantitatively Mapping Cellular Viscosity with Detailed Organelle Information via a Designed PET Fluorescent Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianyu; Liu, Xiaogang; Spring, David R.; Qian, Xuhong; Cui, Jingnan; Xu, Zhaochao

    2014-06-01

    Viscosity is a fundamental physical parameter that influences diffusion in biological processes. The distribution of intracellular viscosity is highly heterogeneous, and it is challenging to obtain a full map of cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information. In this work, we report 1 as the first fluorescent viscosity probe which is able to quantitatively map cellular viscosity with detailed organelle information based on the PET mechanism. This probe exhibited a significant ratiometric fluorescence intensity enhancement as solvent viscosity increases. The emission intensity increase was attributed to combined effects of the inhibition of PET due to restricted conformational access (favorable for FRET, but not for PET), and the decreased PET efficiency caused by viscosity-dependent twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT). A full map of subcellular viscosity was successfully constructed via fluorescent ratiometric detection and fluorescence lifetime imaging; it was found that lysosomal regions in a cell possess the highest viscosity, followed by mitochondrial regions.

  12. Lifetimes, branching fractions, and oscillator strengths of doubly ionized tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz-Johanning, M.; Schnabel, R.; Kock, M. [Inst. fuer Atom- and Molekuelphysik, Abt. Plasmaphysik, Univ. Hannover (Germany); Kling, R. [Inst. fuer Atom- and Molekuelphysik, Abt. Plasmaphysik, Univ. Hannover (Germany); National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Li, Z.; Lundberg, H. [Dept. of Physics, Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden); Johansson, S. [Atomic Spectroscopy, Dept. of Physics, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    A first small set of W III oscillator strengths has been obtained from combined lifetime and branching fraction measurements. The branching fractions in the wavelength region of 154-334 nm were measured with a Penning discharge and a Fourier transform spectrometer. Three levels have been calibrated and absolute scales with lifetimes measured with the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique. The f-values derived have uncertainties of about 8% at best. A comparison with Cowan-code calculations is given since no other data are available in the literature. (orig.)

  13. Radiative lifetimes of odd-parity levels in Nb I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Sheo; Bhattacharyya, Soumen; Yarlagadda, Suresh; Nakhate, S. G.

    2015-11-01

    Radiative lifetimes are reported for 37 odd-parity energy levels of neutral niobium (Nb I), out of which 33 have been measured for the first time. The levels belong to electronic configurations 4d35s5p and 4d45p between 18,790 and 35,730 cm-1. The time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy technique was employed. The Nb atoms were generated in a free-jet by laser vaporization of niobium metal. Lifetime values reported in this work fall in the range 12-340 ns and are accurate to ±10%.

  14. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antônio N.; Junior, Antônio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2012-05-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45° incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 μm diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  15. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Carlos Antonio N. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial (INMETRO), Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia; Palumbo Junior, Antonio; Souza, Pedro A.V.R.; Nasciutti, Luiz E., E-mail: nasciutt@ufrj.b [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Interacoes Celulares

    2011-07-01

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed. (author)

  16. Spatial distribution of elements in the spheroids by prostate tumor cells using synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leitao, Roberta G.; Santos, Carlos Antonio N.; Junior, Antonio Palumbo; Souza, Pedro A. V. R.; Canellas, Catarine G. L.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Nasciutti, Luiz E.; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Biotecnologia - Bioengenharia - DIPRO, Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Normalizacao e Qualidade Industrial, Xerem. 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Interacoes Celulares, ICB-CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941- 590, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear, PEN/COPPE, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, 21941-972, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    The formation of three-dimensional cell microspheres such as spheroids has attracted attention as a useful culture technique. In this study, we investigated the trace elemental distribution (mapping) in spheroids derived from tissue prostate cancer (PCa). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using an optical capillary with 20 {mu}m diameter collimation in the XRF beam line at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil). The results showed that most elements analyzed presented non-uniform distribution. P, S and Cl showed similar elemental distribution in all the samples analyzed. K, Ca, Fe, and Cu showed different elemental distribution for the spheroids analyzed. Zinc presented more intense distributions in the spheroid central region for all spheroids analyzed.

  17. The Lifetime of Axion Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Eby, Joshua; Wijewardhana, L C R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by $V({\\cal A})=m^2 f^2 [1-\\cos({\\cal A}/f)]$, where $m$ and $f$ are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, $\\cal A$, is self adjoint. As a result the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty $\\Delta x \\sim R \\sim 1/(m_a \\Delta)$, where $R$ is the radius of the star and $\\Delta = \\sqrt{1-E_0^2/m_a^2}$. Here $m_a$ and $E_0$ are the mass and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of $\\Delta p \\sim m_a\\Delta$. At strong binding, $\\Delta={\\cal O}(1)$, bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transiti...

  18. DBD dyes as fluorescent probes for sensing lipophilic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Wessig, Pablo; Möllnitz, Kristian; Nikolaus, Jörg; Schwarzer, Roland; Müller, Peter; Herrmann, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Small fluorescent organic molecules based on [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD) could be used as probes for lipophillic microenvironments in aqueous solutions by indicating the critical micelles concentration of detergents and staining cell organelles. Their fluorescence lifetime decreases drastically by the amount of water in their direct environment. Therefore they are potential probes for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM).

  19. The lifetime of axion stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, Joshua; Suranyi, Peter; Wijewardhana, L. C. R.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the decay of condensates of scalars in a field theory defined by V (𝒜) = m2f2[1 -cos(𝒜/f)], where m and f are the mass and decay constant of the scalar field. An example of such a theory is that of the axion, in which case the condensates are called axion stars. The axion field, 𝒜, is self-adjoint. As a result, the axion number is not an absolutely conserved quantity. Therefore, axion stars are not stable and have finite lifetimes. Bound axions, localized on the volume of the star, have a coordinate uncertainty δx ˜ R ˜ 1/(maΔ), where R is the radius of the star and Δ = 1 - E0 2/ma 2. Here ma and E0 are the mass, and the ground state energy of the bound axion. Then the momentum distribution of axions has a width of δp ˜ maΔ. At strong binding, Δ = 𝒪(1), bound axions can easily transfer a sufficient amount of momentum to create and emit a free axion, leading to fast decay of the star with a transition rate Γ ˜ ma. However, when Δ ≪ 1, the momentum distribution is more restricted, and as shown in this paper, the transition rate for creating a free axion decreases as exp(-pδx) ˜exp(-Δ-1). Then sufficiently large, weakly bound axion stars, produced after the Big Bang, survive until the present time. We plot the region of their stability, limited by decay through axion loss and by gravitational instability, as a function of the mass of the axion and the mass of the star.

  20. Lifetime costs of cerebral palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Marie; Michelsen, Susan Ishøy; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht

    2009-01-01

    This study quantified the lifetime costs of cerebral palsy (CP) in a register-based setting. It was the first study outside the US to assess the lifetime costs of CP. The lifetime costs attributable to CP were divided into three categories: health care costs, productivity costs, and social costs....... The population analyzed was retrieved from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Register, which covers the eastern part of the country and has registered about half of the Danish population of individuals with CP since 1950. For this study we analyzed 2367 individuals with CP, who were born in 1930 to 2000 and were alive...

  1. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2014-02-01

    The multiphoton FLIM tomograph MPTflex with its flexible scan head, articulated arm, and the tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study cell monolayers and 3D cell clusters. FLIM was performed with 250 ps temporal resolution and submicron special resolution using time-correlated single photon counting. The autofluorescence based on NAD(P)H and flavins/flavoproteins has been measured in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) originated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts and non-proliferative mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

  2. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.022 ps.

  3. Fluorescence amplification by electrochemically deposited silver nanowires with fractal architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldys, Ewa M; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, Krystyna; Xie, Fang; Shtoyko, Tanya; Matveeva, Eva; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2007-10-10

    Electrochemically deposited silver structures with nanowires 50-100 nm in diameter show high fluorescence amplification and strongly reduced fluorescence lifetimes. Both quantities depend on the structure thickness. With increasing thickness the fluorescence amplification proportionally increases and the fluorescence lifetime decreases. This thickness dependence is caused by fluorophore interaction with a system of plasmon excitations in coupled nanowires extending over micrometer size regions. Thus the amplification is attributed to a combination of extended structure area and strong plasmonic coupling between nanowires which also help to radiatively scatter the fluorescence emission.

  4. Multiphoton autofluorescence lifetime imaging of induced pluripotent stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchugonova, Aisada

    2017-06-01

    The multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging tomograph MPTflex with its flexible 360-deg scan head, articulated arm, and tunable femtosecond laser source was employed to study induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) cultures. Autofluorescence (AF) lifetime imaging was performed with 250-ps temporal resolution and submicron spatial resolution using time-correlated single-photon counting. The two-photon excited AF was based on the metabolic coenzymes NAD(P)H and flavin adenine dinucleotide/flavoproteins. iPS cells generated from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cocultured with growth-arrested MEFs as feeder cells have been studied. Significant differences on AF lifetime signatures were identified between iPS and feeder cells as well as between their differentiating counterparts.

  5. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EII(mtl) in detergent micelles. Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, D S; Broos, J; Visser, A J; van Hoek, A; Robillard, G T

    1997-04-22

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C domain of the enzyme [Swaving Dijkstra et al. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6628-6634]. Since no fluorescent impurities are present in these mutants, the changes in fluorescence and anisotropy could be related with changes in the tryptophan microenvironment. Tryptophans at positions 30 and 42 showed changes in fluorescence intensity decay upon binding mannitol, which were reflected in the changes in lifetime distribution patterns. The disappearance of the shortest-lived decay component in these mutants, as well as in the mutant with a single tryptophan at position 109, indicates a change in the local environment such that quenching via neighboring side chains or solvent is reduced. Phosphorylation at histidine 554 and cysteine 384, located in the cytoplasmatic A and B domains of EII(mtl), respectively, induced an increase in the average fluorescence lifetimes of all of the tryptophans. The effect was most pronounced for tryptophans 30 and 109 which show large increases in the average fluorescence lifetime mainly due to loss of short-lived decay components. A correlation time distribution of the individual tryptophans deduced from an analysis of the anisotropy decay showed that they differed in their rotational mobility with tryptophan 30 showing the least local flexibility. Phosphorylation resulted in immobilization of W109 which, together with changes in the average fluorescence lifetime, is evidence for a conformational coupling between the phosphorylated B domain and the C domain. The influence of mannitol binding on the rotational behavior of the tryptophans is limited; it induces more internal flexibility at all tryptophan positions. A rotational correlation time of 30 ns

  6. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP. In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m−3 (4.0–13.2 × 104 m−3 and 0.72 μg m−3 (0.42–1.19 μg m−3, respectively, accounting for 24% (11–41% of total particle number and 47% (25–65% of total particle mass. During the five-week campaign in February–March 2008 the concentration of coarse-mode Saharan dust particles was highly variable. In contrast, FBAP concentrations remained fairly constant over the course of weeks and had a consistent daily pattern, peaking several hours before sunrise, suggesting observed FBAP was dominated by nocturnal spore emission. This conclusion was supported by the consistent FBAP number size distribution peaking at 2.3 μm, also attributed to fungal spores and mixed biological particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, light microscopy and biochemical staining. A second primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP mode between 0.5 and 1.0 μm was also observed by SEM, but exhibited little fluorescence and no true fungal staining. This mode may have consisted of single bacterial cells, brochosomes, various fragments of biological material, and small Chromalveolata (Chromista spores. Particles liquid-coated with mixed organic-inorganic material constituted a large fraction of observations, and these coatings contained salts likely from primary biological origin. We provide key support for the suggestion that real-time laser-induce fluorescence (LIF techniques using 355 nm excitation provide size-resolved concentrations of FBAP as a lower limit for the atmospheric abundance of biological particles in a pristine

  7. Size distributions and temporal variations of biological aerosol particles in the Amazon rainforest characterized by microscopy and real-time UV-APS fluorescence techniques during AMAZE-08

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Sinha, B.; Garland, R. M.; Snee-Pollmann, A.; Gunthe, S. S.; Artaxo, P.; Martin, S. T.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of the AMAZE-08 campaign during the wet season in the rainforest of central Amazonia, an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS) was operated for continuous measurements of fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAP). In the coarse particle size range (> 1 μm) the campaign median and quartiles of FBAP number and mass concentration were 7.3 × 104 m-3 (4.0-13.2 × 104 m-3) and 0.72 μg m-3 (0.42-1.19 μg m-3), respectively, accounting for 24% (11-41%) of total particle number and 47% (25-65%) of total particle mass. During the five-week campaign in February-March 2008 the concentration of coarse-mode Saharan dust particles was highly variable. In contrast, FBAP concentrations remained fairly constant over the course of weeks and had a consistent daily pattern, peaking several hours before sunrise, suggesting observed FBAP was dominated by nocturnal spore emission. This conclusion was supported by the consistent FBAP number size distribution peaking at 2.3 μm, also attributed to fungal spores and mixed biological particles by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy and biochemical staining. A second primary biological aerosol particle (PBAP) mode between 0.5 and 1.0 μm was also observed by SEM, but exhibited little fluorescence and no true fungal staining. This mode may have consisted of single bacterial cells, brochosomes, various fragments of biological material, and small Chromalveolata (Chromista) spores. Particles liquid-coated with mixed organic-inorganic material constituted a large fraction of observations, and these coatings contained salts likely from primary biological origin. We provide key support for the suggestion that real-time laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) techniques using 355 nm excitation provide size-resolved concentrations of FBAP as a lower limit for the atmospheric abundance of biological particles in a pristine environment. We also show some limitations of using the instrument for ambient monitoring of

  8. Alignment of Solutes in Stretched Polyethylene. Determination of the Five Second and Fourth Moments of the Orientation Distribution of 2-Fluoropyrene from Polarized Fluorescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Frans W.; Gisin, Markus; Thulstrup, Erik W.;

    1983-01-01

    Measurements of linear dichroism and of polarized fluorescence of 2-fluoropyrene (2-F-1) in stretched linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE) at 77K have been used to evaluate the two independent second moments, 〈cos2 z〉 and 〈cos2 y〉, as well as the three independent fourth moments, 〈cos4 z〉, 〈cos4...... y〉, and 〈cos4 x〉, of the orientation distribution function. The results are used to discuss two previously proposed detailed models for the mechanism of the orientation of aromatics in stretched polyethylene. For pyrene (1) and 2-methylpyrene (2-Me-1), four of the five moments were obtained...... axis in the two compounds, respectively. This behavior is ascribed to a symmetry-lowering perturbation by the environment, related to the Ham effect....

  9. Determining the residence time distribution of various screw elements in a co-rotating twin-screw extruder by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepschi, Alexander; Gerstorfer, Gregor; Miethlinger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The Residence Time Distribution (RTD) is key to optimizing the mixing ability of an extruder. For both sensitive and reactive materials, it is important to know how long particles remain in the barrel and how long the polymer remains, for instance, in a kneading element. To assess the influence of different screw configurations on the RTD, a low-concentration tracer particle was injected into the feeding section and measured inline by fluorescence spectroscopy1 both inside the barrel and at the extruder exit. The measurements were conducted using polypropylene with different amounts of organic peroxide. Measuring the residence time at various positions along the screw allows the RTD to be determined for just one screw element. Furthermore, we show the influence of different screw configurations on the polydispersity of polypropylene.

  10. Spatial distribution of arsenic and heavy metals in willow roots from a contaminated floodplain soil measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, Dana, E-mail: dana.zimmer@uni-rostock.de [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Kruse, Jens; Baum, Christel [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Borca, Camelia [Paul Scherrer Institute, Swiss Light Source, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Laue, Michael [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Rostock, Medical Faculty, Strempelstr. 14, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Hause, Gerd [Microscopy Unit, Biocenter of the University of Halle, Weinbergweg 22, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Meissner, Ralph [UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Department of Soil Physics, Lysimeter Station, Dorfstrasse 55, D-39615 Falkenberg (Germany); Leinweber, Peter [Soil Science, University of Rostock, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Under changing redox conditions some plants create plaques at their root surface, which may affect the mobility and uptake of As and heavy metals but it is unknown to what extent this also holds true for willows in contaminated floodplain soils. Therefore, willow roots were sampled from a phytoremediation trial in the contaminated floodplain of the river Elbe (Germany), cryofixed, freeze-dried, and cross sections were mapped for the distribution of As, Ca, Cu, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, S and Zn by synchrotron based X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. The elements Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were concentrated in the aerenchymatic tissue, and not associated with Fe and Mn. Mixed Fe-Mn plaques covered the surface of the willow roots and As was accumulated in these plaques. The observed association pattern between As and Fe was explained by the different sorption/desorption properties of As(III) and As(V). The Cu and Zn intensities were not associated with the intensity of Fe in the plaque, which seems to be a willow-specific difference compared to other wetland plants. These results suggested that willows are especially suited to stabilize low-phytoextractable elements like Cu and As in their roots and rhizosphere. Thus, short rotation coppicing of willows may be a practical approach to mitigate the adverse effects of floodplain soil contamination. - Research highlights: {yields} Elemental distributions were mapped on willow roots for the first time by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. {yields} Ca, Cu, Ni, S and Zn were enriched in the aerenchyma but As, Fe and Mn formed root plaques. {yields} The Cu and Zn enrichments in aerenchyma but absence in plaques appeared to be willow-specific. {yields} In the plaques were three groups of pixels which strongly differed in the As to Fe and As to Mn ratios. {yields} This indicated different species of these redox-sensitive elements.

  11. Application of fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques to the study of lectin-binding site distribution on Paramecium primaurelia (Protista, Ciliophora) cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, D; Delmonte Corrado, M U; Politi, H; Bottiroli, G

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a photophysical phenomenon occurring between the molecules of two fluorochromes with suitable spectral characteristics (donor-acceptor dye pair), and consisting in an excitation energy migration through a non-radiative process. Since the efficiency of the process is strictly dependent on the distance and reciprocal orientation of the donor and acceptor molecules, FRET-based techniques can be successfully applied to the study of biomolecules and cell component organisation and distribution. These techniques have been employed in studying Paramecium primaurelia surface membrane for the reciprocal distribution of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NeuAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) glycosidic residues, which were found to be involved in mating cell pairing. NeuAc and GlcNAc were detected by their specific binding lectins, Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (LPA) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), respectively. Microspectrofluorometric analysis afforded the choice of fluorescein isothiocyanate and Texas red conjugated with LPA and WGA, respectively, as a suitable donor-acceptor couple efficiently activating FRET processes. Studies performed both in solution and in cells allowed to define the experimental conditions favourable for a FRET analysis. The comparative study carried out both on the conjugating-region and the non conjugating region of the surface membrane, indicates that FRET distribution appears quite homogeneous in mating-competent mating type (mt) I, whereas, in mating-competent mt II cells, FRET distribution seems to be preferentially localised on the conjugating-region functionally involved in mating cell pairing. This difference in the distribution of lectin-binding sites is suggested to be related to mating-competence acquisition.

  12. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingerle, D., E-mail: dingerle@ati.ac.at [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria); Meirer, F. [Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Universiteitsweg 99, 3584 CG Utrecht (Netherlands); Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D. [MiNALab, CMM-irst, Fondazione Bruno Kessler, Via Sommarive 18, I-38050 Povo (Italy); Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C. [Atominstitut, Vienna University of Technology, Stadionallee 2, A-1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence induced by an X-ray beam incident under grazing angles. The resulting angle dependent intensity curves are correlated to the depth distribution and mass density of the elements in the sample. GIXRF provides information on contaminations, total implanted dose and to some extent on the depth of the dopant distribution, but is ambiguous with regard to the exact distribution function. Both techniques use similar measurement procedures and data evaluation strategies, i.e. optimization of a sample model by fitting measured and calculated angle curves. Moreover, the applied sample models can be derived from the same physical properties, like atomic scattering/form factors and elemental concentrations; a simultaneous analysis is therefore a straightforward approach. This combined analysis in turn reduces the uncertainties of the individual techniques, allowing a determination of dose and depth profile of the implanted

  13. MMP-2/9-Specific Activatable Lifetime Imaging Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus T.M. Rood

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical (molecular imaging can benefit from a combination of the high signal-to-background ratio of activatable fluorescence imaging with the high specificity of luminescence lifetime imaging. To allow for this combination, both imaging techniques were integrated in a single imaging agent, a so-called activatable lifetime imaging agent. Important in the design of this imaging agent is the use of two luminophores that are tethered by a specific peptide with a hairpin-motive that ensured close proximity of the two while also having a specific amino acid sequence available for enzymatic cleavage by tumor-related MMP-2/9. Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 were used because in close proximity the emission intensities of both luminophores were quenched and the influence of Cy5 shortens the Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime from 98 ns to 30 ns. Upon cleavage in vitro, both effects are undone, yielding an increase in Ir(ppy3 and Cy5 luminescence and a restoration of Ir(ppy3 luminescence lifetime to 94 ns. As a reference for the luminescence activation, a similar imaging agent with the more common Cy3-Cy5 fluorophore pair was used. Our findings underline that the combination of enzymatic signal activation with lifetime imaging is possible and that it provides a promising method in the design of future disease specific imaging agents.

  14. RADIATIVE LIFETIMES OF V I AND V II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Hartog, E. A.; Lawler, J. E.; Wood, M. P., E-mail: eadenhar@wisc.edu, E-mail: jelawler@wisc.edu, E-mail: mpwood@wisc.edu [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    New radiative lifetimes are reported for 168 levels of V I ranging in energy from 18086 cm{sup –1} to 47702 cm{sup –1}, and for 31 levels of V II ranging in energy from 34593 cm{sup –1} to 47420 cm{sup –1}. These lifetimes are measured using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence on a slow atomic/ionic beam as part of an ongoing study of the radiative properties of the iron group elements. All but two of the V II lifetimes have been measured before using modern laser-based methods, but a large fraction of the V I lifetimes are reported here for the first time. Comparison to earlier measurements is discussed. These new lifetimes are, for the most part, accurate to ±5%. They will be combined with branching fraction measurements to produce a large set of transition probabilities for V I and V II which are needed by the astrophysics community for stellar abundance determinations.

  15. Lifetime prediction based on Gamma processes from accelerated degradation data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Haowei; Xu Tingxue; Mi Qiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Accelerated degradation test is a useful approach to predict the product lifetime at the normal use stress level, especially for highly reliable products. Two kinds of the lifetime prediction based on Gamma processes were studied. One was to predict the lifetime of the population from accelerated degradation data, and the other was to predict the lifetime of an individual by taking the accelerated degradation data as prior information. For an extensive application, the Gamma process with a time transformation and random effects was considered. A novel contribution is that a deducing method for determining the relationships between the shape and scale parameters of Gamma processes and accelerated stresses was presented. When predicting the lifetime of an indi-vidual, Bayesian inference methods were adopted to improve the prediction accuracy, in which the conjugate prior distribution and the non-conjugate prior distribution of random parameters were studied. The conjugate prior distribution only considers the random effect of the scale parameter while the non-conjugate prior distribution considers the random effects of both the scale and shape parameter. The application and usefulness of the proposed method was demonstrated by the accelerated degradation data of carbon-film resistors.

  16. Distribution of aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate in an oral squamous cell carcinoma model. In vivo fluorescence imaging compared with ex vivo analytical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, MJH; Mank, AJG; Speelman, OC; Posthumus, R; Nooren, CAAM; Nauta, JM; Roodenburg, JLN

    1997-01-01

    Photosensitizer-induced fluorescence is studied as a technique for the detection of cancer, Therefore we investigated the ability of a photosensitizer, aluminum phthalocyanine disulfonate (AlPcS2), to localize in tumor tissue. In vivo endoscopic fluorescence imaging, fluorescence microscopy, convent

  17. Growth of Galton-Watson trees: immigration and lifetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xiao'ou

    2010-01-01

    We study certain consistent families $(F_\\lambda)_{\\lambda\\ge 0}$ of Galton-Watson forests with lifetimes as edge lengths and/or immigrants as progenitors of the trees in $F_\\lambda$. Specifically, consistency here refers to the property that for each $\\mu\\le\\lambda$, the forest $F_\\mu$ has the same distribution as the subforest of $F_\\lambda$ spanned by the black leaves in a Bernoulli leaf colouring, where each leaf of $F_\\lambda$ is coloured in black independently with probability $\\mu/\\lambda$. The case of exponentially distributed lifetimes and no immigration was studied by Duquesne and Winkel and related to the genealogy of Markovian continuous-state branching processes. We characterise here such families in the framework of arbitrary lifetime distributions and immigration according to a renewal process, related to Sagitov's (non-Markovian) generalisation of continuous-state branching renewal processes, and similar processes with immigration.

  18. Dynamic Cluster Head for Lifetime Efficiency in WSN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hesham Abusaimeh; Shuang-Hua Yang

    2009-01-01

    Saving energy and increasing network lifetime are significant challenges in wireless sensor networks (WSNs).In this paper,we propose a mechanism to distribute the responsibility of cluster-heads among the wireless sensor nodes in the same cluster based on the ZigBee standard,which is the latest WSN standard.ZigBee supports ad hoc on-demand vector (AODV) and cluster-tree routing protocols in its routing layer. However,none of these protocols considers the energy level of the nodes in the network establishing process or in the data routing process. The cluster-tree routing protocol supports single or multi-cluster networks. However,each single cluster in the multi-cluster network has only one node acting as a cluster head. These cluster-heads are fixed in each cluster during the network lifetime.Consequently,using these cluster-heads will cause them to die quickly,and the entire linked nodes to these cluster-heads will be disconnected from the main network.Therefore,the proposed technique to distribute the role of the cluster head among the wireless sensor nodes in the same cluster is vital to increase the lifetime of the network.Our proposed technique is better in terms of performance than the original structure of these protocols.It has increased the lifetime of the wireless sensor nodes,and increased the lifetime of the WSN by around 50% of the original network lifetime.

  19. Reliability-based assessment of polyethylene pipe creep lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khelif, Rabia [LaMI-UBP and IFMA, Campus de Clermont-Fd, Les Cezeaux, BP 265, 63175 Aubiere Cedex (France); LR3MI, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba 23000 (Algeria)], E-mail: rabia.khelif@ifma.fr; Chateauneuf, Alaa [LGC-University Blaise Pascal, Campus des Cezeaux, BP 206, 63174 Aubiere Cedex (France)], E-mail: alaa.chateauneuf@polytech.univ-bpclermont.fr; Chaoui, Kamel [LR3MI, Departement de Genie Mecanique, Universite Badji Mokhtar, BP 12, Annaba 23000 (Algeria)], E-mail: chaoui@univ-annaba.org

    2007-12-15

    Lifetime management of underground pipelines is mandatory for safe hydrocarbon transmission and distribution systems. The use of high-density polyethylene tubes subjected to internal pressure, external loading and environmental variations requires a reliability study in order to define the service limits and the optimal operating conditions. In service, the time-dependent phenomena, especially creep, take place during the pipe lifetime, leading to significant strength reduction. In this work, the reliability-based assessment of pipe lifetime models is carried out, in order to propose a probabilistic methodology for lifetime model selection and to determine the pipe safety levels as well as the most important parameters for pipeline reliability. This study is enhanced by parametric analysis on pipe configuration, gas pressure and operating temperature.

  20. Fluorescent biological aerosol particle concentrations and size distributions measured with an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Treutlein, B.; Pöschl, U.

    2010-04-01

    Primary Biological Aerosol Particles (PBAPs), including bacteria, spores and pollen, are essential for the spread of organisms and disease in the biosphere, and numerous studies have suggested that they may be important for atmospheric processes, including the formation of clouds and precipitation. The atmospheric abundance and size distribution of PBAPs, however, are largely unknown. At a semi-urban site in Mainz, Germany we used an Ultraviolet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (UV-APS) to measure Fluorescent Biological Aerosol Particles (FBAPs), which provide an estimate of viable bioaerosol particles and can be regarded as an approximate lower limit for the actual abundance of PBAPs. Fluorescence of non-biological aerosol components are likely to influence the measurement results obtained for fine particles (particles (1-20 μm). Averaged over the four-month measurement period (August-December 2006), the mean number concentration of coarse FBAPs was ~3×10-2 cm-3, corresponding to ~4% of total coarse particle number. The mean mass concentration of FBAPs was ~1μg m-3, corresponding to ~20% of total coarse particle mass. The FBAP number size distributions exhibited alternating patterns with peaks at various diameters. A pronounced peak at ~3 μm was essentially always observed and can be described by the following campaign-average lognormal fit parameters: geometric mean diameter 3.2 μm, geometric standard deviation 1.3, number concentration 1.6×10-2 cm-3. This peak is likely due to fungal spores or agglomerated bacteria, and it exhibited a pronounced diel cycle (24-h) with maximum intensity during early/mid-morning. FBAP peaks around ~1.5 μm, ~5 μm, and ~13 μm were also observed, but less pronounced and less frequent. These may be single bacterial cells, larger fungal spores, and pollen grains, respectively. The observed number concentrations and characteristic sizes of FBAPs are consistent with microscopic, biological and chemical analyses of PBAPs in aerosol

  1. High-resolution nanoprobe X-ray fluorescence characterization of heterogeneous calcium and heavy metal distributions in alkali-activated fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provis, John L; Rose, Volker; Bernal, Susan A; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2009-10-06

    The nanoscale distribution of elements within fly ash and the aluminosilicate gel products of its alkaline activation ("fly ash geopolymers") are analyzed by means of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence using a hard X-ray Nanoprobe instrument. The distribution of calcium within a hydroxide-activated (fly ash/KOH solution) geopolymer gel is seen to be highly heterogeneous, with these data providing for the first time direct evidence of the formation of discrete high-calcium particles within the binder structure of a geopolymer synthesized from a low-calcium (geopolymer gel binder structure surrounding the unreacted fly ash particles. This has important implications for the understanding of calcium chemistry within aluminosilicate geopolymer gel phases. Additionally, chromium and iron are seen to be very closely correlated within the structures of both fly ash and the geopolymer product and remain within the regions of the geopolymer which can be identified as unreacted fly ash particles. Given that the potential for chromium release has been one of the queries surrounding the widespread utilization of construction materials derived from fly ash, the observation that this element appears to be localized within the fly ash rather than dispersed throughout the gel binder indicates that it is unlikely to be released problematically into the environment.

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  3. Measurement of the charged kaon lifetime with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2008-01-01

    We have measured the charged kaon lifetime using a sample of 15 \\times 10^6 tagged kaon decays. Charged kaons were produced in pairs at the DA\\PhiNE \\phi-factory, e^+e^- \\to \\phi \\to K^+ K^-. The decay of a K^+ was tagged by the production of a K^- and viceversa. The lifetime was obtained, for both charges, from independent measurements of the decay time and decay lenght distributions. From fits to the four distributions we find \\tau = (12.347\\pm0.030) ns.

  4. Measurement of the Lifetime of the $\\tau$ Lepton

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alpat, B; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Antreasyan, D; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banicz, K; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Buytenhuijs, A O; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Caria, M; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chan, A; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Choi, M T; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; De Boeck, H; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Fernández, D; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hangarter, K; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janssen, H; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapinos, P; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee Jae Sik; Lee, K Y; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lieb, E H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Nagy, E; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nippe, A; Nowak, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riemers, B C; Riles, K; Rind, O; Ro, S; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Rodríguez-Calonge, F J; Roe, B P; Röhner, S; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Santocchia, A; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Schöneich, B; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Sens, Johannes C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonisch, F; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino

    1996-01-01

    The lifetime of the tau lepton is measured using data collected in 1994 by the L3 detector at LEP. The precise track position information of the Silicon Microvertex Detector is exploited. The tau lepton lifetime is determined from the signed impact parameter distribution for 30 322 tau decays into one charged particle and from the decay length distribution for 3891 tau decays into three charged particles. Combining the two methods we obtain $\\tau_{\\tau}$ = 290.1 $\\pm$ 4.0 fs.

  5. Polar plot representation of time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, John Paul; Wen Teng, Kai; Clegg, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Measuring changes in a molecule's fluorescence emission is a common technique to study complex biological systems such as cells and tissues. Although the steady-state fluorescence intensity is frequently used, measuring the average amount of time that a molecule spends in the excited state (the fluorescence lifetime) reveals more detailed information about its local environment. The lifetime is measured in the time domain by detecting directly the decay of fluorescence following excitation by short pulse of light. The lifetime can also be measured in the frequency domain by recording the phase and amplitude of oscillation in the emitted fluorescence of the sample in response to repetitively modulated excitation light. In either the time or frequency domain, the analysis of data to extract lifetimes can be computationally intensive. For example, a variety of iterative fitting algorithms already exist to determine lifetimes from samples that contain multiple fluorescing species. However, recently a method of analysis referred to as the polar plot (or phasor plot) is a graphical tool that projects the time-dependent features of the sample's fluorescence in either the time or frequency domain into the Cartesian plane to characterize the sample's lifetime. The coordinate transformations of the polar plot require only the raw data, and hence, there are no uncertainties from extensive corrections or time-consuming fitting in this analysis. In this chapter, the history and mathematical background of the polar plot will be presented along with examples that highlight how it can be used in both cuvette-based and imaging applications.

  6. Fluorescent nanoparticles for intracellular sensing: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedas-Rama, Maria J., E-mail: mjruedas@ugr.esmailto [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Walters, Jamie D. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, UK CB2 1QT (United Kingdom); Orte, Angel [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Campus Cartuja, 18071, Granada (Spain); Hall, Elizabeth A.H., E-mail: lisa.hall@biotech.cam.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, Tennis Court Road, Cambridge, CB2 1QT (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) in intracellular sensing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Critical review on performance of QDots, metal NPs, silica NPs, and polymer NPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highlighted potential of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). - Abstract: Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs), including semiconductor NPs (Quantum Dots), metal NPs, silica NPs, polymer NPs, etc., have been a major focus of research and development during the past decade. The fluorescent nanoparticles show unique chemical and optical properties, such as brighter fluorescence, higher photostability and higher biocompatibility, compared to classical fluorescent organic dyes. Moreover, the nanoparticles can also act as multivalent scaffolds for the realization of supramolecular assemblies, since their high surface to volume ratio allow distinct spatial domains to be functionalized, which can provide a versatile synthetic platform for the implementation of different sensing schemes. Their excellent properties make them one of the most useful tools that chemistry has supplied to biomedical research, enabling the intracellular monitoring of many different species for medical and biological purposes. In this review, we focus on the developments and analytical applications of fluorescent nanoparticles in chemical and biological sensing within the intracellular environment. The review also points out the great potential of fluorescent NPs for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Finally, we also give an overview of the current methods for delivering of fluorescent NPs into cells, where critically examine the benefits and liabilities of each strategy.

  7. Nanoparticle Sizing and Potential Quality Control of Sols Using a Unique Fluorescence Anisotropy Probe and 3D Contour Anisotropy Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolin, Jan; Geddes, Chris D

    2015-03-19

    Spectroscopic properties of the particle sizing fluorophore Dipole Blue are reported. The probe is cationic in nature, highly water-soluble, and strongly adheres to anionic silica surfaces by electrostatic interactions, as is demonstrated here by Ludox SM 30. The probe has a distinct absorbance band centered at 320 nm, and the fluorescence emission band is Stokes-shifted 100 nm with a peak centered at 426 nm. From time-correlated single-photon counting experiments, the fluorescence lifetime was found to be adequately described by a three-exponential decay model with an intensity-averaged lifetime of 15.6 ns. Perrin graph analysis of steady-state anisotropy shows the presence of silica particles with a radius of (5.44 ± 0.16) nm, which, considering the distribution of particle sizes, is in reasonable agreement with 3.5 nm found from dynamic light scattering experiments.

  8. Probabilistic Prediction of Lifetimes of Ceramic Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Jadaan, Osama M.; Palfi, Tamas; Powers, Lynn; Reh, Stefan; Baker, Eric H.

    2006-01-01

    ANSYS/CARES/PDS is a software system that combines the ANSYS Probabilistic Design System (PDS) software with a modified version of the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life (CARES/Life) Version 6.0 software. [A prior version of CARES/Life was reported in Program for Evaluation of Reliability of Ceramic Parts (LEW-16018), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 20, No. 3 (March 1996), page 28.] CARES/Life models effects of stochastic strength, slow crack growth, and stress distribution on the overall reliability of a ceramic component. The essence of the enhancement in CARES/Life 6.0 is the capability to predict the probability of failure using results from transient finite-element analysis. ANSYS PDS models the effects of uncertainty in material properties, dimensions, and loading on the stress distribution and deformation. ANSYS/CARES/PDS accounts for the effects of probabilistic strength, probabilistic loads, probabilistic material properties, and probabilistic tolerances on the lifetime and reliability of the component. Even failure probability becomes a stochastic quantity that can be tracked as a response variable. ANSYS/CARES/PDS enables tracking of all stochastic quantities in the design space, thereby enabling more precise probabilistic prediction of lifetimes of ceramic components.

  9. Combined evaluation of grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence and X-ray reflectivity data for improved profiling of ultra-shallow depth distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerle, D.; Meirer, F.; Pepponi, G.; Demenev, E.; Giubertoni, D.; Wobrauschek, P.; Streli, C.

    2014-09-01

    The continuous downscaling of the process size for semiconductor devices pushes the junction depths and consequentially the implantation depths to the top few nanometers of the Si substrate. This motivates the need for sensitive methods capable of analyzing dopant distribution, total dose and possible impurities. X-ray techniques utilizing the external reflection of X-rays are very surface sensitive, hence providing a non-destructive tool for process analysis and control. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) is an established technique for the characterization of single- and multi-layered thin film structures with layer thicknesses in the nanometer range. XRR spectra are acquired by varying the incident angle in the grazing incidence regime while measuring the specular reflected X-ray beam. The shape of the resulting angle-dependent curve is correlated to changes of the electron density in the sample, but does not provide direct information on the presence or distribution of chemical elements in the sample. Grazing Incidence XRF (GIXRF) measures the X-ray fluorescence<