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Sample records for fluorescence imaging instrument

  1. Development and integration of Raman imaging capabilities to Sandia National Laboratories hyperspectral fluorescence imaging instrument.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Nieman, Linda T.

    2005-11-01

    Raman spectroscopic imaging is a powerful technique for visualizing chemical differences within a variety of samples based on the interaction of a substance's molecular vibrations with laser light. While Raman imaging can provide a unique view of samples such as residual stress within silicon devices, chemical degradation, material aging, and sample heterogeneity, the Raman scattering process is often weak and thus requires very sensitive collection optics and detectors. Many commercial instruments (including ones owned here at Sandia National Laboratories) generate Raman images by raster scanning a point focused laser beam across a sample--a process which can expose a sample to extreme levels of laser light and requires lengthy acquisition times. Our previous research efforts have led to the development of a state-of-the-art two-dimensional hyperspectral imager for fluorescence imaging applications such as microarray scanning. This report details the design, integration, and characterization of a line-scan Raman imaging module added to this efficient hyperspectral fluorescence microscope. The original hyperspectral fluorescence instrument serves as the framework for excitation and sample manipulation for the Raman imaging system, while a more appropriate axial transmissive Raman imaging spectrometer and detector are utilized for collection of the Raman scatter. The result is a unique and flexible dual-modality fluorescence and Raman imaging system capable of high-speed imaging at high spatial and spectral resolutions. Care was taken throughout the design and integration process not to hinder any of the fluorescence imaging capabilities. For example, an operator can switch between the fluorescence and Raman modalities without need for extensive optical realignment. The instrument performance has been characterized and sample data is presented.

  2. Research on testing instrument and method for correction of the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo

    2011-09-01

    To test the parameters of image intensifier screen is the precondition for researching and developing the third generation image intensifier. The picture of brightness uniformity of tested fluorescence screen shows bright in middle and dark at edge. It is not so direct to evaluate the performance of fluorescence screen. We analyze the energy and density distribution of the electrons, After correction, the image in computer is very uniform. So the uniformity of fluorescence screen brightness can be judged directly. It also shows the correction method is reasonable and close to ideal image. When the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness is corrected, the testing instrument is developed. In a vacuum environment of better than 1×10-4Pa, area source electron gun emits electrons. Going through the electric field to be accelerated, the high speed electrons bombard the screen and the screen luminize. By using testing equipment such as imaging luminance meter, fast storage photometer, optical power meter, current meter and photosensitive detectors, the screen brightness, the uniformity, light-emitting efficiency and afterglow can be tested respectively. System performance are explained. Testing method is established; Test results are given.

  3. Multimodal fluorescence imaging spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stopel, Martijn H W; Blum, Christian; Subramaniam, Vinod; Engelborghs, Yves; Visser, Anthonie J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multimodal fluorescence imaging is a versatile method that has a wide application range from biological studies to materials science. Typical observables in multimodal fluorescence imaging are intensity, lifetime, excitation, and emission spectra which are recorded at chosen locations at the sample.

  4. Instrumentation of Molecular Imaging on Site-Specific Targeting Fluorescent Peptide for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Ma, Lixin

    2012-02-01

    In this work we developed two biomedical imaging techniques for early detection of breast cancer. Both image modalities provide molecular imaging capability to probe site-specific targeting dyes. The first technique, heterodyne CCD fluorescence mediated tomography, is a non-invasive biomedical imaging that uses fluorescent photons from the targeted dye on the tumor cells inside human breast tissue. The technique detects a large volume of tissue (20 cm) with a moderate resolution (1 mm) and provides the high sensitivity. The second technique, dual-band spectral-domain optical coherence tomography, is a high-resolution tissue imaging modality. It uses a low coherence interferometer to detect coherent photons hidden in the incoherent background. Due to the coherence detection, a high resolution (20 microns) is possible. We have finished prototype imaging systems for the development of both image modalities and performed imaging experiments on tumor tissues. The spectroscopic/tomographic images show contrasts of dense tumor tissues and tumor necrotic regions. In order to correlate the findings from our results, a diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the tumors was performed using a small animal 7-Telsa MRI and demonstrated excellent agreement.

  5. Fluorescence live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for cells or tissues to replicate physiological cell dynamics. This chapter aims to give a general overview on microscope design choices critical for fluorescence live cell imaging that apply to most fluorescence microscopy modalities and on environmental control with a focus on mammalian tissue culture cells. In addition, we provide guidance on how to design and evaluate FP constructs by spinning disk confocal microscopy. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Instrument Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The successful completion of this IRAD will deliver a fully functional instrument at TRL 6.  The key characteristics that we will demonstrate are simplicity,...

  7. Image calibration in fluorescence microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; van Rooij, G.J.; Hofstraat, J.W.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    A fluorescence image calibration method is presented based on the use of standardized uniformly fluorescing reference layers. It is demonstrated to be effective for the correction of non-uniform imaging characteristics across the image (shading correction) as well as for relating fluorescence

  8. Assessing Photosynthesis by Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saura, Pedro; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2011-01-01

    This practical paper describes a novel fluorescence imaging experiment to study the three processes of photochemistry, fluorescence and thermal energy dissipation, which compete during the dissipation of excitation energy in photosynthesis. The technique represents a non-invasive tool for revealing and understanding the spatial heterogeneity in…

  9. Multi Spectral Fluorescence Imager (MSFI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Genetic transformation with in vivo reporter genes for fluorescent proteins can be performed on a variety of organisms to address fundamental biological questions. Model organisms that may utilize an ISS imager include unicellular organisms (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and invertebrates (Caenorhabditis elegans). The multispectral fluorescence imager (MSFI) will have the capability to accommodate 10 cm x 10 cm Petri plates, various sized multi-well culture plates, and other custom culture containers. Features will include programmable temperature and light cycles, ethylene scrubbing (less than 25 ppb), CO2 control (between 400 ppm and ISS-ambient levels in units of 100 ppm) and sufficient airflow to prevent condensation that would interfere with imaging.

  10. Fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy in biological imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Peter; Thomas, Steven; Allen, John; McLaren, Wendy; Murr, Elise; Harris, Martin

    2007-02-01

    In vivo fluorescence microscopic imaging of biological systems in human disease states and animal models is possible with high optical resolution and mega pixel point-scanning performance using optimised off-the-shelf turn-key devices. There are however various trade-offs between tissue access and instrument performance when miniaturising in vivo microscopy systems. A miniature confocal scanning technology that was developed for clinical human endoscopy has been configured into a portable device for direct hand-held interrogation of living tissue in whole animal models (Optiscan FIVE-1 system). Scanning probes of 6.3mm diameter with a distal tip diameter of 5.0mm were constructed either in a 150mm length for accessible tissue, or a 300mm probe for laparoscopic interrogation of internal tissues in larger animal models. Both devices collect fluorescence confocal images (excitation 488 nm; emission >505 or >550 nm) comprised of 1024 x 1204 sampling points/image frame, with lateral resolution 0.7um; axial resolution 7um; FOV 475 x 475um. The operator can dynamically control imaging depth from the tissue surface to approx 250um in 4um steps via an internally integrated zaxis actuator. Further miniaturisation is achieved using an imaging contact probe based on scanning the proximal end of a high-density optical fibre bundle (~30,000 fibres) of organs, albeit at lower resolution (30,000 sampling points/image). In rodent models, imaging was performed using various fluorescent staining protocols including fluorescently labelled receptor ligands, labelled antibodies, FITC-dextrans, vital dyes and labelled cells administered topically or intravenously. Abdominal organs of large animals were accessed laparoscopically and contrasted using i.v. fluorescein-sodium. Articular cartilage of sheep and pigs was fluorescently stained with calcein-AM or fluorescein. Surface and sub-surface cellular and sub-cellular details could be readily visualised in vivo at high resolution. In

  11. A new airborne formaldehyde instrument: Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisco, T. F.; Bailey, S. A.; Swanson, A. K.; Wolfe, G. M., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We present the operating principles of a new instrument designed for operation on small aircraft. The instrument uses a new non-resonant fluorescence technique to take advantage of compact industrial lasers to make a small, robust package that can measure formaldehyde at sensitivities better than 100 ppt in 1 second integration. The instrument is designed to fly on the Alphajet at NASA Ames but can be modified to fly on other small aircraft.

  12. Multispectral open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrooz, Ali; Waterman, Peter; Vasquez, Kristine O; Meganck, Jeff; Peterson, Jeffrey D; Faqir, Ilias; Kempner, Joshua

    2017-08-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging informs decisions regarding surgical margins by detecting and localizing signals from fluorescent reporters, labeling targets such as malignant tissues. This guidance reduces the likelihood of undetected malignant tissue remaining after resection, eliminating the need for additional treatment or surgery. The primary challenges in performing open-air intraoperative fluorescence imaging come from the weak intensity of the fluorescence signal in the presence of strong surgical and ambient illumination, and the auto-fluorescence of non-target components, such as tissue, especially in the visible spectral window (400-650 nm). In this work, a multispectral open-air fluorescence imaging system is presented for translational image-guided intraoperative applications, which overcomes these challenges. The system is capable of imaging weak fluorescence signals with nanomolar sensitivity in the presence of surgical illumination. This is done using synchronized fluorescence excitation and image acquisition with real-time background subtraction. Additionally, the system uses a liquid crystal tunable filter for acquisition of multispectral images that are used to spectrally unmix target fluorescence from non-target auto-fluorescence. Results are validated by preclinical studies on murine models and translational canine oncology models.

  13. Fluorescence lifetime imaging using light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Gordon T; Munro, Ian; Poher, Vincent; French, Paul M W; Neil, Mark A A; Elson, Daniel S; Hares, Jonathan D

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate flexible use of low cost, high-power light emitting diodes as illumination sources for fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). Both time-domain and frequency-domain techniques have been implemented at wavelengths spanning the range 450-640 nm. Additionally, we demonstrate optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging by combining structured illumination with frequency-domain FLIM

  14. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  15. A portable near-infrared fluorescence image overlay device for surgical navigation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWade, Melanie A.

    2016-03-01

    A rise in the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes or intrinsic fluorescent markers for surgical guidance and tissue diagnosis has triggered the development of NIR fluorescence imaging systems. Because NIR wavelengths are invisible to the naked eye, instrumentation must allow surgeons to visualize areas of high fluorescence. Current NIR fluorescence imaging systems have limited ease-of-use because they display fluorescent information on remote display monitors that require surgeons to divert attention away from the patient to identify the location of tissue fluorescence. Furthermore, some systems lack simultaneous visible light imaging which provides valuable spatial context to fluorescence images. We have developed a novel, portable NIR fluorescence imaging approach for intraoperative surgical guidance that provides information for surgical navigation within the clinician's line of sight. The system utilizes a NIR CMOS detector to collect excited NIR fluorescence from the surgical field. Tissues with NIR fluorescence are overlaid with visible light to provide information on tissue margins directly on the surgical field. In vitro studies have shown this versatile imaging system can be applied to applications with both extrinsic NIR contrast agents such as indocyanine green and weaker sources of biological fluorescence such as parathyroid gland tissue. This non-invasive, portable NIR fluorescence imaging system overlays an image directly on tissue, potentially allowing surgical decisions to be made quicker and with greater ease-of-use than current NIR fluorescence imaging systems.

  16. Comprehensive phantom for interventional fluorescence molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasopoulou, Maria; Koch, Maximilian; Gorpas, Dimitris; Karlas, Angelos; Klemm, Uwe; Garcia-Allende, Pilar Beatriz; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence imaging has been considered for over a half-century as a modality that could assist surgical guidance and visualization. The administration of fluorescent molecules with sensitivity to disease biomarkers and their imaging using a fluorescence camera can outline pathophysiological parameters of tissue invisible to the human eye during operation. The advent of fluorescent agents that target specific cellular responses and molecular pathways of disease has facilitated the intraoperative identification of cancer with improved sensitivity and specificity over nonspecific fluorescent dyes that only outline the vascular system and enhanced permeability effects. With these new abilities come unique requirements for developing phantoms to calibrate imaging systems and algorithms. We briefly review herein progress with fluorescence phantoms employed to validate fluorescence imaging systems and results. We identify current limitations and discuss the level of phantom complexity that may be required for developing a universal strategy for fluorescence imaging calibration. Finally, we present a phantom design that could be used as a tool for interlaboratory system performance evaluation.

  17. Experimental design and quality assurance: in situ fluorescence instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conmy, Robyn N.; Del Castillo, Carlos E.; Downing, Bryan D.; Chen, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Both instrument design and capabilities of fluorescence spectroscopy have greatly advanced over the last several decades. Advancements include solid-state excitation sources, integration of fiber optic technology, highly sensitive multichannel detectors, rapid-scan monochromators, sensitive spectral correction techniques, and improve data manipulation software (Christian et al., 1981, Lochmuller and Saavedra, 1986; Cabniss and Shuman, 1987; Lakowicz, 2006; Hudson et al., 2007). The cumulative effect of these improvements have pushed the limits and expanded the application of fluorescence techniques to numerous scientific research fields. One of the more powerful advancements is the ability to obtain in situ fluorescence measurements of natural waters (Moore, 1994). The development of submersible fluorescence instruments has been made possible by component miniaturization and power reduction including advances in light sources technologies (light-emitting diodes, xenon lamps, ultraviolet [UV] lasers) and the compatible integration of new optical instruments with various sampling platforms (Twardowski et at., 2005 and references therein). The development of robust field sensors skirt the need for cumbersome and or time-consuming filtration techniques, the potential artifacts associated with sample storage, and coarse sampling designs by increasing spatiotemporal resolution (Chen, 1999; Robinson and Glenn, 1999). The ability to obtain rapid, high-quality, highly sensitive measurements over steep gradients has revolutionized investigations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) optical properties, thereby enabling researchers to address novel biogeochemical questions regarding colored or chromophoric DOM (CDOM). This chapter is dedicated to the origin, design, calibration, and use of in situ field fluorometers. It will serve as a review of considerations to be accounted for during the operation of fluorescence field sensors and call attention to areas of concern when making

  18. Spectral selective fluorescence molecular imaging with volume holographic imaging system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlu Lv

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A compact volume holographic imaging (VHI method that can detect fluorescence objects located in diffusive medium in spectral selective imaging manner is presented. The enlargement of lateral field of view of the VHI system is realized by using broadband illumination and demagnification optics. Each target spectrum of fluorescence emitting from a diffusive medium is probed by tuning the inclination angle of the transmission volume holographic grating (VHG. With the use of the single transmission VHG, fluorescence images with different spectrum are obtained sequentially and precise three-dimensional (3D information of deep fluorescent objects located in a diffusive medium can be reconstructed from these images. The results of phantom experiments demonstrate that two fluorescent objects with a sub-millimeter distance can be resolved by spectral selective imaging.

  19. Optical Methods and Instrumentation in Brain Imaging and Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive up-to-date review of optical approaches used in brain imaging and therapy. It covers a variety of imaging techniques including diffuse optical imaging, laser speckle imaging, photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography. A number of laser-based therapeutic approaches are reviewed, including photodynamic therapy, fluorescence guided resection and photothermal therapy. Fundamental principles and instrumentation are discussed for each imaging and therapeutic technique. Represents the first publication dedicated solely to optical diagnostics and therapeutics in the brain Provides a comprehensive review of the principles of each imaging/therapeutic modality Reviews the latest advances in instrumentation for optical diagnostics in the brain Discusses new optical-based therapeutic approaches for brain diseases

  20. Fluorescence imaging of soybean flavonol isolines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Moon S.; Lee, Edward H.; Mulchi, Charles L.; McMurtrey, James E., III; Chappelle, Emmett W.; Rowland, Randy A.

    1998-07-01

    Experiments were conducted to characterize the fluorescence emission of leaves from four soybean ('Harosoy') plants containing different concentrations of flavonols (kaempferol glycosides). The investigation utilized genetically mutated soybean flavonol isolines grown in a constant environment, thus limiting factors known to affect fluorescence emission characteristics other than different kaempferol glycosides concentrations. Flavonol isolines included OX922, OX941, OX942, OX944. The first two isolines contain kaempferol (K) glycosides; K3, K6, and K9, and the latter two did not have K3, K6, and K9. A fluorescence imaging system (FIS) was used to characterize steady state florescence images of the sample leaves measured at wavelengths centered at 450, 550, 680, and 740 nm with an excitation at 360 nm. Images taken with FIS greatly complement non-imaging fluorescence measurements by characterizing the spatial variation of fluorescence within leaves. We also acquired fluorescence emission spectra to characterize spectral features of the soybean flavonol isolines. The emission spectral shape of the fluorescence emission characteristics were not significantly different between the soybeans that contain kaempferol glycosides and the ones that do not contain kaempferol glycosides. Typical emission maxima of green vegetation in the blue, green, red, and far-red bands were noticed in all four soybean isolines. However, plants containing kaempferol glycosides, OX922 and OX941 had significantly lower intensities throughout the wavelength regions. These results imply that fluorescence emission intensities in the fluorescence emission bands studied are significantly affected by the presence and absence of kaempferol glycosides concentrations (UV radiation screening compounds). Pure kaempferol glycoside dissolved in solution show minimal fluorescence emission when excited with the absorption maximum radiation at 365 nm. However, a broad band emission can be seen in the green

  1. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Riemann, Iris; Stark, Martin; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    In vivo and in vitro multiphoton imaging was used to perform high resolution optical sectioning of human hair by nonlinear excitation of endogenous as well as exogenous fluorophores. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) based on time-resolved single photon counting and near-infrared femtosecond laser pulse excitation was employed to analyze the various fluorescent hair components. Time-resolved multiphoton imaging of intratissue pigments has the potential (i) to identify endogenous keratin and melanin, (ii) to obtain information on intrahair dye accumulation, (iii) to study bleaching effects, and (iv) to monitor the intratissue diffusion of pharmaceutical and cosmetical components along hair shafts.

  2. Optimization of microsatellite DNA Gelred fluorescence imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-10-11

    Oct 11, 2012 ... In order to explore the best microsatellite DNA Gelred imaging technology, this study compared its dosage by using three methods; precasting gels method (PG), staining sample method (SS) and immersion gels method (IG). The results show that agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) fluorescence imaging ...

  3. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  4. Coral monitoring with fluorescence imaging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasano, Masahiko; Kiriya, Nobuo; Yamanouchi, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Akira; Hitomi, Kazuo; Tamura, Kenkichi

    2011-06-01

    It has been pointed out that globally hermatypic corals in coral reefs have been seriously damaged in recent years, and it is predicted that such damages will expand in area in the future. It is important to monitor corals globally, in detail, and over long-term periods, for preservation of the marine environment and biodiversity. The spot-check method, one of the major coral monitoring methods, is operated by snorkelers or divers, and therefore, its operation is limited by the seastate, and its monitoring areas are often for specific observation points. On the other hand, the satellite remote sensing, another major coral monitoring methods, can cover composite coral reef areas, but the image resolution is a few meters, and it is not possible to monitor small size coral colonies and deep sea areas. The boat-based fluorescence imaging lidar system has been developed to complement these coral monitoring methods. This system obtains linear coral observation data along the boat track, and makes it possible to build a cooperative coral monitoring network. Since most hermatypic corals have fluorescent proteins, living tissues can be monitored using the blue-to-green fluorescence from UV excitation. It is possible to observe the UV-excited fluorescence images from live coral even in the daytime, by the UV excited fluorescence imaging lidar. Additionally, laser bathymetry is also possible by time-of-flight measurement. We have succeeded in observing the pseudo-coral fluorescent images and depths down to 30 m depth at the testing basin. Secondly, we have succeeded in observing the live coral fluorescent images and their depths by the lidar system using a glass-bottom-boat at Taketomi island, Okinawa, Japan. The system summary and observed data are reported in this paper.

  5. Laboratory micro-X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy instrumentation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Haschke, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Micro-X-ray fluorescence offers the possibility for a position- sensitive and non-destructive analysis that can be used for the analysis of non-homogeneous materials and layer systems. This analytical technique has shown a dynamic development in the last 15 years and is used for the analysis of small particles, inclusions, of elemental distributions for a wide range of different applications both in research and quality control. The first experiments were performed on synchrotrons but there is a requirement for laboratory instruments which offers a fast and immediate access for analytical results. The book discuss the main components of a µ-XRF instrument and the different measurement modes, it gives an overview about the various instruments types, considers the special requirements for quantification of non-homogeneous materials and presents a wide range of application for single point and multi-point analysis as well as for distribution analysis in one, two and three dimensions.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  7. Fluorescein Derivatives in Intravital Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S. Roberts

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravital fluorescence microscopy enables the direct imaging of fluorophores in vivo and advanced techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM enable the simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores. Consequently, it is now possible to record distribution and metabolism of a chemical in vivo and to optimise the delivery of fluorophores in vivo. Recent clinical applications with fluorescein and other intravital fluorescent stains have occurred in neurosurgery, dermatology [including photodynamic therapy (PDT] and endomicroscopy. Potential uses have been identified in periodontal disease, skin graft and cancer surgery. Animal studies have demonstrated that diseased tissue can be specifically stained with fluorophore conjugates. This review focuses on the fluorescein derived fluorophores in common clinical use and provides examples of novel applications from studies in tissue samples.

  8. Advances in fntd technology: Instrumentation, image processing and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartz, James Andrew

    Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors (FNTDs), based on Al2O 3:C,Mg single crystal material, enable diffraction limited imaging of ionization patterns. This fast, luminescent material is thermally and optically stable. This work expands and assesses the capability of FNTD technology to measure radiation dose quickly and accurately, especially neutron radition. Developments in FNTD instrumentation, software, image reconstruction, image processing and data processing improved ease of use, productivity and reliability and brought the technology into commercial viability. Descriptions of these developments are presented. Additionally, these developments were assessed and were found to comply with ANSI and ISO standards for personnel neutron dosimetry. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  9. Fluorescence optical imaging in anticancer drug delivery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Etrych, Tomáš; Lucas, H.; Janoušková, Olga; Chytil, Petr; Mueller, T.; Mäder, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 226, 28 March (2016), s. 168-181 ISSN 0168-3659 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : fluorescence imaging * drug delivery * theranostics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 7.786, year: 2016

  10. Optimization of microsatellite DNA Gelred fluorescence imaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that agarose gel electrophoresis (AGE) fluorescence imaging technology can use the first method (PG) and the concentration of Gelred was 1X, because of the best banding and easy operation. The polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) can use the third method (IG), for the advantages of clear and ...

  11. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  12. Developing an imaging bi-spectrometer for fluorescent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mahnaz

    Fluorescent effects have been observed for thousands of years. Stokes, in 1852, began the science of fluorescence culminating in his law of fluorescence, which explained that fluorescence emission occurs at longer wavelengths than the excitation wavelength. This phenomenon is observed extensively in the art world. Daylight fluorescent colors known as Day-GloRTM have become an artistic medium since the 1960s. Modern artists exploit these saturated and brilliant colors to glitter their painting. Multipsectral imaging as a noninvasive technique has been used for archiving by museums and cultural-heritage institutions for about a decade. The complex fluorescence phenomenon has been often ignored in the multispectral projects. The ignored fluorescence results in errors in digital imaging of artwork containing fluorescent colors. The illuminant-dependency of the fluorescence radiance makes the fluorescence colorimetry and consequently spectral imaging more complex. In this dissertation an abridged imaging bi-spectrometer for artwork containing both fluorescent and non-fluorescent colors was developed. The method developed included two stages of reconstruction of the spectral reflected radiance factor and prediction of the fluorescent radiance factor. The estimation of the reflected radiance factor as a light source independent component was achieved by imaging with a series of short-wavelength cutoff filters placed in the illumination path. The fluorescent radiance factor, a light source dependent component, was estimated based on a proposed model, the abridged two-monochromator method. The abridged two-monochromator method was developed for reconstructing the bi-spectral matrix of a fluorescent color based on a calibrated UV-fluorescence imaging. In this way, one could predict the fluorescence radiance factor under any desired illuminant and consequently a better color evaluation and rendering could be obtained. Furthermore, this method easily fitted in a general system

  13. Imaging efficacy of a targeted imaging agent for fluorescence endoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, A. J.; Bendiksen, R.; Attramadal, T.; Bjerke, R.; Waagene, S.; Hvoslef, A. M.; Johannesen, E.

    2008-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major cause of cancer death. A significant unmet clinical need exists in the area of screening for earlier and more accurate diagnosis and treatment. We have identified a fluorescence imaging agent targeted to an early stage molecular marker for colorectal cancer. The agent is administered intravenously and imaged in a far red imaging channel as an adjunct to white light endoscopy. There is experimental evidence of preclinical proof of mechanism for the agent. In order to assess potential clinical efficacy, imaging was performed with a prototype fluorescence endoscope system designed to produce clinically relevant images. A clinical laparoscope system was modified for fluorescence imaging. The system was optimised for sensitivity. Images were recorded at settings matching those expected with a clinical endoscope implementation (at video frame rate operation). The animal model was comprised of a HCT-15 xenograft tumour expressing the target at concentration levels expected in early stage colorectal cancer. Tumours were grown subcutaneously. The imaging agent was administered intravenously at a dose of 50nmol/kg body weight. The animals were killed 2 hours post administration and prepared for imaging. A 3-4mm diameter, 1.6mm thick slice of viable tumour was placed over the opened colon and imaged with the laparoscope system. A receiver operator characteristic analysis was applied to imaging results. An area under the curve of 0.98 and a sensitivity of 87% [73, 96] and specificity of 100% [93, 100] were obtained.

  14. A Thermal Imaging Instrument with Uncooled Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposed work, we will perform an instrument concept study for sustainable thermal imaging over land with uncooled detectors. We will define the science and...

  15. Image Restoration for Fluorescence Planar Imaging with Diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanxuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence planar imaging (FPI is failure to capture high resolution images of deep fluorochromes due to photon diffusion. This paper presents an image restoration method to deal with this kind of blurring. The scheme of this method is conceived based on a reconstruction method in fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT with diffusion model. A new unknown parameter is defined through introducing the first mean value theorem for definite integrals. System matrix converting this unknown parameter to the blurry image is constructed with the elements of depth conversion matrices related to a chosen plane named focal plane. Results of phantom and mouse experiments show that the proposed method is capable of reducing the blurring of FPI image caused by photon diffusion when the depth of focal plane is chosen within a proper interval around the true depth of fluorochrome. This method will be helpful to the estimation of the size of deep fluorochrome.

  16. Fluorescence based molecular in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imaging represents a modern research area that allows the in vivo study of molecular biological process kinetics using appropriate probes and visualization methods. This methodology may be defined- apart from the contrast media injection - as non-abrasive. In order to reach an in vivo molecular process imaging as accurate as possible the effects of the used probes on the biological should not be too large. The contrast media as important part of the molecular imaging can significantly contribute to the understanding of molecular processes and to the development of tailored diagnostics and therapy. Since more than 15 years PTB is developing optic imaging systems that may be used for fluorescence based visualization of tissue phantoms, small animal models and the localization of tumors and their predecessors, and for the early recognition of inflammatory processes in clinical trials. Cellular changes occur during many diseases, thus the molecular imaging might be of importance for the early diagnosis of chronic inflammatory diseases. Fluorescent dyes can be used as unspecific or also as specific contrast media, which allow enhanced detection sensitivity

  17. Physics instrumentation for medical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Townsend, D.W.

    1993-01-01

    The first Nobel Physics Prize, awarded in 1901, went to Wilhelm Röntgen for his discovery of X-rays in 1895. This, and the most recent physics Nobel, to Georges Charpak last year for his detector developments, span several generations of applied science. As well as helping to launch the science of atomic physics, Röntgen's discovery also marked the dawn of a medical science - radiography - using beams of various kinds to image what otherwise cannot be seen. Ever since, physicists and radiologists have worked hand in hand to improve imaging techniques and widen their medical applications

  18. Surface Imaging Skin Friction Instrument and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James L. (Inventor); Naughton, Jonathan W. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A surface imaging skin friction instrument allowing 2D resolution of spatial image by a 2D Hilbert transform and 2D inverse thin-oil film solver, providing an innovation over prior art single point approaches. Incoherent, monochromatic light source can be used. The invention provides accurate, easy to use, economical measurement of larger regions of surface shear stress in a single test.

  19. Planetary imaging with amateur astronomical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasopoulos, k.; Giannaris, G.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary imaging can be varied by the types and size of instruments and processing. With basic amateur telescopes and software, can be captured images of our planetary system, mainly Jupiter, Saturn and Mars, but also solar eclipses, solar flares, and many more. Planetary photos can be useful for professional astronomers, and how amateur astronomers can play a role on that field.

  20. Rotating wall vessel system designed for fluorescent imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayag, Tristan J.; Dimitrijevich, S. Dan; Del Gallego, Lauren C.; Kumar, Pankaj

    2011-03-01

    Fluorescent imaging of cells and tissues cultured within a rotating wall vessel bioreactor offers quantitative assessment of the 3-dimensional aggregation of cells into tissue constructs. We present the design of a rotating wall vessel system optimized for real-time fluorescent analysis. The modulation transfer function of our system is found to be superior to the commercially-available vessel used in previous fluorescence imaging studies. We demonstrate dynamic fluorescent imaging of DAPI-stained porcine pancreatic islets.

  1. Fluorescence-Doped Particles for Simultaneous Temperature and Velocity Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danehy, Paul M.; Tiemsin, Pacita I.; Wohl, Chrostopher J.; Verkamp, Max; Lowe, T.; Maisto, P.; Byun, G.; Simpson, R.

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene latex microspheres (PSLs) have been used for particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) measurements for several decades. With advances in laser technologies, instrumentation, and data processing, the capability to collect more information about fluid flow beyond velocity is possible using new seed materials. To provide additional measurement capability, PSLs were synthesized with temperature-sensitive fluorescent dyes incorporated within the particle. These multifunctional PSLs would have the greatest impact if they could be used in large scale facilities with minimal modification to the facilities or the existing instrumentation. Consequently, several potential dyes were identified that were amenable to existing laser systems currently utilized in wind tunnels at NASA Langley Research Center as well as other wind and fluid (water) tunnels. PSLs incorporated with Rhodamine B, dichlorofluorescein (DCF, also known as fluorescein 548 or fluorescein 27) and other dyes were synthesized and characterized for morphology and spectral properties. The resulting particles were demonstrated to exhibit fluorescent emission, which would enable determination of both fluid velocity and temperature. They also would allow near-wall velocity measurements whereas laser scatter from surfaces currently prevents near-wall measurements using undoped seed materials. Preliminary results in a wind tunnel facility located at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech) have verified fluorescent signal detection and temperature sensitivity of fluorophore-doped PSLs.

  2. Coherent Control in Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Arijit Kumar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2009-02-25

    In multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy ultrafast laser pulses, i.e. light pulses having pulse-width ≤ 1picosecond (1 p s = 10 -12 s ), are commonly used to circumvent the low multiphoton absorption cross-sections of common fluorophores. Starting with a discussion on how amplitude modulation of ultrashort pulse-train enhances the two-photon fluorescence providing deep insight into laser-induced photo-thermal damage, the effect of controlling time lag between phase-locked laser pulses on imaging is described. In addition, the prospects of laser pulse-shaping in signal enhancement (by temporal pulse-compression at the sample) and selective excitation of fluorophores (by manipulating the phase and/or amplitude of different frequency components within the pulse) are discussed with promising future applications lying ahead.

  3. Fluorescence guided lymph node biopsy in large animals using direct image projection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringhausen, Elizabeth; Wang, Tylon; Pitts, Jonathan; Akers, Walter J.

    2016-03-01

    The use of fluorescence imaging for aiding oncologic surgery is a fast growing field in biomedical imaging, revolutionizing open and minimally invasive surgery practices. We have designed, constructed, and tested a system for fluorescence image acquisition and direct display on the surgical field for fluorescence guided surgery. The system uses a near-infrared sensitive CMOS camera for image acquisition, a near-infra LED light source for excitation, and DLP digital projector for projection of fluorescence image data onto the operating field in real time. Instrument control was implemented in Matlab for image capture, processing of acquired data and alignment of image parameters with the projected pattern. Accuracy of alignment was evaluated statistically to demonstrate sensitivity to small objects and alignment throughout the imaging field. After verification of accurate alignment, feasibility for clinical application was demonstrated in large animal models of sentinel lymph node biopsy. Indocyanine green was injected subcutaneously in Yorkshire pigs at various locations to model sentinel lymph node biopsy in gynecologic cancers, head and neck cancer, and melanoma. Fluorescence was detected by the camera system during operations and projected onto the imaging field, accurately identifying tissues containing the fluorescent tracer at up to 15 frames per second. Fluorescence information was projected as binary green regions after thresholding and denoising raw intensity data. Promising results with this initial clinical scale prototype provided encouraging results for the feasibility of optical projection of acquired luminescence during open oncologic surgeries.

  4. Electronic Imaging in Astronomy Detectors and Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    McLean, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of Electronic Imaging in Astronomy: Detectors and Instrumentation describes the remarkable developments that have taken place in astronomical detectors and instrumentation in recent years – from the invention of the charge-coupled device (CCD) in 1970 to the current era of very large telescopes, such as the Keck 10-meter telescopes in Hawaii with their laser guide-star adaptive optics which rival the image quality of the Hubble Space Telescope. Authored by one of the world’s foremost experts on the design and development of electronic imaging systems for astronomy, this book has been written on several levels to appeal to a broad readership. Mathematical expositions are designed to encourage a wider audience, especially among the growing community of amateur astronomers with small telescopes with CCD cameras. The book can be used at the college level for an introductory course on modern astronomical detectors and instruments, and as a supplement for a practical or laboratory class.

  5. Performance evaluation of spot detection algorithms in fluorescence microscopy images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Detection of messenger Ribonucleic Acid (mRNA) spots in fluorescence microscopy images is of great importance for biologists seeking better understanding of cell functionality. Fluorescence microscopy and specific staining methods make biological...

  6. Creating Panoramic Images for Bladder Fluorescence Endoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Behrens

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical diagnostic analysis and therapy of urinary bladder cancer based on endoscopes are state of the art in urological medicine. Due to the limited field of view of endoscopes, the physician can examine only a small part of the whole operating field at once. This constraint makes visual control and navigation difficult, especially in hollow organs. A panoramic image, covering a larger field of view, can overcome this difficulty. Directly motivated by a physician we developed an image mosaicing algorithm for endoscopic bladder fluorescence video sequences. In this paper, we present an approach which is capable of stitching single endoscopic video images to a combined panoramic image. Based on SIFT features we estimate a 2-D homography for each image pair, using an affine model and an iterative model-fitting algorithm. We then apply the stitching process and perform a mutual linear interpolation. Our panoramic image results show a correct stitching and lead to a better overview and understanding of the operation field. 

  7. Laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Xie, Shusen

    2007-11-01

    A laser induced fluorescence imaging system for localization of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma is developed. In this fluorescence imaging system, the fluorescence intensity with information of detected objection is gained by an image intensifier, which makes color information of the fluorescence image eliminated and the result is a monochrome image of the fluorescence with thermally induced noise. The monochrome fluorescence image is sent to a CCD and captured by an image board, which is controlled by a computer. Image processing is carried out to improve the image quality and therefore improve the system's ability to differentiate carcinomas from normal tissue. Gaussian smoothing is implemented in order to reduce the noise. Image binarizing process is realized to obtain an optimal threshold of the image. Image pixels with grey value below this threshold are assigned as diseased and those above are normal. A pseudo color processing is then accomplished to get better visual perception and understanding of the image, greatly increasing the detail resolution of the grey image. The processed image is then displayed on the screen of the computer in real time. The real time laser induced fluorescence imaging system with the image processing methods developed is efficient for localization of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  8. Development of a neutral embedding resin for optical imaging of fluorescently labeled biological tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Gang, Yadong; Chen, Shenghua; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yumiao; Li, Longhui; Yin, Fangfang; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-10-01

    Plastic embedding is widely applied in light microscopy analyses. Previous studies have shown that embedding agents and related techniques can greatly affect the quality of biological tissue embedding and fluorescent imaging. Specifically, it is difficult to preserve endogenous fluorescence using currently available acidic commercial embedding resins and related embedding techniques directly. Here, we developed a neutral embedding resin that improved the green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and DsRed fluorescent intensity without adjusting the pH value of monomers or reactivating fluorescence in lye. The embedding resin had a high degree of polymerization, and its fluorescence preservation ratios for GFP, YFP, and DsRed were 126.5%, 155.8%, and 218.4%, respectively. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  9. A Thermal Imaging Instrument with Uncooled Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, A. T.; Barrentine, E. M.; Brown, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we perform an instrument concept study for sustainable thermal imaging over land with uncooled detectors. The National Research Council's Committee on Implementation of a Sustained Land Imaging Program has identified the inclusion of a thermal imager as critical for both current and future land imaging missions. Such an imaging instrument operating in two bands located at approximately 11 and 12 microns (for example, in Landsat 8, and also Landsat 9 when launched) will provide essential information for furthering our hydrologic understanding at scales of human influence, and produce field-scale moisture information through accurate retrievals of evapotranspiration (ET). Landsat 9 is slated to recycle the TIRS-2 instrument launched with Landsat 8 that uses cooled quantum well infrared photodetectors (QWIPs), hence requiring expensive and massive cryocooler technology to achieve its required spectral and spatial accuracies. Our goal is to conceptualize and develop a thermal imaging instrument which leverages recent and imminent technology advances in uncooled detectors. Such detector technology will offer the benefit of greatly reduced instrument cost, mass, and power at the expense of some acceptable loss in detector sensitivity. It would also allow a thermal imaging instrument to be fielded on board a low-cost platform, e.g., a CubeSat. Sustained and enhanced land imaging is crucial for providing high-quality science data on change in land use, forest health, crop status, environment, and climate. Accurate satellite mapping of ET at the agricultural field scale (the finest spatial scale of the environmental processes of interest) requires high-quality thermal data to produce the corresponding accurate land surface temperature (LST) retrievals used to drive an ET model. Such an imaging instrument would provide important information on the following: 1) the relationship between land-use and land/water management practices and water use dynamics; 2) the

  10. A framework for creating realistic synthetic fluorescence microscopy image sequences

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabaso, M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy imaging is an important tool in modern biological research, allowing insights into the processes of biological systems. Automated image analysis algorithms help in extracting information from these images. Validation...

  11. Instrumentation challenges in multi-modality imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brasse, D.; Boisson, F.

    2016-01-01

    Based on different physical principles, imaging procedures currently used in both clinical and preclinical applications present different performance that allow researchers to achieve a large number of studies. However, the relevance of obtaining a maximum of information relating to the same subject is undeniable. The last two decades have thus seen the advent of a full-fledged research axis, the multimodal in vivo imaging. Whether from an instrumentation point of view, for medical research or the development of new probes, all these research works illustrate the growing interest of the scientific community for multimodal imaging, which can be approached with different backgrounds and perspectives from engineers to end-users point of views. In the present review, we discuss the multimodal imaging concept, which focuses not only on PET/CT and PET/MRI instrumentation but also on recent investigations of what could become a possible future in the field.

  12. Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) deployed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a Solmirus Corp. All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer. The IRSI is an automatic, continuously operating, digital imaging and software system designed to capture hemispheric sky images and provide time series retrievals of fractional sky cover during both the day and night. The instrument provides diurnal, radiometrically calibrated sky imagery in the mid-infrared atmospheric window and imagery in the visible wavelengths for cloud retrievals during daylight hours. The software automatically identifies cloudy and clear regions at user-defined intervals and calculates fractional sky cover, providing a real-time display of sky conditions.

  13. Patterned Fluorescence Images with Indigo Precursors in Polymer Film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Bora; Oh, Eun Hae; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jongman

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a new strategy for the generation of patterned fluorescence images in polymer film. A fluorescent acetyl protected indole 6 was transformed to a nonfluorescent indigo dye 7 by UV irradiation. In addition, a t-Boc protected fluorescent indigo molecule 8 was also converted to a nonfluorescent indigo derivative 7 under a chemical amplification condition. Photomasked UV irradiation of the precursor molecules allowed efficient generation of patterned fluorescence images in polymer film. The strategy described in current investigation is believed to be an important addition to the fluorescent patterning technology

  14. Patterned Fluorescence Images with Indigo Precursors in Polymer Film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Bora; Oh, Eun Hae; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jongman [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    We have developed a new strategy for the generation of patterned fluorescence images in polymer film. A fluorescent acetyl protected indole 6 was transformed to a nonfluorescent indigo dye 7 by UV irradiation. In addition, a t-Boc protected fluorescent indigo molecule 8 was also converted to a nonfluorescent indigo derivative 7 under a chemical amplification condition. Photomasked UV irradiation of the precursor molecules allowed efficient generation of patterned fluorescence images in polymer film. The strategy described in current investigation is believed to be an important addition to the fluorescent patterning technology.

  15. Laboratory Scale X-ray Fluorescence Tomography: Instrument Characterization and Application in Earth and Environmental Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforce, Brecht; Vermeulen, Bram; Garrevoet, Jan; Vekemans, Bart; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Janssen, Colin; Vincze, Laszlo

    2016-03-15

    A new laboratory scale X-ray fluorescence (XRF) imaging instrument, based on an X-ray microfocus tube equipped with a monocapillary optic, has been developed to perform XRF computed tomography experiments with both higher spatial resolution (20 μm) and a better energy resolution (130 eV @Mn-K(α)) than has been achieved up-to-now. This instrument opens a new range of possible applications for XRF-CT. Next to the analytical characterization of the setup by using well-defined model/reference samples, demonstrating its capabilities for tomographic imaging, the XRF-CT microprobe has been used to image the interior of an ecotoxicological model organism, Americamysis bahia. This had been exposed to elevated metal (Cu and Ni) concentrations. The technique allowed the visualization of the accumulation sites of copper, clearly indicating the affected organs, i.e. either the gastric system or the hepatopancreas. As another illustrative application, the scanner has been employed to investigate goethite spherules from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary, revealing the internal elemental distribution of these valuable distal ejecta layer particles.

  16. Multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging of cell apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xinye; Zuo, Chao; Yan, Hao

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescence microscopy, utilizing fluorescence labeling, has the capability to observe intercellular changes which transmitted and reflected light microscopy techniques cannot resolve. However, the parts without fluorescence labeling are not imaged. Hence, the processes simultaneously happen in these parts cannot be revealed. Meanwhile, fluorescence imaging is 2D imaging where information in the depth is missing. Therefore the information in labeling parts is also not complete. On the other hand, quantitative phase imaging is capable to image cells in 3D in real time through phase calculation. However, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction and cannot observe intercellular changes below 200 nanometers. In this work, fluorescence imaging and quantitative phase imaging are combined to build a multimodal imaging system. Such system has the capability to simultaneously observe the detailed intercellular phenomenon and 3D cell morphology. In this study the proposed multimodal imaging system is used to observe the cell behavior in the cell apoptosis. The aim is to highlight the limitations of fluorescence microscopy and to point out the advantages of multimodal quantitative phase and fluorescence imaging. The proposed multimodal quantitative phase imaging could be further applied in cell related biomedical research, such as tumor.

  17. Instrumentation of the ESRF medical imaging facility

    CERN Document Server

    Elleaume, H; Berkvens, P; Berruyer, G; Brochard, T; Dabin, Y; Domínguez, M C; Draperi, A; Fiedler, S; Goujon, G; Le Duc, G; Mattenet, M; Nemoz, C; Pérez, M; Renier, M; Schulze, C; Spanne, P; Suortti, P; Thomlinson, W; Estève, F; Bertrand, B; Le Bas, J F

    1999-01-01

    At the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) a beamport has been instrumented for medical research programs. Two facilities have been constructed for alternative operation. The first one is devoted to medical imaging and is focused on intravenous coronary angiography and computed tomography (CT). The second facility is dedicated to pre-clinical microbeam radiotherapy (MRT). This paper describes the instrumentation for the imaging facility. Two monochromators have been designed, both are based on bent silicon crystals in the Laue geometry. A versatile scanning device has been built for pre-alignment and scanning of the patient through the X-ray beam in radiography or CT modes. An intrinsic germanium detector is used together with large dynamic range electronics (16 bits) to acquire the data. The beamline is now at the end of its commissioning phase; intravenous coronary angiography is intended to start in 1999 with patients and the CT pre-clinical program is underway on small animals. The first in viv...

  18. Imaging, cutting, and collecting instrument and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tench, R.J.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Balooch, M.; Balhorn, R.L.; Allen, M.J.

    1995-10-31

    Instrumentation and techniques are described to image small objects, such as but not limited to individual human chromosomes, with nanometer resolution. This instrument and method are also used to cut-off identified parts of objects, to move around and manipulate the cut-off parts on the substrate on which they are being imaged to predetermined locations on the substrate, and to remove the cut-off parts from the substrate. This is accomplished using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and by modification of the conventional cantilever stylus assembly of an AFM. The plural cantilevers are used with either sharp-tips or knife-edges. In addition, the invention can be utilized for measuring the hardness of materials. 10 figs.

  19. Advances in imaging instrumentation for nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kovalski, Gil; Sharir, Tali; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-07-17

    Advances in imaging instrumentation and technology have greatly contributed to nuclear cardiology. Dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras incorporating novel, highly efficient detector, collimator, and system designs have emerged with the expansion of nuclear cardiology. Solid-state radiation detectors incorporating cadmium zinc telluride, which directly convert radiation to electrical signals and yield improved energy resolution and spatial resolution and enhanced count sensitivity geometries, are increasingly gaining favor as the detector of choice for application in dedicated cardiac SPECT systems. Additionally, hybrid imaging systems in which SPECT and PET are combined with X-ray CT are currently widely used, with PET/MRI hybrid systems having also been recently introduced. The improved quantitative SPECT/CT has the potential to measure the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve. Rapid development of silicon photomultipliers leads to enhancement in PET image quality and count rates. In addition, the reduction of emission-transmission mismatch artifacts via application of accurate time-of-flight information, and cardiac motion de-blurring aided by anatomical images, are emerging techniques for further improvement of cardiac PET. This article reviews recent advances such as these in nuclear cardiology imaging instrumentation and technology, and the corresponding diagnostic benefits.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  1. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  2. Application of an X-ray Fluorescence Instrument to Helicopter Wear Debris Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Becker, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the application of an X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument to determine the composition of wear debris collected from helicopter magnetic chip detectors and oil filters. The Twin-X XRF...

  3. Image processing for drift compensation in fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen B.; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is characterized by low background noise, thus a fluorescent object appears as an area of high signal/noise. Thermal gradients may result in apparent motion of the object, leading to a blurred image. Here, we have developed an image processing methodology that may remove...

  4. CMOS Time-Resolved, Contact, and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging for DNA Molecular Diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Guo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumental limitations such as bulkiness and high cost prevent the fluorescence technique from becoming ubiquitous for point-of-care deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA detection and other in-field molecular diagnostics applications. The complimentary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology, as benefited from process scaling, provides several advanced capabilities such as high integration density, high-resolution signal processing, and low power consumption, enabling sensitive, integrated, and low-cost fluorescence analytical platforms. In this paper, CMOS time-resolved, contact, and multispectral imaging are reviewed. Recently reported CMOS fluorescence analysis microsystem prototypes are surveyed to highlight the present state of the art.

  5. Advances in fluorescence labeling strategies for dynamic cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kevin M; Palmer, Amy E

    2014-07-01

    Synergistic advances in optical physics, probe design, molecular biology, labeling techniques and computational analysis have propelled fluorescence imaging into new realms of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity. This review aims to discuss advances in fluorescent probes and live-cell labeling strategies, two areas that remain pivotal for future advances in imaging technology. Fluorescent protein- and bio-orthogonal-based methods for protein and RNA imaging are discussed as well as emerging bioengineering techniques that enable their expression at specific genomic loci (for example, CRISPR and TALENs). Important attributes that contribute to the success of each technique are emphasized, providing a guideline for future advances in dynamic live-cell imaging.

  6. Effects of Depilation-Induced Skin Pigmentation and Diet-Induced Fluorescence on In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) and far-red fluorescence imaging (FRFI) were used to investigate effects of depilation-induced skin pigmentation and diet-induced background fluorescence on fluorescent signal amplitude and lymphatic contraction frequency in C57BL6 mice. Far-red fluorescent signal amplitude, but not frequency, was affected by diet-induced fluorescence, which was removed by feeding the mice an alfalfa-free diet, and skin pigmentation further impacted the amplitude mea...

  7. Fluorescence imaging techniques for studying Drosophila embryo development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrakis, Manos; Rikhy, Richa; Lilly, Mary; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2008-06-01

    This unit describes fluorescence-based techniques for noninvasive imaging of development in living Drosophila embryos, discussing considerations for fluorescent imaging within living embryos and providing protocols for generation of flies expressing fluorescently tagged proteins and for preparation of embryos for fluorescent imaging. The unit details time-lapse confocal imaging of live embryos and discusses optimizing image acquisition and performing three-dimensional imaging. Finally, the unit provides a variety of specific methods for optical highlighting of specific subsets of fluorescently tagged proteins and organelles in the embryo, including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP), and photoactivation techniques, permitting analysis of specific movements of fluorescently tagged proteins within cells. These protocols, together with the relative ease of generating transgenic animals and the ability to express tagged proteins in specific tissues or at specific developmental times, provide powerful means for examining in vivo behavior of any tagged protein in embryos in myriad mutant backgrounds. Copyright 2008 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Fluorescence imaging preparation methods for tissue scaffolds implanted into a green fluorescent protein porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah E; White, Richard A; Grant, David A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-10-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) animal models have become increasingly popular due to their potential to enhance in vivo imaging and their application to many fields of study. We have developed a technique to observe host tissue integration into scaffolds using GFP expressing swine and fluorescence imaging. Current fluorescence imaging preparation methods cannot be translated to a full GFP animal model due to several challenges and limitations that are investigated here. We have implanted tissue scaffolds into GFP expressing swine and have prepared explanted scaffolds for fluorescence imaging using four different methods including formalin fixation and paraffin embedding, vapor fixation, freshly prepared paraformaldehyde fixation, and fresh frozen tissue. Explanted scaffolds and tissue were imaged using confocal microscopy with spectral separation to evaluate the GFP animal model for visualization of host tissue integration into explanted scaffolds. All methods except fresh frozen tissue induced autofluorescence of the scaffold, preventing visualization of detail between host tissue and scaffold fibers. Fresh frozen tissue preparation allowed for the most reliable visualization of fluorescent host tissue integration into non-fluorescent scaffolds. It was concluded that fresh frozen tissue preparation is the best method for fluorescence imaging preparation when using scaffolds implanted into GFP whole animal models.

  9. Refractive index sensing of green fluorescent proteins in living cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Manen, Henk-Jan; Verkuijlen, Paul; Wittendorp, Paul; Subramaniam, Vinod; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Otto, Cees

    2008-01-01

    We show that fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of green fluorescent protein (GFP) molecules in cells can be used to report on the local refractive index of intracellular GFP. We expressed GFP fusion constructs of Rac2 and gp91(phox), which are both subunits of the phagocyte NADPH

  10. FLEX: an imaging spectrometer for measurement of vegetation fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorenburg, Kees; Visser, Huib; Court, Andrew; Stoll, Marc Ph.

    2017-11-01

    Detection of vegetation fluorescence gives information about plant functioning, stress and vitality. During the past decades several ground based laser fluorosensors have been developed to investigate these processes and to demonstrate the value of this technique. FLEX (= FLuorescense EXplorer) is a space mission to measure the fluorescence of vegetation on earth over large areas from space. Such a mission would greatly improve the understanding and enhance the capability to quantify e.g. the role of terrestrial vegetation in global carbon sequestration. Because the fluorescence signal, which is excited by solar irradiation is low with respect to the reflected sunlight the signal from a satellite is proposed to be measured in the solar Fraunhofer lines, where the reflection signal is much reduced. The heart of FLEX is a high resolution imaging spectrometer with 2 channels: channel 1 around the Fraunhofer lines at ‡ = 397 nm, ‡= 423 nm and/or ‡ = 434 nm and channel 2 around the Fraunhofer line at ‡ = 656 nm. The required spectral resolution will depend on the linewidth (0.02-0.3 nm). A first definition of the field of view is 8.4 degrees, leading from an 800 km satellite altitude to a swath of about 120 km. For detection a 1024x1024 pixel frame transfer CCD detector is proposed, with a pixel dimension of 13 x 13 ‡ mm2. The maximum footprint is about 500x500m2. The optical configuration contains a scan mirror for solar calibration, for pointing the FOV in swath direction and for freezing the observed ground scene up to a few seconds to increase the signal to noise performance. At this moment the concept of FLEX is elaborated in a feasibility study. Both the scientific and instrument requirements are updated and the concept is studied in detail. Besides a development plan for FLEX is made. In this paper the idea and the headlines of FLEX are described.

  11. Studying membrane properties using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stöckl, M.T.; Bizzarri, R.; Subramaniam, Vinod; Mely, Y.; Duportail, G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a powerful tool to investigate the structure and composition of biological membranes. A wide variety of fluorescent probes suitable for FLIM experiments have been described. These compounds differ strongly in the details of their incorporation into

  12. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis in humans by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Bernd; Dziekan, Thomas; Weissbach, Carmen; Mahler, Marianne; Schirner, Michael; Berliner, Birgitt; Bauer, Daniel; Voigt, Jan; Berliner, Michael; Bahner, Malte L.; Macdonald, Rainer

    2010-02-01

    The blood pool agent indo-cyanine green (ICG) has been investigated in a prospective clinical study for detection of rheumatoid arthritis using fluorescence imaging. Temporal behavior as well as spatial distribution of fluorescence intensity are suited to differentiate healthy and inflamed finger joints after i.v. injection of an ICG bolus.

  13. Instrumentation and Fluorescent Chemistries Used in qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Löfström, Charlotta; Hansen, Trine

    2012-01-01

    -time PCR instrumentation, including the thermal and optical systems and the software. Performance parameters such as temperature uniformity, accuracy and ramp speed as well as reaction format, optical systems, calibration of dyes, software and comparison between different real-time PCR platforms...

  14. Augmented microscopy: real-time overlay of bright-field and near-infrared fluorescence images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jeffrey R; Gainer, Christian F; Martirosyan, Nikolay; Skoch, Jesse; Lemole, G Michael; Anton, Rein; Romanowski, Marek

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative applications of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents can be aided by instrumentation capable of merging the view of surgical field with that of NIR fluorescence. We demonstrate augmented microscopy, an intraoperative imaging technique in which bright-field (real) and electronically processed NIR fluorescence (synthetic) images are merged within the optical path of a stereomicroscope. Under luminance of 100,000 lx, representing typical illumination of the surgical field, the augmented microscope detects 189 nM concentration of indocyanine green and produces a composite of the real and synthetic images within the eyepiece of the microscope at 20 fps. Augmentation described here can be implemented as an add-on module to visualize NIR contrast agents, laser beams, or various types of electronic data within the surgical microscopes commonly used in neurosurgical, cerebrovascular, otolaryngological, and ophthalmic procedures.

  15. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  16. Fluorogen-based reporters for fluorescence imaging: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescence bioimaging has recently jumped into a new area of spatiotemporal resolution and sensitivity thanks to synergistic advances in both optical physics and probe/biosensor design. This review focuses on the recent development of genetically encodable fluorescent reporters that bind endogenously present or exogenously applied fluorogenic chromophores (so-called fluorogens) and activate their fluorescence. We highlight the innovative engineering and design that gave rise to these new natural and synthetic fluorescent reporters, and describe some of the emerging applications in imaging and biosensing.

  17. Image processing for drift compensation in fluorescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steffen; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Coutinho, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is characterized by low background noise, thus a fluorescent object appears as an area of high signal/noise. Thermal gradients may result in apparent motion of the object, leading to a blurred image. Here, we have developed an image processing methodology that may remove....../reduce blur significantly for any type of microscopy. A total of ~100 images were acquired with a pixel size of 30 nm. The acquisition time for each image was approximately 1second. We can quantity the drift in X and Y using the sub pixel accuracy computed centroid location of an image object in each frame....... We can measure drifts down to approximately 10 nm in size and a drift-compensated image can therefore be reconstructed on a grid of the same size using the “Shift and Add” approach leading to an image of identical size asthe individual image. We have also reconstructed the image using a 3 fold larger...

  18. Sensitive detection of fluorescence in western blotting by merging images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukari; Higa, Shinichiro; Iwasaki, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Harada, Akihito; Baba, Yoshihiro; Fujita, Masatoshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki

    2018-01-01

    The western blotting technique is widely used to analyze protein expression levels and protein molecular weight. The chemiluminescence method is mainly used for detection due to its high sensitivity and ease of manipulation, but it is unsuitable for detailed analyses because it cannot be used to detect multiple proteins simultaneously. Recently, more attention has been paid to the fluorescence detection method because it is more quantitative and is suitable for the detection of multiple proteins simultaneously. However, fluorescence detection can be limited by poor image resolution and low detection sensitivity. Here, we describe a method to detect fluorescence in western blots using fluorescence microscopy to obtain high-resolution images. In this method, filters and fluorescent dyes are optimized to enhance detection sensitivity to a level similar to that of the chemiluminescence method.

  19. Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Uncovers Photosynthetic Fingerprint of Citrus Huanglongbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Cen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Huanglongbing (HLB is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus, which has posed a serious threat to the global citrus production. This research was aimed to explore the use of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging combined with feature selection to characterize and detect the HLB disease. Chlorophyll fluorescence images of citrus leaf samples were measured by an in-house chlorophyll fluorescence imaging system. The commonly used chlorophyll fluorescence parameters provided the first screening of HLB disease. To further explore the photosynthetic fingerprint of HLB infected leaves, three feature selection methods combined with the supervised classifiers were employed to identify the unique fluorescence signature of HLB and perform the three-class classification (i.e., healthy, HLB infected, and nutrient deficient leaves. Unlike the commonly used fluorescence parameters, this novel data-driven approach by using the combination of the mean fluorescence parameters and image features gave the best classification performance with the accuracy of 97%, and presented a better interpretation for the spatial heterogeneity of photochemical and non-photochemical components in HLB infected citrus leaves. These results imply the potential of the proposed approach for the citrus HLB disease diagnosis, and also provide a valuable insight for the photosynthetic response to the HLB disease.

  20. The Wide Field Imager instrument for Athena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meidinger, Norbert; Barbera, Marco; Emberger, Valentin; Fürmetz, Maria; Manhart, Markus; Müller-Seidlitz, Johannes; Nandra, Kirpal; Plattner, Markus; Rau, Arne; Treberspurg, Wolfgang

    2017-08-01

    ESA's next large X-ray mission ATHENA is designed to address the Cosmic Vision science theme 'The Hot and Energetic Universe'. It will provide answers to the two key astrophysical questions how does ordinary matter assemble into the large-scale structures we see today and how do black holes grow and shape the Universe. The ATHENA spacecraft will be equipped with two focal plane cameras, a Wide Field Imager (WFI) and an X-ray Integral Field Unit (X-IFU). The WFI instrument is optimized for state-of-the-art resolution spectroscopy over a large field of view of 40 amin x 40 amin and high count rates up to and beyond 1 Crab source intensity. The cryogenic X-IFU camera is designed for high-spectral resolution imaging. Both cameras share alternately a mirror system based on silicon pore optics with a focal length of 12 m and large effective area of about 2 m2 at an energy of 1 keV. Although the mission is still in phase A, i.e. studying the feasibility and developing the necessary technology, the definition and development of the instrumentation made already significant progress. The herein described WFI focal plane camera covers the energy band from 0.2 keV to 15 keV with 450 μm thick fully depleted back-illuminated silicon active pixel sensors of DEPFET type. The spatial resolution will be provided by one million pixels, each with a size of 130 μm x 130 μm. The time resolution requirement for the WFI large detector array is 5 ms and for the WFI fast detector 80 μs. The large effective area of the mirror system will be completed by a high quantum efficiency above 90% for medium and higher energies. The status of the various WFI subsystems to achieve this performance will be described and recent changes will be explained here.

  1. Photobleaching correction in fluorescence microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Nathalie B; Diaz Zamboni, Javier E; Adur, Javier F; Paravani, Enrique V; Casco, Victor H

    2007-01-01

    Fluorophores are used to detect molecular expression by highly specific antigen-antibody reactions in fluorescence microscopy techniques. A portion of the fluorophore emits fluorescence when irradiated with electromagnetic waves of particular wavelengths, enabling its detection. Photobleaching irreversibly destroys fluorophores stimulated by radiation within the excitation spectrum, thus eliminating potentially useful information. Since this process may not be completely prevented, techniques have been developed to slow it down or to correct resulting alterations (mainly, the decrease in fluorescent signal). In the present work, the correction by photobleaching curve was studied using E-cadherin (a cell-cell adhesion molecule) expression in Bufo arenarum embryos. Significant improvements were observed when applying this simple, inexpensive and fast technique

  2. Coherent Control in Multiphoton Fluorescence Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    De, Arijit Kumar; Goswami, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    In multiphoton fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy ultrafast laser pulses, i.e. light pulses having pulse-width ≤ 1picosecond (1 ps = 10−12 s), are commonly used to circumvent the low multiphoton absorption cross-sections of common fluorophores. Starting with a discussion on how amplitude modulation of ultrashort pulse-train enhances the two-photon fluorescence providing deep insight into laser-induced photo-thermal damage, the effect of controlling time lag between phase-locked laser p...

  3. Benchtop and animal validation of a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for potential use in cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Shiwu; Shao, Pengfei; Smith, Zachary J; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald X

    2018-02-01

    We propose a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system (PFMS) for intraoperative display of biliary structure and prevention of iatrogenic injuries during cholecystectomy. The system consists of a light source module, a camera module, and a Raspberry Pi computer with an LCD. Indocyanine green (ICG) is used as a fluorescent contrast agent for experimental validation of the system. Fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels are acquired by our PFMS and compared with those of a commercial Xenogen IVIS system. We study the fluorescence detection depth by superposing different thicknesses of chicken breast on an ICG-loaded agar phantom. We verify the technical feasibility for identifying potential iatrogenic injury in cholecystectomy using a rat model in vivo. The proposed PFMS system is portable, inexpensive, and suitable for deployment in resource-limited settings. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  4. Ultraminiature optical design for multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Tyler H; Keenan, Molly; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer K

    2017-03-01

    A miniature wide-field multispectral endoscopic imaging system was developed enabling reflectance and fluorescence imaging over a broad wavelength range. At 0.8-mm diameter, the endoscope can be utilized for natural orifice imaging in small lumens such as the fallopian tubes. Five lasers from 250 to 642 nm are coupled into a 125 - ? m diameter multimode fiber and transmitted to the endoscope distal tip for illumination. Ultraviolet and blue wavelengths excite endogenous fluorophores, which can provide differential fluorescence emission images for health and disease. Visible wavelengths provide reflectance images that can be combined for pseudo-white-light imaging and navigation. Imaging is performed by a 300 - ? m diameter three-element lens system connected to a 3000-element fiber. The lens system was designed for a 70-deg full field of view, working distance from 3 mm to infinity, and 40% contrast at the Nyquist cutoff of the fiber bundle. Measured performance characteristics are near design goals. The endoscope was utilized to obtain example monochromatic, pseudo-white-light, and composite fluorescence images of phantoms and porcine reproductive tract. This work shows the feasibility of packaging a highly capable multispectral fluorescence imaging system into a miniature endoscopic system that may have applications in early detection of cancer.

  5. Fluorescence multispectral imaging-based diagnostic system for atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cassandra Su Lyn; Horiuchi, Toshikatsu; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Araya; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Iwaya, Keiichi; Nakai, Kanji; Azmi, Amalina; Zulaziz, Natasha; Azhim, Azran; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Morimoto, Yuji

    2016-08-20

    Composition of atherosclerotic arterial walls is rich in lipids such as cholesterol, unlike normal arterial walls. In this study, we aimed to utilize this difference to diagnose atherosclerosis via multispectral fluorescence imaging, which allows for identification of fluorescence originating from the substance in the arterial wall. The inner surface of extracted arteries (rabbit abdominal aorta, human coronary artery) was illuminated by 405 nm excitation light and multispectral fluorescence images were obtained. Pathological examination of human coronary artery samples were carried out and thickness of arteries were calculated by measuring combined media and intima thickness. The fluorescence spectra in atherosclerotic sites were different from those in normal sites. Multiple regions of interest (ROI) were selected within each sample and a ratio between two fluorescence intensity differences (where each intensity difference is calculated between an identifier wavelength and a base wavelength) from each ROI was determined, allowing for discrimination of atherosclerotic sites. Fluorescence intensity and thickness of artery were found to be significantly correlated. These results indicate that multispectral fluorescence imaging provides qualitative and quantitative evaluations of atherosclerosis and is therefore a viable method of diagnosing the disease.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of oxygen in dental biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerritsen, Hans C.; de Grauw, Cees J.

    2000-12-01

    Dental biofilm consists of micro-colonies of bacteria embedded in a matrix of polysaccharides and salivary proteins. pH and oxygen concentration are of great importance in dental biofilm. Both can be measured using fluorescence techniques. The imaging of dental biofilm is complicated by the thickness of the biofilms that can be up to several hundred micrometers thick. Here, we employed a combination of two-photon excitation microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging to quantify the oxygen concentration in dental biofilm. Collisional quenching of fluorescent probes by molecular oxygen leads to a reduction of the fluorescence lifetime of the probe. We employed this mechanism to measure the oxygen concentration distribution in dental biofilm by means of fluorescence lifetime imaging. Here, TRIS Ruthenium chloride hydrate was used as an oxygen probe. A calibration procedure on buffers was use to measure the lifetime response of this Ruthenium probe. The results are in agreement with the Stern-Volmer equation. A linear relation was found between the ratio of the unquenched and the quenched lifetime and the oxygen concentration. The biofilm fluorescence lifetime imaging results show a strong oxygen gradient at the buffer - biofilm interface and the average oxygen concentration in the biofilm amounted to 50 μM.

  7. In vivo cellular imaging using fluorescent proteins - Methods and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Monti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and genetic engineering of fluorescent proteins has revolutionized cell biology. What was previously invisible to the cell often can be made visible with the use of fluorescent proteins. With this words, Robert M. Hoffman introduces In vivo Cellular Imaging Using Fluorescent proteins, the eighteen chapters book dedicated to the description of how fluorescence proteins have changed the way to analyze cellular processes in vivo. Modern researches aim to study new and less invasive methods able to follow the behavior of different cell types in different biological contexts: for example, how cancer cells migrate or how they respond to different therapies. Also, in vivo systems can help researchers to better understand animal embryonic development so as how fluorescence proteins may be used to monitor different processes in living organisms at the molecular and cellular level.

  8. Effects of Depilation-Induced Skin Pigmentation and Diet-Induced Fluorescence on In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2017-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) and far-red fluorescence imaging (FRFI) were used to investigate effects of depilation-induced skin pigmentation and diet-induced background fluorescence on fluorescent signal amplitude and lymphatic contraction frequency in C57BL6 mice. Far-red fluorescent signal amplitude, but not frequency, was affected by diet-induced fluorescence, which was removed by feeding the mice an alfalfa-free diet, and skin pigmentation further impacted the amplitude measurement. NIRFI showed minimal background fluorescence; however, skin pigmentation reduced the amplitude of fluorescent signal changes. Therefore, these effects should be taken into account when imaging mice with different states of skin pigmentation and diet-induced background fluorescence in vivo.

  9. GFP fluorescence imaging with laser confocal scanning microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yanhua; Xing, Da; Shi, Qiaojuan; Zhou, Junchu

    1999-09-01

    With gene marking technique, green fluorescent protein (GFP) and nodule bacteria gene has been linked together to form a single fusion gene expression vector. Then the vector is transferred into the nodule bacteria and the astragalus sinicus is invaded by the vector. With laser confocal scanning microscope, some important morphological information in plant nitrogen fixation research about the invading of nodule bacteria and the formation process of root nodule has been obtained through the 3D imaging of GFP reporting fluorescence.

  10. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications of Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Petrosky, Brian Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Laser flare can often be a major issue in particle image velocimetry (PIV) involving solid boundaries in a flow or a gas-liquid interface. The use of fluorescent light from dye-doped particles has been demonstrated in water applications, but reproducing the technique in an airflow is more difficult due to particle size constraints and safety concerns. The following thesis is formatted in a hybrid manuscript style, including a full paper presenting the applications of fluorescent Kiton R...

  11. Imaging fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy: new tools for quantitative bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Nirmalya; Wohland, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) techniques provide information at the single-molecule level with excellent time resolution. Usually applied at a single spot in a sample, they have been recently extended into imaging formats, referred to as imaging FFS. They provide spatial information at the optical diffraction limit and temporal information in the microsecond to millisecond range. This review provides an overview of the different modalities in which imaging FFS techniques have been implemented and discusses present imaging FFS capabilities and limitations. A combination of imaging FFS and nanoscopy would allow one to record information with the detailed spatial information of nanoscopy, which is ∼20 nm and limited only by fluorophore size and labeling density, and the time resolution of imaging FFS, limited by the fluorescence lifetime. This combination would provide new insights into biological events by providing spatiotemporal resolution at unprecedented levels.

  12. Rotational multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound: bimodal system for intravascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Bec, Julien; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Gorpas, Dimitris; Fatakdawala, Hussain; Marcu, Laura

    2014-06-01

    We report the development and validation of a hybrid intravascular diagnostic system combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIm) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) for cardiovascular imaging applications. A prototype FLIm system based on fluorescence pulse sampling technique providing information on artery biochemical composition was integrated with a commercial IVUS system providing information on artery morphology. A customized 3-Fr bimodal catheter combining a rotational side-view fiberoptic and a 40-MHz IVUS transducer was constructed for sequential helical scanning (rotation and pullback) of tubular structures. Validation of this bimodal approach was conducted in pig heart coronary arteries. Spatial resolution, fluorescence detection efficiency, pulse broadening effect, and lifetime measurement variability of the FLIm system were systematically evaluated. Current results show that this system is capable of temporarily resolving the fluorescence emission simultaneously in multiple spectral channels in a single pullback sequence. Accurate measurements of fluorescence decay characteristics from arterial segments can be obtained rapidly (e.g., 20 mm in 5 s), and accurate co-registration of fluorescence and ultrasound features can be achieved. The current finding demonstrates the compatibility of FLIm instrumentation with in vivo clinical investigations and its potential to complement conventional IVUS during catheterization procedures.

  13. Exploiting Molecular Biology by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Francis; Fattinger, Christof

    Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal fluorophore. With fluorescence lifetimes in the microsecond range and fluorescence quantum yield of 0.4 some water soluble complexes of Ruthenium like modified Ru(sulfobathophenanthroline) complexes fulfill these properties. They are outstanding fluorescent labels for ultrasensitive assays as illustrated in two examples, in drug discovery and in point of care testing.We discuss the fundamentals and the state-of-the-art of the most sensitive time-gated fluorescence assays. We reflect on how the imaging devices currently employed for readout of these assays might evolve in the future. Many contemporary biological investigations rely on highly sensitive in vitro assays for the analysis of specific molecules in biological specimens, and the main part of these assays depends on high-sensitivity fluorescence detection techniques for the final readout. The analyzed molecules and molecular interactions in the specimen need to be detected in the presence of other highly abundant biomolecules, while the analyzed molecules themselves are only present at nano-, pico-, or even femtomolar concentration.A short scientific rationale of fluorescence is presented. It emphasizes the use of fluorescent labels for sensitive assays in life sciences and specifies the main properties of an ideal

  14. A portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Yang, Chaoyu; Gan, Qi; Ma, Rong; Zhang, Zeshu; Chang, Shufang; Shao, Pengfei; Zhang, Shiwu; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we proposed a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system to prevent iatrogenic biliary injuries from occurring during cholecystectomy due to misidentification of the cystic structures. The system consisted of a light source module, a CMOS camera, a Raspberry Pi computer and a 5 inch HDMI LCD. Specifically, the light source module was composed of 690 nm and 850 nm LEDs, allowing the CMOS camera to simultaneously acquire both fluorescence and background images. The system was controlled by Raspberry Pi using Python programming with the OpenCV library under Linux. We chose Indocyanine green(ICG) as a fluorescent contrast agent and then tested fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels by our fluorescence microscopic system compared with the commercial Xenogen IVIS system. The spatial resolution of the proposed fluorescence microscopic imaging system was measured by a 1951 USAF resolution target and the dynamic response was evaluated quantitatively with an automatic displacement platform. Finally, we verified the technical feasibility of the proposed system in mouse models of bile duct, performing both correct and incorrect gallbladder resection. Our experiments showed that the proposed system can provide clear visualization of the confluence between the cystic duct and common bile duct or common hepatic duct, suggesting that this is a potential method for guiding cholecystectomy. The proposed portable system only cost a total of $300, potentially promoting its use in resource-limited settings.

  15. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope : All-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device

  16. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  17. Neutron imaging and small angle neutron scattering instruments at KUR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasushi; Oba, Yojiro; Hino, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We review the neutron imaging (NI) and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) instruments at KUR, Kumatori, Osaka, Japan. There are two NI and one SANS instruments. The both instruments are compact and used flexibly. Some challenging experiments taking advantage of low neutron fluence are described. The feature of KUR is also described briefly. (author)

  18. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  19. Fluorescence Imaging of Fast Retrograde Axonal Transport in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawid Schellingerhout

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to enable an in vivo imaging technology that can assess the anatomy and function of peripheral nerve tissue (neurography. To do this, we designed and tested a fluorescently labeled molecular probe based on the nontoxic C fragment of tetanus toxin (TTc. TTc was purified, labeled, and subjected to immunoassays and cell uptake assays. The compound was then injected into C57BL/6 mice (N = 60 for in vivo imaging and histologic studies. Image analysis and immunohistochemistry were performed. We found that TTc could be labeled with fluorescent moieties without loss of immunoreactivity or biologic potency in cell uptake assays. In vivo fluorescent imaging experiments demonstrated uptake and retrograde transport of the compound along the course of the sciatic nerve and in the spinal cord. Ex vivo imaging and immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of TTc in the sciatic nerve and spinal cord, whereas control animals injected with human serum albumin did not exhibit these features. We have demonstrated neurography with a fluorescently labeled molecular imaging contrast agent based on the TTc.

  20. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  1. Mesh adaptation technique for Fourier-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, Vadim Y.

    2006-01-01

    A novel adaptive mesh technique in the Fourier domain is introduced for problems in fluorescence lifetime imaging. A dynamical adaptation of the three-dimensional scheme based on the finite volume formulation reduces computational time and balances the ill-posed nature of the inverse problem. Light propagation in the medium is modeled by the telegraph equation, while the lifetime reconstruction algorithm is derived from the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. Stability and computational efficiency of the method are demonstrated by image reconstruction of two spherical fluorescent objects embedded in a tissue phantom

  2. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G [Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Sivaguru, Mayandi [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Chen Yi, E-mail: loganliu@illinois.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2011-09-07

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  3. Refractive index sensing using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Carolyn; Suhling, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime is a function of the refractive index of the fluorophore's environment, for example in the case of the biologically important green fluorescent protein (GFP). In order to address the question whether this effect can be exploited to image the local environment of specific proteins in cell biology, we need to determine the distance over which the fluorophore's lifetime is sensitive to the refractive index. To this end, we employ Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) of fluorescein in NaOH buffer at an interface. This approach allows us to map the fluorescence lifetime as a function of distance from a buffer/air and buffer/oil interface. Preliminary data show that the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein increases near a buffer/air interface and decreases near a buffer/oil interface. The range over which this fluorescence lifetime change occurs is found to be of the order several μm which is consistent with a theoretical model based on the full width at half maximum of the emission spectrum proposed by Toptygin

  4. Enhanced 3D fluorescence live cell imaging on nanoplasmonic substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gartia, Manas Ranjan; Hsiao, Austin; Logan Liu, G; Sivaguru, Mayandi; Chen Yi

    2011-01-01

    We have created a randomly distributed nanocone substrate on silicon coated with silver for surface-plasmon-enhanced fluorescence detection and 3D cell imaging. Optical characterization of the nanocone substrate showed it can support several plasmonic modes (in the 300-800 nm wavelength range) that can be coupled to a fluorophore on the surface of the substrate, which gives rise to the enhanced fluorescence. Spectral analysis suggests that a nanocone substrate can create more excitons and shorter lifetime in the model fluorophore Rhodamine 6G (R6G) due to plasmon resonance energy transfer from the nanocone substrate to the nearby fluorophore. We observed three-dimensional fluorescence enhancement on our substrate shown from the confocal fluorescence imaging of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells grown on the substrate. The fluorescence intensity from the fluorophores bound on the cell membrane was amplified more than 100-fold as compared to that on a glass substrate. We believe that strong scattering within the nanostructured area coupled with random scattering inside the cell resulted in the observed three-dimensional enhancement in fluorescence with higher photostability on the substrate surface.

  5. Self-interference fluorescence microscopy: three dimensional fluorescence imaging without depth scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, M.; Evans, C.L.; de Boer, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for high-resolution, three-dimensional fluorescence imaging. In contrast to beam-scanning confocal microscopy, where the laser focus must be scanned both laterally and axially to collect a volume, we obtain depth information without the necessity of depth scanning. In this

  6. Optofluidic fluorescent imaging cytometry on a cell phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-09-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  7. Optofluidic Fluorescent Imaging Cytometry on a Cell Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Mavandadi, Sam; Coskun, Ahmet F.; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical sciences. Cost-effective translation of these technologies to remote and resource-limited environments could create new opportunities especially for telemedicine applications. Toward this direction, here we demonstrate the integration of imaging cytometry and fluorescent microscopy on a cell phone using a compact, lightweight, and cost-effective optofluidic attachment. In this cell-phone-based optofluidic imaging cytometry platform, fluorescently labeled particles or cells of interest are continuously delivered to our imaging volume through a disposable microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing camera unit of the cell phone. The same microfluidic device also acts as a multilayered optofluidic waveguide and efficiently guides our excitation light, which is butt-coupled from the side facets of our microfluidic channel using inexpensive light-emitting diodes. Since the excitation of the sample volume occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to the detection path, our cell-phone camera can record fluorescent movies of the specimens as they are flowing through the microchannel. The digital frames of these fluorescent movies are then rapidly processed to quantify the count and the density of the labeled particles/cells within the target solution of interest. We tested the performance of our cell-phone-based imaging cytometer by measuring the density of white blood cells in human blood samples, which provided a decent match to a commercially available hematology analyzer. We further characterized the imaging quality of the same platform to demonstrate a spatial resolution of ~2 μm. This cell-phone-enabled optofluidic imaging flow cytometer could especially be useful for rapid and sensitive imaging of bodily fluids for conducting various cell counts (e.g., toward monitoring of HIV+ patients) or rare cell analysis as well as for screening of water quality in

  8. Image reconstruction design of industrial CT instrument for teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Yongning; Cai Yufang

    2009-01-01

    Industrial CT instrument for teaching is applied to teaching and study in field of physics and radiology major, image reconstruction is an important part of software on CT instrument. The paper expatiate on CT physical theory and first generation CT reconstruction algorithm, describe scan process of industrial CT instrument for teaching; analyze image artifact as result of displacement of rotation center, implement method of center displacement correcting, design and complete image reconstruction software, application shows that reconstructed image is very clear and qualitatively high. (authors)

  9. Coherent fiber bundle based integrated photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging (PAUSFI) for endoscopy and diagnostic bio-imaging applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Joseph; Murukeshan, V M; Sathiyamoorthy, K; Woh, Lye Sun

    2014-01-01

    Recent research in diagnostic imaging and sensing focuses on deriving complementary information from the diagnosed site. From that perspective it is imperative to devise new imaging platforms where multiple distinct modalities are used either simultaneously or sequentially. Increased efforts have been devoted towards establishing such multi-modal imaging systems, which house and operate more than two imaging modalities within a single instrumentation set-up. In this context, we propose a novel multi-modal imaging platform using non-ionizing radiation that has been successfully conceptualized, established and experimentally demonstrated. This proposed GRIN lensed fiber-optic microscope and linear array transducer based PAUSFI (photoacoustic, ultrasound and fluorescence imaging) system makes use of non-ionizing radiation sources to map optical and acoustic heterogeneities (complementary information) along the depth of the tissue at multi-scale resolution (microscopic to mesoscopic). The fiber-optic assembly enables the system to perform minimally invasive remote light delivery and high resolution fluorescence and photoacoustic imaging of inaccessible areas of intact tissues or intra body cavities. It is expected that the proposed multi-modal imaging system could open up niches in bio-imaging research in the near future. (paper)

  10. Fluorescence imaging of angiogenesis in green fluorescent protein-expressing tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Jiang, Ping; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Jin W.; Li, Lingna; Yagi, Shigeo; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2002-05-01

    The development of therapeutics for the control of tumor angiogenesis requires a simple, reliable in vivo assay for tumor-induced vascularization. For this purpose, we have adapted the orthotopic implantation model of angiogenesis by using human and rodent tumors genetically tagged with Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) for grafting into nude mice. Genetically-fluorescent tumors can be readily imaged in vivo. The non-luminous induced capillaries are clearly visible against the bright tumor fluorescence examined either intravitally or by whole-body luminance in real time. Fluorescence shadowing replaces the laborious histological techniques for determining blood vessel density. High-level GFP-expressing tumor cell lines made it possible to acquire the high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical images of angiogenesis in both primary tumors and their metastatic lesions in various human and rodent tumor models by means of a light-based imaging system. Intravital images of angiogenesis onset and development were acquired and quantified from a GFP- expressing orthotopically-growing human prostate tumor over a 19-day period. Whole-body optical imaging visualized vessel density increasing linearly over a 20-week period in orthotopically-growing, GFP-expressing human breast tumor MDA-MB-435. Vessels in an orthotopically-growing GFP- expressing Lewis lung carcinoma tumor were visualized through the chest wall via a reversible skin flap. These clinically-relevant angiogenesis mouse models can be used for real-time in vivo evaluation of agents inhibiting or promoting tumor angiogenesis in physiological micro- environments.

  11. Fluorescence microscope by using computational ghost imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a fluorescence microscope by using the computational Ghost imaging (CGI for observing a living cell for a long duration over an hour. There is a problem for observing a cell about light-induced bleaching fora ling-term observation.Toover come the problem, we focused on an advantageof sensitivityof the CGI as second order colleration for an imaging with weak intensity excitation light. Setting for the CGI, a DMD projector was installed at an eye-piece part of a microscope and fluorescent light was detected using a bucket detectorofa photo-multiplier tube.Asaresults,wehaveshownthe imagingadvantageoftheCGI under weak light intensity, in addition, we have demonstrated to detect fluorescence images of biological samples for one day.

  12. Fluorescent Pluronic nanodots for in vivo two-photon imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurin, Mathieu; Vurth, Laeticia; Vial, Jean-Claude; Baldeck, Patrice; Stephan, Olivier; Marder, Seth R; Sanden, Boudewijn Van der

    2009-01-01

    We report the synthesis of new nanosized fluorescent probes based on bio-compatible polyethylene-polypropylene glycol (Pluronic) materials. In aqueous solution, mini-emulsification of Pluronic with a high fluorescent di-stryl benzene-modified derivative, exhibiting a two-photon absorption cross section as high as 2500 Goeppert-Mayer units at 800 nm, leads to nanoparticles exhibiting a hydrodynamic radius below 100 nm. We have demonstrated that these new probes with luminescence located in the spectral region of interest for bio-imaging (the yellow part of the visible spectrum) allow deep (500 μm) bio-imaging of the mice brain vasculature. The dose injected during our experiments is ten times lower when compared to the classical commercial rhodamine-B isothicyanate-Dextran system but gives similar results to homogeneous blood plasma staining. The mean fluorescent signal intensity stayed constant during more than 1 h.

  13. Quantitation of CRM197 using imaged capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection and capillary Western.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughney, John W; Ha, Sha; Rustandi, Richard R

    2017-10-01

    Maurice is a new instrument that can perform imaged capillary isoelectric focusing (icIEF). The standard detection for icIEF is UV absorbance at 280 nm, which limits its application to high protein concentration samples and non-complex samples. Here we describe an icIEF instrument with fluorescence detection. We demonstrate the advantage of using either icIEF with fluorescence detection or quantitative Western Blot to measure diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 protein titer in crude cell lysates and purified samples. These two techniques have great potentials to become standard methods to analyze protein titers in crude cell lysate or other complex samples types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Review of fluorescence guided surgery systems: identification of key performance capabilities beyond indocyanine green imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Alisha V.; Lin, Huiyun; Henderson, Eric R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in using fluorescence imaging instruments to guide surgery, and the leading options for open-field imaging are reviewed here. While the clinical fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) field has been focused predominantly on indocyanine green (ICG) imaging, there is accelerated development of more specific molecular tracers. These agents should help advance new indications for which FGS presents a paradigm shift in how molecular information is provided for resection decisions. There has been a steady growth in commercially marketed FGS systems, each with their own differentiated performance characteristics and specifications. A set of desirable criteria is presented to guide the evaluation of instruments, including: (i) real-time overlay of white-light and fluorescence images, (ii) operation within ambient room lighting, (iii) nanomolar-level sensitivity, (iv) quantitative capabilities, (v) simultaneous multiple fluorophore imaging, and (vi) ergonomic utility for open surgery. In this review, United States Food and Drug Administration 510(k) cleared commercial systems and some leading premarket FGS research systems were evaluated to illustrate the continual increase in this performance feature base. Generally, the systems designed for ICG-only imaging have sufficient sensitivity to ICG, but a fraction of the other desired features listed above, with both lower sensitivity and dynamic range. In comparison, the emerging research systems targeted for use with molecular agents have unique capabilities that will be essential for successful clinical imaging studies with low-concentration agents or where superior rejection of ambient light is needed. There is no perfect imaging system, but the feature differences among them are important differentiators in their utility, as outlined in the data and tables here.

  15. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  16. Plant response to destruxins visualized by imaging of chlorophyll fluorescence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukupová, Julie; Smatanová, Sylvie; Nedbal, Ladislav; Jegorov, A.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 118 (2003), s. 399-405 ISSN 0031-9317 Institutional research plan: CEZ:MSM 123100001; CEZ:AV0Z6087904 Keywords : fungal infection, destruxins * fluorescence imaging Subject RIV: GF - Plant Pathology, Vermin, Weed, Plant Protection Impact factor: 1.767, year: 2003

  17. Demonstration of plant fluorescence by imaging technique and Intelligent FluoroSensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenk, Sándor; Gádoros, Patrik; Kocsányi, László; Barócsi, Attila

    2015-10-01

    Photosynthesis is a process that converts carbon-dioxide into organic compounds, especially into sugars, using the energy of sunlight. The absorbed light energy is used mainly for photosynthesis initiated at the reaction centers of chlorophyll-protein complexes, but part of it is lost as heat and chlorophyll fluorescence. Therefore, the measurement of the latter can be used to estimate the photosynthetic activity. The basic method, when illuminating intact leaves with strong light after a dark adaptation of at least 20 minutes resulting in a transient change of fluorescence emission of the fluorophore chlorophyll-a called `Kautsky effect', is demonstrated by an imaging setup. The experimental kit includes a high radiant blue LED and a CCD camera (or a human eye) equipped with a red transmittance filter to detect the changing fluorescence radiation. However, for the measurement of several fluorescence parameters, describing the plant physiological processes in detail, the variation of several excitation light sources and an adequate detection method are needed. Several fluorescence induction protocols (e.g. traditional Kautsky, pulse amplitude modulated and excitation kinetic), are realized in the Intelligent FluoroSensor instrument. Using it, students are able to measure different plant fluorescence induction curves, quantitatively determine characteristic parameters and qualitatively interpret the measured signals.

  18. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, Valeri I; Bartona, James S; Richardson, Patricia R; Jones, Anita C

    2006-01-01

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect ∼10 attomole/cm 2 with a scan speed of ∼3-10 cm 2 /s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed

  19. Surgical instrument biocontaminant fluorescence detection in ambient lighting conditions for hospital reprocessing and sterilization department (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baribeau, François; Bubel, Annie; Dumont, Guillaume; Vachon, Carl; Lépine, André; Rochefort, Stéphane; Massicotte, Martin; Buteau-Vaillancourt, Louis; Gallant, Pascal; Mermut, Ozzy

    2017-03-01

    Hospitals currently rely on simple human visual inspection for assessing cleanliness of surgical instruments. Studies showed that surgical site infections are in part attributed to inadequate cleaning of medical devices. Standards groups recognize the need to objectively quantify the amount of residues on surgical instruments and establish guidelines. We developed a portable technology for the detection of contaminants on surgical instruments through fluorescence following cleaning. Weak fluorescence signals are usually detected in the obscurity only with the lighting of the excitation source. The key element of this system is that it works in ambient lighting conditions, a requirement to not disturb the normal workflow of hospital reprocessing facilities. A biocompatible fluorescent dye is added to the detergent and labels the proteins of organic residues. It is resistant to the harsh environment in a washer-disinfector. Two inspection devices have been developed with a 488nm laser as the excitation source: a handheld scanner and a tabletop station using spectral-domain and time-domain ambient light cancellation schemes. The systems are eye safe and equipped with image processing and interfacing software to provide visual or audible warnings to the operator based on a set of adjustable signal thresholds. Micron-scale residues are detected by the system which can also evaluate soil size and mass. Unlike swabbing, it can inspect whole tools in real-time. The technology has been validated in an independent hospital decontamination research laboratory. It also has potential applications in the forensics, agro-food, and space fields. Technical aspects and results will be presented and discussed.

  20. Multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging of chemotherapy distribution in solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Marjorie; Watson, Adrienne L.; Anderson, Leah; Largaespada, David A.; Provenzano, Paolo P.

    2017-11-01

    Doxorubicin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic employed to treat multiple human cancers, including numerous sarcomas and carcinomas. Furthermore, doxorubicin possesses strong fluorescent properties that make it an ideal reagent for modeling drug delivery by examining its distribution in cells and tissues. However, while doxorubicin fluorescence and lifetime have been imaged in live tissue, its behavior in archival samples that frequently result from drug and treatment studies in human and animal patients, and murine models of human cancer, has to date been largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate imaging of doxorubicin intensity and lifetimes in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections from mouse models of human cancer with multiphoton excitation and multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Multiphoton excitation imaging reveals robust doxorubicin emission in tissue sections and captures spatial heterogeneity in cells and tissues. However, quantifying the amount of doxorubicin signal in distinct cell compartments, particularly the nucleus, often remains challenging due to strong signals in multiple compartments. The addition of FLIM analysis to display the spatial distribution of excited state lifetimes clearly distinguishes between signals in distinct compartments such as the cell nuclei versus cytoplasm and allows for quantification of doxorubicin signal in each compartment. Furthermore, we observed a shift in lifetime values in the nuclei of transformed cells versus nontransformed cells, suggesting a possible diagnostic role for doxorubicin lifetime imaging to distinguish normal versus transformed cells. Thus, data here demonstrate that multiphoton FLIM is a highly sensitive platform for imaging doxorubicin distribution in normal and diseased archival tissues.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime to image epidermal ionic concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behne, Martin J.; Barry, Nicholas P.; Moll, Ingrid; Gratton, Enrico; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2004-09-01

    Measurements of ionic concentrations in skin have traditionally been performed with an array of methods which either did not reveal detailed localization information, or only provided qualitative, not quantitative information. FLIM combines a number of advantages into a method ideally suited to visualize concentrations of ions such as H+ in intact, unperturbed epidermis and stratum corneum (SC). Fluorescence lifetime is dye concentration-independent, the method requires only low light intensities and is therefore not prone to photobleaching or phototoxic artifacts, and because multiphoton lasers of IR wavelength are used, light penetrates deep into intact tissue. The standard method to measure SC pH is the flat pH electrode, which provides reliable information only about surface pH changes, without further vertical or subcellular spatial resolution; i.e., specific microdomains such as the corneocyte interstices are not resolved, and the deeper SC is inaccessible without resorting to inherently disruptive stripping methods. Furthermore, the concept of a gradient of pH through the SC stems from such stripping experiments, but other confirmation for this concept is lacking. Our investigations into the SC pH distribution so far have revealed the crucial role of the Sodium/Hydrogen Antiporter NHE1 in generation of SC acidity, the colocalization of enzymatic lipid processing activity in the SC with acidic domains of the SC, and the timing and localization of emerging acidity in the SC of newborns. Together, these results have led to an improved understanding of the SC pH, its distribution, origin, and regulation. Future uses for this method include measurements of other ions important for epidermal processes, such as Ca2+, and a quantitative approach to topical drug penetration.

  2. Linear and non-linear fluorescence imaging of neuronal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jonathan A. N.

    Optical imaging of neuronal activity offers new possibilities for understanding brain physiology. The predominant methods in neuroscience for measuring electrical activity require electrodes inserted into the tissue. Such methods, however, provide limited spatial information and are invasive. Optical methods are less physically invasive and offer the possibility for simultaneously imaging the activity of many neurons. In this thesis one- and two-photon fluorescence microscopy techniques were applied to several in vivo and in vitro mammalian preparations. Using one-photon absorption fluorescence microscopy and gradient index (GRIN) lens optics, cortical electrical activity in response to electric stimulation was resolved in three-dimensions at high-speed in the primary somatosensory cortex of the mouse in vivo using voltage-sensitive dyes. Imaging at depths up to 150 mum below the cortex surface, it was possible to resolve depth-dependent patterns of neuronal activity in response to cortical and thalamic electric stimulation. The patterns of activity were consistent with known cortical cellular architecture. In a qualitatively different set of experiments, one-photon fluorescence microscopy via voltage-sensitive dyes was successfully employed to image an in vitro preparation of the perfused rat brainstem during the process of respiratory rhythmogenesis. Imaging results yielded insights into the spatial organization of the central respiratory rhythm generation region in the ventrolateral medulla. A multifocal two-photon scanning microscope was constructed, and design and operation principles are described. Utilizing the novel device, anatomical and functional two-photon imaging via potentiometric dyes and calcium dyes is described, and the results of in vivo versus in vitro imaging are compared. Anatomical imaging results used either functional probe background fluorescence or green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression. Spectroscopic experiments measuring the two

  3. A hyperspectral fluorescence system for 3D in vivo optical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavattini, Guido; Vecchi, Stefania; Mitchell, Gregory; Weisser, Ulli; Leahy, Richard M; Pichler, Bernd J; Smith, Desmond J; Cherry, Simon R

    2006-01-01

    In vivo optical instruments designed for small animal imaging generally measure the integrated light intensity across a broad band of wavelengths, or make measurements at a small number of selected wavelengths, and primarily use any spectral information to characterize and remove autofluorescence. We have developed a flexible hyperspectral imaging instrument to explore the use of spectral information to determine the 3D source location for in vivo fluorescence imaging applications. We hypothesize that the spectral distribution of the emitted fluorescence signal can be used to provide additional information to 3D reconstruction algorithms being developed for optical tomography. To test this hypothesis, we have designed and built an in vivo hyperspectral imaging system, which can acquire data from 400 to 1000 nm with 3 nm spectral resolution and which is flexible enough to allow the testing of a wide range of illumination and detection geometries. It also has the capability to generate a surface contour map of the animal for input into the reconstruction process. In this paper, we present the design of the system, demonstrate the depth dependence of the spectral signal in phantoms and show the ability to reconstruct 3D source locations using the spectral data in a simple phantom. We also characterize the basic performance of the imaging system

  4. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: All-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Q.; Schelen, B.; Schouten, R.

    2012-01-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sam...

  5. Registering plant dysfunction in artificial biosystems through fluorescence imaging technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolova, Alexandra; Krumov, Alexandar; Vassilev, Vesselin

    Humanity ambitions in space exploration and long-term men-operated space missions evoke an increasing interest to artificial ecosystem researches. Advanced studies of plant biosystems provoke development of new innovative technologies for plant cultivation in man-made environment. Closed ecosystems of different types and structure are now used for space horticulture, cultivation of genetically modified species, bio-products for pharmacies and industry etc. New technologies are required to monitor and control basic parameters of future bioregenerative life support system, especially of plants photosynthetic activity as the most fundamental biological process. Authors propose a conception for a non-invasive control of plant physiological status in closed biosystem through spatial registration of chlorophyll fluorescence. This approach allows an early detection of stress impact on plants, reveal the dynamic and direction of the negative influence and the level of plant stress. Technical requirements for obtaining plant fluorescence images are examined in close relation with plant illumination conditions. Problems related with optimised plant illumination are discussed. Examples of fluorescence images of healthy and stressed plants demonstrate the sensibility and rapidity of signal changes caused by plant dysfunction. Proposed conception could be used for developing new technical solutions in autocontrolled bio-support systems, based on real time analysis of fluorescence images.

  6. Tissue characterization using dimensionality reduction and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekadir, Karim; Elson, Daniel S; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Dunsby, Christopher; McGinty, James; Galletly, Neil; Stamp, Gordon; French, Paul M W; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional fluorescence imaging is a powerful molecular imaging modality that is emerging as an important tool in the study of biological tissues. Due to the large volume of multi-spectral data associated with the technique, it is often difficult to find the best combination of parameters to maximize the contrast between different tissue types. This paper presents a novel framework for the characterization of tissue compositions based on the use of time resolved fluorescence imaging without the explicit modeling of the decays. The composition is characterized through soft clustering based on manifold embedding for reducing the dimensionality of the datasets and obtaining a consistent differentiation scheme for determining intrinsic constituents of the tissue. The proposed technique has the benefit of being fully automatic, which could have significant advantages for automated histopathology and increasing the speed of intraoperative decisions. Validation of the technique is carried out with both phantom data and tissue samples of the human pancreas.

  7. Simultaneous Manipulation and Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging of Individual Kinetochores Coupled to Microtubule Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Asbury, Charles L

    2017-01-01

    Kinetochores are large multiprotein complexes that drive mitotic chromosome movements by mechanically coupling them to the growing and shortening tips of spindle microtubules. Kinetochores are also regulatory hubs, somehow sensing when they are erroneously attached and, in response, releasing their incorrect attachments and generating diffusible wait signals to delay anaphase until proper attachments can form. The remarkable ability of a kinetochore to sense and respond to its attachment status might stem from attachment- or tension-dependent changes in the structural arrangement of its core subcomplexes. However, direct tests of the relationship between attachment, tension, and core kinetochore structure have not previously been possible because of the difficulties of applying well-controlled forces and determining unambiguously the attachment status of individual kinetochores in vivo. The recent purification of native yeast kinetochores has enabled in vitro optical trapping-based assays of kinetochore tip-coupling and, in separate experiments, fluorescence imaging of single kinetochore particles. Here we introduce a dual instrument, combining optical trapping with multicolor total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) imaging, to allow kinetochore structure to be monitored directly with nanometer precision while mechanical tension is simultaneously applied. Our instrument incorporates differential interference contrast (DIC) imaging as well, to minimize the photo-bleaching of fluorescent tags during preparative bead and microtubule manipulations. A simple modification also allows the trapping laser to be easily converted into a real-time focus detection and correction system. Using this combined instrument, the distance between specific subcomplexes within a single kinetochore particle can be measured with 2-nm precision after 50 s observation time, or with 11-nm precision at 1 s temporal resolution. While our instrument was constructed specifically for

  8. Fast automatic quantitative cell replication with fluorescent live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ching-Wei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background live cell imaging is a useful tool to monitor cellular activities in living systems. It is often necessary in cancer research or experimental research to quantify the dividing capabilities of cells or the cell proliferation level when investigating manipulations of the cells or their environment. Manual quantification of fluorescence microscopic image is difficult because human is neither sensitive to fine differences in color intensity nor effective to count and average fluorescence level among cells. However, auto-quantification is not a straightforward problem to solve. As the sampling location of the microscopy changes, the amount of cells in individual microscopic images varies, which makes simple measurement methods such as the sum of stain intensity values or the total number of positive stain within each image inapplicable. Thus, automated quantification with robust cell segmentation techniques is required. Results An automated quantification system with robust cell segmentation technique are presented. The experimental results in application to monitor cellular replication activities show that the quantitative score is promising to represent the cell replication level, and scores for images from different cell replication groups are demonstrated to be statistically significantly different using ANOVA, LSD and Tukey HSD tests (p-value Conclusion A robust automated quantification method of live cell imaging is built to measure the cell replication level, providing a robust quantitative analysis system in fluorescent live cell imaging. In addition, the presented unsupervised entropy based cell segmentation for live cell images is demonstrated to be also applicable for nuclear segmentation of IHC tissue images.

  9. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging in the Second Near-Infrared Window Using Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Dai, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    In vivo fluorescence imaging in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II window, 1000-1700 nm) is a powerful imaging technique that emerged in recent years. This imaging tool allows for noninvasive, deep-tissue visualization and interrogation of anatomical features and functions with improved imaging resolution and contrast at greater tissue penetration depths than traditional fluorescence imaging. Here, we present the detailed protocol for conducting NIR-II fluorescence imaging in live animals, including the procedures for preparation of biocompatible and NIR-II fluorescent carbon nanotube solution, live animal administration and NIR-II fluorescence image acquisition.

  10. Airborne In-Situ Measurements of Formaldehyde Over California: First Results from the Compact Formaldehyde Fluorescence Experiment (COFFEE) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette Elizabeth; Saint Clair, Jason; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren; Swanson, Andrew K.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is one of the most abundant oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, playing a role multiple atmospheric processes. Measurements of HCHO can be used to help quantify convective transport, the abundance of VOCs, and ozone production in urban environments. The Compact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE) instrument uses Non-Resonant Laser Induced Fluorescence (NR-LIF) to detect trace concentrations of HCHO as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) payload. Developed at NASA GSFC, COFFEE is a small, low maintenance instrument with a sensitivity of 100 pptv and a quick response time (1 sec). The COFFEE instrument has been customized to fit in an external wing pod on the Alpha Jet aircraft based at NASA ARC. The instrument can operate over a broad range of altitudes, from boundary layer to lower stratosphere, making it well suited for the Alpha Jet, which can access altitudes from the surface up to 40,000 ft. Results of the first COFFEE science flights preformed over the California's Central Valley will be presented. Boundary layer measurements and vertical profiles in the tropospheric column will both be included. This region is of particular interest, due to its elevated levels of HCHO, revealed in satellite images, as well as its high ozone concentrations. In addition to HCHO, the AJAX payload includes measurements of atmospheric ozone, methane, and carbon dioxide. Formaldehyde is one of the few urban pollutants that can be measured from space. Plans to compare in-situ COFFEE data with satellite-based HCHO observations such as those from OMI (Aura) and OMPS (SuomiNPP) will also be presented.

  11. Clinical results of fluorescence lifetime imaging in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, D.; Quick, S.; Klemm, M.; Hammer, M.; Jentsch, S.; Dawczynski, J.; Becker, W.

    2009-07-01

    A laser scanner ophthalmoscope was developed for in vivo fluorescence lifetime measurements at the human retina. Measurements were performed in 30 degree fundus images. The fundus was excited by pulses of 75 ps (FWHM). The dynamic fluorescence was detected in two spectral channels K1(490-560nm), K2(560-700 nm) by time-correlated single photon counting. The decay of fluorescence was three-exponentially. Local and global alterations in lifetimes were found between healthy subjects and patients suffering from age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and vessel occlusion. The lifetimes T1, T2, and T3 in both channels are changed to longer values in AMD and diabetic retinopathy in comparison with healthy subjects. The lifetime T2 in K1 is most sensitive to metabolic alterations in branch arterial vessel occlusion.

  12. Full Field X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging Using Micro Pore Optics for Planetary Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrazin, P.; Blake, D. F.; Gailhanou, M.; Walter, P.; Schyns, E.; Marchis, F.; Thompson, K.; Bristow, T.

    2016-01-01

    Many planetary surface processes leave evidence as small features in the sub-millimetre scale. Current planetary X-ray fluorescence spectrometers lack the spatial resolution to analyse such small features as they only provide global analyses of areas greater than 100 mm(exp 2). A micro-XRF spectrometer will be deployed on the NASA Mars 2020 rover to analyse spots as small as 120m. When using its line-scanning capacity combined to perpendicular scanning by the rover arm, elemental maps can be generated. We present a new instrument that provides full-field XRF imaging, alleviating the need for precise positioning and scanning mechanisms. The Mapping X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer - "Map-X" - will allow elemental imaging with approximately 100µm spatial resolution and simultaneously provide elemental chemistry at the scale where many relict physical, chemical and biological features can be imaged in ancient rocks. The arm-mounted Map-X instrument is placed directly on the surface of an object and held in a fixed position during measurements. A 25x25 mm(exp 2) surface area is uniformly illuminated with X-rays or alpha-particles and gamma-rays. A novel Micro Pore Optic focusses a fraction of the emitted X-ray fluorescence onto a CCD operated at a few frames per second. On board processing allows measuring the energy and coordinates of each X-ray photon collected. Large sets of frames are reduced into 2d histograms used to compute higher level data products such as elemental maps and XRF spectra from selected regions of interest. XRF spectra are processed on the ground to further determine quantitative elemental compositions. The instrument development will be presented with an emphasis on the characterization and modelling of the X-ray focussing Micro Pore Optic. An outlook on possible alternative XRF imaging applications will be discussed.

  13. An airborne lidar instrument for detection of OH using the technique of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. I., Jr.; James, J. V.; Morris, P. T.; Guo, C.; Postiff, R.

    1985-01-01

    Under suitable laboratory conditions, it has been demonstrated that the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurement technique is sensitive enough to detect single atoms and molecules. This potential sensitivity has provided motivation for the development of this technique for ambient OH measurements. The present paper is concerned with an airborne lidar instrument for measuring OH concentration as used for the NASA GTE/CITE (Global Tropospheric Experiment/Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation) intercomparison experiments during the fall of 1983 and the spring of 1984. A description is given of a working airborne instrument for measurements of OH in ambient air. The detection sensitivity demonstrated in the experiments should be sufficient for routine measurements in areas in which the OH concentration is in the range of high 1,000,000 molecule per cu cm or higher.

  14. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  15. Imaging Live Drosophila Brain with Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syeed Ehsan

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is an imaging technique which delivers distinct benefits for in vivo cellular and molecular imaging. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a second messenger molecule, is responsible for triggering many physiological changes in neural system. However, the mechanism by which this molecule regulates responses in neuron cells is not yet clearly understood. When cAMP binds to a target protein, it changes the structure of that protein. Therefore, studying this molecular structure change with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging can shed light on the cAMP functioning mechanism. FRET is a non-radiative dipole-dipole coupling which is sensitive to small distance change in nanometer scale. In this study we have investigated the effect of dopamine in cAMP dynamics in vivo. In our study two-photon fluorescence microscope was used for imaging mushroom bodies inside live Drosophila melanogaster brain and we developed a method for studying the change in cyclic AMP level.

  16. Fluorescence-enhanced gadolinium-doped zinc oxide quantum dots for magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanlan; Ai, Kelong; Yuan, Qinghai; Lu, Lehui

    2011-02-01

    We report here the development of Gd-doped ZnO quantum dots (QDs) as dual modal fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging nanoprobes. They are fabricated in a simple, versatile and environmentally friendly method, not only decreasing the difficulty and complexity, but also avoiding the increase of particle's size brought about by silica coating procedure in the synthesis of nanoprobes reported previously. These nanoprobes, with exceptionally small size and enhanced fluorescence resulting from the Gd doping, can label successfully the HeLa cells in short time and present no evidence of toxicity or adverse affect on cell growth even at the concentration up to 1 mm. These results show that such nanoprobes have low toxicity, especially in comparison with the traditional PEGylated CdSe/ZnS or CdSe/CdS QDs. In MRI studies, they exert strong positive contrast effect with a large longitudinal relaxivity (r(1)) of water proton of 16 mm(-1) s(-1). Their capability of imaging HeLa cells with MRI implies that they have great potential as MRI contrast agents. Combining the high sensitivity of fluorescence imaging with high spatial resolution of MRI, We expect that the as-prepared Gd-doped Zno QDs can provide a better reliability of the collected data and find promising applications in biological, medical and other fields. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager for biological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Madhuri; Melnik, Dmitry; Barnett, Heather; Daly, Kevin; Moran, Christine H.; Chang, Wei-Shun; Link, Stephan; Bucher, Christopher Theodore; Kittrell, Carter; Curl, Robert

    2010-03-01

    A wide-field four-channel fluorescence imager has been developed. The instrument uses four expanded laser beams to image a large section (6 mm×9 mm). An object can be sequentially illuminated with any combination of 408-, 532-, 658-, and 784-nm lasers for arbitrary (down to 1 ms) exposure times for each laser. Just two notch filters block scattered light from all four lasers. The design approach described here offers great flexibility in treatment of objects, very good sensitivity, and a wide field of view at low cost. There appears to be no commercial instrument capable of simultaneous fluorescence imaging of a wide field of view with four-laser excitation. Some possible applications are following events such as flow and mixing in microchannel systems, the transmission of biological signals across a culture, and following simulations of biological membrane diffusion. It can also be used in DNA sequencing by synthesis to follow the progress of the photolytic removal of dye and terminator. Without utilizing its time resolution, it can be used to obtain four independent images of a single tissue section stained with four targeting agents, with each coupled to a different dye matching one of the lasers.

  18. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Ahmad, Moiz; Matsuura, Taeko; Takao, Seishin; Matsuo, Yuto; Fahrig, Rebecca; Shirato, Hiroki; Umegaki, Kikuo; Xing, Lei

    2015-02-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT (pXFCT) imaging of gold in a small animal sized object by means of experiments and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. First, proton-induced gold x-ray fluorescence (pXRF) was measured as a function of gold concentration. Vials of 2.2 cm in diameter filled with 0%-5% Au solutions were irradiated with a 220 MeV proton beam and x-ray fluorescence induced by the interaction of protons, and Au was detected with a 3 × 3 mm(2) CdTe detector placed at 90° with respect to the incident proton beam at a distance of 45 cm from the vials. Second, a 7-cm diameter water phantom containing three 2.2-diameter vials with 3%-5% Au solutions was imaged with a 7-mm FWHM 220 MeV proton beam in a first generation CT scanning geometry. X-rays scattered perpendicular to the incident proton beam were acquired with the CdTe detector placed at 45 cm from the phantom positioned on a translation/rotation stage. Twenty one translational steps spaced by 3 mm at each of 36 projection angles spaced by 10° were acquired, and pXFCT images of the phantom were reconstructed with filtered back projection. A simplified geometry of the experimental data acquisition setup was modeled with the MC TOPAS code, and simulation results were compared to the experimental data. A linear relationship between gold pXRF and gold concentration was observed in both experimental and MC simulation data (R(2) > 0.99). All Au vials were apparent in the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Specifically, the 3% Au vial was detectable in the experimental [contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) = 5.8] and simulated (CNR = 11.5) pXFCT image. Due to fluorescence x-ray attenuation in the higher concentration vials, the 4% and 5% Au contrast were underestimated by 10% and 15%, respectively, in both the experimental and simulated pXFCT images. Proton-induced x-ray fluorescence CT imaging of 3%-5% gold solutions in a small animal sized water phantom has been demonstrated

  19. New Methods for Retrieval of Chlorophyll Red Fluorescence from Hyperspectral Satellite Instruments: Simulations and Application to GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Joanna; Yoshida, Yasuko; Guanter, Luis; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    Global satellite measurements of solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) from chlorophyll over land and ocean have proven useful for a number of different applications related to physiology, phenology, and productivity of plants and phytoplankton. Terrestrial chlorophyll fluorescence is emitted throughout the red and far-red spectrum, producing two broad peaks near 683 and 736nm. From ocean surfaces, phytoplankton fluorescence emissions are entirely from the red region (683nm peak). Studies using satellite-derived SIF over land have focused almost exclusively on measurements in the far red (wavelengths greater than 712nm), since those are the most easily obtained with existing instrumentation. Here, we examine new ways to use existing hyperspectral satellite data sets to retrieve red SIF (wavelengths less than 712nm) over both land and ocean. Red SIF is thought to provide complementary information to that from the far red for terrestrial vegetation. The satellite instruments that we use were designed to make atmospheric trace-gas measurements and are therefore not optimal for observing SIF; they have coarse spatial resolution and only moderate spectral resolution (0.5nm). Nevertheless, these instruments, the Global Ozone Monitoring Instrument 2 (GOME-2) and the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), offer a unique opportunity to compare red and far-red terrestrial SIF at regional spatial scales. Terrestrial SIF has been estimated with ground-, aircraft-, or satellite-based instruments by measuring the filling-in of atmospheric andor solar absorption spectral features by SIF. Our approach makes use of the oxygen (O2) gamma band that is not affected by SIF. The SIF-free O2 gamma band helps to estimate absorption within the spectrally variable O2 B band, which is filled in by red SIF. SIF also fills in the spectrally stable solar Fraunhofer lines (SFLs) at wavelengths both inside and just outside the O2 B band, which further helps

  20. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging of CFP/YFP labeled NDH in cyanobacterium cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Dongmei; Lv Wei; Huang Zhengxi; Xia Andong; Xu Min; Ma Weimin; Mi Hualing; Ogawa Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The laser confocal scanning microscopy combined with time-correlated single photon counting imaging technique to obtain fluorescence intensity and fluorescence lifetime images for fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurement is reported. Both the fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and intensity images show inhomogeneous cyan fluorescent protein and yellow fluorescent protein (CFP /YFP) expression or inhomogeneous energy transfer between CFP and YFP over whole cell. The results presented in this work show that FLIM could be a potential method to reveal the structure-function behavior of NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complexes in living cell

  1. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, Stanislav; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-04-01

    A number of fluorescence microscopy techniques are described to study dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, and whole organelles. However, for studies of plant plasma membrane (PM) proteins, the number of these techniques is still limited because of the high complexity of processes that determine the dynamics of PM proteins and the existence of cell wall. Here, we report on the usage of raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for studies of integral PM proteins in suspension-cultured tobacco cells and show its potential in comparison with the more widely used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method. For RICS, a set of microscopy images is obtained by single-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Fluorescence fluctuations are subsequently correlated between individual pixels and the information on protein mobility are extracted using a model that considers processes generating the fluctuations such as diffusion and chemical binding reactions. As we show here using an example of two integral PM transporters of the plant hormone auxin, RICS uncovered their distinct short-distance lateral mobility within the PM that is dependent on cytoskeleton and sterol composition of the PM. RICS, which is routinely accessible on modern CLSM instruments, thus represents a valuable approach for studies of dynamics of PM proteins in plants.

  2. Mapping microbubble viscosity using fluorescence lifetime imaging of molecular rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, Neveen A.; Mohamedi, Graciela; Rademeyer, Paul; Owen, Joshua; Wu, Yilei; Tang, Meng-Xing; Eckersley, Robert J.; Stride, Eleanor; Kuimova, Marina K.

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulated microbubbles are well established as highly effective contrast agents for ultrasound imaging. There remain, however, some significant challenges to fully realize the potential of microbubbles in advanced applications such as perfusion mapping, targeted drug delivery, and gene therapy. A key requirement is accurate characterization of the viscoelastic surface properties of the microbubbles, but methods for independent, nondestructive quantification and mapping of these properties are currently lacking. We present here a strategy for performing these measurements that uses a small fluorophore termed a “molecular rotor” embedded in the microbubble surface, whose fluorescence lifetime is directly related to the viscosity of its surroundings. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging to show that shell viscosities vary widely across the population of the microbubbles and are influenced by the shell composition and the manufacturing process. We also demonstrate that heterogeneous viscosity distributions exist within individual microbubble shells even with a single surfactant component. PMID:23690599

  3. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of electroperturbation in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, P Thomas; Behrend, Matthew; Wang, Jingjing; Thu, Mya Mya; Gundersen, Martin; Marcu, Laura

    2006-01-01

    We report the design, integration, and validation of a fluorescence microscopy system for imaging of electroperturbation--the effects of nanosecond, megavolt-per-meter pulsed electric fields on biological cells and tissues. Such effects have potential applications in cancer therapy, gene regulation, and biophysical research by noninvasively disrupting intracellular compartments and inducing apoptosis in malignant cells. As the primary observing platform, an epifluorescence microscope integrating a nanosecond high-voltage pulser and a micrometer electrode chamber enable in situ imaging of the intracellular processes triggered by high electric fields. Using specific fluorescence molecular probes, the dynamic biological responses of Jurkat T lymphocytes to nanosecond electric pulses (nanoelectropulses) are studied with this system, including calcium bursts, the polarized translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS), and nuclear enlargement and chromatin/DNA structural changes.

  4. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; Geert Sander de Jong, Jan; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  5. Modulated electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope: all-solid-state camera for fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiaole; Schelen, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van den Oever, Rein; Leenen, René; van Kuijk, Harry; Peters, Inge; Polderdijk, Frank; Bosiers, Jan; Raspe, Marcel; Jalink, Kees; de Jong, Jan Geert Sander; van Geest, Bert; Stoop, Karel; Young, Ian Ted

    2012-12-01

    We have built an all-solid-state camera that is directly modulated at the pixel level for frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurements. This novel camera eliminates the need for an image intensifier through the use of an application-specific charge coupled device design in a frequency-domain FLIM system. The first stage of evaluation for the camera has been carried out. Camera characteristics such as noise distribution, dark current influence, camera gain, sampling density, sensitivity, linearity of photometric response, and optical transfer function have been studied through experiments. We are able to do lifetime measurement using our modulated, electron-multiplied fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope (MEM-FLIM) camera for various objects, e.g., fluorescein solution, fixed green fluorescent protein (GFP) cells, and GFP-actin stained live cells. A detailed comparison of a conventional microchannel plate (MCP)-based FLIM system and the MEM-FLIM system is presented. The MEM-FLIM camera shows higher resolution and a better image quality. The MEM-FLIM camera provides a new opportunity for performing frequency-domain FLIM.

  6. Multielement characterization of atmospheric pollutants by x-ray fluorescence analysis and instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rancitelli, L.A.; Tanner, T.M.

    1976-01-01

    The simultaneous measurement of a wide spectrum of elements in aerosols collected on air filters and in rainwater can yield information on the origin, transport, and removal of atmospheric pollutants. In order to determine the elemental content of these aerosols, a pair of highly sensitive, precise and complementing instrumental techniques, x-ray fluorescence and neutron activation analysis, have been developed and employed. Data are presented on the results of combined x-ray fluorescence and activation analysis of aerosols collected in a number of urban areas of the USA and from the 80th median sampling network in March 1972. From a comparison of these ratios in granite and diabase with those of filters placed in urban areas, it is evident that Zn, Se, Sb, Hg, and Pb levels have been increased by as much as several orders of magnitude. Al, Co, La, Fe, Eu, Sm, Tb, Ta, Hf, and Th appear to exist at levels compatible with an earth's crust origin

  7. A LabVIEW-Based Virtual Instrument System for Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qijun; Wang, Lufei; Zu, Lily

    2011-01-01

    We report the design and operation of a Virtual Instrument (VI) system based on LabVIEW 2009 for laser-induced fluorescence experiments. This system achieves synchronous control of equipment and acquisition of real-time fluorescence data communicating with a single computer via GPIB, USB, RS232, and parallel ports. The reported VI system can also accomplish data display, saving, and analysis, and printing the results. The VI system performs sequences of operations automatically, and this system has been successfully applied to obtain the excitation and dispersion spectra of α-methylnaphthalene. The reported VI system opens up new possibilities for researchers and increases the efficiency and precision of experiments. The design and operation of the VI system are described in detail in this paper, and the advantages that this system can provide are highlighted.

  8. Fluorescent quantum dots: synthesis, biomedical optical imaging, and biosafety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiaoyuan; Peng, Fei; Zhong, Yiling; Su, Yuanyuan; He, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The marriage of nanomaterials with biology has significantly promoted advancement of biological techniques, profoundly facilitating basic research and practical applications in biological and biomedical fields. Taking advantages of unique optical properties (e.g., strong fluorescence, robust photostability, size-tunable emission wavelengths, etc.), fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), appearing as high-performance biological fluorescent nanoprobes, have been extensively explored for a variety of biomedical optical imaging applications. In this review, we present representative synthetic strategies for preparation of QDs and their applications in biomedical optical imaging, as well as risk assessments in vitro and in vivo. Briefly, we first summarize recent progress in fabrication of QDs via two rudimentary approaches, i.e., organometallic route and aqueous synthesis. Next we present representative achievement in QDs-based in vitro and in vivo biomedical optical imaging applications. We further discuss the toxicity assessment of QDs, ranging from cell studies to animal models. In the final section, we discuss challenges and perspectives for the QDs-relative bioapplications in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. [Development of a Fluorescence Probe for Live Cell Imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Aya

    2017-01-01

     Probes that detect specific biological materials are indispensable tools for deepening our understanding of various cellular phenomena. In live cell imaging, the probe must emit fluorescence only when a specific substance is detected. In this paper, we introduce a new probe we developed for live cell imaging. Glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity is higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and is involved in the development of resistance to various anticancer drugs. We previously reported the development of a general strategy for the synthesis of probes for detection of GST enzymes, including fluorogenic, bioluminogenic, and 19 F-NMR probes. Arylsulfonyl groups were used as caging groups during probe design. The fluorogenic probes were successfully used to quantitate very low levels of GST activity in cell extracts and were also successfully applied to the imaging of microsomal MGST1 activity in living cells. The bioluminogenic and 19 F-NMR probes were able to detect GST activity in Escherichia coli cells. Oligonucleotide-templated reactions are powerful tools for nucleic acid sensing. This strategy exploits the target strand as a template for two functionalized probes and provides a simple molecular mechanism for multiple turnover reactions. We developed a nucleophilic aromatic substitution reaction-triggered fluorescent probe. The probe completed its reaction within 30 s of initiation and amplified the fluorescence signal from 0.5 pM target oligonucleotide by 1500 fold under isothermal conditions. Additionally, we applied the oligonucleotide-templated reaction for molecular releasing and peptide detection.

  10. Neural imaging in songbirds using fiber optic fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Hearn, Gentry; Lints, Thierry; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2012-02-01

    The song control system of juvenile songbirds is an important model for studying the developmental acquisition and generation of complex learned vocal motor sequences, two processes that are fundamental to human speech and language. To understand the neural mechanisms underlying song production, it is critical to characterize the activity of identified neurons in the song control system when the bird is singing. Neural imaging in unrestrained singing birds, although technically challenging, will advance our understanding of neural ensemble coding mechanisms in this system. We are exploring the use of a fiber optic microscope for functional imaging in the brain of behaving and singing birds in order to better understand the contribution of a key brain nucleus (high vocal center nucleus; HVC) to temporal aspects of song motor control. We have constructed a fluorescence microscope with LED illumination, a fiber bundle for transmission of fluorescence excitation and emission light, a ~2x GRIN lens, and a CCD for image acquisition. The system has 2 μm resolution, 375 μm field of view, 200 μm working distance, and 1 mm outer diameter. As an initial characterization of this setup, neurons in HVC were imaged using the fiber optic microscope after injection of quantum dots or fluorescent retrograde tracers into different song nuclei. A Lucid Vivascope confocal microscope was used to confirm the imaging results. Long-term imaging of the activity of these neurons in juvenile birds during singing may lead us to a better understanding of the central motor codes for song and the central mechanism by which auditory experience modifies song motor commands to enable vocal learning and imitation.

  11. Direct comparison of soft x-ray images of organelles with optical fluorescence images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishino, Masahiko; Kado, Masataka; Kishimoto, Maki; Nishikino, Masaharu; Ohba, Toshiyuki; Kaihori, Takeshi; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Tamotsu, Satoshi; Yasuda, Keiko; Mikata, Yuji; Shinohara, Kunio

    2011-01-01

    Soft x-ray microscopes operating in the water window region are capable of imaging living hydrated cells. Up to now, we have been able to take some soft x-ray images of living cells by the use of a contact x-ray microscope system with laser produced plasma soft x-ray source. Since the soft x-ray images are different from the optical images obtained with an ordinary microscope, it is very important to identify what is seen in the x-ray images. Hence, we have demonstrated the direct comparison between the images of organelles obtained with a fluorescence microscope and those with a soft x-ray microscope. Comparing the soft x-ray images to the fluorescence images, the fine structures of the organelles could be identified and observed. (author)

  12. Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscope for imaging of living glioma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Qiyin; Wang, Jingjing; Sun, Yinghua; Vernier, Thomas; Papaioannou, Thanassis; Jo, Javier; Thu, Mya M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-03-01

    In this communication, we report the imaging of living glioma cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) technique. The growing interests in developing novel techniques for diagnosis and minimally invasive therapy of brain tumor have led to microscopic studies of subcellular structures and intracellular processes in glioma cells. Fluorescence microscopy has been used with a number of exogenous molecular probes specific for certain intracellular structures such as mitochondria, peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), and calcium concentration. When probes with overlapping emission spectra being used, separate samples are required to image each probe individually under conventional fluorescence microscopy. We have developed a wide-field FLIM microscope that uses fluorescence lifetime as an additional contrast for resolving multiple markers in the same essay. The FLIM microscope consists of a violet diode laser and a nitrogen-pumped dye laser to provide tunable sub-nanosecond excitation from UV to NIR. The detection system is based on a time-gated ICCD camera with minimum 80 ps gate width. The performance of the system was evaluated using fluorescence dyes with reported lifetime values. Living rat glioma C6 cells were stained with JC-1 and Rhodamine 123. FLIM images were acquired and their lifetimes in living cells were found in good agreements with values measured in solutions by a time-domain fluorescence spectrometer. These results indicate that imaging of glioma cells using FLIM can resolve multiple spectrally-overlapping probes and provide quantitative functional information about the intracellular environment.

  13. Particle Image Velocimetry Applications Using Fluorescent Dye-Doped Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosky, Brian J.; Maisto, Pietro; Lowe, K. Todd; Andre, Matthieu A.; Bardet, Philippe M.; Tiemsin, Patsy I.; Wohl, Christopher J.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Polystyrene latex sphere particles are widely used to seed flows for velocimetry techniques such as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These particles may be doped with fluorescent dyes such that signals spectrally shifted from the incident laser wavelength may be detected via Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF). An attractive application of the LIF signal is achieving velocimetry in the presence of strong interference from laser scatter, opening up new research possibilities very near solid surfaces or at liquid/gas interfaces. Additionally, LIF signals can be used to tag different fluid streams to study mixing. While fluorescence-based PIV has been performed by many researchers for particles dispersed in water flows, the current work is among the first in applying the technique to micron-scale particles dispersed in a gas. A key requirement for such an application is addressing potential health hazards from fluorescent dyes; successful doping of Kiton Red 620 (KR620) has enabled the use of this relatively safe dye for fluorescence PIV for the first time. In this paper, basic applications proving the concept of PIV using the LIF signal from KR620-doped particles are exhibited for a free jet and a twophase flow apparatus. Results indicate that while the fluorescence PIV techniques are roughly 2 orders of magnitude weaker than Mie scattering, they provide a viable method for obtaining data in flow regions previously inaccessible via standard PIV. These techniques have the potential to also complement Mie scattering signals, for example in multi-stream and/or multi-phase experiments.

  14. Measurement and quantification of fluorescent changes in ocular tissue using a novel confocal instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenschoen, Kim K.; Girkin, John M.; Daly, Daniel J.

    2014-05-01

    Our sight is a major contributor to our quality of life. The treatment of diseases like macular degeneration and glaucoma, however, presents a challenge as the delivery of medication to ocular tissue is not well understood. The instrument described here will help quantify targeted delivery by non-invasively and simultaneously measuring light reflected from and fluorescence excited in the eye, used as position marker and to track compounds respectively. The measurement concept has been proven by monitoring the diffusion of fluorescein and a pharmaceutical compound for treating open angle glaucoma in vitro in a cuvette and in ex vivo porcine eyes. To obtain a baseline of natural fluorescence we measured the change in corneal and crystalline lens autofluorescence in volunteers over a week. We furthermore present data on 3D ocular autofluorescence. Our results demonstrate the capability to measure the location and concentration of the compound of interest with high axial and temporal resolution of 178 μm and 0.6 s respectively. The current detection limit is 2 nM for fluorescein, and compounds with a quantum yield as low as 0.01 were measured to concentrations below 1 μM. The instrument has many applications in assessing the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through the eye and skin in vitro and in vivo, measuring autofluorescence of ocular tissues and reducing the number of animals needed for research. The instrument has the capability of being used both in the clinical and home care environment opening up the possibility of measuring controlled drug release in a patient friendly manner.

  15. Implantable CMOS imaging device with absorption filters for green fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunaga, Yoshinori; Haruta, Makito; Takehara, Hironari; Ohta, Yasumi; Motoyama, Mayumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-01

    Green fluorescent materials such as Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) and fluorescein are often used for observing neural activities. Thus, it is important to observe the fluorescence in a freely moving state in order to understand neural activities corresponding to behaviors. In this work, we developed an implantable CMOS imaging device for in-vivo green fluorescence imaging with efficient excitation light rejection using a combination of absorption filters. An interference filter is usually used for a fluorescence microscope in order to achieve high fluorescence imaging sensitivity. However, in the case of the implantable device, interference filters are not suitable because their transmission spectra depend on incident angle. To solve this problem we used two kinds of absorption filters that do not have angle dependence. An absorption filter consisting of yellow dye (VARYFAST YELLOW 3150) was coated on the pixel array of an image sensor. The rejection ratio of ideal excitation light (490 nm) against green fluorescence (510 nm) was 99.66%. However, the blue LED as an excitation light source has a broad emission spectrum and its intensity at 510 nm is 2.2 x 10-2 times the emission peak intensity. By coating LEDs with the emission absorption filters, the intensity of the unwanted component of the excitation light was reduced to 1.4 x 10-4. Using the combination of absorption filters, we achieved excitation light transmittance of 10-5 onto the image sensor. It is expected that high-sensitivity green fluorescence imaging of neural activities in a freely moving mouse will be possible by using this technology.

  16. Single photon imaging. New instrumentation and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muehllehner, G.; Colsher, J.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of Anger scintillation cameras continues to be enhanced through a series of small improvements which result in significantly better imaging characteristics. The most recent changes in camera design consist of: (1) the introduction of photomultipliers with better photocathode and electron collection efficiencies, (2) the use of thinner (3/8 or 1/4 in) crystals giving slightly better intrinsic resolution for low gamma-ray energies, (3) inclusion of a spatially varying energy window to compensate for variations of light collection efficiency, (4) event-by-event, real-time distortion removal for uniformity correction, and (5) introduction of new methods to improve the count-rate capability. Whereas some of these improvements are due to better understanding of the fundamentals of camera design, others are the result of technological advances in electronic components such as analogue-to-digital converters, microprocessors and high-density digital memories. The development of single photon tomography has developed along two parallel paths. Multipinhole and rotating slant-hole collimator attachments provide some degree of longitudinal tomography, and are currently being applied to cardiac imaging. At the same time rotating camera systems capable of transverse as well as longitudinal imaging are being refined technically and evaluated clinically. Longitudinal tomography is of limited use in quantitative studies and is likely to be an interim solution to three-dimensional imaging. Rotating camera systems, on the other hand, not only provide equal resolution in all three dimensions but are also capable of providing quantitative accuracy. This is the result of progress in attenuation correction and the design of special collimators. Single photon tomography provides a small but noticeable improvement in diagnostic accuracy which is likely to result in widespread use of rotating camera systems in the future

  17. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  18. Development of Fluorescence Imaging Lidar for Boat-Based Coral Observation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasano Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A fluorescence imaging lidar system installed in a boat-towable buoy has been developed for the observation of reef-building corals. Long-range fluorescent images of the sea bed can be recorded in the daytime with this system. The viability of corals is clear in these fluorescent images because of the innate fluorescent proteins. In this study, the specifications and performance of the system are shown.

  19. Pathological diagnosis of bladder cancer by image analysis of hypericin induced fluorescence cystoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, James C. Y.; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma based on hypericin fluorescence cystoscopy has shown to have a higher degree of sensitivity for the detection of flat bladder carcinoma compared to white light cystoscopy. The potential of the photosensitizer hypericin-induced fluorescence in performing non-invasive optical biopsy to grade bladder cancer in vivo using fluorescence cystoscopic image analysis without surgical resection for tissue biopsy is investigated in this study. The correlation between tissue fluorescence and histopathology of diseased tissue was explored and a diagnostic algorithm based on fluorescence image analysis was developed to classify the bladder cancer without surgical resection for tissue biopsy. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between tissue fluorescence and bladder cancer grade. By combining both the red-to-blue and red-to-green intensity ratios into a 2D scatter plot yields an average sensitivity and specificity of around 70% and 85% respectively for pathological cancer grading of the three different grades of bladder cancer. Therefore, the diagnostic algorithm based on colorimetric intensity ratio analysis of hypericin fluorescence cystoscopic images developed in this preliminary study shows promising potential to optically diagnose and grade bladder cancer in vivo.

  20. Highly sensitive rapid fluorescence detection of protein residues on surgical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalev, Valeri I [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Bartona, James S [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Richardson, Patricia R [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom); Jones, Anita C [School of Chemistry, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, EH9 3JJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    There is a risk of contamination of surgical instruments by infectious protein residues, in particular, prions which are the agents for Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease in humans. They are exceptionally resistant to conventional sterilization, therefore it is important to detect their presence as contaminants so that alternative cleaning procedures can be applied. We describe the development of an optimized detection system for fluorescently labelled protein, suitable for in-hospital use. We show that under optimum conditions the technique can detect {approx}10 attomole/cm{sup 2} with a scan speed of {approx}3-10 cm{sup 2}/s of the test instrument's surface. A theoretical analysis and experimental measurements will be discussed.

  1. Small portable interchangeable imager of fluorescence for fluorescence guided surgery and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusanya, Olugbenga T; Madajewski, Brian; Segal, Erin; Judy, Brendan F; Venegas, Ollin G; Judy, Ryan P; Quatromoni, Jon G; Wang, May D; Nie, Shuming; Singhal, Sunil

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescence guided surgery (FGS) is a developing field of surgical and oncologic research. Practically, FGS has shown useful applications in urologic surgery, benign biliary surgery, colorectal cancer liver metastasis resection, and ovarian cancer debulking. Most notably in in cancer surgery, FGS allows for the clear delineation of cancerous tissue from benign tissue. FGS requires the utilization of a fluorescent contrast agent and an intraoperative fluorescence imaging device (IFID). Currently available IFIDs are expensive, unable to work with multiple fluorophores, and can be cumbersome. This study aims to describe the development and utility of a small, cost-efficient, and interchangeable IFID made from commercially available components. Extensive research was done to design and construct a light-weight, portable, and cost-effective IFID. We researched the capabilities, size, and cost of several camera types and eventually decided on a near-infrared (NIR) charged couple device (CCD) camera for its overall profile. The small portable interchangeable imager of fluorescence (SPIIF) is a "scout" IFID system for FGS. The main components of the SPIIF are a NIR CCD camera with an articulating light filter. These components and a LED light source with an attached heat sink are mounted on a small metal platform. The system is connected to a laptop by a USB 2.0 cable. Pixielink © software on the laptop runs the system by controlling exposure time, gain, and image capture. After developing the system, we evaluated its utility as an IFID. The system weighs less than two pounds and can cover a large area. Due to its small size, it is easily made sterile by covering it with any sterile plastic sheet. To determine the system's ability to detect fluorescent signal, we used the SPIIF to detect indocyanine green under ex and in-vivo conditions and fluorescein under ex-vivo conditions. We found the SPIIF was able to detect both ICG and fluorescein under different depths of a

  2. RNA Imaging with Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence in situ Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, Jeffrey R.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of both the copy number and spatial distribution of large fractions of the transcriptome in single-cells could revolutionize our understanding of a variety of cellular and tissue behaviors in both healthy and diseased states. Single-molecule Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (smFISH)—an approach where individual RNAs are labeled with fluorescent probes and imaged in their native cellular and tissue context—provides both the copy number and spatial context of RNAs but has been limited in the number of RNA species that can be measured simultaneously. Here we describe Multiplexed Error Robust Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (MERFISH), a massively parallelized form of smFISH that can image and identify hundreds to thousands of different RNA species simultaneously with high accuracy in individual cells in their native spatial context. We provide detailed protocols on all aspects of MERFISH, including probe design, data collection, and data analysis to allow interested laboratories to perform MERFISH measurements themselves. PMID:27241748

  3. Nm-scale spatial resolution x-ray imaging with MLL nanofocusing optics: instrumentational requirements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazaretski, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yan, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lauer, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Huang, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xu, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kalbfleisch, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yan, Hui [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Li, Li [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bouet, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhou, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Shu, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Conley, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source; Chu, Y. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The Hard X-ray Nanoprobe (HXN) beamline at NSLS-II has been designed and constructed to enable imaging experiments with unprecedented spatial resolution and detection sensitivity. The HXN X-ray Microscope is a key instrument for the beamline, providing a suite of experimental capabilities which includes scanning fluorescence, diffraction, differential phase contrast and ptychography utilizing Multilayer Laue Lenses (MLL) and zoneplate (ZP) as nanofocusing optics. In this paper, we present technical requirements for the MLL-based scanning microscope, outline the development concept and present first ~15 x 15 nm2 spatial resolution x-ray fluorescence images.

  4. Intravital fiber-optic fluorescence imaging for monitoring ovarian carcinoma progression and treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bryan Q.; Celli, Jonathan P.; Evans, Conor L.; Zhong, Wei; Rizvi, Imran; Mai, Zhiming; Mertz, Jerome; Yun, Seok H.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2009-06-01

    Our laboratory has constructed a custom fluorescence microendoscope for detecting and monitoring tumor nodules in a mouse model of metastatic ovarian carcinoma (OVCA). The microendoscope is being applied for tumor recognition and for quantifying tumor burden reduction following photodynamic therapy (PDT). Benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), a photosensitizing agent for PDT, is administered to the mice and imaged with the microendoscope prior to PDT. BPD-MA fluorescence is a convenient means for locating tumor sites and quantifying tumor burden (despite the fact that BPD-MA is a non-targeted contrast agent). The miniature, flexible microendoscope probe is delivered via a 14-gauge catheter for imaging metastases along the outer surfaces of the internal organs and the inner walls of the peritoneal cavity. The minimal invasiveness of this approach facilitates frequent imaging of the mice in order to monitor cancer progression and treatment response. We present promising data for intravital imaging of treatment response following PDT and new developments in the microendoscope instrumentation for improved image quality.

  5. Selective Detection of Neurotransmitters by Fluorescence and Chemiluminescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziqiang Wang; Edward S. Yeung

    2001-08-06

    In recent years, luminescence imaging has been widely employed in neurochemical analysis. It has a number of advantages for the study of neuronal and other biological cells: (1) a particular molecular species or cellular constituent can be selectively visualized in the presence of a large excess of other species in a heterogeneous environment; (2) low concentration detection limits can be achieved because of the inherent sensitivity associated with fluorescence and chemiluminescence; (3) low excitation intensities can be used so that long-term observation can be realized while the viability of the specimen is preserved; and (4) excellent spatial resolution can be obtained with the light microscope so subcellular compartments can be identified. With good sensitivity, temporal and spatial resolution, the flux of ions and molecules and the distribution and dynamics of intracellular species can be measured in real time with specific luminescence probes, substrates, or with native fluorescence. A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with CCD imaging is down to {micro}M levels of glutamate with reasonable response time. They also found that chemiluminescence associated with the ATP-dependent reaction between luciferase and luciferin can be used to image ATP at levels down to 10 nM in the millisecond time scale. Similar imaging experiments should be feasible in a broad spectrum of biological systems.

  6. Brightness calibrates particle size in single particle fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihe; Sun, Zezhou; Di, Weihua; Qin, Weiping; Yuan, Zhen; Wu, Changfeng

    2015-04-01

    This Letter provides a novel approach to quantify the particle sizes of highly bright semiconductor polymer dots (Pdots) for single-particle imaging and photobleaching studies. A quadratic dependence of single-particle brightness on particle size was determined by single-particle fluorescence imaging and intensity statistics. In terms of the same imaging conditions, the particle diameter can be quantified by comparing the individual brightness intensity with associated calibration curve. Based on this sizing method, photobleaching trajectories and overall photon counts emitted by single particles were analyzed. It is found that photobleaching rate constants of different sized Pdots are not strongly dependent on particle diameter except the sparsely occurring fluorescence blinking in certain dim particles and the rapid photobleaching component in some bright particles. The overall photon counts increase with increasing particle diameter. However, those larger than 30 nm deviate away from the increasing tendency. These results reveal the significance of selecting appropriate Pdots (≤30  nm) for single-particle imaging and tracking applications.

  7. Ultrafast superresolution fluorescence imaging with spinning disk confocal microscope optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Shinichi; Okada, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    Most current superresolution (SR) microscope techniques surpass the diffraction limit at the expense of temporal resolution, compromising their applications to live-cell imaging. Here we describe a new SR fluorescence microscope based on confocal microscope optics, which we name the spinning disk superresolution microscope (SDSRM). Theoretically, the SDSRM is equivalent to a structured illumination microscope (SIM) and achieves a spatial resolution of 120 nm, double that of the diffraction limit of wide-field fluorescence microscopy. However, the SDSRM is 10 times faster than a conventional SIM because SR signals are recovered by optical demodulation through the stripe pattern of the disk. Therefore a single SR image requires only a single averaged image through the rotating disk. On the basis of this theory, we modified a commercial spinning disk confocal microscope. The improved resolution around 120 nm was confirmed with biological samples. The rapid dynamics of micro-tubules, mitochondria, lysosomes, and endosomes were observed with temporal resolutions of 30-100 frames/s. Because our method requires only small optical modifications, it will enable an easy upgrade from an existing spinning disk confocal to a SR microscope for live-cell imaging. © 2015 Hayashi and Okada. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  8. Spectra-resolved technique of a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhouyi; Tian, Zhen; Jia, Yali

    2004-07-01

    The lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates are used for marking substance in time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay (TRFIA), marking the protein, hormone, antibody, nucleic acid probe or biologica alive cell, to measure the concentration of the analysis substance inside the reaction system with time-resolved fluorometry after the reaction system occurred, and attain the quantitative analysis's purpose. TRFIA has been become a kind of new and more sensitive measure method after radioisotope marking, enzymatic marking, chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, it primarily is decided by the special physics and chemistry characteristic of lanthanide trivalence ion and its chelates. In this paper, the result of spectroscopic evaluation of europium trivalence ion and its chelate, and the principle of spectra-resolved technology and a sensitive time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay instrument made by ourselves are reported. In the set, a high frequency Xenon pulsed-light was adopted as exciting light, and two special filters was utilized according to spectra-resolved technique. Thus the influence of scattering light and short-lifetime fluorescence was removed. And the sensitivity is 10-12mol/L (when Eu3+ was used for marking substance), examination repeat is CV = 95% (p < 0.01).

  9. In situ Analysis of Coral Recruits Using Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Zweifler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recruitment is a fundamental process that influences coral population dynamics as well as reef community structure. To date, coral recruitment success rates are poorly quantified because survey methods are labor-intensive and require manual interpretation. Thus, they are prone to human errors and have low repeatability—a gap we aim to bridge in this research. Since both corals and their symbiotic algae contain fluorescent pigments (chlorophyll and fluorescent proteins, we used the non-invasive Fluorescence Imaging System (FluorIS and developed a methodology to acquire daytime fluorescent photographs and identify coral recruits in them. We tested our method by monitoring 20 random quadrats at two sites in the Gulf of Aqaba, Israel. The quadrats were surveyed once a month for 8 months in order to track the settlement, mortality and survival rates of new coral recruits. We demonstrate daytime imaging using our method and identification of coral recruits as small as 1 mm in diameter, in a 20 × 20 cm quadrat. Our results show that this photographic method reduces surveyor errors and improves precision. The surveys revealed that on average, there are ~2 new coral recruit settlements (<2 cm for a quadrat (40 cm2 per month and that 83% of them survive the first month. Our study suggests a relative stability in the Gulf of Aqaba coral population during the survey period. The ability to survey recruits during the day using low-cost, easy-to-use photographic equipment has the potential to contribute significantly to the standardization of coral reef monitoring and management tools, at a time when the world's coral reefs are declining due to local and global stressors.

  10. Luminescence and fluorescence of essential oils. Fluorescence imaging in vivo of wild chamomile oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, F; Fontanella, M; Calderan, L; Sbarbati, A

    2011-06-16

    Essential oils are currently of great importance to pharmaceutical companies, cosmetics producers and manufacturers of veterinary products. They are found in perfumes, creams, bath products, and household cleaning substances, and are used for flavouring food and drinks. It is well known that some of them act on the respiratory apparatus. The increasing interest in optical imaging techniques and the development of related technologies have made possible the investigation of the optical properties of several compounds. Luminescent properties of essential oils have not been extensively investigated. We evaluated the luminescent and fluorescent emissions of several essential oils, in order to detect them in living organisms by exploiting their optical properties. Some fluorescent emission data were high enough to be detected in dermal treatments. Consequently, we demonstrated how the fluorescent signal can be monitored for at least three hours on the skin of living mice treated with wild chamomile oil. The results encourage development of this technique to investigate the properties of drugs and cosmetics containing essential oils.

  11. Defining a superlens operating regime for imaging fluorescent molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem Elsayad

    Full Text Available It has been shown that thin metal-based films can at certain frequencies act as planar near-field lenses for certain polarization components. A desirable property of such "lenses" is that they can also enhance and focus some large transverse spatial frequency components which contain sub-diffraction limit details. Over the last decade there has been much work in optimizing designs to reduce effects (such as material losses and surface roughness that are detrimental to image reconstruction. One design that can reduce some of these undesirable effects, and which has received a fair amount of attention recently, is the stacked metal-dielectric superlens. Here we theoretically explore the imaging ability of such a design for the specific purpose of imaging a fluorescent dye (the common bio-marker GFP in the vicinity of the superlens surface. Our calculations take into consideration the interaction (damping of an oscillating electric dipole with the metallic layers in the superlens. We also assume a Gaussian frequency distribution spectrum for the dipole. We treat the metallic-alloy and dielectric-alloy layers separately using an appropriate effective medium theory. The transmission properties are evaluated via Transfer matrix (-matrix calculations that were performed in the MatLab and MathCad environments. Our study shows that it is in principle possible to image fluorescent molecules using a simple bilayer planar superlens. We find that optimal parameters for such a superlens occur when the peak dipole emission-frequency is slightly offset from the Surface Plasmon resonance frequency of the metal-dielectric interfaces. The best resolution is obtained when the fluorescent molecules are not too close (>/ approximately 10 nm or too far (>/approximately 30 nm from the superlens surface. The realization and application of a superlens with the specified design is possible using current nanofabrication techniques. When combined with e.g. a sub

  12. Laser scanning endoscope via an imaging fiber bundle for fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Lorenz D.; Nestler, Dirk; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-12-01

    Based on a laser scanning endoscope via an imaging fiber bundle, a new approach for a tumor diagnostic system has been developed to assist physicians in the diagnosis before the actual PDT is carried out. Laser induced, spatially resolved fluorescence images of diseased tissue can be compared with images received by video endoscopy using a white light source. The set- up is required to produce a better contrast between infected and healthy tissue and might serve as a constructive diagnostic help for surgeons. The fundamental idea is to scan a low-power laser beam on an imaging fiber bundle and to achieve a spatially resolved projection on the tissue surface. A sufficiently high laser intensity from the diode laser is concentrated on each single spot of the tissue exciting fluorescence when a dye has previously been accumulated. Subsequently, video image of the tissue is recorded and stored. With an image processing unit, video and fluorescence images are overlaid producing a picture of the fluorescence intensity in the environment of the observed tissue.

  13. Instrumentation development for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, G.; Wiggins, J.; Rhodes, J.; Bertagnolli, K.; Ludwig, R.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity non-destructive inspection methodology for polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. We use electrical impedance tomography to image the conductivity in the diamond table. In this paper we report on progress in preparing this instrument for factory deployment. Instrument enhancements include an adjustable part holder, a field-swappable sensor and GPU-enabled software capable of rapidly acquiring images.

  14. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated.

  15. Imaging instrument for positron emitting heavy ion beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llacer, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Jackson, H.C.; Lin, J.C.; Zunzunegui, M.V.

    1978-10-01

    The design and performance of an instrument for the imaging of coincidence annihilation gamma rays emitted from the end point of the trajectories of radioactive high-energy heavy ions is described. The positron-emitting heavy ions are the result of nuclear fragmentation of accelerated heavy ions used in cancer therapy or diagnostic medicine. The instrument constructed is capable of locating the ion beam trajectory end point within 1 mm for an injected activity of 200 nanoCi in a measurement time of 1 sec in some favorable conditions. Limited imaging in three dimensions is also demonstrated

  16. Controlled light-exposure microscopy reduces photobleaching and phototoxicity in fluorescence live-cell imaging.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, R.A.; van Oven, C.H.; Gadella, Th.W.J.; Dhonukshe, P.B.; van Noorden, C.J.F.; Manders, E.M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of living cells enables visualization of the dynamics and interactions of intracellular molecules. However, fluorescence live-cell imaging is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity induced by the excitation light. Here we describe controlled light-exposure microscopy

  17. Controlled light-exposure microscopy reduces photobleaching and phototoxicity in fluorescence live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebe, R. A.; van Oven, C. H.; Gadella, T. W. J.; Dhonukshe, P. B.; van Noorden, C. J. F.; Manders, E. M. M.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of living cells enables visualization of the dynamics and interactions of intracellular molecules. However, fluorescence live-cell imaging is limited by photobleaching and phototoxicity induced by the excitation light. Here we describe controlled light-exposure microscopy (

  18. Assessment of efficiencies of electroporation and sonoporation methods by using fluorescence RGB imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovels, D.; Lihachev, A.; Spigulis, J.; Satkauskas, S.; Tamosiunas, M.; Lo, C. W.; Chen, W. S.

    2013-11-01

    Simple RGB method for fluorescence in vivo imaging is presented to assess efficiency of electroporation and sonoporation methods by measuring distribution and accumulation of green fluorescence protein (GFP) concentration. 20 laboratory measurements were performed on mice to test the method.

  19. Improved fluorescent X-ray image intensifying screen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landeghem, W.K. van; Suys, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    An X-ray image intensifying screen is described, which includes at least one fluorescent layer comprising phosphor particles dispersed in a binder and on top of such layer a protective layer containing a crosslinked polymer mass obtained by an acid-catalyzed reaction of a polymer or mixture of polymers containing reactive hydrogen atoms and a cross-linking agent, the cross-linking agent being an organic compound containing a plurality of etherified N-methylol groups. Examples are given of appropriate polymers and cross-linking agents. (author)

  20. Techniques to Improve Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandukuri, Jayanth

    Novel approaches to the improvement of ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging--a relatively new imaging modality that combines ultrasound and optical imaging techniques--have been proposed for early cancer detection. In USF, a high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) beam is used to induce temperature rise within its acoustic focal region due to which a thermo-sensitive USF contrast agent undergoes a switch in its state by increasing the output of fluorescence photons. By using an increase in fluorescence, one can isolate and quantify the fluorescence properties within the ultrasonic focal area. Therefore, USF is able to provide fluorescence contrast while maintaining ultrasound resolution in tissue. The major challenge of the conventional USF technique is its low axial resolution and its sensitivity (i.e. its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)). This work focuses on investigating and developing a novel USF system design that can improve the resolution and SNR of USF imaging for biological applications. This work can be divided into two major parts: characterizing the performance of a high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer; and improving the axial resolution and sensitivity of the USF technique. Preliminary investigation was conducted by using an IR camera setup to detect temperature variation and thereby study the performance of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer to quantify different parameters of ultrasound-induced temperature focal size (UTFS). Investigations are conducted for the purpose of high-resolution imaging with an emphasis on HIFU-induced thermal focus size, short duration of HIFU-induced temperature increase (to avoid thermal diffusion or conduction), and control of HIFU-induced temperature increase within a few degrees Celsius. Next, the focus was shifted to improving the sensitivity of the ultrasound-switchable fluorescence-imaging technique. In this study, the USF signal is encoded with the modulation frequency of the

  1. Objective identification of dental abnormalities with multispectral fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Surya Pratap; Fält, Pauli; Barman, Ishan; Koistinen, Arto; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Kullaa, Arja M

    2017-10-01

    Sensitive methods that can enable early detection of dental diseases (caries and calculus) are desirable in clinical practice. Optical spectroscopic approaches have emerged as promising alternatives owing to their wealth of molecular information and lack of sample preparation requirements. In the present study, using multispectral fluorescence imaging, we have demonstrated that dental caries and calculus can be objectively identified on extracted tooth. Spectral differences among control, carious and calculus conditions were attributed to the porphyrin pigment content, which is a byproduct of bacterial metabolism. Spectral maps generated using different porphyrin bands offer important clues to the spread of bacterial infection. Statistically significant differences utilizing fluorescence intensity ratios were observed among three groups. In contrast to laser induced fluorescence, these methods can provide information about exact spread of the infection and may aid in long term dental monitoring. Successful adoption of this approach for routine clinical usage can assist dentists in implementing timely remedial measures. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Radiography imaging of cultural heritage obtained with a modified portable X-Ray Fluorescence System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza Cuevas, Ariadna; Velazquez Maldonado, Luis Ramon

    2011-01-01

    The sufficiency of imaging quality of the radiographies obtained with a modified portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was evaluated for the study of cultural heritage. The proposed instrument use an X-ray tube with Pd anode (2 mm) that allows a maximum voltage and current of 50 kV and 1 mA respectively and a collimation system permit to irradiate a square shape region in the analyzed object by the projection of light beam with the same shape on its surface. The spatial resolution of the obtained radiographic image make possible to localize and well define pentimenti in painting, identify filling materials in a painting under restoration process, the radiogrametry of archaeological bone and the identification of a petrified sphere from an archaeological discovery. The radiographic analysis is proposed for study of physical anthropology in Cuba. (author)

  3. Account of spectral dependence of instrumental factor in quantitative X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershin, N.V.; Mosichev, V.I.

    1990-01-01

    A new method for calibration of X-ray fluorescence spectrometers using scanning spectrometric channel is proposed. The method is based on a separate account of matrix and instrumental effects and needs no calibration standards for the element analysed. For calibration in the whole spectral range of XRS (0.03-1.0 nm) it is sufficient to have from 10 to 15 pure element emitters made of most wide spread elements. The method provides rapid development of quantitative analysis for the elements which are not provided with standard samples and preparation of pure element emitters for which is impossible or problematic. The practical verification of the method was made by analysing a set of 146 standard samples covering a wide group of alloys. The mean relative error of the method was 3-5 % in an analytical range of 0.1-3.0 wt %

  4. Fluorescence lifetime images of different green fluorescent proteins in fly brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Sih-Yu; Lin, Y. Y.; Chiang, A. S.; Huang, Y. C.

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of learning and memory are the most important functions in an animal brain. Investigating neuron circuits and network maps in a brain is the first step toward understanding memory and learning behavior. Since Drosophila brain is the major model for understanding brain functions, we measure the florescence lifetimes of different GFP-based reporters expressed in a fly brain. In this work, two Gal4 drivers, OK 107 and MZ 19 were used. Intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]) concentration is an importation indicator of neuronal activity. Therefore, several groups have developed GFP-based calcium sensors, among which G-CaMP is the most popular and reliable. The fluorescence intensity of G-CaMP will increase when it binds to calcium ion; however, individual variation from different animals prevents quantitative research. In this work, we found that the florescence lifetime of G-CaMP will shrink from 1.8 ns to 1.0 ns when binding to Ca2+. This finding can potentially help us to understand the neuron circuits by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is a light-activated ion-channel protein on a neuron cell membrane. In this work, we express ChR2 and G-CaMP in a fly brain. Using a pulsed 470-nm laser to activate the neurons, we can also record the fluorescence lifetime changes in the structure. Hence, we can trace and manipulate a specific circuit in this animal. This method provides more flexibility in brain research.

  5. phiFLIM: a new method to avoid aliasing in frequency domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, E.B.; Gadella, Th.W.J.

    2004-01-01

    In conventional wide-field frequency-domain fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM), excitation light is intensity-modulated at megahertz frequencies. Emitted fluorescence is recorded by a CCD camera through an image intensifier, which is modulated at the same frequency. From images recorded

  6. Design, manufacturing and alignment of a fluorescence imaging spectrometer based on refractive optics and a transmission grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousberg, G. P.; Lemagne, F.; Gloesener, P.; Flebus, C.; Rougelot, S.; Coatantiec, C.; Harnisch, B.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of the Fluorescence Explorer (FLEX) phase A/B1 study, an elegant breadboard (EBB) of an imaging spectrometer is designed, manufactured and aligned by AMOS, with Airbus Defence&Space as the prime Contractor of the study. The FLEX mission is one of the two candidates of the 8th Earth Explorer mission. The main constituting instrument of the FLEX mission is an imaging spectrometer observing vegetation fluorescence and reflectance with a high- and a low-resolution channels in the 500 nm -780 nm band. As part of the system feasibility study of the mission, a breadboard of the high-resolution channel of the instrument is designed and manufactured with a high representativeness of a future flight concept. The high-resolution channel is referred to as FIMAS (Fluorescence IMAging Spectrometer). The main purpose of the EBB is to demonstrate (1) the manufacturability of the instrument and (2) the compliance of the optical performances with respect to the science requirements (including spatial and spectral resolution and stray-light).

  7. A New Instrument Design for Imaging Low Energy Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, John W.; Collier, Michael R.; Chornay, Dennis; Rozmarynowski, Paul; Getty, Stephanie; Cooper, John F.; Smith, Billy

    2007-01-01

    The MidSTAR-2 satellite, to be built at the US Naval Academy as a follow-on to the successful MidSTAR-1 satellite (http://web.ew.usna.edu/midstar/), will launch in 2011 and carry three Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) experiments developed under Goddard's Internal Research and Development (IRAD) program. One of these GSFC instruments, the Miniature Imager for Neutral Ionospheric atoms and Magnetospheric Electrons (MINI-ME) builds on the heritage of the Goddard-developed Low-Energy Neutral Atom (LENA) imager launched on the IMAGE spacecraft in 2000. MINI-ME features a Venetian-blind conversion surface assembly that improves both light rejection and conversion efficiency in a smaller and lighter package than LENA making this an highly effective instrument for viewing solar wind charge exchange with terrestrial and planetary exospheres. We will describe the MINI-ME prototyping effort and its science targets.

  8. Analysis of receptor clustering on cell surfaces by imaging fluorescent particles

    OpenAIRE

    Morrison, I.E.; Anderson, C.M.; Georgiou, G.N.; Stevenson, G.V.; Cherry, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescently labeled low density lipoproteins (LDL) and influenza virus particles were bound to the surface of human fibroblasts and imaged with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera attached to a fluorescence microscope. Particles were also imaged after attachment to polylysine-coated microscope slides. The digital images were analyzed by fitting data points in the region of fluorescent spots by a two-dimensional Gaussian function, thus obtaining a measure of spot intensity with correction for loca...

  9. Intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging during robotic operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Antonio Luiz de Vasconcellos; Schraibman, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    The intraoperative identification of certain anatomical structures because they are small or visually occult may be challenging. The development of minimally invasive surgery brought additional difficulties to identify these structures due to the lack of complete tactile sensitivity. A number of different forms of intraoperative mapping have been tried. Recently, the near-infrared fluorescence imaging technology with indocyanine green has been added to robotic platforms. In addition, this technology has been tested in several types of operations, and has advantages such as safety, low cost and good results. Disadvantages are linked to contrast distribution in certain clinical scenarios. The intraoperative near-infrared fluorescent imaging is new and promising addition to robotic surgery. Several reports show the utility of this technology in several different procedures. The ideal dose, time and site for dye injection are not well defined. No high quality evidence-based comparative studies and long-term follow-up outcomes have been published so far. Initial results, however, are good and safe. RESUMO A identificação intraoperatória de certas estruturas anatômicas, por seu tamanho ou por elas serem ocultas à visão, pode ser desafiadora. O desenvolvimento da cirurgia minimamente invasiva trouxe dificuldades adicionais, pela falta da sensibilidade tátil completa. Diversas formas de detecção intraoperatória destas estruturas têm sido tentadas. Recentemente, a tecnologia de fluorescência infravermelha com verde de indocianina foi associada às plataformas robóticas. Além disso, essa tecnologia tem sido testada em uma variedade de cirurgias, e suas vantagens parecem estar ligadas a baixo custo, segurança e bons resultados. As desvantagens estão associadas à má distribuição do contraste em determinados cenários. A imagem intraoperatória por fluorescência infravermelha é uma nova e promissora adição à cirurgia robótica. Diversas séries mostram

  10. Motion corrected photoacoustic difference imaging of fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Märk, Julia; Wagener, Asja; Pönick, Sarah; Grötzinger, Carsten; Zhang, Edward; Laufer, Jan

    2016-03-01

    In fluorophores, such as exogenous dyes and genetically expressed proteins, the excited state lifetime can be modulated using pump-probe excitation at wavelengths corresponding to the absorption and fluorescence spectra. Simultaneous pump-probe pulses induce stimulated emission (SE) which, in turn, modulates the thermalized energy, and hence the photoacoustic (PA) signal amplitude. For time-delayed pulses, by contrast, SE is suppressed. Since this is not observed in endogenous chromophores, the location of the fluorophore can be determined by subtracting images acquired using simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation. This simple experimental approach exploits a fluorophorespecific contrast mechanism, and has the potential to enable deep-tissue molecular imaging at fluences below the MPE. In this study, some of the challenges to its in vivo implementation are addressed. First, the PA signal amplitude generated in fluorophores in vivo is often much smaller than that in blood. Second, tissue motion can give rise to artifacts that correspond to endogenous chromophores in the difference image. This would not allow the unambiguous detection of fluorophores. A method to suppress motion artifacts based on fast switching between simultaneous and time-delayed pump-probe excitation was developed. This enables the acquisition of PA signals using the two excitation modes with minimal time delay (20 ms), thus minimizing the effects of tissue motion. The feasibility of this method is demonstrated by visualizing a fluorophore (Atto680) in tissue phantoms, which were moved during the image acquisition to mimic tissue motion.

  11. Fluorescence Imaging of the Cytoskeleton in Plant Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachok, Julia; Paez-Garcia, Ana; Yoo, Cheol-Min; Palanichelvam, Karuppaiah; Blancaflor, Elison B

    2016-01-01

    During the past two decades the use of live cytoskeletal probes has increased dramatically due to the introduction of the green fluorescent protein. However, to make full use of these live cell reporters it is necessary to implement simple methods to maintain plant specimens in optimal growing conditions during imaging. To image the cytoskeleton in living Arabidopsis roots, we rely on a system involving coverslips coated with nutrient supplemented agar where the seeds are directly germinated. This coverslip system can be conveniently transferred to the stage of a confocal microscope with minimal disturbance to the growth of the seedling. For roots with a larger diameter such as Medicago truncatula, seeds are first germinated in moist paper, grown vertically in between plastic trays, and roots mounted on glass slides for confocal imaging. Parallel with our live cell imaging approaches, we routinely process fixed plant material via indirect immunofluorescence. For these methods we typically use non-embedded vibratome-sectioned and whole mount permeabilized root tissue. The clearly defined developmental regions of the root provide us with an elegant system to further understand the cytoskeletal basis of plant development.

  12. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeks, James A; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2017-05-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina.

  13. An imaging X-ray fluorescence spectrometer for near earth objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.P.; Brunton, A.N.; Fraser, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a novel imaging X-ray spectrometer to be flown on a space mission to a Near Earth Object (NEO) (the Moon, a near Earth asteroid or a comet). In either of the first two cases the instrument will record X-ray fluorescence excited from the surface by the solar X-ray flux to form 'compositional maps' of its surface, providing valuable information on the evolution of these objects. In the case of a comet, the device will study the X-ray emission resulting from its interaction with the solar wind. During cruise when the spacecraft is en-route to the NEO the instrument will be used to make astronomical observations of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), X-ray binary stars and coronal sources in star clusters such as the Pleiades or Hyades. The instrument, proposed for ESA's SMART-1 mission, is a miniature telescope, of 37.5 cm focal length, based on microchannel plate (MCP) optics and charged coupled device (CCD) detectors providing both imaging and a medium resolution ∼50-100 eV spectroscopic capability; sufficient to resolve the L lines of Ca, Ti, Fe, and the K lines of O, Mg, Al and Si with an angular resolution ∼10 arcmin and a 6x6 deg. field of view

  14. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) for quantitative and sensitive live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Sébastien; Elgass, Kirstin; Sackrow, Marcus; Caesar, Katharina; Born, Anne-Kathrin; Maniura, Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Meixner, Alfred J.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy became an invaluable tool in cell biology in the past 20 years. However, the information that lies in these studies is often corrupted by a cellular fluorescence background known as autofluorescence. Since the unspecific background often overlaps with most commonly used labels in terms of fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime, the use of spectral filters in the emission beampath or timegating in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is often no appropriate means for distinction between signal and background. Despite the prevalence of fluorescence techniques only little progress has been reported in techniques that specifically suppress autofluorescence or that clearly discriminate autofluorescence from label fluorescence. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) is a novel technique which is based on the image acquisition protocol of FLIM. Whereas FLIM spatially resolved maps the average fluorescence lifetime distribution in a heterogeneous sample such as a cell, FIDSAM enhances the dynamic image contrast by determination of the autofluorescence contribution by comparing the fluorescence decay shape to a reference function. The technique therefore makes use of the key difference between label and autofluorescence, i.e. that for label fluorescence only one emitting species contributes to fluorescence intensity decay curves whereas many different species of minor intensity contribute to autofluorescence. That way, we were able to suppress autofluorescence contributions from chloroplasts in Arabidopsis stoma cells and from cell walls in Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells to background level. Furthermore, we could extend the method to more challenging labels such as the cyan fluorescent protein CFP in human fibroblasts.

  15. Fluorescent imaging of protein myristoylation during cellular differentiation and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Andrew J; Ejendal, Karin F K; Gengelbach, Lindsey M; Traore, Meghan A; Wang, Xu; Umulis, David M; Calve, Sarah; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara L

    2017-10-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) serve to give proteins new cellular functions and can influence spatial distribution and enzymatic activity, greatly enriching the complexity of the proteome. Lipidation is a PTM that regulates protein stability, function, and subcellular localization. To complement advances in proteomic identification of lipidated proteins, we have developed a method to image the spatial distribution of proteins that have been co- and post-translationally modified via the addition of myristic acid (Myr) to the N terminus. In this work, we use a Myr analog, 12-azidododecanoic acid (12-ADA), to facilitate fluorescent detection of myristoylated proteins in vitro and in vivo. The azide moiety of 12-ADA does not react to natural biological chemistries, but is selectively reactive with alkyne functionalized fluorescent dyes. We find that the spatial distribution of myristoylated proteins varies dramatically between undifferentiated and differentiated muscle cells in vitro. Further, we demonstrate that our methodology can visualize the distribution of myristoylated proteins in zebrafish muscle in vivo. Selective protein labeling with noncanonical fatty acids, such as 12-ADA, can be used to determine the biological function of myristoylation and other lipid-based PTMs and can be extended to study deregulated protein lipidation in disease states. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festa, G.; Tardino, G.; Pontecorvo, L.; Mannes, D.C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Andreani, C.

    2014-01-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the ‘Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento’ in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments’ restoration process

  17. Neutrons and music: Imaging investigation of ancient wind musical instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festa, G., E-mail: giulia.festa@roma2.infn.it [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Tardino, G. [BauArt Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Pontecorvo, L. [Conservatorio di Cosenza – Cosenza Conservatory (Italy); Mannes, D.C. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Senesi, R. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy); Gorini, G. [Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); Andreani, C. [Università degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-IPCF, Messina (Italy)

    2014-10-01

    A set of seven musical instruments and two instruments cares from the ‘Fondo Antico della Biblioteca del Sacro Convento’ in Assisi, Italy, were investigated through neutron and X-ray imaging techniques. Historical and scientific interests around ancient musical instruments motivate an intense research effort for their characterization using non-destructive and non-invasive techniques. X-ray and neutron tomography/radiography were applied to the study of composite material samples containing wood, hide and metals. The study was carried out at the NEUTRA beamline, PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Results of the measurements provided new information on the composite and multi-scale structure, such as: the internal structure of the samples, position of added materials like metals, wood fiber displays, deformations, presence of adhesives and their spatial distribution and novel insight about construction methods to guide the instruments’ restoration process.

  18. Single aflatoxin contaminated corn kernel analysis with fluorescence hyperspectral image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2010-04-01

    Aflatoxins are toxic secondary metabolites of the fungi Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus, among others. Aflatoxin contaminated corn is toxic to domestic animals when ingested in feed and is a known carcinogen associated with liver and lung cancer in humans. Consequently, aflatoxin levels in food and feed are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food and 100 ppb in feed for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests including thin-layer chromatography (TCL) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). These analytical tests require the destruction of samples, and are costly and time consuming. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, nondestructive way is crucial to the grain industry, particularly to corn industry. Hyperspectral imaging technology offers a non-invasive approach toward screening for food safety inspection and quality control based on its spectral signature. The focus of this paper is to classify aflatoxin contaminated single corn kernels using fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. Field inoculated corn kernels were used in the study. Contaminated and control kernels under long wavelength ultraviolet excitation were imaged using a visible near-infrared (VNIR) hyperspectral camera. The imaged kernels were chemically analyzed to provide reference information for image analysis. This paper describes a procedure to process corn kernels located in different images for statistical training and classification. Two classification algorithms, Maximum Likelihood and Binary Encoding, were used to classify each corn kernel into "control" or "contaminated" through pixel classification. The Binary Encoding approach had a slightly better performance with accuracy equals to 87% or 88% when 20 ppb or 100 ppb was used as classification threshold, respectively.

  19. Tumor Endothelial Marker Imaging in Melanomas Using Dual-Tracer Fluorescence Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Gunn, Jason R.; Bosenberg, Marcus W.; Turk, Mary-Jo; Hasan, Tayyaba; Stan, Radu V.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cancer-specific endothelial markers available for intravascular binding are promising targets for new molecular therapies. In this study, a molecular imaging approach of quantifying endothelial marker concentrations (EMCI) is developed and tested in highly light-absorbing melanomas. The approach involves injection of targeted imaging tracer in conjunction with an untargeted tracer, which is used to account for nonspecific uptake and tissue optical property effects on measured targeted tracer concentrations. Procedures Theoretical simulations and a mouse melanoma model experiment were used to test out the EMCI approach. The tracers used in the melanoma experiments were fluorescently labeled anti-Plvap/PV1 antibody (plasmalemma vesicle associated protein Plvap/PV1 is a transmembrane protein marker exposed on the luminal surface of endothelial cells in tumor vasculature) and a fluorescent isotype control antibody, the uptakes of which were measured on a planar fluorescence imaging system. Results The EMCI model was found to be robust to experimental noise under reversible and irreversible binding conditions and was capable of predicting expected overexpression of PV1 in melanomas compared to healthy skin despite a 5-time higher measured fluorescence in healthy skin compared to melanoma: attributable to substantial light attenuation from melanin in the tumors. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential of EMCI to quantify endothelial marker concentrations in vivo, an accomplishment that is currently unavailable through any other methods, either in vivo or ex vivo. PMID:24217944

  20. A widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor for image cytometry of biospecimens: Considerations for image quality optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheson, Joshua A.; Majid, Aneeka A.; Powless, Amy J.; Muldoon, Timothy J., E-mail: tmuldoon@uark.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 120 Engineering Hall, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Linear image sensors have been widely used in numerous research and industry applications to provide continuous imaging of moving objects. Here, we present a widefield fluorescence microscope with a linear image sensor used to image translating objects for image cytometry. First, a calibration curve was characterized for a custom microfluidic chamber over a span of volumetric pump rates. Image data were also acquired using 15 μm fluorescent polystyrene spheres on a slide with a motorized translation stage in order to match linear translation speed with line exposure periods to preserve the image aspect ratio. Aspect ratios were then calculated after imaging to ensure quality control of image data. Fluorescent beads were imaged in suspension flowing through the microfluidics chamber being pumped by a mechanical syringe pump at 16 μl min{sup −1} with a line exposure period of 150 μs. The line period was selected to acquire images of fluorescent beads with a 40 dB signal-to-background ratio. A motorized translation stage was then used to transport conventional glass slides of stained cellular biospecimens. Whole blood collected from healthy volunteers was stained with 0.02% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate was imaged to highlight leukocyte morphology with a 1.56 mm × 1.28 mm field of view (1540 ms total acquisition time). Oral squamous cells were also collected from healthy volunteers and stained with 0.01% (w/v) proflavine hemisulfate to demonstrate quantifiable subcellular features and an average nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio of 0.03 (n = 75), with a resolution of 0.31 μm pixels{sup −1}.

  1. Harmonic optical microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging platform for multimodal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelegati, Vitor B; Adur, Javier; De Thomaz, André A; Almeida, Diogo B; Baratti, Mariana O; Andrade, Liliana A L A; Bottcher-Luiz, Fátima; Cesar, Carlos L

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we proposed and built a multimodal optical setup that extends a commercially available confocal microscope (Olympus VF300) to include nonlinear second harmonic generation (SHG) and third harmonic generation (THG) optical (NLO) microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We explored all the flexibility offered by this commercial confocal microscope to include the nonlinear microscopy capabilities. The setup allows image acquisition with confocal, brightfield, NLO/multiphoton and FLIM imaging. Simultaneously, two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and SHG are well established in the biomedical imaging area, because one can use the same ultrafast laser and detectors set to acquire both signals simultaneously. Because the integration with FLIM requires a separated modulus, there are fewer reports of TPEF+SHG+FLIM in the literature. The lack of reports of a TPEF+SHG+THG+FLIM system is mainly due to difficulties with THG because the present NLO laser sources generate THG in an UV wavelength range incompatible with microscope optics. In this article, we report the development of an easy-to-operate platform capable to perform two-photon fluorescence (TPFE), SHG, THG, and FLIM using a single 80 MHz femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser source. We described the modifications over the confocal system necessary to implement this integration and verified the presence of SHG and THG signals by several physical evidences. Finally, we demonstrated the use of this integrated system by acquiring images of vegetables and epithelial cancer biological samples. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Portable instrument that integrates irradiation with fluorescence and reflectance spectroscopies during clinical photodynamic therapy of cutaneous disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, W. J.; Oseroff, A. R.; Foster, T. H.

    2006-06-01

    We report a portable clinical instrument for delivering photodynamic therapy (PDT) while performing noninvasive spectroscopic monitoring in vivo. Using an off-surface probe, the instrument delivers the treatment beam to a user-defined field on the skin and performs reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopies at two regions within this field. The instrument is being used to monitor photosensitizer fluorescence photobleaching, fluorescent photoproduct kinetics, blood volume, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation during a pilot clinical trial of 5-aminolevulinic acid-PDT treatment of superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Protoporphyrin IX and photoproduct fluorescence excited by the 633nm PDT treatment laser is collected between 655 and 800nm. During a series of brief treatment interruptions at programable time points, white light reflectance spectra between 475 and 800nm are acquired. Fluorescence spectra are corrected for the effects of absorption and scattering, informed by the reflectance measurements, and then decomposed into known fluorophore contributions in real time using a robust singular value decomposition fitting routine. Reflectance spectra additionally provide information on blood volume and hemoglobin oxygen saturation. Monitoring blood oxygenation and implicit dose metrics such as photosensitizer photobleaching during PDT allows the improved interpretation of clinical results and is helping to guide the treatment protocol for an anticipated low-irradiance PDT clinical trial of BCC.

  3. Time-Domain Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Techniques Suitable for Solid-State Imaging Sensor Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Henderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully demonstrated video-rate CMOS single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD-based cameras for fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM by applying innovative FLIM algorithms. We also review and compare several time-domain techniques and solid-state FLIM systems, and adapt the proposed algorithms for massive CMOS SPAD-based arrays and hardware implementations. The theoretical error equations are derived and their performances are demonstrated on the data obtained from 0.13 μm CMOS SPAD arrays and the multiple-decay data obtained from scanning PMT systems. In vivo two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging data of FITC-albumin labeled vasculature of a P22 rat carcinosarcoma (BD9 rat window chamber are used to test how different algorithms perform on bi-decay data. The proposed techniques are capable of producing lifetime images with enough contrast.

  4. Dual-modality, fluorescent, PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles for molecular and cellular fluorescence imaging and computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swy, Eric R; Schwartz-Duval, Aaron S; Shuboni, Dorela D; Latourette, Matthew T; Mallet, Christiane L; Parys, Maciej; Cormode, David P; Shapiro, Erik M

    2014-11-07

    Reports of molecular and cellular imaging using computed tomography (CT) are rapidly increasing. Many of these reports use gold nanoparticles. Bismuth has similar CT contrast properties to gold while being approximately 1000-fold less expensive. Herein we report the design, fabrication, characterization, and CT and fluorescence imaging properties of a novel, dual modality, fluorescent, polymer encapsulated bismuth nanoparticle construct for computed tomography and fluorescence imaging. We also report on cellular internalization and preliminary in vitro and in vivo toxicity effects of these constructs. 40 nm bismuth(0) nanocrystals were synthesized and encapsulated within 120 nm Poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles by oil-in-water emulsion methodologies. Coumarin-6 was co-encapsulated to impart fluorescence. High encapsulation efficiency was achieved ∼70% bismuth w/w. Particles were shown to internalize within cells following incubation in culture. Bismuth nanocrystals and PLGA encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles exhibited >90% and >70% degradation, respectively, within 24 hours in acidic, lysosomal environment mimicking media and both remained nearly 100% stable in cytosolic/extracellular fluid mimicking media. μCT and clinical CT imaging was performed at multiple X-ray tube voltages to measure concentration dependent attenuation rates as well as to establish the ability to detect the nanoparticles in an ex vivo biological sample. Dual fluorescence and CT imaging is demonstrated as well. In vivo toxicity studies in rats revealed neither clinically apparent side effects nor major alterations in serum chemistry and hematology parameters. Calculations on minimal detection requirements for in vivo targeted imaging using these nanoparticles are presented. Indeed, our results indicate that these nanoparticles may serve as a platform for sensitive and specific targeted molecular CT and fluorescence imaging.

  5. Performance comparison of different compact NIR fluorescent imaging systems with goggle display for intraoperative image-guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman; Zhu, Nan; Liang, Rongguang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent imaging system has been widely used for intraoperative image-guided application. In this paper, we present performance comparison from three compact NIR fluorescence imaging system prototypes with goggle display that we developed for intraoperative guidance: threshold detection based two camera system, feature matching based three cameras system and miniature beam-splitter single camera system. Their performance is evaluated according to sensitivity regarding different ICG concentrations, accuracy of image overlay between NIR-visible channels, compactness and practicability in intraoperative use. The comparison results show great potentials of using these NIR fluorescence imaging systems to improve user experience and surgical outcomes in intraoperative use.

  6. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, Christopher; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey; Goldstein, Bob; Heppert, Jennifer; Dickinson, Daniel; Pani, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo . Recent advances in genome editing have enabled precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments, and they facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent p...

  7. Model for the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of image intensifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Qian, YunSheng; Fu, RongGuo; Gao, Youtang; Si, Tian

    2007-01-01

    The three elements of photoelectrical cathode, microchannel plate and fluorescence screen are important parts to imaging quality of low light and ultraviolet Image intensifier. To do research and analysis work on the Fluorescence screen parameter testing have practical significance to the understanding of the performance of fluorescence screen and then can help to know where improvement should be made and then achieve a best performance entire tube, This article mainly introduce the testing theory of the brightness uniformity of fluorescence screen of Image Intensifier and how to build a mathematic model.

  8. Quantitative analysis of fluorescence lifetime measurements of the macula using the fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dysli, Chantal; Quellec, Gwénolé; Abegg, Mathias; Menke, Marcel N; Wolf-Schnurrbusch, Ute; Kowal, Jens; Blatz, Johannes; La Schiazza, Olivier; Leichtle, Alexander B; Wolf, Sebastian; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2014-04-03

    Fundus autofluorescence (FAF) cannot only be characterized by the intensity or the emission spectrum, but also by its lifetime. As the lifetime of a fluorescent molecule is sensitive to its local microenvironment, this technique may provide more information than fundus autofluorescence imaging. We report here the characteristics and repeatability of FAF lifetime measurements of the human macula using a new fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscope (FLIO). A total of 31 healthy phakic subjects were included in this study with an age range from 22 to 61 years. For image acquisition, a fluorescence lifetime ophthalmoscope based on a Heidelberg Engineering Spectralis system was used. Fluorescence lifetime maps of the retina were recorded in a short- (498-560 nm) and a long- (560-720 nm) spectral channel. For quantification of fluorescence lifetimes a standard ETDRS grid was used. Mean fluorescence lifetimes were shortest in the fovea, with 208 picoseconds for the short-spectral channel and 239 picoseconds for the long-spectral channel, respectively. Fluorescence lifetimes increased from the central area to the outer ring of the ETDRS grid. The test-retest reliability of FLIO was very high for all ETDRS areas (Spearman's ρ = 0.80 for the short- and 0.97 for the long-spectral channel, P macula in healthy subjects. By using a custom-built software, we were able to quantify fluorescence lifetimes within the ETDRS grid. Establishing a clinically accessible standard against which to measure FAF lifetimes within the retina is a prerequisite for future studies in retinal disease.

  9. Non-conventional applications of a noninvasive portable X-ray diffraction/fluorescence instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, Giacomo [Getty Conservation Institute, Science Department, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Sarrazin, Philippe [Examinart LLC, Sunnyvale, CA (United States); Heginbotham, Arlen [The J. Paul Getty Museum, Sculpture and Decorative Arts Conservation, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Noninvasive techniques have become widespread in the cultural heritage analytical domain. The popular handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) devices give the elemental composition of all the layers that X-rays can penetrate, but no information on how atoms are bound together or at which depth they are located. A noninvasive portable X-ray powder diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF) device may offer a solution to these limitations, since it can provide information on the composition of crystalline materials. This paper introduces applications of XRD beyond simple phase recognition. The two fundamental principles for XRD are: (1) the crystallites should be randomly oriented, to ensure proper intensity to all the diffraction peaks, and (2) the material should be positioned exactly in the focal plane of the instrument, respecting its geometry, as any displacement of the sample would results in 2θ shifts of the diffraction peaks. In conventional XRD, the sample is ground and set on the properly positioned sample holder. Using a noninvasive portable instrument, these two requirements are seldom fulfilled. The position, size and orientation of a given crystallite within a layered structure depend on the object itself. Equation correlating the displacement (distance from the focal plane) versus peak shift (angular difference in 2θ from the standard value) is derived and used to determine the depth at which a given substance is located. The quantitative composition of two binary Cu/Zn alloys, simultaneously present, was determined measuring the cell volume and using Vegard's law. The analysis of the whole object gives information on the texture and possible preferred orientations of the crystallites, which influences the peak intensity. This allows for the distinction between clad and electroplated daguerreotypes in the case of silver and between ancient and modern gilding for gold. Analyses of cross sections can be carried out successfully. Finally, beeswax, used in

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of plants using a liquid crystal tunable filter and charge coupled device imaging camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yasunori; Matsubara, Tomohiro; Koga, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Fumitoshi; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Nomura, Akio

    2005-10-01

    We developed a laser-induced fluorescence imaging system for plant monitoring use, with which it was possible to make an image at any wavelength between 430 and 750nm. The excitation source for the fluorescence was a cw ultraviolet laser diode with 398nm, and the detector was an image-intensified charge coupled device. A liquid crystal tunable filter was used as the fluorescence wavelength selection device. All of the system performance including the wavelength tuning was electrically controlled, so that it could be operated with no mechanical vibration noise. The fluorescence images of a coffee tree leaf obtained at 440, 530, 685, and 740nm clearly showed a distribution pattern of the fluorescence intensity over the leaf. The pattern reflected the different physiological statuses of the plant. Advantages of the imaging system were experimentally discussed on a point of detection of inhomogeneous physiological activities over a plant leaf.

  11. Imaging Multimodalities for Dissecting Alzheimer's Disease: Advanced Technologies of Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojo, Masafumi; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya; Sahara, Naruhiko

    2015-01-01

    The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations.

  12. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of the surface. A direct correlation with the optical image is obtained. We demonstrate that this reflection setup is suitable for dielectric samples. Images in fluorescence have been obtained o­n Lan...

  13. X-ray Fluorescence Method for Trace Analysis and Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Hayakawa, Shinjiro

    2000-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis has a long history as a conventional bulk elemental analysis with medium sensitivity. However, with the use of synchrotron radiation x-ray fluorescence method has become a unique analytical technique which can provide trace elemental information with the spatial resolution. To obtain quantitative information of trace elemental distribution by using the x-ray fluorescence method, theoretical description of x-ray fluorescence yield is described. Moreover, methods and...

  14. Improved in Vivo Whole-Animal Detection Limits of Green Fluorescent Protein–Expressing Tumor Lines by Spectral Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M. Tam

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein (GFP has been used for cell tracking and imaging gene expression in superficial or surgically exposed structures. However, in vivo murine imaging is often limited by several factors, including scatter and attenuation with depth and overlapping autofluorescence. The autofluorescence signals have spectral profiles that are markedly different from the GFP emission spectral profile. The use of spectral imaging allows separation and quantitation of these contributions to the total fluorescence signal seen in vivo by weighting known pure component profiles. Separation of relative GFP and autofluorescence signals is not readily possible using epifluorescent continuous-wave single excitation and emission bandpass imaging (EFI. To evaluate detection thresholds using these two methods, nude mice were subcutaneously injected with a series of GFP-expressing cells. For EFI, optimized excitation and emission bandpass filters were used. Owing to the ability to separate autofluorescence contributions from the emission signal using spectral imaging compared with the mixed contributions of GFP and autofluorescence in the emission signal recorded by the EFI system, we achieved a 300-fold improvement in the cellular detection limit. The detection limit was 3 × 103 cells for spectral imaging versus 1 × 106 cells for EFI. Despite contributions to image stacks from autofluorescence, a 100-fold dynamic range of cell number in the same image was readily visualized. Finally, spectral imaging was able to separate signal interference of red fluorescent protein from GFP images and vice versa. These findings demonstrate the utility of the approach in detecting low levels of multiple fluorescent markers for whole-animal in vivo applications.

  15. 3D imaging of transition metals in the zebrafish embryo by X-ray fluorescence microtomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Daisy; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Yi, Hong; Will, Fabian; Richter, Heiko; Shin, Chong Hyun; Fahrni, Christoph J

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microtomography has emerged as a powerful technique for the 3D visualization of the elemental distribution in biological samples. The mechanical stability, both of the instrument and the specimen, is paramount when acquiring tomographic projection series. By combining the progressive lowering of temperature method (PLT) with femtosecond laser sectioning, we were able to embed, excise, and preserve a zebrafish embryo at 24 hours post fertilization in an X-ray compatible, transparent resin for tomographic elemental imaging. Based on a data set comprised of 60 projections, acquired with a step size of 2 μm during 100 hours of beam time, we reconstructed the 3D distribution of zinc, iron, and copper using the iterative maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) reconstruction algorithm. The volumetric elemental maps, which entail over 124 million individual voxels for each transition metal, revealed distinct elemental distributions that could be correlated with characteristic anatomical features at this stage of embryonic development.

  16. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  17. Compact whole-body fluorescent imaging of nude mice bearing EGFP expressing tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanping; Xiong, Tao; Chu, Jun; Yu, Li; Zeng, Shaoqun; Luo, Qingming

    2005-01-01

    Issue of tumor has been a hotspot of current medicine. It is important for tumor research to detect tumors bearing in animal models easily, fast, repetitively and noninvasivly. Many researchers have paid their increasing interests on the detecting. Some contrast agents, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Discosoma red fluorescent protein (Dsred) were applied to enhance image quality. Three main kinds of imaging scheme were adopted to visualize fluorescent protein expressing tumors in vivo. These schemes based on fluorescence stereo microscope, cooled charge-coupled-device (CCD) or camera as imaging set, and laser or mercury lamp as excitation light source. Fluorescence stereo microscope, laser and cooled CCD are expensive to many institutes. The authors set up an inexpensive compact whole-body fluorescent imaging tool, which consisted of a Kodak digital camera (model DC290), fluorescence filters(B and G2;HB Optical, Shenyang, Liaoning, P.R. China) and a mercury 50-W lamp power supply (U-LH50HG;Olympus Optical, Japan) as excitation light source. The EGFP was excited directly by mercury lamp with D455/70 nm band-pass filter and fluorescence was recorded by digital camera with 520nm long-pass filter. By this easy operation tool, the authors imaged, in real time, fluorescent tumors growing in live mice. The imaging system is external and noninvasive. For half a year our experiments suggested the imaging scheme was feasible. Whole-body fluorescence optical imaging for fluorescent expressing tumors in nude mouse is an ideal tool for antitumor, antimetastatic, and antiangiogenesis drug screening.

  18. Cryo-imaging of fluorescently labeled single cells in a mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyer, Grant J.; Roy, Debashish; Salvado, Olivier; Stone, Meredith E.; Wilson, David L.

    2009-02-01

    We developed a cryo-imaging system to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse, with particular applicability to stem cells and metastatic cancer. The Case cryoimaging system consists of a fluorescence microscope, robotic imaging positioner, customized cryostat, PC-based control system, and visualization/analysis software. The system alternates between sectioning (10-40 μm) and imaging, collecting color brightfield and fluorescent blockface image volumes >60GB. In mouse experiments, we imaged quantum-dot labeled stem cells, GFP-labeled cancer and stem cells, and cell-size fluorescent microspheres. To remove subsurface fluorescence, we used a simplified model of light-tissue interaction whereby the next image was scaled, blurred, and subtracted from the current image. We estimated scaling and blurring parameters by minimizing entropy of subtracted images. Tissue specific attenuation parameters were found [uT : heart (267 +/- 47.6 μm), liver (218 +/- 27.1 μm), brain (161 +/- 27.4 μm)] to be within the range of estimates in the literature. "Next image" processing removed subsurface fluorescence equally well across multiple tissues (brain, kidney, liver, adipose tissue, etc.), and analysis of 200 microsphere images in the brain gave 97+/-2% reduction of subsurface fluorescence. Fluorescent signals were determined to arise from single cells based upon geometric and integrated intensity measurements. Next image processing greatly improved axial resolution, enabled high quality 3D volume renderings, and improved enumeration of single cells with connected component analysis by up to 24%. Analysis of image volumes identified metastatic cancer sites, found homing of stem cells to injury sites, and showed microsphere distribution correlated with blood flow patterns. We developed and evaluated cryo-imaging to provide single-cell detection of fluorescently labeled cells in mouse. Our cryo-imaging system provides extreme (>60GB), micron

  19. Preparation and Characterization of Highly Fluorescent, Glutathione-coated Near Infrared Quantum Dots for in Vivo Fluorescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshichika Yoshioka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent probes that emit in the near-infrared (NIR, 700-1,300 nm region are suitable as optical contrast agents for in vivo fluorescence imaging because of low scattering and absorption of the NIR light in tissues. Recently, NIR quantum dots (QDs have become a new class of fluorescent materials that can be used for in vivo imaging. Compared with traditional organic fluorescent dyes, QDs have several unique advantages such as size- and composition-tunable emission, high brightness, narrow emission bands, large Stokes shifts, and high resistance to photobleaching. In this paper, we report a facile method for the preparation of highly fluorescent, water-soluble glutathione (GSH-coated NIR QDs for in vivo imaging. GSH-coated NIR QDs (GSH-QDs were prepared by surface modification of hydrophobic CdSeTe/CdS (core/shell QDs. The hydrophobic surface of the CdSeTe/CdS QDs was exchanged with GSH in tetrahydrofuran-water. The resulting GSH-QDs were monodisperse particles and stable in PBS (phosphate buffered saline, pH = 7.4. The GSH-QDs (800 nm emission were highly fluorescent in aqueous solutions (quantum yield = 22% in PBS buffer, and their hydrodynamic diameter was less than 10 nm, which is comparable to the size of proteins. The cellular uptake and viability for the GSH-QDs were examined using HeLa and HEK 293 cells. When the cells were incubated with aqueous solutions of the GSH-QDs (10 nM, the QDs were taken into the cells and distributed in the perinuclear region of both cells. After 12 hrs incubation of 4 nM of GSH-QDs, the viabilities of HeLa and HEK 293 cells were ca. 80 and 50%, respectively. As a biomedical utility of the GSH-QDs, in vivo NIRfluorescence imaging of a lymph node in a mouse is presented.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of subsurface tissue structures with a volume holographic spatial-spectral imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yuan; Gelsinger-Austin, Paul J; Watson, Jonathan M; Barbastathis, George; Barton, Jennifer K; Kostuk, Raymond K

    2008-09-15

    A three-dimensional imaging system incorporating multiplexed holographic gratings to visualize fluorescence tissue structures is presented. Holographic gratings formed in volume recording materials such as a phenanthrenquinone poly(methyl methacrylate) photopolymer have narrowband angular and spectral transmittance filtering properties that enable obtaining spatial-spectral information within an object. We demonstrate this imaging system's ability to obtain multiple depth-resolved fluorescence images simultaneously.

  1. Whole-slide imaging is a robust alternative to traditional fluorescent microscopy for fluorescence in situ hybridization imaging using break-apart DNA probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Camille; Guérin, Maxime; Frenois, François-Xavier; Thuries, Valérie; Jalabert, Laurence; Brousset, Pierre; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2013-08-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization is an indispensable technique used in routine pathology and for theranostic purposes. Because fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques require sophisticated microscopic workstations and long procedures of image acquisition with sometimes subjective and poorly reproducible results, we decided to test a whole-slide imaging system as an alternative approach. In this study, we used the latest generation of Pannoramic 250 Flash digital microscopes (P250 Flash digital microscopes; 3DHISTECH, Budapest, Hungary) to digitize fluorescence in situ hybridization slides of diffuse large B cells lymphoma cases for detecting MYC rearrangement. The P250 Flash digital microscope was found to be precise with better definition of split signals in cells containing MYC rearrangement with fewer truncated signals as compared to traditional fluorescence microscopy. This digital technique is easier thanks to the preview function, which allows almost immediate identification of the tumor area, and the panning and zooming functionalities as well as a shorter acquisition time. Moreover, fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses using the digital technique appeared to be more reproducible between pathologists. Finally, the digital technique also allowed prolonged conservation of photos. In conclusion, whole-slide imaging technologies represent rapid, robust, and highly sensitive methods for interpreting fluorescence in situ hybridization slides with break-apart probes. In addition, these techniques offer an easier way to interpret the signals and allow definitive storage of the images for pathology expert networks or e-learning databases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Noninvasive imaging in vivo with fluorescent proteins from centimeters to micrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Jiang, Ping; Al-Zaid, Manal; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2008-02-01

    Whole-body imaging with fluorescent proteins has been shown to be a powerful technology with many applications in small animals. Our laboratory pioneered in vivo imaging with fluorescent proteins (1) including noninvasive whole-body imaging (2). Whole-body imaging with fluorescent proteins depends in large part on the brightness of the protein. Brighter, red-shifted proteins can make whole-body imaging more sensitive due to reduced absorption by tissues and less scatter. Non-invasive imaging with fluorescent proteins has been shown to be able to quantitatively track tumor growth and metastasis, gene expression, angiogenesis, and bacterial infection (3) even at subcellular resolution depending on the position of the cells in the animal. Interference by skin autofluorescence is kept to a minimum with the use of proper filters. To noninvasively image cancer cell/stromal cell interaction in the tumor microenvironment and drug response at the cellular level in live animals in real time, we developed a new imageable three-color animal model. The model consists of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing mice transplanted with dual-color cancer cells labeled with GFP in the nucleus and red fluorescent protein (RFP) in the cytoplasm. Various in vivo phenomena of tumor-host interaction and cellular dynamics were imaged, including mitotic and apoptotic tumor cells, stromal cells interacting with the tumor cells, tumor vasculature, and tumor blood flow as well as drug response. This imageable technology should lead to many new insights of in vivo cancer cell biology.

  3. Positron emission tomography: Physics, instrumentation, and image analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porenta, G.

    1994-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique that permits reconstruction of cross-sectional images of the human body which depict the biodistribution of PET tracer substances. A large variety of physiological PET tracers, mostly based on isotopes of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and fluorine is available and allows the in vivo investigation of organ perfusion, metabolic pathways and biomolecular processes in normal and diseased states. PET cameras utilize the physical characteristics of positron decay to derive quantitative measurements of tracer concentrations, a capability that has so far been elusive for conventional SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) imaging techniques. Due to the short half lives of most PET isotopes, an on-site cyclotron and a radiochemistry unit are necessary to provide an adequate supply of PET tracers. While operating a PET center in the past was a complex procedure restricted to few academic centers with ample resources. PET technology has rapidly advanced in recent years and has entered the commercial nuclear medicine market. To date, the availability of compact cyclotrons with remote computer control, automated synthesis units for PET radiochemistry, high-performance PET cameras, and userfriendly analysis workstations permits installation of a clinical PET center within most nuclear medicine facilities. This review provides simple descriptions of important aspects concerning physics, instrumentation, and image analysis in PET imaging which should be understood by medical personnel involved in the clinical operation of a PET imaging center. (author)

  4. Diverse Protocols for Correlative Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging and Electron Microscopy of Cells and Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-25

    super - resolution fluorescence imaging and electron microscopy of cells and tissue Benjamin G. Kopek1, Maria G...have recently developed related approaches for super - resolution imaging within endogenous cellular environments using correlative light and electron...low as ~10 nm under ideal conditions), collectively dubbed “ super - resolution imaging ”5-10. A major super - resolution imaging modality is

  5. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gufeng; Stender, Anthony S.; Sun, Wei; and Fang, Ning

    2009-12-17

    Precise imaging of cellular and subcellular structures and dynamic processes in live cells is crucial for fundamental research in life sciences and in medical applications. Non-fluorescent nanoparticles are an important type of optical probe used in live-cell imaging due to their photostability, large optical cross-sections, and low toxicity. Here, we provide an overview of recent developments in the optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanoparticle probes in live cells.

  6. Fluorescence lifetime imaging study of a single cell: stress-induced environmental change and electric field effects on fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Nobuhiro; Nakabayashi, Takakazu; Nagao, Issei; Kinjo, Masataka; Aoki, Yumiko; Tanaka, Minoru

    2009-02-01

    A dramatic change occurs in the cellular microenvironment during cell stress, but it has been difficult to follow these changes in vivo. Here, fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) microscopy has been used to examine stress-induced changes in the microenvironment in a single cell. It is observed that the fluorescence lifetime of HeLa cells expressing an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tudor fusion protein changes under stress. The change in the fluorescence lifetime appears to be due to an alteration in the local electric field in the protein matrix surrounding the chromophore of EGFP. In fact, the fluorescence lifetime of the GFP chromophore in a polyvinyl alcohol film is found to decrease in the presence of an electric field, based on the measurements of the field-induced change in the fluorescence decay profile. The results indicate that the rate of the non-radiative process of the chromophore of GFP is enhanced by an applied electric field. The FLIM method allows noninvasive determination of the status of the individual cells.

  7. Gamma-ray Detectors for Nuclear Medical Imaging Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Gyu Seong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    In this review paper, basic configurations of gamma detectors in SPECT and PET systems were reviewed together with key performance parameters of the imaging system, such as the detection efficiency, the spatial resolution, the contrast resolution, and the data acquisition time for quick understanding of the system-component relationship and future design of advanced systems. Also key elements of SPECT and PET detectors, such as collimators, gamma detectors were discussed in conjunction with their current and future trend. Especially development trend of new scintillation crystals, innovative silicon-based photo-sensors and futuristic room temperature semiconductor detectors were reviewed for researchers who are interested in the development of future nuclear medical imaging instruments.

  8. Worldwide distribution of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation and its different fields of application: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockenkämper, Reinhold; von Bohlen, Alex

    2014-09-01

    A survey was carried out with users and manufacturers of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation in order to demonstrate the worldwide distribution of TXRF equipment and the different fields of applications. In general, TXRF users come from universities and scientific institutes, from working places at synchrotron beam-lines, or laboratories in semiconductor fabs. TXRF instrumentation is distributed in more than 50 countries on six continents and is applied at about 200 institutes and laboratories. The number of running desktop instruments amounts to nearly 300 units. About 60 beamlines run working places dedicated to TXRF. About 300 floor-mounted instruments are estimated to be used in about 150 fabs of the semiconductor industry. In total, 13 different fields of applications could be registered statistically from three different aspects.

  9. Fluorescence imaging under background light with a self-reset complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor image sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Yamaguchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors propose and demonstrate the fluorescence imaging of green fluorescence protein (GFP expressed in a brain slice with a self-reset complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor image sensor under background light. By using a self-reset function to avoid pixel saturation, the weak fluorescence of GFP was successfully observed, even under background light. The result suggests that the sensor can be applied to in vivo imaging of laboratory animals during light–dark cycles, so that they can observe the different responses to bright and dark environments.

  10. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  11. Model control of image processing for telerobotics and biomedical instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, An Huu

    1993-06-01

    This thesis has model control of image processing (MCIP) as its major theme. By this it is meant that there is a top-down model approach which already knows the structure of the image to be processed. This top-down image processing under model control is used further as visual feedback to control robots and as feedforward information for biomedical instrumentation. The software engineering of the bioengineering instrumentation image processing is defined in terms of the task and the tools available. Early bottom-up image processing such as thresholding occurs only within the top-down control regions of interest (ROI's) or operating windows. Moment computation is an important bottom-up procedure as well as pyramiding to attain rapid computation, among other considerations in attaining programming efficiencies. A distinction is made between initialization procedures and stripped down run time operations. Even more detailed engineering design considerations are considered with respect to the ellipsoidal modeling of objects. Here the major axis orientation is an important additional piece of information, beyond the centroid moments. Careful analysis of various sources of errors and considerable benchmarking characterized the detailed considerations of the software engineering of the image processing procedures. Image processing for robotic control involves a great deal of 3D calibration of the robot working environment (RWE). Of special interest is the idea of adapting the machine scanpath to the current task. It was important to pay careful attention to the hardware aspects of the control of the toy robots that were used to demonstrate the general methodology. It was necessary to precalibrate the open loop gains for all motors so that after initialization the visual feedback, which depends on MCIP, would be able to supply enough information quickly enough to the control algorithms to govern the robots under a variety of control configurations and task operations

  12. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging for monitoring nitrogen fertilizing treatments of wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Francine; Sowinska, Malgorzata; Khalili, Elisabeth; Eckert, Caroline; Miehe, Joseph-Albert; Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K.

    1997-07-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence imaging system allows the recording of spectrally selected fluorescence images of the whole leaves or plants which is better and in contrast to the so far applied spot spectrofluorometer measurements. The fluorescence images of leaves of winter wheat (Soissons variety, Alsace) have been recorded at the four characteristic emission bands (440, 520, 690 and 740 nm) with a high resolution imaging device consisting of a frequency triplet or doubled Nd:YAG source for 355 nm or 532 nm excitation and of an intensified and gated CCD digitized camera. The effect of four different nitrogen treatments (0, 100, 140 and 180 kg/ha) on the fluorescence parameters (intensities F440, F520, F690, F740 and ratios F440/F520, F440/F690, F440/F740 and F690/F740) obtained by image processing has been analyzed by statistical treatment, in a randomized blocks experiment. The measurements have been carried out on two leaf storeys weekly gathered during two months (May and June 1996). For 355 nm excitation, a significant decrease of the fluorescence ratios F440/F690 and F440/F740 was observed for increasing nitrogen concentration: the blue and green mean fluorescence intensities remained much the same, while the red and far-red chlorophyll fluorescence emissions were enhanced by the fertilization. The fluorescence results are in excellent correlation with the crop yields.

  13. Gold nanoparticle cluster-plasmon-enhanced fluorescent silica core-shell nanoparticles for X-ray computed tomography-fluorescence dual-mode imaging of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Nakamura, Michihiro; Miki, Hirokazu; Ozaki, Shuji; Abe, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Toshio; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2013-06-11

    Owing to the surface plasmon resonance-enhanced electromagnetic field, clustered gold nanoparticles-fluorescent silica core-shell nanoparticles became excited within the therapeutic window and fluoresced strongly in this window. The nanoparticles enabled tumor detection using fluorescence imaging and X-ray computed tomography.

  14. Novel Instrument to Measure Aerosol Fluorescence, Absorption, and Scattering, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picarro, Inc proposes to develop the first cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) system to measure fluorescence, absorption, and scattering properties of atmospheric...

  15. Algorithms for differentiating between images of heterogeneous tissue across fluorescence microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitalia, Rhea; Mueller, Jenna; Fu, Henry L; Whitley, Melodi Javid; Kirsch, David G; Brown, J Quincy; Willett, Rebecca; Ramanujam, Nimmi

    2016-09-01

    Fluorescence microscopy can be used to acquire real-time images of tissue morphology and with appropriate algorithms can rapidly quantify features associated with disease. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of various segmentation algorithms to isolate fluorescent positive features (FPFs) in heterogeneous images and identify an approach that can be used across multiple fluorescence microscopes with minimal tuning between systems. Specifically, we show a variety of image segmentation algorithms applied to images of stained tumor and muscle tissue acquired with 3 different fluorescence microscopes. Results indicate that a technique called maximally stable extremal regions followed by thresholding (MSER + Binary) yielded the greatest contrast in FPF density between tumor and muscle images across multiple microscopy systems.

  16. A new non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the airborne in situ measurement of formaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. St. Clair

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A new in situ instrument for gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO, COmpact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE, is presented. COFFEE utilizes non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence (NR-LIF to measure HCHO, with 300 mW of 40 kHz 355 nm laser output exciting multiple HCHO absorption features. The resulting HCHO fluorescence is collected at 5 ns resolution, and the fluorescence time profile is fit to yield the ambient HCHO mixing ratio. Typical 1σ precision at  ∼  0 pptv HCHO is 150 pptv for 1 s data. The compact instrument was designed to operate with minimal in-flight operator interaction and infrequent maintenance (1–2 times per year. COFFEE fits in the wing pod of the Alpha Jet stationed at the NASA Ames Research Center and has successfully collected HCHO data on 27 flights through 2017 March. The frequent flights, combined with a potentially long-term data set, makes the Alpha Jet a promising platform for validation of satellite-based column HCHO.

  17. A new non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the airborne in situ measurement of formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Jason M.; Swanson, Andrew K.; Bailey, Steven A.; Wolfe, Glenn M.; Marrero, Josette E.; Iraci, Laura T.; Hagopian, John G.; Hanisco, Thomas F.

    2017-12-01

    A new in situ instrument for gas-phase formaldehyde (HCHO), COmpact Formaldehyde FluorescencE Experiment (COFFEE), is presented. COFFEE utilizes non-resonant laser-induced fluorescence (NR-LIF) to measure HCHO, with 300 mW of 40 kHz 355 nm laser output exciting multiple HCHO absorption features. The resulting HCHO fluorescence is collected at 5 ns resolution, and the fluorescence time profile is fit to yield the ambient HCHO mixing ratio. Typical 1σ precision at ˜ 0 pptv HCHO is 150 pptv for 1 s data. The compact instrument was designed to operate with minimal in-flight operator interaction and infrequent maintenance (1-2 times per year). COFFEE fits in the wing pod of the Alpha Jet stationed at the NASA Ames Research Center and has successfully collected HCHO data on 27 flights through 2017 March. The frequent flights, combined with a potentially long-term data set, makes the Alpha Jet a promising platform for validation of satellite-based column HCHO.

  18. Bladder cancer diagnosis with fluorescence-image-guided optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Durand, D. B.; Adler, H.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    A fluorescence-image-guided OCT (FIG-OCT) system is described, and its ability to enhance the sensitivity and specificity is examined in an animal bladder cancer model. Total 97 specimens were examined by fluorescence imaging, OCT and histological microscopy. The sensitivity and specificity of FIG-OCT is 100% and 93% respectively, compared to 79% and 53% for fluorescence imaging, while the OCT examination time has been dramatically decreased by 3~4 times. In combination of endoscopic OCT, FIG-OCT is a promising technique for effective early bladder cancer diagnosis.

  19. Development of a neutral embedding resin for optical imaging of fluorescently labeled biological tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongfu; Gang, Yadong; Chen, Shenghua; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yumiao; Li, Longhui; Yin, Fangfang; Liu, Yue; Liu, Xiuli; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-10-01

    Plastic embedding is widely applied in light microscopy analyses. Previous studies have shown that embedding agents and related techniques can greatly affect the quality of biological tissue embedding and fluorescent imaging. Specifically, it is difficult to preserve endogenous fluorescence using currently available acidic commercial embedding resins and related embedding techniques directly. Here, we developed a neutral embedding resin that improved the green fluorescent protein (GFP), yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), and DsRed fluorescent intensity without adjusting the pH value of monomers or reactivating fluorescence in lye. The embedding resin had a high degree of polymerization, and its fluorescence preservation ratios for GFP, YFP, and DsRed were 126.5%, 155.8%, and 218.4%, respectively.

  20. Imaging of multi-color fluorescence emission from leaf tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nedbal, Ladislav

    2-3, č. 102 (2009), s. 169-175 ISSN 0166-8595 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Chlorophyll fluorescence * Blue-green fluorescence * Pyridine nucleotide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.303, year: 2009

  1. Evaluation of chemical fluorescent dyes as a protein conjugation partner for live cell imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Hayashi-Takanaka

    Full Text Available To optimize live cell fluorescence imaging, the choice of fluorescent substrate is a critical factor. Although genetically encoded fluorescent proteins have been used widely, chemical fluorescent dyes are still useful when conjugated to proteins or ligands. However, little information is available for the suitability of different fluorescent dyes for live imaging. We here systematically analyzed the property of a number of commercial fluorescent dyes when conjugated with antigen-binding (Fab fragments directed against specific histone modifications, in particular, phosphorylated H3S28 (H3S28ph and acetylated H3K9 (H3K9ac. These Fab fragments were conjugated with a fluorescent dye and loaded into living HeLa cells. H3S28ph-specific Fab fragments were expected to be enriched in condensed chromosomes, as H3S28 is phosphorylated during mitosis. However, the degree of Fab fragment enrichment on mitotic chromosomes varied depending on the conjugated dye. In general, green fluorescent dyes showed higher enrichment, compared to red and far-red fluorescent dyes, even when dye:protein conjugation ratios were similar. These differences are partly explained by an altered affinity of Fab fragment after dye-conjugation; some dyes have less effect on the affinity, while others can affect it more. Moreover, red and far-red fluorescent dyes tended to form aggregates in the cytoplasm. Similar results were observed when H3K9ac-specific Fab fragments were used, suggesting that the properties of each dye affect different Fab fragments similarly. According to our analysis, conjugation with green fluorescent dyes, like Alexa Fluor 488 and Dylight 488, has the least effect on Fab affinity and is the best for live cell imaging, although these dyes are less photostable than red fluorescent dyes. When multicolor imaging is required, we recommend the following dye combinations for optimal results: Alexa Fluor 488 (green, Cy3 (red, and Cy5 or CF640 (far-red.

  2. Image-guided cancer surgery : the value of near-infrared fluorescence imaging during oncologic and gastrointestinal procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, Floris Paul Reinier

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative imaging using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence is a relatively new technique that can be used to visualize tumor tissue, sentinel nodes and vital anatomical structures. This thesis is divided in three parts. In part one the ability to visualize surgical margins using NIR fluorescence

  3. Preclinical, fluorescence and diffuse optical tomography: non-contact instrumentation, modeling and time-resolved 3D reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouizi, F.

    2011-09-01

    Time-Resolved Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-DOT) is a new non-invasive imaging technique increasingly used in the clinical and preclinical fields. It yields optical absorption and scattering maps of the explored organs, and related physiological parameters. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (TR-FDOT) is based on the detection of fluorescence photons. It provides spatio-temporal maps of fluorescent probe concentrations and life times, and allows access to metabolic and molecular imaging which is important for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring, particularly in oncology. The main goal of this thesis was to reconstruct 3D TR-DOT/TR-FDOT images of small animals using time-resolved optical technology. Data were acquired using optical fibers fixed around the animal without contact with its surface. The work was achieved in four steps: 1)- Setting up an imaging device to record the 3D coordinates of an animal's surface; 2)- Modeling the no-contact approach to solve the forward problem; 3)- Processing of the measured signals taking into account the impulse response of the device; 4)- Implementation of a new image reconstruction method based on a selection of carefully chosen points. As a result, good-quality 3D optical images were obtained owing to reduced cross-talk between absorption and scattering. Moreover, the computation time was cut down, compared to full-time methods using whole temporal profiles. (author)

  4. Use of a Novel Rover-mounted Fluorescence Imager and Fluorescent Probes to Detect Biological Material in the Atacama Desert in Daylight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S.; Pane, D.; Warren-Rhodes, K.; Cockell, C.; Ernst, L. A.; Minkley, E.; Fisher, G.; Emani, S.; Wettergreen, D. S.; Wagner, M.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed an imaging system, the Fluorescence Imager (FI), for detecting fluorescence signals from sparse microorganisms and biofilms during autonomous rover exploration. The fluorescence signals arise both from naturally occurring chromophores, such as chlorophyll of cyanobacteria and lichens, and from fluorescent probes applied to soil and rocks. Daylight imaging has been accomplished by a novel use of a high-powered flashlamp synchronized to a CCD camera. The fluorescent probes are cell permanent stains that have extremely low intrinsic fluorescence (quantum yields less than 0.01) and a large fluorescence enhancement (quantum yields greater than 0.4) when bound to the target. Each probe specifically targets either carbohydrates, proteins, nucleic acids or membrane lipids, the four classes of macromolecules found in terrestrial life. The intent of the probes is to interrogate the environment for surface and endolithic life forms.

  5. Flexible imaging payload for real-time fluorescent biological imaging in parabolic, suborbital and space analog environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamsey, Matthew T.; Paul, Anna-Lisa; Graham, Thomas; Ferl, Robert J.

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescent imaging offers the ability to monitor biological functions, in this case biological responses to space-related environments. For plants, fluorescent imaging can include general health indicators such as chlorophyll fluorescence as well as specific metabolic indicators such as engineered fluorescent reporters. This paper describes the Flex Imager a fluorescent imaging payload designed for Middeck Locker deployment and now tested on multiple flight and flight-related platforms. The Flex Imager and associated payload elements have been developed with a focus on 'flexibility' allowing for multiple imaging modalities and change-out of individual imaging or control components in the field. The imaging platform is contained within the standard Middeck Locker spaceflight form factor, with components affixed to a baseplate that permits easy rearrangement and fine adjustment of components. The Flex Imager utilizes standard software packages to simplify operation, operator training, and evaluation by flight provider flight test engineers, or by researchers processing the raw data. Images are obtained using a commercial cooled CCD image sensor, with light-emitting diodes for excitation and a suite of filters that allow biological samples to be imaged over wavelength bands of interest. Although baselined for the monitoring of green fluorescent protein and chlorophyll fluorescence from Arabidopsis samples, the Flex Imager payload permits imaging of any biological sample contained within a standard 10 cm by 10 cm square Petri plate. A sample holder was developed to secure sample plates under different flight profiles while permitting sample change-out should crewed operations be possible. In addition to crew-directed imaging, autonomous or telemetric operation of the payload is also a viable operational mode. An infrared camera has also been integrated into the Flex Imager payload to allow concurrent fluorescent and thermal imaging of samples. The Flex Imager has been

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Boreham

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  7. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Characterization of Dendritic Polymer Nanoparticles and Applications in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boreham, Alexander; Brodwolf, Robert; Walker, Karolina; Haag, Rainer; Alexiev, Ulrike

    2016-12-24

    The emerging field of nanomedicine provides new approaches for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases, for symptom relief and for monitoring of disease progression. One route of realizing this approach is through carefully constructed nanoparticles. Due to the small size inherent to the nanoparticles a proper characterization is not trivial. This review highlights the application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) for the analysis of nanoparticles, covering aspects ranging from molecular properties to particle detection in tissue samples. The latter technique is particularly important as FLIM allows for distinguishing of target molecules from the autofluorescent background and, due to the environmental sensitivity of the fluorescence lifetime, also offers insights into the local environment of the nanoparticle or its interactions with other biomolecules. Thus, these techniques offer highly suitable tools in the fields of particle development, such as organic chemistry, and in the fields of particle application, such as in experimental dermatology or pharmaceutical research.

  8. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as α and low-energy β particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed 241 Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  9. Application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of a photosensitizer in photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Lixin; Zhao, Huimin; Zhang, Zhiguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2017-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently an advanced optical technology in medical applications. However, the application of PDT is limited by the detection of photosensitizers. This work focuses on the application of fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging in the detection of an effective photosenzitizer, hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME). Optical properties of HMME were measured and analyzed based on its absorption and fluorescence spectra. The production mechanism of its fluorescence emission was analyzed. The detection device for HMME based on fluorescence spectroscopy was designed. Ratiometric method was applied to eliminate the influence of intensity change of excitation sources, fluctuates of excitation sources and photo detectors, and background emissions. The detection limit of this device is 6 μg/L, and it was successfully applied to the diagnosis of the metabolism of HMME in the esophageal cancer cells. To overcome the limitation of the point measurement using fluorescence spectroscopy, a two-dimensional (2D) fluorescence imaging system was established. The algorithm of the 2D fluorescence imaging system is deduced according to the fluorescence ratiometric method using bandpass filters. The method of multiple pixel point addition (MPPA) was used to eliminate fluctuates of signals. Using the method of MPPA, SNR was improved by about 30 times. The detection limit of this imaging system is 1.9 μg/L. Our systems can be used in the detection of porphyrins to improve the PDT effect.

  10. Facilitating in vivo tumor localization by principal component analysis based on dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Chen, Maomao; Wu, Junyu; Zhou, Yuan; Cai, Chuangjian; Wang, Daliang; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging has been used to target tumors in mice with xenograft tumors. However, tumor imaging is largely distorted by the aggregation of fluorescent probes in the liver. A principal component analysis (PCA)-based strategy was applied on the in vivo dynamic fluorescence imaging results of three mice with xenograft tumors to facilitate tumor imaging, with the help of a tumor-specific fluorescent probe. Tumor-relevant features were extracted from the original images by PCA and represented by the principal component (PC) maps. The second principal component (PC2) map represented the tumor-related features, and the first principal component (PC1) map retained the original pharmacokinetic profiles, especially of the liver. The distribution patterns of the PC2 map of the tumor-bearing mice were in good agreement with the actual tumor location. The tumor-to-liver ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio were significantly higher on the PC2 map than on the original images, thus distinguishing the tumor from its nearby fluorescence noise of liver. The results suggest that the PC2 map could serve as a bioimaging marker to facilitate in vivo tumor localization, and dynamic fluorescence molecular imaging with PCA could be a valuable tool for future studies of in vivo tumor metabolism and progression.

  11. Folic acid-targeted magnetic Tb-doped CeF3 fluorescent nanoparticles as bimodal probes for cellular fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhi-Ya; Liu, Yu-Ping; Bai, Ling-Yu; An, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Xuan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-Shuai; Zhao, Yuan-Di

    2015-10-07

    Magnetic fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have great potential applications for diagnostics, imaging and therapy. We developed a facile polyol method to synthesize multifunctional Fe3O4@CeF3:Tb@CeF3 NPs with small size (imaging agents for simultaneous in vitro targeted fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of HeLa cells with overexpressed folate receptors (FR). The results indicated that these NPs had strong luminescence and enhanced T2-weighted MR contrast and would be promising candidates as multimodal probes for both fluorescence and MRI imaging.

  12. Time efficient methods for scanning a fluorescent membrane with a fluorescent microscopic imager for the quality assurance of food

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerm, Steffen; Holder, Silvio; Schellhorn, Mathias; Brückner, Peter; Linß, Gerhard

    2013-05-01

    An important part of the quality assurance of meat is the estimation of germs in the meat exudes. The kind and the number of the germs in the meat affect the medical risk for the consumer of the meat. State-of-the-art analyses of meat are incubator test procedures. The main disadvantages of such incubator tests are the time consumption, the necessary equipment and the need of special skilled employees. These facts cause in high inspection cost. For this reason a new method for the quality assurance is necessary which combines low detection limits and less time consumption. One approach for such a new method is fluorescence microscopic imaging. The germs in the meat exude are caught in special membranes by body-antibody reactions. The germ typical signature could be enhanced with fluorescent chemical markers instead of reproduction of the germs. Each fluorescent marker connects with a free germ or run off the membrane. An image processing system is used to detect the number of fluorescent particles. Each fluorescent spot should be a marker which is connected with a germ. Caused by the small object sizes of germs, the image processing system needs a high optical magnification of the camera. However, this leads to a small field of view and a small depth of focus. For this reasons the whole area of the membrane has to be scanned in three dimensions. To minimize the time consumption, the optimal path has to be found. This optimization problem is influenced by features of the hardware and is presented in this paper. The traversing range in each direction, the step width, the velocity, the shape of the inspection volume and the field of view have influence on the optimal path to scan the membrane.

  13. Multispectral imaging system based on laser-induced fluorescence for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneve, L.; Colao, F.; Del Franco, M.; Palucci, A.; Pistilli, M.; Spizzichino, V.

    2016-10-01

    The development of portable sensors for fast screening of crime scenes is required to reduce the number of evidences useful to be collected, optimizing time and resources. Laser based spectroscopic techniques are good candidates to this scope due to their capability to operate in field, in remote and rapid way. In this work, the prototype of a multispectral imaging LIF (Laser Induced Fluorescence) system able to detect evidence of different materials on large very crowded and confusing areas at distances up to some tens of meters will be presented. Data collected as both 2D fluorescence images and LIF spectra are suitable to the identification and the localization of the materials of interest. A reduced scan time, preserving at the same time the accuracy of the results, has been taken into account as a main requirement in the system design. An excimer laser with high energy and repetition rate coupled to a gated high sensitivity ICCD assures very good performances for this purpose. Effort has been devoted to speed up the data processing. The system has been tested in outdoor and indoor real scenarios and some results will be reported. Evidence of the plastics polypropylene (PP) and polyethilene (PE) and polyester have been identified and their localization on the examined scenes has been highlighted through the data processing. By suitable emission bands, the instrument can be used for the rapid detection of other material classes (i.e. textiles, woods, varnishes). The activities of this work have been supported by the EU-FP7 FORLAB project (Forensic Laboratory for in-situ evidence analysis in a post blast scenario).

  14. B-Spline potential function for maximum a-posteriori image reconstruction in fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpa Dilipkumar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available An iterative image reconstruction technique employing B-Spline potential function in a Bayesian framework is proposed for fluorescence microscopy images. B-splines are piecewise polynomials with smooth transition, compact support and are the shortest polynomial splines. Incorporation of the B-spline potential function in the maximum-a-posteriori reconstruction technique resulted in improved contrast, enhanced resolution and substantial background reduction. The proposed technique is validated on simulated data as well as on the images acquired from fluorescence microscopes (widefield, confocal laser scanning fluorescence and super-resolution 4Pi microscopy. A comparative study of the proposed technique with the state-of-art maximum likelihood (ML and maximum-a-posteriori (MAP with quadratic potential function shows its superiority over the others. B-Spline MAP technique can find applications in several imaging modalities of fluorescence microscopy like selective plane illumination microscopy, localization microscopy and STED.

  15. U-SPECT-BioFluo : An integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, M.N.; Kreuger, R.; Buckle, T.; Mahn, W.A.; Bunschoten, A.; Josephson, L.; Van Leeuwen, F.W.B.; Beekman, F.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a

  16. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autiero, Maddalena [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Celentano, Luigi [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomorfologiche e Funzionali, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Pansini 5, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Cozzolino, Rosanna [Dipartimento di Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Laccetti, Paolo [Dipartimento di Biologia Strutturale e Funzionale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Marotta, Marcello [Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Sperimentale, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Pansini 5, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Mettivier, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Cristina Montesi, Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Quarto, Maria [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Riccio, Patrizia [Dipartimento di Biologia e Patologia Cellulare e Molecolare, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Pansini 5, I-80131 Naples (Italy); Roberti, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy)]. E-mail: roberti@unina.it; Russo, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli Federico II, Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Via Cinthia, I-80126 Naples (Italy)

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice.

  17. Early detection of tumor masses by in vivo hematoporphyrin-mediated fluorescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autiero, Maddalena; Celentano, Luigi; Cozzolino, Rosanna; Laccetti, Paolo; Marotta, Marcello; Mettivier, Giovanni; Cristina Montesi, Maria; Quarto, Maria; Riccio, Patrizia; Roberti, Giuseppe; Russo, Paolo

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the capability of fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI) for the early detection of surface tumors in mice. We used a hematoporphyrin (HP) compound (HP dichlorohydrate) as a red fluorescent marker and a low noise, high sensitivity, digital CCD camera for fluorescence imaging. In this preliminary study, highly malignant anaplastic human thyroid carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously in one mouse and their growth was monitored daily for 5 days by FRI. The selective HP uptake by the tumor tissues was successfully observed: we observed the fluorescence of tumor only 3 days after cancer cells injection, i.e. when the tumor mass was neither visible (to the naked eye) or palpable. These measurements indicate that FRI is a suitable technique to detect minute subcutaneous tumor masses. This FRI system will be coupled to a radionuclide imaging system based on a CdTe detector for in vivo multimodal imaging in mice

  18. Cancer detection using NIR elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demos, S G; Staggs, M; Radousky, H B; Gandour-Edwards, R; deVere White, R

    2000-12-04

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue fluorescence under long-wavelength laser excitation are explored for cancer detection. Various types of normal and malignant human tissue samples were utilized in this investigation.

  19. LED-Induced fluorescence and image analysis to detect stink bug damage in cotton bolls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafic, Adnan; Roberts, Erin E; Toews, Michael D; Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-02-20

    Stink bugs represent a major agricultural pest complex attacking more than 200 wild and cultivated plants, including cotton in the southeastern US. Stink bug feeding on developing cotton bolls will cause boll abortion or lint staining and thus reduced yield and lint value. Current methods for stink bug detection involve manual harvesting and cracking open of a sizable number of immature cotton bolls for visual inspection. This process is cumbersome, time consuming, and requires a moderate level of experience to obtain accurate estimates. To improve detection of stink bug feeding, we present here a method based on fluorescent imaging and subsequent image analyses to determine the likelihood of stink bug damage in cotton bolls. Damage to different structures of cotton bolls including lint and carpal wall can be observed under blue LED-induced fluorescence. Generally speaking, damaged regions fluoresce green, whereas non-damaged regions with chlorophyll fluoresce red. However, similar fluorescence emission is also observable on cotton bolls that have not been fed upon by stink bugs. Criteria based on fluorescent intensity and the size of the fluorescent spot allow to differentiate between true positives (fluorescent regions associated with stink bug feeding) and false positives (fluorescent regions due to other causes). We found a detection rates with two combined criteria of 87% for true-positive marks and of 8% for false-positive marks. The imaging technique presented herein gives rise to a possible detection apparatus where a cotton boll is imaged in the field and images processed by software. The unique fluorescent signature left by stink bugs can be used to determine with high probability if a cotton boll has been punctured by a stink bug. We believe this technique, when integrated in a suitable device, could be used for more accurate detection in the field and allow for more optimized application of pest control.

  20. LED-Induced fluorescence and image analysis to detect stink bug damage in cotton bolls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Stink bugs represent a major agricultural pest complex attacking more than 200 wild and cultivated plants, including cotton in the southeastern US. Stink bug feeding on developing cotton bolls will cause boll abortion or lint staining and thus reduced yield and lint value. Current methods for stink bug detection involve manual harvesting and cracking open of a sizable number of immature cotton bolls for visual inspection. This process is cumbersome, time consuming, and requires a moderate level of experience to obtain accurate estimates. To improve detection of stink bug feeding, we present here a method based on fluorescent imaging and subsequent image analyses to determine the likelihood of stink bug damage in cotton bolls. Results Damage to different structures of cotton bolls including lint and carpal wall can be observed under blue LED-induced fluorescence. Generally speaking, damaged regions fluoresce green, whereas non-damaged regions with chlorophyll fluoresce red. However, similar fluorescence emission is also observable on cotton bolls that have not been fed upon by stink bugs. Criteria based on fluorescent intensity and the size of the fluorescent spot allow to differentiate between true positives (fluorescent regions associated with stink bug feeding) and false positives (fluorescent regions due to other causes). We found a detection rates with two combined criteria of 87% for true-positive marks and of 8% for false-positive marks. Conclusions The imaging technique presented herein gives rise to a possible detection apparatus where a cotton boll is imaged in the field and images processed by software. The unique fluorescent signature left by stink bugs can be used to determine with high probability if a cotton boll has been punctured by a stink bug. We believe this technique, when integrated in a suitable device, could be used for more accurate detection in the field and allow for more optimized application of pest control. PMID:23421982

  1. Fluorescence cell imaging and manipulation using conventional halogen lamp microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamagata

    Full Text Available Technologies for vitally labeling cells with fluorescent dyes have advanced remarkably. However, to excite fluorescent dyes currently requires powerful illumination, which can cause phototoxic damage to the cells and increases the cost of microscopy. We have developed a filter system to excite fluorescent dyes using a conventional transmission microscope equipped with a halogen lamp. This method allows us to observe previously invisible cell organelles, such as the metaphase spindle of oocytes, without causing phototoxicity. Cells remain healthy even after intensive manipulation under fluorescence observation, such as during bovine, porcine and mouse somatic cell cloning using nuclear transfer. This method does not require expensive epifluorescence equipment and so could help to reduce the science gap between developed and developing countries.

  2. Fabrication of fluorescent silica nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission luminogens for cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Lam, Jacky W Y; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-based techniques have found wide applications in life science. Among various luminogenic materials, fluorescent nanoparticles have attracted much attention due to their fabulous emission properties and potential applications as sensors. Here, we describe the fabrication of fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) containing aggregation-induced emission (AIE) luminogens. By employing surfactant-free sol-gel reaction, FSNPs with uniform size and high surface charge and colloidal stability are generated. The FSNPs emit strong light upon photoexcitation, due to the AIE characteristic of the silole -aggregates in the hybrid nanoparticles. The FSNPs are cytocompatible and can be utilized as fluorescent visualizer for intracellular imaging for HeLa cells.

  3. Mass media image of selected instruments of economic develepment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruliš Ladislav

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is twofold. Firstly, two instruments of economic development – investment incentives and cluster initiatives – were compared according to the frequency of their occurrence in selected mass media sources in the Czech Republic in the periods 2004-2005 and 2011-2012. Secondly, the mass media image of these two instruments of economic development was evaluated with respect to the frames deductively constructed from literature review. The findings pointed out a higher occurrence of the mass media articles/news dealing with investment incentives. These articles/news were, additionally, more controversial and covered a wider spectrum of frames. Politicians were a relatively more frequent type of actors who created the media message from the articles/news. On the contrary, the mass media articles/news concerning cluster initiatives typically created the frame of positive effects of clusters. The messages were told either by economic experts or by public authority representatives who were closely connected with cluster initiatives. Spatial origin of these messages was rather limited. The definitional vagueness, intangible and uncontroversial nature of cluster initiatives restrained their media appeal.

  4. In-vivo optical detection of cancer using chlorin e6 – polyvinylpyrrolidone induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, William WL; Thong, Patricia SP; Bhuvaneswari, Ramaswamy; Soo, Khee Chee; Heng, Paul WS; Olivo, Malini

    2009-01-01

    Photosensitizer based fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy is fast becoming a promising approach for cancer detection. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (Ce6) formulated in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a potential exogenous fluorophore for fluorescence imaging and spectroscopic detection of human cancer tissue xenografted in preclinical models as well as in a patient. Fluorescence imaging was performed on MGH human bladder tumor xenografted on both the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the murine model using a fluorescence endoscopy imaging system. In addition, fiber optic based fluorescence spectroscopy was performed on tumors and various normal organs in the same mice to validate the macroscopic images. In one patient, fluorescence imaging was performed on angiosarcoma lesions and normal skin in conjunction with fluorescence spectroscopy to validate Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence visual assessment of the lesions. Margins of tumor xenografts in the CAM model were clearly outlined under fluorescence imaging. Ce6-PVP-induced fluorescence imaging yielded a specificity of 83% on the CAM model. In mice, fluorescence intensity of Ce6-PVP was higher in bladder tumor compared to adjacent muscle and normal bladder. Clinical results confirmed that fluorescence imaging clearly captured the fluorescence of Ce6-PVP in angiosarcoma lesions and good correlation was found between fluorescence imaging and spectral measurement in the patient. Combination of Ce6-PVP induced fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy could allow for optical detection and discrimination between cancer and the surrounding normal tissues. Ce6-PVP seems to be a promising fluorophore for fluorescence diagnosis of cancer

  5. Fluorescent carbon dots and nanodiamonds for biological imaging: preparation, application, pharmacokinetics and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Hui; Yang, Sheng-Tao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Wang, Haifang

    2012-10-01

    The rapid advancement of nanotechnology has brought us some new types of fluorescent probes, which are indispensable for bioimaging in life sciences. Because of their innate biocompatibility, good resistance against photobleaching, long fluorescence lifetime and wide fluorescence spectral region, fluorescent carbon quantum dots (C-Dots) and nanosized diamonds (nanodiamonds, NDs) are gradually evolving into promising reagents for bioimaging. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements in fluorescent C-Dots and NDs with emphases on their preparation, properties, imaging application, pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Perspectives on further investigations and opportunities to develop C-Dots and NDs into the safer and more sensitive imaging probes for both living cells and animal models are discussed.

  6. Wide field fluorescence imaging in narrow passageways using scanning fiber endoscope technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cameron M.; Chandler, John E.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2010-02-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) has been developed for high resolution imaging of regions in the body that are commonly inaccessible. The SFE produces 500 line color images at 30 Hz frame rate while maintaining a 1.2-1.7 mm outer diameter. The distal tip of the SFE houses a 9 mm rigid scan engine attached to a highly flexible tether (minimum bend radius technologies, the unique characteristics of this system have allowed the SFE to navigate narrow passages without sacrificing image quality. To date, the SFE has been used for in vivo imaging of the bile duct, esophagus and peripheral airways. In this study, the standard SFE operation was tailored to capture wide field fluorescence images and spectra. Green (523 nm) and blue (440 nm) lasers were used as illumination sources, while the white balance gain values were adjusted to accentuate red fluorescence signal. To demonstrate wide field fluorescence imaging of small lumens, the SFE was inserted into a phantom model of a human pancreatobiliary tract and navigated to a custom fluorescent target. Both wide field fluorescence and standard color images of the target were captured to demonstrate multimodal imaging.

  7. In vivo tomographic imaging with fluorescence and MRI using tumor-targeted dual-labeled nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Yue Zhang,1 Bin Zhang,1 Fei Liu,1,2 Jianwen Luo,1,3 Jing Bai1 1Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, 2Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, 3Center for Biomedical Imaging Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of China Abstract: Dual-modality imaging combines the complementary advantages of different modalities, and offers the prospect of improved preclinical research. The combination of fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI provides cross-validated information and direct comparison between these modalities. Here, we report on the application of a novel tumor-targeted, dual-labeled nanoparticle (NP, utilizing iron oxide as the MRI contrast agent and near infrared (NIR dye Cy5.5 as the fluorescent agent. Results of in vitro experiments verified the specificity of the NP to tumor cells. In vivo tumor targeting and uptake of the NPs in a mouse model were visualized by fluorescence and MR imaging collected at different time points. Quantitative analysis was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of MRI contrast enhancement. Furthermore, tomographic images were also acquired using both imaging modalities and cross-validated information of tumor location and size between these two modalities was revealed. The results demonstrate that the use of dual-labeled NPs can facilitate the dual-modal detection of tumors, information cross-validation, and direct comparison by combing fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT and MRI. Keywords: dual-modality, fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, nanoparticle

  8. A new indicator in early drought diagnosis of cucumber with chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng; Li, Haifeng; Xu, Liang; Liu, Xu

    2015-05-01

    Crop population growth information can more fully reflect the state of crop growth, eliminate individual differences, and reduce error in judgment. We have built a suitable plant population growth information online monitoring system with the plant chlorophyll fluorescence and spectral scanning imaging to get the crop growth status. On the basis of the fluorescence image detection, we have studied the early drought diagnosis of cucumber. The typical chlorophyll fluorescence parameters can not reflect the drought degree significantly. We define a new indication parameter (DI). With the drought deepening, DI declines. DI can enlarge the early manifestation of cucumber drought (3-5 days), indicate more significantly in the early drought diagnosis of cucumber.

  9. Fluorescent Bisphosphonate and Carboxyphosphonate Probes: A Versatile Imaging Toolkit for Applications in Bone Biology and Biomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuting; Błażewska, Katarzyna M; Kadina, Anastasia P; Kashemirov, Boris A; Duan, Xuchen; Triffitt, James T; Dunford, James E; Russell, R Graham G; Ebetino, Frank H; Roelofs, Anke J; Coxon, Fraser P; Lundy, Mark W; McKenna, Charles E

    2016-02-17

    A bone imaging toolkit of 21 fluorescent probes with variable spectroscopic properties, bone mineral binding affinities, and antiprenylation activities has been created, including a novel linking strategy. The linking chemistry allows attachment of a diverse selection of dyes fluorescent in the visible to near-infrared range to any of the three clinically important heterocyclic bisphosphonate bone drugs (risedronate, zoledronate, and minodronate or their analogues). The resultant suite of conjugates offers multiple options to "mix and match" parent drug structure, fluorescence emission wavelength, relative bone affinity, and presence or absence of antiprenylation activity, for bone-related imaging applications.

  10. Enhanced Measurements of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) for Water Quality Analysis using a New Simultaneous Absorbance and Fluorescence Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Water quality, with respect to suspended particles and dissolved organic and inorganic compounds, is now recognized as one of the top global environmental concerns. Contemporary research indicates fluorescence spectral analyses coupled with UV-VIS absorbance assays have the potential, especially when combined and coordinated, to facilitate rapid, robust quantification of a wide range of compounds, including interactions among them. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) collected over the UV-VIS region provide a wealth of information on chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). CDOM includes humic and fulvic acid, chlorophyll, petroleum, protein, amino acid, quinone, fertilizer, pesticide, sewage and numerous other compound classes. Analysis of the EEMs using conventional and multivariate techniques, including primarily parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), provides information about many types of CDOM relevant to carbon cycling and pollution of fresh, marine and drinking water sources. Of critical concern also are the CDOM interactions with, and optical activities of, dissolved inorganic compounds. Many of the inorganic compounds and oxygen demand parameters can be analyzed with a wide range of UV-VIS absorbance assays. The instrument is designed and optimized for high UV throughput and low stray light performance. The sampling optics are optimized for both fluorescence and absorbance detection with the same sample. Both EEM and absorbance measurements implement NIST traceable instrument correction and calibration routines. The fluorescence detection utilizes a high dynamic range CCD coupled to a high-resolution spectrograph while absorbance utilizes diode based detection with a high dynamic range and extremely low-stray light specifications. The CDOM analysis is facilitated by a transfer of the data and model information with the PARAFAC routine. The EEM analysis software package facilitates coordinated correction of and correlation with the

  11. Miniature and Cost-Effective Remote Raman, Fluorescence, and Lidar Multi-Spectral Instrument for Characterization of Planetary Surfaces and Atmosphere from Robotic Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedin, M. N.; Bradley, A. T.; Ismail, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Lucey, P. G.; Misra, A. K.; Sandford, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a remote Raman-Fluorescence spectroscopy and Lidar multi-sensor instrument capable of investigation and identification of minerals, organics, and biogenic materials, as well as atmospheric studies of Mars.

  12. Bright field microscopy as an alternative to whole cell fluorescence in automated analysis of macrophage images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Selinummi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence microscopy is the standard tool for detection and analysis of cellular phenomena. This technique, however, has a number of drawbacks such as the limited number of available fluorescent channels in microscopes, overlapping excitation and emission spectra of the stains, and phototoxicity.We here present and validate a method to automatically detect cell population outlines directly from bright field images. By imaging samples with several focus levels forming a bright field -stack, and by measuring the intensity variations of this stack over the -dimension, we construct a new two dimensional projection image of increased contrast. With additional information for locations of each cell, such as stained nuclei, this bright field projection image can be used instead of whole cell fluorescence to locate borders of individual cells, separating touching cells, and enabling single cell analysis. Using the popular CellProfiler freeware cell image analysis software mainly targeted for fluorescence microscopy, we validate our method by automatically segmenting low contrast and rather complex shaped murine macrophage cells.The proposed approach frees up a fluorescence channel, which can be used for subcellular studies. It also facilitates cell shape measurement in experiments where whole cell fluorescent staining is either not available, or is dependent on a particular experimental condition. We show that whole cell area detection results using our projected bright field images match closely to the standard approach where cell areas are localized using fluorescence, and conclude that the high contrast bright field projection image can directly replace one fluorescent channel in whole cell quantification. Matlab code for calculating the projections can be downloaded from the supplementary site: http://sites.google.com/site/brightfieldorstaining.

  13. Fluorescence laparoscopy imaging of pancreatic tumor progression in an orthotopic mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Cao, Hop S.; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Lee, Claudia; Snyder, Cynthia S.; Thompson, Kari J.; Horgan, Santiago; Talamini, Mark A.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of fluorescent proteins to label tumors is revolutionizing cancer research, enabling imaging of both primary and metastatic lesions, which is important for diagnosis, staging, and therapy. This report describes the use of fluorescence laparoscopy to image green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing tumors in an orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer. Methods The orthotopic mouse model of human pancreatic cancer was established by injecting GFP-expressing MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells into the pancreas of 6-week-old female athymic mice. On postoperative day 14, diagnostic laparoscopy using both white and fluorescent light was performed. A standard laparoscopic system was modified by placing a 480-nm short-pass excitation filter between the light cable and the laparoscope in addition to using a 2-mm-thick emission filter. A camera was used that allowed variable exposure time and gain setting. For mouse laparoscopy, a 3-mm 0° laparoscope was used. The mouse’s abdomen was gently insufflated to 2 mm Hg via a 22-gauge angiocatheter. After laparoscopy, the animals were sacrificed, and the tumors were collected and processed for histologic review. The experiments were performed in triplicate. Results Fluorescence laparoscopy enabled rapid imaging of the brightly fluorescent tumor in the pancreatic body. Use of the proper filters enabled simultaneous visualization of the tumor and the surrounding structures with minimal autofluorescence. Fluorescence laparoscopy thus allowed exact localization of the tumor, eliminating the need to switch back and forth between white and fluorescence lighting, under which the background usually is so darkened that it is difficult to maintain spatial orientation. Conclusion The use of fluorescence laparoscopy permits the facile, real-time imaging and localization of tumors labeled with fluorescent proteins. The results described in this report should have important clinical potential. PMID:20533064

  14. Quantitative image correction and calibration for confocal fluorescence microscopy using thin reference layers and SIPchart-based calibration procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwier, J.M.; Oomen, L.; Brocks, L.; Jalink, K.; Brakenhoff, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    The fluorescence intensity image of an axially integrated through-focus series of a thin standardized uniform fluorescent layer can be used for image intensity correction and calibration in sectioning microscopy. This intensity image is in fact available from the earlier introduced Sectioned Imaging

  15. Simple and rapid determination of homozygous transgenic mice via in vivo fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Jia, Junshuang; Qin, Yujuan; Lin, Xia; Li, Wei; Xiao, Gaofang; Li, Yanqing; Xie, Raoying; Huang, Hailu; Zhong, Lin; Wu, Qinghong; Wang, Wanshan; Huang, Wenhua; Yao, Kaitai; Xiao, Dong; Sun, Yan

    2015-11-17

    Setting up breeding programs for transgenic mouse strains require to distinguish homozygous from the heterozygous transgenic animals. The combinational use of the fluorescence reporter transgene and small animal in-vivo imaging system might allow us to rapidly and visually determine the transgenic mice homozygous for transgene(s) by the in vivo fluorescence imaging. RLG, RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice ubiquitously express red fluorescent protein (RFP). To identify homozygous RLG transgenic mice, whole-body fluorescence imaging for all of newborn F2-generation littermates produced by mating of RFP-positive heterozygous transgenic mice (F1-generation) derived from the same transgenic founder was performed. Subsequently, the immediate data analysis of the in vivo fluorescence imaging was carried out, which greatly facilitated us to rapidly and readily distinguish RLG transgenic individual(s) with strong fluorescence from the rest of F2-generation littermates, followed by further determining this/these RLG individual(s) showing strong fluorescence to be homozygous, as strongly confirmed by mouse mating. Additionally, homozygous RCLG or Rm17LG transgenic mice were also rapidly and precisely distinguished by the above-mentioned optical approach. This approach allowed us within the shortest time period to obtain 10, 8 and 2 transgenic mice homozygous for RLG, RCLG and Rm17LG transgene, respectively, as verified by mouse mating, indicating the practicality and reliability of this optical method. Taken together, our findings fully demonstrate that the in vivo fluorescence imaging offers a visual, rapid and reliable alternative method to the traditional approaches (i.e., mouse mating and real-time quantitative PCR) in identifying homozygous transgenic mice harboring fluorescence reporter transgene under the control of a ubiquitous promoter in the situation mentioned in this study.

  16. Recent Developments in Instrumentation for Pre-Clinical Imaging Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meikle, S.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Recent advances in imaging instrumentation have led to a variety of tomograph designs for dedicated pre clinical imaging of laboratory animals. These advances make it possible to image and quantify the kinetics of radiolabelled pharmaceuticals in a wide range of animal models from rodents to non-human primates. Applications include evaluation of promising new radiopharmaceuticals, study of the molecular origins of human disease and evaluation of new forms of therapy. These applications and advances in instrumentation are equally applicable to positron emitters and single photon emitters. This paper provides an overview of recent advances which have led to the current state-of-the-art in pre clinical imaging. The common inorganic scintillators that have been used for SPECT and PET, including some of the promising materials recently studied. The current crystal of choice for SPECT imaging is NaI(Tl) because of its high light output and density which make it well suited to imaging photons in the 100-200 keV range. However, NaI(Tl) has the disadvantage that it must be hermetically sealed to prevent absorption of moisture from the environment. Therefore, investigators have explored a number of alternative inorganic crystals, including CsI(Tl) and cerium-doped yttrium aluminium perovskite (YAP), as well as solid state detectors such as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT). Many of the crystals used in SPECT have also been tried for PET, including NaI(Tl) and YAP. However these crystals have lower stopping power than BGO and NaI(Tl) is also relatively slow. A very promising scintillator for PET is cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) (1) which has similar stopping power to BGO and relatively high light output and fast decay. The first PET scanner to use LSO was the UCLA animal scanner, microPET, which also makes use of a number of other new technologies and unique design features. Recently, improvements in multi-anode and crossed wire position sensitive

  17. Meteosat third generation imager: simulation of the flexible combined imager instrument chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, Dieter; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Roveda, Fausto; Steenbergen, Theo

    2014-10-01

    The Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) Programme is the next generation of European geostationary meteorological systems. The first MTG satellite, MTG-I1, which is scheduled for launch at the end of 2018, will host two imaging instruments: the Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) and the Lightning Imager. The FCI will provide continuation of the SEVIRI imager operations on the current Meteosat Second Generation satellites (MSG), but with an improved spatial, temporal and spectral resolution, not dissimilar to GOES-R (of NASA/NOAA). Unlike SEVIRI on the spinning MSG spacecraft, the FCI will be mounted on a 3-axis stabilised platform and a 2-axis tapered scan will provide a full coverage of the Earth in 10 minute repeat cycles. Alternatively, a rapid scanning mode can cover smaller areas, but with a better temporal resolution of up to 2.5 minutes. In order to assess some of the data acquisition and processing aspects which will apply to the FCI, a simplified end-to-end imaging chain prototype was set up. The simulation prototype consists of four different functional blocks: - A function for the generation of FCI-like references images - An image acquisition simulation function for the FCI Line-of-Sight calculation and swath generation - A processing function that reverses the swath generation process by rectifying the swath data - An evaluation function for assessing the quality of the processed data with respect to the reference images This paper presents an overview of the FCI instrument chain prototype, covering instrument characteristics, reference image generation, image acquisition simulation, and processing aspects. In particular, it provides in detail the description of the generation of references images, highlighting innovative features, but also limitations. This is followed by a description of the image acquisition simulation process, and the rectification and evaluation function. The latter two are described in more detail in a separate paper. Finally, results

  18. Instrumental dead-time and its relationship with matrix corrections in X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, I.L.; Haukka, M.T.; Anderson, D.H.

    1979-01-01

    The relationship between instrumental dead-time and the self-absorption coefficients, αsub(ii) in x.r.f. matrix correction by means of influence coefficients, is not generally recognized but has important analytical consequences. Systematic errors of the order of 1% (relative) for any analyte result from experimental uncertainties in instrumental dead-time. Such errors are applied unevenly across a given range of concentration because the error depends on the calibration standards and on the instrumental conditions used. Refinement of the instrumental dead-time value and other calibration parameters to conform with influence coefficients determined elsewhere assumes exact knowledge of dead-time of the instrument used originally, and quite similar excitation conditions and spectrometer geometry for the two instruments. Though these qualifications may not be met, adjustment of any of the parameters (dead-time, reference concentration, background concentration, self-absorption and other influence coefficients) can be easily achieved. (Auth.)

  19. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  20. Hyperspectral imaging of endogenous fluorescent metabolic molecules to identify pain states in central nervous system tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Gosnell, Martin E.; Anwer, Ayad G.; Mustafa, Sanam; Hutchinson, Mark R.; Goldys, Ewa M.

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescence-based bio-imaging methods have been extensively used to identify molecular changes occurring in biological samples in various pathological adaptations. Auto-fluorescence generated by endogenous fluorescent molecules within these samples can interfere with signal to background noise making positive antibody based fluorescent staining difficult to resolve. Hyperspectral imaging uses spectral and spatial imaging information for target detection and classification, and can be used to resolve changes in endogenous fluorescent molecules such as flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids that are involved in cell metabolism. Hyperspectral auto-fluorescence imaging of spinal cord slices was used in this study to detect metabolic differences within pain processing regions of non-pain versus sciatic chronic constriction injury (CCI) animals, an established animal model of peripheral neuropathy. By using an endogenous source of contrast, subtle metabolic variations were detected between tissue samples, making it possible to distinguish between animals from non-injured and injured groups. Tissue maps of native fluorophores, flavins, bound and free NADH and retinoids unveiled subtle metabolic signatures and helped uncover significant tissue regions with compromised mitochondrial function. Taken together, our results demonstrate that hyperspectral imaging provides a new non-invasive method to investigate central changes of peripheral neuropathic injury and other neurodegenerative disease models, and paves the way for novel cellular characterisation in health, disease and during treatment, with proper account of intrinsic cellular heterogeneity.

  1. Adaptive-optics SLO imaging combined with widefield OCT and SLO enables precise 3D localization of fluorescent cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Zhang, Pengfei; Zam, Azhar; Miller, Eric B; Goswami, Mayank; Wang, Xinlei; Jonnal, Ravi S; Lee, Sang-Hyuck; Kim, Dae Yu; Flannery, John G; Werner, John S; Burns, Marie E; Pugh, Edward N

    2015-06-01

    Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO) has recently been used to achieve exquisite subcellular resolution imaging of the mouse retina. Wavefront sensing-based AO typically restricts the field of view to a few degrees of visual angle. As a consequence the relationship between AO-SLO data and larger scale retinal structures and cellular patterns can be difficult to assess. The retinal vasculature affords a large-scale 3D map on which cells and structures can be located during in vivo imaging. Phase-variance OCT (pv-OCT) can efficiently image the vasculature with near-infrared light in a label-free manner, allowing 3D vascular reconstruction with high precision. We combined widefield pv-OCT and SLO imaging with AO-SLO reflection and fluorescence imaging to localize two types of fluorescent cells within the retinal layers: GFP-expressing microglia, the resident macrophages of the retina, and GFP-expressing cone photoreceptor cells. We describe in detail a reflective afocal AO-SLO retinal imaging system designed for high resolution retinal imaging in mice. The optical performance of this instrument is compared to other state-of-the-art AO-based mouse retinal imaging systems. The spatial and temporal resolution of the new AO instrumentation was characterized with angiography of retinal capillaries, including blood-flow velocity analysis. Depth-resolved AO-SLO fluorescent images of microglia and cone photoreceptors are visualized in parallel with 469 nm and 663 nm reflectance images of the microvasculature and other structures. Additional applications of the new instrumentation are discussed.

  2. Energy dispersive detector for white beam synchrotron x-ray fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Matthew D., E-mail: Matt.Wilson@stfc.ac.uk; Seller, Paul; Veale, Matthew C. [Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Campus,UK (United Kingdom); Connolley, Thomas [Diamond Light Source, I12 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dolbnya, Igor P.; Malandain, Andrew; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source, B16 Beamline, Harwell Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Grant, Patrick S.; Liotti, Enzo; Lui, Andrew [Department of Materials, University of Oxford Parks Road, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-07-27

    A novel, “single-shot” fluorescence imaging technique has been demonstrated on the B16 beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron using the HEXITEC energy dispersive imaging detector. A custom made furnace with 200µm thick metal alloy samples was positioned in a white X-ray beam with a hole made in the furnace walls to allow the transmitted beam to be imaged with a conventional X-ray imaging camera consisting of a 500 µm thick single crystal LYSO scintillator, mirror and lens coupled to an AVT Manta G125B CCD sensor. The samples were positioned 45° to the incident beam to enable simultaneous transmission and fluorescence imaging. The HEXITEC detector was positioned at 90° to the sample with a 50 µm pinhole 13 cm from the sample and the detector positioned 2.3m from pinhole. The geometric magnification provided a field of view of 1.1×1.1mm{sup 2} with one of the 80×80 pixels imaging an area equivalent to 13µm{sup 2}. Al-Cu alloys doped with Zr, Ag and Mo were imaged in transmission and fluorescence mode. The fluorescence images showed that the dopant metals could be simultaneously imaged with sufficient counts on all 80x80 pixels within 60 s, with the X-ray flux limiting the fluorescence imaging rate. This technique demonstrated that it is possible to simultaneously image and identify multiple elements on a spatial resolution scale ~10µm or higher without the time consuming need to scan monochromatic energies or raster scan a focused beam of X-rays. Moving to high flux beamlines and using an array of detectors could improve the imaging speed of the technique with element specific imaging estimated to be on a 1 s timescale.

  3. Fluorescence imaging in vivo: raster scanned point-source imaging provides more accurate quantification than broad beam geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W; Gibbs, Summer L; Chen, Bin; Savellano, Mark

    2004-02-01

    Two fluorescence imaging systems were compared for their ability to quantify mean fluorescence intensity from surface-weighted imaging of tissue. A broad beam CCD camera system was compared to a point sampling system that raster scans to create the image. The effects of absorption and scattering in the background tissue volume were shown to be similar in their effect upon the signal, but the effect of the three-dimensional shape of the tissue was shown to be a significant distortion upon the signal. Spherical phantoms with Intralipid and blood for absorber and scatterer were used with a fixed concentration of aluminum phthalocyanine fluorophore to illustrate that the mean intensity observed with the broad beam system increased with size, while the mean intensity observed with the raster scanned system was not as significantly affected. Similar results were observed in vivo with mice injected with the fluorophore and imaged multiple times to observe the pharmacokinetics of the drug. The fluorescence in the tumor observed with the broad beam system was higher than that observed with the raster scanned system. Based upon the phantom and animal observations in this study, it should be concluded that using broad beam fluorescence imaging systems to quantify fluorescence in vivo may be problematic when comparing tissues with different three dimensional characteristics. In particular, the ratio of fluorescence from tumor to normal tissue can yield inaccurate results when the tumor is large. However, similar measurements with a narrow beam system that is raster scanned to create the images are not as significantly affected by the three dimensional shape of the tissue. Raster scanned imaging appears to provide a more uniform and accurate way to quantify fluorescence signals from distributed tissues in vivo.

  4. Functional imaging in bulk tissue specimens using optical emission tomography: fluorescence preservation during optical clearing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakhalkar, H S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Dewhirst, M [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oliver, T [Department of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Cao, Y [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States); Oldham, M [Department of Radiation Oncology Physics, and Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710 (United States)

    2007-04-21

    Optical emission computed tomography (optical-ECT) is a technique for imaging the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of fluorescent probes in biological tissue specimens with high contrast and spatial resolution. In optical-ECT, functional information can be imaged by (i) systemic application of functional labels (e.g. fluorophore labelled proteins) and/or (ii) endogenous expression of fluorescent reporter proteins (e.g. red fluorescent protein (RFP), green fluorescent protein (GFP)) in vivo. An essential prerequisite for optical-ECT is optical clearing, a procedure where tissue specimens are made transparent to light by sequential perfusion with fixing, dehydrating and clearing agents. In this study, we investigate clearing protocols involving a selection of common fixing (4% buffered paraformaldehyde (PFA), methanol and ethanol), dehydrating (methanol and ethanol) and clearing agents (methyl salicylate and benzyl-alcohol-benzyl-benzoate (BABB)) in order to determine a 'fluorescence friendly' clearing procedure. Cell culture experiments were employed to optimize the sequence of chemical treatments that best preserve fluorescence. Texas red (TxRed), fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), RFP and GFP were tested as fluorophores and fluorescent reporter proteins of interest. Fluorescent and control cells were imaged on a microscope using a DSred2 and FITC filter set. The most promising clearing protocols of cell culture experiments were applied to whole xenograft tumour specimens, to test their effectiveness in large unsectioned samples. Fluorescence of TxRed/FITC fluorophores was not found to be significantly affected by any of the test clearing protocols. RFP and GFP fluorescence, however, was found to be significantly greater when cell fixation was in ethanol. Fixation in either PFA or methanol resulted in diminished fluorescence. After ethanol fixation, the RFP and GFP fluorescence proved remarkably robust to subsequent exposure to either methyl salicylate

  5. Laser-induced emission, fluorescence and Raman hybrid setup: A versatile instrument to analyze materials from cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syvilay, D.; Bai, X. S.; Wilkie-Chancellier, N.; Texier, A.; Martinez, L.; Serfaty, S.; Detalle, V.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research project was the development of a hybrid system in laboratory coupling together three analytical techniques, namely laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and Raman spectroscopy in a single instrument. The rationale for combining these three spectroscopies was to identify a material (molecular and elemental analysis) without any preliminary preparation, regardless of its organic or inorganic nature, on the surface and in depth, without any surrounding light interference thanks to time resolution. Such instrumentation would allow characterizing different materials from cultural heritage. A complete study on LIBS-LIF-Raman hybrid was carried out, from its conception to instrumental achievement, in order to elaborate a strategy of analysis according to the material and to be able to address conservation issues. From an instrumental point of view, condensing the three spectroscopies was achieved by using a single laser for excitation and two spectrometers (time-integrated and not time-integrated) for light collection. A parabolic mirror was used as collecting system, while three excitation sources directed through this optical system ensured the examination of a similar probe area. Two categories of materials were chosen to test the hybrid instrumentation on cultural heritage applications (copper corrosion products and wall paintings). Some examples are reported to illustrate the wealth of information provided by the hybrid, thus demonstrating its great potential to be used for cultural heritage issues. Finally, several considerations are outlined aimed at further improving the hybrid.

  6. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Xu, Y.; Lin, B.; Chen, H.

    2015-08-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565-750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565-750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as 1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems.

  7. Quantitative method to assess caries via fluorescence imaging from the perspective of autofluorescence spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q G; Xu, Y; Zhu, H H; Chen, H; Lin, B

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative method to discriminate caries lesions for a fluorescence imaging system is proposed in this paper. The autofluorescence spectral investigation of 39 teeth samples classified by the International Caries Detection and Assessment System levels was performed at 405 nm excitation. The major differences in the different caries lesions focused on the relative spectral intensity range of 565–750 nm. The spectral parameter, defined as the ratio of wavebands at 565–750 nm to the whole spectral range, was calculated. The image component ratio R/(G + B) of color components was statistically computed by considering the spectral parameters (e.g. autofluorescence, optical filter, and spectral sensitivity) in our fluorescence color imaging system. Results showed that the spectral parameter and image component ratio presented a linear relation. Therefore, the image component ratio was graded as <0.66, 0.66–1.06, 1.06–1.62, and >1.62 to quantitatively classify sound, early decay, established decay, and severe decay tissues, respectively. Finally, the fluorescence images of caries were experimentally obtained, and the corresponding image component ratio distribution was compared with the classification result. A method to determine the numerical grades of caries using a fluorescence imaging system was proposed. This method can be applied to similar imaging systems. (paper)

  8. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  9. A novel approach for phytotoxicity assessment by CCD fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gavel, Alan; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 19, - (2004), s. 429-432 ISSN 1520-4081 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : phytotoxicity * chlorophyll fluorescence * algal bioassay Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.373, year: 2004

  10. Application of instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis to the examination of objects of art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panczyk, E.; Ligeza, M.; Walis, L.

    1999-01-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw in collaboration with the Department of Preservation and Restoration of Works of Art of the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow and National Museum in Warsaw systematic studies using nuclear methods, particularly instrumental neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence analysis, have been carried out on the panel paintings from the Krakowska-Nowosadecka School and Silesian School of the period from the XIV-XVII century, Chinese and Thai porcelains and mummies fillings of Egyptian sarcophagi. These studies will provide new data to the existing data base, will permit to compare materials used by various schools and individual artists. (author)

  11. Application of instrumental neutron activation and X-ray fluorescence analysis to the examination of objects of art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panczyk, E.; Ligeza, M.; Walis, L.

    1999-01-01

    In the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology in Warsaw in collaboration with the Department of Preservation and Restoration of Works of Art of the Academy of Fine Arts in Cracow and National Museum in Warsaw systematic studies using nuclear methods, particulary instrumental neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence analysis, have been carried out on the panel paintings from the Krakowska- Nowosadecka School and Silesian School of the period from the XIV-XVII century, Chinese and Thai porcelains and mummies fillings of Egyptian sarcophagi. These studies will provide new data to the existing data base, will permit to compare materials used by various schools and individual artists.

  12. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of mammalian cells and xenograft tumors with SNAP-tag.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibiao Gong

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR spectral region is suitable for in vivo imaging due to its reduced background and high penetration capability compared to visible fluorescence. SNAP(f is a fast-labeling variant of SNAP-tag that reacts with a fluorescent dye-conjugated benzylguanine (BG substrate, leading to covalent attachment of the fluorescent dye to the SNAP(f. This property makes SNAP(f a valuable tool for fluorescence imaging. The NIR fluorescent substrate BG-800, a conjugate between BG and IRDye 800CW, was synthesized and characterized in this study. HEK293, MDA-MB-231 and SK-OV-3 cells stably expressing SNAP(f-Beta-2 adrenergic receptor (SNAP(f-ADRβ2 fusion protein were created. The ADRβ2 portion of the protein directs the localization of the protein to the cell membrane. The expression of SNAP(f-ADRβ2 in the stable cell lines was confirmed by the reaction between BG-800 substrate and cell lysates. Microscopic examination confirmed that SNAP(f-ADRβ2 was localized on the cell membrane. The signal intensity of the labeled cells was dependent on the BG-800 concentration. In vivo imaging study showed that BG-800 could be used to visualize xenograph tumors expressing SNAP(f-ADRβ2. However, the background signal was relatively high, which may be a reflection of non-specific accumulation of BG-800 in the skin. To address the background issue, quenched substrates that only fluoresce upon reaction with SNAP-tag were synthesized and characterized. Although the fluorescence was successfully quenched, in vivo imaging with the quenched substrate CBG-800-PEG-QC1 failed to visualize the SNAP(f-ADRβ2 expressing tumor, possibly due to the reduced reaction rate. Further improvement is needed to apply this system for in vivo imaging.

  14. Wide-field spectrally resolved quantitative fluorescence imaging system: toward neurosurgical guidance in glioma resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yijing; Thom, Maria; Ebner, Michael; Wykes, Victoria; Desjardins, Adrien; Miserocchi, Anna; Ourselin, Sebastien; McEvoy, Andrew W.; Vercauteren, Tom

    2017-11-01

    In high-grade glioma surgery, tumor resection is often guided by intraoperative fluorescence imaging. 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) provides fluorescent contrast between normal brain tissue and glioma tissue, thus achieving improved tumor delineation and prolonged patient survival compared with conventional white-light-guided resection. However, commercially available fluorescence imaging systems rely solely on visual assessment of fluorescence patterns by the surgeon, which makes the resection more subjective than necessary. We developed a wide-field spectrally resolved fluorescence imaging system utilizing a Generation II scientific CMOS camera and an improved computational model for the precise reconstruction of the PpIX concentration map. In our model, the tissue's optical properties and illumination geometry, which distort the fluorescent emission spectra, are considered. We demonstrate that the CMOS-based system can detect low PpIX concentration at short camera exposure times, while providing high-pixel resolution wide-field images. We show that total variation regularization improves the contrast-to-noise ratio of the reconstructed quantitative concentration map by approximately twofold. Quantitative comparison between the estimated PpIX concentration and tumor histopathology was also investigated to further evaluate the system.

  15. Red fluorescence imaging for dental plaque detection and quantification: pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao; Gomez, Juliana; Khan, Soniya; Peru, Debbie; Ellwood, Roger

    2017-09-01

    The red fluorescence of dental plaque originating from porphyrins in oral bacteria may allow visualization, detection, and scoring of plaque without disclosing agents. Two studies were conducted. The first included 24 healthy participants who abstained from oral hygiene for 24 h. Dental plaque was collected from tooth surfaces, and a 10% solution was prepared. These were scanned by a molecular spectrometer to identify the optimum excitation and emission wavelengths of plaque for developing a red fluorescence imaging system. Fourteen healthy subjects completed the second study. After a washout period (1 week), participants had a prophylaxis at baseline and abstained from oral hygiene during the study. They were monitored using the fluorescence imaging system at baseline, 24 h, and 48 h. A dentist clinically assessed plaque after disclosing and on red fluorescence images. Three descriptors were extracted from images and a RUSBoost classifier derived computer fluorescence scores through cross-validation. Red fluorescence plaque levels increased during the 48-h accumulation. Plaque progression was identified by dentist assessment and computer analysis, presenting significant differences between visits at tooth and subject levels (poral hygiene assessment.

  16. Epi-fluorescence imaging of colloid transport in porous media at decimeter scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Yonggang

    2006-10-01

    A noninvasive epi-fluorescence imaging technique was developed for real-time observation of colloid transport in porous media at decimeter scales. Fluorescent latex microspheres and translucent quartz sand were used as a model colloid-porous medium system. Various calibrations were performed for accurate conversion of fluorescence intensities to microsphere concentrations. Fluorescence intensities were found to linearly increase with microsphere concentrations (5 x 10(5)-5 x 10(8) spheres/mL in saturated sand) and with camera exposure time. Fluorescence intensities also increased with sand thickness (saturated with microsphere solution), indicating that the fluorescence signals detected by the imaging system were integrated signals from the entire thickness (10 mm) of the sand. A set of microsphere transport experiments was conducted to demonstrate the versatility of the imaging system. Excellent mass recoveries (93-103%) were achieved in all transport experiments, demonstrating the robustness of the imaging system for quantitative study of colloid transport. The system allowed the change of flow velocity, ionic strength, and flow direction within one transport experiment and the real-time, quantitative monitoring of the movement of microspheres in packed sand, greatly reducing the time and effort needed for similar work with traditional column experiments.

  17. High Spatial Resolution Imaging of Endogenous Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Cells by Solid-State Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Eric; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2016-09-02

    Herein, we describe selective imaging of hydrogen peroxide using a precipitating dye conjugated to a boronic acid-based immolative linker. We achieved visualization of endogenous hydrogen peroxide in phagosomes by solid-state two-photon fluorescence imaging in living cells with exceptionally high spatial resolution. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Image overlay solution based on threshold detection for a compact near infrared fluorescence goggle system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shengkui; Mondal, Suman B; Zhu, Nan; Liang, RongGuang; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Near infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has shown great potential for various clinical procedures, including intraoperative image guidance. However, existing NIR fluorescence imaging systems either have a large footprint or are handheld, which limits their usage in intraoperative applications. We present a compact NIR fluorescence imaging system (NFIS) with an image overlay solution based on threshold detection, which can be easily integrated with a goggle display system for intraoperative guidance. The proposed NFIS achieves compactness, light weight, hands-free operation, high-precision superimposition, and a real-time frame rate. In addition, the miniature and ultra-lightweight light-emitting diode tracking pod is easy to incorporate with NIR fluorescence imaging. Based on experimental evaluation, the proposed NFIS solution has a lower detection limit of 25 nM of indocyanine green at 27 fps and realizes a highly precise image overlay of NIR and visible images of mice in vivo. The overlay error is limited within a 2-mm scale at a 65-cm working distance, which is highly reliable for clinical study and surgical use.

  19. Multiphoton excitation fluorescence imaging applied to the study of embryo development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokosin, David L.; White, John G.

    1998-07-01

    The use of fluorescent probes is a powerful technique for the study of living specimens. Unfortunately, living tissues are vulnerable to photodamage from the excitation illumination and they make poor optical specimens due to their light-scattering nature. Multiphoton (two or more photon) excitation imaging offers significant advantages compared to laser-scanning confocal fluorescence microscopy for fluorescence microscopy of live specimens: considerable reduction in total sample fluorophore excitation and hence less photodamage, increased depth penetration due to increased tolerance for scattering, and increased detection sensitivity as more signal photons can be used for imaging. These advantages become more significant if 3D or 4D (multifocal plane, time-lapse) imaging is undertaken. In addition, multiphoton excitation imaging allows UV excited probes such as DAPI or INDO I or endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H and serotonin to be imaged without UV excitation. We, and others, have been evaluating the potential of multi-photon excitation imaging for biological microscopy and have found all of the aforementioned advantages particularly significant for laser-scanning fluorescence imaging of developing embryos; a summary of currently pursued developmental biology applications will be presented. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will also be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, 'turnkey' multiphoton imaging systems. The combination of demonstrated applications, simple ultrafast laser sources, and affordable commercial systems may promote a revolution in the study of embryogenesis with the light microscope.

  20. Targeted imaging in oncologic surgery : preclinical studies utilizing near-infrared fluorescence and radioactivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonstra, M.C.

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) is an intraoperative imaging technique already introduced and validated in the clinic for sentinel lymph node mapping and biliary imaging. Conjugating a NIR-dye to a specific tumor-targeting vehicle dramatically enhances the specificity of this technique. Hence, a

  1. Dielectric and fluorescent samples imaged by scanning near-field optical microscopy in reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalocha, A.; Jalocha, A.; van Hulst, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    Dielectric fluorescent samples are imaged by scanning near- field optical microscopy in reflection. A non-metallized tapered fibre tip is used both as an emitter and a detector. Shear force feedback controls the distance between the tip and the sample and gives simultaneously a topographic image of

  2. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K.

    2004-01-01

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a μm-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (μ-XRF). We developed a μ-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit μ-XRF (GE-μ-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 μm at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant 'Quinoa'. The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-μ-XRF. We expect that GE-μ-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region

  3. Development and applications of grazing exit micro X-ray fluorescence instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emoto, T.; Sato, Y.; Konishi, Y.; Ding, X.; Tsuji, K. E-mail: tsuji@a-chem.eng.osaka-cu.ac.jp

    2004-08-31

    A polycapillary X-ray lens is an effective optics to obtain a {mu}m-size X-ray beam for micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry ({mu}-XRF). We developed a {mu}-XRF instrument using a polycapillary X-ray lens, which also enabled us to perform Grazing Exit {mu}-XRF (GE-{mu}-XRF). The evaluated diameter of the primary X-ray beam was 48 {mu}m at the focal distance of the X-ray lens. Use of this instrument enabled two-dimensional mapping of the elemental distributions during growth of the plant 'Quinoa'. The results of the mapping revealed elemental transition during growth. In addition, a small region of thin film was analyzed by GE-{mu}-XRF. We expect that GE-{mu}-XRF will become an effective method of estimating the film thickness of a small region.

  4. Multispectral, Fluorescent and Photoplethysmographic Imaging for Remote Skin Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigulis, Janis

    2017-05-19

    Optical tissue imaging has several advantages over the routine clinical imaging methods, including non-invasiveness (it does not change the structure of tissues), remote operation (it avoids infections) and the ability to quantify the tissue condition by means of specific image parameters. Dermatologists and other skin experts need compact (preferably pocket-size), self-sustaining and easy-to-use imaging devices. The operational principles and designs of ten portable in-vivo skin imaging prototypes developed at the Biophotonics Laboratory of Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy, University of Latvia during the recent five years are presented in this paper. Four groups of imaging devices are considered. Multi-spectral imagers offer possibilities for distant mapping of specific skin parameters, thus facilitating better diagnostics of skin malformations. Autofluorescence intensity and photobleaching rate imagers show a promising potential for skin tumor identification and margin delineation. Photoplethysmography video-imagers ensure remote detection of cutaneous blood pulsations and can provide real-time information on cardiovascular parameters and anesthesia efficiency. Multimodal skin imagers perform several of the abovementioned functions by taking a number of spectral and video images with the same image sensor. Design details of the developed prototypes and results of clinical tests illustrating their functionality are presented and discussed.

  5. A selective colorimetric and fluorescent sensor for Al3+ ion and its application to cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Rangasamy; Hrishikesan, Elango; Kannan, Palaninathan

    2015-04-01

    A new rhodamine-based fluorescent turn-on chemosensor (L) for selective detection of Al3+ ion has been developed and characterized. The fluorescent chemosensor L was synthesized by the reaction of intermediate (4) with 2,5-bis (4-phenylacyl chloride)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (3). The chemosensor L displays an excellent selective and sensitive response to Al3+ ion over other metal ions, in which the spirocyclic (non-fluorescent) to ring opened amide (fluorescent) process was utilized and a 1:2 stoichiometry for L-Al3+ complex was formed with an association constant of 2.03 × 103 M-1. Furthermore, chemosensor L can be applied as a fluorescent probe for monitoring Al3+ in living cells by performing cell imaging studies.

  6. Field trial of a dual-wavelength fluorescent emission (L.I.F.E.) instrument and the Magma White rover during the MARS2013 Mars analog mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groemer, Gernot; Sattler, Birgit; Weisleitner, Klemens; Hunger, Lars; Kohstall, Christoph; Frisch, Albert; Józefowicz, Mateusz; Meszyński, Sebastian; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael; Bothe, Claudia; Boyd, Andrea; Dinkelaker, Aline; Dissertori, Markus; Fasching, David; Fischer, Monika; Föger, Daniel; Foresta, Luca; Frischauf, Norbert; Fritsch, Lukas; Fuchs, Harald; Gautsch, Christoph; Gerard, Stephan; Goetzloff, Linda; Gołebiowska, Izabella; Gorur, Paavan; Groemer, Gerhard; Groll, Petra; Haider, Christian; Haider, Olivia; Hauth, Eva; Hauth, Stefan; Hettrich, Sebastian; Jais, Wolfgang; Jones, Natalie; Taj-Eddine, Kamal; Karl, Alexander; Kauerhoff, Tilo; Khan, Muhammad Shadab; Kjeldsen, Andreas; Klauck, Jan; Losiak, Anna; Luger, Markus; Luger, Thomas; Luger, Ulrich; McArthur, Jane; Moser, Linda; Neuner, Julia; Orgel, Csilla; Ori, Gian Gabriele; Paternesi, Roberta; Peschier, Jarno; Pfeil, Isabella; Prock, Silvia; Radinger, Josef; Ragonig, Christoph; Ramirez, Barbara; Ramo, Wissam; Rampey, Mike; Sams, Arnold; Sams, Elisabeth; Sams, Sebastian; Sandu, Oana; Sans, Alejandra; Sansone, Petra; Scheer, Daniela; Schildhammer, Daniel; Scornet, Quentin; Sejkora, Nina; Soucek, Alexander; Stadler, Andrea; Stummer, Florian; Stumptner, Willibald; Taraba, Michael; Tlustos, Reinhard; Toferer, Ernst; Turetschek, Thomas; Winter, Egon; Zanella-Kux, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Abstract We have developed a portable dual-wavelength laser fluorescence spectrometer as part of a multi-instrument optical probe to characterize mineral, organic, and microbial species in extreme environments. Operating at 405 and 532 nm, the instrument was originally designed for use by human explorers to produce a laser-induced fluorescence emission (L.I.F.E.) spectral database of the mineral and organic molecules found in the microbial communities of Earth's cryosphere. Recently, our team had the opportunity to explore the strengths and limitations of the instrument when it was deployed on a remote-controlled Mars analog rover. In February 2013, the instrument was deployed on board the Magma White rover platform during the MARS2013 Mars analog field mission in the Kess Kess formation near Erfoud, Morocco. During these tests, we followed tele-science work flows pertinent to Mars surface missions in a simulated spaceflight environment. We report on the L.I.F.E. instrument setup, data processing, and performance during field trials. A pilot postmission laboratory analysis determined that rock samples acquired during the field mission exhibited a fluorescence signal from the Sun-exposed side characteristic of chlorophyll a following excitation at 405 nm. A weak fluorescence response to excitation at 532 nm may have originated from another microbial photosynthetic pigment, phycoerythrin, but final assignment awaits development of a comprehensive database of mineral and organic fluorescence spectra. No chlorophyll fluorescence signal was detected from the shaded underside of the samples.

  7. Semi-automatic system for UV images analysis of historical musical instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Piercarlo; Invernizzi, Claudia; Licchelli, Maurizio; Lombardi, Luca; Malagodi, Marco; Rovetta, Tommaso

    2015-06-01

    The selection of representative areas to be analyzed is a common problem in the study of Cultural Heritage items. UV fluorescence photography is an extensively used technique to highlight specific surface features which cannot be observed in visible light (e.g. restored parts or treated with different materials), and it proves to be very effective in the study of historical musical instruments. In this work we propose a new semi-automatic solution for selecting areas with the same perceived color (a simple clue of similar materials) on UV photos, using a specifically designed interactive tool. The proposed method works in two steps: (i) users select a small rectangular area of the image; (ii) program automatically highlights all the areas that have the same color of the selected input. The identification is made by the analysis of the image in HSV color model, the most similar to the human perception. The achievable result is more accurate than a manual selection, because it can detect also points that users do not recognize as similar due to perception illusion. The application has been developed following the rules of usability, and Human Computer Interface has been improved after a series of tests performed by expert and non-expert users. All the experiments were performed on UV imagery of the Stradivari violins collection stored by "Museo del Violino" in Cremona.

  8. Multifunctional ferritin cage nanostructures for fluorescence and MR imaging of tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zhi-Ping; Luo, Ming; Yu, Xiang; Han, Yu; Wei, Hong-Ping; Cui, Zong-Qiang; Zhang, Xian-En

    2011-12-01

    Bionanoparticles and nanostructures have attracted increasing interest as versatile and promising tools in many applications including biosensing and bioimaging. In this study, to image and detect tumor cells, ferritin cage-based multifunctional hybrid nanostructures were constructed that: (i) displayed both the green fluorescent protein and an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide on the exterior surface of the ferritin cages; and (ii) incorporated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into the ferritin interior cavity. The overall architecture of ferritin cages did not change after being integrated with fusion proteins and ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. These multifunctional nanostructures were successfully used as a fluorescent imaging probe and an MRI contrast agent for specifically probing and imaging αvβ3 integrin upregulated tumor cells. The work provides a promising strategy for tumor cell detection by simultaneous fluorescence and MR imaging.Bionanoparticles and nanostructures have attracted increasing interest as versatile and promising tools in many applications including biosensing and bioimaging. In this study, to image and detect tumor cells, ferritin cage-based multifunctional hybrid nanostructures were constructed that: (i) displayed both the green fluorescent protein and an Arg-Gly-Asp peptide on the exterior surface of the ferritin cages; and (ii) incorporated ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into the ferritin interior cavity. The overall architecture of ferritin cages did not change after being integrated with fusion proteins and ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. These multifunctional nanostructures were successfully used as a fluorescent imaging probe and an MRI contrast agent for specifically probing and imaging αvβ3 integrin upregulated tumor cells. The work provides a promising strategy for tumor cell detection by simultaneous fluorescence and MR imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c1nr11132

  9. Characterization of a versatile reference instrument for traceable fluorescence measurements using different illumination and viewing geometries specified in practical colorimetry—part 1: bidirectional geometry (45:0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Neil, William; Noël, Mario

    2016-10-01

    For highest accuracy fluorescence colorimetry, standardizing organizations recommend the use of a two-monochromator method with a bidirectional illumination and viewing geometry (45:0 or 0:45). For this reason, reference fluorescence instruments developed by National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) have largely conformed to this bidirectional geometry. However, for many practical applications in colorimetry where the samples exhibit texture, surface roughness or other spatial non-uniformities, the relevant standard test methods specify a sphere geometry with diffuse illumination or viewing (e.g. d:8 or 8:d) which gives improved measurement precision. This difference in the measurement geometry between the primary instrument used to realize the fluorescence scale and the secondary testing instruments used for practical measurements, compromises the traceability of these fluorescence calibrations. To address this metrology issue, a two-monochromator goniospectrofluorimeter instrument has been developed at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC). This instrument can be configured for different illumination and viewing geometries to conform with international standards for different colorimetric applications. To improve the traceability chain for measurements using different geometries, the instrument has been thoroughly characterized and validated by means of comparison measurements with NRC’s other spectrophotometric and fluorescence reference instruments. This uncertainty analysis has been carried out in a step-wise manner; first, for a bidirectional geometry (45:0) and then for a sphere geometry (8:d) to provide an uninterrupted traceability to primary radiometric scales. The first paper in this two paper series reviews the background to this work and provides details of the basic design of the new instrument and its characterization for measurements using a bidirectional geometry (45:0), including a representative uncertainty budget. In part 2, the major

  10. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  11. A Laser-Induced Fluorescence Instrument for Aircraft Measurements of Sulfur Dioxide in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Andrew W.; Thornberry, Troy D.; Ciciora, Steven J.; McLaughlin, Richard J.; Watts, Laurel A.; Hanisco, Thomas F.; Baumann, Esther; Giorgetta, Fabrizio R.; Bui, Thaopaul V.; Fahey, David W.

    2016-01-01

    This work describes the development and testing of a new instrument for in situ measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) on airborne platforms in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The instrument is based on the laser-induced fluorescence technique and uses the fifth harmonic of a tunable fiber-amplified semiconductor diode laser system at 1084.5 nm to excite SO2 at 216.9 nm. Sensitivity and background checks are achieved in flight by additions of SO2 calibration gas and zero air, respectively. Aircraft demonstration was performed during the NASA Volcano Plume Investigation Readiness and Gas-Phase and Aerosol Sulfur (VIRGAS) experiment, which was a series of flights using the NASA WB-57F during October 2015 based at Ellington Field and Harlingen, Texas. During these flights, the instrument successfully measured SO2 in the UTLS at background (non-volcanic) conditions with a precision of 2 ppt at 10 s and an overall uncertainty determined primarily by instrument drifts of +/- (16% + 0.9 ppt).

  12. Worldwide distribution of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation and its different fields of application: A survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klockenkämper, Reinhold, E-mail: reinhold.klockenkaemper@isas.de; Bohlen, Alex von

    2014-09-01

    A survey was carried out with users and manufacturers of Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence instrumentation in order to demonstrate the worldwide distribution of TXRF equipment and the different fields of applications. In general, TXRF users come from universities and scientific institutes, from working places at synchrotron beam-lines, or laboratories in semiconductor fabs. TXRF instrumentation is distributed in more than 50 countries on six continents and is applied at about 200 institutes and laboratories. The number of running desktop instruments amounts to nearly 300 units. About 60 beamlines run working places dedicated to TXRF. About 300 floor-mounted instruments are estimated to be used in about 150 fabs of the semiconductor industry. In total, 13 different fields of applications could be registered statistically from three different aspects. - Highlights: • According to the survey world maps show the distribution of TXRF equipment. • Nearly 700 individual units are running actually in 57 countries of 6 continents. • Users work at 200 universities, 60 synchrotron-beamlines, and 150 semiconductor fabs. • 13 fields of applications (e.g. environmental, chemical) are evaluated statistically. • Manufacturers, conference members and authors lead to 3 different pie-charts.

  13. Molecular imaging with optics: primer and case for near-infrared fluorescence techniques in personalized medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Rasmussen, John C.

    2010-01-01

    We compare and contrast the development of optical molecular imaging techniques with nuclear medicine with a didactic emphasis for initiating readers into the field of molecular imaging. The nuclear imaging techniques of gamma scintigraphy, single-photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography are first briefly reviewed. The molecular optical imaging techniques of bioluminescence and fluorescence using gene reporter/probes and gene reporters are described prior to introducing the governing factors of autofluorescence and excitation light leakage. The use of dual-labeled, near-infrared excitable and radio-labeled agents are described with comparative measurements between planar fluorescence and nuclear molecular imaging. The concept of time-independent and -dependent measurements is described with emphasis on integrating time-dependent measurements made in the frequency domain for 3-D tomography. Finally, we comment on the challenges and progress for translating near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging agents for personalized medicine. PMID:19021311

  14. Cisplatin Prodrug-Conjugated Gold Nanocluster for Fluorescence Imaging and Targeted Therapy of the Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fangyuan; Feng, Bing; Yu, Haijun; Wang, Dangge; Wang, Tingting; Liu, Jianping; Meng, Qingshuo; Wang, Siling; Zhang, Pengcheng; Zhang, Zhiwen; Li, Yaping

    2016-01-01

    Theranostic nanomedicine has emerged as a promising modality for cancer diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we report the fabrication of fluorescence gold nanoclusters (GNC) conjugated with a cisplatin prodrug and folic acid (FA) (FA-GNC-Pt) for fluorescence imaging and targeted chemotherapy of breast cancer. The physio-chemical properties of FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles are thoroughly characterized by fluorescence/UV-Vis spectroscopic measurement, particle size and zeta-potential examination. We find that FA-modification significantly accelerated the cellular uptake and increased the cytotoxicity of GNC-Pt nanoparticles in murine 4T1 breast cancer cells. Fluorescence imaging in vivo using 4T1 tumor bearing nude mouse model shows that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles selectively accumulate in the orthotopic 4T1 tumor and generate strong fluorescence signal due to the tumor targeting effect of FA. Moreover, we demonstrate that FA-GNC-Pt nanoparticles significantly inhibit the growth and lung metastasis of the orthotopically implanted 4T1 breast tumors. All these data imply a good potential of the GNC-based theranostic nanoplatform for fluorescence tumor imaging and cancer therapy.

  15. Static Hyperspectral Fluorescence Imaging of Viscous Materials Based on a Linear Variable Filter Spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W. Koch

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-cost hyperspectral measurement setup in a new application based on fluorescence detection in the visible (Vis wavelength range. The aim of the setup is to take hyperspectral fluorescence images of viscous materials. Based on these images, fluorescent and non-fluorescent impurities in the viscous materials can be detected. For the illumination of the measurement object, a narrow-band high-power light-emitting diode (LED with a center wavelength of 370 nm was used. The low-cost acquisition unit for the imaging consists of a linear variable filter (LVF and a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS 2D sensor array. The translucent wavelength range of the LVF is from 400 nm to 700 nm. For the confirmation of the concept, static measurements of fluorescent viscous materials with a non-fluorescent impurity have been performed and analyzed. With the presented setup, measurement surfaces in the micrometer range can be provided. The measureable minimum particle size of the impurities is in the nanometer range. The recording rate for the measurements depends on the exposure time of the used CMOS 2D sensor array and has been found to be in the microsecond range.

  16. Fluorescence and confocal imaging of mammalian cells using conjugated oligoelectrolytes with phenylenevinylene core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milczarek, Justyna; Pawlowska, Roza; Zurawinski, Remigiusz; Lukasik, Beata; Garner, Logan E.; Chworos, Arkadiusz

    2017-05-01

    Over the last few years, considerable efforts are taken, in order to find a molecular fluorescent probe fulfilling their applicability requirements. Due to a good optical properties and affinity to biological structures conjugated oligoelectrolytes (COEs) can be considered as a promising dyes for application in fluorescence-based bioimaging. In this work, we synthetized COEs with phenylenevinylene core (PV-COEs) and applied as fluorescent membranous-specific probes. Cytotoxicity effects of each COE were probed on cancerous and non-cancerous cell types and little to no toxicity effects were observed at the high range of concentrations. The intensity of cell fluorescence following the COE staining was determined by the photoluminescence analysis and fluorescence activated cell sorting method (FACS). Intercalation of tested COEs into mammalian cell membranes was revealed by fluorescent and confocal microscopy colocalization with commercial dyes specific for cellular structures including mitochondria, Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum. The phenylenevinylene conjugated oligoelectrolytes have been found to be suitable for fluorescent bioimaging of mammalian cells and membrane-rich organelles. Due to their water solubility coupled with spontaneous intercalation into cells, favorable photophysical features, ease of cell staining, low cytotoxicity and selectivity for membranous structures, PV-COEs can be applied as markers for fluorescence imaging of a variety of cell types.

  17. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prieur, G.; Nadi, M.; Hedjiedj, A.; Weber, S.

    1995-01-01

    This second chapter on instrumentation gives little general consideration on history and classification of instrumentation, and two specific states of the art. The first one concerns NMR (block diagram of instrumentation chain with details on the magnets, gradients, probes, reception unit). The first one concerns precision instrumentation (optical fiber gyro-meter and scanning electron microscope), and its data processing tools (programmability, VXI standard and its history). The chapter ends with future trends on smart sensors and Field Emission Displays. (D.L.). Refs., figs

  18. Neutron, fluorescence, and optical imaging: An in situ combination of complementary techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, D.; Egelhaaf, S. U.; Hermes, H. E.; Börgardts, M.; Müller, T. J. J.; Grünzweig, C.; Lehmann, E.

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus which enables the simultaneous combination of three complementary imaging techniques, optical imaging, fluorescence imaging, and neutron radiography, is presented. While each individual technique can provide information on certain aspects of the sample and their time evolution, a combination of the three techniques in one setup provides a more complete and consistent data set. The setup can be used in transmission and reflection modes and thus with optically transparent as well as opaque samples. Its capabilities are illustrated with two examples. A polymer hydrogel represents a transparent sample and the diffusion of fluorescent particles into and through this polymer matrix is followed. In reflection mode, the absorption of solvent by a nile red-functionalized mesoporous silica powder and the corresponding change in fluorescent signal are studied

  19. Fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy for in vivo imaging of epidermal reactions to two experimental irritants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suihko, C.; Serup, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Fibre-optic fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is a novel non-invasive technique for in vivo imaging of skin. The cellular structure of the epidermis can be studied. A fluorophore, e.g. fluorescein sodium, is introduced by an intradermal injection or applied...... to the skin surface before scanning. Images are horizontal optical sections parallel to the skin surface. Fluorescence CLSM has hitherto not been applied to experimental contact dermatitis. Objective: The aim was to study the applicability of fluorescence CLSM for in situ imaging of irritant contact......, modified the physico-chemical properties of the skin surface and both disturbed epicutaneous labelling with the flurophore and immersion oil coupling between the skin surface and the optical system. Thus, SLS was technically more difficult to study by CLSM than PA. Conclusions: This preliminary study...

  20. Mechanotransduction in Endothelial Cells Studied with Fluorescence Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien Shu

    2011-01-01

    Mechanotransduction involves the conversion of mechanical stimuli to intracellular signaling to modulate gene and protein expressions and hence cellular functions in endothelial cells, thus playing importance roles in the regulation of homeostasis in health and disease. The aim of this paper is to investigate the dynamics of mechanotransduction in endothelial cells by the use of fluorescent resonance energy transfer (FRET) to study the temporal and spatial activation of Src kinase and focal adhesion kinase, both of which play critical roles in many cellular processes. The results have contributed to the elucidation of the roles of these two important signaling molecules and their interactions in mediating mechanotransduction.

  1. Development of a wide-field fluorescence imaging system for evaluation of wound re-epithelialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Walfre; Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Purschke, Martin; Wang, Ying; Tam, Josh; Anderson, R. Rox; Doukas, Apostolos

    2013-03-01

    Normal skin barrier function depends on having a viable epidermis, an epithelial layer formed by keratinocytes. The transparent epidermis, which is less than a 100 mum thick, is nearly impossible to see. Thus, the clinical evaluation of re-epithelialization is difficult, which hinders selecting appropriate therapy for promoting wound healing. An imaging system was developed to evaluate epithelialization by detecting endogenous fluorescence emissions of cellular proliferation over a wide field of view. A custom-made 295 nm ultraviolet (UV) light source was used for excitation. Detection was done by integrating a near-UV camera with sensitivity down to 300 nm, a 12 mm quartz lens with iris and focus lock for the UV regime, and a fluorescence bandpass filter with 340 nm center wavelength. To demonstrate that changes in fluorescence are related to cellular processes, the epithelialization of a skin substitute was monitored in vitro. The skin substitute or construct was made by embedding microscopic live human skin tissue columns, 1 mm in diameter and spaced 1 mm apart, in acellular porcine dermis. Fluorescence emissions clearly delineate the extent of lateral surface migration of keratinocytes and the total surface covered by the new epithelium. The fluorescence image of new epidermis spatially correlates with the corresponding color image. A simple, user-friendly way of imaging the presence of skin epithelium would improve wound care in civilian burns, ulcers and surgeries.

  2. Spectral Behavior of White Pigment Mixtures Using Reflectance, Ultraviolet-Fluorescence Spectroscopy, and Multispectral Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronti, Lucilla; Felici, Anna Candida; Ménager, Matthieu; Vieillescazes, Cathy; Piacentini, Mario

    2017-12-01

    Reflectance spectroscopy, ultraviolet (UV)-fluorescence spectroscopy, and multispectral imaging have been widely employed for pigment identification on paintings. From ancient times to the present, lead white, zinc white, and titanium white have been the most important white pigments used for paintings and they are used as pigment markers for dating a work of art. The spectral behavior of these pigments is reported in several scientific papers and websites, but those of their mixtures are quite unknown. We present a combined nondestructive approach for identifying mixtures of lead white, zinc white, and titanium white as powder and dispersed in two different binder media (egg yolk and linseed oil) by using reflectance spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence imaging. We propose a novel approach for mapping the presence of white pigments in paintings by false color images obtained from multispectral reflectance and UV-fluorescence images. We found that the presence of lead white mixed with either zinc white or titanium white is highly detectable. Zinc white mixed with lead white or titanium white can be identified due to its UV-fluorescence emission, whereas titanium white in association with lead white or zinc white is distinguishable by its reflectance spectral features. In most cases, the UV-fluorescence analyses also permit the recognition of the binder media in which the pigments are dispersed.

  3. Iodinated oil-loaded, fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomography/fluorescence trimodal imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Sihan Xue,1 Yao Wang,1 Mengxing Wang,2 Lu Zhang,1 Xiaoxia Du,2 Hongchen Gu,1 Chunfu Zhang1,31School of Biomedical Engineering and Med-X Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Shanghai Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance, Department of Physics, East China Normal University, 3State Key Laboratory of Oncogenes and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: In this study, a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI/computed tomography (CT/fluorescence trifunctional probe was prepared by loading iodinated oil into fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (i-fmSiO4@SPIONs. Fluorescent mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (fmSiO4@SPIONs were prepared by growing fluorescent dye-doped silica onto superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs directed by a cetyltrimethylammonium bromide template. As prepared, fmSiO4@SPIONs had a uniform size, a large surface area, and a large pore volume, which demonstrated high efficiency for iodinated oil loading. Iodinated oil loading did not change the sizes of fmSiO4@SPIONs, but they reduced the MRI T2 relaxivity (r2 markedly. I-fmSiO4@SPIONs were stable in their physical condition and did not demonstrate cytotoxic effects under the conditions investigated. In vitro studies indicated that the contrast enhancement of MRI and CT, and the fluorescence signal intensity of i-fmSiO4@SPION aqueous suspensions and macrophages, were intensified with increased i-fmSiO4@SPION concentrations in suspension and cell culture media. Moreover, for the in vivo study, the accumulation of i-fmSiO4@SPIONs in the liver could also be detected by MRI, CT, and fluorescence imaging. Our study demonstrated that i-fmSiO4@SPIONs had great potential for MRI/C/fluorescence trimodal imaging.Keywords: multifunctional probe, SPIONs, mesoporous silica

  4. An operational fluorescence system for crop assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Charles; Belanger, Marie-Christine; Viau, Alain A.; Chamberland, Martin; Roy, Simon

    2004-03-01

    The development of precision farming requires new tools for plant nutritional stress monitoring. An operational fluorescence system has been designed for vegetation status mapping and stress detection at plant and field scale. The instrument gives relative values of fluorescence at different wavelengths induced by the two-excitation sources. Lightinduced fluorescence has demonstrated successful crop health monitoring and plant nutritional stress detection capabilities. The spectral response of the plants has first been measured with an hyperspectral imager using laser-induced fluorescence. A tabletop imaging fluorometer based on flash lamp technology has also been designed to study the spatial distribution of fluorescence on plant leaves. For field based non-imaging system, LED technology is used as light source to induce fluorescence of the plant. The operational fluorescence system is based on ultraviolet and blue LED to induce fluorescence. Four narrow fluorescence bands centered on 440, 520, 690 and 740nm are detected. The instrument design includes a modular approach for light source and detector. It can accommodate as many as four different light sources and six bands of fluorescence detection. As part of the design for field application, the instrument is compatible with a mobile platform equipped with a GPS and data acquisition system. The current system developed by Telops/GAAP is configured for potato crops fluorescence measurement but can easily be adapted for other crops. This new instrument offers an effective and affordable solution for precision farming.

  5. In vivo assessment of wound re-epithelialization by UV fluorescence excitation imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Williams, Maura; Farinelli, William; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2017-02-01

    Background and Objectives: We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds in vitro. This system can image highly-proliferating cellular processes (295/340 nm excitation/emission wavelengths) to study epithelialization in a cultured wound model. The objective of the current work is to evaluate the suitability of u-FEI for monitoring wound re-epithelialization in vivo. Study Design: Full-thickness wounds were created in the tail of rats and imaged weekly using u-FEI at 295/340nm excitation/emission wavelengths. Histology was used to investigate the correlation between the spatial distribution and intensity of fluorescence and the extent of wound epithelialization. In addition, the expression of the nuclear protein Ki67 was used to confirm the association between the proliferation of keratinocyte cells and the intensity of fluorescence. Results: Keratinocytes forming neo-epidermis exhibited higher fluorescence intensity than the keratinocytes not involved in re-epithelialization. In full-thickness wounds the fluorescence first appeared at the wound edge where keratinocytes initiated the epithelialization process. Fluorescence intensity increased towards the center as the keratinocytes partially covered the wound. As the wound healed, fluorescence decreased at the edges and was present only at the center as the keratinocytes completely covered the wound at day 21. Histology demonstrated that changes in fluorescence intensity from the 295/340nm band corresponded to newly formed epidermis. Conclusions: u-FEI at 295/340nm allows visualization of proliferating keratinocyte cells during re-epithelialization of wounds in vivo, potentially providing a quantitative, objective and simple method for evaluating wound closure in the clinic.

  6. Evaluation of intestinal perfusion by ICG fluorescence imaging in laparoscopic colorectal surgery with DST anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawada, Kenji; Hasegawa, Suguru; Wada, Toshiaki; Takahashi, Ryo; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hida, Koya; Sakai, Yoshiharu

    2017-03-01

    Decreased blood perfusion is an important risk factor for postoperative anastomotic leakage (AL). Fluorescence imaging with indocyanine green (ICG) provides a real-time assessment of intestinal perfusion. This study evaluated the utility of ICG fluorescence imaging in determining the transection line of the proximal colon during laparoscopic colorectal surgery with double stapling technique (DST) anastomosis. This was a prospective single-institution study of 68 patients with left-sided colorectal cancers who underwent laparoscopic colorectal surgery between August 2013 and December 2014. After distal transection of the bowel, the specimen was extracted extracorporeally and then the mesentery was divided along the planned transection line determined by the surgeons' judgement under normal q. After ICG was injected intravenously, intestinal perfusion of the proximal colon was assessed in the fluorescent imaging mode. Intestinal perfusion was examined in relation to the patient-, tumor- and surgery-related variables using univariate and multivariate analyses. ICG fluorescence imaging showed that intestinal perfusion was present at 3 mm (median) distal to the initially planned transection line. ICG fluorescence imaging resulted in a proximal change of the transection line by more than 5 mm in 18 patients (26.5 %) and, particularly, by more than 50 mm in 3 patients (4.4 %), compared with the initially planned transection line. Univariate analysis revealed that diabetes mellitus, anticoagulation therapy, preoperative chemotherapy and operative time were significantly associated with poor intestinal perfusion. Multivariate analysis identified anticoagulation therapy (P = 0.021) and preoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.019) as independent risk factors for poor intestinal perfusion. Three patients (4.5 %) with a change of transection line developed AL. ICG fluorescence imaging is useful for determining the transection line in laparoscopic colorectal surgery with DST

  7. Method for Imaging Live-Cell RNA Using an RNA Aptamer and a Fluorescent Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shin-Ichi; Yatsuzuka, Kenji; Katsuda, Yousuke; Uesugi, Motonari

    2018-01-01

    Live-cell imaging of mRNA dynamics is increasingly important to understanding spatially restricted gene expression. We recently developed a convenient and versatile method that uses a gene-specific RNA aptamer and a fluorescent probe to enable spatiotemporal imaging of endogenous mRNAs in living cells. The method was validated by live-cell imaging of the endogenous mRNA of β-actin. The new RNA-imaging technology might be useful for live-cell imaging of any RNA molecules.

  8. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  9. Highly biocompatible super-resolution fluorescence imaging using the fast photoswitching fluorescent protein Kohinoor and SPoD-ExPAN with Lp-regularized image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazawa, Tetsuichi; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Takauchi, Hiroki; Washio, Takashi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2018-02-02

    Far-field super-resolution fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to visualize live cells in great detail and with an unprecedented resolution. However, the techniques developed thus far have required high-power illumination (102-106 W/cm2), which leads to considerable phototoxicity to live cells and hampers time-lapse observation of the cells. In this study we show a highly biocompatible super-resolution microscopy technique that requires a very low-power illumination. The present technique combines a fast photoswitchable fluorescent protein, Kohinoor, with SPoD-ExPAN (super-resolution by polarization demodulation/excitation polarization angle narrowing). With this technique, we successfully observed Kohinoor-fusion proteins involving vimentin, paxillin, histone and clathrin expressed in HeLa cells at a spatial resolution of 70-80 nm with illumination power densities as low as ~1 W/cm2 for both excitation and photoswitching. Furthermore, although the previous SPoD-ExPAN technique used L1-regularized maximum-likelihood calculations to reconstruct super-resolved images, we devised an extension to the Lp-regularization to obtain super-resolved images that more accurately describe objects at the specimen plane. Thus, the present technique would significantly extend the applicability of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy for live-cell imaging. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. In vivo quantification of fluorescent molecular markers in real-time by ratio Imaging for diagnostic screening and image-guided surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaards, A.; Sterenborg, H. J. C. M.; Trachtenberg, J.; Wilson, B. C.; Lilge, L.

    2007-01-01

    Future applications of "molecular diagnostic screening" and "molecular image-guided surgery" will demand images of molecular markers with high resolution and high throughput (similar to >= 30 frames/second). MRI, SPECT, PET, optical fluorescence tomography, hyper-spectral fluorescence imaging, and

  11. Comparison between the indocyanine green fluorescence and blue dye methods for sentinel lymph node biopsy using novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in different types of hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kunshan; Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Huang, Wenhe; Wu, Jundong; Wang, Yabing; He, Lifang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Wang, Jiandong; Tian, Jie

    2016-12-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) has become a standard of care to detect axillary lymph metastasis in early-stage breast cancer patients with clinically negative axillary lymph nodes. Current SLNB detection modalities comprising a blue dye, a radioactive tracer, or a combination of both have advantages as well as disadvantages. Thus, near-infrared fluorescence imaging using indocyanine green (ICG) has recently been regarded as a novel method that has generated interest for SLNB around the world. However, the lack of appropriate fluorescence imaging systems has hindered further research and wide application of this method. Therefore, we developed novel fluorescence image-guided resection equipment (FIRE) to detect sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). Moreover, to compare the ICG fluorescence imaging method with the blue dye method and to explore the universal feasibility of the former, a different type of hospital study was conducted. Ninety-nine eligible patients participated in the study at 3 different types of hospitals. After subcutaneous ICG allergy testing, all the patients were subcutaneously injected with methylene blue and ICG into the subareolar area. Consequently, 276 SLNs (range 1-7) were identified in 98 subjects (detection rate: 99%) by using the ICG fluorescence imaging method. In contrast, the blue dye method only identified 202 SLNs (range 1-7) in 91 subjects (detection rate: 91.92%). Besides, the results of the fluorescence imaging method were similar in the 3 hospitals. Our findings indicate the universal feasibility of the ICG fluorescence imaging method for SLNB using the fluorescence image-guided resection equipment in early breast cancer detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor

  13. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2001-04-01

    SCK-CEN's research and development programme on instrumentation involves the assessment and the development of sensitive measurement systems used within a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the assessment of optical fibre components and their adaptability to radiation environments. The evaluation of ageing processes of instrumentation in fission plants, the development of specific data evaluation strategies to compensate for ageing induced degradation of sensors and cable performance form part of these activities. In 2000, particular emphasis was on in-core reactor instrumentation applied to fusion, accelerator driven and water-cooled fission reactors. This involved the development of high performance instrumentation for irradiation experiments in the BR2 reactor in support of new instrumentation needs for MYRRHA, and for diagnostic systems for the ITER reactor.

  14. A Single-Photon Avalanche Diode Array for Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David Eric; Charbon, Edoardo; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the design, characterization, and demonstration of a fully integrated single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD) imager for use in time-resolved fluorescence imaging. The imager consists of a 64-by-64 array of active SPAD pixels and an on-chip time-to-digital converter (TDC) based on a delay-locked loop (DLL) and calibrated interpolators. The imager can perform both standard time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) and an alternative gated-window detection useful for avoiding pulse pile-up when measuring bright signal levels. To illustrate the use of the imager, we present measurements of the decay lifetimes of fluorescent dyes of several types with a timing resolution of 350 ps. PMID:23976789

  15. External optical imaging of freely moving mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing metastatic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Meng; Baranov, Eugene; Shimada, Hiroshi; Moossa, A. R.; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2000-04-01

    We report here a new approach to genetically engineering tumors to become fluorescence such that they can be imaged externally in freely-moving animals. We describe here external high-resolution real-time fluorescent optical imaging of metastatic tumors in live mice. Stable high-level green flourescent protein (GFP)-expressing human and rodent cell lines enable tumors and metastasis is formed from them to be externally imaged from freely-moving mice. Real-time tumor and metastatic growth were quantitated from whole-body real-time imaging in GFP-expressing melanoma and colon carcinoma models. This GFP optical imaging system is highly appropriate for high throughput in vivo drug screening.

  16. Imaging of Bacterial and Fungal Cells Using Fluorescent Carbon Dots Prepared from Carica papaya Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasibabu, Betha Saineelima B; D'souza, Stephanie L; Jha, Sanjay; Kailasa, Suresh Kumar

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we have described a simple hydrothermal method for preparation of fluorescent carbon dots (C-dots) using Carica papaya juice as a precursor. The synthesized C-dots show emission peak at 461 nm with a quantum yield of 7.0 %. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on E. coli. The C-dots were used as fluorescent probes for imaging of bacterial (Bacillus subtilis) and fungal (Aspergillus aculeatus) cells and emitted green and red colors under different excitation wavelengths, which indicates that the C-dots can be used as a promising material for cell imaging.

  17. Instrumental parameters' determination in a fluorescences X-ray Philips PW 1400 equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, J.M.; Fasio, I.; Baronio, N.; Viola, M.

    1987-01-01

    The instrumental parameters of a Philips PW 1400 equipment wavelengths dispersive are determined; fundamentally, those related to the equipment's accuracy (stability at a very short, short and long term drift) as well as to those related to the detection system (dead time, detector's cleaning and detection limit). (S.M.) [es

  18. Characterization of a versatile reference instrument for traceable fluorescence measurements using different illumination and viewing geometries specified in practical colorimetry—part 2: sphere geometry (8:d)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwinkels, Joanne; Neil, William; Noël, Mario; Côté, Eric

    2017-02-01

    In the second part of this two-part series on the development of a versatile reference instrument at the National Research Council of Canada (NRC), we have extended the characterization of the NRC Reference Goniospectrofluorimeter to high-accuracy fluorescence measurements in a sphere geometry (8:d) that is specified in standard test methods for many practical applications in colorimetry. This builds upon the work reported in part-one of this series which described in detail the design, characterization and validation of this new instrument for realizing a total spectral radiance factor scale in a bidirectional (45a:0) geometry. To extend the measurement capabilities to a sphere geometry, it was configured with a large diameter integrating sphere accessory. Preliminary results using a substitution-mode operating procedure showed large sphere errors that were characterized and corrected for. To improve this traceability, the sphere was modified to operate in comparison-mode and this effectively eliminated many of the sphere-related errors that typically limit the accuracy of sphere-based fluorescence measurements. The performance of the instrument configured for a sphere geometry (8:d) with this modified sphere design has been validated by means of comparison measurements of both non-fluorescent and fluorescent artifacts. The reflectance component has been validated using non-fluorescent comparison samples that have been calibrated under the same geometric conditions with traceability to the NRC Absolute Reflectometer (d:0 geometry). The fluorescent-only component has been validated using near-Lambertian fluorescent reflecting materials with traceability to the NRC Reference Spectrofluorimeter (45:0 geometry), under the assumption that this component is nearly the same for these two geometries. This work has enabled NRC to provide an uninterrupted link for improved traceability of fluorescence calibrations that specify a sphere geometry. These calibration requests

  19. Performance evaluation of currently used portable X ray fluorescence instruments for measuring the lead content of paint in field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Yan; Favreau, Philippe; Kohler, Marcel

    2014-01-01

    Field-portable X-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) instruments are important for non-destructive, rapid and convenient measurements of lead in paint, in view of potential remediation. Using real-life paint samples, we compared measurements from three FP-XRF instruments currently used in Switzerland with laboratory measurements using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after complete sample dissolution. Two FP-XRF devices that functioned by lead L shell excitation frequently underestimated the lead concentration of samples. Lack of accuracy correlated with lead depth and/or the presence of additional metal elements (Zn, Ba or Ti). A radioactive source emitter XRF that enabled the additional K shell excitation showed higher accuracy and precision, regardless of the depth of the lead layer in the sample or the presence of other elements. Inspection of samples by light and electron microscopy revealed the diversity of real-life samples, with multi-layered paints showing various depths of lead and other metals. We conclude that the most accurate measurements of lead in paint are currently obtained with instruments that provide at least sufficient energy for lead K shell excitation.

  20. Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Fluorescence Line Height (FLH) Global Mapped Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS (or Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) is a key instrument aboard the Terra (EOS AM) and Aqua (EOS PM) satellites. Terra's orbit around the Earth...

  1. Using simulated fluorescence cell micrographs for the evaluation of cell image segmentation algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, Veit; Bergler, Matthias; Palmisano, Ralf; Prinzen, Martin; Franz, Daniela; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2017-03-18

    Manual assessment and evaluation of fluorescent micrograph cell experiments is time-consuming and tedious. Automated segmentation pipelines can ensure efficient and reproducible evaluation and analysis with constant high quality for all images of an experiment. Such cell segmentation approaches are usually validated and rated in comparison to manually annotated micrographs. Nevertheless, manual annotations are prone to errors and display inter- and intra-observer variability which influence the validation results of automated cell segmentation pipelines. We present a new approach to simulate fluorescent cell micrographs that provides an objective ground truth for the validation of cell segmentation methods. The cell simulation was evaluated twofold: (1) An expert observer study shows that the proposed approach generates realistic fluorescent cell micrograph simulations. (2) An automated segmentation pipeline on the simulated fluorescent cell micrographs reproduces segmentation performances of that pipeline on real fluorescent cell micrographs. The proposed simulation approach produces realistic fluorescent cell micrographs with corresponding ground truth. The simulated data is suited to evaluate image segmentation pipelines more efficiently and reproducibly than it is possible on manually annotated real micrographs.

  2. Colocalization of fluorescence and Raman microscopic images for the identification of subcellular compartments: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Sascha D; Petersen, Dennis; Niedieker, Daniel; Fricke, Inka; Freier, Erik; El-Mashtoly, Samir F; Gerwert, Klaus; Mosig, Axel

    2015-04-07

    A major promise of Raman microscopy is the label-free detailed recognition of cellular and subcellular structures. To this end, identifying colocalization patterns between Raman spectral images and fluorescence microscopic images is a key step to annotate subcellular components in Raman spectroscopic images. While existing approaches to resolve subcellular structures are based on fluorescence labeling, we propose a combination of a colocalization scheme with subsequent training of a supervised classifier that allows label-free resolution of cellular compartments. Our colocalization scheme unveils statistically significant overlapping regions by identifying correlation between the fluorescence color channels and clusters from unsupervised machine learning methods like hierarchical cluster analysis. The colocalization scheme is used as a pre-selection to gather appropriate spectra as training data. These spectra are used in the second part as training data to establish a supervised random forest classifier to automatically identify lipid droplets and nucleus. We validate our approach by examining Raman spectral images overlaid with fluorescence labelings of different cellular compartments, indicating that specific components may indeed be identified label-free in the spectral image. A Matlab implementation of our colocalization software is available at .

  3. Dual-Color Fluorescence Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Live Cancer Cells Using Conjugated Polymer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Minjie; Sun, Bin; Liu, Yun; Shen, Qun-Dong; Jiang, Shaojun

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in biological applications of nanomaterials brings about pressing needs for exploring nanomaterial-cell interactions. Cationic blue-emissive and anionic green-emissive conjugated polymers are applied as dual-color fluorescence probes to the surface of negatively charged magnetic nanoparticles through sequentially electrostatic adsorption. These conjugated polymers have large extinction coefficients and high fluorescence quantum yield (82% for PFN and 62% for ThPFS). Thereby, one can visualize trace amount (2.7 μg/mL) of fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles within cancer cells by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Fluorescence labeling by the conjugated polymers is also validated for quantitative determination of the internalized nanoparticles in each individual cell by flow cytometry analysis. Extensive overlap of blue and green fluorescence signals in the cytoplasm indicates that both conjugated polymer probes tightly bind to the surface of the nanoparticles during cellular internalization. The highly charged and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles non-specifically bind to the cell membranes, followed by cellular uptake through endocytosis. The nanoparticles form aggregates inside endosomes, which yields a punctuated staining pattern. Cellular internalization of the nanoparticles is dependent on the dosage and time. Uptake efficiency can be enhanced three-fold by application of an external magnetic field. The nanoparticles are low cytotoxicity and suitable for simultaneously noninvasive fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging application. PMID:26931282

  4. Membrane lipid domains and rafts: current applications of fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F M; Loura, Luís M S; Prieto, Manuel

    2009-02-01

    Membrane microdomains and their involvement in cellular processes are part of the current paradigm of biomembranes. However, a better characterization of domains, namely lipid rafts, is needed. In this review, it is shown how the use of time-resolved fluorescence, with the adequate parameters and probes, helps elucidating the type, number, fraction, composition and size of lipid phases and domains in multicomponent model systems. The determination of phase diagrams for lipid mixtures containing sphingolipids and/or cholesterol is exemplified. The use of fluorescence quenching and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) are also illustrated. Strategies for studying protein-induced domains are presented. The advantages of using single point microscopic decays and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in systems with three-phase coexistence are explained. Finally, the introduction of FLIM allows studies in live cell membranes, and the nature of the microdomains observed is readily elucidated due to the information retrieved from fluorescence lifetimes.

  5. Benchtop and animal validation of a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system for potential use in cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jian; Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Peng; Zhang, Shiwu; Shao, Pengfei; Smith, Zachary J.; Liu, Chenhai; Xu, Ronald X.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a portable fluorescence microscopic imaging system (PFMS) for intraoperative display of biliary structure and prevention of iatrogenic injuries during cholecystectomy. The system consists of a light source module, a camera module, and a Raspberry Pi computer with an LCD. Indocyanine green (ICG) is used as a fluorescent contrast agent for experimental validation of the system. Fluorescence intensities of the ICG aqueous solution at different concentration levels are acquired by our PFMS and compared with those of a commercial Xenogen IVIS system. We study the fluorescence detection depth by superposing different thicknesses of chicken breast on an ICG-loaded agar phantom. We verify the technical feasibility for identifying potential iatrogenic injury in cholecystectomy using a rat model in vivo. The proposed PFMS system is portable, inexpensive, and suitable for deployment in resource-limited settings.

  6. Time-gated fluorescence imaging of different organs in tumor-bearing mice after porphyrin administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Canti, Gianfranco L.; Musolino, Mario; Pifferi, Antonio; Taroni, Paola; Valentini, Gianluca

    1994-01-01

    A time-gated fluorescence imaging technique was applied on tumor-bearing porphyrin-treated mice to study the sensitizer distribution in different organs and tissue types, and to establish whether false positives in the diagnosis of tumors (based on porphyrin fluorescence) could be generated by this localization in healthy tissues. Mice were administered 25 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) of HpD or 5 mg/kg b.w. of PII, and sacrificed 8 hr later. Time- gated fluorescence images were acquired from tumor, skin, muscle, fat, brain, heart, lung, lymph nodes, liver, bowel, spleen, and bone of both treated and untreated animals. Similar results were obtained with HpD and PII. The presence of porphyrins clearly helps the localization of the neoplastic area, which is characterized by the strongest fluorescence in delayed images. An appreciable long-living emission was observed also in bones. With the exception of the bowel, the fluorescence of other organs was weaker and, in untreated mice, short-living.

  7. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  8. Photoacoustic tomography of human hepatic malignancies using intraoperative indocyanine green fluorescence imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Miyata

    Full Text Available Recently, fluorescence imaging following the preoperative intravenous injection of indocyanine green has been used in clinical settings to identify hepatic malignancies during surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green as a contrast agent to produce representative fluorescence images of hepatic tumors by visualizing the spatial distribution of indocyanine green on ultrasonographic images. Indocyanine green (0.5 mg/kg, intravenous was preoperatively administered to 9 patients undergoing hepatectomy. Intraoperatively, photoacoustic tomography was performed on the surface of the resected hepatic specimens (n = 10 under excitation with an 800 nm pulse laser. In 4 hepatocellular carcinoma nodules, photoacoustic imaging identified indocyanine green accumulation in the cancerous tissue. In contrast, in one hepatocellular carcinoma nodule and five adenocarcinoma foci (one intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma and 4 colorectal liver metastases, photoacoustic imaging delineated indocyanine green accumulation not in the cancerous tissue but rather in the peri-cancerous hepatic parenchyma. Although photoacoustic tomography enabled to visualize spatial distribution of ICG on ultrasonographic images, which was consistent with fluorescence images on cut surfaces of the resected specimens, photoacoustic signals of ICG-containing tissues decreased approximately by 40% even at 4 mm depth from liver surfaces. Photoacoustic tomography using indocyanine green also failed to identify any hepatocellular carcinoma nodules from the body surface of model mice with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. In conclusion, photoacoustic tomography has a potential to enhance cancer detectability and differential diagnosis by ultrasonographic examinations and intraoperative fluorescence imaging through visualization of stasis of bile-excreting imaging agents in and/or around hepatic tumors. However, further technical

  9. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described

  10. Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on instrumentation involves the development of advanced instrumentation systems for nuclear applications as well as the assessment of the performance of these instruments in a radiation environment. Particular emphasis is on the use of optical fibres as umbilincal links of a remote handling unit for use during maintanance of a fusion reacor, studies on the radiation hardening of plasma diagnostic systems; investigations on new instrumentation for the future MYRRHA accelerator driven system; space applications related to radiation-hardened lenses; the development of new approaches for dose, temperature and strain measurements; the assessment of radiation-hardened sensors and motors for remote handling tasks and studies of dose measurement systems including the use of optical fibres. Progress and achievements in these areas for 2001 are described.

  11. GEO-CAPE Coastal Ecosystem Dynamics Imager (COEDI) Instrument Design

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary goal of this study is to build a breadboard instrument and prove the functionality of the optical-mechanical assembly for the Coastal Ecosystem Dynamics...

  12. Fluorescent Nanoparticle Imaging Allows Noninvasive Evaluation of Immune Cell Modulation in Esophageal Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiman Habibollahi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal tumors provide unique challenges and opportunities for developing and testing surveillance imaging technology for different tumor microenvironment components, including assessment of immune cell modulation, with the ultimate goal of promoting early detection and response evaluation. In this context, accessibility through the lumen using a minimally invasive approach provides a means for repetitive evaluation longitudinally by combining fluorescent endoscopic imaging technology with novel fluorescent nanoparticles that are phagocytized by immune cells in the microenvironment. The agent we developed for imaging is synthesized from Feraheme (ferumoxytol, a Food and Drug Administration-approved monocrystaline dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticle, which we conjugated to a near-infrared fluorochrome, CyAL5.5. We demonstrate a high level of uptake of the fluorescent nanoparticles by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in the esophagus and spleen of L2Cre;p120ctnflox/flox mice. These mice develop esophageal dysplasia leading to squamous cell carcinoma; we have previously demonstrated that dysplastic and neoplastic esophageal lesions in these mice have an immune cell infiltration that is dominated by MDSCs. In the L2Cre;p120ctnflox/flox mice, evaluation of the spleen reveals that nearly 80% of CD45+ leukocytes that phagocytized the nanoparticle were CD11b+Gr1+ MDSCs. After dexamethasone treatment, we observed concordant decreased fluorescent signal from esophageal lesions during fluorescent endoscopy and decreased CyAL5.5-fluorescent-positive immune cell infiltration in esophageal dysplastic lesions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis. Our observations suggest that this translatable technology may be used for the early detection of dysplastic changes and the serial assessment of immunomodulatory therapy and to visualize changes in MDSCs in the esophageal tumor microenvironment.

  13. Gating circuit for single photon-counting fluorescence lifetime instruments using high repetition pulsed light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laws, W.R.; Potter, D.W.; Sutherland, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    We have constructed a circuit that permits conventional timing electronics to be used in single photon-counting fluorimeters with high repetition rate excitation sources (synchrotrons and mode-locked lasers). Most commercial time-to-amplitude and time-to-digital converters introduce errors when processing very short time intervals and when subjected to high-frequency signals. This circuit reduces the frequency of signals representing the pulsed light source (stops) to the rate of detected fluorescence events (starts). Precise timing between the start/stop pair is accomplished by using the second stop pulse after a start pulse. Important features of our design are that the circuit is insensitive to the simultaneous occurrence of start and stop signals and that the reduction in the stop frequency allows the start/stop time interval to be placed in linear regions of the response functions of commercial timing electronics

  14. Instrumental aspects of tube-excited energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, F.; Nullens, H.; Espen, P. van

    1983-01-01

    Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry is an attractive and widely used method for sensitive multi-element analysis. The method suffers from the extreme density of spectral components in a rather limited energy range which implies the need for computer based spectrum analysis. The method of iterative least squares analysis is the most powerful tool for this. It requires a systematic and accurate description of the spectral features. Other important necessities for accurate analysis are the calibration of the spectrometer and the correction for matrix absorption effects in the sample; they can be calculated from available physical constants. Ours and similar procedures prove that semi-automatic analyses are possible with an accuracy of the order of 5%. (author)

  15. Functionalized silica nanoparticles: a platform for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kemin; He, Xiaoxiao; Yang, XiaoHai; Shi, Hui

    2013-07-16

    Going in vivo, including living cells and the whole body, is very important for gaining a better understanding of the mystery of life and requires specialized imaging techniques. The diversity, composition, and temporal-spatial variation of life activities from cells to the whole body require the analysis techniques to be fast-response, noninvasive, highly sensitive, and stable, in situ and in real-time. Functionalized nanoparticle-based fluorescence imaging techniques have the potential to meet such needs through real-time and noninvasive visualization of biological events in vivo. Functionalized silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) doped with fluorescent dyes appear to be an ideal and flexible platform for developing fluorescence imaging techniques used in living cells and the whole body. We can select and incorporate different dyes inside the silica matrix either noncovalently or covalently. These form the functionalized hybrid SiNPs, which support multiplex labeling and ratiometric sensing in living systems. Since the silica matrix protects dyes from outside quenching and degrading factors, this enhances the photostability and biocompatibility of the SiNP-based probes. This makes them ideal for real-time and long-time tracking. One nanoparticle can encapsulate large numbers of dye molecules, which amplifies their optical signal and temporal-spatial resolution response. Integrating fluorescent dye-doped SiNPs with targeting ligands using various surface modification techniques can greatly improve selective recognition. Along with the endocytosis, functionalized SiNPs can be efficiently internalized into cells for noninvasive localization, assessment, and monitoring. These unique characteristics of functionalized SiNPs substantially support their applications in fluorescence imaging in vivo. In this Account, we summarize our efforts to develop functionalized dye-doped SiNPs for fluorescence imaging at the cell and small animal levels. We first discuss how to design and

  16. The total antioxidant capacity and fluorescence imaging of selected plant leaves commonly consumed in Brunei Darussalam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watu, Aswani; Metussin, Nurzaidah; Yasin, Hartini M.; Usman, Anwar

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the total antioxidant capacity and fluorescence imaging of several selected plants, namely Centella asiatica, Aidia borneensis and Anacardium occidentale, which are grown and traditionally consumed in Brunei Darussalam. The total antioxidant capacities of aqueous-methanolic infusions of their leaves were measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity, and microscopic fluorescence images were measured to identify the fluorescent substances bound in the leaves. We found that the total antioxidant capacity of their infusions is estimated to be 150, 25, 15 folds, respectively, lower compared with that of the standard gallic acid. Accordingly, we demonstrated that the relative antioxidant activity of young and matured leaves agrees with the intensity of red light emission of their fresh leaves upon UV excitation. Thus, this non-invasive spectroscopic method can be potentially utilized to indicate the antioxidants in plant leaves qualitatively.

  17. Demonstration of x-ray fluorescence imaging of a high-energy-density plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, M. J., E-mail: macdonm@umich.edu; Gamboa, E. J. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Keiter, P. A.; Fein, J. R.; Klein, S. R.; Kuranz, C. C.; LeFevre, H. J.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Wan, W. C.; Drake, R. P. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Montgomery, D. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biener, M. M.; Fournier, K. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Streit, J. [Schafer Corporation, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Experiments at the Trident Laser Facility have successfully demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence imaging (XRFI) to diagnose shocked carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foams doped with Ti. One laser beam created a shock wave in the doped foam. A second laser beam produced a flux of vanadium He-α x-rays, which in turn induced Ti K-shell fluorescence within the foam. Spectrally resolved 1D imaging of the x-ray fluorescence provided shock location and compression measurements. Additionally, experiments using a collimator demonstrated that one can probe specific regions within a target. These results show that XRFI is a capable alternative to path-integrated measurements for diagnosing hydrodynamic experiments at high energy density.

  18. Structured oblique illumination microscopy for enhanced resolution imaging of non-fluorescent, coherently scattering samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Dhalla, Al-Hafeez; Izatt, Joseph

    2012-08-01

    Many biological structures of interest are beyond the diffraction limit of conventional microscopes and their visualization requires application of super-resolution techniques. Such techniques have found remarkable success in surpassing the diffraction limit to achieve sub-diffraction limited resolution; however, they are predominantly limited to fluorescent samples. Here, we introduce a non-fluorescent analogue to structured illumination microscopy, termed structured oblique illumination microscopy (SOIM), where we use simultaneous oblique illuminations of the sample to multiplex high spatial-frequency content into the frequency support of the system. We introduce a theoretical framework describing how to demodulate this multiplexed information to reconstruct an image with a spatial-frequency support exceeding that of the system's classical diffraction limit. This approach allows enhanced-resolution imaging of non-fluorescent samples. Experimental confirmation of the approach is obtained in a reflection test target with moderate numerical aperture.

  19. pH-responsive biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles based on phenylboronic acid for intracellular imaging and drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengliang; Hu, Kelei; Cao, Weipeng; Sun, Yun; Sheng, Wang; Li, Feng; Wu, Yan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2014-10-01

    To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a phenylboronic acid-modified poly(lactic acid)-poly(ethyleneimine)(PLA-PEI) copolymer loaded with doxorubicin (Dox) for intracellular imaging and pH-responsive drug delivery. The nanoparticles exhibited superior fluorescence properties, such as fluorescence stability, no blinking and excitation-dependent fluorescence behavior. The Dox-loaded fluorescent nanoparticles showed pH-responsive drug release and were more effective in suppressing the proliferation of MCF-7 cells. In addition, the biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles could be used as a tool for intracellular imaging and drug delivery, and the process of endosomal escape was traced by real-time imaging. These pH-responsive and biocompatible fluorescent polymer nanoparticles, based on phenylboronic acid, are promising tools for intracellular imaging and drug delivery.To address current medical challenges, there is an urgent need to develop drug delivery systems with multiple functions, such as simultaneous stimuli-responsive drug release and real-time imaging. Biocompatible polymers have great potential for constructing smart multifunctional drug-delivery systems through grafting with other functional ligands. More importantly, novel biocompatible polymers with intrinsic fluorescence emission can work as theranostic nanomedicines for real-time imaging and drug delivery. Herein, we developed a highly fluorescent nanoparticle based on a

  20. Rapid assessment of different oxygenic phototrophs and single-cell photosynthesis with multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trampe, Erik Christian Løvbjerg; Kolbowski, J.; Schreiber, U.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new system for microscopic multicolour variable chlorophyll fluorescence imaging of aquatic phototrophs. The system is compact and portable and enables microscopic imaging of photosynthetic performance of individual cells and chloroplasts using different combinations of blue, green, ...

  1. Combined nonlinear laser imaging (two-photon excitation fluorescence, second and third-harmonic generation, and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopies) in ovarian tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adur, J.; Pelegati, V. B.; de Thomaz, A. A.; Bottcher-Luiz, F.; Andrade, L. A. L. A.; Almeida, D. B.; Carvalho, H. F.; Cesar, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    We applied Two-photon Excited Fluorescence (TPEF), Second/Third Harmonic Generation (SHG and THG) and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) Non Linear Optics (NLO) Laser-Scanning Microscopy within the same imaging platform to evaluate their use as a diagnostic tool in ovarian tumors. We assess of applicability of this multimodal approach to perform a pathological evaluation of serous and mucinous tumors in human samples. The combination of TPEF-SHG-THG imaging provided complementary information about the interface epithelium/stromal, such as the transformation of epithelium surface (THG) and the overall fibrillar tissue architecture (SHG). The fact that H&E staining is the standard method used in clinical pathology and that the stored samples are usually fixed makes it important a re-evaluation of these samples with NLO microscopy to compare new results with a library of already existing samples. FLIM, however, depends on the chemical environment around the fluorophors that was completely changed after fixation; therefore it only makes sense in unstained samples. Our FLIM results in unstained samples demonstrate that it is possible to discriminate healthy epithelia from serous or mucinous epithelia. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the different imaging modalities used showed that multimodal nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy ovarian tissue.

  2. The potential of L-shell X-ray fluorescence CT (XFCT) for molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence CT (XFCT), a novel modality proposed for high-sensitivity high-resolution molecular imaging of probes labelled with a high atomic-number element, has been performed with high-energy K-shell X-rays. XFCT performed with low-energy L-shell X-rays could, in principle, result in an increase of XFCT imaging sensitivity; however, the significant L-shell X-ray attenuation limits its use for imaging of small objects. This commentary discusses the advantages and drawbacks of L-shell XFCT imaging.

  3. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles derived from natural materials of mango fruit for bio-imaging probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Roy, Arup Kumer; Kim, Sung Han; Lee, Jung-Eun; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2014-11-01

    Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials.Water soluble fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (FCP) obtained from a single natural source, mango fruit, were developed as unique materials for non-toxic bio-imaging with different colors and particle sizes. The prepared FCPs showed blue (FCP-B), green (FCP-G) and yellow (FCP-Y) fluorescence, derived by the controlled carbonization method. The FCPs demonstrated hydrodynamic diameters of 5-15 nm, holding great promise for clinical applications. The biocompatible FCPs demonstrated great potential in biological fields through the results of in vitro imaging and in vivo biodistribution. Using intravenously administered FCPs with different colored particles, we precisely defined the clearance and biodistribution, showing rapid and efficient urinary excretion for safe elimination from the body. These findings therefore suggest the promising possibility of using natural sources for producing fluorescent materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04805a

  4. Instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umminger, K.

    2008-01-01

    A proper measurement of the relevant single and two-phase flow parameters is the basis for the understanding of many complex thermal-hydraulic processes. Reliable instrumentation is therefore necessary for the interaction between analysis and experiment especially in the field of nuclear safety research where postulated accident scenarios have to be simulated in experimental facilities and predicted by complex computer code systems. The so-called conventional instrumentation for the measurement of e. g. pressures, temperatures, pressure differences and single phase flow velocities is still a solid basis for the investigation and interpretation of many phenomena and especially for the understanding of the overall system behavior. Measurement data from such instrumentation still serves in many cases as a database for thermal-hydraulic system codes. However some special instrumentation such as online concentration measurement for boric acid in the water phase or for non-condensibles in steam atmosphere as well as flow visualization techniques were further developed and successfully applied during the recent years. Concerning the modeling needs for advanced thermal-hydraulic codes, significant advances have been accomplished in the last few years in the local instrumentation technology for two-phase flow by the application of new sensor techniques, optical or beam methods and electronic technology. This paper will give insight into the current state of instrumentation technology for safety-related thermohydraulic experiments. Advantages and limitations of some measurement processes and systems will be indicated as well as trends and possibilities for further development. Aspects of instrumentation in operating reactors will also be mentioned.

  5. Using multiphoton fluorescence lifetime imaging to characterize liver damage and fluorescein disposition in liver in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorling, Camilla A.; Studier, Hauke; Crawford, Darrell; Roberts, Michael S.

    2016-03-01

    Liver disease is the fifth most common cause of death and unlike many other major causes of mortality, liver disease rates are increasing rather than decreasing. There is no ideal measurement of liver disease and although biopsies are the gold standard, this only allows for a spot examination and cannot follow dynamic processes of the liver. Intravital imaging has the potential to extract detailed information over a larger sampling area continuously. The aim of this project was to investigate whether multiphoton and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy could detect early liver damage and to assess whether it could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein in normal and diseased livers. Four experimental groups were used in this study: 1) control; 2) ischemia reperfusion injury; 3) steatosis and 4) steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. Results showed that multiphoton microscopy could visualize morphological changes such as decreased fluorescence of endogenous fluorophores and the presence of lipid droplets, characteristic of steatosis. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy showed increase in NADPH in steatosis with and without ischemia reperfusion injury and could detect changes in metabolism of fluorescein to fluorescein monoglurcuronide, which was impaired in steatosis with ischemia reperfusion injury. These results concluded that the combination of multiphoton microscopy and fluorescence lifetime imaging is a promising method of assessing early stage liver damage and that it can be used to study changes in drug metabolism in the liver as an indication of liver disease and has the potential to replace the traditional static liver biopsy currently used.

  6. Fluorescence hyperspectral imaging technique for the foreign substance detection on fresh-cut lettuce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nondestructive methods based on fluorescence hyperspectral imaging (HSI) techniques were developed in order to detect worms on fresh-cut lettuce. The optimal wavebands for detecting worms on fresh-cut lettuce were investigated using the one-way ANOVA analysis and correlation analysis. The worm detec...

  7. Tracking viral movement in plants by means of chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pineda, M.; Olejníčková, Julie; Cséfalvay, Ladislav; Baron, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 168, č. 17 (2011), s. 2035-2040 ISSN 0176-1617 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA522/09/1565 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : biotic stress * chlorophyll fluorescence imaging * Nicotiana benthamiana * pepper mild mottle virus * Viral movement Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.791, year: 2011

  8. Optical imaging of non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in live cells using transient absorption microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Lu, Feng; Streets, Aaron M; Fei, Peng; Quan, Junmin; Huang, Yanyi

    2013-06-07

    We directly observe non-fluorescent nanodiamonds in living cells using transient absorption microscopy. This label-free technology provides a novel modality to study the dynamic behavior of nanodiamonds inside the cells with intrinsic three-dimensional imaging capability. We apply this method to capture the cellular uptake of nanodiamonds under various conditions, confirming the endocytosis mechanism.

  9. Polymerized LB Films Imaged with a Combined Atomic Force Microscope-Fluorescence Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Putman, C.A.J.; Putman, Constant A.J.; Hansma, Helen G.; Gaub, Hermann E.; Hansma, Paul K.

    1992-01-01

    The first results obtained with a new stand-alone atomic force microscope (AFM) integrated with a standard Zeiss optical fluorescence microscope are presented. The optical microscope allows location and selection of objects to be imaged with the high-resolution AFM. Furthermore, the combined

  10. Label-free in vivo imaging of human leukocytes using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence enables label-free morphological and functional imaging of various human blood cells. Specifically, we achieved distinctive morphological contrast to visualize morphology of important leukocytes, such as polymorphonuclear structure of granulocyte and mononuclear feature of agranulocyte, through the employment of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence signals. In addition, NADH fluorescence images clearly reveal the morphological transformation process of neutrophils during disease-causing bacterial infection. Our findings also show that time-resolved NADH fluorescence can be potentially used for functional imaging of the phagocytosis of pathogens by leukocytes (neutrophils) in vivo. In particular, we found that free-to-bound NADH ratios measured in infected neutrophils increased significantly, which is consistent with a previous study that the energy consumed in the phagocytosis of neutrophils is mainly generated through the glycolysis pathway that leads to the accumulation of free NADH. Future work will focus on further developing and applying label-free imaging technology to investigate leukocyte-related diseases and disorders.

  11. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  12. Near infrared fluorescence imaging of EGFR expression in vivo using IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Wendy; El-Sayed, Ayman; Barreto, Kris; Gonzalez, Carolina; Hill, Wayne; Parada, Angel Casaco; Fonge, Humphrey; Geyer, C. Ronald

    2018-01-01

    Nimotuzumab is a humanized anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) monoclonal antibody that is approved in many countries for the treatment of EGFR-positive cancers. Near infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye-labeled antibodies represent an attractive class of image-guided surgical probes because of their high specificity, tumor uptake, and low dissociation from tumor cells that express the antigen. In this study, we developed a NIR fluorescent dye-labeled nimotuzumab immunoconjugate, IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab, and evaluated in vitro binding with EGFR-positive cells, in vivo tumor uptake by NIR fluorescent imaging, and ex vivo biodistribution. There was no difference in binding between nimotuzumab and IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab to EGFR-positive cells. In mice bearing EGFR-positive xenografts, IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab uptake peaked at 4 days post injection and slowly decreased thereafter with high levels of accumulation still observed at 28 days post injection. In EGFR-positive xenografts, IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab showed more than 2-fold higher uptake in tumors compared to IRDye800CW-cetuximab. In addition, liver uptake of IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab was two-fold lower than cetuximab. The lower liver uptake of IRDye800CW-nimotuzumab could have implications on the selected dose for clinical trials of the immunoconjugate. In summary, this study shows that nimotuzumab is a good candidate for NIR fluorescent imaging and image-guided surgery. PMID:29464066

  13. Development and validation of a custom made indocyanine green fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallotta, Olivia J.; van Zanten, Malou; McEwen, Mark; Burrow, Lynne; Beesley, Jack; Piller, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Lymphoedema is a chronic progressive condition often producing significant morbidity. An in-depth understanding of an individual's lymphatic architecture is valuable both in the understanding of underlying pathology and for targeting and tailoring treatment. Severe lower limb injuries resulting in extensive loss of soft tissue require transposition of a flap consisting of muscle and/or soft tissue to close the defect. These patients are at risk of lymphoedema and little is known about lymphatic regeneration within the flap. Indocyanine green (ICG), a water-soluble dye, has proven useful for the imaging of lymphatic vessels. When injected into superficial tissues it binds to plasma proteins in lymph. By exposing the dye to specific wavelengths of light, ICG fluoresces with near-infrared light. Skin is relatively transparent to ICG fluorescence, enabling the visualization and characterization of superficial lymphatic vessels. An ICG fluorescence lymphatic vessel imager was manufactured to excite ICG and visualize real-time fluorescence as it travels through the lymphatic vessels. Animal studies showed successful ICG excitation and detection using this imager. Clinically, the imager has assisted researchers to visualize otherwise hidden superficial lymphatic pathways in patients postflap surgery. Preliminary results suggest superficial lymphatic vessels do not redevelop in muscle flaps.

  14. pH within pores in plant fiber cell walls assessed by Fluorescence Ratio Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidayat, Budi Juliman; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2013-01-01

    The pH within cell wall pores of filter paper fibers and hemp fibers was assessed by Fluorescence Ratio Imaging (FRIM). It was found that the Donnan effect affected the pH measured within the fibers. When the conductivity of the added liquid was low (0. 7 mS), pH values were lower within the cell...

  15. Novel instrumentation of multispectral imaging technology for detecting tissue abnormity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Dingrong; Kong, Linghua

    2012-10-01

    Multispectral imaging is becoming a powerful tool in a wide range of biological and clinical studies by adding spectral, spatial and temporal dimensions to visualize tissue abnormity and the underlying biological processes. A conventional spectral imaging system includes two physically separated major components: a band-passing selection device (such as liquid crystal tunable filter and diffraction grating) and a scientific-grade monochromatic camera, and is expensive and bulky. Recently micro-arrayed narrow-band optical mosaic filter was invented and successfully fabricated to reduce the size and cost of multispectral imaging devices in order to meet the clinical requirement for medical diagnostic imaging applications. However the challenging issue of how to integrate and place the micro filter mosaic chip to the targeting focal plane, i.e., the imaging sensor, of an off-shelf CMOS/CCD camera is not reported anywhere. This paper presents the methods and results of integrating such a miniaturized filter with off-shelf CMOS imaging sensors to produce handheld real-time multispectral imaging devices for the application of early stage pressure ulcer (ESPU) detection. Unlike conventional multispectral imaging devices which are bulky and expensive, the resulting handheld real-time multispectral ESPU detector can produce multiple images at different center wavelengths with a single shot, therefore eliminates the image registration procedure required by traditional multispectral imaging technologies.

  16. Airborne laser induced fluorescence imaging. Innovative technology summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-06-01

    Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) was demonstration as part of the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) Plant 1 Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area located at the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The demonstration took place on November 19, 1996. In order to allow the contaminated buildings undergoing deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) to be opened to the atmosphere, radiological surveys of floors, walls and ceilings must take place. After successful completion of the radiological clearance survey, demolition of the building can continue. Currently, this process is performed by collecting and analyzing swipe samples for radiological analysis. Two methods are used to analyze the swipe samples: hand-held frisker and laboratory analysis. For the purpose of this demonstration, the least expensive method, swipe samples analyzed by hand-held frisker, is the baseline technology. The objective of the technology demonstration was to determine if the baseline technology could be replaced using LIF

  17. A new self-made digital slide scanner and microscope for imaging and quantification of fluorescent microspheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henning, William; Bjerglund Andersen, Julie; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A low-cost microscope slide scanner was constructed for the purpose of digital imaging of newborn piglet brain tissue and to quantify fluorescent microspheres in tissue. Methods: Using a standard digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera, fluorescent imaging of newborn piglet brain tiss...

  18. Master/slave: A better tool for Gabor filtering optical coherence tomography imaging instruments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cernat, Ramona; Bradu, Adrian; Israelsen, Niels Møller

    2017-01-01

    In this report, the benefits that the Master/Slave (MS) implementation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) can bring to a Gabor filtering (GF) imaging instrument are illustrated. The MS allows simultaneous display of three categories of images in one frame: multiple depth en-face OCT images, two...

  19. Instrumental images: the visual rhetoric of self-presentation in Hevelius's Machina Coelestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertesi, Janet

    2010-06-01

    This article places the famous images of Johannes Hevelius's instruments in his Machina Coelestis (1673) in the context of Hevelius's contested cometary observations and his debate with Hooke over telescopic sights. Seen thus, the images promote a crafted vision of Hevelius's astronomical practice and skills, constituting a careful self-presentation to his distant professional network and a claim as to which instrumental techniques guarantee accurate observations. Reviewing the reception of the images, the article explores how visual rhetoric may be invoked and challenged in the context of controversy, and suggests renewed analytical attention to the role of laboratory imagery in instrumental cultures in the history of science.

  20. Characterization of E coli biofim formations on baby spinach leaf surfaces using hyperspectral fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjeong; Baek, Insuck; Oh, Mirae; Kim, Sungyoun; Lee, Hoonsoo; Kim, Moon S.

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilm formed by pathogens on fresh produce surfaces is a food safety concern because the complex extracellular matrix in the biofilm structure reduces the reduction and removal efficacies of washing and sanitizing processes such as chemical or irradiation treatments. Therefore, a rapid and nondestructive method to identify pathogenic biofilm on produce surfaces is needed to ensure safe consumption of fresh, raw produce. This research aimed to evaluate the feasibility of hyperspectral fluorescence imaging for detecting Escherichia.coli (ATCC 25922) biofilms on baby spinach leaf surfaces. Samples of baby spinach leaves were immersed and inoculated with five different levels (from 2.6x104 to 2.6x108 CFU/mL) of E.coli and stored at 4°C for 24 h and 48 h to induce biofilm formation. Following the two treatment days, individual leaves were gently washed to remove excess liquid inoculums from the leaf surfaces and imaged with a hyperspectral fluorescence imaging system equipped with UV-A (365 nm) and violet (405 nm) excitation sources to evaluate a spectral-image-based method for biofilm detection. The imaging results with the UV-A excitation showed that leaves even at early stages of biofilm formations could be differentiated from the control leaf surfaces. This preliminary investigation demonstrated the potential of fluorescence imaging techniques for detection of biofilms on leafy green surfaces.

  1. Evaluation of a new handheld instrument for the detection of counterfeit artesunate by visual fluorescence comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Nicola; Tabernero, Patricia; Green, Michael D; Verbois, Leigh; Herrington, James; Sampson, Eric; Satzger, R Duane; Phonlavong, Chindaphone; Thao, Khamxay; Newton, Paul N; Witkowski, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    There is an urgent need for accurate and inexpensive handheld instruments for the evaluation of medicine quality in the field. A blinded evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the Counterfeit Detection Device 3 (CD-3), developed by the US Food and Drug Administration Forensic Chemistry Center, was conducted in the Lao People's Democratic Republic. Two hundred three samples of the oral antimalarial artesunate were compared with authentic products using the CD-3 by a trainer and two trainees. The specificity (95% confidence interval [95% CI]), sensitivity (95% CI), positive predictive value (95% CI), and negative predictive value (95% CI) of the CD-3 for detecting counterfeit (falsified) artesunate were 100% (93.8-100%), 98.4% (93.8-99.7%), 100% (96.2-100%), and 97.4% (90.2-99.6%), respectively. Interobserver agreement for 203 samples of artesunate was 100%. The CD-3 holds promise as a relatively inexpensive and easy to use instrument for field evaluation of medicines, potentially empowering drug inspectors, customs agents, and pharmacists. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Water Soluble Fluorescent Carbon Nanodots from Biosource for Cells Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumud Malika Tripathi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanodots (CNDs derived from a green precursor, kidney beans, was synthesized with high yield via a facile pyrolysis technique. The CND material was easily modified through simple oxidative treatment with nitric acid, leading to a high density “self-passivated” water soluble form (wsCNDs. The synthesized wsCNDs have been extensively characterized by using various microscopic and spectroscopic techniques and were crystalline in nature. The highly carboxylated wsCNDs possessed tunable-photoluminescence emission behavior throughout the visible region of the spectrum, demonstrating their application for multicolor cellular imaging of HeLa cells. The tunable-photoluminescence properties of “self-passivated” wsCNDs make them a promising candidate as a probe in biological cell-imaging applications.

  3. Exploiting multimode waveguides for pure fibre based fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čižmár, TomáÅ.¡; Dholakia, Kishan

    2013-03-01

    There has been an immense drive in modern microscopy towards miniaturisation and _bre based technology. This has been necessitated by the need to access hostile or difficult environments particulalrly in-situ and in-vivo. Strategies to date have included the use of specialist fibres and miniaturised scanning systems accompanied by ingenious microfabricated lenses. In parallel recent studies of randomized light fields and their holographic control opened up new ways for imaging. We present a novel approach for this field by utilising disordered light within a standard multimode optical fibre for minimally invasive lenseless microscopy and optical mode conversion. We demonstrate scanning uorescence microscopy at acquisition rates allowing observation of dynamic processes such as Brownian motion of mesoscopic particles. As the sample plane can be defined at any distance from the fibre facet, we eliminate the need for complex or elaborate focusing optics (e.g. miniaturized objectives, GRIN lenses) and instead reconfigure the system dynamically to image different axial planes. Furthermore, we show how such control can realise a new form of mode converter and generate various types of advanced light fields such as propagation-invariant beams and optical vortices. These may be useful for future fibre based implementations of super-resolution or light sheet microscopy. To the best of our knowledge, this technology represents the narrowest possible image guiding system based on light propagation.

  4. Contraction of gut smooth muscle cells assessed by fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei Tokita

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we discuss the development of a novel cell imaging system for the evaluation of smooth muscle cell (SMC contraction. SMCs were isolated from the circular and longitudinal muscular layers of mouse small intestine by enzymatic digestion. SMCs were stimulated by test agents, thereafter fixed in acrolein. Actin in fixed SMCs was stained with phalloidin and cell length was determined by measuring diameter at the large end of phalloidin-stained strings within the cells. The contractile response was taken as the decrease in the average length of a population of stimulated-SMCs. Various mediators and chemically identified compounds of daikenchuto (DKT, pharmaceutical-grade traditional Japanese prokinetics, were examined. Verification of the integrity of SMC morphology by phalloidin and DAPI staining and semi-automatic measurement of cell length using an imaging analyzer was a reliable method by which to quantify the contractile response. Serotonin, substance P, prostaglandin E2 and histamine induced SMC contraction in concentration-dependent manner. Two components of DKT, hydroxy-α-sanshool and hydroxy-β-sanshool, induced contraction of SMCs. We established a novel cell imaging technique to evaluate SMC contractility. This method may facilitate investigation into SMC activity and its role in gastrointestinal motility, and may assist in the discovery of new prokinetic agents.

  5. Quantum dots in bioanalysis: a review of applications across various platforms for fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryayeva, Eleonora; Algar, W Russ; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are brightly luminescent nanoparticles that have found numerous applications in bioanalysis and bioimaging. In this review, we highlight recent developments in these areas in the context of specific methods for fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. Following a primer on the structure, properties, and biofunctionalization of QDs, we describe select examples of how QDs have been used in combination with steady-state or time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to develop a variety of assays, bioprobes, and biosensors that function via changes in QD photoluminescence intensity, polarization, or lifetime. Some special attention is paid to the use of Förster resonance energy transfer-type methods in bioanalysis, including those based on bioluminescence and chemiluminescence. Direct chemiluminescence, electrochemiluminescence, and charge transfer quenching are similarly discussed. We further describe the combination of QDs and flow cytometry, including traditional cellular analyses and spectrally encoded barcode-based assay technologies, before turning our attention to enhanced fluorescence techniques based on photonic crystals or plasmon coupling. Finally, we survey the use of QDs across different platforms for biological fluorescence imaging, including epifluorescence, confocal, and two-photon excitation microscopy; single particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy; super-resolution imaging; near-field scanning optical microscopy; and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In each of the above-mentioned platforms, QDs provide the brightness needed for highly sensitive detection, the photostability needed for tracking dynamic processes, or the multiplexing capacity needed to elucidate complex systems. There is a clear synergy between advances in QD materials and spectroscopy and imaging techniques, as both must be applied in concert to achieve their full potential.

  6. Monosodium glutamate derived tricolor fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for cell-imaging application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nannan; Ding, Sha; Zhou, Xingping

    2016-06-01

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN) is a new type of carbon-based materials. Because of its wide raw material sources, excellent optical properties and good biocompatibility, FCN is getting more and more attentions. However, its synthesis from resources at low cost under mild conditions is still a challenge. Here we report a novel and simple method derived from monosodium glutamate carbonization to make tricolor fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with an average size below 10nm, a high yield up to 35.2% based on the carbon content in the resource, a long life-time of 3.71ns, and a high fluorescence quantum yield up to 51.5% by using quinine sulfate as the standard substance. We discovered that the fluorescent stability of the FCNs was very excellent under UV irradiation for hours in aqueous solutions of pH ranged from 2.0 to 9.0. The cell viability tested under a pretty high concentration of FCNs indicated their safety for biological applications. Based on their high fluorescence quantum efficiency and the advantages mentioned above, these FCNs were then used for cell imaging and exhibited a perfect performance under 3 kinds of excitation bands (UV, blue, and green lights). Thus, they can be practically applied to immune labeling and imaging in vivo in the near future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. CVD grown 2D MoS2 layers: A photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oezden, Ayberk; Madenoglu, Buesra; Sar, Hueseyin; Ay, Feridun; Perkgoez, Nihan Kosku; Yeltik, Aydan; Sevik, Cem

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we report on the fluorescence lifetime imaging and accompanying photoluminescence properties of a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) grown atomically thin material, MoS 2 . μ-Raman, μ-photoluminescence (PL) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) are utilized to probe the fluorescence lifetime and photoluminescence properties of individual flakes of MoS 2 films. Usage of these three techniques allows identification of the grown layers, grain boundaries, structural defects and their relative effects on the PL and fluorescence lifetime spectra. Our investigation on individual monolayer flakes reveals a clear increase of the fluorescence lifetime from 0.3 ns to 0.45 ns at the edges with respect to interior region. On the other hand, investigation of the film layer reveals quenching of PL intensity and lifetime at the grain boundaries. These results could be important for applications where the activity of edges is important such as in photocatalytic water splitting. Finally, it has been demonstrated that PL mapping and FLIM are viable techniques for the investigation of the grain-boundaries. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. A visible-light-excited fluorescence method for imaging protein crystals without added dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, Tiit; Gillilan, Richard E.; Szebenyi, Doletha M. E.; Zipfel, Warren R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy methods have seen an increase in popularity in recent years for detecting protein crystals in screening trays. The fluorescence-based crystal detection methods have thus far relied on intrinsic UV-inducible tryptophan fluorescence, nonlinear optics or fluorescence in the visible light range dependent on crystals soaked with fluorescent dyes. In this paper data are presented on a novel visible-light-inducible autofluorescence arising from protein crystals as a result of general stabilization of conjugated double-bond systems and increased charge delocalization due to crystal packing. The visible-light-inducible autofluorescence serves as a complementary method to bright-field microscopy in beamline applications where accurate crystal centering about the rotation axis is essential. Owing to temperature-dependent chromophore stabilization, protein crystals exhibit tenfold higher fluorescence intensity at cryogenic temperatures, making the method ideal for experiments where crystals are cooled to 100 K with a cryostream. In addition to the non-damaging excitation wavelength and low laser power required for imaging, the method can also serve a useful role for differentiating protein crystals from salt crystals in screening trays. PMID:26937240

  9. Monitoring changes in whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored under modified atmosphere packaging by front face fluorescence spectroscopy and instrumental techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoun, Abdo; Karoui, Romdhane

    2016-06-01

    Quality assessment of whiting (Merlangius merlangus) fillets stored in normal air (control group) and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP1: 50% N2/50% CO2 and MAP2: 80% N2/20% CO2) for up to 15 days at 4 °C was performed. The physico-chemical [pH, drip loss, moisture content, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide value (PV)], textural (i.e., hardness, fragility, gumminess, chewiness, springiness, cohesiveness), and color (i.e., L(∗), a(∗), b(∗)) parameters were determined. Front face fluorescence spectroscopy (FFFS) emission spectra were also scanned on the same samples with excitation set at 290 and 360 nm. The results indicated that MAP treatment, particularly MAP1 had an obvious preservative effect on fish quality by reducing pH value, TBARS and TVB-N contents, and retarding the softening of fish texture compared to control samples. Principal component analysis (PCA) applied to physico-chemical and instrumental data sets showed a clear discrimination of fish samples according to both their storage time and condition. A complete (100%) of correct classification was obtained by the concatenation of spectral, physico-chemical, and instrumental data sets. The results demonstrated that storage under MAP can be recommended to improve quality of whiting fillets, which in turn, can be evaluated by FFFS as a rapid and non-destructive technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Direct Vpr-Vpr Interaction in Cells monitored by two Photon Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mély Yves

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 encodes several regulatory proteins, notably Vpr which influences the survival of the infected cells by causing a G2/M arrest and apoptosis. Such an important role of Vpr in HIV-1 disease progression has fuelled a large number of studies, from its 3D structure to the characterization of specific cellular partners. However, no direct imaging and quantification of Vpr-Vpr interaction in living cells has yet been reported. To address this issue, eGFP- and mCherry proteins were tagged by Vpr, expressed in HeLa cells and their interaction was studied by two photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Results Results show that Vpr forms homo-oligomers at or close to the nuclear envelope. Moreover, Vpr dimers and trimers were found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Point mutations in the three α helices of Vpr drastically impaired Vpr oligomerization and localization at the nuclear envelope while point mutations outside the helical regions had no effect. Theoretical structures of Vpr mutants reveal that mutations within the α-helices could perturb the leucine zipper like motifs. The ΔQ44 mutation has the most drastic effect since it likely disrupts the second helix. Finally, all Vpr point mutants caused cell apoptosis suggesting that Vpr-mediated apoptosis functions independently from Vpr oligomerization. Conclusion We report that Vpr oligomerization in HeLa cells relies on the hydrophobic core formed by the three α helices. This oligomerization is required for Vpr localization at the nuclear envelope but not for Vpr-mediated apoptosis.

  11. Instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buehrer, W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-12-31

    The present paper mediates a basic knowledge of the most commonly used experimental techniques. We discuss the principles and concepts necessary to understand what one is doing if one performs an experiment on a certain instrument. (author) 29 figs., 1 tab., refs.

  12. Human induced pluripotent stem cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for targeted imaging and hyperthermia therapy for gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chao; Ruan, Jing; Yang, Meng; Pan, Fei; Gao, Guo; Qu, Su; Shen, You-Lan; Dang, Yong-Jun; Wang, Kan; Jin, Wei-Lin; Cui, Da-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells exhibit great potential for generating functional human cells for medical therapies. In this paper, we report for use of human iPS cells labeled with fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMNPs) for targeted imaging and synergistic therapy of gastric cancer cells in vivo. Human iPS cells were prepared and cultured for 72 h. The culture medium was collected, and then was co-incubated with MGC803 cells. Cell viability was analyzed by the MTT method. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells were prepared and injected into gastric cancer-bearing nude mice. The mouse model was observed using a small-animal imaging system. The nude mice were irradiated under an external alternating magnetic field and evaluated using an infrared thermal mapping instrument. Tumor sizes were measured weekly. iPS cells and the collected culture medium inhibited the growth of MGC803 cells. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells targeted and imaged gastric cancer cells in vivo, as well as inhibited cancer growth in vivo through the external magnetic field. FMNP-labeled human iPS cells exhibit considerable potential in applications such as targeted dual-mode imaging and synergistic therapy for early gastric cancer

  13. A Review of Instruments for Assessing Body Image in Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Zamora, Cristina; Navas, Leandro

    2017-01-01

    Society has produced many idealized and unattainable standards of beauty. These may be internalized by young children, increasing the risk of body dissatisfaction, which is the strongest predictor of eating disorders. Prompted by this concern, the aim of the present research was to identify and analyze the instruments that have been used to…

  14. Combined phase and X-Ray fluorescence imaging at the sub-cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosior, Ewelina

    2013-01-01

    This work presents some recent developments in the field of hard X-ray imaging applied to biomedical research. As the discipline is evolving quickly, new questions appear and the list of needs becomes bigger. Some of them are dealt with in this manuscript. It has been shown that the ID22NI beamline of the ESRF can serve as a proper experimental setup to investigate diverse aspects of cellular research. Together with its high spatial resolution, high flux and high energy range the experimental setup provides bigger field of view, is less sensitive to radiation damages (while taking phase contrast images) and suits well chemical analysis with emphasis on endogenous metals (Zn, Fe, Mn) but also with a possibility for exogenous one's like these found in nanoparticles (Au, Pt, Ag) study. Two synchrotron-based imaging techniques, fluorescence and phase contrast imaging were used in this research project. They were correlated with each other on a number of biological cases, from bacteria E.coli to various cells (HEK 293, PC12, MRC5VA, red blood cells). The explorations made in the chapter 5 allowed preparation of more established and detailed analysis, described in the next chapter where both techniques, X-ray fluorescence and phase contrast imaging, were exploited in order to access absolute metal projected mass fraction in a whole cell. The final image presents for the first time true quantitative information at the sub-cellular level, not biased by the cell thickness. Thus for the first time a fluorescence map serves as a complete quantitative image of a cell without any risk of misinterpretation. Once both maps are divided by each other pixel by pixel (fluorescence map divided by the phase map) they present a complete and final result of the metal (Zn in this work) projected mass fraction in ppm of dry weight. For the purpose of this calculation the analysis was extended to calibration (non-biological) samples. Polystyrene spheres of a known diameter and known

  15. Prototype of a Laser-Induced Fluorescence Ground-Based Instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Iodine Monoxide (IO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlow, M. E.; Co, D. T.; Hanisco, T. F.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer: (1) IO participates in depletion episodes of O3 and in the removal of mercury in the Arctic polar spring by enhancing atomic Br mixing ratios. Recent observations and computer simulations suggest that mercury sequestration is closely tied to halogen photochemistry and that gaseous atomic Hg depletion can be enhanced significantly by the presence of small amounts of iodine-containing compounds. (2) IO and higher- order iodine oxides are involved in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments. Studies using smog chamber experiments simulating coastal atmospheric conditions have demonstrated that new particles can form from condensable iodine-containing vapors and that their concentrations over the open ocean are sufficient to influence marine particle formation. (3) IO has also been shown to affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere by altering the partitioning of NO2/NO and HO2/HO and by activating chlorine and bromine in sea salt aerosols. In the stratosphere, these same processes can lead to enhanced ozone loss rates. Detailed photochemical models that include iodine photochemistry, however, are hampered by the lack of observational data. The distribution of IO in vertical, horizontal, and temporal coordinates is unknown, so the impact of IO on global photochemistry cannot be predicted. The resolution of these important scientific issues requires an in situ IO instrument. A fully functional nanosecond Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser system and a prototype IO ground-based instrument have been built in our lab. With the current setup, the laser system was situated 10 m from the field station, and the laser light was coupled via an optical fiber. With the use of highly efficient fluorescence detection optics and photon counting techniques, sensitivities of better than 0.1 ppt in 1 s for IO was achieved in the

  16. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of lipids during 3T3-L1 cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young Sik; Won, Young Jae; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Dug Young

    2014-03-01

    Obesity is becoming a big health problem in these days. Since increased body weight is due to increased number and size of the triglyceride-storing adipocytes, many researchers are working on differentiation conditions and processes of adipocytes. Adipocytes also work as regulators of whole-body energy homeostasis by secreting several proteins that regulate processes as diverse as haemostasis, blood pressure, immune function, angiogenesis and energy balance. 3T3-L1 cells are widely used cell line for studying adipogenesis because it can differentiate into an adipocyte-like phenotype under appropriate conditions. In this paper, we propose an effective fluorescence lifetime imaging technique which can easily distinguish lipids in membrane and those in lipid droplets. Nile red dyes are attached to lipids in 3T3-L1 cells. Fluorescence lifetime images were taken for 2 week during differentiation procedure of 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes. We used 488 nm pulsed laser with 5MHz repetition rate and emission wavelength is 520 nm of Nile Red fluorescent dye. Results clearly show that the lifetime of Nile red in lipid droplets are smaller than those in cell membrane. Our results suggest that fluorescence lifetime imaging can be a very powerful tool to monitor lipid droplet formation in adipocytes from 3T3-L1 cells.

  17. Leaf Gas Exchange and Chlorophyll a Fluorescence Imaging of Rice Leaves Infected with Monographella albescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatagiba, Sandro Dan; DaMatta, Fábio Murilo; Rodrigues, Fabrício Ávila

    2015-02-01

    This study was intended to analyze the photosynthetic performance of rice leaf blades infected with Monographella albescens by combining chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence images with gas exchange and photosynthetic pigment pools. The net CO2 assimilation rate, stomatal conductance, transpiration rate, total Chl and carotenoid pools, and Chl a/b ratio all decreased but the internal CO2 concentration increased in the inoculated plants compared with their noninoculated counterparts. The first detectable changes in the images of Chl a fluorescence from the leaves of inoculated plants were already evident at 24 h after inoculation (hai) and increased dramatically as the leaf scald lesions expanded. However, these changes were negligible for the photosystem II photochemical efficiency (Fv/Fm) at 24 hai, in contrast to other Chl fluorescence traits such as the photochemical quenching coefficient, yield of photochemistry, and yield for dissipation by downregulation; which, therefore, were much more sensitive than the Fv/Fm ratio in assessing the early stages of fungal infection. It was also demonstrated that M. albescens was able to impair the photosynthetic process in both symptomatic and asymptomatic leaf areas. Overall, it was proven that Chl a fluorescence imaging is an excellent tool to describe the loss of functionality of the photosynthetic apparatus occurring in rice leaves upon infection by M. albescens.

  18. In vivo self-bio-imaging of tumors through in situ biosynthesized fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianling; Zhang, Gen; Li, Qiwei; Jiang, Hui; Liu, Chongyang; Amatore, Christian; Wang, Xuemei

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging in vivo allows non-invasive tumor diagnostic thus permitting a direct monitoring of cancer therapies progresses. It is established herein that fluorescent gold nanoclusters are spontaneously biosynthesized by cancerous cell (i.e., HepG2, human hepatocarcinoma cell line; K562, leukemia cell line) incubated with micromolar chloroauric acid solutions, a biocompatible molecular Au(III) species. Gold nanoparticles form by Au(III) reduction inside cells cytoplasms and ultimately concentrate around their nucleoli, thus affording precise cell imaging. Importantly, this does not occur in non-cancerous cells, as evidenced with human embryo liver cells (L02) used as controls. This dichotomy is exploited for a new strategy for in vivo self-bio-imaging of tumors. Subcutaneous injections of millimolar chloroauric acid solution near xenograft tumors of the nude mouse model of hepatocellular carcinoma or chronic myeloid leukemia led to efficient biosynthesis of fluorescent gold nanoclusters without significant dissemination to the surrounding normal tissues, hence allowing specific fluorescent self-bio-marking of the tumors.

  19. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  20. Ambient light effect on the uniformity of image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, YaFeng; Chang, BenKang; Sun, LianJun; Zhang, JunJu; Gao, YouTang; Fu, RongGuo

    2008-02-01

    When testing the uniformity of Image intensifier fluorescence screen brightness, the million scale CCD brightness meter is used. Due to the distance between the meter and fluorescence screen, the effect of ambient light on the testing result is essential to the design of testing system. Test with super second generation tube, input a constant voltage to insure the fluorescence screen brightness to be constant. Collect the brightness of the same fluorescence screen in different ambient luminance environment of 1×102Lx, 1×101Lx, 1Lx, 1×10-1Lx, 1×10-2Lx, 1×10-3Lx. Study the results with software MATLAB. It is concluded as: In ambient luminance environment of 1×10-1Lx the CCD has the best result. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of above 1×103Lx show untrue image. The testing result in ambient luminance environment of below 1×10-3Lx shows its own noise image and is unbelievable either.

  1. Improved optical sub-systems for intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioux, Sylvain; Degrand, Alec M.; Lee, Deborah S.; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Idoine, John D.; Lomnes, Stephen J.; Frangioni, John V.

    2005-11-01

    Near-infrared light propagation through living tissue provides promising opportunities for the development of non-invasive imaging techniques for human care. We have developed a Fluorescence-Assisted Resection and Exploration (FLARE) imaging system for surgery. The FLARE system uses invisible near-infrared light to help the surgeon visualize critical structures intraoperatively and in real-time. We present here the continued optimization of our imaging system from a research prototype to an efficient and ergonomic tool to be used during human surgery. New, hands-free operation enables the surgeon to zoom, focus, recall and save images through a footswitch. A LabVIEW curve-fitting algorithm, in combination with stepper motor control, provides auto-focus capability. Cardiac and/or respiratory gating minimizes motion artifacts of moving objects in the surgical field, and permits in-focus imaging during long fluorescence integration times. Automated subtraction of the near-infrared fluorescence signal from background reflections minimizes the effect of ambient illumination and improves the contrast to noise ratio with only moderate effects on intensity precision. Taken together, this study improves several optical components of the FLARE system, and helps ready it for human clinical testing.

  2. Hyperbranched conjugated polyelectrolyte for dual-modality fluorescence and magnetic resonance cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Wang, Guan; Liu, Jianzhao; Li, Kai; Pu, Kan-Yi; Hu, Yong; Ng, Jason C Y; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2012-11-19

    Herein is reported the synthesis of gadolinium ion (Gd(III))-chelated hyperbranched conjugated polyelectrolyte (HCPE-Gd) and its application in fluorescence and magnetic resonance (MR) dual imaging in live animals. The synthesized HCPE-Gd forms nanospheres with an average diameter of ∼42 nm measured by laser light scattering and a quantum yield of 10% in aqueous solution. The absorption spectrum of HCPE-Gd has two maxima at 318 and 417 nm, and its photoluminescence maximum centers at 591 nm. Confocal laser scanning microscopy studies indicate that the HCPE-Gd is internalized in MCF-7 cancer cell cytoplasm with good photostability and low cytotoxicity. Further fluorescence and MR imaging studies on hepatoma H22 tumor-bearing mouse model reveal that HCPE-Gd can serve as an efficient optical/MR dual-modal imaging nanoprobe for in vivo cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Three-dimensional super-resolution imaging for fluorescence emission difference microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shangting You

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method theoretically to break the diffraction limit and to improve the resolution in all three dimensions for fluorescence emission difference microscopy. We produce two kinds of hollow focal spot by phase modulation. By incoherent superposition, these two kinds of focal spot yield a 3D hollow focal spot. The optimal proportion of these two kinds of spot is given in the paper. By employing 3D hollow focal spot, super-resolution image can be yielded by means of fluorescence emission difference microscopy, with resolution enhanced both laterally and axially. According to computation result, size of point spread function of three-dimensional super-resolution imaging is reduced by about 40% in all three spatial directions with respect to confocal imaging.

  4. Diffraction enhanced imaging and x-ray fluorescence microtomography for analyzing biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, H.S.; Pereira, G.R.; Lopes, R.T. [Laboratorio de Instrumentacao Nuclear-COPPE/UFRJ-RJ (Brazil); Anjos, M.J. [Instituto de Fisica-UERJ-RJ (Brazil); Faria, P. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer-INCa-RJ (Brazil); Kellermann, G.; Perez, C.A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron-Campinas-SP (Brazil); Tirao, G. [Faculdad de Mat. Astronomia y Fisica (FAMAF), UNC. Cordoba (Argentina); Mazzaro, I. [Laboratorio de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao-UFPR-Curitiba-PR (Brazil); Giles, C. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia Aplicada e Raios X-UNICAMP-Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-07-15

    In this work, breast tissue samples were investigated in order to verify the distribution of certain elements by x-ray fluorescence computed tomography (XRFCT) correlated with the characteristics and pathology of each tissue observed by diffraction enhanced imaging (DEI). The DEI system can show details in low attenuation tissues. It is based on the contrast imaging obtained by extinction, diffraction and refraction characteristics and can improve reduction in false positive and false negative diagnoses. XRFCT allows mapping of all elements within the sample, since even a minute fluorescence signal can be detected. DEI imaging techniques revealed the complex structure of the disease, confirmed by the histological section, and showed microstructures in all planes of the sample. The XRFCT showed the distribution of Zn, Cu and Fe at higher concentration. (authors)

  5. Synthesis and cell imaging applications of fluorescent mono/di/tri-heterocyclyl-2,6-dicyanoanilines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisal, Mahesh M; Annadate, Ritesh A; Athalye, Meghana C; Kumar, Deepak; Chavan, Subhash P; Sarkar, Dhiman; Borate, Hanumant B

    2017-02-15

    Synthesis of 3,4,5-triheterocyclyl-2,6-dicyanoanilines, starting from heterocyclic aldehydes and 1,2-diheterocycle-substituted ethanones, is described. 2,6-Dicyanoanilines with one or two heterocyclic substituents have also been synthesized. It was found that some of these molecules have selective cell-staining properties useful for cell imaging applications. The compounds 1g, 10f and 11 were found to stain cytoplasm of the cells in contact but not the nucleus while the compound 12 showed affinity to apoptotic cells resulting in blue fluorescence. The cell imaging results with compound 12 were similar to Annexin V-FITC, a known reagent containing recombinant Annexin V conjugated to green-fluorescent FITC dye, used for detection of apoptotic cells. These compounds were found to be non-cytotoxic and have potential application as cell imaging agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. High-End CMOS Active Pixel Sensors For Space-Borne Imaging Instruments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bogaerts, Jan; Lepage, Gerald; Dantes, Didier

    2005-01-01

    ...) offer great promise for use in space-borne imaging instruments. This paper highlights present-day high-end CMOS APS sensors and sketches their advantages with respect to their CCD counterparts...

  7. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) Instrument: Role, Performance, and Status

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bidwell, S. W; Flaming, G. M; Durning, J. F; Smith, E. A

    2005-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument is a multi-channel, conical-scanning, microwave radiometer serving an essential role in the near-global-coverage and frequent-revisit-time requirements of GPM...

  8. 3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

    2007-02-01

    A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

  9. Enhanced simulator software for image validation and interpretation for multimodal localization super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdélyi, Miklós; Sinkó, József; Gajdos, Tamás.; Novák, Tibor

    2017-02-01

    Optical super-resolution techniques such as single molecule localization have become one of the most dynamically developed areas in optical microscopy. These techniques routinely provide images of fixed cells or tissues with sub-diffraction spatial resolution, and can even be applied for live cell imaging under appropriate circumstances. Localization techniques are based on the precise fitting of the point spread functions (PSF) to the measured images of stochastically excited, identical fluorescent molecules. These techniques require controlling the rate between the on, off and the bleached states, keeping the number of active fluorescent molecules at an optimum value, so their diffraction limited images can be detected separately both spatially and temporally. Because of the numerous (and sometimes unknown) parameters, the imaging system can only be handled stochastically. For example, the rotation of the dye molecules obscures the polarization dependent PSF shape, and only an averaged distribution - typically estimated by a Gaussian function - is observed. TestSTORM software was developed to generate image stacks for traditional localization microscopes, where localization meant the precise determination of the spatial position of the molecules. However, additional optical properties (polarization, spectra, etc.) of the emitted photons can be used for further monitoring the chemical and physical properties (viscosity, pH, etc.) of the local environment. The image stack generating program was upgraded by several new features, such as: multicolour, polarization dependent PSF, built-in 3D visualization, structured background. These features make the program an ideal tool for optimizing the imaging and sample preparation conditions.

  10. Multi-scale fluorescence imaging of bacterial infections in animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2013-03-01

    Tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), currently affects roughly one-third of the world's population. Drug resistant strains of Mtb decrease the effectiveness of current therapeutics and demand the development of new antimicrobial therapies. In addition, the current vaccine, Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), has variable efficacy for disease prevention in different populations. Animal studies are often limited by the need to sacrifice at discrete time points for pathology and tissue homogenization, which greatly reduces spatial and temporal resolution. Optical imaging offers the potential for a minimally-invasive solution to imaging on a macroscopic and microscopic scale, allowing for high resolution study of infection. We have integrated a fluorescence microendoscope into a whole-animal optical imaging system, allowing for simultaneous microscopic and macroscopic imaging of tdTomato expressing BCG in vivo. A 535 nm LED was collimated and launched into a 10,000 element fiber bundle with an outer diameter of 0.66 mm. The fiber bundle can be inserted through an intra-tracheal catheter into the lung of a mouse. Fluorescence emission can either be (1) collected by the bundle and imaged onto the surface of a CCD camera for localized detection or (2) the fluorescence can be imaged by the whole animal imaging system providing macroscopic information. Results from internal localized excitation and external whole body detection indicate the potential for imaging bacterial infections down to 100 colony forming units. This novel imaging technique has the potential to allow for functional studies, enhancing the ability to assess new therapeutic agents.

  11. Potential Application of Fluorescence Imaging for Assessing Fecal Contamination of Soil and Compost Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjeong Cho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic microorganisms can lead to serious outbreaks of foodborne illnesses, particularly if fresh produce becomes contaminated and then happens to be inappropriately handled in a manner that can incubate pathogens. Pathogenic microbial contamination of produce can occur through a variety of pathways, such as from the excrement of domesticated and wild animals, biological soil amendment, agricultural water, worker health and hygiene, and field tools used during growth and harvest. The use of mature manure compost and preventative control of fecal contamination from wildlife and livestock are subject to safety standards to minimize the risk of foodborne illness associated with produce. However, in a field production environment, neither traces of animal feces nor the degree of maturity of manure compost can be identified by the naked eye. In this study, we investigated hyperspectral fluorescence imaging techniques to characterize fecal samples from bovine, swine, poultry, and sheep species, and to determine feasibilities for both detecting the presence of animal feces as well as identifying the species origin of the feces in mixtures of soil and feces. In addition, the imaging techniques were evaluated for assessing the maturity of manure compost. The animal feces exhibited dynamic and unique fluorescence emission features that allowed for the detection of the presence of feces and showed that identification of the species origin of fecal matter present in soil-feces mixtures is feasible. Furthermore, the results indicate that using simple single-band fluorescence imaging at the fluorescence emission maximum for animal feces, simpler than full-spectrum hyperspectral fluorescence imaging, can be used to assess the maturity of manure compost.

  12. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boutet, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  13. The Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) Instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutet, Sebastien; Williams, Garth J.; /SLAC

    2011-08-16

    The Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) has become the first ever operational hard X-ray Free Electron Laser in 2009. It will operate as a user facility capable of delivering unique research opportunities in multiple fields of science. The LCLS and the LCLS Ultrafast Science Instruments (LUSI) construction projects are developing instruments designed to make full use of the capabilities afforded by the LCLS beam. One such instrument is being designed to utilize the LCLS coherent beam to image with high resolution any sub-micron object. This instrument is called the Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) instrument. This instrument will provide a flexible optical system capable of tailoring key beam parameters for the users. A suite of shot-to-shot diagnostics will also be provided to characterize the beam on every pulse. The provided instrumentation will include multi-purpose sample environments, sample delivery and a custom detector capable of collecting 2D data at 120 Hz. In this article, the LCLS will be briefly introduced along with the technique of Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI). A few examples of scientific opportunities using the CXI instrument will be described. Finally, the conceptual layout of the instrument will be presented along with a description of the key requirements for the overall system and specific devices required.

  14. Video Object Tracking in Neural Axons with Fluorescence Microscopy Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Yuan

    2014-01-01

    tracking. In this paper, we describe two automated tracking methods for analyzing neurofilament movement based on two different techniques: constrained particle filtering and tracking-by-detection. First, we introduce the constrained particle filtering approach. In this approach, the orientation and position of a particle are constrained by the axon’s shape such that fewer particles are necessary for tracking neurofilament movement than object tracking techniques based on generic particle filtering. Secondly, a tracking-by-detection approach to neurofilament tracking is presented. For this approach, the axon is decomposed into blocks, and the blocks encompassing the moving neurofilaments are detected by graph labeling using Markov random field. Finally, we compare two tracking methods by performing tracking experiments on real time-lapse image sequences of neurofilament movement, and the experimental results show that both methods demonstrate good performance in comparison with the existing approaches, and the tracking accuracy of the tracing-by-detection approach is slightly better between the two.

  15. Automatic classification of minimally invasive instruments based on endoscopic image sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speidel, Stefanie; Benzko, Julia; Krappe, Sebastian; Sudra, Gunther; Azad, Pedram; Müller-Stich, Beat Peter; Gutt, Carsten; Dillmann, Rüdiger

    2009-02-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is nowadays a frequently applied technique and can be regarded as a major breakthrough in surgery. The surgeon has to adopt special operation-techniques and deal with difficulties like the complex hand-eye coordination and restricted mobility. To alleviate these constraints we propose to enhance the surgeon's capabilities by providing a context-aware assistance using augmented reality techniques. To analyze the current situation for context-aware assistance, we need intraoperatively gained sensor data and a model of the intervention. A situation consists of information about the performed activity, the used instruments, the surgical objects, the anatomical structures and defines the state of an intervention for a given moment in time. The endoscopic images provide a rich source of information which can be used for an image-based analysis. Different visual cues are observed in order to perform an image-based analysis with the objective to gain as much information as possible about the current situation. An important visual cue is the automatic recognition of the instruments which appear in the scene. In this paper we present the classification of minimally invasive instruments using the endoscopic images. The instruments are not modified by markers. The system segments the instruments in the current image and recognizes the instrument type based on three-dimensional instrument models.

  16. Prototyping a Global Soft X-Ray Imaging Instrument for Heliophysics, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Sibeck, D. G.; Carter, J. A.; Chiao, M. P.; Chornay, D. J.; Cravens, T.; Galeazzi, M.; Keller, J. W.; Koutroumpa, D.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We describe current progress in the development of a prototype wide field-of-view soft X-ray imager that employs Lobstereye optics and targets heliophysics, planetary, and astrophysics science. The prototype will provide proof-of-concept for a future flight instrument capable of imaging the entire dayside magnetosheath from outside the magnetosphere. Such an instrument was proposed for the ESA AXIOM mission.

  17. PARPi-FL - a Fluorescent PARP1 Inhibitor for Glioblastoma Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Irwin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available New intravital optical imaging technologies have revolutionized our understanding of mammalian biology and continue to evolve rapidly. However, there are only a limited number of imaging probes available to date. In this study, we investigated in mouse models of glioblastoma whether a fluorescent small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair enzyme PARP1, PARPi-FL, can be used as an imaging agent to detect glioblastomas in vivo. We demonstrated that PARPi-FL has appropriate biophysical properties, low toxicity at concentrations used for imaging, high stability in vivo, and accumulates selectively in glioblastomas due to high PARP1 expression. Importantly, subcutaneous and orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts were imaged with high contrast clearly defining tumor tissue from normal surrounding tissue. This research represents a step toward exploring and developing PARPi-FL as an optical intraoperative imaging agent for PARP1 in the clinic.

  18. Imaging multimodalities for dissecting Alzheimer’s disease: advanced technologies of positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi eShimojo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid progress in advanced imaging technologies has expanded our toolbox for monitoring a variety of biological aspects in living subjects including human. In vivo radiological imaging using small chemical tracers, such as with positron emission tomography, represents an especially vital breakthrough in the efforts to improve our understanding of the complicated cascade of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD, and it has provided the most reliable visible biomarkers for enabling clinical diagnosis. At the same time, in combination with genetically modified animal model systems, the most recent innovation of fluorescence imaging is helping establish diverse applications in basic neuroscience research, from single-molecule analysis to animal behavior manipulation, suggesting the potential utility of fluorescence technology for dissecting the detailed molecular-based consequence of AD pathophysiology. In this review, our primary focus is on a current update of PET radiotracers and fluorescence indicators beneficial for understanding the AD cascade, and discussion of the utility and pitfalls of those imaging modalities for future translational research applications. We will also highlight current cutting-edge genetic approaches and discuss how to integrate individual technologies for further potential innovations.

  19. Characterization of Fluorescent Proteins for Three- and Four-Color Live-Cell Imaging in S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi-Sanabria, Ryo; Garcia, Enrique J; Tomoiaga, Delia; Munteanu, Emilia L; Feinstein, Paul; Pon, Liza A

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae are widely used for imaging fluorescently tagged protein fusions. Fluorescent proteins can easily be inserted into yeast genes at their chromosomal locus, by homologous recombination, for expression of tagged proteins at endogenous levels. This is especially useful for incorporation of multiple fluorescent protein fusions into a single strain, which can be challenging in organisms where genetic manipulation is more complex. However, the availability of optimal fluorescent protein combinations for 3-color imaging is limited. Here, we have characterized a combination of fluorescent proteins, mTFP1/mCitrine/mCherry for multicolor live cell imaging in S. cerevisiae. This combination can be used with conventional blue dyes, such as DAPI, for potential four-color live cell imaging.

  20. Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging During Robot-assisted Laparoscopic Sentinel Node Biopsy: A First Step Towards a Fluorescence-based Anatomic Roadmap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Nynke S; Buckle, Tessa; KleinJan, Gijs H; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2017-07-01

    During (robot-assisted) sentinel node (SN) biopsy procedures, intraoperative fluorescence imaging can be used to enhance radioguided SN excision. For this combined pre- and intraoperative SN identification was realized using the hybrid SN tracer, indocyanine green- 99m Tc-nanocolloid. Combining this dedicated SN tracer with a lymphangiographic tracer such as fluorescein may further enhance the accuracy of SN biopsy. Clinical evaluation of a multispectral fluorescence guided surgery approach using the dedicated SN tracer ICG- 99m Tc-nanocolloid, the lymphangiographic tracer fluorescein, and a commercially available fluorescence laparoscope. Pilot study in ten patients with prostate cancer. Following ICG- 99m Tc-nanocolloid administration and preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and single-photon emission computed tomograpy imaging, the number and location of SNs were determined. Fluorescein was injected intraprostatically immediately after the patient was anesthetized. A multispectral fluorescence laparoscope was used intraoperatively to identify both fluorescent signatures. Multispectral fluorescence imaging during robot-assisted radical prostatectomy with extended pelvic lymph node dissection and SN biopsy. (1) Number and location of preoperatively identified SNs. (2) Number and location of SNs intraoperatively identified via ICG- 99m Tc-nanocolloid imaging. (3) Rate of intraoperative lymphatic duct identification via fluorescein imaging. (4) Tumor status of excised (sentinel) lymph node(s). (5) Postoperative complications and follow-up. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging of ICG- 99m Tc-nanocolloid visualized 85.3% of the SNs. In 8/10 patients, fluorescein imaging allowed bright and accurate identification of lymphatic ducts, although higher background staining and tracer washout were observed. The main limitation is the small patient population. Our findings indicate that a lymphangiographic tracer can provide additional information during SN biopsy based on ICG- 99m

  1. Compressive hyperspectral time-resolved wide-field fluorescence lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Qi; Yao, Ruoyang; Sinsuebphon, Nattawut; Intes, Xavier

    2017-07-01

    Spectrally resolved fluorescence lifetime imaging and spatial multiplexing have offered information content and collection-efficiency boosts in microscopy, but efficient implementations for macroscopic applications are still lacking. An imaging platform based on time-resolved structured light and hyperspectral single-pixel detection has been developed to perform quantitative macroscopic fluorescence lifetime imaging (MFLI) over a large field of view (FOV) and multiple spectral bands simultaneously. The system makes use of three digital micromirror device (DMD)-based spatial light modulators (SLMs) to generate spatial optical bases and reconstruct N by N images over 16 spectral channels with a time-resolved capability (∼40 ps temporal resolution) using fewer than N2 optical measurements. We demonstrate the potential of this new imaging platform by quantitatively imaging near-infrared (NIR) Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) both in vitro and in vivo. The technique is well suited for quantitative hyperspectral lifetime imaging with a high sensitivity and paves the way for many important biomedical applications.

  2. Tracking multiple particles in fluorescence time-lapse microscopy images via probabilistic data association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinez, William J; Rohr, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Tracking subcellular structures as well as viral structures displayed as 'particles' in fluorescence microscopy images yields quantitative information on the underlying dynamical processes. We have developed an approach for tracking multiple fluorescent particles based on probabilistic data association. The approach combines a localization scheme that uses a bottom-up strategy based on the spot-enhancing filter as well as a top-down strategy based on an ellipsoidal sampling scheme that uses the Gaussian probability distributions computed by a Kalman filter. The localization scheme yields multiple measurements that are incorporated into the Kalman filter via a combined innovation, where the association probabilities are interpreted as weights calculated using an image likelihood. To track objects in close proximity, we compute the support of each image position relative to the neighboring objects of a tracked object and use this support to recalculate the weights. To cope with multiple motion models, we integrated the interacting multiple model algorithm. The approach has been successfully applied to synthetic 2-D and 3-D images as well as to real 2-D and 3-D microscopy images, and the performance has been quantified. In addition, the approach was successfully applied to the 2-D and 3-D image data of the recent Particle Tracking Challenge at the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) 2012.

  3. Time-resolved imaging of fluorescent inclusions in optically turbid medium — phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacprzak, M.; Liebert, A.; Sawosz, P.; Żołek, N.; Milej, D.; Maniewski, R.

    2010-03-01

    We present results of application of a time-resolved optical system for imaging of fluorescence excited in an inclusion containing indocyanine green (ICG), and located in optically turbid medium. The developed imaging system enabled simultaneous acquisition of fluorescence and diffusive reflectance. Eight independent time-resolved measurement channels based on time-correlated single photon counting technique were applied. In four of these channels, used for the fluorescence detection, sets of filters were applied in order to block the excitation light. Fast optomechanical switches allowed us to illuminate sequentially nine different spots on the surface of the studied object and finally 4×4 pixels maps at excitation and emission wavelengths were obtained. A liquid phantom used in this study consists of the fish tank filed with a solution ofmilk and water with black ink added to obtain optical properties in the range of the optical properties typical for the living tissue. A gel ball of a diameter of 5 mm with precisely controlled concentration of ICG was immersed in the liquid. The measurements were performed for inclusion located at different depths and for various ICG concentrations in the gel ball and in the surrounding liquid. The recorded distributions of times of arrival (DTA) of fluorescence photons and times of flight (DTOF) of diffusely reflected photons were analyzed by calculation of their statistical moments. We observed specific changes in moments of the measured DTAs as a function of depth of immersion of the fluorescent inclusion in the medium. We noted also that the changes of moments depend significantly on concentration of the dye in the fluorescence inclusion as well as in the surrounding liquid.

  4. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  5. Automated Cart with VIS/NIR Hyperspectral Reflectance and Fluorescence Imaging Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M. Lefcourt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A system to take high-resolution Visible/Near Infra-Red (VIS/NIR hyperspectral reflectance and fluorescence images in outdoor fields using ambient lighting or a pulsed laser (355 nm, respectively, for illumination purposes was designed, built, and tested. Components of the system include a semi-autonomous cart, a gated-intensified camera, a spectral adapter, a frequency-triple Nd:YAG (Neodymium-doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet laser, and optics to convert the Gaussian laser beam into a line-illumination source. The front wheels of the cart are independently powered by stepper motors that support stepping or continuous motion. When stepping, a spreadsheet is used to program parameters of image sets to be acquired at each step. For example, the spreadsheet can be used to set delays before the start of image acquisitions, acquisition times, and laser attenuation. One possible use of this functionality would be to establish acquisition parameters to facilitate the measurement of fluorescence decay-curve characteristics. The laser and camera are mounted on an aluminum plate that allows the optics to be calibrated in a laboratory setting and then moved to the cart. The system was validated by acquiring images of fluorescence responses of spinach leaves and dairy manure.

  6. Detection of fecal contamination on beef meat surfaces using handheld fluorescence imaging device (HFID)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Mirae; Lee, Hoonsoo; Cho, Hyunjeong; Moon, Sang-Ho; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Moon S.

    2016-05-01

    Current meat inspection in slaughter plants, for food safety and quality attributes including potential fecal contamination, is conducted through by visual examination human inspectors. A handheld fluorescence-based imaging device (HFID) was developed to be an assistive tool for human inspectors by highlighting contaminated food and food contact surfaces on a display monitor. It can be used under ambient lighting conditions in food processing plants. Critical components of the imaging device includes four 405-nm 10-W LEDs for fluorescence excitation, a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, optical filter (670 nm used for this study), and Wi-Fi transmitter for broadcasting real-time video/images to monitoring devices such as smartphone and tablet. This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of HFID in enhancing visual detection of fecal contamination on red meat, fat, and bone surfaces of beef under varying ambient luminous intensities (0, 10, 30, 50 and 70 foot-candles). Overall, diluted feces on fat, red meat and bone areas of beef surfaces were detectable in the 670-nm single-band fluorescence images when using the HFID under 0 to 50 foot-candle ambient lighting.

  7. [Nondestructive imaging of elements distribution in biomedical samples by X-ray fluorescence computed tomography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qun; Deng, Biao; Lü, Wei-Wei; Du, Guo-Hao; Yan, Fu-Hua; Xiao, Ti-Qiao; Xu, Hong-Jie

    2011-10-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography is a stimulated emission tomography that allows nondestructive reconstruction of the elements distribution in the sample, which is important for biomedical investigations. Owing to the high flux density and easy energy tunability of highly collimated synchrotron X-rays, it is possible to apply X-ray fluorescence CT to biomedical samples. Reported in the present paper, an X-ray fluorescence CT system was established at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility for the investigations of trace elements distribution inside biomedical samples. By optimizing the experiment setup, the spatial resolution was improved and the data acquisition process was obviously speeded up. The maximum-likelihood expectation-maximization algorithm was introduced for the image reconstruction, which remarkably improved the imaging accuracy of element distributions. The developed system was verified by the test sample and medical sample respectively. The results showed that the distribution of interested elements could be imaged correctly, and the spatial resolution of 150 m was achieved. In conclusion, the developed system could be applied to the research on large-size biomedical samples, concerning imaging accuracy, spatial resolution and data collection time.

  8. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid–solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  9. Construction of In Vivo Fluorescent Imaging of Echinococcus granulosus in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibo; Yang, Tao; Zhang, Xuyong; Xia, Jie; Guo, Jun; Wang, Xiaoyi; Hou, Jixue; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Xueling; Wu, Xiangwei

    2016-06-01

    Human hydatid disease (cystic echinococcosis, CE) is a chronic parasitic infection caused by the larval stage of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. As the disease mainly affects the liver, approximately 70% of all identified CE cases are detected in this organ. Optical molecular imaging (OMI), a noninvasive imaging technique, has never been used in vivo with the specific molecular markers of CE. Thus, we aimed to construct an in vivo fluorescent imaging mouse model of CE to locate and quantify the presence of the parasites within the liver noninvasively. Drug-treated protoscolices were monitored after marking by JC-1 dye in in vitro and in vivo studies. This work describes for the first time the successful construction of an in vivo model of E. granulosus in a small living experimental animal to achieve dynamic monitoring and observation of multiple time points of the infection course. Using this model, we quantified and analyzed labeled protoscolices based on the intensities of their red and green fluorescence. Interestingly, the ratio of red to green fluorescence intensity not only revealed the location of protoscolices but also determined the viability of the parasites in vivo and in vivo tests. The noninvasive imaging model proposed in this work will be further studied for long-term detection and observation and may potentially be widely utilized in susceptibility testing and therapeutic effect evaluation.

  10. Bio-degradable highly fluorescent conjugated polymer nanoparticles for bio-medical imaging applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repenko, Tatjana; Rix, Anne; Ludwanowski, Simon; Go, Dennis; Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud; Kuehne, Alexander J C

    2017-09-07

    Conjugated polymer nanoparticles exhibit strong fluorescence and have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals. However, conjugated polymer particles are hydrophobic and often chemically inert materials with diameters ranging from below 50 nm to several microns. As such, conjugated polymer nanoparticles cannot be excreted through the renal system. This drawback has prevented their application for clinical bio-medical imaging. Here, we present fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units. These nanoparticles can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages. Reactive oxygen species induce scission of the conjugated polymer backbone at the imidazole unit, leading to complete decomposition of the particles into soluble low molecular weight fragments. Furthermore, the nanoparticles can be surface functionalized for directed targeting. The approach opens a wide range of opportunities for conjugated polymer particles in the fields of medical imaging, drug-delivery, and theranostics.Conjugated polymer nanoparticles have been applied for biological fluorescence imaging in cell culture and in small animals, but cannot readily be excreted through the renal system. Here the authors show fully conjugated polymer nanoparticles based on imidazole units that can be bio-degraded by activated macrophages.

  11. Air, telescope, and instrument temperature effects on the Gemini Planet Imager’s image quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Melisa; Bailey, Vanessa P.; Macintosh, Bruce; Hayward, Thomas L.; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; Ruffio, Jean-Baptiste; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Savransky, Dmitry; Wang, Jason J.; GPIES Team

    2018-01-01

    We present results from an analysis of air, telescope, and instrument temperature effects on the Gemini Planet Imager’s (GPI) image quality. GPI is a near-infrared, adaptive optics-fed, high-contrast imaging instrument at the Gemini South telescope, designed to directly image and characterize exoplanets and circumstellar disks. One key metric for instrument performance is “contrast,” which quantifies the sensitivity of an image in terms of the flux ratio of the noise floor vs. the primary star. Very high contrast signifies that GPI could succeed at imaging a dim, close companion around the primary star. We examine relationships between multiple temperature sensors placed on the instrument and telescope vs. image contrast. These results show that there is a strong correlation between image contrast and the presence of temperature differentials between the instrument and the temperature outside the dome. We discuss potential causes such as strong induced dome seeing or optical misalignment due to thermal gradients. We then assess the impact of the current temperature control and ventilation strategy and discuss potential modifications.

  12. Oxygen-generating hybrid nanoparticles to enhance fluorescent/photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging guided tumor photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Guohao; Qin, Zainen; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Guoqing; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising tumor treatment modality that can convert oxygen into cytotoxic singlet oxygen (SO) via photosensitizer to ablate tumor growth. However, the uncontrolled cancer cell proliferation during tumor development and the oxygen consumption during PDT always result in an insufficient oxygen level in tumors, which can adversely affect the PDT efficiency in turn. We designed an oxygen-generating PDT nanocomplex by encapsulating a manganese dioxide nanoparticle (MnO 2 NP) in an indocyanine green (ICG) modified hyaluronic acid nanoparticle (HANP) to overcome this limitation. Because of the excellent fluorescent and photoacoustic properties, the tumor accumulation of the ICG-HANP/MnO 2 (IHM) nanocomplex was monitored by fluorescent imaging and photoacoustic imaging after intravenous administration into the SCC7 tumor-bearing mouse model. Both high fluorescent and photoacoustic signals were detected and found peak at 6 h post-injection (tumor-muscle ratio: 4.03 ± 0.36 for fluorescent imaging and 2.93 ± 0.13 for photoacoustic imaging). In addition, due to the high reactivity of MnO 2 NP to H 2 O 2 , an unfavorable tumor cell metabolic, the oxygen content in the tumor is elevated 2.25 ± 0.07 times compared to that without IHM treatment as ultrasound imaging confirmed. After laser irradiation, significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in the IHM-treated group compared to the ICG-HANP-treated group, attributed to the beneficial oxygen-generating property of IHM for PDT. It is expected that the design of IHM will provide an alternative way of improving clinical PDT efficacy and will be widely applied in cancer theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) for comparing spectra from corn ears naturally and artificially infected with aflatoxin producing fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, Zuzana; Yao, Haibo; Kincaid, Russell; Darlington, Dawn; Brown, Robert L; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E

    2013-08-01

    In an effort to address the problem of rapid detection of aflatoxin in grain, particularly oilseeds, the current study assessed the spectral differences of aflatoxin production in kernels from a cornfield inoculated with spores from 2 different strains of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus. Aflatoxin production in corn from the same field due to natural infestation was also assessed. A small corn plot in Baton Rouge, La., U.S.A., was used during the 2008-growing season. Two groups of 400 plants were inoculated with 2 different inocula and 1 group of 400 plants was designated as controls. Any contamination detected in the controls was attributed to natural infestation. A subset of each group was imaged with a visible near infra red (VNIR) hyperspectral system under ultra violet (UV) excitation and subsequently analyzed for aflatoxin using affinity column fluorometry. Group differences were statistically analyzed. Results indicate that when all the spectral data across all groups were averaged, any potential differences between groups (treated and untreated) were obscured. However, spectral analysis based on contaminated "hot" pixel classification showed a distinct spectral shift/separation between contaminated and clean ears with fluorescence peaks at 501 and 478 nm, respectively. All inoculated and naturally infected control ears had fluorescence peaks at 501 nm that differed from uninfected corn ears. Results from this study may be useful in evaluating rapid, noninvasive instrumentation and/or methodology for aflatoxin detection in grain. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. MicroASC instrument onboard Juno spacecraft utilizing inertially controlled imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Arge Klevang; Jørgensen, Andreas Härstedt; Benn, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    This contribution describes the post-processing of the raw image data acquired by the microASC instrument during the Earth-fly-by of the Juno spacecraft. The images show a unique view of the Earth and Moon system as seen from afar. The procedure utilizes attitude measurements and inter......-calibration of the Camera Head Units of the microASC system to trigger the image capturing. The triggering is synchronized with the inertial attitude and rotational phase of the sensor acquiring the images. This is essentially works as inertially controlled imaging facilitating image acquisition from unexplored...

  15. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging: theory, instrumentation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senarathna, Janaka; Rege, Abhishek; Li, Nan; Thakor, Nitish V

    2013-01-01

    Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a wide field of view, non scanning optical technique for observing blood flow. Speckles are produced when coherent light scattered back from biological tissue is diffracted through the limiting aperture of focusing optics. Mobile scatterers cause the speckle pattern to blur; a model can be constructed by inversely relating the degree of blur, termed speckle contrast to the scatterer speed. In tissue, red blood cells are the main source of moving scatterers. Therefore, blood flow acts as a virtual contrast agent, outlining blood vessels. The spatial resolution (~10 μm) and temporal resolution (10 ms to 10 s) of LSCI can be tailored to the application. Restricted by the penetration depth of light, LSCI can only visualize superficial blood flow. Additionally, due to its non scanning nature, LSCI is unable to provide depth resolved images. The simple setup and non-dependence on exogenous contrast agents have made LSCI a popular tool for studying vascular structure and blood flow dynamics. We discuss the theory and practice of LSCI and critically analyze its merit in major areas of application such as retinal imaging, imaging of skin perfusion as well as imaging of neurophysiology.

  16. First Experience on Laparoscopic Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Hepatic Uveal Melanoma Metastases using Indocyanine Green

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummers, Quirijn R.J.G.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Prevoo, Hendrica A.J.M.; Braat, Andries E.; Baeten, Coen I.M.; Frangioni, John V.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular tumor in adults and up to 50% of patients will develop liver metastases. Complete surgical resection of these metastases can improve 5-year survival, but only a few patients are eligible for radical surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to introduce a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence laparoscope during minimally-invasive surgery for intraoperative identification of uveal melanoma hepatic metastases and to use it to provide guidance during resection. Methods Three patients diagnosed with one solitary liver metastasis from uveal melanoma are presented. Patients received 10 mg indocyanine green (ICG) intravenously 24 h before surgery. A NIR fluorescence laparoscope was used to detect malignant liver lesions. Results In all 3 patients, laparoscopic NIR fluorescence imaging using ICG successfully identified uveal melanoma metastases. In 2 patients, multiple additional lesions were identified by inspection and NIR fluorescence imaging, which were not identified by preoperative conventional imaging. In one patient, one additional lesion, not identified by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, laparoscopic ultrasonography and inspection, was observed with NIR fluorescence imaging only.. Importantly, NIR fluorescence imaging provided guidance during resection of these metastases. Conclusions We describe the successful use of laparoscopic identification and resection of uveal melanoma liver metastases using NIR fluorescence imaging and ICG. This procedure is minimally-invasive, and should be used as complementary to conventional techniques for the detection and resection of liver metastases. PMID:24902685

  17. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH Signal Analysis Using Automated Generated Projection Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwei Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH tests provide promising molecular imaging biomarkers to more accurately and reliably detect and diagnose cancers and genetic disorders. Since current manual FISH signal analysis is low-efficient and inconsistent, which limits its clinical utility, developing automated FISH image scanning systems and computer-aided detection (CAD schemes has been attracting research interests. To acquire high-resolution FISH images in a multi-spectral scanning mode, a huge amount of image data with the stack of the multiple three-dimensional (3-D image slices is generated from a single specimen. Automated preprocessing these scanned images to eliminate the non-useful and redundant data is important to make the automated FISH tests acceptable in clinical applications. In this study, a dual-detector fluorescence image scanning system was applied to scan four specimen slides with FISH-probed chromosome X. A CAD scheme was developed to detect analyzable interphase cells and map the multiple imaging slices recorded FISH-probed signals into the 2-D projection images. CAD scheme was then applied to each projection image to detect analyzable interphase cells using an adaptive multiple-threshold algorithm, identify FISH-probed signals using a top-hat transform, and compute the ratios between the normal and abnormal cells. To assess CAD performance, the FISH-probed signals were also independently visually detected by an observer. The Kappa coefficients for agreement between CAD and observer ranged from 0.69 to 1.0 in detecting/counting FISH signal spots in four testing samples. The study demonstrated the feasibility of automated FISH signal analysis that applying a CAD scheme to the automated generated 2-D projection images.

  18. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yankelevich, Diego R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, 3101 Kemper Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura, E-mail: lmarcu@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Elson, Daniel S. [Hamlyn Centre for Robotic Surgery, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence

  19. Identifying fluorescently labeled single molecules in image stacks using machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkin, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    In the past several years, a host of new technologies have made it possible to visualize single molecules within cells and organisms (Raj et al., Nat Methods 5:877-879, 2008; Paré et al., Curr Biol 19:2037-2042, 2009; Lu and Tsourkas, Nucleic Acids Res 37:e100, 2009; Femino et al., Science 280:585-590, 1998; Rodriguez et al., Semin Cell Dev Biol 18:202-208, 2007; Betzig et al., Science 313:1642-1645, 2006; Rust et al., Nat Methods 3:793-796, 2006; Fusco et al., Curr Biol 13:161-167, 2003). Many of these are based on fluorescence, either fluorescent proteins or fluorescent dyes coupled to a molecule of interest. In many applications, the fluorescent signal is limited to a few pixels, which poses a classic signal processing problem: how can actual signal be distinguished from background noise? In this chapter, I present a MATLAB (MathWorks (2010) MATLAB. Retrieved from http://www.mathworks.com) software suite designed to work with these single-molecule visualization technologies (Rifkin (2010) spotFinding Suite. http://www.biology.ucsd.edu/labs/rifkin/software.html). It takes images or image stacks from a fluorescence microscope as input and outputs locations of the molecules. Although the software was developed for the specific application of identifying single mRNA transcripts in fixed specimens, it is more general than this and can be used and/or customized for other applications that produce localized signals embedded in a potentially noisy background. The analysis pipeline consists of the following steps: (a) create a gold-standard dataset, (b) train a machine-learning algorithm to classify image features as signal or noise depending upon user defined statistics, (c) run the machine-learning algorithm on a new dataset to identify mRNA locations, and (d) visually inspect and correct the results.

  20. Fluorescent protein vectors for pancreatic islet cell identification in live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Hongyan; Xu, Yunjian; Yu, Qian; Gylfe, Erik; Tengholm, Anders

    2016-10-01

    The islets of Langerhans contain different types of endocrine cells, which are crucial for glucose homeostasis. β- and α-cells that release insulin and glucagon, respectively, are most abundant, whereas somatostatin-producing δ-cells and particularly pancreatic polypeptide-releasing PP-cells are more scarce. Studies of islet cell function are hampered by difficulties to identify the different cell types, especially in live-cell imaging experiments when immunostaining is unsuitable. The aim of the present study was to create a set of vectors for fluorescent protein expression with cell-type-specific promoters and evaluate their applicability in functional islet imaging. We constructed six adenoviral vectors for expression of red and green fluorescent proteins controlled by the insulin, preproglucagon, somatostatin, or pancreatic polypeptide promoters. After transduction of mouse and human islets or dispersed islet cells, a majority of the fluorescent cells also immunostained for the appropriate hormone. Recordings of the sub-plasma membrane Ca(2+) and cAMP concentrations with a fluorescent indicator and a protein biosensor, respectively, showed that labeled cells respond to glucose and other modulators of secretion and revealed a striking variability in Ca(2+) signaling among α-cells. The measurements allowed comparison of the phase relationship of Ca(2+) oscillations between different types of cells within intact islets. We conclude that the fluorescent protein vectors allow easy identification of specific islet cell types and can be used in live-cell imaging together with organic dyes and genetically encoded biosensors. This approach will facilitate studies of normal islet physiology and help to clarify molecular defects and disturbed cell interactions in diabetic islets.

  1. Development of a Hybrid Nanoprobe for Triple-Modality MR/SPECT/Optical Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Renata; Svenmarker, Pontus; Ingvar, Christian; Ståhlberg, Freddy; Engels, Stefan-Andersson; Knutsson, Linda; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid clinical imaging is an emerging technology, which improves disease diagnosis by combining already existing technologies. With the combination of high-resolution morphological imaging, i.e., MRI/CT, and high-sensitive molecular detection offered by SPECT/PET/Optical, physicians can detect disease progression at an early stage and design patient-specific treatments. To fully exploit the possibilities of hybrid imaging a hybrid probe compatible with each imaging technology is required. Here, we present a hybrid nanoprobe for triple modality MR/SPECT/Fluorescence imaging. Our imaging agent is comprised of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), labeled with 99mTc and an Alexa fluorophore (AF), together forming 99mTc-AF-SPIONs. The agent was stable in human serum, and, after subcutaneous injection in the hind paw of Wistar rats, showed to be highly specific by accumulating in the sentinel lymph node. All three modalities clearly visualized the imaging agent. Our results show that a single imaging agent can be used for hybrid imaging. The use of a single hybrid contrast agent permits simultaneous hybrid imaging and, more conventionally, allow for single modality imaging at different time points. For example, a hybrid contrast agent enables pre-operative planning, intra-operative guidance, and post-operative evaluation with the same contrast agent. PMID:26852675

  2. Precision scan-imaging for paperboard quality inspection utilizing X-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norlin, B.; Reza, S.; Fröjdh, C.; Nordin, T.

    2018-01-01

    Paperboard is typically made up of a core of cellulose fibers [C6H10O5] and a coating layer of [CaCO3]. The uniformity of these layers is a critical parameter for the printing quality. Current quality control methods include chemistry based visual inspection methods as well as X-ray based methods to measure the coating thickness. In this work we combine the X-ray fluorescence signals from the Ca atoms (3.7 keV) in the coating and from a Cu target (8.0 keV) placed behind the paper to simultaneously measure both the coating and the fibers. Cu was selected as the target material since its fluorescence signal is well separated from the Ca signal while its fluorescence's still are absorbed sufficiently in the paper. A laboratory scale setup is built using stepper motors, a silicon drift detector based spectrometer and a collimated X-ray beam. The spectroscopic image is retrieved by scanning the paperboard surface and registering the fluorescence signals from Ca and Cu. The exposure time for this type of setups can be significantly improved by implementing spectroscopic imaging sensors. The material contents in the layers can then be retrieved from the absolute and relative intensities of these two signals.

  3. Intracellular fluorescent light-up bioprobes with different morphology for image-guided photothermal cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bangbang; Zhang, Peng; Du, Jianwei; Zhao, Xiao; Wang, Youxiang

    2017-06-01

    Multifunctional nanoprobe was drawing increased attention in tumor diagnosis and therapy. The simple and effective establishment of the theranostic nanoplatforms was still under urgent need. Meanwhile, the targeting ability and morphology of nanoprobe were essential for the effective endocytosis, which could further affect the diagnosis. In this work, two morphologies of nanoprobes were fabricated using gold nanorods (AuNRs) and gold nanospheres (AuNSs). Thiolated-hyaluronic acid labeled with nile blue (HS-HA-NB), a near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence dye, was coated on the surface of the gold nanoparticles to form stable nanoprobes (AuNR@HS-HA-NB, AuNS@HS-HA-NB). The fluorescence of NB molecules quenched outside cells due to the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), and recovered after the HA degradation inside the cells. HA also could enhance cellular uptake in CD44 receptor highly expressed human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7). In this way, bioprobes realized the MCF-7 cell images through intracellular fluorescent light-up. Comparing with the sphere bioprobe, the rod-shaped bioprobe dramatically promoted endocytosis to achieve a better diagnosis effect in a short time. After NIR light irradiation, severe MCF-7 apoptosis was observed with AuNR@HS-HA-NB existed. Our studies suggested that the AuNR@HS-HA-NB nanoparticles were the excellent candidates of versatile bioprobes to realize rapid, precise image and photothermal therapy to MCF-7 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetically Encoded Fluorescent Probe for Imaging Apoptosis in Vivo with Spontaneous GFP Complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasu, Yusuke; Asaoka, Yoichi; Namae, Misako; Nishina, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Hideaki; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2016-01-05

    Apoptosis plays a pivotal role in development and tissue homeostasis in multicellular organisms. Dysfunction of apoptosis is involved in many fatal diseases such as cancer. Visualization of apoptosis in living animals is necessary to understand the mechanism of apoptosis-related diseases. Here, we describe a genetically encoded fluorescent probe for imaging apoptosis in living multicellular organisms, based on spontaneous complementation of two fragments of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant (GFP OPT). The probe is designed for detection of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis during which a mitochondrial protein of Smac is released into cytosol. The Smac is connected with a carboxy-terminal fragment of GFP OPT (GFP11), whereas the remainder of GFP OPT (GFP(1-10)) is located in the cytosol. Under an apoptotic condition, the Smac is released from mitochondria into cytosol, allowing complementation of the GFP-OPT fragments and the emission of fluorescence. Live-cell imaging demonstrates that the probe enables detection of apoptosis in living cells with a high signal-to-background ratio. We applied the probe to living zebrafish, in which apoptotic cells were visualized with fluorescence. The technique provides a useful tool for the study of apoptosis in living animals, facilitating elucidation of the mechanisms of apoptosis-related diseases.

  5. Instrumental fundamental parameters and selected applications of the microfocus X-ray fluorescence analysis at a scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rackwitz, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    For a decade X-ray sources have been commercially available for the microfocus X-ray fluorescence analysis (μ-XRF) and offer the possibility of extending the analytics at a scanning electron microscope (SEM) with an attached energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS). By using the μ-XRF it is possible to determine the content of chemical elements in a microscopic sample volume in a quantitative, reference-free and non-destructive way. For the reference-free quantification with the XRF the Sherman equation is referred to. This equation deduces the intensity of the detected X-ray intensity of a fluorescence peak to the content of the element in the sample by means of fundamental parameters. The instrumental fundamental parameters of the μ-XRF at a SEM/EDS system are the excitation spectrum consisting of X-ray tube spectrum and the transmission of the X-ray optics, the geometry and the spectrometer efficiency. Based on a calibrated instrumentation the objectives of this work are the development of procedures for the characterization of all instrumental fundamental parameters as well as the evaluation and reduction of their measurement uncertainties: The algorithms known from the literature for the calculation of X-ray tube spectrum are evaluated with regard to their deviations in the spectral distribution. Within this work a novel semi-empirical model is improved with respect to its uncertainties and enhanced in the low energy range as well as extended for another three anodes. The emitted X-ray tube spectrum is calculated from the detected one, which is measured at an especially developed setup for the direct measurement of X-ray tube spectra. This emitted X-ray tube spectrum is compared to the one calculated on base of the model of this work. A procedure for the determination of the most important parameters of an X-ray semi-lens in parallelizing mode is developed. The temporal stability of the transmission of X-ray full lenses, which have been in regular use at

  6. Live imaging using adaptive optics with fluorescent protein guide-stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiaodong; Crest, Justin; Kotadia, Shaila; Azucena, Oscar; Chen, Diana C; Sullivan, William; Kubby, Joel

    2012-07-02

    Spatially and temporally dependent optical aberrations induced by the inhomogeneous refractive index of live samples limit the resolution of live dynamic imaging. We introduce an adaptive optical microscope with a direct wavefront sensing method using a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor and fluorescent protein guide-stars for live imaging. The results of imaging Drosophila embryos demonstrate its ability to correct aberrations and achieve near diffraction limited images of medial sections of large Drosophila embryos. GFP-polo labeled centrosomes can be observed clearly after correction but cannot be observed before correction. Four dimensional time lapse images are achieved with the correction of dynamic aberrations. These studies also demonstrate that the GFP-tagged centrosome proteins, Polo and Cnn, serve as excellent biological guide-stars for adaptive optics based microscopy.

  7. Use of portable X-ray fluorescence instrument for bulk alloy analysis on low corroded indoor bronzes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šatović, D.; Desnica, V.; Fazinić, S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most often used non-destructive methods for elemental analysis when performing field measurements on bronze sculptures is X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis based on portable instrumentation. However, when performing routine in-situ XRF analysis on corroded objects obtained results are sometimes considerably influenced by the corrosion surface products. In this work the suitability of portable XRF for bulk analysis of low corroded bronzes, which were initially precisely characterized using sophisticated and reliable laboratory methods, was investigated and some improvements in measuring technique and data processing were given. Artificially corroded bronze samples were analyzed by a portable XRF instrument using the same methodology and procedures as when performing in-situ analysis on real objects. The samples were first investigated using sophisticated complementary laboratory techniques: Scanning Electron Microscopy, Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry, in order to gain precise information on the formation of the corrosion product layers and in-depth elemental profile of corrosion layers for different aging parameters. It has been shown that for corrosion layers of up to ca. 25 μm a portable XRF can yield very accurate quantification results. - Highlights: • XRF quantification is very accurate for bronze corrosion layers of up to ca. 25 μm. • Corrosion layer formation on bronze described in two phases. • Corrosion layers precisely characterized using PIXE, RBS and SEM. • Corrosion approximated as CuO for layer thickness calculations via X-ray attenuations • Increasingly lighter corrosion matrix may cause SnLα radiation intensity inversion

  8. Widefield in vivo spectral and fluorescence imaging microscopy of microvessel blood supply and oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer; Kozikowski, Raymond; Wankhede, Mamta; Sorg, Brian S.

    2011-02-01

    Abnormal microvascular function and angiogenesis are key components of various diseases that can contribute to the perpetuation of the disease. Several skin diseases and ophthalmic pathologies are characterized by hypervascularity, and in cancer the microvasculature of tumors is structurally and functionally abnormal. Thus, the microvasculature can be an important target for treatment of diseases characterized by abnormal microvasculature. Motivated largely by cancer research, significant effort has been devoted to research on drugs that target the microvasculature. Several vascular targeting drugs for cancer therapy are in clinical trials and approved for clinical use, and several off-label uses of these drugs have been reported for non-cancer diseases. The ability to image and measure parameters related to microvessel function preclinically in laboratory animals can be useful for development and comparison of vascular targeting drugs. For example, blood supply time measurements give information related to microvessel morphology and can be measured with first-pass fluorescence imaging. Hemoglobin saturation measurements give an indication of microvessel oxygen transport and can be measured with spectral imaging. While each measurement individually gives some information regarding microvessel function, the measurements together may yield even more information since theoretically microvessel morphology can influence microvessel oxygenation, especially in metabolically active tissue like tumors. However, these measurements have not yet been combined. In this study, we report the combination of blood supply time imaging and hemoglobin saturation imaging of microvessel networks in tumors using widefield fluorescence and spectral imaging, respectively. The correlation between the measurements in a mouse mammary tumor is analyzed.

  9. A review of performance of near-infrared fluorescence imaging devices used in clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) molecular imaging holds great promise as a new “point-of-care” medical imaging modality that can potentially provide the sensitivity of nuclear medicine techniques, but without the radioactivity that can otherwise place limitations of usage. Recently, NIRF imaging devices of a variety of designs have emerged in the market and in investigational clinical studies using indocyanine green (ICG) as a non-targeting NIRF contrast agent to demark the blood and lymphatic vasculatures both non-invasively and intraoperatively. Approved in the USA since 1956 for intravenous administration, ICG has been more recently used off label in intradermal or subcutaneous administrations for fluorescence imaging of the lymphatic vasculature and lymph nodes. Herein, we summarize the devices of a variety of designs, summarize their performance in lymphatic imaging in a tabular format and comment on necessary efforts to develop standards for device performance to compare and use these emerging devices in future, NIRF molecular imaging studies. PMID:25410320

  10. Near-infrared fluorescent probes in cancer imaging and therapy: an emerging field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xiaomin; Wang, Fuli; Qin, Weijun; Yang, Xiaojian; Yuan, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is an attractive modality for early cancer detection with high sensitivity and multi-detection capability. Due to convenient modification by conjugating with moieties of interests, NIRF probes are ideal candidates for cancer targeted imaging. Additionally, the combinatory application of NIRF imaging and other imaging modalities that can delineate anatomical structures extends fluorometric determination of biomedical information. Moreover, nanoparticles loaded with NIRF dyes and anticancer agents contribute to the synergistic management of cancer, which integrates the advantage of imaging and therapeutic functions to achieve the ultimate goal of simultaneous diagnosis and treatment. Appropriate probe design with targeting moieties can retain the original properties of NIRF and pharmacokinetics. In recent years, great efforts have been made to develop new NIRF probes with better photostability and strong fluorescence emission, leading to the discovery of numerous novel NIRF probes with fine photophysical properties. Some of these probes exhibit tumoricidal activities upon light radiation, which holds great promise in photothermal therapy, photodynamic therapy, and photoimmunotherapy. This review aims to provide a timely and concise update on emerging NIRF dyes and multifunctional agents. Their potential uses as agents for cancer specific imaging, lymph node mapping, and therapeutics are included. Recent advances of NIRF dyes in clinical use are also summarized. PMID:24648733

  11. Combination of widefield fluorescence imaging and nonlinear optical microscopy of oral epithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rahul; Edward, Kert; Brown, Tyra; Ma, Liang; Yang, Jinping; McCammon, Susan; Motamedi, Massoud; Vargas, Gracie

    2013-03-01

    Multiphoton Autofluorescence Microscopy (MPAM) and Second Harmonic Generation Microscopy (SHGM) have shown the potential for noninvasive assessment of oral precancers and cancers. We have explored a combination of these nonlinear optical microscopic imaging techniques with widefield fluorescence imaging to assess morphometry similar to that of pathologic evaluation as well as information from endogenous fluorophores, which are altered with neoplastic transformation. Widefield fluorescence revealed areas of interest corresponding to sites with precancers or early tumors, generally resulting in a decrease in green emission or increase in red emission. Subsequent microscopy revealed significant differences in morphology between normal, dysplastic/neoplastic mucosa for all layers. Combination of a widefield and a microscopic technique provides a novel approach for tissue morphometric analysis along with large area assessment of tissue autofluorescence properties.

  12. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  13. Uptake of diuron and concomitant loss of photosynthetic activity in leaves as visualized by imaging the red chlorophyll fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenthaler, Hartmut K; Langsdorf, Gabriele; Buschmann, Claus

    2013-10-01

    The principles of the chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence induction kinetics (known as Kautsky effect) and their change by the photosystem II herbicide diuron are presented together with the Chl fluorescence emission spectra of a normal and diuron-inhibited leaf. By imaging the Chl fluorescence emission of green leaves the successive uptake of diuron and the concomitant loss of photosynthetic quantum conversion from the leaf base to the leaf tip are documented.

  14. Fluorescence/luminescence circadian imaging of complex tissues at single-cell resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellix, Michael T; Currie, Jake; Menaker, Michael; Wijnen, Herman

    2010-06-01

    The use of luciferase reporter genes together with luminescence detection has enabled high frequency monitoring of molecular circadian clock function in living tissues. With the help of an intensified CCD camera combined with an inverted epifluorescence microscope, the authors have established a new imaging strategy that makes use of transgenic cell type-specific expression of fluorescent proteins to identify cells of interest for subsequent circadian luminescence recording at single-cell resolution.

  15. A tumor-targeted polymer theranostics platform for positron emission tomography and fluorescence imaging

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koziolová, Eva; Goel, S.; Chytil, Petr; Janoušková, Olga; Barnhart, T. E.; Cai, W.; Etrych, Tomáš

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 30 (2017), s. 10906-10918 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-02986S; GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28594A; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers * positron emission tomography ( PET ) * fluorescence imaging Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry OBOR OECD: Polymer science Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  16. 1-Million droplet array with wide-field fluorescence imaging for digital PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Andrew C; Fisher, Jeffrey S; Tovar, Armando R; Hsieh, Albert T; Lin, Robert; Pentoney, Stephen L; Yang, David L; Lee, Abraham P

    2011-11-21

    Digital droplet reactors are useful as chemical and biological containers to discretize reagents into picolitre or nanolitre volumes for analysis of single cells, organisms, or molecules. However, most DNA based assays require processing of samples on the order of tens of microlitres and contain as few as one to as many as millions of fragments to be detected. Presented in this work is a droplet microfluidic platform and fluorescence imaging setup designed to better meet the needs of the high-throughput and high-dynamic-range by integrating multiple high-throughput droplet processing schemes on the chip. The design is capable of generating over 1-million, monodisperse, 50 picolitre droplets in 2-7 minutes that then self-assemble into high density 3-dimensional sphere packing configurations in a large viewing chamber for visualization and analysis. This device then undergoes on-chip polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and fluorescence detection to digitally quantify the sample's nucleic acid contents. Wide-field fluorescence images are captured using a low cost 21-megapixel digital camera and macro-lens with an 8-12 cm(2) field-of-view at 1× to 0.85× magnification, respectively. We demonstrate both end-point and real-time imaging ability to perform on-chip quantitative digital PCR analysis of the entire droplet array. Compared to previous work, this highly integrated design yields a 100-fold increase in the number of on-chip digitized reactors with simultaneous fluorescence imaging for digital PCR based assays.

  17. Determination of Dynamics of Plant Plasma Membrane Proteins with Fluorescence Recovery and Raster Image Correlation Spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laňková, Martina; Humpolíčková, Jana; Vosolsobě, S.; Cit, Zdeněk; Lacek, Jozef; Čovan, Martin; Čovanová, Milada; Hof, Martin; Petrášek, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 290-299 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2476; GA ČR(CZ) GPP501/12/P951 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : raster image correlation spectroscopy * fluorescence recovery after photobleaching * auxin influx Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  18. Quantitative imaging of glutathione in live cells using a reversible reaction-based ratiometric fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiqian; Yu, Yong; Chen, Jianwei; Zhao, Mingkun; Chen, Hui; Song, Xianzhou; Matzuk, Alexander J; Carroll, Shaina L; Tan, Xiao; Sizovs, Antons; Cheng, Ninghui; Wang, Meng C; Wang, Jin

    2015-03-20

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in maintaining redox homeostasis inside cells. Currently, there are no methods available to quantitatively assess the GSH concentration in live cells. Live cell fluorescence imaging revolutionized the field of cell biology and has become an indispensable tool in current biological studies. In order to minimize the disturbance to the biological system in live cell imaging, the probe concentration needs to be significantly lower than the analyte concentration. Because of this, any irreversible reaction-based GSH probe can only provide qualitative results within a short reaction time and will exhibit maximum response regardless of the GSH concentration if the reaction is completed. A reversible reaction-based probe with an appropriate equilibrium constant allows measurement of an analyte at much higher concentrations and, thus, is a prerequisite for GSH quantification inside cells. In this contribution, we report the first fluorescent probe-ThiolQuant Green (TQ Green)-for quantitative imaging of GSH in live cells. Due to the reversible nature of the reaction between the probe and GSH, we are able to quantify mM concentrations of GSH with TQ Green concentrations as low as 20 nM. Furthermore, the GSH concentrations measured using TQ Green in 3T3-L1, HeLa, HepG2, PANC-1, and PANC-28 cells are reproducible and well correlated with the values obtained from cell lysates. TQ Green imaging can also resolve the changes in GSH concentration in PANC-1 cells upon diethylmaleate (DEM) treatment. In addition, TQ Green can be conveniently applied in fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) to measure GSH level changes. Through this study, we not only demonstrate the importance of reaction reversibility in designing quantitative reaction-based fluorescent probes but also provide a practical tool to facilitate redox biology studies.

  19. Development of a handheld smart dental instrument for root canal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Chukwuemeka; Vartanian, Albert; Toussaint, , Kimani C., Jr.

    2016-11-01

    Ergonomics and ease of visualization play a major role in the effectiveness of endodontic therapy. Using only commercial off-the-shelf components, we present the pulpascope-a prototype of a compact, handheld, wireless dental instrument for pulp cavity imaging. This instrument addresses the current limitations of occupational injuries, size, and cost that exist with current endodontic microscopes used for root canal procedures. Utilizing a 15,000 coherent, imaging fiber bundle along with an integrated illumination source and wireless CMOS sensor, we demonstrate images of various teeth with resolution of ˜48 μm and angular field-of-view of 70 deg.

  20. Denoising of two-photon fluorescence images with block-matching 3D filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielyan, Aram; Wu, Yu-Wei; Shih, Pei-Yu; Dembitskaya, Yulia; Semyanov, Alexey

    2014-07-01

    Two-photon florescence imaging is widely used to perform morphological analysis of subcellular structures such as neuronal dendrites and spines, astrocytic processes etc. This method is also indispensable for functional analysis of cellular activity such as Ca2+ dynamics. Although spatial resolution of laser scanning two-photon system is greater than that of confocal or wide field microscope, it is still diffraction limited. In practice, the resolution of the system is more affected by its signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) than the diffraction limit. Thus, various approaches aiming to increase the SNR in two-photon imaging are desirable and can potentially save on building costly super-resolution imaging system. Here we analyze the statistics of noise in the two-photon florescence images of hippocampal astrocytes expressing genetically encoded Ca2+ sensor GCaMP2 and show that it can be reasonably well approximated using the same models which are used for describing noise in images acquired with digital cameras. This allows to use denoising methods available for wide field imaging on two-photon images. Particularly we demonstrate that the Block-Matching 3D (BM3D) filter can significantly improve the quality of two-photon fluorescence images so small details such as astrocytic processes can be easier identified. Moreover, denoising of the images with BM3D yields less noisy Ca2+ signals in astrocytes when denoising of the images with Gaussian filter. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fluorescent Nanoprobes Dedicated to in Vivo Imaging: From Preclinical Validations to Clinical Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Texier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With the fast development, in the last ten years, of a large choice of set-ups dedicated to routine in vivo measurements in rodents, fluorescence imaging techniques are becoming essential tools in preclinical studies. Human clinical uses for diagnostic and image-guided surgery are also emerging. In comparison to low-molecular weight organic dyes, the use of fluorescent nanoprobes can improve both the signal sensitivity (better in vivo optical properties and the fluorescence biodistribution (passive “nano” uptake in tumours for instance. A wide range of fluorescent nanoprobes have been designed and tested in preclinical studies for the last few years. They will be reviewed and discussed considering the obstacles that need to be overcome for their potential everyday use in clinics. The conjugation of fluorescence imaging with the benefits of nanotechnology should open the way to new medical applications in the near future.

  2. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. J. Bloss

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE. The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ.

  3. Validation of the calibration of a laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the measurement of OH radicals in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, W. J.; Lee, J. D.; Bloss, C.; Heard, D. E.; Pilling, M. J.; Wirtz, K.; Martin-Reviejo, M.; Siese, M.

    2004-04-01

    An assessment of the accuracy of OH concentrations measured in a smog chamber by a calibrated laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been made, in the course of 9 experiments performed to study the photo-oxidation of benzene, toluene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, para-xylene, ortho-cresol and ethene at the European Photoreactor facility (EUPHORE). The LIF system was calibrated via the water photolysis / ozone actinometry approach. OH concentrations were inferred from the instantaneous rate of removal of each hydrocarbon species (measured by FTIR or HPLC) via the appropriate rate coefficient for their reaction with OH, and compared with those obtained from the LIF system. Good agreement between the two approaches was found for all species with the exception of 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, for which OH concentrations inferred from hydrocarbon removal were a factor of 3 lower than those measured by the LIF system. From the remaining 8 experiments, an overall value of 1.15±0.13 (±1σ) was obtained for [OH]LIF / [OH]Hydrocarbon Decay, compared with the estimated uncertainty in the accuracy of the water photolysis / ozone actinometry OH calibration technique of 26% (1σ).

  4. Lead detection in food, medicinal, and ceremonial items using a portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reames, Ginger; Charlton, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The authors evaluated a Niton XLp303A X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument, used to identify lead hazards in housing, to determine its effectiveness to screen food, medicinal, and ceremonial items during lead poisoning investigations. Fifty-eight suspect exposure items were tested for lead by XRF and then sent to the laboratory for confirmation. A lead content cut-point of 10 parts per million (ppm; the lower level at which the XRF model could reliably determine the presence of lead) was used to evaluate the results. The Niton consistently identified the presence of lead spectra emissions and gave quantitative readings above 10 ppm for the nine samples with lead content that exceeded 10 ppm in laboratory testing. The authors' study suggests that the Niton XLp303A is an effective screening method for food and similar items with lead content > or = 10 ppm, provided the operator is trained to identify lead spectra. Rapid, on-site identification of lead exposure sources allows an investigator to inform the family of immediate steps they can take to decrease their child's lead exposure.

  5. Elemental analysis of granite by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Taher, A

    2012-01-01

    The instrumental neutron activation analysis technique (INAA) was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of granite samples collected from four locations in the Aswan area in South Egypt. The samples were prepared together with their standards and simultaneously irradiated in a neutron flux of 7×10(11)n/cm(2)s in the TRIGA Mainz research reactor. Gamma-ray spectra from an hyper-pure germanium detector were analyzed. The present study provides the basic data of elemental concentrations of granite rocks. The following elements have been determined Na, Mg, K, Fe, Mn, Sc, Cr, Ti, Co, Zn, Ga, Rb, Zr, Nb, Sn, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Yb, Lu, Hf, Ta, Th and U. The X-ray fluorescence (XRF) was used for comparison and to detect elements, which can be detected only by XRF such as F, S, Cl, Co, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se and V. The data presented here are our contribution to understanding the elemental composition of the granite rocks. Because there are no existing databases for the elemental analysis of granite, our results are a start to establishing a database for the Egyptian granite. It is hoped that the data presented here will be useful to those dealing with geochemistry, granite chemistry and related fields. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Analytical performance of benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence instrumentation for multielemental analysis of wine samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalipi, Rogerta; Marguí, Eva; Borgese, Laura; Bilo, Fabjola; Depero, Laura E.

    2016-06-01

    Recent technological improvements have led to a widespread adoption of benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence systems (TXRF) for analysis of liquid samples. However, benchtop TXRF systems usually present limited sensitivity compared with high-scale instrumentation which can restrict its application in some fields. The aim of the present work was to evaluate and compare the analytical capabilities of two TXRF systems, equipped with low power Mo and W target X-ray tubes, for multielemental analysis of wine samples. Using the Mo-TXRF system, the detection limits for most elements were one order of magnitude lower than those attained using the W-TXRF system. For the detection of high Z elements like Cd and Ag, however, W-TXRF remains a very good option due to the possibility of K-Lines detection. Accuracy and precision of the obtained results have been evaluated analyzing spiked real wine samples and comparing the TXRF results with those obtained by inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). In general, good agreement was obtained between ICP-OES and TXRF results for the analysis of both red and white wine samples except for light elements (i.e., K) which TXRF concentrations were underestimated. However, a further achievement of analytical quality of TXRF results can be achieved if wine analysis is performed after dilution of the sample with de-ionized water.

  7. Instrumentation for ice crystal characterization in laboratory using interferometric out-of-focus imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunel, M.; Demange, G.; Fromager, M.; Talbi, M.; Zapolsky, H.; Patte, R.; Aït Ameur, K.; Jacquot-Kielar, J.; Coetmellec, S.; Gréhan, G.; Quevreux, B.

    2017-08-01

    Airborne characterization of ice crystals has important applications. The extreme difficulty of realizing in situ tests requires the development of a complete instrumentation in the laboratory. Such an installation should enable design, development, test, and calibration of instruments in conditions as close as possible to real ones. We present a set of numerical and experimental tools that have been developed to realize ice crystal sensors based on interferometric particle imaging. The set of tools covers the development of complementary simulators for crystal growth and interferometric particle imaging predictions, experimental generation of "programmable" ice crystals, and instrumentation of a freezing column where different techniques as in-focus imaging, out-of-focus imaging, and digital in-line holography can be combined simultaneously for test and calibration.

  8. Master/slave: a better tool for Gabor filtering optical coherence tomography imaging instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernat, Ramona; Bradu, Adrian; Istraelsen, Niels M.; Bang, Ole; Rivet, Sylvain; Keane, Pearse A.; Garway-Heath, David; Rajendram, Ranjan; Podoleanu, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    In this report, the benefits that the Master/Slave (MS) implementation of optical coherence tomography (OCT) can bring to a Gabor filtering (GF) imaging instrument are illustrated. The MS allows simultaneous display of three categories of images in one frame: multiple depth en-face OCT images, two B-scan OCT and a confocal like image. The power of MS is illustrated here by showing 3D images of constant transversal resolution from different objects, obtained by merging sub-volumes collected for four different focus positions. By combining the two techniques, GF and MS, a powerful imaging instrument is demonstrated. We show that when more than four focus positions are required, MS can produce fused volumes faster than the conventional FT based procedure.

  9. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  10. Analysis of receptor clustering on cell surfaces by imaging fluorescent particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, I E; Anderson, C M; Georgiou, G N; Stevenson, G V; Cherry, R J

    1994-09-01

    Fluorescently labeled low density lipoproteins (LDL) and influenza virus particles were bound to the surface of human fibroblasts and imaged with a cooled slow-scan CCD camera attached to a fluorescence microscope. Particles were also imaged after attachment to polylysine-coated microscope slides. The digital images were analyzed by fitting data points in the region of fluorescent spots by a two-dimensional Gaussian function, thus obtaining a measure of spot intensity with correction for local background. The intensity distributions for particles bound to polylysine slides were mainly accounted for by particle size distributions as determined by electron microscopy. In the case of LDL, the intensity distributions for particles bound to fibroblasts were considerably broadened, indicative of clustering. The on-cell intensity distributions were deconvolved into 1-particle, 2-particle, 3-particle, etc. components using the data obtained with LDL bound to polylysine-coated slides as an empirical measure of the single particle intensity distribution. This procedure yielded a reasonably accurate measure of the proportion of single particles, but large errors were encountered in the proportions of larger cluster sizes. The possibility of studying the dynamics of clustering was investigated by binding LDL to cells at 4 degrees C and observing changes in the intensity distribution with time after warming to 20 degrees C.

  11. Fluorescence Imaging Assisted Photodynamic Therapy Using Photosensitizer-Linked Gold Quantum Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Lakshmi V; Nazeer, Shaiju S; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2015-06-23

    Fluorescence imaging assisted photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a viable two-in-one clinical tool for cancer treatment and follow-up. While the surface plasmon effect of gold nanorods and nanoparticles has been effective for cancer therapy, their emission properties when compared to gold nanoclusters are weak for fluorescence imaging guided PDT. In order to address the above issues, we have synthesized a near-infrared-emitting gold quantum cluster capped with lipoic acid (L-AuC with (Au)18(L)14) based nanoplatform with excellent tumor reduction property by incorporating a tumor-targeting agent (folic acid) and a photosensitizer (protoporphyrin IX), for selective PDT. The synthesized quantum cluster based photosensitizer PFL-AuC showed 80% triplet quantum yield when compared to that of the photosensitizer alone (63%). PFL-AuC having 60 μg (0.136 mM) of protoporphyrin IX was sufficient to kill 50% of the tumor cell population. Effective destruction of tumor cells was evident from the histopathology and fluorescence imaging, which confirm the in vivo PDT efficacy of PFL-AuC.

  12. Early Identification of Herbicide Stress in Soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) Using Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Wang, Pei; Weber, Jonas Felix; Gerhards, Roland

    2017-12-22

    Herbicides may damage soybean in conventional production systems. Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technology has been applied to identify herbicide stress in weed species a few days after application. In this study, greenhouse experiments followed by field experiments at five sites were conducted to investigate if the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging is capable of identifying herbicide stress in soybean shortly after application. Measurements were carried out from emergence until the three-to-four-leaf stage of the soybean plants. Results showed that maximal photosystem II (PS II) quantum yield and shoot dry biomass was significantly reduced in soybean by herbicides compared to the untreated control plants. The stress of PS II inhibiting herbicides occurred on the cotyledons of soybean and plants recovered after one week. The stress induced by DOXP synthase-, microtubule assembly-, or cell division-inhibitors was measured from the two-leaf stage until four-leaf stage of soybean. We could demonstrate that the chlorophyll fluorescence imaging technology is capable for detecting herbicide stress in soybean. The system can be applied under both greenhouse and field conditions. This helps farmers to select weed control strategies with less phytotoxicity in soybean and avoid yield losses due to herbicide stress.

  13. Data collection instrumentation for ultrasonic imaging under sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKnight, J.A.; Parker, J.A.

    1981-05-01

    A team at the Risley Nuclear Power Development Establishment has been developing apparatus for the production of ultrasonic images under opaque liquids. The technique is intended for examining objects under liquid sodium at 300 0 C, and the range of possible methods is restricted as a consequence. The method chosen uses pulse-echo ultrasonics combined with mechanical scanning to assemble the final image. The data is collected using a CAMAC system under the control of an Intel 8080 microprocessor. The data is analysed separately and presented on a colour display using a DEC LSl 11 microprocessor controlled system. To achieve the required performance a number of special electronic assemblies were made. A single image requires 2.5 M byte of data. The cost of using the apparatus on a Fast Reactor is such that it is prudent to provide back-up data collection through a data link, and to maximise the data collection rate. This causes problems with the interrupt cycle time of the CAMAC controller, which can be resolved using synchronous programs specifically tailored to each application. (author)

  14. Developing a genetically encoded green fluorescent protein mutant for sensitive light-up fluorescent sensing and cellular imaging of Hg(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Guo, Daiping; Wang, Qian; Wu, Xin; Li, Zhao; Zheng, Zhenhua; Yin, Boyuan; Xia, Lin; Tang, Jixian; Luo, Wenxin; Xia, Ningshao; Jiang, Yunbao

    2015-05-30

    Hg(II) is well-known for quenching fluorescence in a distance dependent manner. Nevertheless, when we exposed the fluorophore of a green fluorescent protein (GFP) toward Hg(II), through H148C mutation, the GFP fluorescence could be "lighted up" by Hg(II) down to sub-nM level. The detection linear range is 0.5-3.0 nM for protein solutions at 8.0 nM. The GFPH148C protein displayed a promising selectivity toward Hg(II) and also the cellular imaging capacity. Spectra measurements suggested that the ground-state redistribution of protein contributed to the fluorescence enhancement, which was found not limited to Hg(II), and thus presented an opening for building a pool of GFP-based chemosensors toward other heavy metal ions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. The international image of the state as an instrument of soft power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A. Koptyaeva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The international image of the state as an instrument of soft power is revealed on the example of Russia as one of the Arctic states. The analysis of the main aspects of the international image of Russia, a set of causes and factors that influence the perception of Russia abroad have been analyzed. The specific of the international image making of Russia is discussed.

  16. The image of psychology programs: the value of the instrumental-symbolic framework

    OpenAIRE

    Van Hoye, Greet; Lievens, Filip; De Soete, Britt; Libbrecht, Nele; Schollaert, Eveline; Baligant, Dimphna

    2014-01-01

    As competition for funding and students intensifies, it becomes increasingly important for psychology programs to have an image that is attractive and makes them stand out from other programs. We use the instrumental-symbolic framework from the marketing domain to determine the image of different master’s programs in psychology and examine how these image dimensions relate to student attraction and competitor differentiation. The samples consist of both potential students (N = 114) and curren...

  17. An individually coated near-infrared fluorescent protein as a safe and robust nanoprobe for in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Xiang, Kun; Yang, Yi-Xin; Wang, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yangdong; Wang, Haifang; Zhu, Qing-Qing; Fan, Liqiang; Liu, Yuanfang; Cao, Aoneng

    2013-10-01

    A prerequisite for in vivo fluorescence imaging is the safety of fluorescent probes. Among all fluorescent probes, fluorescent proteins (FPs) might be the safest ones, which have been widely used in biological sciences at the gene level. But FPs have not been used in vivo in the purified form yet due to the instability of proteins. Here, we individually coat near-infrared (NIR) FPs (NIRFPs) with a silica nanoshell, resulting in NIRFP@silica, one of the safest and brightest NIR fluorescent nanoprobes with a quantum yield of 0.33 for in vivo imaging. The silica shell not only protects NIRFPs from denaturation and metabolic digestion, but also enhances the quantum yield and photostability of the coated NIRFPs. When injected via the tail vein, NIRFP@silica NPs can distribute all over the mouse body, and then can be efficiently eliminated through urine in 24 h, demonstrating its potential applications as a safe and robust NIR fluorescence probe for whole body imaging.A prerequisite for in vivo fluorescence imaging is the safety of fluorescent probes. Among all fluorescent probes, fluorescent proteins (FPs) might be the safest ones, which have been widely used in biological sciences at the gene level. But FPs have not been used in vivo in the purified form yet due to the instability of proteins. Here, we individually coat near-infrared (NIR) FPs (NIRFPs) with a silica nanoshell, resulting in NIRFP@silica, one of the safest and brightest NIR fluorescent nanoprobes with a quantum yield of 0.33 for in vivo imaging. The silica shell not only protects NIRFPs from denaturation and metabolic digestion, but also enhances the quantum yield and photostability of the coated NIRFPs. When injected via the tail vein, NIRFP@silica NPs can distribute all over the mouse body, and then can be efficiently eliminated through urine in 24 h, demonstrating its potential applications as a safe and robust NIR fluorescence probe for whole body imaging. Electronic supplementary information (ESI

  18. Sun-induced fluorescence - a new probe of photosynthesis: First maps from the imaging spectrometer HyPlant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rascher, U.; Alonso, A.; Burkart, A.; Cilia, C.; Cogliati, S.; Colombo, R.; Damm, A.; Drusch, M.; Guanter, L.; Hanuš, Jan; Hyvarinen, T.; Jullita, T.; Jussila, J.; Kataja, K.; Kokkalis, P.; Kraft, S.; Kraska, T.; Matveeva, M.; Moreno, J.; Müller, O.; Panigada, C.; Pikl, Miroslav; Pinto, F.; Prey, L.; Pude, F.; Rossini, M.; Schickling, A.; Schurr, E.; Schüttemeyer, D.; Verrlest, J.; Zemek, František

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 12 (2015), s. 4673-4684 ISSN 1354-1013 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : airborne measurements * chlorophyll fluorescence * FLEX * HyPlant * imaging spectroscopy * photosynthesis * remote sensing * sun-induced fluorescence * vegetation monitoring Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 8.444, year: 2015

  19. Drug quantification in turbid media by fluorescence imaging combined with light-absorption correction using white Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2011-01-01

    in vivo by the fluorescence imaging technique. In this paper we present a novel approach to compensate for the light absorption in homogeneous turbid media both for the excitation and emission light, utilizing time-resolved fluorescence white Monte Carlo simulations combined with the Beer-Lambert law...

  20. Fluorescent and quantitative mitochondrial redox imaging of tumor targeted by Octa-RGD probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Sha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, over-expressed in a broad range of cancer diseases, are widely utilized as a tumor biomarker. Metabolism investigation also plays important roles in tumor theranostics. Developing simple integrin-targetting probe and monitoring tumor metabolism will give opportunities to find ways for cancer treatment, however, the investigation of tumor metabolism with integrin receptor based probes has been rarely reported so far. Here, we developed an octavalent fluorescent probe Octa-RGD by convenient genetic method, based on one tetrameric far-red fluorescent protein (fRFP linked with RGD peptides. We validated its intergin targeting by confocal imaging in vitro. Then we screened a variety of tumor cells, and differentiated their binding affinity based on the fluorescence of the probe via flow cytometry. Among these cells, CNE-2 cells had the highest uptake of the probe, while B16 cells had the lowest, corresponding with their intergin expression levels. Next, the fluorescent and metabolic imaging was performed in HT1080 (intergin postive tumor, where nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen (NADH, flavoprotein (Fp and fRFP fluorescent signals were collected. The tumor from mice intravenously injected with Octa-RGD probe displayed obviously higher NADH redox ratio NADH/(Fp+NADH and fRFP signal, than those with fRFP protein. It suggested that integrin targeting may have influence on the target cell metabolism, and further demonstrated Octa-RGD probe facilitated its uptake in the targeted tumor in vivo. This paper developed a useful probe, which can bind integrins specifically and efficiently in tumor cells, and together with tumor metabolic information, it may provide new insight for RGD targeting-based cancer therapeutics.

  1. A new screening method to detect proximal dental caries using fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Soo; Lee, Eun-Song; Kang, Si-Mook; Jung, Eun-Ha; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Jung, Hoi-In; Kim, Baek-Il

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the screening performance of the quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology to detect proximal caries using both fluorescence loss and red fluorescence in a clinical situation. Moreover, a new simplified QLF score for the proximal caries (QS-Proximal) is proposed and its validity for detecting proximal caries was evaluated as well. This clinical study included 280 proximal surfaces, which were assessed by visual-tactile and radiographic examinations and scored by each scoring system according to lesion severity. The occlusal QLF images were analysed in two different ways: (1) a quantitative analysis producing fluorescence loss (ΔF) and red fluorescence (ΔR) parameters; and (2) a new QLF scoring index. For both quantitative parameters and QS-Proximal, the sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) were calculated as a function of the radiographic scoring index at the enamel and dentine caries levels. Both ΔF and ΔR showed excellent AUROC values at the dentine caries level (ΔF=0.860, ΔR=0.902) whereas a relatively lower value was observed at the enamel caries level (ΔF=0.655, ΔR=0.686). The QS-Proximal also showed excellent AUROC ranged from 0.826 to 0.864 for detecting proximal caries at the dentine level. The QS-Proximal, which represents fluorescence changes, showed excellent performance in detecting proximal caries using the radiographic score as the gold standard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Improved localization accuracy in stochastic super-resolution fluorescence microscopy by K-factor image deshadowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Meiri, Amihai; Ebeling, Carl G; Menon, Rajesh; Gerton, Jordan M; Jorgensen, Erik M; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-12-16

    Localization of a single fluorescent particle with sub-diffraction-limit accuracy is a key merit in localization microscopy. Existing methods such as photoactivated localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) achieve localization accuracies of single emitters that can reach an order of magnitude lower than the conventional resolving capabilities of optical microscopy. However, these techniques require a sparse distribution of simultaneously activated fluorophores in the field of view, resulting in larger time needed for the construction of the full image. In this paper we present the use of a nonlinear image decomposition algorithm termed K-factor, which reduces an image into a nonlinear set of contrast-ordered decompositions whose joint product reassembles the original image. The K-factor technique, when implemented on raw data prior to localization, can improve the localization accuracy of standard existing methods, and