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Sample records for fluorescence anisotropy study

  1. Interaction of aromatic compounds with Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase: fluorescence anisotropy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Nemtseva, E.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.

    2003-01-01

    The time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence techniques were employed to elucidate possible interactions of four aromatic compounds (anthracene, POPOP, MSB and 1,4-naphthalendiol) with bacterial luciferase. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence anisotropy decays of these compounds were studied in

  2. Study the effects of divalent metallic ions on the combination of DNA and histones with fluorescence anisotropy assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YuYing; WANG PengYe; DOU ShuoXing; XIE Ping; XI XuGuang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) on the interaction between DNA and histone are studied using a fluorescence anisotropy assay. Fluorescence anisotropies of DNA and DNA-histone in the presence of divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) are measured. The results indicate that histone reduces the fluorescence anisotropy of lambda DNA while the divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) significantly enhance the fluorescence anisotropy. Compared to the case of DNA incubated with histone alone, there are more histones binding to DNA when divalent ion, histone and DNA are incubated together. We also find that Mn2+ makes the DNA-histone complexes more condensed than the other ions do.

  3. Sol-gel particle growth studied using fluorescence anisotropy: An alternative to scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2000-08-01

    The aggregation of silica particles during hydrogel polymerization has been observed in situ with angstrom resolution using the combined fluorescence anisotropy decay of solvated and bound dye. Primary particles of mean hydrodynamic radius ~1.5 nm are found to be present within 20 min of mixing sodium silicate solution and sulfuric acid. Clustering then occurs during siloxane polymerization to produce after ~30 h secondary particles with a mean radius up to ~4.5 nm at a growth rate that depends on silicate concentration and time to microgelation tg. Subsequent condensation to ~4 nm radius occurs within 1 week as particle syneresis dominates.

  4. Effect of sodium deoxycholate and sodium cholate on DPPC vesicles: A fluorescence anisotropy study with diphenylhexatriene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usharani Subuddhi; Ashok K Mishra

    2007-03-01

    Effects of two bile salts, namely sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), on DPPC small unilamellar vesicles have been investigated using the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy () of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a tool. It was found that the variation of is sensitive enough to monitor different stages of interaction of bile salts with DPPC vesicles. NaDC induced significant changes in the membrane well below its CMC (6 mM). Even at 4 mM, which is still lower than the CMC, the phospholipids were completely solubilised by the NaDC micelles. The effect of NaC on DPPC vesicles, however, was much less significant, especially in the sub-micellar concentration regime. Being more hydrophilic NaC does not interact with the membrane efficiently. Complete solubilisation of phospholipids took place only when the concentration of NaC was above its CMC (16 mM). The experiments also showed that the bile salt-induced changes of vesicle structure were strongly dependent on the concentration of the bile salt and not on the molar ratio of lipid and bile salt.

  5. Translational and rotational motions of albumin sensed by a non-covalent associated porphyrin under physiological and acidic conditions: a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time resolved anisotropy study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, S.M.; Costa, S.M.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between a free-base, anionic water-soluble porphyrin, TSPP, and the drug carrier protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) at two different pH-values. Both rotational correlatio

  6. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of the Interaction Between DNA and a Peptide Truncated from the p53 Protein Core Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengxuan; Liang, Gaiting; Liu, Zhen; Zu, Lily

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction between a peptide truncated from the binding site of tumor suppressor p53 protein and the DNAs covalently labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) dye. Fluorescence intensity quenching and changes of anisotropy decay lifetime were monitored when FAM labeled DNA formed complex with the peptide. The results demonstrated that the sequence of DNA could not define the binding specificity between the peptide and DNA. But the anisotropy decay of FAM can be used to examine the binding affinity of the peptide to DNA. The fluorescent dynamics of FAM can also be used to represent the rigidity of the complex formed between the peptide and DNA.

  7. Fluorescence anisotropy of acridinedione dyes in glycerol: Prolate model of ellipsoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Indirapriyadharshini; P Ramamurthy

    2007-03-01

    Time-dependent reorientations of resorcinol-based acridinidione (ADR) dyes in glycerol were studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. The difference between fluorescence anisotropy decays recorded at 460 nm when exciting at 250 nm and those obtained when exciting at 394 nm are reported. When exciting at 394 nm, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is bi-exponential, while on exciting at 250 nm a mono-exponential fluorescence anisotropy decay is observed. We interpret this in terms of different directions of the absorption dipole at 394 and 250 nm with the emission dipole respectively, which is experimentally validated and further analysed as a prolate model of ellipsoid.

  8. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  10. Effect of sucrose on chemically and thermally induced unfolding of domain-I of human serum albumin: Solvation dynamics and fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Sen, Pratik

    2016-04-01

    The present study is devoted to understand the effect of sucrose on the hydration dynamics and rotational relaxation dynamics within the domain-I of HSA during chemically as well as thermally induced unfolding. It has been observed that the average solvation time become slower in the presence of sucrose for the lower concentrations of GnHCl, however at higher concentrations of GnHCl the effect of sucrose is almost negligible. From the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy it has been observed that in the lower concentration region of GnHCl the sucrose induced stabilization is small as compared to the higher concentrations of GnHCl. We have concluded that the hydration dynamics plays an important role in the sucrose induced stabilization process at the low concentration region; whereas environmental restriction is responsible at the higher concentration of GnHCl. However, we have observed a negligible stabilizing effect of sucrose towards the temperature induced unfolding.

  11. Comparative study of the fatty acid binding process of a new FABP from Cherax quadricarinatus by fluorescence intensity, lifetime and anisotropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayao Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are small cytosolic proteins, largely distributed in invertebrates and vertebrates, which accomplish uptake and intracellular transport of hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. Although long chain fatty acids play multiple crucial roles in cellular functions (structural, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, the precise functions of FABPs, especially those of invertebrate species, remain elusive. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel FABP family member, Cq-FABP, from the hepatopancreas of red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. We report the characterization of fatty acid-binding affinity of Cq-FABP by four different competitive fluorescence-based assays. In the two first approaches, the fluorescent probe 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS, a binder of internal cavities of protein, was used either by directly monitoring its fluorescence emission or by monitoring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring between the single tryptophan residue of Cq-FABP and ANS. The third and the fourth approaches were based on the measurement of the fluorescence emission intensity of the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid probe or the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of a fluorescently labeled fatty acid (BODIPY-C16, respectively. The four methodologies displayed consistent equilibrium constants for a given fatty acid but were not equivalent in terms of analysis. Indeed, the two first methods were complicated by the existence of non specific binding modes of ANS while BODIPY-C16 and cis-parinaric acid specifically targeted the fatty acid binding site. We found a relationship between the affinity and the length of the carbon chain, with the highest affinity obtained for the shortest fatty acid, suggesting that steric effects primarily influence the interaction of fatty acids in the binding cavity of Cq-FABP. Moreover, our results show that the binding affinities

  12. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  13. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  14. Fluorescence anisotropy (polarization): from drug screening to precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hairong; Wu, Qian; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the major established methods accepted by industry and regulatory agencies for understanding the mechanisms of drug action and selecting drug candidates utilizing a high-throughput format. Areas covered This review covers the basics of FA and complementary methods, such as fluorescence lifetime anisotropy and their roles in the drug discovery process. The authors highlight the factors affecting FA readouts, fluorophore selection, and instrumentation. Furthermore, the authors describe the recent development of a successful, commercially valuable FA assay for Long QT syndrome drug toxicity to illustrate the role that FA can play in the early stages of drug discovery. Expert opinion Despite the success in drug discovery, the FA-based technique experiences competitive pressure from other homogeneous assays. That being said, FA is an established yet rapidly developing technique, recognized by academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies across the globe. The technical problems encountered in working with small molecules in homogeneous assays are largely solved, and new challenges come from more complex biological molecules and nanoparticles. With that, FA will remain one of the major work-horse techniques leading to precision (personalized) medicine. PMID:26289575

  15. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotr...

  16. Nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy studies of intermolecular interactions in bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and its mixtures with various cosolvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Nanda, Raju; Seth, Sudipta; Ghosh, Arindam; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-09-01

    Keeping in mind the potential usefulness of mixed ionic liquid (IL)-cosolvents systems in several industrial applications, intermolecular interactions between a borate-based IL, bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([BIMIMDBA][TF2N]), and its binary mixtures with several molecular solvents has been investigated through NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of the 1H chemical shifts (δ/ppm) and translational diffusion coefficients (D) of the IL in different solvent mixtures demonstrate interplay of nonspecific (ion-dipole) and specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in governing the properties of these mixtures. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data provide evidence in favour of different IL-solvent interaction for different IL-cosolvent systems.

  17. Fluorescence anisotropy characterization of urine in the diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is considered as the second most commonly occurring malignancy among women, next to breast cancer. It is well known that most of the cancer patients diagnosed with advanced stages and there is a pressing need for improved methods to detect cancer at its initial stages. Many techniques have been adopted for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Among these, fluorescence polarization spectroscopy is a complementary technique of fluorescence spectroscopy which helps us to elucidate the spectral characteristics which highly depend on pH, viscosity and local environment. Since urine has many metabolites and the measurement of native fluorescence of urine, in principle, able to provide an indication of a number of health conditions, attempts were made to study fluorescence anisotropic characterization of the human urine of cervical cancer patients and normal subjects. Significant differences were observed between the anisotropic and polarization values of cancer subjects and normal subjects.

  18. Nanoparticle Sizing and Potential Quality Control of Sols Using a Unique Fluorescence Anisotropy Probe and 3D Contour Anisotropy Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolin, Jan; Geddes, Chris D

    2015-03-19

    Spectroscopic properties of the particle sizing fluorophore Dipole Blue are reported. The probe is cationic in nature, highly water-soluble, and strongly adheres to anionic silica surfaces by electrostatic interactions, as is demonstrated here by Ludox SM 30. The probe has a distinct absorbance band centered at 320 nm, and the fluorescence emission band is Stokes-shifted 100 nm with a peak centered at 426 nm. From time-correlated single-photon counting experiments, the fluorescence lifetime was found to be adequately described by a three-exponential decay model with an intensity-averaged lifetime of 15.6 ns. Perrin graph analysis of steady-state anisotropy shows the presence of silica particles with a radius of (5.44 ± 0.16) nm, which, considering the distribution of particle sizes, is in reasonable agreement with 3.5 nm found from dynamic light scattering experiments.

  19. Liposome fluidization and melting point depression by pressurized CO2 determined by fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothun, Geoffrey D; Knutson, Barbara L; Strobel, Herbert J; Nokes, Sue E

    2005-01-18

    The influence of CO2 on the bilayer fluidity of liposomes, which are representative of model cellular membranes, was examined for the first time at the elevated pressures (up to 13.9 MPa) associated with CO2-based processing of liposomes and microbial sterilization. Fluidization and melting point depression of aqueous dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes by pressurized CO2 (present as an excess phase) were studied by steady-state fluorescence anisotropy using the membrane probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Isothermal experiments revealed reversible, pressure-dependent fluidization of DPPC bilayers at temperatures corresponding to near-gel (295 K) and fluid (333 K) phases at atmospheric pressure, where the gel-to-fluid phase transition (Tm) occurs at approximately 315 K. Isobaric measurements (PCO2 =1.8, 7.0, and 13.9 MPa) of DPH anisotropy demonstrate substantial melting point depression (DeltaTm = -4.8 to -18.5 K) and a large broadening of the gel-fluid phase transition region, which were interpreted using conventional theories of melting point depression. Liposome fluidity is influenced by CO2 accumulation in the hydrocarbon core and polar headgroup region, as well as the formation of carbonic acid and/or the presence of buffering species under elevated CO2 pressure.

  20. Confocal fluorescence anisotropy and FRAP imaging of α-synuclein amyloid aggregates in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Julia Roberti

    Full Text Available We assessed the intracellular association states of the Parkinson's disease related protein α-synuclein (AS in living cells by transfection with a functional recombinant mutant protein (AS-C4 bearing a tetracysteine tag binding the fluorogenic biarsenical ligands FlAsH and ReAsH, The aggregation states of AS-C4 were assessed by in situ microscopy of molecular translational mobility with FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and of local molecular density with confocal fluorescence anisotropy (CFA. FRAP recovery was quantitative and rapid in regions of free protein, whereas AS in larger aggregates was>80% immobile. A small 16% recovery characterized by an apparent diffusion constant of 0.03-0.04 µm(2/s was attributed to the dynamics of smaller, associated forms of AS-C4 and the exchange of mobile species with the larger immobile aggregates. By CFA, the larger aggregates exhibited high brightness and very low anisotropy, consistent with homoFRET between closely packed AS, for which a Förster distance (R(o of 5.3 nm was calculated. Other bright regions had high anisotropy values, close to that of monomeric AS, and indicative of membrane-associated protein with both low mobility and low degree of association. The anisotropy-fluorescence intensity correlations also revealed regions of free protein or of small aggregates, undetectable by conventional fluorescence imaging alone. The combined strategy (FRAP+CFA provides a highly sensitive means for elucidating both the dynamics and structural features of protein aggregates and other intracellular complexes in living cells, and can be extended to other amyloid systems and to drug screening protocols.

  1. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  2. Investigating the allosteric reverse signalling of PARP inhibitors with microsecond molecular dynamic simulations and fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Jean-Rémy; Carotti, Andrea; Passeri, Daniela; Filipponi, Paolo; Liscio, Paride; Camaioni, Emidio; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The inhibition of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family members is a strategy pursued for the development of novel therapeutic agents in a range of diseases, including stroke, cardiac ischemia, cancer, inflammation and diabetes. Even though some PARP-1 inhibitors have advanced to clinical setting for cancer therapy, a great deal of attention is being devoted to understand the polypharmacology of current PARP inhibitors. Besides blocking the catalytic activity, recent works have shown that some PARP inhibitors exhibit a poisoning activity, by trapping the enzyme at damaged sites of DNA and forming cytotoxic complexes. In this study we have used microsecond molecular dynamics to study the allosteric reverse signalling that is at the basis of such an effect. We show that Olaparib, but not Veliparib and HYDAMTIQ, is able to induce a specific conformational drift of the WGR domain of PARP-1, which stabilizes PARP-1/DNA complex through the locking of several salt bridge interactions. Fluorescence anisotropy assays support such a mechanism, providing the first experimental evidence that HYDAMTIQ, a potent PARP inhibitor with neuroprotective properties, is less potent than Olaparib to trap PARP-1/DNA complex.

  3. Employing the fluorescence anisotropy and quenching kinetics of tryptophan to hunt for residual structures in denatured proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish Kumar; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2007-03-01

    Residual structures in denatured proteins have acquired importance in recent years owing to their role as protein-folding initiation sites. Locating these structures in proteins has proved quite formidable, requiring techniques like NMR. Here in this report, we take advantage of the ubiquitous presence of tryptophan residues in residual structures to hunt for their presence using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The surface accessibility and rotational dynamics of tryptophan in putative residual structures among ten different proteins, namely glucagon, melittin, subtilisin carlsberg, myelin basic protein, ribonuclease T1, human serum albumin, barstar mutant, bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 peptide, was studied using steady state fluorescence quenching and anisotropy, respectively. Five proteins, namely ribonuclease T1, bovine serum albumin, melittin, barstar and hen egg white lysozyme appear likely to possess tryptophan(s) in hydrophobic clusters based on their reduced bimolecular quenching rates and higher steady-state anisotropy in proportion to their chain length. We also show that the fluorescence emission maximum of tryptophan is insensitive to the presence of residual structures.

  4. Flexibility of Enzymes Suspended in Organic Solvents Probed by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy. Evidence That Enzyme Activity and Enantioselectivity Are Directly Related to Enzyme Flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Jaap; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Verboom, Willem; Hoek, Arie van; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1995-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study on the molecular flexibility of active-site labeled anthraniloyl-α-chymotrypsin, dansylsubtilisin Carlsberg, and native subtilisin Carlsberg, suspended in organic solvents, is described. The internal rotational mobility of the fluorophore in the

  5. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  7. Fluorescence anisotropy excitation by polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, J.; Patas, A.; Althoff, J.; Lindinger, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report improved fluorescence contrast between dyes by two-photon excitation with polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber utilizing the anisotropy of the dye molecules. Particularly phase- and polarization-tailored pulse shapes are employed for two-photon excited fluorescence of dyes in a liquid environment at the distal end of the kagome fiber. The distortions due to the optical fiber properties are precompensated in order to receive predefined polarization-shaped laser pulses after the kagome fiber. This enables to optimally excite one dye in one polarization direction and simultaneously the other dye in the other polarization direction. The presented method has a high potential for endoscopic applications due to the unique properties of kagome fibers for guiding ultrashort laser pulses.

  8. Fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene and its cationic Trimethylamino derivative in liquid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes: opposing responses to isoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Steven C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of action of volatile general anesthetics has not yet been resolved. In order to identify the effects of isoflurane on the membrane, we measured the steady-state anisotropy of two fluorescent probes that reside at different depths. Incorporation of anesthetic was confirmed by shifting of the main phase transition temperature. Results In liquid crystalline dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, isoflurane (7-25 mM in the bath increases trimethylammonium-diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy by ~0.02 units and decreases diphenylhexatriene anisotropy by the same amount. Conclusions The anisotropy data suggest that isoflurane decreases non-axial dye mobility in the headgroup region, while increasing it in the tail region. We propose that these results reflect changes in the lateral pressure profile of the membrane.

  9. Extending Velocity Channel Analysis for Studying Turbulence Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, Dinesh; Pogosyan, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the fluctuations in the velocity slices of Position-Position- Velocity (PPV) spectroscopic data from Doppler broadened lines, i.e. Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) introduced by Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000), to study anisotropy of the underlying velocity and density turbulence statistics that arises from the presence of magnetic field. In particular, we study analytically how the measurable anisotropy of the statistics of the channel map fluctuations changes with the thickness of velocity channels. In agreement with the earlier VCA studies we find that the anisotropy of the thick channels reflects the anisotropy of the density field, while the relative contribution of density and velocity fluctuations to the thin velocity channels depends on the density spectral slope. We show that the anisotropies arising from Alfven, slow and fast modes are different, in particular, the anisotropy in PPV created by fast modes is opposite to that created by Alfven and slow modes and this can be use...

  10. The study of the shape anisotropy in patterned permalloy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dong; Zhai Ya; Zhai Hong-Ru

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a systematic ferromagnetic resonance study shows that an in-plane magnetic anisotropy in the patterned micron octagon permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements is mainly determined by the element geometry. The easy-axis is along the edge of the elements, and the hard-axis is along the diagonal. The shape anisotropy of the octagon elements is determined by square and equilateral octagon, and the theoretical calculation was studied on the shape anisotropy. The shape anisotropy of rectangular was calculated by using the same theory.

  11. A fluorescence anisotropy assay for the muscarinic M1 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwiler, Kristin G; De Rosier, Therese; Hanson, Bonnie; Vogel, Kurt W

    2010-06-01

    In the search for new chemical entities that interact with G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs), assays that quantify efficacy and affinity are employed. Traditional methods for measuring affinity involve radiolabeled ligands. To address the need for homogeneous biochemical fluorescent assays to characterize orthosteric ligand affinity and dissociation rates, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay for the muscarinic M1 receptor that can be conducted in a 384-well plate. We used membranes from a muscarinic M1 cell line optimized for high-throughput functional assays and the previously characterized fluorescent antagonist BODIPY FL pirenzepine. The affinities of reference compounds were determined in the competitive FA assay and compared with those obtained with a competitive filter-based radioligand-binding assay using [(3)H] N-methylscopolamine. The IC(50) values produced from the FA assay were well-correlated with the radioligand-binding K(i) values (R(2) = 0.98). The dissociation of the BODIPY FL pirenzepine was readily monitored in real time using the FA assay and was sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator gallamine. This M1 FA assay offers advantages over traditional radioligandbinding assays as it eliminates radioactivity while allowing investigation of orthosteric or allosteric muscarinic M1 ligands in a homogeneous format.

  12. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ(T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s ± scenario for the whole doping range.

  13. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México D.F., México (Mexico); Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI (United States); Pogosyan, D., E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: pogosyan@ualberta.ca [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  14. Cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon: A novel efficient signal translator for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pan; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    Due to its unique features such as high sensitivity, homogeneous format, and independence on fluorescent intensity, fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay has become a hotspot of study in oligonucleotide-based bioassays. However, until now most FA probes require carefully customized structure designs, and thus are neither generalizable for different sensing systems nor effective to obtain sufficient signal response. To address this issue, a cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was successfully engineered for signal amplified FA bioassay, via combining the unique stable structure of molecular beacon and the large molecular mass of streptavidin. Compared with single DNA strand probe or conventional molecular beacon, the DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon exhibited a much higher FA value, which was potential to obtain high signal-background ratio in sensing process. As proof-of-principle, this novel DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was further applied for FA bioassay using DNAzyme-Pb(2+) as a model sensing system. This FA assay approach could selectively detect as low as 0.5nM Pb(2+) in buffer solution, and also be successful for real samples analysis with good recovery values. Compatible with most of oligonucleotide probes' designs and enzyme-based signal amplification strategies, the molecular beacon can serve as a novel signal translator to expand the application prospect of FA technology in various bioassays.

  15. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Light-emitting diode, LED, lighting, fluorescent, waste reduction, energy conservation, net zero , mercury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Center (ATC) to assess the benefits of converting fluorescent tube lighting to light-emitting diode (LED) technology. The report documents the waste ...1-15 SECTION 2. SUBTESTS 2.1 HAZARDOUS WASTE REDUCTION

  16. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ (T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ (T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ (T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s± scenario for the whole doping range. Knowing that the s± gap symmetry exists across the superconducting dome for the electron doped systems, we next looked at λ (T), in optimally - doped, SrFe2(As1-xPx)2, x =0.35. Both, as-grown (Tc ~ 25 K) and annealed (Tc ~ 35 K) single crystals of SrFe2(As1-xPx)2 were measured. Annealing decreases the absolute value of the London penetration depth from λ(0) = 300 ± 10 nm in as-grown samples to λ (0) = 275±10 nm. At low temperatures, λ (T) ~ T indicates a superconducting gap with line nodes. Analysis of the full-temperature range superfluid density is consistent with the line nodes, but differs from the simple single-gap d-wave. The observed behavior is very similar to that of BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, showing that isovalently substituted pnictides are inherently different from

  17. Anisotropy Studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, E M

    2009-01-01

    An anisotropy signal for the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) of more than 99% confidence level was established using data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory. Cosmic rays with energy above $\\sim 6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV show a correlation with the positions of extragalactic nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), being maximum for sources at less than $\\sim$100 Mpc and angular separation of a few degrees. The evolution of the correlation signal with the energy shows that the departure from anisotropy coincides with the flux suppression observed in the spectrum, being therefore consistent with the hypothesis that the correlated events have their origin in extragalactic sources close enough to avoid significant interaction with the cosmic microwave background (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect). Even though the observed signal cannot unambiguously identify AGNs as the production sites of UHECRs, the potential sources have to be distributed in a similar way. A number of additional st...

  18. Femtosecond fluorescence studies of DNA/RNA constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, T; Banyasz, A; Markovitsi, D [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453 CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Improta, R, E-mail: thomas.gustavsson@cea.fr [Permanent address : Istituto Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    In this overview, femtosecond fluorescence studies of various DNA constituents are presented, ranging from the monomeric chromophores to different model helices. In order to interpret the experimental results in terms of fundamental processes on the molecular scale they are discussed in the light of recent theoretical calculations. The ultrafast fluorescence decay observed for the monomers is explained by the involvement of highly efficient conical intersections (CI) between the first singlet excited state and the ground state. For the model helices, the picture is more complex, but fluorescence anisotropy data reveal collective effects.

  19. Monitoring changes of cellular metabolism and microviscosity in vitro based on time-resolved endogenous fluorescence and its anisotropy decay dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a well-known metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore. In this study, we develop a system that simultaneously measures time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence to extract free and protein-bound NADH signals from total cellular fluorescence. We analyze temporal characteristics of NADH fluorescence in a mixture of NADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as in living cell samples. The results show that in both the NADH/LDH mixture and cell samples, a fraction of free NADH and protein-bound components can be identified. The extracted free and bound NADH signals are confirmed by time-resolved measurement of anisotropy decay of NADH fluorescence, based on the fact that free NADH is a small fluorescent molecule with much shorter rotational diffusion time than bound NADH. The ratio of free NADH signal to bound NADH signal is very different between normal and cancer cervical epithelial cells. In addition, the ratio changes significantly when the cell samples are treated with a mitochondrial inhibitor or uncoupler, demonstrating that the method is sensitive to monitor cellular metabolic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the microviscosity for relatively small molecules such as NADH in cells could be extracted from wavelength- and time-resolved NADH fluorescence of living cell samples.

  20. Development of a homogeneous fluorescence anisotropy assay to monitor and measure FtsZ assembly in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reija, Belén; Monterroso, Begoña; Jiménez, Mercedes; Vicente, Miguel; Rivas, Germán; Zorrilla, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    We present here a fluorescence anisotropy method for the quantification of the polymerization of FtsZ, an essential protein for cytokinesis in prokaryotes whose GTP-dependent assembly initiates the formation of the divisome complex. Using Alexa 488 labeled wild-type FtsZ as a tracer, the assay allows determination of the critical concentration of FtsZ polymerization from the dependence of the measured steady-state fluorescence anisotropy on the concentration of FtsZ. The incorporation of the labeled protein into FtsZ polymers and the lack of spectral changes on assembly were independently confirmed by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Critical concentration values determined by this new assay are compatible with those reported previously under the same conditions by other well-established methods. As a proof of principle, data on the sensitivity of the assay to changes in FtsZ assembly in response to Mg(2+) concentration or to the presence of high concentrations of Ficoll 70 as crowding agent are shown. The proposed method is sensitive, low sample consuming, rapid, and reliable, and it can be extended to other cooperatively polymerizing systems. In addition, it can help to discover new antimicrobials that may interfere with FtsZ polymerization because it can be easily adapted to systematic screening assays.

  1. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy of basic dyes bound to poly(methacrylic acid in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Hueder Paulo M. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of atactic poly(methacrylic acid, PMAA, with molecular weights in the range of (1.6 to 3.4 x 10(5 g mol-1, and labeled with the fluorescent dyes 9-aminoacridine or Nile blue were studied by photophysical measurements as a function of solvent viscosity and polarity. The conformational behavior of the PMAA chain segments around the fluorescent probe was reported by the change in the rotational diffusion of the dyes. Ethylene glycol swells the polymer chain compared with the more contracted conformation of PMAA in 50% water/ethylene glycol. The change in the rotational relaxation time of the dye bound to PMAA with the decrease of water content in the solvent mixture indicates a progressive expansion of polymer chain to a more open coil form in solution.

  2. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EII(mtl) in detergent micelles. Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, D S; Broos, J; Visser, A J; van Hoek, A; Robillard, G T

    1997-04-22

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C domain of the enzyme [Swaving Dijkstra et al. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6628-6634]. Since no fluorescent impurities are present in these mutants, the changes in fluorescence and anisotropy could be related with changes in the tryptophan microenvironment. Tryptophans at positions 30 and 42 showed changes in fluorescence intensity decay upon binding mannitol, which were reflected in the changes in lifetime distribution patterns. The disappearance of the shortest-lived decay component in these mutants, as well as in the mutant with a single tryptophan at position 109, indicates a change in the local environment such that quenching via neighboring side chains or solvent is reduced. Phosphorylation at histidine 554 and cysteine 384, located in the cytoplasmatic A and B domains of EII(mtl), respectively, induced an increase in the average fluorescence lifetimes of all of the tryptophans. The effect was most pronounced for tryptophans 30 and 109 which show large increases in the average fluorescence lifetime mainly due to loss of short-lived decay components. A correlation time distribution of the individual tryptophans deduced from an analysis of the anisotropy decay showed that they differed in their rotational mobility with tryptophan 30 showing the least local flexibility. Phosphorylation resulted in immobilization of W109 which, together with changes in the average fluorescence lifetime, is evidence for a conformational coupling between the phosphorylated B domain and the C domain. The influence of mannitol binding on the rotational behavior of the tryptophans is limited; it induces more internal flexibility at all tryptophan positions. A rotational correlation time of 30 ns

  3. Fluorescence anisotropy of DNA/DAPI complex: torsional dynamics and geometry of the complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization of synthetic polydeoxynucleotide/4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride complexes has been investigated as a function of dye/polymer coverage. At low coverage, fluorescence depolarization is due to local torsional motions of the DNA segment where the dye resides. At relatively high coverage, fluorescence depolarization is dominated by energy transfer to other dye molecules along the DNA. The extent of the observed depolarization due to torsional motion depe...

  4. Polarimetric study of the optical anisotropy of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyavsky, N.; Korneva, I.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents the results of an optical anisotropy study of a polymer film and the effect of temperature on birefringence. A method using a polariscope for the quantitative determination of the optical path difference is offered. The research findings are useful to students of physical and engineering specialities studying electromagnetic theory and optics. The described experiments and theoretical approaches are based on prominent aspects of modern optics. This work can be used to teach students the methods of polarimetry, the method of measuring optical anisotropy, and the basics of colorimetry. Students will learn a color description system to demonstrate the interference of polarized light, as well as being able to make a comparison between the numerical simulation and experiment of the interference pattern.

  5. Investigation of β-lactam antibacterial drugs, β-lactamases, and penicillin-binding proteins with fluorescence polarization and anisotropy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B.

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the uses of fluorescence polarization and anisotropy for the investigation of bacterial penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), which are the targets of β-lactam antibacterial drugs (penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams), and of the β-lactamase enzymes that destroy these drugs and help to render bacterial pathogens resistant to them. Fluorescence polarization and anisotropy-based methods for quantitation of β-lactam drugs are also reviewed. A particular emphasis is on methods for quantitative measurement of the interactions of β-lactams and other inhibitors with PBPs and β-lactamases.

  6. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Visser, N.V.; Amerongen, van H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and ex

  7. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  8. A sensitive fluorescence anisotropy method for detection of lead (II) ion by a G-quadruplex-inducible DNA aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dapeng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Yin, Lei; Meng, Zihui [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yu, Anchi [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872 (China); Guo, Lianghong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Wang, Hailin, E-mail: hlwang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A fluorescence anisotropy approach for detection of Pb{sup 2+} was developed. •The strategy was based on binding-induced allosteric conformational change of aptamer probe. •The sensing mechanism was established by testing the photoinduced electron transfer interaction. -- Abstract: Sensitive and selective detection of Pb{sup 2+} is of great importance to both human health and environmental protection. Here we propose a novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for sensing Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution by a G-rich thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The TBA labeled with 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR) at the seventh thymine nucleotide was used as a fluorescent probe for signaling Pb{sup 2+}. It was found that the aptamer probe had a high FA in the absence of Pb{sup 2+}. This is because the rotation of TMR is restricted by intramolecular interaction with the adjacent guanine bases, which results in photoinduced electron transfer (PET). When the aptamer probe binds to Pb{sup 2+} to form G-quadruplex, the intramolecular interaction should be eliminated, resulting in faster rotation of the fluorophore TMR in solution. Therefore, FA of aptamer probe is expected to decrease significantly upon binding to Pb{sup 2+}. Indeed, we observed a decrease in FA of aptamer probe upon Pb{sup 2+} binding. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetime measurement were used to verify the reliability and reasonability of the sensing mechanism. By monitoring the FA change of the aptamer probe, we were able to real-time detect binding between the TBA probe and Pb{sup 2+}. Moreover, the aptamer probe was exploited as a recognition element for quantification of Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution. The change in FA showed a linear response to Pb{sup 2+} from 10 nM to 2.0 μM, with 1.0 nM limit of detection. In addition, this sensing system exhibited good selectivity for Pb{sup 2+} over other metal ions. The method is simple

  9. Studying Photosynthesis by Measuring Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Francisco; Quiles, Maria Jose

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an easy experiment to study the absorption and action spectrum of photosynthesis, as well as the inhibition by heat, high light intensity and the presence of the herbicide 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) on the photosynthetic process. The method involves measuring the chlorophyll fluorescence emitted by intact…

  10. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore in silica and PVA thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    in silica thin films and PVA films were studied by means of steady-state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. We have found that the azadioxatriangulenium entrapped in silica thin film has a wider fluorescence lifetime distribution (Lorentzian distribution), lower fluorescence efficiencies, shorter....... In contrast to the PVA matrices, the porous silica films allow restricted rotations of Azadioxatriangulenium molecules, which result in faster and complex fluorescence anisotropy decays suggesting energy migration among dye molecules....

  11. Assessment of the mode of action of polyhexamethylene biguanide against Listeria innocua by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeau, Elise; Dumas, Emilie; Adt, Isabelle; Degraeve, Pascal; Noël, Claude; Girodet, Christophe; Oulahal, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a cationic biocide. The antibacterial mode of action of PHMB (at concentrations not exceeding its minimal inhibitory concentration) upon Listeria innocua LRGIA 01 was investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Fourier transformed infrared spectra of bacteria treated with or without PHMB presented some differences in the lipids region: the CH(2)/CH(3) (2924 cm(-1)/2960 cm(-1)) band areas ratio significantly increased in the presence of PHMB. Since this ratio generally reflects membrane phospholipids and membrane microenvironment of the cells, these results suggest that PHMB molecules interact with membrane phospholipids and, thus, affect membrane fluidity and conformation. To assess the hypothesis of PHMB interaction with L. innocua membrane phospholipids and to clarify the PHMB mode of action, we performed fluorescence anisotropy experiments. Two probes, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and its derivative 1-[4-(trimethyl-amino)-phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene (TMA-DPH), were used. DPH and TMA-DPH incorporate inside and at the surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, respectively. When PHMB was added, an increase of TMA-DPH fluorescence anisotropy was observed, but no changes of DPH fluorescence anisotropy occurred. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PHMB molecules perturb L. innocua LRGIA 01 cytoplasmic membrane by interacting with the first layer of the membrane lipid bilayer.

  12. Experimental study of void space, permeability and elastic anisotropy in crustal rocks under ambient and hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip Michael

    Anisotropy in the physical and transport properties of crustal rocks is a key influence on crustal evolution and energy resource management. Data from deep seismic soundings, borehole logging and laboratory measurement all show that the physical properties of the earth are anisotropic. Such anisotropy generally results from the superposition of fabric development during diagenesis and/or petrogenesis, and the application of anisotropic tectonic stresses. This leads to an aligned crack and pore fabric in crustal rocks that, in turn, leads to seismic velocity anisotropy and permeability anisotropy. This thesis describes an experimental study which aims to investigate the relationships between pressure, pore fabric geometry and seismic and permeability anisotropy under hydrostatic pressures from room pressure to ~4km depth equivalence within the Earth's crust. Firstly, pore fabric analyses of three representative crustal rock types is presented. These rock types represent a range of crack and pore fabrics. The average void space shape and orientation is determined 3-D using the methods of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and velocity anisotropy. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent-dye crack imaging techniques further aid in the void space characterisation. Secondly, the development and application of an apparatus capable of contemporaneously measuring elastic wave velocity, porosity and permeability at effective pressures of up to 100 MPa is described. Results are analysed in terms of applied effective pressure and the rock pore fabric type and orientation. Finally, the laboratory data are used to test models that attempt to predict geophysical parameters such as permeability and elastic wave velocity from microstructural attributes. This multi-facetted analysis allows a number of conclusions to be drawn, expanding the state-of-the-art in how the pore fabric microstructure of crustal rock is represented by the methods of elastic wave velocity and

  13. Alpha Anisotropy Studies of Near-Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Duppen, P

    2002-01-01

    % IS329 \\\\ \\\\ Although it was the first decay mode to be discovered, the process of $\\alpha$-particle emission is still poorly understood. A few years ago the first systematic study of anisotropic $\\alpha$-decay triggered renewed theoretical interest. Nevertheless, today the theories are still not adequate enough and more experimental data are urgently needed. We therefore measure the $\\alpha$-anisotropies of the favoured transitions of a number of near-spherical Rn and At isotopes, and of deformed nuclei near A=220. As the different models yield contradictory predictions for the transitions that are investigated, the measurements will allow to discern on their validity. They will at the same time provide the necessary basis for further theoretical developments.

  14. Study on the Anisotropy of Meniscus in the Growing Sapphire

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Tai; ZUO Hong-bo; HAN Jie-cai; MENG Song-he; ZHANG Ming-fu; LI Chang-qing; Grigoryan Benik

    2006-01-01

    This study is aimed at predicting the relationship between the meniscus and the quality of the sapphire crystals produced by the micro-pulling and shoulder at cooled center (SAPMIC) technique. As with different orientations, the shapes of the meniscus vary, so an investigation into the anisotropy of the meniscus shapes is very important for the final quality of the sapphire crystal. An effective model to describe meniscus shapes and their formation process has been presented. The model has been applied to a sapphire crystal of 200 mm diameter in order to check its reliability. The results show that the model proves to be useful for forecasting the final shapes of the sapphire crystal made by the SAPMIC technique.

  15. Fluorescence Studies of Selected 2-Alkylaminopyrimidines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Low

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The reactions of 2-chloropyrimidine with methylamine, ethylamine and piperidine gave the corresponding 2-N-methylamino-, 2-N-ethylamino- and 2N- piperidinopyrimidines, respectively. The fluorescence properties of these alkylamino derivatives in chloroform, ethyl acetate, carbon tetrachloride, acetone, ether, ethanol and methanol were studied. All the alkylamino derivatives showed the highest fluorescence intensity in polar protic solvents; thus 2-N-methylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 377 nm when excited at 282 nm and 2-N-ethylaminopyrimidine (highest fluorescence intensity at 375 nm, when excited at 286 nm showed the highest fluorescence in methanol. In ethanol, 2-N-piperidinopyrimidine showed a fluorescence peak at 403 nm when excited at 360 nm and in chloroform it fluoresced at 392 nm when excited at 356 nm.

  16. Explaining the highly enantiomeric photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylate bound to human serum albumin using time-resolved anisotropy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Denis; Kato, Hanako; Nishijima, Masaki; Fukuhara, Gaku; Mori, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Bohne, Cornelia

    2013-01-09

    The mechanism for the high enantiomeric excess (ee) (80-90%) observed in the photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylate (AC) in the chiral binding sites of human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using fluorescence anisotropy. A long rotational correlation time of 36 ns was observed for the excited states of the ACs bound to the HSA site responsible for the high ee, suggesting that the ACs have restricted rotational mobility in this site. The ACs in this site have the same prochiral face protected by the protein, and this protection is responsible for the high ee observed. These insights provide a strategy for the rational design of supramolecular photochirogenic systems.

  17. Comparison of microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles in the presence of inorganic and organic salts: a time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, G B

    2005-11-08

    Microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was examined in the presence of additives such as sodium chloride and p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) by monitoring the fluorescence anisotropy decays of two hydrophobic probes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and coumarin 6 (C6). It has been well-established that SDS micelles undergo a sphere-to-rod transition and that their mean hydrodynamic radius increases from 19 to 100 A upon the addition of 0.0-0.7 M NaCl at 298 K. A similar size and shape transition is induced by PTHC at concentrations that are 20 times lower compared to that of NaCl. This study was undertaken to find out how the microviscosity of the micelles is influenced under these circumstances. It was noticed that the microviscosity of the SDS/NaCl system increased by approximately 45%, whereas there was a less than 10% variation in the microviscosity of the SDS/PTHC system. The large increase in the microviscosity of the former system with salt concentration has been rationalized on the basis of the high concentration of sodium ions in the headgroup region of the micelles and their ability to strongly coordinate with the water present in this region, which decreases the mobility of the probe molecules.

  18. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  19. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, R., E-mail: rbonino@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - IFSI, c.so Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); INFN sezione di Torino, v. P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  20. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.

    2012-11-01

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5×1017 eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  1. Fluorescence microscopy: A tool to study autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Shashank; Manjithaya, Ravi

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is a cellular recycling process through which a cell degrades old and damaged cellular components such as organelles and proteins and the degradation products are reused to provide energy and building blocks. Dysfunctional autophagy is reported in several pathological situations. Hence, autophagy plays an important role in both cellular homeostasis and diseased conditions. Autophagy can be studied through various techniques including fluorescence based microscopy. With the advancements of newer technologies in fluorescence microscopy, several novel processes of autophagy have been discovered which makes it an essential tool for autophagy research. Moreover, ability to tag fluorescent proteins with sub cellular targets has enabled us to evaluate autophagy processes in real time under fluorescent microscope. In this article, we demonstrate different aspects of autophagy in two different model organisms i.e. yeast and mammalian cells, with the help of fluorescence microscopy.

  2. A study on turbulence modulation via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; MANHART

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence modulation by particles in a turbulent two-phase channel flow via an analysis of turbulence anisotropy-invariants. The fluid turbulence is calculated by a large eddy simulation with a point-force two-way coupling model and particles are tracked by the Lagrangian trajectory method. The channel turbulence follows the two-component turbulence state within the viscous sub-layer region and outside the region the turbulence tends to follow the right curve of the anisotropy-invariant. The channel turbulence, interacting with heavy particles, is modulated to the two-component turbulence limit state near the wall and is separate from the axisymmetric turbulence state in the turbulence anisotropy-invariants map. The fluctuations of streamwise component are transferred to the other two components and hence the anisotropy decreases due to particle modulation. The study has deepened the understanding of the turbulence modulation mechanism in two-phase turbulent flows.

  3. First principles study on the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Lei; Jiang Cheng-Bao; Shang Jia-Xiang; XU Hui-Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the electronic structure and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive material by means of the full potential-linearized augmented plane-wave method within the generalized gradient approximation.The 3d-orbit splitting of Fe atoms in D03,B2-like and L12 crystalline structures of Fe-Ga is calculated with consideration of the crystal field as well as the spin-orbit coupling effect.Because of the frozen orbital angular momenta of the 3d-orbit for Fe atoms in Fe-Ga magnetostrictive alloys and the spin-orbit coupling,the distribution of the electron cloud is not isotropic,which leads to the anisotropy of exchange interaction between the different atoms.A method on estimating the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga alloys by means of calculating orbit-projected density of states for Fe atoms is performed.The anisotropic distribution of the electron cloud of Fe atoms in these three crystalline structures of Fe-Ga is studied based on the above method showing the highest magnetic anisotropy for B2-like structure.This qualitative method comes closer to physical reality with a vivid physical view,which can evaluate the anisotropy of electron cloud for 3d transition atoms directly.The calculated results are in good agreement with both the previous theoretical computation and the tested value on the magnetic anisotropy constant,which con firms that the electron cloud anisotropy of Fe atoms could well characterize the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of Fe-Ga magnetostrictive material.

  4. Fluorescence study on the aggregation of collagen molecules in acid solution influenced by hydroxypropyl methylcellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cuicui; Zhang, Min; Li, Guoying

    2016-01-20

    The effect of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) on the aggregation of collagen molecules with collagen concentrations of 0.25, 0.5 and 1.0mg/mL was studied by fluorescence techniques. On one hand, both the synchronous fluorescence spectra and fluorescence emission spectra showed that there was no change in the fluorescence intensity of collagen intrinsic fluorescence when 30% HPMC was added, while it decreased obviously when HPMC content ≥ 50%. From the two-dimensional fluorescence correlation analysis, it was indicated that collagen molecules in 0.25 and 0.5mg/mL collagen solutions were more sensitive to HPMC than those in 1.0mg/mL collagen solution. On the other hand, the pyrene fluorescence and the fluorescence anisotropy measurements indicated that HPMC inhibited the collagen aggregation for 0.25 and 0.5mg/mL collagen, but promoted it for 1.0mg/mL collagen. The atomic force microscopy images further confirmed the effect of HPMC on collagen with different initial states.

  5. Study of the one-way speed of light anisotropy with particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Concepts of high precision studies of the one-way speed of light anisotropy are discussed. The high energy particle beam allows measurement of a one-way speed of light anisotropy (SOLA) via analysis of the beam momentum variation with sidereal phase without the use of synchronized clocks. High precision beam position monitors could provide accurate monitoring of the beam orbit and determination of the particle beam momentum with relative accuracy on the level of 10^-10, which corresponds to a limit on SOLA of 10^-18 with existing storage rings. A few additional versions of the experiment are also presented.

  6. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EIImtl in detergent micelles : Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaving Dijkstra, Dolf; Broos, J.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; van Hoek, A.; Robillard, George

    1997-01-01

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C d

  7. Drug/protein interactions studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Vayá, Ignacio; Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. C.; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2014-09-01

    We report here on a recent time-resolved fluorescence study [1] of the interaction between flurbiprofen (FBP), a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and human serum albumin (HSA), the main transport protein in the human body. We compare the results obtained for the drug-protein complex with those of various covalently linked flurbiprofentryptophan dyads having well-defined geometries. In all cases stereoselective dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed, varying greatly from one system to another. In addition, the fluorescence anisotropy decays also display a clear stereoselectivity. For the drug-protein complexes, this can be interpreted in terms of the protein microenvironment playing a significant role in the conformational relaxation of FBP, which is more restricted in the case of the (R)- enantiomer.

  8. The influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy on the magnetocaloric effect: A case study on Co 2 B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, M.; Skokov, K. P.; Karpenkov, D. Yu.; Franco, V.; Ener, S.; Gutfleisch, O.

    2016-12-01

    The influence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy on the magnetocaloric effect (MCE) was studied on single crystals of Co2B and compared to measurements on polycrystalline samples. Large differences in adiabatic temperature change Δ T a d and magnetic entropy change Δ S M were found along the different crystallographic directions. The magnetocaloric effect differs by 40% in the case of Δ T a d in a field change of 1.9 T when applying the field along the hard axis and easy plane of magnetization. In the case of Δ S M , the values differ 50% and 35% from each other in field changes of 1 and 1.9 T, respectively. It was found that this anisotropy effect does not saturate in fields up to 4 T, which is higher than the anisotropy field of Co2B ( ≈2 T). A simple model was developed to illustrate the possible effect on magnetocrystalline anisotropy, showing large differences especially in application relevant fields of about 1 T. The results strongly suggest that the MCE could be maximized when orienting single crystalline powders in an easy axis parallel to the applied field in active magnetocaloric regenerator structures, and therefore the overall device efficiency could be increased.

  9. Fluorescence Spectroscopic Studies on Ovis Lactoperoxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Joseph

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ovis lactoperoxidase (sLP, on excitation at 280 nm shows fluorescence emission of a single broad maximum at 332 nm. The conformational stability was measured by unfolding studies in urea and guanidine hydrochloride. The fluorescence intensity gradually decreased with increase in urea concentrations. The decline might have been caused by partial unfolding, affecting some of the tryptophan residues. In 5 M GuHCl concentrations, a red shift in emission maximum to 356 nm was observed. It indicates that tryptophan is buried in the interior of the hydrophobic environment in native folded state and inaccessible to solvent water but on unfolding all get exposed to aqueous environment. Acrylamide is an efficient quencher and the quenching process is essentially homogenous with all tryptophan being accessible. A little quenching is observed for KI is interpreted as sLP has tryptophan residues that are buried inside the core of the protein.

  10. Anisotropy studies around the galactic centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Alvarez, C; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Anjos, J C; Aramo, C; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bacelar, J; Backer, T; Badagnani, D O; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barbosa, H M J; Barkhausen, M; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Ben Zvi, S; Bérat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boghrat, P; Bohacova, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brunet, J M; Buchholz, P; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Capdevielle, J N; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Claes, D; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Clay, S B; Connolly, B; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dang Quang, T; Darriulat, Pierre; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; De Almeida, R M; De Carvalho, L A; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De Mello Junior, W J M; De Mello-Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; De Oliveira, M A L; De Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L N; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Ewers, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Fauth, A C; Fazio, D; Fazzini, N; Fernández, A; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fokitis, E; Fonte, R; Fuhrmann, D; Fulgione, W; García, B; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrard, L; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Geranios, A; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Gitto, J; Glass, H; Gobbi, F; Gold, M S; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gomez Berisso, M; Gómez-Herrero, R; Goncalvesdo Amaral, M; Gongora, J P; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Gora, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A; Grunfeld, C; Grupen, C; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutíerrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Harakeh, M N; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Homola, P; Horandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovsky, M; Huege, T; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Kaducak, M; Kalashev, O; Kampert, K H; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D H; Kolotaev, Yu; Kopmann, A; Krömer, O; Kuhlman, S; Kuijpers, J; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Longo, G; López, R; López-Aguera, A; Lucero, A; Maldera, S; Malek, M; Maltezos, S; Mancarella, G; Mancenido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Martello, D; Martínez, N; Martínez, J; Martínez, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurin, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, G; Medina, M C; Medina Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meurer, C; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, François; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Morris, C; Mostafa, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nichol, R; Nierstenhofer, N; Nitz, D; Nogima, H; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Oliveira, L F A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Pham Ngoc, D; Pham Thi, T N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pisanti, O; Porter, T A; Pouryamout, J; Prado Junior, L; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Reis, H C; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rídky, J; Risi, A; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robbins, S; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Rodriguez Frias, D; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roucelle, C; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santos, E M; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovanek, P; Schussler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Semikoz, Dmitry V; Sequeiros, G; Shellard, R C; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Skelton, P; Slater, W; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smialkowski, A; Smida, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tascau, O; Ticona, R; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tonachini, A; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés-Galicia, J F; Valino, I; Valore, L; Vanden Berg, A M; Van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberic, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vo Van, T; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Waldenmaier, T; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wiebusch, C; Wieczorek, G J; Wiencke, L; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Xu, J; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Zha, M; Ziolkowski, M

    2006-01-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius $A$. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the `hybrid' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  11. Anisotropy studies around the galactic centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J. C.; Aramo, C.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bacelar, J.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Barkhausen, M.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boghrat, P.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brunet, J. M.; Buchholz, P.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Capdevielle, J. N.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Claes, D.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Clay, S. B.; Connolly, B.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Quang, T. Dang; Darriulat, P.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Carvalho, L. A.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, M. A. L.; de Souza, V.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Ewers, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazio, D.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fokitis, E.; Fonte, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrard, L.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Geranios, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gobbi, F.; Gold, M. S.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gongora, J. P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Grupen, C.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kalashev, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kolotaev, Y.; Kopmann, A.; Krömer, O.; Kuhlman, S.; Kuijpers, J.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Longo, G.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lucero, A.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Maltezos, S.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martinez, N.; Martínez, J.; Martínez, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurin, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, G.; Medina, M. C.; Medina Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Thi, T. Nguyen; Nichol, R.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nogima, H.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, L. F. A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pham Ngoc, D.; Pham Thi, T. N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pisanti, O.; Porter, T. A.; Pouryamout, J.; Prado, L.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reis, H. C.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Řídký, J.; Risi, A.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robbins, S.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roucelle, C.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santos, E. M.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Semikoz, D.; Sequeiros, G.; Shellard, R. C.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Skelton, P.; Slater, W.; de Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Ticona, R.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vo van, T.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zha, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ‘hybrid’ data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  12. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  13. Fluorescent Polystyrene Sulfonate for Polyelectrolyte Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Wayne; Tong, Xiaowei; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Zhang, Donghui; Russo, Paul

    2012-02-01

    The slow-mode decay found by dynamic light scattering for polyelectrolytes in low-salt conditions has perplexed investigators since its first observation. Many characterization methods have suggested temporary or transient aggregation, although there is still no consensus on the cause. Many different polyelectrolytes demonstrate the slow-mode decay, but the sodium salt of polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS) is the most popular choice for study. Commercially available NaPSS may have hydrophobic patches due to incomplete sulfonation leading to associations apart from any putative ionic mechanisms. Therefore, essentially full sulfonation, or ``patchless'', NaPSS should be synthesized. To facilitate fluorescence measurements, which can provide new insights to the slow-mode phenomenon, the material must be rendered fluorescent (F-NaPSS). Several approaches to F-NaPSS have appeared; some labeled a previously synthesized NaPSS without concern for its hydrophobic patches. Other strategies include a free radical copolymerization of styrene sulfonate and a vinyl amine to provide side chains viable for labeling. This method is successful, but yields only small amounts of nearly monodisperse polymer after fractionation. In this presentation, a high-yield synthesis of fully sulfonated, low-polydispersity, fluorescently tagged polymer will be discussed.

  14. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of DNA dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scalettar, B.A.

    1987-04-01

    Random solvent induced motions of DNA are manifest as nanosecond torsional oscillations of the helix backbone, nanosecond through millisecond bending deformations and overall rotational and translational diffusion of the polymer. Fluorescence spectroscopy is used to study this spectrum of DNA motions while ethidium monoazide was covalently bounded. The steady state fluorescence depolarization data indicate that the covalent monoazide/DNA complex exhibits internal motions characterized by an average angular amplitude of 26 degrees confirming reports of fast torsional oscillations in noncovalent ethidium bromide/DNA systems. Data obtained by use of a new polarized photobleaching recovery technique (FPR) reflect both the rotational dynamics of the polymer and the reversible photochemistry of the dye. To isolate the reorientational motion of the DNA, the FPR experiments were ran in two modes that differ only in the polarization of the bleaching light. A quotient function constructed from the data obtained in these two modes monitors only the rotational component of the FPR recovery. In specific applications those bending deformations of long DNA molecules that have characteristic relaxation times on the order of 100 microseconds have been resolved. A fluorescence correlation technique that relates fluctuations in particle number to center-of-mass motion was used to measure translational diffusion on coefficients of the plasmid PBR322 and a short oligomeric DNA. A theory that describes angular correlation in systems exhibiting cyclic, biologically directed reorientation and random Brownian rotation is developed.

  15. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  16. Characterization of the heterogeneity and specificity of interpolypeptide interactions in amyloid protofibrils by measurement of site-specific fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anjali; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2009-10-30

    The aggregation of proteins often results in highly ordered fibrillar structures. While significant insights have been obtained on structural aspects of amyloid fibrils, little is known about the structures of protofibrils, which are presumed to be the precursors of fibrils. An understanding of the molecular mechanism of the formation of protofibrils and fibrils requires information on the landscape of interpeptide interactions. This work addresses this question by using, as a model protein, barstar, which forms protofibrils and fibrils at low (environment-sensitive fluorophore, 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS), attached to specific locations in the protein. Firstly, it was observed that barstar, when labeled at certain locations with 1,5-IAEDANS, did not form mixed protofibrils with the corresponding unlabeled protein. Labeled and unlabeled proteins formed protofibrils as separate populations. A two-population model of fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics exhibiting a 'dip-and-rise' behavior was the main readout in arriving at this conclusion. Additional support for this conclusion came from the fluorescence lifetime of the probe 1,5-IAEDANS. Subsequently, the location of the fluorophore was moved along the length of the protein in nine mutant proteins, and the capability to form mixed fibrils was assessed. The results revealed that about two-thirds of the protein sequence at the C-terminal end of the protein was intimately involved in the formation of ordered protofibrils, probably forming the core, while the remaining one-third of the protein (i.e., the N-terminal region) remained largely noninteractive and flexible. This methodology can be used as a general strategy to identify regions of a given protein sequence involved in interprotein interactions in amyloid protofibrils.

  17. Fluorescence line-narrowing studies of rare earths in disordered solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, D.W.

    1982-08-10

    This dissertation is made up of two experimental studies dealing with apparently diverse topics within the subject of rare earths (RE) in solids. The first study, described in Part II, concerns the vibrations of a disordered host material about an optically active rare-earth ion as manifested by vibrationally-assisted-electronic, or vibronic transitions. Part III of the dissertation describes an investigation of the influence of site anisotropy on the purely electronic, laser transition of Nd/sup 3 +/ in glass. These two studies are bound together by the common experimental technique of laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing (FLN). By exciting fluorescence with monochromatic light of well-characterized polarization, one may select and observe the response of a single subset of the optically active ions and obtain information that is usually masked by the inhomogeneous nature of disordered solids.

  18. Experimental study of anisotropy for Berea Sandstone with image-based evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Y.; Yun, T.

    2013-12-01

    The rock anisotropy in internal structure of sedimentary rock governs physical behavior of whole body. Spatial composition of mineral and geometry of fabric contributes the anisotropy of rock, influencing on thermal property and wave propagation in internal structure of rock. Thermal conductivity and Wave velocity are important parameters to rock physical properties correlating other key parameters such as strength and elastic modulus. However, the invisibility of anisotropy of rock makes it hard to characterize the internal structure. In this study, 3D X-ray Computed Tomography is used to reveal the orientation of layer in Berea Sandstone based on statistical approach, SPM (Slicing Plane Method) with respect to the uniformly rotated orientation. This study also represents experimental study of thermal conductivity and elastic wave velocity Berea Sandstone. Divided bar method is conducted to get thermal conductivity of rock and elastic wave velocity is evaluated. Result from the statistical study based on image shows that anisotropic ratio for every orientation has unique value and they are coincides with tendency of layer direction. The uniqueness of thermal conductivity and wave velocity based on experimental study is also discussed. 3D Image of Berea Sandstone Result from SPM

  19. STUDY ON ELIMINATING FLUORESCENCE IN COTTON PULP WITH PERACETIC ACID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LixinXu; BaoguoSun

    2004-01-01

    This paper has studied processing conditions and the influence of every variable to the pulp when the fluorescence in cotton linter pulp is eliminated with peracetic acid. The suitable variables of the elimination of fluorescence, are found.

  20. STUDY ON ELIMINATING FLUORESCENCE IN COTTON PULP WITH PERACETIC ACID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lixin Xu; Baoguo Sun

    2004-01-01

    This paper has studied processing conditions and the influence of every variable to the pulp when the fluorescence in cotton linter pulp is eliminated with peracetic acid. The suitable variables of the elimination of fluorescence. are found.

  1. Strength anisotropy in Southern Africa from gravity-topography coherence studies: Implications for continental deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, J.; Simons, F. J.

    2006-12-01

    The relationship between gravity anomalies and topography, diagnostic of the elastic strength of the lithosphere and expressed in the wavelength domain by means of the coherence function, has been found to be directionally dependent in various portions of the North American, Australian, and Indian (sub)continents. While various mechanisms have been proposed as to the origin of azimuthal variations in the degree and mechanism of isostatic compensation per se, a fruitful way of interpreting this information has been to construe the orientations of mechanical weakness as indicators of fossil strain and compare them to the fast axes of seismic anisotropy, which are themselves an independent measure of strain, and to which they should be orthogonal under certain simplifying assumptions. Seen in this light, the study of mechanical anisotropy via gravity-topography coherence functions is a useful way to define the very essence of the mechanical lithosphere, as that portion which relates consistently to its seismic anisotropy, delineating a stable regime that has been coherently deformed by the action of orogenic processes over time (in the sense of Silver) and separating it from the actively deforming asthenosphere (in the sense of Vinnik) below it. In this study we present evidence for the mechanically anisotropic nature of the Southern African continent from a multitaper spectral analysis of two-dimensional coherence functions relating high-resolution Bouguer gravity anomalies and topography. Of the thirteen 750×750 km2 areas surveyed within the continental confines, five fall within an area for which seismic anisotropy has been measured by means of shear-wave splitting analysis, and 80%, or four of those, corroborate Silver's hypothesis of vertically coherent deformation in that the directions of mechanical weakness are perpendicular to the fast axis of seismic wave propagation. We discuss the limitations of our evidence and present it with a view to further work.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy studies on pulsed electrodeposited Ni/Ag/Ni trilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanapal, K.; Revathy, T.A.; Raj, M. Anand [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Narayanan, V. [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Stephen, A., E-mail: stephen_arum@hotmail.com [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Ni/Ag/Ni layered film has been prepared using pulsed electrodeposition method. • Crystalline nature of layered films is confirmed using XRD. • Magnetic easy axis is observed to be parallel to the plane of the film. • Magnetic anisotropy change is dependent on number of layers. • Ni/Ag/Ni layered film shows higher anisotropy energy than pure Ni film. - Abstract: The pulsed electrodeposition method was employed for the deposition of pure Ni, Ni/Ag and Ni/Ag/Ni films due to its greater advantages while comparing with other methods. The X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the formation of fcc structure for both nickel and silver. The cross sectional scanning electron microscopy shows the layer formation in Ni/Ag and Ni/Ag/Ni films. The metallic nature of the nickel and silver were also confirmed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The magnetic anisotropy behaviour was studied using vibrating sample magnetometer which gives that the easy axis is in plan of the film for all the film.

  3. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe Multilayers Studied with Torque Magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ataur

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) of multilayers critically depend on the magnetic and structural ordering of the interface. To study the effect of interface on PMA, Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with varying Fe (0.8-9.0 nm) and Gd (0.5-2.8 nm) or Tb (0.3-6.3 nm) layer thicknesses were fabricated by planar magnetron sputtering. The magnetometer results of spin orientation clearly reveals that samples with Gd or Tb layer thickness of more than 1.2 nm display no PMA, regardless of the Fe layer thickness. Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with thin (<1.2 nm) Tb or Gd layers display large PMA, but no PMA is observed when the Fe layer thickness is increased to 4.0 nm and higher. The bulk magnetization and anisotropy energy constant of the samples are found to increase with increasing Fe layer thickness. Torque measurement also reveals that there are two distinctly different axes of spin alignment at different energy. Tb/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers with similar composition reveal similar magnetic and structural characteristics, and it may imply that single-ion-anisotropy of rare-earth element, which is quite large for Tb ions and very small for Gd ions, may not be the dominating cause of PMA in Td/Fe and Gd/Fe multilayers. A detailed explanation of the results will be provided based on exchange interaction at the interface.

  4. Simultaneous Measurement of Elastic and Electrical Anisotropy of Shales under Elevated Pressure: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, L.; Niu, Q.; Prasad, M.

    2015-12-01

    Low-porosity shales are generally considered as transverse isotropic (TI) material, both elastically and electrically. We explore the correlation of elastic and electrical anisotropy of shales to mineralogy and organic richness. Both, elastic and electrical anisotropies in rocks are known to be functions of clay and kerogen contents. The elastic anisotropy in clay- and organic-rich shales is related to their laminated and lenticular texture that is enhanced with compaction and diagenesis leading. The correlation of complex resistivity and anisotropy in shales with clay content has theoretically modeled using cation exchange capacity of the clay minerals. Although, it is appear likely that elastic and electrical anisotropy might be controlled by similar petrophyiscal properties, very little research exists that explores the relationship between these two anisotropies and how petrophysical properties might influence them. We present an experimental data of elastic and electrical anisotropy in shales acquired with a new system that allows simultaneous measurements of acoustic velocities and complex resistivities under hydrostatic pressure in three directions: parallel, 45° and perpendicular to any orientation, such as bedding planes. Our results of five shale samples show: Elastic and electrical anisotropy are inversely related to pressure Electrical anisotropy is generally higher than elastic anisotropy Electrical anisotropy is more sensitive to pressure change Complex resistivity anisotropy for in-phase resistivity and phase is highly frequency dependent In future, we plan to measure shale samples with varying clay and organic contents and correlate anisotropy to petrophysical properties.

  5. [Fluorescence spectroscopy study of synthetic food colors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guo-qing; Wu, Ya-min; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Tuo; Gao, Shu-mei

    2009-09-01

    According to the characteristic of synthetic food colors molecule and the relationship between fluorescence and molecular structure, and through analyzing, it has been concluded that synthetic food colors is fluorescent material. By using SP-2558 multifunctional spectral measuring system, the three-dimensional fluorescence spectra of ponceau 4R, amaranth, tartrazine, sunset yellow and brilliant blue were measured. The results show that ponceau 4R excited by light at the wavelength of 330-430 nm can generate a strong fluorescence at the 621 nm peak wavelength with its best excitation wavelength being 376 nm, amaranth excited by light at the wavelength of 300-440 nm can generate a strong fluorescence at the 643 nm peak wavelength with its best excitation wavelength being 370 nm, tartrazine excited by light at the wavelength of 280-380 nm can generate a strong fluorescence at the 565 nm peak wavelength with its best excitation wavelength being 315 nm, sunset yellow excited by light with wavelength of 310-410 nm can generate a strong fluorescence at the 592 nm peak wavelength with its best excitation wavelength being 348 nm, and brilliant blue excited by light at the wavelength of 320-390 nm can generate a strong fluorescence at the 456 nm peak wavelength with its best excitation wavelength being 350 nm. Moreover, the fluorescence spectra of the five kinds of synthetic food colors were discussed. These results can provide helps for testing of food colors and food safety.

  6. Experimental Study of Rock Drill-ability Anisotropy by Acoustic Velocity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Rock drill-ability anisotropy has significant effects on directional drilling and deviation control. Its evaluation is an important but difficult research subject. Definitions of drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of rock are given in this paper. The acoustic velocities and the drill-ability parameters of several rock samples from the Engineering Center for Chinese Continental Scientific Drilling (CCSD) are respectively measured with the device for testing the rock drill-ability and the ultrasonic testing system in laboratory, so that their drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy are respectively calculated and discussed in detail by using the experimental data. On the basis of these experimental results and calculations, correlations between drill-ability anisotropy and acoustic anisotropy of the rock samples are illustrated through regression analyses. Thus, a mathematical model developed may be used to evaluate the rock drill-ability anisotropy with the acoustic logging or seismic data to a certain extent.

  7. Ab initio studies of magnetic anisotropy energy in highly Co-doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusakowski, A.; Szuszkiewicz, W.

    2017-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the energy of magnetic anisotropy for diluted magnetic semiconductor (Zn,Co)O were performed using OpenMX package with fully relativistic pseudopotentials. The analysis of the band spin-orbit interaction and the magnetic ion's surrounding on magnetic anisotropy have been provided. As a result, the calculations show that the magnetic anisotropy in (Zn,Co)O solid solution, mainly of the single ion anisotropy type has been caused by Co ions.

  8. Numerical study of influence of anisotropy on flanging earing based on Barlat six-component yield function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大永; 张少睿; 彭颖红; 胡平

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropy of stamped sheet metal exerts evident effects on the formability. Barlat six-component yield function was introduced into the elastoplastic finite element formulation based on the principle of virtual velocity and the discrete Kirchhoff triangular element model. The flanging earing in cylindrical cup drawing process of circular sheet metal was numerically simulated. The influence of anisotropy on the forming process was studied.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy and microscopy studies in magnetostrictive Tb-(Fe,Co) thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umadevi, K.; Talapatra, A.; Arout Chelvane, J.; Palit, Mithun; Mohanty, J.; Jayalakshmi, V.

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports the effect of the film thickness on the magnetostrictive behavior of (Fe,Co) rich Tb-(Fe,Co) films grown on Si ⟨100⟩ by electron beam evaporation. Magnetostriction was found to decrease with an increase in film thicknesses. To understand the variation of magnetostriction with the film thickness, detailed structural, microstructural, magnetization, and magnetic microscopy studies were carried out. X-ray diffraction studies indicated the presence of two phases, viz., Tb2 (Fe, Co)17 and Fe-Co phases, for all the films. With the increase in the film thickness, the peak intensity of the Tb2 (Fe, Co)17 phase decreased and that of the Fe-Co phase increased. Magnetization studies showed the presence of strong in-plane anisotropy for all the films. In addition to this, the presence of the out-of-plane component of magnetization was also observed for the films grown with higher thicknesses. This anisotropic behavior was also validated through magnetic microscopy studies carried out along the in-plane and out-of-plane directions employing magneto-optic Kerr microscopy and magnetic force microscopy, respectively. The decrease in magnetostriction was explained on the basis of dual phase formation and complex interplay between the in-plane and out-of-plane magnetic anisotropies present in the film.

  10. Quantifying trabecular bone material anisotropy and orientation using low resolution clinical CT images: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemi, S Majid; Cooper, David M L; Johnston, James D

    2016-09-01

    Accounting for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation can improve the accuracy of quantitative computed tomography-based finite element (FE) modeling of bone. The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of quantifying trabecular material anisotropy and orientation using clinical computed tomography (CT). Forty four cubic volumes of interest were obtained from micro-CT images of the human radius. Micro-FE modeling was performed on the samples to obtain orthotropic stiffness entries as well as trabecular orientation. Simulated computed tomography images (0.32, 0.37, and 0.5mm isotropic voxel sizes) were created by resampling micro-CT images with added image noise. The gray-level structure tensor was used to derive fabric eigenvalues and eigenvectors in simulated CT images. For 'best case' comparison purposes, Mean Intercept Length was used to define fabric from micro-CT images. Regression was used in combination with eigenvalues, imaged density and FE to inversely derive the constants used in Cowin and Zysset-Curnier fabric-elasticity equations, and for comparing image derived fabric-elasticity stiffness entries to those obtained using micro-FE. Image derived eigenvectors (which indicated trabecular orientation) were then compared to orientation derived using micro-FE. When using clinically available voxel sizes, gray-level structure tensor derived fabric combined with Cowin's equations was able to explain 94-97% of the variance in orthotropic stiffness entries while Zysset-Curnier equations explained 82-88% of the variance in stiffness. Image derived orientation deviated by 4.4-10.8° from micro-FE derived orientation. Our results indicate potential to account for spatial variation of trabecular material anisotropy and orientation in subject-specific finite element modeling of bone using clinically available CT.

  11. APPLICATION OF MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE AND MODULATED CHLOROPHYLL FLUORESCENCE IMAGING IN STUDYING ENVIRONMENTAL STRESSES EFFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guidi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorophyll (Chl a fluorescence is a widely used tool to monitor the photosynthetic process in plants subjected to environmental stresses.this review reports the theoretical bases of Chl fluorescence, and the significance of the most important Chl fluorescence parameters. it also reportshow these parameters can be utilised to estimate changes in photosystem ii (PSII photochemistry, linear electron flux and energy dissipationmechanisms. the relation between actual PSII photochemistry and CO2 assimilation is discussed, as is the role of photochemical andnon-photochemical quenching in inducing changes in PSII activity. the application of Chl fluorescence imaging to study heterogeneity on leaflamina is also considered. this review summarises only some of the results obtained by this methodology to study the effects of differentenvironmental stresses, namely water and nutrients availability, pollutants, temperature and salinity.

  12. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  13. Magnetic field-dependent shape anisotropy in small patterned films studied using rotating magnetoresistance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaolong Fan; Hengan Zhou; Jinwei Rao; Xiaobing Zhao; Jing Zhao; Fengzhen Zhang; Desheng Xue

    2015-01-01

    Based on the electric rotating magnetoresistance method, the shape anisotropy of a Co microstrip has been systematically investigated. We find that the shape anisotropy is dependent not only on the shape itself, but also on the magnetization distribution controlled by an applied magnetic field. Together with micro-magnetic simulations, we present a visualized picture of how non-uniform magnetization affects the values and polarities of the anisotropy constants and . From the perspective of po...

  14. Single-ion anisotropy in the gadolinium pyrochlores studied by electron paramagnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, V. N.; Zhitomirsky, M. E.; Smirnov, A. I.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.; Loidl, A.; Marin, C.; Sanchez, J.-P.

    2005-07-01

    The electron paramagnetic resonance is used to measure the single-ion anisotropy of Gd3+ ions in the pyrochlore structure of (Y1-xGdx)2Ti2O7 . A rather strong easy-plane-type anisotropy is found. The anisotropy constant D is comparable to the exchange integral J in the prototype Gd2Ti2O7 , D≃0.75J , and exceeds the dipolar energy scale. Physical implications of an easy-plane anisotropy for a pyrochlore antiferromagnet are considered. We calculate the magnetization curves at T=0 and discuss phase transitions in a magnetic field.

  15. Environment-responsive fluorescent nucleoside analogue probe for studying oligonucleotide dynamics in a model cell-like compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Maroti G; Srivatsan, Seergazhi G

    2013-11-21

    The majority of fluorescent nucleoside analogue probes that have been used in the in vitro study of nucleic acids are not suitable for cell-based biophysical assays because they exhibit excitation maxima in the UV region and low quantum yields within oligonucleotides. Therefore, we propose that the photophysical characterization of oligonucleotides labeled with a fluorescent nucleoside analogue in reverse micelles (RM), which are good biological membrane models and UV-transparent, could provide an alternative approach to studying the properties of nucleic acids in a cell-like confined environment. In this context, we describe the photophysical properties of an environment-sensitive fluorescent uridine analogue (1), based on the 5-(benzo[b]thiophen-2-yl)pyrimidine core, in micelles and RM. The emissive nucleoside, which is polarity- and viscosity-sensitive, reports the environment of the surfactant assemblies via changes in its fluorescence properties. The nucleoside analogue, incorporated into an RNA oligonucleotide and hybridized to its complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides, exhibits a significantly higher fluorescence intensity, lifetime, and anisotropy in RM than in aqueous buffer, which is consistent with the environment of RM. Collectively, our results demonstrate that nucleoside 1 could be utilized as a fluorescent label to study the function of nucleic acids in a model cellular milieu.

  16. Developing Fluorescent Hyaluronan Analogs for Hyaluronan Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Ke

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Two kinds of fluorescent hyaluronan (HA analogs, one serving as normal imaging agent and the other used as a biosensitive contrast agent, were developed for the investigation of HA uptake and degradation. Our approach of developing HA imaging agents depends on labeling HA with varying molar percentages of a near-infrared (NIR dye. At low labeling ratios, the hyaluronan uptake can be directly imaged while at high labeling ratios, the fluorescent signal is quenched and signal generation occurs only after degradation. It is found that the conjugate containing 1%–2% NIR dye can be used as a normal optical imaging agent, while bioactivable imaging agents are formed at 6% to 17% dye loading. It was determined that the conjugation of dye to HA with different loading percentages does not impact HA biodegradation by hyaluronidase (Hyal. The feasibility of using these two NIR fluorescent hyaluronan analogs for HA investigation was evaluated in vivo with optical imaging. The data demonstrates that the 1% dye loaded fluorescent HA can be used to monitor the behavior of HA and its fragments, whereas bioactivatable HA imaging agent (17% dye in HA is more suitable for detecting HA fragments.

  17. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  18. Micromagnetic study of magnetic domain structure and magnetization reversal in amorphous wires with circular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betancourt, I., E-mail: israelb@correo.unam.m [Departamento de Materiales Metalicos y Ceramicos, Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Hrkac, G. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin St., Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Schrefl, T. [Department of Engineering Materials, University of Sheffield, Mappin St., Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); St. Poelten University of Applied Sciences (Austria)

    2011-05-15

    In this work we present a detailed numerical investigation on the magnetic domain formation and magnetization reversal mechanism in sub-millimeter amorphous wires with negative magnetostriction by means of micromagnetic calculations. The formation of circular magnetic domains surrounding a multidomain axially oriented central nucleus was observed for the micromagnetic model representing the amorphous wire. The magnetization reversal explained by micromagnetic computations for the M-H curve is described in terms of a combined nucleation-propagation-rotational mechanism after the saturated state. Results are interpreted in terms of the effective magnetic anisotropy. - Research highlights: > Magnetic domain formation in small amorphous wires is studied by micromagnetic calculations. > Magnetization reversal in small amorphous wires is studied by micromagnetic calculations. > Formation of circular domains around an axially oriented central core was observed. > Magnetization reversal is described in terms of nucleation-propagation-rotational mechanisms. > Magnetic domains and reversal mechanism are consistent with experimental reports.

  19. M(o)ssbauer study of the field induced uniaxial anisotropy in electro-deposited FeCo alloy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Wei; Yang Xu; Wang Hai-Bo; Liu Xin; Li Fa-Shen

    2009-01-01

    Thin ferromagnetic films with in-plane magnetic anisotropy are promising materials for obtaining high microwave permeability. The paper reports a M(o)ssbauer study of the field induced in-plane uniaxial anisotropy in electro-deposited FeCo alloy films. The FeCo alloy films were prepared by the electro-deposition method with and without an external magnetic field applied parallel to the film plane during deposition, Vibrating sample magnetometry and M(o)ssbauer spectroscopy measurements at room temperature indicate that the film deposited in external field shows an in-plane uniaxial anisotropy with an easy direction coinciding with the external field direction and a hard direction perpendicular to the field direction, whereas the film deposited without external field does not show any in-plane anisotropy. M(o)ssbauer spectra taken in three geometric arrangements show that the magnetic moments are almost constrained in the film plane for the film deposited with applied magnetic field. Also, the magnetic moments tend to align in the direction of the applied external magnetic field during deposition, indicating that the observed anisotropy should be attributed to directional ordering of atomic pairs.

  20. Mapping of coma anisotropies to plasma structures of weak comets: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gortsas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of coma anisotropies on the plasma environment of comets have been studied by means of a 3-D hybrid model which treats electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas ion dynamics are covered by a kinetic approach. From Earth-based observations as well as from in-situ spacecraft measurements the shape of the coma of many comets is ascertained to be anisotropic. However, most plasma simulation studies deploy a spherically symmetric activity pattern. In this paper anisotropy is studied by considering three different coma shape models. The first model is derived from the Haser model and is characterised by spherically symmetry. This reference model is then compared with two different neutral gas shape models: the dayside restricted model with no nightside activity and a cone shaped model with opening angle of π/2. In all models the integrated surface activity is kept constant. The simulations have been done for the Rosetta target comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for two heliocentric distances, 1.30 AU and 3.25 AU. It is found that shock formation processes are modified as a result of increasing spatial confinement. Characteristic plasma structures of comets such as the bow shock, magnetic barrier region and the ion composition boundary exhibit a shift towards the sun. In addition, the cone shaped model leads to a strong increase of the mass-loaded region which in turn leads to a smooth deceleration of the solar wind flow and an increasing degree of mixture between the solar wind and cometary ion species. This creates an additional transport channel of the magnetic field from the magnetic barrier region away which in turn leads to a broadening of this region. In addition, it leads to an ion composition boundary which is only gradually developed.

  1. Anisotropy of the U-Mo alloy: Molecular-dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolotova, L. N.; Starikov, S. V.

    2016-05-01

    Metastable structures of homogeneous U-Mo phases formed in the course of alloy solidification have been studied by the method of atomistic simulation. It has been shown that, at low molybdenum concentrations, a phase with a tetragonal lattice is more stable. This structure can be considered as close to a body-centered cubic structure with the central atom slightly displaced from the center of the unit cell. The calculation results are in agreement with the experimental data and confirm the anisotropy of the alloy structure. With increasing molybdenum concentration, a gradual transition to a cubic structure occurs. However, this transition occurs due to the accumulation of centers of the stabilization of the cubic structure represented by molybdenum atoms, rather than via changes in the uranium-atom positions.

  2. Photosynthetic membrane development studied using picosecond fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Sauer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Using measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission, the development of the photosynthetic membrane during etioplast-to-chloroplast differentiation was investigated. Tthe chlorophyll fluorescence decay kinetics of pea chloroplasts from plants grown under intermittent (2 min light-118 min dark) and continuous light regimes were monitored with a single-proton timing system with picosecond resolution. The changes in the fluorescence yields and decay kinetics were associated with known structural and organizational developmental phenomena in the chloroplast. This correlation provides a more detailed assignment of the origins of the fluorescence decay components than has been previously obtained by studying only mature chloroplasts. In particular, the analysis of the variable kinetics and multiexponential character of the fluorescence emission during thylakoid development focuses on the organization of photosynthetic units and the degree of communication between reaction centers in the same photosystem. These results further demonstrate that the age of etiolated tissue is critical to plastid development.

  3. The effect of temperature of fluorescence: an animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Alex; Masters, Bart; Jansen, Duco; Welch, A. J.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2010-02-01

    The effect of temperature on the fluorescence of enucleated porcine eyes and rat skin was studied. The fluorescence peak intensity was found to decrease as the tissue temperature increased. A dual-excitation, fiber-based system was used to collect fluorescence and diffuse-reflectance spectra from the samples. A thermal camera was used to determine the temperature of the tissue at the time of fluorescence measurement. The samples were mounted in a saline bath and measurements were made as the tissue temperature was increased from -20°C to 70°C. Results indicate that temperature affects several fluorescence spectra characteristics. The peak height decreased as temperature increased. At temperatures above 60°C, the peak position shifted to lower wavelengths. Heating and cooling experiments of the rat skin demonstrate the recovery of the loss in fluorescence. The diffuse reflectance spectra indicated a change in optical properties past 60°C, but prior to the denaturation temperature for collagen at 57°C, no change in optical properties was observed. Results suggest that the decrease in fluorescence is both a property of fluorescence and a result of altering optical properties.

  4. Pulp tissue in sex determination: A fluorescent microscopic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Nayar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To determine and compare the reliability of pulp tissue in determination of sex and to analyze whether caries have any effect on fluorescent body test. Materials and Methods: This study was carried on 50 maxillary and mandibular teeth (25 male teeth and 25 female teeth, which were indicated for extraction. The teeth are categorized into 5 groups, 10 each (5 from males and 5 from females on the basis of caries progression. The pulp cells are stained with quinacrine hydrochloride and observed with fluorescent microscope for fluorescent body. Gender is determined by identification of Y chromosome fluorescence in dental pulp. Results: Fluorescent bodies were found to be more in sound teeth in males as the caries increase the mean percentage of fluorescent bodies observed decreases in males. We also observed the fluorescent spots in females, and the value of the spot increases in female as the caries progresses, thereby giving false positive results in females. Conclusion: Sex determination by fluorescent staining of the Y chromosome is a reliable technique in teeth with healthy pulps or caries with enamel or up to half way of dentin. Teeth with caries involving pulp cannot be used for sex determination.

  5. Study on the Explicit Formula of the Triangular Flat Shell Element Based on the Analytical Trial Functions for Anisotropy Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Rong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel way to formulate the triangular flat shell element. The basic analytical solutions of membrane and bending plate problem for anisotropy material are studied separately. Combining with the conforming displacement along the sides and hybrid element strategy, the triangular flat shell elements based on the analytical trial functions (ATF for anisotropy material are formulated. By using the explicit integral formulae of the triangular element, the matrices used in proposed shell element are calculated efficiently. The benchmark examples showed the high accuracy and high efficiency.

  6. Magnetic field-dependent shape anisotropy in small patterned films studied using rotating magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiaolong; Zhou, Hengan; Rao, Jinwei; Zhao, Xiaobing; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Fengzhen; Xue, Desheng

    2015-11-13

    Based on the electric rotating magnetoresistance method, the shape anisotropy of a Co microstrip has been systematically investigated. We find that the shape anisotropy is dependent not only on the shape itself, but also on the magnetization distribution controlled by an applied magnetic field. Together with micro-magnetic simulations, we present a visualized picture of how non-uniform magnetization affects the values and polarities of the anisotropy constants K1 and K2. From the perspective of potential appliantions, our results are useful in designing and understanding the performance of micro- and nano-scale patterned ferromagnetic units and the related device properties.

  7. Study of ultra-energetic cosmic rays at the Pierre Auger Observatory from particle detection to anisotropy measurement; Etude des rayons cosmiques ultra-energetiques avec l'Observatoire de Pierre Auger: de l'acceptance du detecteur a la nature des particules primaires et aux mesures d'anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aublin, J

    2006-09-15

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, still under construction in Argentina, is designed to study the cosmic rays with energies above a few EeV. The experiment combines two complementary techniques: the fluorescence light detection and the sampling of the shower with an array of detectors at ground, covering a surface of 3000 square kilometers. The calculation of the acceptance of the detector, which is of utmost importance to establish the energy spectrum, has been achieved. The method of computation of the acceptance is simple and reliable. The detection efficiency depends on the nature of primary cosmic rays, allowing to study the cosmic rays composition with the surface detector. The calculation of the cosmic rays energy spectrum has been performed, using different methods to estimate the energy of the events. A cross calibration between the fluorescence and the surface detector provides an estimation of the energy almost independent of hadronic interaction models. The study of large scale anisotropies in the cosmic rays angular distribution provides useful informations about the cosmic rays sources and the conditions of propagation. A new analysis method is presented, allowing to estimate the parameters of an underlying dipolar and quadrupolar anisotropy in the data. The method is applied to a preliminary Auger data set. (author)

  8. The study of blue LED to induce fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging for oral carcinoma detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Longjiang; Hu, Yuanting

    2009-07-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy and fluorescence imaging diagnosis of malignant lesions provides us with a new method to diagnose diseases in precancerous stage. Early diagnosis of disease has significant importance in cancer treatment, because most cancers can be cured well in precancerous, especially when the diffusion of cancer is limited in a restricted region. In this study, Golden hamster models were applied to 5% 9, 10 dimethyl-1, 2-benzanthracene (DMBA) to induce hamster buccal cheek pouch carcinoma three times a week. Rose Bengal, which has been used in clinican for years and avoids visible side-effect to human was chosen as photosensitizer. 405 nm blue LED was used to induce the fluorescence of photosensitizer. After topical application of photosensitizer, characteristic red emission fluorescence peak was observed around 600nm. Similar, normal oral cavity has special luminescence around 480nm. Fluorescence spectroscopy technology is based on analysing emission peaks of photosensitizer in the areas of oral carcinoma, moreover, red-to-green (IR/IG) intensity ratio is also applied as a diagnostic algorithm. A CCD which is connected with a computer is used to take pictures at carcinoma areas through different filters. Fluorescence images from normal hamster buccal cheek pouch are compared with those from carcinogen-induced models of carcinoma, and morphological differences between normal and lesion tissue can be distinguished. The pictures are analyzed by Matlab and shown on the screen of computer. This paper demonstrates that Rose Bengal could be used as photosensitizer to detect oral carcinoma, and blue LED as excitation source could not only have a good effect to diagnose oral carcinoma, but also decrease cost greatly.

  9. Atomic fluorescence study of high temperature aerodynamic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.; Sethi, D. S.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet laser induced atomic fluorescence has been used to characterize supersonic jet aerodynamic levitation experiments. The levitated specimen was a 0.4 cm sapphire sphere that was separately heated at temperatures up to 2327 K by an infrared laser. The supersonic jet expansion and thermal gradients in the specimen wake were studied by measuring spatial variations in the concentration of atomic Hg added to the levitating argon gas stream. Further applications of atomic fluorescence in containerless experiments, such as ideal gas fluorescence thermometry and containerless process control are discussed.

  10. The mean field study of phase transitions in two dimensional Kagome lattice under local anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mortezapour

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available  In this work we investigated the critical properties of the anti-ferromagnetic XY model on a two dimensional Kagome lattice under single-ion easy-axes anisotropy. Employing the mean field theory, we found that this model shows a second order phase transition from disordered to all-in all-out state for any value of anisotropy.

  11. Study of magnetoelastic and magnetocrystalline anisotropies in Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} nanowire arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskaltsova, Anastasiia, E-mail: amoskaltsova@inesc-mn.pt [National Technical University Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, 21, Frunze Str., 61002 Kharkiv (Ukraine); INESC-MN, Rua Alves Redol, 9-1, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Proenca, Mariana P. [IFIMUP and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Dep. Física e Astronomia, Univ. Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Nedukh, Sergey V. [O. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 12, Proskura str., 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Sousa, Célia T. [IFIMUP and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Dep. Física e Astronomia, Univ. Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vakula, Arthur [O. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 12, Proskura str., 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Kakazei, Gleb N. [IFIMUP and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Dep. Física e Astronomia, Univ. Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Institute of Magnetism National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36b Vernadskogo Blvd., 03142 Kiev (Ukraine); Tarapov, Sergey I. [O. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 12, Proskura str., 61085 Kharkov (Ukraine); Araujo, Joao P. [IFIMUP and IN Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Dep. Física e Astronomia, Univ. Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-01-15

    Highly ordered Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} nanowire (NW) arrays were electrodeposited inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide membranes. The control of the applied potential during the electrodeposition process allowed us to easily tune the Co% in the alloy. Systematic studies on the morphological and crystallographic properties together with static and dynamic magnetic characterizations were performed. In this work we focus on the study of the dynamic magnetic properties of CoNi NW arrays using the ferromagnetic resonance method at both room (RT) and low (LT) temperatures. The careful comparison analysis performed between the magnetic anisotropy fields obtained at RT and LT, allowed us to extract for the first time the magnetocrystalline anisotropy effect of the Co component and, most importantly, the magnetoelastic anisotropy effect of Ni. - Highlights: • Ordered hexagonal arrays of Co{sub x}Ni{sub 1−x} nanowires were grown by DC electrodeposition. • The Co:Ni ratio in the nanowires was tuned by varying the deposition potential. • We studied magnetic anisotropies using ferromagnetic resonance method. • The experiments were performed at room and low temperatures. • We extracted the magnetoelastic contribution of Ni in the fabricated nanowires.

  12. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna del Carmen Lara-Severino

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ=150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes.

  13. A study of process parameters on workpiece anisotropy in the laser engineered net shaping (LENSTM) process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Shubham; Rao, Balkrishna C.

    2017-06-01

    The process of laser engineered net shaping (LENSTM) is an additive manufacturing technique that employs the coaxial flow of metallic powders with a high-power laser to form a melt pool and the subsequent deposition of the specimen on a substrate. Although research done over the past decade on the LENSTM processing of alloys of steel, titanium, nickel and other metallic materials typically reports superior mechanical properties in as-deposited specimens, when compared to the bulk material, there is anisotropy in the mechanical properties of the melt deposit. The current study involves the development of a numerical model of the LENSTM process, using the principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and the subsequent prediction of the volume fraction of equiaxed grains to predict process parameters required for the deposition of workpieces with isotropy in their properties. The numerical simulation is carried out on ANSYS-Fluent, whose data on thermal gradient are used to determine the volume fraction of the equiaxed grains present in the deposited specimen. This study has been validated against earlier efforts on the experimental studies of LENSTM for alloys of nickel. Besides being applicable to the wider family of metals and alloys, the results of this study will also facilitate effective process design to improve both product quality and productivity.

  14. Encapsulation of serotonin in β-cyclodextrin nano-cavities: Fluorescence spectroscopic and molecular modeling studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sudip; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2010-06-01

    Serotonin is a physiologically important biogenic amine, deficiency of which leads to mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, infantile autism, and depression. Both β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) and its chemically substituted synthetic varieties (often possessing enhanced aqueous solubility and improved drug complexing abilities) are finding wide applications as drug delivery vehicles. Here we have studied the encapsulation of serotonin in β-CD and succinyl-2-hydroxypropyl β-cyclodextrin (SHP-β-CD) by exploiting the intrinsic serotonin fluorescence. Enhanced fluorescence emission intensity (which increases by ˜18% and 34% in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) and anisotropy ( r) ( r = 0.075 and 0.1 in β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively) are observed in presence of the cyclodextrins. From the fluorescence data host-guest interaction with 1:1 stoichiometry is evident, the association constants ( K) being 126.06 M -1 and 461.62 M -1 for β-CD and SHPβ-CD respectively. Additionally, molecular docking and semiempirical calculations have been carried out which provide, for the first time, detailed insights regarding the encapsulation process. In particular, it is evident that the indole ring is inserted within the β-CD cavity with the aliphatic amine side chain protruding towards the primary rim of the β-CD cavity. Docking calculations reveal that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex. Semiempirical calculations indicate that formation of the 1:1 inclusion complex is energetically favorable which is consistent with the fluorescence data.

  15. Numerical study on the emergence of anisotropy in artificial flocks: A BOIDS modeling and simulations of empirical findings

    CERN Document Server

    Makiguchi, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    In real flocks, it was revealed that the angular density of nearest neighbors shows a strong {\\it anisotropic structure} of individuals by very recent extensive field studies by Ballerini et al [{\\it Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA} {\\bf 105}, pp.1232-1237 (2008)]. In this paper, we show that this empirical evidence in real flocks, namely, the structure of anisotropy also emerges in an artificial flock simulation based on the {\\it BOIDS} by Reynolds [{\\it Computer Graphics} {\\bf 21}, pp.25-34 (1987)]. We numerically find that appropriate combinations of the weights for just only three essential factors of the BOIDS, namely, `Cohesion', `Alignment' and `Separation' lead to a strong anisotropy in the flock. This result seems to be highly counter-intuitive and also provides a justification of the hypothesis that the anisotropy emerges as a result of self-organization of interacting intelligent agents (birds for instance). To quantify the anisotropy, we evaluate a useful statistics (a kind of ...

  16. Fluorescence Imaging Study of Impinging Underexpanded Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was designed to create a simplified simulation of the flow through a hole in the surface of a hypersonic aerospace vehicle and the subsequent impingement of the flow on internal structures. In addition to planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) flow visualization, pressure measurements were recorded on the surface of an impingement target. The PLIF images themselves provide quantitative spatial information about structure of the impinging jets. The images also help in the interpretation of impingement surface pressure profiles by highlighting the flow structures corresponding to distinctive features of these pressure profiles. The shape of the pressure distribution along the impingement surface was found to be double-peaked in cases with a sufficiently high jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio so as to have a Mach disk, as well as in cases where a flow feature called a recirculation bubble formed at the impingement surface. The formation of a recirculation bubble was in turn found to depend very sensitively upon the jet-exit-to-ambient pressure ratio. The pressure measured at the surface was typically less than half the nozzle plenum pressure at low jet pressure ratios and decreased with increasing jet pressure ratios. Angled impingement cases showed that impingement at a 60deg angle resulted in up to a factor of three increase in maximum pressure at the plate compared to normal incidence.

  17. Quantitative Fluorescence Studies in Living Cells: Extending Fluorescence Fluctuation Spectroscopy to Peripheral Membrane Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elizabeth Myhra

    The interactions of peripheral membrane proteins with both membrane lipids and proteins are vital for many cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cellular signaling, and cell growth/regulation. Building accurate biophysical models of these processes requires quantitative characterization of the behavior of peripheral membrane proteins, yet methods to quantify their interactions inside living cells are very limited. Because peripheral membrane proteins usually exist both in membrane-bound and cytoplasmic forms, the separation of these two populations is a key challenge. This thesis aims at addressing this challenge by extending fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS) to simultaneously measure the oligomeric state of peripheral membrane proteins in the cytoplasm and at the plasma membrane. We developed a new method based on z-scan FFS that accounts for the fluorescence contributions from cytoplasmic and membrane layers by incorporating a fluorescence intensity z-scan through the cell. H-Ras-EGFP served as a model system to demonstrate the feasibility of the technique. The resolvability and stability of z-scanning was determined as well as the oligomeric state of H-Ras-EGFP at the plasma membrane and in the cytoplasm. Further, we successfully characterized the binding affinity of a variety of proteins to the plasma membrane by quantitative analysis of the z-scan fluorescence intensity profile. This analysis method, which we refer to as z-scan fluorescence profile deconvoution, was further used in combination with dual-color competition studies to determine the lipid specificity of protein binding. Finally, we applied z-scan FFS to provide insight into the early assembly steps of the HTLV-1 retrovirus.

  18. Study of nanocrystalline thin cobalt films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy obtained by thermal evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Witold; Balcerski, Józef; Szmaja, Witold

    2017-02-01

    We have performed a detailed investigation of the morphological and magnetic domain structures of nanocrystalline thin cobalt films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The films were thermally evaporated at an incidence angle of 0° in a vacuum of about 10-5 mbar and possessed thicknesses in the range from 60 nm to 100 nm. The films were studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron diffraction of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), magnetic force microscopy (MFM) and the Fresnel mode of TEM. The films are polycrystalline and consist of very densely packed grains with sizes at the nanometer range. The grains are roundish in shape and generally exhibit no geometric alignment. The films are mainly composed of the hexagonal close-packed (HCP) phase of cobalt and possess preferential orientation of the cobalt grains with the hexagonal axis perpendicular to the film surface. 70 nm thick films and thicker have fully perpendicular magnetization, while 60 nm thick films possess clearly dominating perpendicular magnetization component. The magnetic domain structure is in the form of stripe domains forming a maze pattern. When the film thickness increases from 60 nm to 100 nm, the average grain size increases from 28.9 nm to 31.5 nm and the average domain width increases from 79.4 nm to 98.7 nm.

  19. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  20. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: Depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2014-09-01

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylenelike backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  1. A fluorescence microscopy study of quantum dots as fluorescent probes for brain tumor diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Vernier, P. Thomas; Sun, Yinghua; Gundersen, Martin A.; Marcu, Laura

    2005-03-01

    In vivo fluorescent spectroscopy and imaging using endogenous and exogenous sources of contrast can provide new approaches for enhanced demarcation of brain tumor margins and infiltration. Quantum dots (QDs), nanometer-size fluorescent probes, represent excellent contrast agents for biomedical imaging due to their broader excitation spectrum, narrower emission spectra, and higher sensitivity and stability. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the development and progression of a number of human solid tumors including brain tumors and thus a potential target for brain tumor diagnosis. In this study, we investigate the up-take of ODs by brain tumor cells and the potential use of EGFR-targeted QDs for enhanced optical imaging of brain tumors. We conducted fluorescence microscopy studies of the up-take mechanism of the anti-EGFR-ODs complexes by Human U87, and SKMG-3 glioblastoma cells. Our preliminary results show that QDs can enter into glioma cells through anti-EGFR mediated endocytosis, suggesting that these nano-size particles can tag brain tumor cells.

  2. Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy: advanced studies of fluorescence dynamics, lifetime imaging, clinical sensing, two-photon excitation, and light quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Kusba, Jozef; Akkaya, Engin; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1994-08-01

    The Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS) is a multi-user facility providing state of the art time-resolved fluorescence instrumentation and software for scientists, whose research can be enhanced by such experimental data. The CFS is a national center, supported by the National Center for Research Resources Division of the National Institutes of Health, and in part by the National Science Foundation. Both time-domain (TD) and frequency- domain (FD) measurements (10 MHz to 10 Ghz) are available, with a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths (UV to NIR). The data can be used to recover distances and site-to-site diffusion in protein, interactions between macromolecules, accessibility of fluorophores to quenchers, and the dynamic properties of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids. Current software provides for analysis of multi-exponential intensity and anisotropy decays, lifetime distribution, distance distributions for independent observation of fluorescence donors and acceptors, transient effects in collisional quenching, phase-modulation spectra and time-resolved emission spectra. Most programs provide for global analysis of multiple data sets obtained under similar experimental conditions. Data can be analyzed on-site by connection with the CFS computers through the internet. During six years of operation we have established scientific collaborations with over 30 academic and industrial groups in the United States. These collaborations have resulted in 63 scientific papers.

  3. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, G; Leif, R

    2009-07-15

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  4. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  5. [Study on fluorescence spectra of Chinese rice wine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhou-yi; Zhu, Tuo; Gu, En-dong; Liu, Ying; Song, Chun-yuan

    2008-10-01

    Chinese rice wine has a history of more than 5000 years, only in China, hich is called "Nation Wine", and Shao Xing Chinese rice wine is a representative of it. The fluorescence spectra of 3 kinds of Shao Xing Chinese rice wine with different storage age induced by suitable UV-light were obtained in the present paper through experiment. The authors compared and analyzed them comprehensively by using three dimensional contour and two dimensional fluorescence technique, and found that their best induced light was all in the vicinity of 370 nm. The peak wavelength of 3 year storage age wine was 504 nm, while 488 nm and 505 nm were for 5 and 8 year storage age wine respectively. The emitted fluorescence existed in 400 to 680 nm, which had wide peak. More over, the emitting mechanism of Shao Xing Chinese rice wine was discussed. The authors also have explained the similarity and difference of fluorescence spectra among the 3 kinds of wine. The reason for wide fluorescence peak was also analyzed. This investigation contributes to the study of the characteristic, year detection and food safety of Chinese rice wine.

  6. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional group IV-VI compounds: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guangzhao; Qin, Zhenzhen; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-05-01

    New classes of two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport is a fundamental physical parameter. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of the 2D orthorhombic group IV-VI compounds of GeS, GeSe, SnS and SnSe by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite their similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as phonon group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity (κ), etc. Especially, the κ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer GeS shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer SnS and SnSe show almost isotropy in phonon transport. The origin of the diverse anisotropy is fully studied and the underlying mechanism is discussed in details. With limited size, the κ could be effectively lowered, and the anisotropy could be effectively modulated by nanostructuring, which would extend the applications to nanoscale thermoelectrics and thermal management. Our study offers fundamental understanding of the anisotropic phonon transport properties of 2D materials, and would be of significance for further study, modulation and applications in emerging technologies.

  7. Conformation induction in melanotropic peptides by trifluoroethanol: fluorescence and circular dichroism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Basak, S

    1998-09-14

    Conformation induction in the two related peptides, alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and delta-melanocyte stimulating hormone (delta-MSH), have been studied in solvent media containing varying percentages of the membrane-mimetic solvent 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis of the CD spectra at different TFE concentrations showed that these spectra can be described as linear combinations of only two distinct basis spectra, corresponding to the peptides in the random-coil and 'folded' conformations. For alpha-MSH the spectrum of the folded state is very similar to the standard spectrum of the alpha-helix, while that for delta-MSH has partial resemblance to the helical spectrum. Fitting the data on ellipticity (at 222 nm) as a function of TFE volume fraction to an equation based on a two-state model describing TFE-induced conformation induction in the peptides gave values of (1.1 +/- 0.4) and (4.2 +/- 0.5) kcal mol-1 for alpha-MSH and delta-MSH, respectively, for the free energy of equilibrium between the helix and coil forms in water. Measurement of fluorescence emission parameters (emission maximum, quantum yield, steady-state anisotropy and mean excited-state lifetime) indicated that the microenvironment around the single tryptophan residues of both peptides changes in like manner with increasing concentration of TFE in the solvent. The similarity of fluorescence behaviour of the peptides suggests that their Trp fluorophores do not participate in secondary structure formation in TFE.

  8. Photoluminescence polarization anisotropy for studying long-range structural ordering within semiconductor multi-atomic alloys and organic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prutskij, T.; Percino, J. [Instituto de Ciencias, BUAP, Privada 17 Norte, No 3417, col. San Miguel Huyeotlipan, 72050, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Orlova, T. [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN (United States); Vavilova, L. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St Petersburg 194021, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-04

    Long-range structural ordering within multi-component semiconductor alloys and organic crystals leads to significant optical anisotropy and, in particular, to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission. The PL emission of ternary and quaternary semiconductor alloys is polarized if there is some amount of the atomic ordering within the crystal structure. We analyze the polarization of the PL emission from the quaternary GaInAsP semiconductor alloy grown by Liquid Phase Epitaxy (LPE) and conclude that it could be caused by low degree atomic ordering within the crystal structure together with the thermal biaxial strain due to difference between the thermal expansion coefficients of the layer and the substrate. We also study the state of polarization of the PL from organic crystals in order to identify different features of the crystal PL spectrum.

  9. Voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy in Fe|MgO tunnel junctions studied by x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miwa, Shinji, E-mail: miwa@mp.es.osaka-u.ac.jp; Matsuda, Kensho; Tanaka, Kazuhito; Goto, Minori; Suzuki, Yoshishige [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kotani, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Tetsuya [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2015-10-19

    In this study, voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) in Fe|MgO tunnel junctions was investigated via the magneto-optical Kerr effect, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy. The Fe|MgO tunnel junctions showed enhanced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy under external negative voltage, which induced charge depletion at the Fe|MgO interface. Despite the application of voltages of opposite polarity, no trace of chemical reaction such as a redox reaction attributed to O{sup 2−} migration was detected in the x-ray absorption spectra of the Fe. The VCMA reported in the Fe|MgO-based magnetic tunnel junctions must therefore originate from phenomena associated with the purely electric effect, that is, surface electron doping and/or redistribution induced by an external electric field.

  10. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy influence on voltage-driven spin-diode effect in magnetic tunnel junctions: A micromagnetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marek; Chȩciński, Jakub; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz

    2017-05-01

    We study the influence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy on the voltage-induced ferromagnetic resonance in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). An MTJ response to the applied radio-frequency voltage excitation is investigated using micromagnetic calculations with the free layer oriented both in-plane and out-of-plane. Our model allows for a quantitative description of the magnetic system parameters such as resonance frequency, sensitivity or quality factor and for a distinction between material-dependent internal damping and disorder-dependent effective damping. We find that the sensitivity abruptly increases up to three orders of magnitude near the anisotropy transition regime, while the quality factor declines due to effective damping increase. We attribute the origin of this behaviour to the changes of the exchange energy in the system, which is calculated using micromagnetic approach.

  11. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-27

    Abstract Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  12. Meta-analysis of diffusion tensor imaging studies shows altered fractional anisotropy occurring in distinct brain areas in association with depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Melissa L

    2011-09-01

    Fractional anisotropy anomalies occurring in the white matter tracts in the brains of depressed patients may reflect microstructural changes underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. We conducted a meta-analysis of fractional anisotropy abnormalities occurring in major depressive disorder using voxel-based diffusion tensor imaging studies. Using the Embase, PubMed and Google Scholar databases, 89 relevant data sets were identified, of which 7 (including 188 patients with major depressive disorder and 221 healthy controls) met our inclusion criteria. Authors were contacted to retrieve any additional data required. Coordinates were extracted from clusters of significant white matter fractional anisotropy differences between patients and controls. Relevant demographic, clinical and methodological variables were extracted from each study or obtained directly from authors. The meta-analysis was carried out using Signed Differential Mapping. Patients with depression showed decreased white matter fractional anisotropy values in the superior longitudinal fasciculus and increased fractional anisotropy values in the fronto-occipital fasciculus compared to controls. Using quartile and jackknife sensitivity analysis, we found that reduced fractional anisotropy in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus was very stable, with increases in the right fronto-occipital fasciculus driven by just one study. In conclusion, our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in fractional anisotropy values in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus, which may ultimately play an important role in the pathology of depression.

  13. Extended wavelength anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) measurements: better filters, validation standards, and Rayleigh scatter removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Ryder, Alan G.

    2017-09-01

    Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) provides valuable insights into multi-fluorophore proteins (Groza et al 2015 Anal. Chim. Acta 886 133-42). Fluorescence anisotropy adds to the multidimensional fluorescence dataset information about the physical size of the fluorophores and/or the rigidity of the surrounding micro-environment. The first ARMES studies used standard thin film polarizers (TFP) that had negligible transmission between 250 and 290 nm, preventing accurate measurement of intrinsic protein fluorescence from tyrosine and tryptophan. Replacing TFP with pairs of broadband wire grid polarizers enabled standard fluorescence spectrometers to accurately measure anisotropies between 250 and 300 nm, which was validated with solutions of perylene in the UV and Erythrosin B and Phloxine B in the visible. In all cases, anisotropies were accurate to better than ±1% when compared to literature measurements made with Glan Thompson or TFP polarizers. Better dual wire grid polarizer UV transmittance and the use of excitation-emission matrix measurements for ARMES required complete Rayleigh scatter elimination. This was achieved by chemometric modelling rather than classical interpolation, which enabled the acquisition of pure anisotropy patterns over wider spectral ranges. In combination, these three improvements permit the accurate implementation of ARMES for studying intrinsic protein fluorescence.

  14. Study of humic substances by fluorescence spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Konecna

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine main fluorophores of soil humic substances using 2D and 3D synchronous fluorescencespectroscopy (SFS. The measured synchronous spectra werecompared with standards IHSS. Differences between humic andfulvic acids as well as our and IHSS samples are discussed.

  15. Influence of skull anisotropy for the forward and inverse problem in EEG: simulation studies using FEM on realistic head models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, G; Guerin, C; Baillet, S; Garnero, L; Meunier, G

    1998-01-01

    For the sake of realism in the description of conduction from primary neural currents to scalp potentials, we investigated the influence of skull anisotropy on the forward and inverse problems in brain functional imaging with EEG. At present, all methods available for cortical imaging assume a spherical geometry, or when using realistic head shapes do not consider the anisotropy of head tissues. However, to our knowledge, no study relates the implication of this simplifying hypothesis on the spatial resolution of EEG for source imaging. In this paper, a method using finite elements in a realistic head geometry is implemented and validated. The influence of erroneous conductivity values for the head tissues is presented, and results show that the conductivities of the brain and the skull in the radial orientation are the most critical ones. In the inverse problem, this influence has been evaluated with simulations using a distributed source model with a comparison of two regularization techniques, with the isotropic model working on data sets produced by a nonisotropic model. Regularization with minimum norm priors produces source images with spurious activity, meaning that the errors in the head model totally annihilate any localization ability. But nonlinear regularization allows the accurate recovery of simultaneous spots of activity, while the restoration of very close active regions is profoundly disabled by errors in the head model. We conclude that for robust cortical source imaging with EEG, a realistic head model taking anisotropy of tissues into account should be used.

  16. Systematic study of anomalous fragment anisotropies in subbarrier complete fusion—fission reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangHuan-Qiao; LiuZu-Hua; 等

    1997-01-01

    The complete fusion-fission is separated from the transter-induced-fission with the fragment folding angle technique.The cross sections and fragment angular distributions for the complete fusion-fission reactions of 11B+ 238U(237Np),237NP,16O+232Th(238U) and 19F+232Th at near-and sub-barrier energies have been measured.The present fusion and fission standard models can reproduces both the excitation functions and the fragment anisotropies for the systems of 11B+238U(237Np)and 12C+237Np;but fail to explain both the experimental data for the other 3 systems simultaneously,The evidence of the entrance-channel dependence of fission-fragment anisotropies is revealsed by comparison of the 11B+237NP and 16O+232Th data.Based on the observations a new version model of preequilibrium fission is put forward to explain the anomaly.

  17. A reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy study of underpotential deposition of copper onto Au(110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. I.; Farell, T.; Lucas, C. A.; Nichols, R. J.; Weightman, P.

    2005-11-01

    The underpotential deposition of Cu on Au(110) has been monitored by Reflection Anisotropy Spectroscopy (RAS). The changes in the intensity of spectral features observed at 2.6 eV and 3.4 eV in the RA spectrum of Au(110) that are induced by the deposition of Cu occur on different timescales. It is suggested that these changes arise, respectively, from the partial quenching of surface states and from changes in surface morphology.

  18. Magnetic anisotropy considerations in magnetic force microscopy studies of single superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocera, Tanya M; Chen, Jun; Murray, Christopher B; Agarwal, Gunjan

    2012-12-14

    In recent years, superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNs) have become increasingly important in applications ranging from solid state memory devices to biomedical diagnostic and therapeutic tools. However, detection and characterization of the small and unstable magnetic moment of an SPN at the single particle level remains a challenge. Further, depending on their physical shape, crystalline structure or orientation, SPNs may also possess magnetic anisotropy, which can govern the extent to which their magnetic moments can align with an externally applied magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate how we can exploit the magnetic anisotropy of SPNs to enable uniform, highly-sensitive detection of single SPNs using magnetic force microscopy (MFM) in ambient air. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques are utilized to characterize the collective magnetic behavior, morphology and composition of the SPNs. Our results show how the consideration of magnetic anisotropy can enhance the ability of MFM to detect single SPNs at ambient room temperature with high force sensitivity and spatial resolution.

  19. Radial anisotropy in Valhall: ambient noise-based studies of Scholte and Love waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Gaurav; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Mordret, Aurelien; Singh, Satish C.; Montagner, Jean-Paul

    2017-03-01

    We perform the ambient noise Scholte and Love waves phase-velocity tomography to image the shallow subsurface (a few hundreds of metres) at the Valhall oil field. Seismic noise was recorded by multicomponent (north, east and vertical) ocean bottom cable from the Valhall life of field seismic network. We cross-correlate six and a half hours of continuous recording of noise between all possible pairs of receivers. The vertical-vertical and the transverse-transverse components cross-correlations are used to extract the Scholte and Love waves, respectively. We combine more than 10 millions of interstation correlations to compute the average phase-velocity dispersion curves for fundamental mode and first overtone. Then, a Monte Carlo inversion method is used to compute average 1-D profiles of VSV and VSH down to 600 m depth. In the next step, we construct 2-D Scholte and Love waves phase-velocity maps for fundamental mode using the eikonal tomography method. These maps are then jointly inverted to get the 3-D distribution of VSV and VSH from which the radial anisotropy and the isotropic velocity (VS) are estimated. The final model includes two layers of anisotropy: one in the shallow part (above 220 m) with a significant negative radial anisotropy (VSH VSV) due to the stratification at that depth.

  20. BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    farquar, G; Leif, R

    2008-09-12

    Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds are being used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres are being produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. The advantages and disadvantages of each method will be presented and discussed in greater detail along with fluorescent and charge properties of the aerosols. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

  1. Sensitivity studies of SREM instrument response and spectral unfolding to particle environment anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdas, Wojtek; Xiao, Hualin; Marcinkowski, Radoslaw

    2016-04-01

    The Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) is installed on several ESA satellites to monitor space radiation environment of protons and electrons [1]. With its 15 spectroscopy channels the monitor can distinguish between particle species and provide information on their energy spectra. Measurements are based on three sensors located behind different shielding materials. Two of them are arranged into a telescope. All SREM instruments have been carefully calibrated and modelled during laboratory preparation phase. Space data are unfolded using a wide range of methods ranging from simple fit functions to response matrix inversions [2]. Cross comparisons often show discrepancies reaching even an order of magnitude. They are usually attributed to the particle environment anisotropy. Due to various thicknesses of the shielding given by SREM itself and the spacecraft mass distributions the response functions show directional sensitivity. Knowing the spacecraft orientation with respect to the magnetic field allows for more accurate spectral measurements [3]. It is not always possible as only some spacecraft with SREM on board provide such information. This study utilizes pitch angle distributions of particles in the radiation belts for improved unfolding of the SREM energy spectra. Both, random and known SREM orientations with respect to the magnetic field are investigated. Results are given for wide range of numerical studies and for space measurements based on the PROBA1 mission [4]. They contribute to improved accuracy of SREM spectral measurements and give valuable inputs to design of new spacecraft radiation instruments. Literature [1 A. Hajdas, P. Bühler, C. Eggel, P. Favre, A. Mchedlishvili, and A. Zehnder, "Radiation environment along the INTEGRAL orbit measured with the IREM monitor," Astro. Astrophys., vol. 411, pp. L43-L47, 2003. [2] I. Sandberg, I. A. Daglis, A. Anastasiadis, P. Bühler, P. Nieminen, and H. Evans, IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. vol. 59, no. 4

  2. First-Principles Study of Effects of Boron on Magnetic Anisotropy in MgO/CoFe(B)/X (X = Ru, Ta) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shugo; Shiota, Masashi; Fukuchi, Yasushi

    2016-09-01

    We study the effects of boron on the magnetic anisotropy in the MgO/CoFe(B)/X (X = Ru, Ta) systems using relativistic first-principles calculations. It is found that the B atoms tend to be rejected from the CoFeB layer into the X underlayer. The system with no B atoms shows perpendicular magnetic anisotropy when the Fe atoms are adjacent to the MgO layer.

  3. Rock magnetism and magnetic anisotropy in folded sills and basaltic flows: A case study of volcanics from the Taimyr Peninsula, Northern Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ShuWei; J. Harald WALDERHAUG; YANG YueJun

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic measurements were performed on apparently deformed igneous rocks of 23 sites from the southeastern part of the Taimyr Peninsula. Rock magnetism and reflected light microscopy analyses reveal that fine-grained titanomagnetites up to pure magnetites mainly carry the majority of magnetic fabrics in the sills, and that the slightly coarser Ti-poor or-medium titanomagnetites carry most mag-netic fabrics in the basaltic flows. Magnetic anisotropies were determined by applying anisotropy of low-field magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on 180 unheated samples and 128 samples that had been pre-viously heated to 600℃ during a paleomagnetic study to detect heating effects on the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) properties of volcanic rocks. Laboratory heating significantly affects anisotropy variations of these igneous rocks corresponding to the mineralogical changes during the heat treatment.

  4. Magnetic anisotropy and lattice dynamics in FeAs studied by Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Błachowski, A. [Mössbauer Spectroscopy Division, Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Ruebenbauer, K., E-mail: sfrueben@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Mössbauer Spectroscopy Division, Institute of Physics, Pedagogical University, ul. Podchorążych 2, PL-30-084 Kraków (Poland); Żukrowski, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Department of Solid State Physics, Av. A. Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Kraków (Poland); Bukowski, Z. [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Okólna 2, PL-50-422 Wrocław (Poland)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Large anisotropy of the Fe hyperfine field along magnetic spiral. • Lattice hardening upon transition to the magnetic state. • Anisotropy of the recoilless fraction in the paramagnetic state. • Evaporation of arsenic at about 1000 K. -- Abstract: Iron mono-arsenide in the powder form has been investigated by transmission {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy in the temperature range 4.2–1000 K. Additional spectra have been obtained at 20 K and 100 K applying external magnetic field of 7 T. It was found that the spin spiral propagating along the c-axis leads to the complex variation of the hyperfine magnetic field amplitude with the spin orientation varying in the a–b plane. The magnitude of the hyperfine field pointing in the direction of the local magnetic moment depends on the orientation of this moment in the a–b plane. Patterns are vastly different for iron located in the [0 k 0] positions and for iron in the [0 k +1/2 0] positions within the orthorhombic cell set to the Pnma symmetry. Lattice softens upon transition to the paramagnetic state at 69.2 K primarily in the a–c plane as seen by iron atoms. This effect is quite large considering lack of the structural transition. Two previously mentioned iron sites are discernible in the paramagnetic region till 300 K by different electron densities on the iron nuclei. The anisotropy of the iron vibrations developed at the transition to the paramagnetic state increases with the temperature in accordance with the harmonic approximation, albeit tends to saturation at high temperatures indicating gradual onset of the quasi-harmonic conditions. It seems that neither hyperfine fields nor magnetic moments are correct order parameters in light of the determined static critical exponents. Sample starts to loose arsenic at about 1000 K and under vacuum.

  5. Off-specular polarized neutron reflectometry study of magnetic dots with a strong shape anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Temst, K; Moshchalkov, V V; Bruynseraede, Y; Fritzsche, H; Jonckheere, R

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the off-specular polarized neutron reflectivity of a regular array of rectangular magnetic polycrystalline Co dots, which were prepared by a combination of electron-beam lithography, molecular beam deposition, and lift-off processes. The dots have a length-to-width ratio of 4:1 imposing a strong shape anisotropy. The intensity of the off-specular satellite reflection was monitored as a function of the magnetic field applied parallel to the rows of dots and in the plane of the sample, allowing us to analyze the magnetization-reversal process using the four spin-polarized cross sections. (orig.)

  6. Concentric Multiple Rings by Droplet Epitaxy: Fabrication and Study of the Morphological Anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaschini C

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present the Molecular Beam Epitaxy fabrication of complex GaAs/AlGaAs nanostructures by Droplet Epitaxy, characterized by the presence of concentric multiple rings. We propose an innovative experimental procedure that allows the fabrication of individual portions of the structure, controlling their diameter by only changing the substrate temperature. The obtained nanocrystals show a significant anisotropy between [110] and [1–10] crystallographic directions, which can be ascribed to different activation energies for the Ga atoms migration processes.

  7. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reyna del Carmen Lara-Severino; Miguel Ángel Camacho-López; Jessica Marlene García-Macedo; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M.; Ángel H. Sandoval-Trujillo; Keila Isaac-Olive; Ninfa Ramírez-Durán

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detec...

  8. Neutron diffraction study of nanocrystalline NbC0.93 powders and the anisotropy of deformation distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurlov, A. S.; Bobrikov, I. A.; Balagurov, A. M.; Gusev, A. I.

    2015-01-01

    Broadening of the diffraction reflections in nanocrystalline powders of nonstoichiometric niobium carbide NbC0.93 with the average particle size from ˜200 to ˜2000 Å has been studied by the neutron diffraction method. The functional dependence of the broadening W 2 on the interplanar distance d 2 has been obtained including size, deformation, and inhomogeneous broadening. The average size of the coherent scattering regions and microstrains in crystallites with allowance for the anisotropy of the deformation distortions have been estimated.

  9. Anisotropy induced Kondo splitting in a mechanically stretched molecular junction: A first-principles based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Hou, Dong, E-mail: houdong@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zheng, Xiao, E-mail: xz58@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guizhou Provincial Key Laboratory of Computational Nano-Material Science, Institute of Applied Physics, Guizhou Normal College, Guiyang, Guizhou 550018 (China); Yan, YiJing [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, iChEM (Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials), University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong (China)

    2016-01-21

    The magnetic anisotropy and Kondo phenomena in a mechanically stretched magnetic molecular junction are investigated by combining the density functional theory (DFT) and hierarchical equations of motion (HEOM) approach. The system is comprised of a magnetic complex Co(tpy–SH){sub 2} sandwiched between adjacent gold electrodes, which is mechanically stretched in experiments done by Parks et al. [Science 328, 1370 (2010)]. The electronic structure and mechanical property of the stretched system are investigated via the DFT calculations. The HEOM approach is then employed to characterize the Kondo resonance features, based on the Anderson impurity model parameterized from the DFT results. It is confirmed that the ground state prefers the S = 1 local spin state. The structural properties, the magnetic anisotropy, and corresponding Kondo peak splitting in the axial stretching process are systematically evaluated. The results reveal that the strong electron correlations and the local magnetic properties of the molecule magnet are very sensitive to structural distortion. This work demonstrates that the combined DFT+HEOM approach could be useful in understanding and designing mechanically controlled molecular junctions.

  10. [Studies on laticifers and milk of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.) with fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopic methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póczi, Dorottya; Böddi, Béla

    2010-01-01

    Using fluorescence imaging and fluorescence spectroscopic methods, the localisation of the laticifers and the native spectral properties of the milk were studied in various organs of greater celandine (Chelidonium majus L.). Direct measurements on tissue pieces (without the extraction and the separation of the components) provided information about the complexity of the milk and the various ratios of the alkaloid contents in the tissues. Whole plant were studied in a gel documentation system using ultraviolet light source, while the localisation of the laticifers was observed along the leaf veins in fluorescence microscope, using blue excitation light. Measuring different tissue pieces, fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed that the greater celandine alkaloids have emission bands at 469, 530-531, 553, 572-575 and 592 nm and excitation bands at 365, 370, 386 is 400 nm. These results give a possibility for conclusions about the alkaloid contents and composition or ratios of the alkaloid components in various tissue pieces directly, via comparisons with alkaloid standards.

  11. A detailed seismic anisotropy study during the 2011-2012 unrest period in the Santorini Volcanic Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviris, G.; Papadimitriou, P.; Kravvariti, Ph.; Kapetanidis, V.; Karakonstantis, A.; Voulgaris, N.; Makropoulos, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Santorini Volcanic Complex (SVC) is an area in the Southern Aegean (Greece) which has been characterized by low seismicity rates for the last decades, especially in the Santorini Caldera where they have been very low until 2010. This pattern changed completely in February 2011, when intense microseismic activity was initiated within the Caldera. During the manual analysis of the events, the shear-wave splitting phenomenon was observed, revealing the existence of an anisotropic upper crust in the SVC area. A detailed anisotropy study has been conducted using 231 events within the shear-wave window that fulfilled the selection criteria. The polarization direction of the fast shear-wave, the time-delay between the two split shear-waves and the source polarization direction were calculated after visual inspection, using both the polarigram and the hodogram representations. This procedure, applied for eight local stations, resulted in the determination of 340 splitting parameters. The obtained mean anisotropy directions are not homogeneous, revealing a complex regime in the activated area. Nevertheless, these results are explained by the APE model, related to the stress-sensitive behavior of fluid-saturated microcracked rocks. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of both the time-delay and anisotropy direction was carried out. The time-delays measured in the “band-1” window exhibit gradual increase and sudden drop that can be related to imminent bursts of seismicity, as well as to the major Mw = 5.1 and 5.2 events which took place about 40 km SW of Santorini on 26 and 27 January 2012, respectively. On the other hand, no significant temporal variations or 90° flips of the Sfast polarization direction were observed.

  12. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beaudet A.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  13. Experimental Study on Conductivity Anisotropy of Limestone Considering the Bedding Directional Effect in the Whole Process of Uniaxial Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinji; Liu, Bin; Li, Shucai; Yang, Lei; Song, Jie; Li, Ming; Mei, Jie

    2016-03-04

    Experimental studies were conducted on the changes of the potential differences in different directions during the uniaxial compression on limestone samples parallel and normal to the bedding plane. In the test, electric current was supplied at both ends of the samples, and concurrent measurement was conducted in four measuring lines at a 45-degree angle to each other. First, the change laws of the potential differences in different directions and the similarities and differences of rock samples were summarized. In regards to the uniaxial compression properties and crack growth, the above-mentioned similarities and differences were further analyzed. Then, the anisotropy factor was introduced to further explore the response characteristics. It was found that the anisotropic changes of rock samples went through three stages during the uniaxial compression process, providing a reference for describing the properties in different failure stages of rock samples and obtaining precursory information about the fracture. Besides, the relationship between the peak stress and initial potential difference in a direction normal to the current direction was obtained by means of data fitting, providing a new method of predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of rock samples. According to the preceding analysis, this paper studied rock anisotropy by considering the bedding directional effect in terms of conductivity and provided a reference for subsequent study on rock materials' properties and engineering practices.

  14. Experimental Study on Conductivity Anisotropy of Limestone Considering the Bedding Directional Effect in the Whole Process of Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinji Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted on the changes of the potential differences in different directions during the uniaxial compression on limestone samples parallel and normal to the bedding plane. In the test, electric current was supplied at both ends of the samples, and concurrent measurement was conducted in four measuring lines at a 45-degree angle to each other. First, the change laws of the potential differences in different directions and the similarities and differences of rock samples were summarized. In regards to the uniaxial compression properties and crack growth, the above-mentioned similarities and differences were further analyzed. Then, the anisotropy factor was introduced to further explore the response characteristics. It was found that the anisotropic changes of rock samples went through three stages during the uniaxial compression process, providing a reference for describing the properties in different failure stages of rock samples and obtaining precursory information about the fracture. Besides, the relationship between the peak stress and initial potential difference in a direction normal to the current direction was obtained by means of data fitting, providing a new method of predicting the uniaxial compressive strength of rock samples. According to the preceding analysis, this paper studied rock anisotropy by considering the bedding directional effect in terms of conductivity and provided a reference for subsequent study on rock materials’ properties and engineering practices.

  15. Numerical study of the effective magnetocrystalline anisotropy and magnetostriction in polycrystalline FeGa films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Julian; Bryan, M. T.; Morley, N. A.; Hrkac, G.; Javed, A.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Allwood, D. A.

    2011-08-01

    The high interest in FeGa films is due to the high magnetostriction present in single crystal thin films. There is, however, significant reduction in the magnetostriction when grown using sputtering. The reduction is explained here using finite element analysis by considering the local magnetocrystalline and magnetoelastic behavior of the grains within the sample. It is shown that, if the saturation magnetostrictive constant for each grain in a polycrystalline structure is of the order of 400 ppm, this is reduced to less than 90 ppm when the crystallites are randomly orientated. Furthermore, the inherent stress due to the sample fabrication leads to an increase in the anisotropy field. This work suggests that, with low stress fabrication and aligning the in-plane orientation of the crystallites, the potential in unlocking FeGa as a thin film for sensory applications can be realised.

  16. Anisotropy in elastic properties of lithium sodium sulphate hexahydrate single crystal—An ultrasonic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    George Varughese; A Santhosh Kumar; J Philip; Godfrey Louis

    2009-12-01

    The double sulfate family (ABSO4), where A and B are alkali metal cations, is the object of great interest owing to the complexity and richness of its sequence of phase transition induced by temperature variation. A new sulfate salt characterized by the presence of water molecule in the unit cell with the chemical formula, Li2Na3(SO4)2.6H2O (LSSW), was obtained. The ultrasonic velocity measurement was done with pulse echo overlap technique [PEO]. All the six second order elastic stiffness constants, 11 = 22, 33, 44 = 55, 12, 14 and 13 = 23 are reported for the first time. The anisotropy in the elastic properties of the crystal are well explained by the pictorial representation of the polar plots of phase velocity, slowness, Young’s modulus and linear compressibility in – and – planes.

  17. Anisotropy in elastic properties of lithium sodium sulphate hexahydrate single crystal—An ultrasonic study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    George Varughese; A S Kumar; J Philip; Godfrey Louis

    2013-02-01

    The double sulfate family of (ABSO4) where A and B are alkali metal cations, is the object of great interest owing to the complexity and richness of its sequence of phase transition induced by temperature variation. A new sulfate salt characterized by the presence of water molecule in the unit cell with the chemical formula, Li2Na3(SO4)2.6H2O (LSSW), was obtained. The ultrasonic velocity measurement was done with pulse echo overlap technique [PEO]. All the six second order elastic stiffness constants, 11 = 22, 33, 44 = 55, 12, 14 and 13 = 23, are reported for the first time. The anisotropy in the elastic properties of the crystal are well explained by the pictorial representation of the surface plots of phase velocity, slowness, Young’s modulus and linear compressibility in – and – planes.

  18. Studies on longitudinal fluctuations of anisotropy flow event planes in PbPb and pPb collisions at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Guilbaud, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Most studies of anisotropy flow phenomena have assumed a global flow phase angle (or event plane angle) that is boost invariant in pseudorapidity ($\\eta$). It was realized in recent years that this assumption may not be valid in presence of initial-state fluctuations, especially along the longitudinal direction. The effect of eta-dependent event plane fluctuations would break the factorization relation of Fourier coefficients from two-particle azimuthal correlations into a product of single-particle anisotropy Fourier harmonics as a function of $\\eta$. First study of factorization breakdown effect in $\\eta$ is carried out using the CMS detector, which covers a wide $\\eta$ range of 10 units. A novel method is employed to suppress nonflow correlations at small pseudorapidity gaps of two particles. Significant eta-dependent factorization breakdown is observed in both PbPb and high-multiplicity pPb collisions. The measurements are presented for various orders of flow harmonics as a function of centrality or event...

  19. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins as powerful toolkits for in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusanov, A. L.; Savitsky, A. P.

    2011-02-01

    To expand the field of research in biological systems development of extra-sensitive analytical methods is highly desirable. In this review, the latest advances in technologies relying on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer between fluorescent proteins (FP's) to visualize numerous molecular processes in living cells are discussed. Variety of FP's as well as of novel experimental techniques allows one to choose the most appropriate tools to attack concrete problems.

  20. Where is magnetic anisotropy field pointing to?

    CERN Document Server

    Gutowski, Marek W

    2013-01-01

    The desired result of magnetic anisotropy investigations is the determination of value(s) of various anisotropy constant(s). This is sometimes difficult, especially when the precise knowledge of saturation magnetization is required, as it happens in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies. In such cases we usually resort to `trick' and fit our experimental data to the quantity called \\emph{anisotropy field}, which is strictly proportional to the ratio of the searched anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization. Yet, this quantity is scalar, simply a number, and is therefore of little value for modeling or simulations of the magnetostatic or micromagnetic structures. Here we show how to `translate' the values of magnetic anisotropy constants into the complete vector of magnetic anisotropy field. Our derivation is rigorous and covers the most often encountered cases, from uniaxial to cubic anisotropy.

  1. Vectorial magnetometry and anisotropy studies on thin Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films using MOKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuschel, Timo; Wollschlaeger, Joachim [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastr. 7, 49069 Osnabrueck (Germany); Hamrle, Jaroslav; Pistora, Jaromir [Department of Physics, VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, 17. listopadu 15, 70833 Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic); Bosu, Subrojati; Sakuraba, Yuya; Takanashi, Koki [Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Katahira 2-1-1, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    Magnetooptical Kerr effect (MOKE) is a powerful tool to determine magnetic properties of thin magnetic films. In some cases this technique is only applied to detect magnetization curves qualitatively. In order to perform a quantitative analysis we present MOKE measurements with s- and p-polarized incident light, using an external magnetic field either parallel or perpendicular to the plane of incidence of light and different orientations of the crystalline substrate. The processing of the data includes vectorial magnetometry as well as studies of the anisotropy constants and magnetic axes. The investigated Co{sub 50}Fe{sub 50} films o f 50 nm thickness on MgO(001) are prepared with different annealing temperatures (RT up to 400 C). On the one hand the films with lower annealing tempe ratures show typical magnetic reversal processes of samples with four-fold symmetry as expected for cubic crystal structures. On the other hand the film annealed at 400 C presents an additional strong in-plane anisotropy, which is discussed in context of a classical free energy approach.

  2. Mesostructure anisotropy of bacterial cellulose-polyacrylamide hydrogels as studied by spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Velichko, E V; Chetverikov, Yu O; Duif, C P; Bouwman, W G; Smyslov, R Yu

    2016-01-01

    The submicron- and micron-scale structures of composite hydrogels based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and polyacrylamide were studied by spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SESANS). These hydrogels were synthesized via free-radical polymerization of acrylamide carried out in pellicle of BC swollen in the reaction solution. No neutron scattering was observed for the samples swollen in heavy water to the equilibrium state, but a SESANS signal appeared when TbCl$_{3}$ salt was added to the solvent. The SESANS dependences obtained for these samples revealed the anisotropy of mesostructure for the hydrogels under investigation. Density inhomogeneities on the characteristic scale of 11.5 $\\pm$ 0.5 $\\mu$m were detected in one specific orientation of the sample, i.e. with growth plane of BC parallel to plane formed by neutron beam and spin-echo length. The uniaxial anisotropy revealed agrees with the proposed model, which attributes this behavior to the existence of the tunnel-like oriented structures inside BC.

  3. Electron spin resonance study of the single-ion anisotropy in the pyrochlore antiferromagnet Gd2Sn2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazkov, V. N.; Smirnov, A. I.; Sanchez, J. P.; Forget, A.; Colson, D.; Bonville, P.

    2006-02-01

    Single-ion anisotropy is of importance for the magnetic ordering of the frustrated pyrochlore antiferromagnets Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Sn2O7. The anisotropy parameters for Gd2Sn2O7 were measured using the electron spin resonance technique. The anisotropy was found to be of the easy plane type, with the main constant D = 140 mK. This value is 35% smaller than the value of the corresponding anisotropy constant of the related compound Gd2Ti2O7.

  4. Applying two-photon excitation fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to study photosynthesis in plant leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broess, K.; Borst, J.W.; Amerongen, van H.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates to which extent two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy can be applied to study picosecond fluorescence kinetics of individual chloroplasts in leaves. Using femtosecond 860 nm excitation pulses, fluorescence lifetimes can be measured in leaves of

  5. Capillary electrophoretic study of green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhen; Feng, Feng; Hu, Qin; Paau, Man Chin; Liu, Yang; Chen, Zezhong; Bai, Yunfeng; Guo, Fangfang; Choi, Martin M F

    2015-09-01

    CE coupled with laser-induced fluorescence and UV absorption detections has been applied to study the complexity of as-synthesized green fluorescent hollow carbon nanoparticles (HC-NP) samples. The effects of pH, type, and concentration of the run buffer and SDS on the separation of HC-NP are studied in detail. It is observed that phosphate run buffer is more effective in separating the HC-NP and the optimal run buffer is found to be 30 mM phosphate and 10 mM SDS at pH 9.0. The CE separation of this HC-NP is based on the difference in size and electrophoretic mobility of HC-NP. Some selected HC-NP fractions are collected and further characterized by UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, MS, and transmission electron microscopy. The fractionated HC-NP show profound differences in absorption, emission characteristics, and PL quantum yield that would have been otherwise misled by studying the complex mixture alone. It is anticipated that our CE methodology will open a new initiative on extensive studies of individual HC-NP species in the biomedical, catalysis, electronic, and optical device, energy storage, material, and sensing field.

  6. Use of laser fluorescence in dental caries diagnosis: a fluorescence x biomolecular vibrational spectroscopic comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fabíola Bastos de; Barbosa, Artur Felipe Santos; Zanin, Fátima Antonia Aparecida; Brugnera Júnior, Aldo; Silveira Júnior, Landulfo; Pinheiro, Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to verify the existence of correlation between Raman spectroscopy readings of phosphate apatite (~960 cm-1), fluoridated apatite (~575 cm-1) and organic matrix (~1450 cm-1) levels and Diagnodent® readings at different stages of dental caries in extracted human teeth. The mean peak value of fluorescence in the carious area was recorded and teeth were divided in enamel caries, dentin caries and sound dental structure. After fluorescence readings, Raman spectroscopy was carried out on the same sites. The results showed significant difference (ANOVA, pcaries. There was significant negative correlation (pcaries. It may be concluded that the higher the fluorescence detected by Diagnodent the lower the peaks of phosphate apatite and fluoridated apatite. As the early diagnosis of caries is directly related to the identification of changes in the inorganic tooth components, Raman spectroscopy was more sensitive to variations of these components than Diagnodent.

  7. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  8. Fundamental study on anisotropy of diffusion and migration pathway in compacted bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Haruo [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-09-01

    SEM observations for micropore structure in compacted bentonite and through-diffusion experiments for non-sorptive tritiated water (HTO) were conducted to evaluate the anisotropy of diffusive pathway in compacted bentonite used as a buffer material in the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The SEM observations and thorough-diffusion experiments were conducted for axial and perpendicular directions to the compacted direction of bentonite as a function of bentonite's dry density. Two types of Na-bentonites, Kunigel-V1 and Kunipia-F with different smectite contents were used in both experiments. No orientation of clay particles was found for low-smectite content Kunigel-V1, while layers of clay particles orientated in the perpendicular direction to compacted direction were observed for Kunipia-F with approximately 100 wt% smectite content. This tendency is in good agreement with that for HTO's effective diffusivities obtained from diffusion experiments, indicating that smectite content in bentonite affects the orientation properties of clay particles and diffusive pathway. (author)

  9. The Study of Anisotropy and Domain Condition of Permalloy Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Morozov

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hysteretic Loops, 1,5; 3,0; 4,5; 6 and 10 nm in thickness, obtained by magnetron sputtering of Ni81Fe19 alloy, were measured by means of vibration magnetometer. It has been detected that by increasing the film thickness from 3 to 10 nm coercive force (HC increases as well. In the direction perpendicular to the axis of easy magnetization the loop form considerably differs from the right-angled one, which is caused by amplitude dispersion of anisotropy. The films, derived in scattered magnetic field of the Earth, are by magnetic parameter isotropic. The results of atomic force microscope investigation indicate to the granular structure of films and confirms the presence of non-magnetized areas among the examined films. The critical thickness at which permalloy films pass from multi-domain to single-domain state was 10 nm. Estimation of the critical thickness of the transition from single-domain state to superparamagnetic led to the values of 1.5-2 nm.

  10. Study of the Solar Anisotropy for Cosmic Ray Primaries of about 200 GeV Energy with the L3+C Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benitez, M; van den Akker, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, J; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, Valery P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Bahr, J; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillere, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Bohm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo, M; Chiarusi, T; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J; de Asmundis, R; Deglon, P; Debreczeni, J; Degre, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; DeNotaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Ding, L K; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Duran, I; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El Hage, A; El Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Faber, G; Falagan, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, K; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S N; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grabosch, H J; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Groenstege, H; Gruenewald, M W; Guida, M; Guo, Y N; Gupta, S; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Haller, Ch; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hayashi, Y; He, Z X; Hebbeker, T; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Huo, A X; Hu, Y; Ito, N; Jin, B N; Jing, C L; Jones, Lawrence W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kantserov, V; Kaur, M; Kawakami, S; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W; Klimentov, A; Konig, A C; Kok, E; Korn, A; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V; Kraber, M; Kuang, H H; Kraemer, R W; Kruger, A; Kuijpers, J; Kunin, A; Ladron de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Lei, Y; Leich, H; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levtchenko, P; Li, C; Li, L; Li, Z C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, F L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Ma, X H; Ma, Y Q; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Mana, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Meng, X W; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; van Mil, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Monteleoni, B; Muanza, y G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Nahnhauer, R; Naumov, V A; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novak, T; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Parriaud, J -F; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroue, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pojidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Qing, C R; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A; Ravindran, K C; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Rewiersma, P; Riemann, y S; Riles, Keith; Roe, B P; Rojkov, A; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Saidi, R; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sanchez, E; Schafer, C; Schegelsky, V; Schmitt, V; Schoeneich, B; Schopper, H; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shen, C Q; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Straessner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sulanke, H; Sultanov, G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillasi, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Toth, J; Trowitzsch, G; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Unger, M; Valente, E; Verkooijen, H; Van de Walle, R T; Vasquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitsky, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopianov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, R G; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, X W; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; van Wijk, R; Wijnen, T A M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Y P; Xu, J S; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yang, X F; Yao, Z G; Yeh, S C; Yu, Z Q; Zalite, An; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, C; Zhang, F; Zhang, J; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhou, S J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zhu, Q Q; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zoller, M; Zwart, A N M

    2008-01-01

    Primary cosmic rays experience multiple deflections in the nonuniform galactic and heliospheric magnetic fields which may generate anisotropies. A study of anisotropies in the energy range between 100 and 500 GeV is performed. This energy range is not yet well explored. The L3 detector at the CERN electron-positron collider, LEP, is used for a study of the angular distribution of atmospheric muons with energies above 20 GeV. This distribution is used to investigate the isotropy of the time-dependent intensity of the primary cosmic-ray flux with a Fourier analysis. A small deviation from isotropy at energies around 200 GeV is observed for the second harmonics at the solar frequency. No sidereal anisotropy is found at a level above 10^-4. The measurements have been performed in the years 1999 and 2000.

  11. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  12. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  13. A seismic anisotropy study of the Dragon Flag hydrothermal field (49°39'E ) on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, M.; Tong, V. C. H.; Qiu, X.

    2015-12-01

    Dragon Flag hydrothermal field located at 49°39'E on the Southwest Indian Ridge contains the active hydrothermal vents firstly discovered on the ultraslow spreading ridge (Tao et al, 2012). Anisotropic study in this area will provide important information tectonic activities. 65634 traveltime residuals from the three-dimensional isotropic inversion (Zhao et al., 2013), were divided into three groups, which correspond to quasi ocean crustal Layer 2 (qL2), quasi ocean crustal Layer 3 (qL3) and quasi uppermost mantle (qUM), respectively. Traveltime residuals at different depths show that there are obvious cosine relationships between traveltime residuals and azimuth of qL2, qL3 and qUM, indicating anisotropy existed in both crust and mantle beneath Dragon Flag hydrothermal field. The best fitted cosine curves indicate that the fast directions (negative traveltime residuals) corresponding to the general trend of ridge axis of N104°E. According to these results, we propose that there may be prevalent cracks penetrating into lower crust or even uppermost mantle. We argue that the hydrothermal convection of Dragon Flag hydrothermal field not only occurs perpendicular to ridge axis, but also occurs parallel to ridge axis. We reveal for the first time anisotropic characteristics of the ultraslow spreading ridge, which has profound scientific significance for the future research on global ocean lithospheric anisotropy. This research was granted by the Natural Science Foundation of China (91028002, 41176053, 91428204). Keywords: ultraslow spreading ridge, Southwest Indian Ridge, Dragon Flag hydrothermal field, P wave traveltime residuals, anisotropy References: Tao C H, Lin J, Guo S, et al. First active hydrothermal vents on an ultraslow-spreading center: Southwest Indian Ridge. Geology, 2012, 40(1): 47~50. Zhao M H, Qiu X L, Li J B, et al. Three-dimensional seismic structure of the Dragon Flag oceanic core complex at the ultraslow spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (49°39

  14. Study on fluorescence spectra of thiamine, riboflavin and pyridoxine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Xiao, Xue; Zhao, Xuesong; Hu, Lan; Lv, Caofang; Yin, Zhangkun

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of vitamin B1, B2 and B6 measured with 3D fluorescence Spectrophotometer. Three strong fluorescence areas of vitamin B2 locate at λex/λem=270/525nm, 370/525nm and 450/525nm, one fluorescence areas of vitamin B1 locates at λex/λem=370/460nm, two fluorescence areas of vitamin B6 locate at λex/λem=250/370nm and 325/370nm were found. The influence of pH of solution to the fluorescence profile was also discussed. Using the PARAFAC algorithm, 10 vitamin B1, B2 and B6 mixed solutions were successfully decomposed, and the emission profiles, excitation profiles, central wavelengths and the concentration of the three components were retrieved precisely through about 5 iteration times.

  15. Study of the magnetic anisotropy induced in CoFeSiB amorphous ribbons by solidification in a magnetic field using giant magnetoimpedance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, J.A. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007, Oviedo (Spain); Saad, A. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007, Oviedo (Spain) and Laboratorio de Solidos Amorfos, Departmento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Paseo de Colon 850, C10063ACV Capital Federal (Argentina)]. E-mail: asaad@fi.uba.ar; Garcia-Arribas, A. [Departemento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco, Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Santos, J.D. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007, Oviedo (Spain); Elbaile, L. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007, Oviedo (Spain); Tejedor, M. [Departmento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007, Oviedo (Spain)

    2004-12-31

    Magnetoimpedance effect was used as a tool to investigate the effectiveness of the method to induce magnetic anisotropy by applying a DC magnetic field during the melt spinning process in amorphous magnetic ribbons. Amorphous ribbons of composition Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 4}Si{sub 15}B{sub 12} were melt spun with and without applying the DC field in order to compare the results. From the different magnetoimpedance response to the external field in both kinds of ribbons, the induced magnetic anisotropy can be studied. Magnetoimpedance demonstrates to be a fine instrument to detect small changes of magnetic anisotropy and it is a good method to be employed in very narrow ribbons where other techniques are ineffective or unfeasible.

  16. Solid State NMR and Fluorescence Studies of Conjugated Polymer Nanocomposties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Jun JING; Liu Sheng CHEN; Yi SHI; Xi Gao JIN

    2005-01-01

    13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of a conjugated polymer MEH-PPV in polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites together with the steady state fluorescence emission and transient fluorescence decay measurements have been investigated. The T1 values of the conjugated carbons decrease dramatically according to the reduction of polymer concentration in the nano composites, while the fluorescence life times (τ) show a linear prolonging tendency. The results are explained from the point of view of molecular dynamics.

  17. EFFECT OF SANDSTONE ANISOTROPY ON ITS HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fořt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Each type of natural stone has its own geological history, formation conditions, different chemical and mineralogical composition, which influence its possible anisotropy. Knowledge in the natural stones anisotropy represents crucial information for the process of stone quarrying, its correct usage and arrangement in building applications. Because of anisotropy, many natural stones exhibit different heat and moisture transport properties in various directions. The main goal of this study is to analyse several anisotropy indices and their effect on heat transport and capillary absorption. For the experimental determination of the anisotropy effect, five types of sandstone coming from different operating quarries in the Czech Republic are chosen. These materials are often used for restoration of culture heritage monuments as well as for other building applications where they are used as facing slabs, facade panels, decoration stones, paving, etc. For basic characterization of studied materials, determination of their bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity is done. Chemical composition of particular sandstones is analysed by X-Ray Fluorescence. Anisotropy is examined by the non-destructive measurement of velocity of ultrasonic wave propagation. On the basis of ultrasound testing data, the relative anisotropy, total anisotropy and anisotropy coefficient are calculated. Then, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in various directions of samples orientation is carried out. The obtained results reveal significant differences between the parameters characterizing the heat transport in various directions, whereas these values are in accordance with the indices of anisotropy. Capillary water transport is described by water absorption coefficient measured using a sorption experiment, which is performed for distilled water and 1M NaCl water solution.  The measured data confirm the effect of anisotropy which is

  18. A Study of the Fluorescence Response of Tetraphenyl-butadiene

    CERN Document Server

    Jerry, R; Bugel, L; Conrad, J M

    2010-01-01

    Tetraphenyl-butadiene (TPB) is a widely used fluorescent wavelength-shifter. A common application is in liquid-argon-based particle detectors, where scintillation light is produced in the UV at 128 nm. In liquid argon experiments, TPB is often employed to shift the scintillation light to the visible range in order to allow detection via standard photomultiplier tubes. This paper presents studies on the stability of TPB with time under exposure to light. We also examine batch-to-batch variations. We compare scintillation-grade TPB to 99% pure TPB response. In the 99% pure samples, we report a yellowing effect, and full degradation of the TPB emission-peak, upon extended exposure to light.

  19. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  20. Study on Fluorescence Properties of Eu(Ⅲ) Cryptates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈秋云; 刘青山; 郑和根

    2003-01-01

    The mononuclear cryptate [Eu(H3LF)(NO3)(H2O)](NO3)2 and the heterodinuclear cryptate [EuZnLF(DMF)](ClO4)2 were synthesized and characterized. The triplet-state energy of the cryptand (H3LF) was studied by phosphorescence spectrum. The fluorescent properties of Eu(Ⅲ) cryptates in MeOH solution show that the cryptand (H3LF) can sensitize the Eu(Ⅲ) ion to luminescence and the introduction of the Zn(Ⅱ) ion into the mononuclear Eu(Ⅲ) cryptate resulted in blue-shift of three ligand-centered bands, increase of molar absorption coefficient and increase of the luminescence intensity of Eu(Ⅲ).

  1. [Study of achieving white organic LED by fluorescence dye].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Wang, Jing; Zheng, Rong-er; Meng, Ji-wu

    2005-08-01

    Some hybrid organic LEDs are made by using fluorescence dye and InGaN blue-light chip and the possibility of achieving white organic LED is investigated according to light conversion theory. Firstly, the LEDs made by normal method and double-dotting glue method are studied. It is found that the double-dotting glue method is too complex and the LEDs made by this way is low-luminance, so it isn't fit to make LED. Secondly the different weight ratio of 1/1/100, 1/1/200, 2/1.5/100 ax-17/zq-13/AB LEDs are manufactured. The 2/1.5/100 LED's color coordinate is (0.32, 0.30), approaching to white point and the correlative color temperature is 6290K which is close to sunlight. So it is a relatively ideal white lamp-house.

  2. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-Gao; QIAN Xia; LIU Wei; LIU Chuan-lin; ZHAN Wen-Shan

    2000-01-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  3. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gao; Qian, Xia; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Zhan, Wen-Shan

    2000-07-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  4. Apolipoprotein C-III Nanodiscs Studied by Site-Specific Tryptophan Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Chase A; Lee, Jennifer C

    2016-09-06

    Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) is found on high-density lipoproteins (HDLs) and remodels 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine vesicles into HDL-like particles known as nanodiscs. Using single-Trp-containing ApoC-III mutants, we have studied local side chain environments and interactions in nanodiscs at positions W42, W54, and W65. Using transmission electron microscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, nanodiscs were characterized at the ultrastructural and secondary conformational levels, respectively. Nearly identical particles (15 ± 2 nm) were produced from all proteins containing approximately 25 ± 4 proteins per particle with an average helicity of 45-51% per protein. Distinct residue-specific fluorescence properties were observed with W54 residing in the most hydrophobic environment followed by W42 and W65. Interestingly, time-resolved anisotropy measurements revealed that Trp side chain mobility is uncorrelated to the polarity of its surroundings. W54 is the most mobile compared to W65 and W42, which are more immobile in a nanodisc-bound state. On the basis of Trp spectral comparisons of ApoC-III in micellar and vesicle environments, ApoC-III binding within nanodiscs more closely resembles a bilayer-bound state. Despite the nanodiscs being structurally similar, we found marked differences during nanodisc formation by the Trp variants as a function of temperature, with W42 behaving the most like the wild-type protein. Our data suggest that despite the modest mutations of Trp to Phe at two of the three native sites, the interfacial location of W42 is important for lipid binding and nanodisc assembly, which may be biologically meaningful as of the three Trp residues, only W42 is invariant among mammals.

  5. Fluorescence Spectra Studies on the Interaction between Lanthanides and Calmodulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The conformation of Calmodulin(CaM) induced by lanthanides has been examined using fluorescence methods.With the addition of lanthanide (Ln3+), the intrinsic fluorescence intensity of CaM without calcium ions (Apo-CaM) first increases and then decreases.Ln3+ causes the decrease of intrinsic fluorescence intensity of calcium saturated CaM (Ca2+4-CaM) only at high concentrations.At low concentrations, Ln3+ results not only in the enhancement of fluorescence intensity of Apo-CaM, but also in a blue shift of the maximum emission wavelengh of dansyl labeled calmodulin(Apo-D-CaM).The molecular mechanism of the interaction between Ln3+ and CaM has been discussed in the light of the fluorescence spectra.

  6. Longitudinal assessment of fractional anisotropy alterations caused by simian immunodeficiency virus infection: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenchao; Dong, Enqing; Liu, Jiaojiao; Liu, Zhenyu; Wei, Wenjuan; Wang, Bo; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies found that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection led to white matter (WM) microstructure degeneration. Most of the DTI studies were cross-sectional and thus merely investigated only one specific point in the disease. In order to systematically study the WM impairments caused by HIV infection, more longitudinal studies are needed. However, longitudinal studies on HIV patients are very difficult to conduct. To address this question, we employed the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus monkeys model to carry out a longitudinal DTI study. We aimed to longitudinally access the WM abnormalities of SIV-infected rhesus monkeys by studying the fractional anisotropy (FA) alterations with Tract Based Spatial Statistic (TBSS) analysis. Four rhesus monkeys inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239 were utilized in the study. DTI scans and peripheral blood CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell counts were acquired prior to virus inoculation (as the baseline) and in the 12th and 24th week postvirus inoculation. Significant FA alterations were found in the two areas of the inferotemporal regions (iTE), respectively located in the ventral subregion of posterior iTE (iTEpv) and the dorsal subregion of iTE (iTEpd). The decreased FA values in iTEpd were found significantly negatively correlated with the elevated peripheral blood CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratios. It might suggest that WM in iTEpd was still impaired even though the immune dysfunction alleviated temporally.

  7. Estimation of anisotropy parameters for shales based on an improved rock physics model, part 2: case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Part 1 of this paper presented an improved shale rock physics model to enable the prediction of anisotropy parameters from both vertical and horizontal well logs. The predicted elastic constants were demonstrated using the published laboratory measurements of a Greenhorn shale in paper 1, and are more accurate than the estimations in the existing literature. In this paper, this model is applied to the well log data of an Upper Triassic shale formation to predict the VTI anisotropy parameters, which are usually difficult to measure directly in the borehole. The effective elastic constants are calculated for solid clay, aligned clay-fluid-kerogen, a rotated clay-fluid-kerogen mixture and shale step by step using different effective medium theories. The input to this workflow includes the volume fraction of minerals, kerogen and two different pore spaces. Two parameters (the lamination index and pore aspect ratio) need to be inverted simultaneously by fitting the vertical or horizontal logs. An estimation of the anisotropy parameters from the vertical well logs uses a least square inversion in terms of C 33 and C 44. The result is demonstrated by calibration with the seismic amplitude versus angle (AVA) response. Correlations are found between the anisotropy parameters (ε and δ) and rock properties (pore aspect ratio, lamination index, clay content and total porosity). In the horizontal well, the anisotropy parameters are predicted by minimizing the objective function in terms of C 11 and C 44. The overestimated qP-wave velocity of clay-rich shales in the horizontal well is anisotropy-corrected and thus provides a more appropriate V p–V s relation. The impact of strong VTI anisotropy on Poisson’s ratio is also overcome by the anisotropy-correction, thus improving the brittleness characterization of shale reservoirs.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  9. Fluorescence optimisation and lifetime studies of fingerprints treated with magnetic powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, L K; Dinish, U S; Phang, W F; Chao, Z X; Murukeshan, V M

    2005-09-10

    Fluorescence study plays a significant role in fingerprint detection when conventional chemical enhancement methods fail. The basic properties of fluorescence emission such as colour, intensity and lifetime could be well exploited in the detection of latent fingerprints under steady state and in dynamic methods. This paper describes a systematic study of fluorescence emission intensity from fingerprint samples treated with different magnetic powders. Understanding of suitable excitation wavelength required for getting maximum fluorescence emission intensity could be beneficial when selecting the appropriate fluorescent powders for the fingerprint detection. Lifetime study of fingerprints treated with various magnetic powders was also carried out. The importance of lifetime study is well explained through the time-resolved (TR) imaging of fingerprints with nanosecond resolution. Results from the TR imaging study revealed an improvement in the fingerprint image contrast. This is significant when the print is deposited on fluorescing background and its emission wavelength is close to that of treated fingerprint.

  10. Anisotropy of the nitrogen conduction states in the group III nitrides studied by polarized x-ray absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Institute of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Liliental-Weber, Z.; Gullikson, E.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Group III nitrides (AlN, GaN, and InN) consist of the semiconductors which appear recently as a basic materials for optoelectronic devices active in the visible/ultraviolet spectrum as well as high-temperature and high-power microelectronic devices. However, understanding of the basic physical properties leading to application is still not satisfactory. One of the reasons consists in unsufficient knowledge of the band structure of the considered semiconductors. Several theoretical studies of III-nitrides band structure have been published but relatively few experimental studies have been carried out, particularly with respect to their conduction band structure. This motivated the authors to examine the conduction band structure projected onto p-states of the nitrogen atoms for AlN, GaN and InN. An additional advantage of their studies is the availability of the studied nitrides in two structures, hexagonal (wurtzite) and cubic (zincblende). This offers an opportunity to gain information about the role of the anisotropy of electronic band states in determining various physical properties.

  11. Energy response calibration of photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, H-M; Ding, H; Ziemer, B P; Molloi, S

    2014-12-07

    Accurate energy calibration is critical for the application of energy-resolved photon-counting detectors in spectral imaging. The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of energy response calibration and characterization of a photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was performed using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) to investigate the optimal technique for x-ray fluorescence calibration. Simulations were conducted using a 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2.7 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 × 3 mm(2) in detection area. The angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence and scatter background was investigated by varying the detection angle from 20° to 170° with respect to the beam direction. The effects of the detector material, shape, and size on the recorded x-ray fluorescence were investigated. The fluorescent material size effect was considered with and without the container for the fluorescent material. In order to provide validation for the simulation result, the angular dependence of x-ray fluorescence from five fluorescent materials was experimentally measured using a spectrometer. Finally, eleven of the fluorescent materials were used for energy calibration of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The optimal detection angle was determined to be approximately at 120° with respect to the beam direction, which showed the highest fluorescence to scatter ratio (FSR) with a weak dependence on the fluorescent material size. The feasibility of x-ray fluorescence for energy calibration of photon-counting detectors in the diagnostic x-ray energy range was verified by successfully calibrating the energy response of a CZT-based photon-counting detector. The results of this study can be used as a guideline to implement the x-ray fluorescence calibration method for photon-counting detectors in a typical imaging laboratory.

  12. Polarized neutron reflectivity study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in MgO/CoFeB/W thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambaye, Haile; Zhan, Xiao; Li, Shufa; Lauter, Valeria; Zhu, Tao

    In this work we study the origin of PMA in MgO/CoFeB/W trilayer systems using polarized neutron reflectivity. Recently, the spin Hall effect in the heavy metals, such as Pt and Ta, has been of significant interest for highly efficient magnetization switching of the ultrathin ferromagnets sandwiched by such a heavy metal and an oxide, which can be used for spintronic based memory and logic devices. Most work has focused on heavy-metal/ferromagnet/oxide trilayer (HM/FM/MO) structures with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA), where the oxide layer plays the role of breaking inversion symmetry .No PMA was found in W/CoFeB/MgO films. An insertion of Hf layer in between the W and CoFeB layers, however, has been found to create a strong PMA. Roughness and formation of interface alloys by interdiffusion influences the extent of PMA. We intend to identify these influences using the depth sensitive technique of PNR. In our previous study, we have successfully performed polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR) measurements on the Ta/CoFeB/MgO/CoFeB/Ta thin film with MgO thickness of 1 nm. The PNR measurements were carried out using the BL-4A Magnetic Reflectometer at SNS. This work has been supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB933102). Research at SNS was supported by the Office of BES, DOE.

  13. Fluorescence intensity studies of Triassic acritarchs from the Yanchang Formation in Ordos basin,northwestern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Liming; MENG Fanwei; XU Jinli

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescence properties of Early Cambrian acritarchs were investigated using Leica das Mikroskop (DM)microscopy with a mercury lamp.Well-preserved autoflurescence properties show a correlation between acritarchs morphology and the intensity of emitted fluorescence.In accordance with the fluorescence intensity of organic cell walls,two groups ofmicrofossils were distinguished.Results of observation in this study,which are consistent with those of the previous foreign studies,are in good agreement with regular difference in autofluorescence intensity among palynomorphs reported by McPhilemy (1998).Spores and algae,including Botryococcus,have very bright fluorescence while acritarchs often show less intense fluorescence.Dark brown microfossils have been reworked,and have little or no fluorescence.

  14. A fluorescence spectroscopic study of a coagulating protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, H M; Maikokera, R

    2007-11-15

    The fluorescence studies of coagulating protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds have been studied using steady-state intrinsic fluorescence. The fluorescence spectra are dominated by tryptophan emission and the emission peak maximum (lambda(max)=343+ or -2nm) indicated that the tryptophan residue is not located in the hydrophobic core of the protein. Changes in solution pH affected the protein conformation as indicated by changes in the tryptophan fluorescence above pH 9 whereas the ionic strength had minimal effect. The exposure and environments of the tryptophan residue were determined using collisional quenchers.

  15. Fluorescence spectral studies of Gum Arabic: Multi-emission of Gum Arabic in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhenadhayalan, Namasivayam, E-mail: ndhena@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Mythily, Rajan, E-mail: rajanmythily@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India); Kumaran, Rajendran, E-mail: kumaranwau@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Dwaraka Doss Goverdhan Doss Vaishnav College (Autonomous), 833, Gokul Bagh, E.V.R. Periyar Road, Arumbakkam, Chennai 600 106 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Gum Arabic (GA), a food hydrocolloid is a natural composite obtained from the stems and branches of Acacia Senegal and Acacia Seyal trees. GA structure is made up of highly branched arabinogalactan polysaccharides. Steady-state absorption, fluorescence, and time-resolved fluorescence spectral studies of acid hydrolyzed GA solutions were carried out at various pH conditions. The fluorescence in GA is predominantly attributed to the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine amino acids. The presence of multi-emissive peaks at different pH condition is attributed to the exposure of the fluorescing amino acids to the aqueous phase, which contains several sugar units, hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of GA exhibits a multi-exponential decay with different fluorescence lifetime of varying amplitude which confirms that tyrosine is confined to a heterogeneous microenvironment. The existence of multi-emissive peaks with large variation in the fluorescence intensities were established by 3D emission contour spectral studies. The probable location of the fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment was further ascertained by constructing a time-resolved emission spectrum (TRES) and time-resolved area normalized emission spectrum (TRANES) plots. Fluorescence spectral technique is used as an analytical tool in understanding the photophysical properties of a water soluble complex food hydrocolloid containing an intrinsic fluorophore located in a multiple environment is illustrated. - Highlights: • The Manuscript deals with the steady state absorption, emission, fluorescence lifetime and time-resolved emission spectrum studies of Gum Arabic in aqueous medium at various pH conditions. • The fluorescence emanates from the tyrosine amino acid present in GA. • Change in pH results in marked variation in the fluorescence spectral properties of tyrosine. • Fluorescence spectral techniques are employed as a tool in establishing the

  16. Gelation in free-radical crosslinking copolymerization; fast transient fluorescence study

    OpenAIRE

    Ö. Pekcan; D. Kaya

    2002-01-01

    The fast transient fluorescence (FTRF) technique was used to study the sol-gel phase transition in free-radical crosslinking copolymerization (FCC) in two different monomeric systems. Pyrene (Py) was used as a fluorescence probe for the in situ polymerization experiments. The fluorescence lifetimes of Py from its decay traces were measured and used to monitor the gelation process. Monomer consumption profiles were determined during gelation process using Stern-Volmer model. Gelations...

  17. Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging System for in Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moinuddin Hassan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a fluorescence lifetime imaging system for small animals is presented. Data were collected by scanning a region of interest with a measurement head, a linear fiber array with fixed separations between a single source fiber and several detection fibers. The goal was to localize tumors and monitor their progression using specific fluorescent markers. We chose a near-infrared contrast agent, Alexa Fluor 750 (Invitrogen Corp., Carlsbad, CA. Preliminary results show that the fluorescence lifetime for this dye was sensitive to the immediate environment of the fluorophore (in particular, pH, making it a promising candidate for reporting physiologic changes around a fluorophore. To quantify the intrinsic lifetime of deeply embedded fluorophores, we performed phantom experiments to investigate the contribution of photon migration effects on observed lifetime by calculating the fluorescence intensity decay time. A previously proposed theoretical model of migration, based on random walk theory, is also substantiated by new experimental data. The developed experimental system has been used for in vivo mouse imaging with Alexa Fluor 750 contrast agent conjugated to tumor-specific antibodies (trastuzumab [Herceptin]. Three-dimensional mapping of the fluorescence lifetime indicates lower lifetime values in superficial breast cancer tumors in mice.

  18. A Study on Compressive Anisotropy and Nonassociated Flow Plasticity of the AZ31 Magnesium Alloy in Hot Rolling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of anisotropy in compression is studied on hot rolling of AZ31 magnesium alloy with a three-dimensional constitutive model based on the quadratic Hill48 yield criterion and nonassociated flow rule (non-AFR. The constitutive model is characterized by compressive tests of AZ31 billets since plastic deformations of materials are mostly caused by compression during rolling processes. The characterized plasticity model is implemented into ABAQUS/Explicit as a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT based on semi-implicit backward Euler's method. The subroutine is employed to simulate square-bar rolling processes. The simulation results are compared with rolled specimens and those predicted by the von Mises and the Hill48 yield function under AFR. Moreover, strip rolling is also simulated for AZ31 with the Hill48 yield function under non-AFR. The strip rolling simulation demonstrates that the lateral spread generated by the non-AFR model is in good agreement with experimental data. These comparisons between simulation and experiments validate that the proposed Hill48 yield function under non-AFR provides satisfactory description of plastic deformation behavior in hot rolling for AZ31 alloys in case that the anisotropic parameters in the Hill48 yield function and the non-associated flow rule are calibrated by the compressive experimental results.

  19. Study on the mechanism of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Ta/CoFeB/MgO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Yongle; Zhang, Yuming; Guo, Hui; Xu, Daqing; Yimen, Zhang

    2017-06-01

    The mechanism of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in a MgO-based magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) has been studied in this article. By comparing the magnetic properties and elementary composition analysis for different CoFeB-based structures, such as Ta/CoFeB/MgO, Ta/CoFeB/Ta and Ru/CoFeB/MgO structures, it is found that a certain amount of Fe-oxide existing at the interface of CoFeB/MgO is helpful to enhance the PMA and the PMA is originated from the interface of CoFeB/MgO. In addition, Ta film plays an important role to enhance the PMA in Ta/CoFeB/MgO structure. Project supported by the National Defense Advance Research Foundation (No. 9140A08XXXXXX0DZ106), the Basic Research Program of Ministry of Education, China (No. JY10000925005), the Scientific Research Program Funded by Shaanxi Provincial Education Department (No.11JK0912), the Scientific Research Foundation of Xi’an University of Science and Technology (No. 2010011), the Doctoral Research Startup Fund of Xi’an University of Science and Technology (No. 2010QDJ029).

  20. Seismic anisotropy beneath the Mississippi Embayment and the New Madrid Seismic Zone: A study of shear wave splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyamwandha, Cecilia A.; Powell, Christine A.

    2016-11-01

    Shear wave splitting associated with the Mississippi Embayment (ME) is determined using teleseismic SKS phases recorded by the Northern Embayment Lithosphere Experiment (NELE), the USArray Transportable Array (TA), and the New Madrid seismic network for the period 2005-2016. Our data set consists of 5900 individual splitting measurements from 257 earthquakes recorded at 151 stations within and outside the ME. Stations outside of the ME exhibit significant shear wave splitting, with average delay times between 0.4 s and 1.8 s. To the northeast and east of the ME, nearly all observed fast orientations are approximately oriented northeast-southwest, in agreement with absolute plate motion (APM) predicted by HS3-Nuvel-1A. The homogeneity of the fast orientations in this region suggests that the splitting is due to active flow in the asthenosphere. A counterclockwise rotation in the splitting orientation is observed moving northeast to northwest across the study area. Inside the ME, some stations show large and systematic deviations of the measured fast orientations from the APM. The delay times within the entire ME range from 0.9 s to 2.1 s. Splitting complexity is attributed to relic lithospheric fabrics formed during past tectonic events including passage of a hot spot in mid-Cretaceous time. The anisotropy may also be linked to the presence of a southwest dipping region of low P and S wave velocities below the ME or to deeper flow in the asthenosphere.

  1. Crystallographic origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoPt film: polarized x-ray absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K [National University of Singapore; Chen, J [National University of Singapore; Liu, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sun, C [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source; Chow, G [National University of Singapore

    2009-01-01

    Crystallographic structure, growth induced miscibility gap and strain in Ta/Co100 xPtx (0 x 43 at%)/Ru/Ta/glass films deposited at ambient temperature were investigated using polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy to clarify the origin of observed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Co72Pt28 film. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy data at Co K-edge showed that Co has a similar local atomic environment and averaged interatomic distance in the in-plane and out-of-plane polarization geometries for Co72Pt28, ruling out the contribution of magneto-elastic anisotropy and growth induced structural anisotropy as the origin of PMA. A large PMA in Co72Pt28 film was attributed to the preferred hexagonal close-packed stacking as observed using the x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy.

  2. Study on Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry Excited by Synchrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-jia Guo; Wu-er Gan; Guo-bin Zhang; Qing-de Su

    2008-01-01

    A novel analysis approach using atomic fluorescence excited by synchrotron radiation is presented. A system for synchrotron radiation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry is developed, and experimental conditions such as flow rate, analyte acidity, concentration of pre-reducing and hydrogenation system are optimized. The proposed method is successfully applied to get an excitation spectrum of arsenic. Seven of ten primary spectral lines, four of which have never been reported by means of atomic fluorescence spectrometry, agree well with the existing reports. The other three are proposed for the first time. Excitation potentials and possible transitions are investigated. Especially for the prominent line at 234.99 nm, the mechanism of generation is discussed and a model of energy transition processes is proposed.

  3. STUDIES ON THE EXCIMER FLUORESCENCE AND THE STERIC TACTICITY OF POLYPHENYLSILSESQUIOXANES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chaoran; XU Guangzhi; ZHANG Xinsheng; SHI Lianghe

    1987-01-01

    The steric tacticity of polyphenylsilsesquioxanes (PPS) was studied by excimer fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that the fluorescence of PPS come mainly from its intramolecular excimers. The experimental results indicated that the steric-structure of PPS is most probably cis-isotactic rather than the cis-syndiotactic as suggested in the literature. With the increase in defect content monomer fluorescence intensity increases because of the enhanced mobility of phenyl groups. Molecular weights and molecular weight distributions do not affect the fluorescence spectra of PPS.

  4. Unfolding features of bovine testicular hyaluronidase studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Nina; Cai, Xiaoqiang; Tang, Kai; Zou, Guolin

    2005-11-01

    Chemical unfolding of bovine testicular hyaluronidase (HAase) has been studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Thermodynamic parameters were determined for unfolding HAase from changes in the intrinsic fluorescence emission intensity and the formations of several possible unfolding intermediates have been identified. This was further confirmed by representation of fluorescence data in terms of 'phase diagram'. The secondary structures of HAase have been assigned and semiquantitatively estimated from the FTIR. The occurrence of conformational change during chemical unfolding as judged by fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy indicated that the unfolding of HAase may not follow the typical two-state model.

  5. Potential of protoporphyrin IX and metal derivatives for single molecule fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu Yi; Geissinger, Peter [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Woehl, Joerg C., E-mail: woehl@uwm.ed [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 3210 N. Cramer Street, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Metalloporphyrins are cofactors of a variety of proteins, and are often used as spectroscopic probes of the active site. Many high resolution techniques, such as single molecule spectroscopy, are based on fluorescence contrast and require the replacement of the native metalloporphyrin by a fluorescent analog. We have investigated the potential of several fluorescent analogs of heme, namely free-base protoporphyrin IX and its metal derivatives containing Zn, Sn, and Mg, for single molecule fluorescence studies by determining their room-temperature molecular absorption cross sections and fluorescence quantum yields. According to these data, free-base protoporphyrin IX and its Zn derivative, which have the highest fluorescence quantum yields, are the most suitable heme analogs for single molecule fluorescence studies. - Research highlights: Protoporphyrin IX and fluorescent metal derivatives for single molecule detection. Measurement of room temperature absorption cross sections for Q bands. Measurement of room temperature fluorescence quantum yields for Q bands. PPIX and Zn derivative have highest quantum yields for lowest-energy transition.

  6. Carrier-phonon interactions in hybrid halide perovskites probed with ultrafast anisotropy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Jasmine P. H.; Richter, Johannes M.; Price, Michael B.; Credgington, Dan; Deschler, Felix

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid halide perovskites are at the frontier of optoelectronic research due to their excellent semiconductor properties and solution processability. For this reason, much attention has recently been focused on understanding photoexcited charge-carrier generation and recombination in these materials. Conversely, very few studies have so far been devoted to understanding carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering mechanisms in these materials. This is surprising given that carrier scattering mechanisms fundamentally limit charge-carrier motilities and therefore the performance of photovoltaic devices. We apply linear polarization selective transient absorption measurements to polycrystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 hybrid halide perovskite films as an effective way of studying the scattering processes in these materials. Comparison of the photo induced bleach signals obtained when the linear polarizations of the pump and probe are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to one another, reveal a significant difference in spectral intensity and shape within the first few hundred femtoseconds after photoexcitation.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Study of Surface Anisotropy in Ag_{60} Cu_{40} Alloy at Nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Hussain, Fayyaz; Rashid, Muhammad; Kousar, Farhana; Javid, M. Arshad; Ullah, Hafeez; Ahmad, Ejaz; Ahmad, S. A.

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to investigate the anisotropic behavior of free standing Ag_{60} Cu_{40} nanorods. We choose different orientations with various cross sections to study the dynamics of thermal behavior of Ag_{60} Cu_{40} nanorods. The system is modeled using embedded atom method potentials. The radial distribution functions are analyzed to reveal the dynamic evolution of the structural behavior of nanorods with different orientations and sample sizes. The total energy and mean square displacement is also calculated to characterize the melting phenomenon of various samples. The melting temperature of the nanorods is found to be significantly size and orientation dependent, and it increases with the increase in cross-sectional area. The nanorods with low-index crystallographic surfaces such as (110) exhibit lowest melting temperature as compared to compact surfaces (111).

  8. Optical and diamagnetic anisotropy of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, A. L.; Vora, P. M.; Lou, Z.; Johnson, A. T.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    We have recently shown that graphene oxide (GO) emits a broad photoluminescence (PL) band in both solid and aqueous preparations. The origin of this PL is not yet well understood, but for absorptive and emissive optical processes originating in the two dimensional GO plane, one expects an in-plane polarization. Studies of optical anisotropy can therefore help to clarify the origin of the PL. Here we use a method of optical nanomagnetometry (Torrens, et al, JACS 129, p. 252 (2007)) to extract these quantities, also determining the magnetic anisotropy. We find that when aqueous preparations of GO are placed in a magnetic field, diamagnetically induced alignment leads to marked linear polarization anisotropy of absorbance and photoluminescence. By taking six optical measurements at each magnetic field, we are able to extract the intrinsic polarization anisotropies of optical absorption and emission of GO flakes and to quantify the orbital diamagnetic anisotropy. We discuss how these quantities give insight into electronic delocalization in these systems.

  9. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin FeCo alloy films on Pd(0 0 1) surface: First principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongyoo [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Jisang [Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan 608-737 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hongj@pknu.ac.kr

    2009-06-15

    Using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FLAPW) method, thickness dependent magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin FeCo alloy films in the range of 1 monolayer (ML) to 5 ML coverage on Pd(0 0 1) surface has been explored. We have found that the FeCo alloy films have close to half metallic state and well-known surface enhancement in thin film magnetism is observed in Fe atom, whereas the Co has rather stable magnetic moment. However, the largest magnetic moment in Fe and Co is found at 1 ML thickness. Interestingly, it has been observed that the interface magnetic moments of Fe and Co are almost the same as those of surface elements. The similar trend exists in orbital magnetic moment. This indicates that the strong hybridization between interface FeCo alloy and Pd gives rise to the large magnetic moment. Theoretically calculated magnetic anisotropy shows that the 1 ML FeCo alloy has in-plane magnetization, but the spin reorientation transition (SRT) from in-plane to perpendicular magnetization is observed above 2 ML thickness with huge magnetic anisotropy energy. The maximum magnetic anisotropy energy for perpendicular magnetization is as large as 0.3 meV/atom at 3 ML film thickness with saturation magnetization of 2.36{mu}{sub B}. Besides, the calculated X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) has been presented.

  10. Comparison of auto-fluorescence and tetracycline fluorescence for guided bone surgery of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw: a randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristow, O; Otto, S; Geiß, C; Kehl, V; Berger, M; Troeltzsch, M; Koerdt, S; Hohlweg-Majert, B; Freudlsperger, C; Pautke, C

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have indicated that bone shows auto-fluorescence under an appropriate fluorescence lamp. The aim of this preliminary study was to compare the success rates of the established tetracycline fluorescence-guided bone surgery with auto-fluorescence-guided bone surgery in the treatment of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Forty patients suffering from MRONJ were referred for surgical treatment and were divided randomly into two groups: auto-fluorescence (n=20) or tetracycline fluorescence (n=20) guided bone surgery. The primary endpoint was treatment success, defined as the absence of exposed bone at 8 weeks after surgery. Secondary outcomes assessed were mucosal integrity, signs of infection, pain, and loss of sensitivity; these were evaluated descriptively at 10 days, 8 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. At 8 weeks postoperative, 18/20 patients (90%) in the auto-fluorescence group and 17/20 patients (85%) in the tetracycline fluorescence group showed mucosal integrity (P>0.05). At the last follow-up, 94% in the auto-fluorescence group and 89% in the tetracycline fluorescence group presented complete mucosal coverage with no exposed bone, infection, or pain (P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the two techniques for any of the secondary outcomes (P>0.05). The results of this preliminary study show that auto-fluorescence-guided bone surgery has comparable success rates to the established tetracycline fluorescence-guided bone surgery. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A subnanomolar fluorescent probe for protein kinase CK2 interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enkvist, Erki; Viht, Kaido; Bischoff, Nils; Vahter, Jürgen; Saaver, Siiri; Raidaru, Gerda; Issinger, Olaf-Georg; Niefind, Karsten; Uri, Asko

    2012-11-21

    Up-regulation of an acidophilic protein kinase, CK2, has been established in several types of cancer. This cognition has made CK2 an important target for drug development for cancer chemotherapy. The characterization of potential drug candidates, determination of the structure and clarification of the functions of CK2 could be facilitated by the application of small-molecule fluorescent probes that bind to the active site of the enzyme with high affinity and selectivity. We have used a bisubstrate approach for the development of a highly potent inhibitor of CK2. 4,5,6,7-Tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole was conjugated with peptides containing multiple aspartate residues via different linkers. The design of the inhibitors was by crystallographic analysis of the complex of an inhibitor with the catalytic subunit of the enzyme (CK2α). The inhibitory potency of the synthesized compounds was established in a kinetic assay that used thin layer chromatography for the measurement of the rate of phosphorylation of fluorescently labelled peptide 5-TAMRA-RADDSDDDDD. The most potent inhibitor, ARC-1502 (K(i) = 0.5 nM), revealed high selectivity for CK2α in a panel of 140 protein kinases. Labelling of ARC-1502 with PromoFluor-647 gave the fluorescent probe ARC-1504 that possessed subnanomolar affinity towards both CK2α and the holoenzyme. The probe was used in a fluorescence anisotropy-based binding assay to measure the concentration of CK2α and characterize non-labelled ligands binding to the active site of CK2α.

  12. Seismic anisotropy in tomographic studies of the upper mantle beneath Southern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Plomerovà

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Regional seismic tomography of Iberia, Italy, the South Balkans and the Aegean region down to about 400 km are discussed along with results of studies on the anisotropic structure of the lithosphere based on an analysis of spatial variations of P-residuals. The P-residual spheres, showing azimuth-incidence angle dependent terms of relative residuals, map lateral changes of the anisotropic structure of the subcrustal lithosphere related to large tectonic units. Isotropic velocity perturbation models correlate, in general, with models of the lithosphere thickness but in some provinces they are affected by neglecting the anisotropic propagation within the lithosphere.

  13. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  14. A systematic study of head tissue inhomogeneity and anisotropy on EEG forward problem computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashar, M R; Li, Y; Wen, P

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we propose a stochastic method to analyze the effects of inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue conductivity on electroencephalogram (EEG) in forward computation. We apply this method to an inhomogeneous and anisotropic spherical human head model. We apply stochastic finite element method based on Legendre polynomials, Karhunen-Loeve expansion and stochastic Galerkin methods. We apply Volume and Wang's constraints to restrict the anisotropic conductivities for both the white matter (WM) and the skull tissue compartments. The EEGs resulting from deterministic and stochastic FEMs are compared using statistical measurement techniques. Based on these comparisons, we find that EEGs generated by incorporating WM and skull inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue properties individually result in an average of 56.5 and 57.5% relative errors, respectively. Incorporating these tissue properties for both layers together generate 43.5% average relative error. Inhomogeneous scalp tissue causes 27% average relative error and a full inhomogeneous anisotropic model brings in an average of 45.5% relative error. The study results demonstrate that the effects of inhomogeneous anisotropic tissue conductivity are significant on EEG.

  15. A polarizable embedding DFT study of one-photon absorption in fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beerepoot, Maarten; Steindal, Arnfinn H.; Kongsted, Jacob;

    2013-01-01

    A theoretical study of the one-photon absorption of five fluorescent proteins (FPs) is presented. The absorption properties are calculated using a polarizable embedding approach combined with density functional theory (PE-DFT) on the wild-type green fluorescent protein (wtGFP) and several of its...

  16. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    OpenAIRE

    Dudzisz, Katarzyna; Szaniawski, Rafał; Michalski, Krzysztof; Manby, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB). The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagne...

  17. Study on fluorescence spectra of molecular association of acetic acid-water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Caiqin Han; Ying Liu; Yang Yang; Xiaowu Ni; Jian Lu; Xiaosen Luo

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution excited by ultraviolet (UV) light are studied, and the relationship between fluorescence spectra and molecular association of acetic acid is discussed. The results indicate that when the exciting light wavelength is longer than 246 nm, there are two fluorescence peaks located at 305 and 334 nm, respectively. By measuring the excitation spectra, the optimal wavelengths of the two fluorescence peaks are obtained, which are 258 and 284 nm, respectively. Fluorescence spectra of acetic acid-water solution change with concentrations, which is primarily attributed to changes of molecular association of acetic acid in aqueous solution. Through theoretical analysis, three variations of molecular association have been obtained in acetic acid-water solution, which are the hydrated monomers, the linear dimers, and the water separated dimers. This research can provide references to studies of molecular association of acetic acid-water, especially studies of hydrogen bonds.

  18. Seasonal anisotropy in handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory V; Martin, Maryanne

    2008-01-01

    The preference for using either the left or the right hand has been linked to important human characteristics such as language lateralisation within the cerebral hemispheres, and evidence has been reported that the proportions of different types of handedness may be influenced by factors such as levels of maternal hormones and anxiety. Under such influences, it is possible in principle that distributions of handedness provide evidence of seasonal anisotropy, that is, variation in the direction of handedness for births in different parts of the year. The results of a number of studies are compared here, and shown to provide evidence of a significant tendency for the incidence of left-handed people to be higher among those born in the spring and ensuing months (March-July in the northern hemisphere) than among those born in the remainder of the year, at least among the male population.

  19. Eddy currents in the anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility measurement - A model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, Josef; Hrouda, Frantisek

    2016-04-01

    Analytical solutions of Maxwell equations for eddy currents caused by AC field in a conductive sphere, known from 1950s, provide a general formula for magnetic susceptibility. It contains the parameters describing the sphere (its size, conductivity and permeability), surrounding medium (permeability) and the applied field (frequency). The formula is complex and without numerical evaluation it is difficult to distinguish the real (in-phase) and imaginary (out-of-phase) part of susceptibility. Representing all the parameters by only two, relative permeability (sphere vs. medium) and skin ratio (summarizing the effect of sphere size, conductivity and permeability, and frequency of the field), we derive approximate formulas for both phases and the phase angle. These are valid for a reasonable range of parameters (from rock magnetism point of view) and enable us to study their influence. The in-phase susceptibility depends very weakly on the fourth power of the skin ratio while the out-of-phase susceptibility depends more strongly on its second power. The coefficients of the dependence are expressed by means of relative permeability. The approximations of in-phase and out-of-phase susceptibilities provide a possibility to assess possible effects of eddy currents in rocks in case of low content of conductive minerals and solve problems of the type by which size one piece of a mineral in the measured sample can produce a phase shift that is observed by measurement. Examples of magnetite and pyrrhotite are given.

  20. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging study of anastomotic recurrence of Crohn's disease after right ileocolonic resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Maunoury, Vincent; Klein, Olivier; Colombel, Jean-Frederic

    1995-12-01

    Crohn's disease is an inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. Vasculitis is hypothesized but it was never demonstrated in vivo. This study aimed to evaluate the vascular mucosa perfusion using fluorescence imaging in 13 patients who had previously undergone eileocolonic resection and who agreed to participate in a prospective endoscopic study of anastomotic recurrence. This anastomotic recurrence rate is known to be high (73% after 1 year follow-up) and is characterized by ulcerations. The fluorescence study was started with an I.V. bolus injection of sodium fluorescein. The pre-anastomotic mucosa was endoscopically examined with blue light that stimulates fluorescein fluorescence. Fluorescence emission was recorded with an ultra-high-sensitivity camera connected to the endoscope via an interference filter (520 - 560 nm). A uniform fluorescence was observed a few seconds after the injection and lasted for 15 min in healthy subjects. In case of recurrence, the centers of the ulcerations displayed a very low fluorescence indicating localized ischemia. In contrast, the rims of the ulcers revealed brighter fluorescent images than those of normal mucosa. The anastomotic ulcerations of Crohn's disease recurrence exhibit a high fluorescence intensity at their margins indicating an increased mucosal blood flow and/or enhanced transcapillary diffusion. These findings support the hypothesis of a primary vasculitis in Crohn's disease.

  1. Induced magnetic anisotropy in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic materials: A transmission x-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, R., E-mail: rparsons01@gmail.com; Suzuki, K. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Yanai, T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Kishimoto, H.; Kato, A. [Toyota Motor Corporation, Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan); Ohnuma, M. [Faculty and Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2015-05-07

    In order to better understand the origin of field-induced anisotropy (K{sub u}) in Si-free nanocrystalline soft magnetic alloys, the lattice spacing of the bcc-Fe phase in nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} (x = 10, 12, 14) alloys annealed under an applied magnetic field has been investigated by X-ray diffraction in transmission geometry (t-XRD) with the diffraction vector parallel and perpendicular to the field direction. The saturation magnetostriction (λ{sub s}) of nanocrystalline Fe{sub 94−x}Nb{sub 6}B{sub x} was found to increase linearly with the volume fraction of the residual amorphous phase and is well described by taking into account the volume-weighted average of two local λ{sub s} values for the bcc-Fe nanocrystallites (−5 ± 2 ppm) and the residual amorphous matrix (+8 ± 2 ppm). The lattice distortion required to produce the measured K{sub u} values (∼100 J/m{sup 3}) was estimated via the inverse magnetostrictive effect using the measured λ{sub s} values and was compared to the lattice spacing estimations made by t-XRD. The lattice strain required to produce K{sub u} under the magnetoelastic model was not observed by the t-XRD experiments and so the findings of this study suggest that the origin of magnetic field induced K{sub u} cannot be explained through the magnetoelastic effect.

  2. The curved Magallanes fold and thrust belt: Tectonic insights from a paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete, F.; Roperch, P.; Hervé, F.; Diraison, M.; Espinoza, M.; Arriagada, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Magallanes fold and thrust belt (FTB) presents a large-scale curvature from N-S oriented structures north of 52°S to nearly E-W in Tierra del Fuego Island. We present a paleomagnetic and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) study from 85 sites sampled in Cretaceous to Miocene marine sediments. Magnetic susceptibility is lower than 0.0005 SI for 76 sites and mainly controlled by paramagnetic minerals. AMS results indicate that the sedimentary fabric is preserved in the undeformed areas of Tierra del Fuego and the more external thrust sheets units, where an incipient lineation due to layer parallel shortening is recorded. Prolate AMS ellipsoids, indicating a significant tectonic imprint in the AMS fabric, are observed in the internal units of the belt. AMS results show a good correlation between the orientation of the magnetic lineation and the fold axes. However, in Península Brunswick, the AMS lineations are at ~20° counterclockwise to the strike of the fold axes. Pretectonic stable characteristic remanent magnetizations (ChRM) were determined in seven sites. A counterclockwise rotation (21.2° ± 9.2°) is documented by ChRM data from four sites near the hinge of the belt in Península Brunswick and near Canal Whiteside while there is no evidence of rotation near the nearly E-W oriented Vicuña thrust within Tierra del Fuego. The curved shape of the Cenozoic Magallanes FTB is not related to vertical axis rotation, and thus, the Magallanes FTB can be considered as a primary arc.

  3. Studying DNA translocation in nanocapillaries using single molecule fluorescence

    CERN Document Server

    Thacker, Vivek V; Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F; 10.1063/1.4768929

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate simultaneous measurements of DNA translocation into glass nanopores using ionic current detection and fluorescent imaging. We verify the correspondence between the passage of a single DNA molecule through the nanopore and the accompanying characteristic ionic current blockage. By tracking the motion of individual DNA molecules in the nanocapillary perpendicular to the optical axis and using a model, we can extract an effective mobility constant for DNA in our geometry under high electric fields.

  4. Illumination pattern optimization for fluorescence tomography: theory and simulation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Joyita; Ahn, Sangtae; Joshi, Anand A; Leahy, Richard M

    2010-05-21

    Fluorescence molecular tomography is a powerful tool for 3D visualization of molecular targets and pathways in vivo in small animals. Owing to the high degrees of absorption and scattering of light through tissue, the fluorescence tomographic inverse problem is inherently ill-posed. In order to improve source localization and the conditioning of the light propagation model, multiple sets of data are acquired by illuminating the animal surface with different spatial patterns of near-infrared light. However, the choice of these patterns in most experimental setups is ad hoc and suboptimal. This paper presents a systematic approach for designing efficient illumination patterns for fluorescence tomography. Our objective here is to determine how to optimally illuminate the animal surface so as to maximize the information content in the acquired data. We achieve this by improving the conditioning of the Fisher information matrix. We parameterize the spatial illumination patterns and formulate our problem as a constrained optimization problem that, for a fixed number of illumination patterns, yields the optimal set of patterns. For geometric insight, we used our method to generate a set of three optimal patterns for an optically homogeneous, regular geometrical shape and observed expected symmetries in the result. We also generated a set of six optimal patterns for an optically homogeneous cuboidal phantom set up in the transillumination mode. Finally, we computed optimal illumination patterns for an optically inhomogeneous realistically shaped mouse atlas for different given numbers of patterns. The regularized pseudoinverse matrix, generated using the singular value decomposition, was employed to reconstruct the point spread function for each set of patterns in the presence of a sample fluorescent point source deep inside the mouse atlas. We have evaluated the performance of our method by examining the singular value spectra as well as plots of average spatial

  5. A study of fluorescence properties of citrinin in {beta}-cyclodextrin aqueous solution and different solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Youxiang [Institute of Quality Standard and Testing Technology for Agro-products, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430064 (China); Chen Jianbiao; Dong Lina; Lu Liang [College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China); Chen Fusheng [College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation of the Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China); National Key Laboratory of Agro-microbiology, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China); Hu Dingjin [Institute of Quality Standard and Testing Technology for Agro-products, Hubei Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430064 (China); Wang Xiaohong, E-mail: wxh@mail.hzau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Evaluation of the Ministry of Agriculture, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430070 (China)

    2012-06-15

    Citrinin (CIT) is a nephrotoxic mycotoxin initially isolated from filamentous fungus Penicilliu citrinum. It was later isolated from several other species, such as Aspergillus and Monascus. It has a conjugated, planar structure that gives it a natural fluorescence ability, which can be used to develop sensitive methods for detecting CIT in food. In this paper, we used the spectrofluorescence technique to study the effects of pH value, {beta}-cyclodextrin ({beta}-CD) and organic solvents on the CIT fluorescence intensity. The results show that lower pH value, aceitc acid, {beta}-CD and acetonitrile can induce a higher fluorescence intensity of CIT, but methanol or H{sub 2}O has a decreasing effect on the fluorescence intensity of CIT. Findings in this study provide a theoretical basis for development of a high sensitivity fluorescence-based trace analysis for CIT detection. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of pH, solvents and {beta}-CD on the fluorescence of citrinin are analyzed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer [H]{sup +}, acetic acid, {beta}-CD and acetonitrile can induce CIT fluorescence enhancement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methanol and H{sub 2}O can induce CIT fluorescence reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The 1:1 inclusion complex of CIT/{beta}-CD can form in acidic phosphate solution.

  6. High-pressure SANS and fluorescence unfolding study of calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibrat, Gabriel; Hoa, Gaston Hui Bon; Craescu, Constantin T; Assairi, Liliane; Blouquit, Yves; Annighöfer, Burkhard; May, Roland P; Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire

    2014-09-01

    Apo-calmodulin, a small soluble mainly α protein, is a calcium-dependent protein activator. Calcium binding affects the calmodulin conformation but also its stability. Calcium free form unfolds between 40 and 80°C, whereas the calcium-saturated form is stable up to temperatures as high as 100°C, forbidding comparison of the thermal unfolding pathways of the two forms. Thus, this paper focuses especially on the conformation of pressure-induced unfolding states of both forms of calmodulin, by combining small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) with biophysical techniques such as tyrosines and ANS fluorescence. In contrast to heat denaturation (Gibrat et al., BBA, 2012), the pressure denaturation of calmodulin is reversible up to pressures of 3000bar (300MPa). A pressure-induced compact intermediate state has been found for the two calmodulin forms, but their unfolding pathways are different. A domain compaction and an increase of the ANS fluorescence of holo form have been evidenced. On the contrary, a domain dilatation and an ANS fluorescence decrease have been found for the apo form. The pressure induced an increase of the interdomain distance for both calmodulin forms, suggesting that the central linker of calmodulin is flexible in solution.

  7. Fluorescence imaging to study cancer burden on lymph nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Alisha V.; Elliott, Jonathan T.; Gunn, Jason R.; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2015-03-01

    Morbidity and complexity involved in lymph node staging via surgical resection and biopsy calls for staging techniques that are less invasive. While visible blue dyes are commonly used in locating sentinel lymph nodes, since they follow tumor-draining lymphatic vessels, they do not provide a metric to evaluate presence of cancer. An area of active research is to use fluorescent dyes to assess tumor burden of sentinel and secondary lymph nodes. The goal of this work was to successfully deploy and test an intra-nodal cancer-cell injection model to enable planar fluorescence imaging of a clinically relevant blue dye, specifically methylene blue along with a cancer targeting tracer, Affibody labeled with IRDYE800CW and subsequently segregate tumor-bearing from normal lymph nodes. This direct-injection based tumor model was employed in athymic rats (6 normal, 4 controls, 6 cancer-bearing), where luciferase-expressing breast cancer cells were injected into axillary lymph nodes. Tumor presence in nodes was confirmed by bioluminescence imaging before and after fluorescence imaging. Lymphatic uptake from the injection site (intradermal on forepaw) to lymph node was imaged at approximately 2 frames/minute. Large variability was observed within each cohort.

  8. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and molecular modeling studies on 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexes with tubulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbildua, José J; Brunet, Juan E; Jameson, David M; López, Maribel; Nova, Esteban; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2006-03-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the binding properties and location of 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexed with tubulin. Using fluorescence anisotropy, a dissociation constant of 5.2+/-0.4 microM for the DAPI-tubulin complex was determined, slightly lower than that for the tubulin S complex. The influence of the C-terminal region on the binding of DAPI to tubulin was also characterized. Using FRET experiments, and assuming a kappa2 value of 2/3, distances between Co2+ bound to its high-affinity binding site and the DAPI-binding site and 2',3'-O-(trinitrophenyl)guanosine 5'-triphosphate bound to the exchangeable nucleotide and the DAPI-binding site were found to be 20+/-2 A and 43+/-2 A, respectively. To locate potential DAPI-binding sites on tubulin, a molecular modeling study was carried out using the tubulin crystal structure and energy minimization calculations. The results from the FRET measurements were used to limit the possible location of DAPI in the tubulin structure. Several candidate binding sites were found and these are discussed in the context of the various properties of bound DAPI.

  9. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and molecular modeling studies on 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexes with tubulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbildua, José J.; Brunet, Juan E.; Jameson, David M.; López, Maribel; Nova, Esteban; Lagos, Rosalba; Monasterio, Octavio

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the binding properties and location of 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) complexed with tubulin. Using fluorescence anisotropy, a dissociation constant of 5.2 ± 0.4 μM for the DAPI–tubulin complex was determined, slightly lower than that for the tubulin S complex. The influence of the C-terminal region on the binding of DAPI to tubulin was also characterized. Using FRET experiments, and assuming a κ2 value of 2/3, distances between Co2+ bound to its high-affinity binding site and the DAPI-binding site and 2′,3′-O-(trinitrophenyl)guanosine 5′-triphosphate bound to the exchangeable nucleotide and the DAPI-binding site were found to be 20 ± 2 Å and 43 ± 2 Å, respectively. To locate potential DAPI-binding sites on tubulin, a molecular modeling study was carried out using the tubulin crystal structure and energy minimization calculations. The results from the FRET measurements were used to limit the possible location of DAPI in the tubulin structure. Several candidate binding sites were found and these are discussed in the context of the various properties of bound DAPI. PMID:16452620

  10. Magnetic anisotropy in rhyolitic ignimbrite, Snake River Plain: Implications for using remanent magnetism of volcanic rocks for correlation, paleomagnetic studies, and geological reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, David R.; Coe, Robert S.; Kelly, Henry; Branney, Michael; Knott, Thomas; Reichow, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Individual ignimbrite cooling units in southern Idaho display significant variation of magnetic remanence directions and other magnetic properties. This complicates paleomagnetic correlation. The ignimbrites are intensely welded and exhibit mylonite-like flow banding produced by rheomorphic ductile shear during emplacement, prior to cooling below magnetic blocking temperatures. Glassy vitrophyric lithologies commonly have discrepantly shallow remanence directions rotated closer to the orientation of the subhorizontal shear fabric when compared to the microcrystalline center of the same cooling unit. To investigate this problem, we conducted a detailed paleomagnetic and rock magnetic study of a vertical profile through a single ignimbrite cooling unit and its underlying baked soil. The results demonstrate that large anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization correlates with large (up to 38°) deflections of the stable remanence direction. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility revealed no strong anisotropy. A strong lineation and deflection of the remanence declination suggest that rheomorphic shear above magnetic blocking temperatures is the dominant mechanism controlling the formation of the magnetic fabric, with compaction contributing to a lesser extent. Nucleation and growth of anisotropic fine-grained magnetite in volcanic glass at high temperatures after, and perhaps also during, emplacement is indicated by systematic variation of magnetic properties from the quickly chilled ignimbrite base to the interior. These properties include remanence directions, anisotropy, coercivity, susceptibility, strength of natural remanent magnetization, and dominant unblocking temperature. The microcrystalline ignimbrite center has a magnetic direction that is the same as the underlying baked soil and, therefore, is a more reliable recorder of the paleofield direction than the glassy margins of highly welded ignimbrites.

  11. Estudio Monte Carlo de un Ferrimagneto de Ising Mixto con Diferentes Anisotropías Monte Carlo Study of a Mixed Ising Ferrimagnet with Different Anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás A De La Espriella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mediante simulaciones de Monte Carlo, se analizan las propiedades magnéticas de un modelo ferrimagnético de Ising mixto, con espines S = ±3/2, ±1/2 y σ = ±5/2, ±3/2, ±1/2 distribuidos sobre una red cuadrada, con diferentes anisotropías. Se supuso que la interacción de intercambio a primeros vecinos, J1, entre espines S y σ es antiferromagnética (J1 Using Monte Carlo simulations, the magnetic properties of a mixed Ising ferrimagnetic model with spins S = ±3/2, ±1/2 y σ = ±5/2, ±3/2, ±1/2 distributed on a square lattice with different anisotropies was analyzed. It was assumed that the exchange interaction to nearest neighbors, J1, between spins S and σ, is antiferromagnetic (J1 < 0. Also, it was considered that the effect of the intensities of the single-ion anisotropies, due to the crystalline fields of the sublattices S and σ, Ds and Dj respectively. The existence and dependence of the compensation temperature in the model with respect to the single-ion anisotropies was also studied. By fixing the parameter Ds and varying the intensity of Dj it probable phase transitions of first order appear. The analysis of the critical temperatures is obtained through the maximum of the specific heat of the system. Phase diagrams at finite temperatures are obtained in the temperature-anisotropy plane.

  12. Fluorescence studies on the interaction of ethidium bromide with duplex, triplex and quadruplex DNA structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙雪光; 曹恩华; 何裕建; 秦静芬

    1999-01-01

    Under different conditions, oligonucleotides can form several alternative DNA structures such as duplex, triplex and quadruplex. All these structures can interact with ethidium bromide (EB) and make its fluorescence intensity change. The fluorescence spectra and other related parameters provided by static fluorescence techniques showed that the interaction mechanisms between EB and these structures were not always the same. Among them, B type duplex and triplex DNA adopt an intercalative mode when binding to the EB, which has a relatively high efficiency of energy transfer and the fluorescence of EB cannot be quenched easily. While for the parallel duplex DNA, the interaction mode is an outside binding in which energy transfer can hardly happen and its fluorescence intensity as well as Stern-Volmer constant is almost the same to the free EB. For the quadruplex, the binding mechanism to EB is more complex. Results from the energy transfer and quenching studies indicate that the two interaction modes note

  13. Studies on the Transition Metal Ion Induced Fluorescence Enhancement of 1,8-Naphthalimide Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN,Guo-Tao; ZHU,Man-Zhou; WANG,Zhuo; MENG,Xiang-Ming; HU,Hui-Yuan; GUO,Qing-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    Two fluorosensor systems have been designed and synthesized with their photophysical properties and fluorescence responses toward the transition metal ions studied. The fluorosensor was composed of 1,8-naphthalimide and 4-chloro-1,8-naphthalimide as fluorophore respectively, an amino moiety as the receptor and a hydrocarbon chain as the spacer to link the fluorophore and receptor. Fluorescence intensity of these systems is very weak due to the process of the efficient intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) in the absence of metal ions. Titration of the transition metal ions can switch on the fluorescence immediately. The intensity of released fluorescence is even higher than the expected from the consideration of the PET in these systems. It may be rationalized that the receptor bound to transition metal ions and the solvation of the fluorophore by the water molecules from the hydrated transition metal salts, may significantly cause fluorescence enhancement.

  14. Comparative study of the fluorescence intensity of dental composites and human teeth submitted to artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Tatiana; Takahashi, Marcos Kenzo; Brum, Rafeal Torres; Rached, Rodrigo Nunes; Souza, Evelise M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the fluorescence of resin composites and human teeth, and to determine the stability of fluorescence after aging. Ten specimens were built using a 1 mm thick increment of dentin composite overlapped by a 0.5 mm thick increment of enamel composite. Ten sound human molars were sectioned and silicon carbide-polished to obtain enamel and dentin slabs 1.5 mm in thickness. Fluorescence measurements were carried out by a fluorescence spectrophotometer before and after thermocycling (2000 cycles, 5°C and 55°C). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures and Tukey's test were performed at a significance level of 5%. Most of the tested composites showed significant differences in fluorescence both before and after aging (P composite whose fluorescence was similar to that of human teeth at both periods of evaluation (P > 0.05), and was the only composite that showed comparable results of fluorescence to the tooth structure before and after thermocycling. With the exception of Filtek Supreme, there were significant reductions in fluorescence intensity for all the tested composites (P < 0.05).

  15. Multi-resolution anisotropy studies of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, A. L.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Mussa, R.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perlín, M.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roncoroni, M. J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Ruehl, P.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2017-06-01

    We report a multi-resolution search for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with local zenith angles up to 80o and energies in excess of 4 EeV (4 × 1018 eV). This search is conducted by measuring the angular power spectrum and performing a needlet wavelet analysis in two independent energy ranges. Both analyses are complementary since the angular power spectrum achieves a better performance in identifying large-scale patterns while the needlet wavelet analysis, considering the parameters used in this work, presents a higher efficiency in detecting smaller-scale anisotropies, potentially providing directional information on any observed anisotropies. No deviation from isotropy is observed on any angular scale in the energy range between 4 and 8 EeV. Above 8 EeV, an indication for a dipole moment is captured; while no other deviation from isotropy is observed for moments beyond the dipole one. The corresponding p-values obtained after accounting for searches blindly performed at several angular scales, are 1.3 × 10-5 in the case of the angular power spectrum, and 2.5 × 10-3 in the case of the needlet analysis. While these results are consistent with previous reports making use of the same data set, they provide extensions of the previous works through the thorough scans of the angular scales.

  16. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin Co|Ni multilayer films studied with ferromagnetic resonance and magnetic x-ray microspectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macia, F., E-mail: ferran.macia@gmail.com [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Warnicke, P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Bedau, D. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P. [Center for X-ray Optics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Arena, D.A. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Kent, A.D. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectroscopy and magnetic transmission soft x-ray microscopy (MTXM) experiments have been performed to gain insight into the magnetic anisotropy and domain structure of ultrathin Co|Ni multilayer films with a thin permalloy layer underneath. MTXM images with a spatial resolution better than 25 nm were obtained at the Co L{sub 3} edge down to an equivalent thickness of Co of only 1 nm, which establishes a new lower boundary on the sensitivity limit of MTXM. Domain sizes are shown to be strong functions of the anisotropy and thickness of the film. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show record sensitivity of x-ray microscopy in a 1 nm Co effective thickness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found extreme sensitivity of the domain structure to number of bilayer repeats. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perpendicular anisotropy is nearly independent of the number of bilayers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have combined Ferromagnetic resonance and high resolution XMCD microscopy.

  17. Crystallographic origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoPt film: polarized x-ray absorption study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, K.K.M.; Chen, J.S.; Liu, T.; Sun, C.J.; Chow, G.M.; (NU Sinapore); (ORNL)

    2009-09-17

    Crystallographic structure, growth induced miscibility gap and strain in Ta/Co{sub 100-x}Pt{sub x} (0 {le} x {le} 43 at%)/Ru/Ta/glass films deposited at ambient temperature were investigated using polarized x-ray absorption spectroscopy to clarify the origin of observed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in Co{sub 72}Pt{sub 28} film. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy data at Co K-edge showed that Co has a similar local atomic environment and averaged interatomic distance in the in-plane and out-of-plane polarization geometries for Co{sub 72}Pt{sub 28}, ruling out the contribution of magneto-elastic anisotropy and growth induced structural anisotropy as the origin of PMA. A large PMA in Co{sub 72}Pt{sub 28} film was attributed to the preferred hexagonal close-packed stacking as observed using the x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy.

  18. Fluorescence polarization studies of autoionization in CS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliakoff, E. D.; Dehmer, J. L.; Parr, A. C.; Leroi, G. E.

    1987-03-01

    The fluorescence polarization spectrum of CS2(+) produced by photoionization of CS2 (using synchrotron radiation from the NBS SURF-II electron-storage ring) at excitation wavelengths 875-967 A is investigated experimentally, with a focus on autoionization features. The results of polarization measurements for the A2Pi-X2Pi transition are presented in graphs and compared with spectra simulated using the procedure of Poliakoff et al. (1982); qualitative agreement is obtained, but quantitative discrepancies are noted, especially on the low-wavelength side of the resonance. The spectral assignments of Ogawa and Chang (1970) for the autoionizing Rydberg states are confirmed.

  19. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies on binding of a flavonoid antioxidant quercetin to serum albumins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Beena Mishra; Atanu Barik; K Indira Priyadarsini; Hari Mohan

    2005-11-01

    Binding of quercetin to human serum albumin (HSA) was studied and the binding constant measured by following the red-shifted absorption spectrum of quercetin in the presence of HSA and the quenching of the intrinsic protein fluorescence in the presence of different concentrations of quercetin. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of HSA showed decrease in the average lifetimes indicating binding at a location, near the tryptophan moiety, and the possibility of fluorescence energy transfer between excited tryptophan and quercetin. Critical transfer distance () was determined, from which the mean distance between tryptophan-214 in HSA and quercetin was calculated. The above studies were also carried out with bovine serum albumin (BSA).

  20. Fluorescence microscopic spectral study of fluorescein and some amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Otero de Joshi, Virginia; Rodrigues, Nestor; Hernandes, Luis

    1995-04-01

    A conventional collinear laser induced fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis was modified by replacing a GaAs photomultiplier by a Charge coupled Device which was operated at liquid nitrogen temperature. This permits longer exposure time to collect the weak radiation and hence extends the limit of detection and spectral analysis of lower concentration of biological active molecules. Using the above technique, and passing the solution through a capillary of 20 micrometers inside diameter, we have recorded fluorescence spectra of biological important molecules such as Arginine, Glutamate and Glutamine; all of them were derivatized with Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC) isomer I. Spectra of FITC as a function of the pH were examined to lower the detection limit. The concentration of the molecules was as low as 10-14 M. All the spectra recorded lied in the expected region (510 nm to 550 nm) and showed considerable similarity. The spectrum of low concentration of molecules provides significant information as the intensity of intra-molecular interaction is reduced. The recorded spectra gave information about the distribution of vibrational states near S0 and S1 levels.

  1. Magneto transport- and anisotropy studies on (001)- and (311)A-(Ga,Mn)As; Magnetotransport- und Anisotropieuntersuchungen an (001)- und (311)A-(Ga,Mn)As

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeppe, M.

    2007-10-19

    In recent years the in low temperatures ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As has gotten more and more into the focus of scientific interests. In the present work especially the magnetic anisotropies are concentrated upon. The first trials of epitactical growth of thin (Ga,Mn)As layers were successful on (001) GaAs substrate (typical thickness 20. 200 nm). In 2003 the Giant Planar Hall effect (GPHE) was discovered by resistance measurements in Hall geometry (transverse resistance) with an applied in plane magnetic field. The spin orbit coupling is accountable for both GPHE and the long known anisotropic magneto resistance (AMR). The gradient of the Hall voltage is important for the description of the resetting of magnetization because the resistance depends on the angle between the magnetization and the current path. This work presents results of anisotropy study on samples with a structure size in micro- and nanometer dimensions. The only a few hundred nanometer wide (Ga,Mn)As stripes were made by means of electron beam lithography and show strong additional uniaxiale magnetic anisotropy. The aspect ratio of the structure also influenced the resetting of magnetization. With the aid of compounding individual (Ga,Mn)As stripes (in a so-called zigzag structure) the evidence of a positive domain wall resistance in this material system could be shown. The second part of this work presents studies of (Ga,Mn)As layers grown on (311)A GaAs substrate. Here the B-field dependent Hall resistance measurements showed anomalous magnetic anisotropy in variance to (001)-(Ga,Mn)As. The orientation of the magnetic easy axes of (311)A (Ga,Mn)As depends - in contrast to (001)-(Ga,Mn)As - on the thickness of the magnetic layer and is tilted outside the (311)A surface. By an in plane applied magnetic field the AHE was also observable by the resetting of magnetization based on a non evanescent z-component perpendicular to the surface of this. An exact determination of the switching

  2. Effect of anisotropy on small magnetic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred; Sil, Shreekantha; Entel, Peter; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.104438

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dipolar interaction and local uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetic response of small spin clusters where spins are located on the vertices of icosahedron, cuboctahedron, tetrahedron and square geometry have been investigated. We consider the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy and dipolar interaction and apply numerical exact diagonalization technique in order to study the influence of frustration and anisotropy on the ground state properties of the spin-clusters. The ground state magnetization, spin-spin correlation and several thermodynamic quantities such as entropy and specific heat are calculated as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  3. Bodipy-FL-Verapamil: A Fluorescent Probe for the Study of Multidrug Resistance Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosati

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the substances used as fluorescent probes to study drug transport and the effect of efflux blockers in multidrug resistant cells have many drawbacks, such as toxicity, unspecific background, accumulation in mitochondria. New fluorescent compounds, among which Bodipy‐FL‐verapamil (BV, have been therefore proposed as more useful tools. The uptake of BV has been evaluated by cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy using cell lines that overexpress P‐glycoprotein (P388/ADR and LLC‐PK1/ADR or MRP (multidrug resistance‐related protein (PANC‐1 and clinical specimens from patients. The effect of specific inhibitors for P‐glycoprotein (verapamil and vinblastine or MRP (MK571 and probenecid has been also studied. BV intracellular concentrations were significantly lower in the two P‐glycoprotein overexpressing cell lines in comparison with the parental lines. In addition, verapamil and vinblastine increased the intracellular concentrations of the dye; MK571 and probenecid, two MRP inhibitors, increased BV levels in PANC‐1 cells, that express this protein. These findings were confirmed in clinical specimens from patients. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a faint fluorescence emission in P‐glycoprotein or MRP expressing cell lines; however, treatment with specific inhibitors significantly increased the fluorescence. BV is a useful tool for studying multidrug resistance proteins with different techniques such as cytofluorimetry and fluorescence microscopy, but does not discriminate between P‐glycoprotein and MRP. In comparison with other classic fluorescent probes, the assay with this dye is extremely rapid, simple, not toxic for cells, devoid of fluorescent background, and can be useful in the clinical settings.

  4. The study of laser induced fluorescence of tooth hard tissues with aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrakhova, D. S.; Kuznetsova, J. O.; Loschenov, V. B.

    2016-08-01

    This work is about the possibility of fluorescence diagnosis application with the use of aluminum phthalocyanine nanoparticles (nAlPc) in order to detect enamel microdamage. For the investigation, five human teeth samples of various age groups were removed for various reasons. The autofluorescence spectrums of these samples hard tissues and fluorescence spectrums of nAlPc mixed with enamel powder were obtained during the experiment. The research shows that sample pathogenic microflora causes nAlPc fluorescence. This fact will allow detecting enamel microdamage in future studies.

  5. Optical absorption and fluorescence studies on imidazolium ionic liquids comprising the bis(trifluoromethanesulphonyl)imide anion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aniruddha Paul; Anunay Samanta

    2006-07-01

    Optical absorption and fluorescence behaviour of two rigorously purified imidazolium ionic liquids, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide are studied in the neat condition and in solution. Non-negligible absorption in the UV region with a long tail extending into the visible region is the main feature of the absorption. Excitation wavelength-dependent two-component fluorescence characterizes the emission behaviour of these liquids. That ion association gives rise to the long absorption tail and shifting fluorescence maximum, which appears to be common to most of the imidazolium ionic liquids, is evident from the effect of the conventional solvents.

  6. Interaction of potassium mono and di phosphates with bovine serum albumin studied by fluorescence quenching method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkialakshmi, S; Shanthi, B; Chandrakala, D

    2011-03-01

    The interactions between potassium mono and di phosphates and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied using fluorescence spectroscopy (FS) and ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV). The experimental results showed that the potassium mono and di phosphates could insert into the BSA and quench the inner fluorescence of BSA by forming the potassium mono phosphate-BSA and pottassium di phosphate-BSA complexes. It was found that the static quenching was the main reason leading to the fluorescence quenching. It was conformed by XRD and SEM techniques.

  7. Experimental study of multi-photon contamination on the measurement of fluorescent decay time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the measurement of fluorescent lifetime based on time correlation-single photon counting technique by means of TAC, due to the contamination of multi-photons a deviation of fluorescent lifetime measured from the expected value is experimentally studied. A correction function instead of a simple exponential function is used to fit the experiment data. The validation of the correction function is checked using the experimental data of several test samples: YAP, NaI(T1) and LSO. The results show that the correction function well fits the data and the reasonable fluorescent lifetimes are obtained.

  8. The interaction of new piroxicam analogues with lipid bilayers--a calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniewska, Jadwiga; Szczęśniak-Sięga, Berenika; Poła, Andrzej; Sroda-Pomianek, Kamila; Malinka, Wiesław; Michalak, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper was to assess the ability of new piroxicam analogues to interact with the lipid bilayers. The results of calorimetric and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments of two new synthesized analogues of piroxicam, named PR17 and PR18 on the phase behavior of phospholipid bilayers and fluorescence quenching of fluorescent probes (Laurdan and Prodan), which molecular location within membranes is known with certainty, are shown in present work. The presented results revealed that, depending on the details of chemical structure, the studied compounds penetrated the lipid bilayers.

  9. Photophysical behavior and fluorescence quenching by halides of quinidine dication: Steady state and time resolved study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Neeraj Kumar; Tewari, Neeraj; Arora, Priyanka; Rautela, Ranjana; Pant, Sanjay [Photophysics Laboratory, Department of Physics, DSB Campus, Kumaun University, Nainital 263002, Uttarakhand (India); Joshi, Hem Chandra, E-mail: hem_sup@yahoo.co.uk [Institute for Plasma Research, Laser Diagnostics Division, Bhat, Near Indira Bridge, Gandhinagar 382428, Gujarat (India)

    2015-02-15

    The fluorescence quenching of quinidine in acidified aqueous solution by various halides (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −} and I{sup −}) was studied using steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. The quenching process was characterized by Stern–Volmer (S–V) plots. Possibility of conformers (one is not quenched by halide and the other is quenched) is invoked to explain the observed results. - Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching of quinidine in acidified aqueous solution by halides. • Various quenching parameters have been estimated. • Possibility of conformers is invoked to explain the observed results.

  10. Spectral and Fluorescent Studies of the Interaction of an Anionic Oxacarbocyanine Dye with Bovine Serum Albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronkin, P. G.; Tatikolov, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the formation of noncovalent intermolecular complexes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the spectral and fluorescent properties of the anionic oxacarbocyanine dye 3,3'-di-(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-diphenyl-9-ethyloxacarbocyanine betaine (OCC) was studied. Binding of OCC to BSA increased significantly the dye fluorescence. Changes in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of OCC upon interaction with BSA argued in favor of a shift of the dye cis-trans equilibrium in the complex. The effects of adding albumin-denaturing compounds (urea, sodium dodecyl sulfate) on the spectral and fluorescent properties of the dye in the OCC-BSA complex were studied. It was concluded that OCC can act as a probe for albumins and can be used to study protein denaturing.

  11. Synthesis and Characteristic Study on Complexes of Europium(Ⅲ) and Maleic Acid Doped with Non-Fluorescent Ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Complex of europium (Ⅲ) with maleic acid, and binuclear complexes of europium(Ⅲ)with maleic acid doped with non-fluorescent ions gadolinium, lanthanum and yttrium, were synthesized. The compositions and structures of complexes were characterized with elemental analysis, single crystal X-ray diffraction, IR and DSC-TG. Fluorescent properties were studied with fluorescence spectrum. The results indicated that the strongest fluorescent complexes were obtained when the ratio of europium and non-fluorescent ion was 8: 2. The order of Eu3+ fluorescence strengthened by three doped rare earths was Gd3+>La3+>Y3+.

  12. Studies on the Fluorescence Properties of Chloromethyl Polystyrene Supported Fluorophore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN; HongXia

    2001-01-01

    The basic materials used in making photoluminescence materials are all synthesized polymers at present, such as PVC, etc [1]. Red and green LEDs are easy to be prepared, but the blue LED is difficult to be done. In this paper, we used chloromethyl polystyrene as supporter, leading into the known fluorophore by polymer chemical reaction, so as to obtaining blue luminous material.  The PS-CH2Cl supported fluorophore are prepared by PS-CH2Cl and benzidine (B), dimethylbenzidine (MA), 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl ether (DAPE), 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DAPS), respectively. They were characterized by IR and elemental analysis. The stead state fluorescence properties of these supported polymers were investigated.The results were summarized in table 1.  ……

  13. Studies on the Fluorescence Properties of Chloromethyl Polystyrene Supported Fluorophore

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN HongXia; LEI ZiQiang; WANG SongBai; YANG ZhiWang; WANG YunPu

    2001-01-01

    @@ The basic materials used in making photoluminescence materials are all synthesized polymers at present, such as PVC, etc [1]. Red and green LEDs are easy to be prepared, but the blue LED is difficult to be done. In this paper, we used chloromethyl polystyrene as supporter, leading into the known fluorophore by polymer chemical reaction, so as to obtaining blue luminous material. The PS-CH2Cl supported fluorophore are prepared by PS-CH2Cl and benzidine (B), dimethylbenzidine (MA), 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl ether (DAPE), 4,4'-diamino-diphenyl sulfone (DAPS), respectively. They were characterized by IR and elemental analysis. The stead state fluorescence properties of these supported polymers were investigated.The results were summarized in table 1.

  14. DBD dyes as fluorescence lifetime probes to study conformational changes in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzinek, Robert; Ziomkowska, Joanna; Heuveling, Johanna; Mertens, Monique; Herrmann, Andreas; Schneider, Erwin; Wessig, Pablo

    2013-12-16

    Previously, [1,3]dioxolo[4,5-f][1,3]benzodioxole (DBD)-based fluorophores used as highly sensitive fluorescence lifetime probes reporting on their microenvironmental polarity have been described. Now, a new generation of DBD dyes has been developed. Although they are still sensitive to polarity, in contrast to the former DBD dyes, they have extraordinary spectroscopic properties even in aqueous surroundings. They are characterized by long fluorescence lifetimes (10-20 ns), large Stokes shifts (≈100 nm), high photostabilities, and high quantum yields (>0.56). Here, the spectroscopic properties and synthesis of functionalized derivatives for labeling biological targets are described. Furthermore, thio-reactive maleimido derivatives of both DBD generations show strong intramolecular fluorescence quenching. This mechanism has been investigated and is found to undergo a photoelectron transfer (PET) process. After reaction with a thiol group, this fluorescence quenching is prevented, indicating successful bonding. Being sensitive to their environmental polarity, these compounds have been used as powerful fluorescence lifetime probes for the investigation of conformational changes in the maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter through fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. The differing tendencies of the fluorescence lifetime change for both DBD dye generations promote their combination as a powerful toolkit for studying microenvironments in proteins.

  15. [Studies on toxicity of four kinds of heavy metals in water by synchronous-scan fluorescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jing-Bo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Zhang, Yu-Jun; Zhao, Nan-Jing; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Yin, Gao-Fang; Fang, Li; Liu, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Spectrofluorometry of chlorella pyrenoidosa was studied by three dimensional excitation-emission (3DEEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy with Delta gamma = 20 nm in the stress of Hg+, Cd2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+. The conclusion from two kinds of Spectrofluorometry was the same: after 96h stress by heavy metals, the maximum fluorescence values reduced obviously, chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b in the photosynthetic system were seriously damaged by heavy metal. Further analysis of the correlations between heavy metal concentration and fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I can conclude that the toxicity of heavy metal and the fluorescence quenching efficiency I0/I were positively correlated, and they all increased with the heavy metal concentration and stress time. For one kind of heavy metals, synchronous scan fluorometry is a sensitive method for its toxicity assessment. Compared to 3DEEM fluorescence spectroscopy, synchronous scan fluorescence spectroscopy is less time consuming and of higher selectivity. It is suitable to assess the toxicity of pollutions in water.

  16. The aggregation behavior of native collagen in dilute solution studied by intrinsic fluorescence and external probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun; Liu, Wentao; Li, Guoying

    2013-02-01

    The aggregation behavior of type I collagen in acid solutions with the concentrations covering a range of 0.06-1.50 mg/mL was studied utilizing both of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the phenylalanine and tyrosine residues and the external probing of 1,8-anilinonaphthalene sulfonate (ANS). FRET at 0.30 mg/mL showed the distance among collagen monomers was within 10 nm without the obvious aggregates formed. The predominance of tyrosine fluorescence in FRET in the range of 0.45-0.75 mg/mL identified the existence of collagen aggregates companied with the formation of hydrophobic microdomains revealed by the change of the fluorescence of ANS. The blue-shift of tyrosine fluorescence from 303 to 293 nm for 0.90-1.50 mg/mL dedicated the formation of high order aggregates. The results from the two-phase diagrams of the intrinsic fluorescence for the guanidine hydrochloride-induced unfolding of collagen confirmed these conclusions. By the two-dimensional correlation analysis for the intrinsic fluorescence of collagen solutions of 0.45, 0.75 and 1.05 mg/mL, the probable characteristic fluorescence peaks for the interactions of proline-aromatic (CH ˜ π) among the collagen molecules were found at 298 and 316 nm.

  17. Effects of magnesium ions on ribosomes: a fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonincontro, A; Briganti, G; Giansanti, A; Pedone, F; Risuleo, G

    1993-07-18

    Fluorescence intensity measurements of ethidium bromide (EB) bound to ribosomal RNA (rRNA) in suspensions of 30S and 50S subunits, of 70S ribosomal particles and of protein-free extracted rRNA are presented. Changes in the intercalation of EB reflect changes in conformation and degree of exposure of rRNA. The effect of removal of magnesium ions on the binding of EB is compared in protein-free rRNA and in ribosomal particles by a Scatchard plot analysis. In free ribosomal RNA the number of bound EBs do not depend on magnesium content, only the association constant is affected. In intact 70S particles and both in the separated 50S and 30S subunits the presence of magnesium greatly reduces binding of EB and no saturation of the fluorescence intensity with rRNA concentration is observed, preventing a Scatchard plot analysis. Removal of magnesium restores a strong EB intercalation. Then magnesium ions induce a conformational change in the 70S particles as well as in the separated subunits. The different behavior of the free-rRNA and of the ribosomal particles indicates that ribosomal proteins are relevant to the structural changes induced by magnesium ions. The comparison of the number of excluded sites and of the association constant in the 30S, 50S subunits and in the 70S particles indicates that even without Mg2+ ions the two subunits still interact, at variance with the commonly shared opinion that subunits dissociation takes place at low magnesium concentration.

  18. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    1997-01-01

    We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed perturbations in a universe dominated by cold dark matter. Using a gauge invariant linear perturbation analysis, we solve the perturbation equations on super-horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds. We find that perturbations induced by seeds -- under very mild restrictions -- are nearly isocurvature. Thus, compensation, which is mainly the consequence of physically sensible initial conditions, is very generic. We then restrict our study to the case of scaling sources, motivated by global scalar fields. We parameterize the energy momentum tensor of the source by ``seed functions'' and calculate the Sachs-Wolfe and acoustic contributions to the CMB anisotropies. We discuss the dependence of the anisotropy spectrum on the parameters of the model considered. Even within the restricted class of models investigated in this work, we find a surprising variety of results for the position and height of the first ac...

  19. Magnetic anisotropy of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy due to grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni has been studied by simulating experimental magnetization data with the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory. In the model the grain boundary magnetic anisotropy energy is expressed as the sum of the uniaxial anisotropy and the cubic anisotropy, characterized by Kua and Kca anisotropy constants. By comparing the calculated magnetization with the experimental magnetization measurements at finite temperatures, the values of Kua and Kca can be determined. For nanocrystalline Ni it is found that with increasing temperature Kua decreases and Kca increases. At low temperatures Kua dominates the grain boundary anisotropy energy, whereas Kca is very small and it can be neglected. At room temperature Kua and Kca are of the same order with the corresponding ratio Kua /Kca ≈ 1.9 , both coefficients are much larger than the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant.

  20. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in Ultrathin Co/Ni Multilayer Films Studies with Ferromagnetic Resonance and Magnetic X-Ray Microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-28

    Element specific hysteresis measurements for n¼6 obtained at the Fe L3 edge with an out-of-plane applied field, showing a hard axis magnetic response...of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in these systems, XMCD spectroscopy and element-specific hysteresis loops were measured at beam line U4B at...Fig. 2(b) and (c) were measured by tuning the photon energy to the L3 edges of Co, Ni, and Fe and sweeping the out-of-plane magnetic field from an

  1. An automated field spectrometer system for studying VIS, NIR and SWIR anisotropy for semi-arid savanna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huber, Silvia; Tagesson, Håkan Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    off-nadir observation angles but for observations of large off-nadir angles highest values were found in the morning or evening hours (both forward and backward scatter direction). Anisotropy factors corresponding to MODIS, SPOT and SEVIRI red, near-infrared (NIR) and shortwave-infrared (SWIR) sensor...... collected with the DAFIS system for monitoring of plant spectro-directional behavior in semi-arid African savanna for quantitative evaluation of satellite or airborne remote sensing data or development of new Earth Observation (EO) based indices and algorithms to monitor vegetation status or stress....

  2. Coexistence of Probe Conformations in Lipid Phases—A Polarized Fluorescence Microspectroscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Urbančič, Iztok; Ljubetič, Ajasja; Arsov, Zoran; Štrancar, Janez

    2013-01-01

    Several well-established fluorescence methods depend on environment-sensitive probes that report about molecular properties of their local environment. For reliable interpretation of experiments, careful characterization of probes’ behavior is required. In this study, bleaching-corrected polarized fluorescence microspectroscopy with nanometer spectral peak position resolution was applied to characterize conformations of two alkyl chain-labeled 7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl phospholipids in...

  3. Anisotropy of superconducting single crystal SmFeAsO_(0.8)F_(0.2) studied by torque magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Weyeneth, S.; Puzniak, R.; Mosele, U.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Katrych, S.; Bukowski, Z.; J. Karpinski; Kohout, S; Roos, J; Keller, H

    2008-01-01

    Single crystals of the oxypnictide superconductor SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 with T c≃45(1) K were investigated by torque magnetometry. The crystals of mass ≤0.1 μg were grown by a high-pressure cubic anvil technique. The use of a high-sensitive piezoresistive torque sensor made it possible to study the anisotropic magnetic properties of these tiny crystals. The anisotropy parameter γ was found to be field independent, but varies strongly with temperature ranging from γ≃8 at T≲T c to γ≃23 at T≃0.4T c....

  4. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200 GeV

    OpenAIRE

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Bataineh, H.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R. (R.); Aronson, S H; Asai, J.; Atomssa, E. T.; Averbeck, R.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200 GeV and 62.4 GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4 GeV. The dec...

  5. Advanced fluorescence microscopy methods for the real-time study of transcription and chromatin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annibale, Paolo; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-03-12

    In this contribution we provide an overview of the recent advances allowed by the use of fluorescence microscopy methods in the study of transcriptional processes and their interplay with the chromatin architecture in living cells. Although the use of fluorophores to label nucleic acids dates back at least to about half a century ago, (1) two recent breakthroughs have effectively opened the way to use fluorescence routinely for specific and quantitative probing of chromatin organization and transcriptional activity in living cells: namely, the possibility of labeling first the chromatin loci and then the mRNA synthesized from a gene using fluorescent proteins. In this contribution we focus on methods that can probe rapid dynamic processes by analyzing fast fluorescence fluctuations.

  6. Fluorescence endoscopic imaging for evaluation of gastric mucosal blood flow: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquillon, Nicolas; Mordon, Serge R.; Mathieu, D.; Maunoury, Vincent; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Neviere, Remi; Wattel, Francis; Chopin, Claude

    1999-02-01

    Microcirculatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract appear to be a major compound of the multiple organ dysfunction syndrome secondary to sepsis or septic shock. A better analysis of mucosal hypoperfusion in critically ill patients with sepsis may be helpful for the comprehension of this high mortality-associated syndrome. Fluorescence endoscopy has been recognized as a non-invasive method for both spatial and temporal evaluation of gastrointestinal mucosal perfusion. We performed this imaging technique during routine gastric endoscopy in patients with sepsis criteria. The study included gastric observation and appearance time of gastric fluorescence after an intravenous 10% sodium - fluorescein bolus. Qualitative analysis of high fluorescence areas was compared with mucosal blood flow measurements by laser - Doppler flowmetry. We concluded that the fluorescence endoscopic imaging in critically ill patients with sepsis may reveal spacial and temporal differences in the mucosal microcirculation distribution.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence study of electron transfer in a model peptide system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald, Fiona; Hungerford, Graham; Moore, Barry D.; Birch, David J. S.

    1994-08-01

    At present there is a great deal of interest in the study of the transference of energy in biological systems. For example, electron transfer is of major importance in many synthetic and biological processes and in nature is mediated by proteins. Information regarding this process is therefore useful in leading to a greater understanding of phenomena such as photosynthesis and respiration. Previous work on protein systems has shown the electron transfer process to be complex to analyze because of the presence of competing pathways. This has led to the use of model systems to simplify the kinetics. We have synthesized novel model systems using peptides containing both a fluorescent methoxy- naphthalene donor and a dicyanoethylene group as a potential electron acceptor and observed fluorescence quenching for both dipeptide and oligopeptide systems. Biexponential fluorescence decay behavior was observed for all donor acceptor systems, with an increase in the amount of the shorter fluorescence decay component on increasing temperature.

  8. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP

  9. Practical use of corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of fluorescent proteins in Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Visser, N.V.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2003-01-01

    Corrected fluorescence excitation and emission spectra have been obtained from several enhanced variants of the green fluorescent protein (EGFP) isolated from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria, blue fluorescence protein (EBFP), cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), EGFP and yellow fluorescent protein

  10. Surface structure effect on the magnetic anisotropy of Co/Pd (001) thin film: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Minyeong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Heechae [Computational Science Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 14-Gil 5, Hwarang-Ro, Seoungbuk-Gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Yubin; Yun, Kyung-Han [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong-Chae, E-mail: yongchae@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222 Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-31

    Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) in thin film is the key factor to obtain good properties for high density storage devices. Although the importance of the properties of PMA is well-known for Co/Pd thin film, it is still unclear which surface structure and composition indicate that PMA is present. In this work, the surface structure and magnetic properties of L1{sub 0}-ordered Co/Pd (001) were analyzed using density functional theory calculations. It was confirmed that only Pd-rich A among the facile surface structures indicates PMA properties. However, according to the calculated surface energy, not only Pd-rich A but also Co-rich B is among the most energetically stable structures. The density of states showed a clear distinct electronic structure between Pd-rich A and Co-rich B derived from the structural difference. This result indicates that PMA is not always present in a sandwich structure such as Pd-rich A. The results provide a useful guide to magnetic devices created using L1{sub 0}-ordered Co/Pd (001) on substrate Pd. - Highlights: • Investigation on the possible surface structure of L1{sub 0}-ordered Co/Pd (001) • Using surface phase diagram, the stable structures were Pd-rich A and Co-rich B. • The magnetic property of Pd-rich A and Co-rich B has been measured and discussed. • Pd-rich A only showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  11. Upper crust seismic anisotropy study and temporal variations of shear-wave splitting parameters in the western Gulf of Corinth (Greece) during 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviris, George; Spingos, Ioannis; Kapetanidis, Vasileios; Papadimitriou, Panayotis; Voulgaris, Nicholas; Makropoulos, Kostas

    2017-08-01

    During 2013, the Western Gulf of Corinth (WGoC, Central Greece) experienced a period of increased seismicity, with a total of over 4700 earthquakes. This fact in combination with the existence of dense seismological networks provided an excellent opportunity for the study of crustal seismic anisotropy. Of special note is the seismic crisis period of May-October, during which the main feature was the occurrence of the Helike seismic swarm. Polarigrams and hodograms were employed to analyze local waveforms. This method resulted in 659 measurements of shear-wave splitting parameters, namely the direction of the fast shear-wave (Sfast), the time-delay (Td) between the two split shear-waves and the source polarization direction. A pattern of a general WNW-ESE anisotropy direction, parallel to the GoC's fault systems' strike, is established, with the exception of two stations located in adjacent areas at the north. This is in agreement with the existence of fluid-filled microcracks, oriented according to the regional stress field. The obtained splitting parameters are compared to the results of other anisotropy studies performed in the WGoC. A detailed analysis of the temporal evolution of the normalized time-delay (Tn) was performed to associate temporal stress changes to seismicity fluctuations. Increase in normalized time-delays and drop before the occurrence of the first significant event belonging to the ;July Cluster;, which occurred between the 13th and the 16th of the same month, was observed for most of the analyzed stations.

  12. Tectonic insight based on anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and compaction studies in the Sierras Australes thrust and fold belt (southwest Gondwana boundary, Argentina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzadún, Guadalupe; Tomezzoli, Renata N.; Cesaretti, Nora N.

    2016-04-01

    The Sierras Australes fold and thrust belt (Buenos Aires Province, Argentina) was in the southwestern Gondwanaland margin during the Paleozoic. The Tunas Formation (Permian) is exposed along the eastern part of it and continues eastward beneath the Claromecó Basin. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) and compaction studies are described and compared with previous paleomagnetic studies with the aim of determining direction and magnitude of the main stresses acting during the sedimentation of the Tunas Formation. The anisotropy ellipsoids are triaxial with oblate or prolate shapes, reflecting different stages of layer parallel shortening during the evolution of the basin. Kmax axes trend NW-SE, parallel to the fold axes, while Kmin move from a horizontal (base) to a vertical orientation at the top of the succession, showing a change from a tectonic to almost a sedimentary fabric. The magnitude of anisotropy and compaction degree decreases toward the top of the succession. The AMS results are consistent with the outcrop structural observations and the compaction and paleomagnetic data. Regional pattern indicates a compression from the SW along this part of Gondwana, with a migration of the orogenic front and attenuation toward the NE in the foreland basin during the Upper Paleozoic. This deformation, locally assigned to the San Rafael noncollisional orogenic phase, is the result of the latitudinal movements toward the Equator of Gondwana (southern plates) and Laurentia (northern plates) during the Permian. This movement is the result of a rearrangement of the microplates that collided with Gondwana during the Late Devonian, to configure Pangea during the Triassic.

  13. Encapsulation of 3-hydroxyflavone in γ-cyclodextrin nanocavities: Excited state proton transfer fluorescence and molecular docking studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, Biswapathik; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    2011-12-01

    Steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy have been used to explore the confinement of 3-hydroxyflavone (3HF), (a bioactive flavonol) in γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CDx) nanocavities in aqueous medium. With increasing concentrations of γ-CDx, dramatic enhancements occur in the intensity and anisotropy of the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) tautomer fluorescence of 3HF. These observations indicate that 3HF readily enters the relatively hydrophobic cavity of γ-CDx, where the chromone ring is well shielded from external H-bonding perturbation effects, thus facilitates the ESIPT process. Additionally, appearance of induced circular dichroism (ICD) bands is noted in the absorption region of 3HF, which further confirms the inclusion process. Docking calculations suggest that hydrogen bonding interactions are involved in the formation of the inclusion complex.

  14. Measurement of the thermopower anisotropy in iron arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, T., E-mail: fujii@crc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Shirachi, T. [Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Asamitsu, A. [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ashikaga Institute of Technology, 268-1 Omae, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In this study, in order to investigate the origin of the in-plane anisotropy, the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower was measured for the detwined single crystals of BFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. And, we found no anisotropy in the thermopower above T{sub AFO}, although there is a large anisotropy in the resistivity. This result gives evidence that the anisotropy in the resistivity arise from the anisotropy of the scattering time, and the energy dependence of the scattering time can be considered negligible. In the case of iron pnictides, the proposed orbital ordering more likely results in an anisotropy of electronic structure below T{sub AFO}, whereas the spin-nematic ordering leads to an anisotropy of electron scattering above T{sub AFO}. Therefore, our results suggest that nematicity above T{sub AFO} results from anisotropic magnetic scattering. - Abstract: We investigated the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower and electrical resistivity on detwinned single crystals of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity was clearly observed far above the magnetostructural transition temperature T{sub AFO}. While, the thermopower showed the in-plane anisotropy only below T{sub AFO}. These results are associated with the different origin of the anisotropy above and below T{sub AFO}. Since the thermopower does not depend on the scattering time, the anisotropy of the resistivity above T{sub AFO} is considered to be due to the anisotropic scattering. On the other hand, the anisotropy in the thermopower below T{sub AFO} is ascribed to the reconstructed Fermi surface.

  15. Studies of the ADP/ATP carrier of mitochondria with fluorescent ADP analogue formycin diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graue, C; Klingenberg, M

    1979-06-05

    The ADP/ATP carrier was studied by a fluorescent substrate, formycin diphosphate which is the only fluorescent ADP analogue to bind. Its low quantum yield, short decay time and spectral overlap with tryptophan has as yet prevented its wider use. By incorporating fluorescent acceptors of formycin diphosphate fluorescence, anthracene-maleimide and vinylanthracene, into the membrane, these difficulties were circumvented. Only bound formycin diphosphate transfers energy to the probes so that the secondary emission of these probes is a measure for membrane-bound formycin diphosphate. The fluorescent transfer is inhibited by ADP, bongkrekate and carboxyatractylate whether added before or after incubation of formycin diphosphate showing that only binding to the adenine nucleotide carrier is measured. It also shows directly that the earlier demonstrated ADP fixation by bongkrekate is indeed a displacement into the matrix. The fluorescence decay time of the bound formycin diphosphate is measured as 1.95 ns compared to 0.95 ns of the free formycin diphosphate, indicating that formycin diphosphate is bound at the carrier in a non-polar environment. The depolarization decay time was found to be larger than 15 ns, indicating that carrier-bound formycin diphosphate is immobile within this time period.

  16. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation as a tool to study interactions of regulatory proteins in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Werkman, Joshua R; Yuan, Ling

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are an important aspect of the gene regulation process. The expression of a gene in response to certain stimuli, within a specific cell type or at a particular developmental stage, involves a complex network of interactions between different regulatory proteins and the cis-regulatory elements present in the promoter of the gene. A number of methods have been developed to study protein-protein interactions in vitro and in vivo in plant cells, one of which is bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC). BiFC is a relatively simple technique based upon the reconstitution of a fluorescent protein. The interacting protein complex can be visualized directly in a living plant cell when two non-fluorescent fragments, of an otherwise fluorescent protein, are fused to proteins found within that complex. Interaction of tagged proteins brings the two non-fluorescent fragments into close proximity and reconstitutes the fluorescent protein. In addition, the subcellular location of an interacting protein complex in the cell can be simultaneously determined. Using this approach, we have successfully demonstrated a protein-protein interaction between a R2R3 MYB and a basic helix-loop-helix MYC transcription factor related to flavonoid biosynthetic pathway in tobacco protoplasts.

  17. A fluorescence study on the interaction of telmisartan in triblock polymers pluronic P123 and F127

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Maneesha Esther; Rao, Vaidya Jayathirtha; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Telmisartan is a poorly soluble drug used in treatment of hypertension. There is a recent interest to use pluronic for improving the solubility and bioavailability of these drugs. In this study the interaction of telmisartan with P123 and F127 has been carried out using steady state and time dependent fluorescence study. Quenching of telmisartan fluorescence by potassium iodide is controlled by interactions arising from collisions and complex formation. A comparison of the fluorescence of telmisartan in pluronics with the well understood fluorescence of 8-anilino-1-naphthalene-sulfonic acid, a known fluorescent molecular probe, indicates that telmisartan is generally present in a relatively polar microenvironment with restricted diffusive motion.

  18. Tuning the magnetocrystalline anisotropy in R CoPO by means of R substitution: A ferromagnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prando, G.; Alfonsov, A.; Pal, A.; Awana, V. P. S.; Büchner, B.; Kataev, V.

    2016-07-01

    We report on broad-band electron-spin resonance measurements performed within the itinerant ferromagnetic phase of R CoPO (R = La, Pr, Nd, and Sm). We reveal that the R substitution is highly effective in gradually introducing a sizable easy-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy within the Co sublattice. We explain our results in terms of a subtle interplay of structural effects and of indirect interactions between the f and d orbitals from R and Co, respectively. Our observations provide interesting information on the crucial role of R ions in affecting the electronic properties of the CoP layers, of possible interest also for the isostructural FeAs-based family of high-Tc superconductors.

  19. The study of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the magnetic sensors with linear sensitivity using polarized neutron reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, T.

    2016-04-01

    The CoFeB sandwiched by Ta and MgO layers enables a perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) and provides a pathway for such application. In this paper, we reported the origin of PMA in CoFeB using the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and polarized neutron reflectometry (PNR). From PNR experiments, we obtained the details of the magnetic and structural depth profiles inside the film. It is found that the PMA properties of CoFeB layers deposited above and under MgO layer are different and PNR measurements confirmed that a large PMA in the CoFeB above MgO layer is related to its low magnetization. Based on this PMA mechanism, we obtain a high sensitivity of AHE in the perpendicular CoFeB, which opens a new avenue to detect ultralow magnetic field.

  20. Magnetism and magnetocrystalline anisotropy of 3dtransition metal monolayers on Pt(001): a density-functional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taivansaikhan, P; Odkhuu, D; Kwon, O R; Tsogbadrakh, N; Hong, S C

    2014-12-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of having Pt as a substrate and/or capping layer on the magnetism and magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) of 3d transition metal (TMs; Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co) monolayers (MLs) by using a first-principles calculationl method. We found that Fe and Co MLs are ferromagnetic (FM) on a Pt(001) surface, but Mn and Cr MLs are antiferromagnetic (AFM). The magnetic moments are quite robust with additional Pt-capping. Furthermore, Pt-capping enhances the small perpendicular MCA (meV) of Fe/Pt(001) significantly to 4.44 meV. Our electronic structure analyses indicate that strong hybridization between Pt-5d and TM-3d orbitals plays a crucial role in determining magnetic ordering and MCA. For comparison we also calculated magnetism and MCA of 3d TM MLs on Ta(001) with and without Ta-capping.

  1. Diverse anisotropy of phonon transport in two-dimensional IV-VI compounds: A first-principles study

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Guangzhao; Fang, Wu-Zhang; Zhang, Li-Chuan; Yue, Sheng-Ying; Yan, Qing-Bo; Hu, Ming; Su, Gang

    2016-01-01

    New class two-dimensional (2D) materials beyond graphene, including layered and non-layered, and their heterostructures, are currently attracting increasing interest due to their promising applications in nanoelectronics, optoelectronics and clean energy, where thermal transport property is one of the fundamental physical parameters. In this paper, we systematically investigated the phonon transport properties of 2D orthorhombic IV-VI compounds of $GeS$, $GeSe$, $SnS$ and $SnSe$ by solving the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) based on first-principles calculations. Despite the similar puckered (hinge-like) structure along the armchair direction as phosphorene, the four monolayer compounds possess diverse anisotropic properties in many aspects, such as group velocity, Young's modulus and lattice thermal conductivity ($\\kappa$), etc. Especially, the $\\kappa$ along the zigzag and armchair directions of monolayer $GeS$ shows the strongest anisotropy while monolayer $SnS$ and $SnSe$ shows an almost isotropy in p...

  2. Multi-resolution anisotropy studies of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andrada, B; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Balaceanu, A; Luz, R J Barreira; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Biteau, J; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Botti, A M; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Briechle, F L; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, L; Cancio, A; Canfora, F; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Chavez, A G; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; D'Amico, S; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Debatin, J; Deligny, O; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Dundovic, A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; Fuster, A; Gaior, R; García, B; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gaté, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Golup, G; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Hasankiadeh, Q; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hulsman, J; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kemp, J; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Lauscher, M; Legumina, R; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Luce, Q; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Mockler, D; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Müller, A L; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Mussa, R; Naranjo, I; Nellen, L; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, H; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pedreira, F; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Peña-Rodriguez, J; Pereira, L A S; Perlín, M; Perrone, L; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Ramos-Pollan, R; Rautenberg, J; Ravignani, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Fernandez, G Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rogozin, D; Roncoroni, M J; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Ruehl, P; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento, C A; Sato, R; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schimp, M; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Silli, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stasielak, J; Stassi, P; Strafella, F; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Sudholz, T; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taboada, A; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Elipe, G Torralba; Torri, M; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Quispe, I D Vergara; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Yang, L; Yelos, D; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zong, Z; Zuccarello, F

    2016-01-01

    We report a multi-resolution search for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory with local zenith angles up to $80^\\circ$ and energies in excess of 4 EeV ($4 \\times 10^{18}$ eV). This search is conducted by measuring the angular power spectrum and performing a needlet wavelet analysis in two independent energy ranges. No deviation from isotropy is observed on any angular scale in the energy range between 4 and 8 EeV. Above 8 EeV, an indication for a dipole moment is captured; while no other deviation from isotropy is observed for moments beyond the dipole one. While these results are consistent with previous reports making use of the same data set, they provide extensions of the previous works through the thorough scans of the angular scales.

  3. Studies on spatial modes and the correlation anisotropy of entangled photons generated from 2D quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, X. W.; Xu, P.; Sun, C. W.; Jin, H.; Hou, R. J.; Leng, H. Y.; Zhu, S. N.

    2017-06-01

    Concurrent spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) processes have proved to be an appealing approach for engineering the path-entangled photonic state with designable and tunable spatial modes. In this work, we propose a general scheme to construct high-dimensional path entanglement and demonstrate the basic properties of concurrent SPDC processes from domain-engineered quadratic nonlinear photonic crystals, including the spatial modes and the photon flux, as well as the anisotropy of spatial correlation under noncollinear quasi-phase-matching geometry. The overall understanding about the performance of concurrent SPDC processes will give valuable references to the construction of compact path entanglement and the development of new types of photonic quantum technologies.

  4. Microscopic origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Nd-Co homogeneous and compositionally modulated, thin films studied by XMCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, R; Diaz, J; Alvarez-Prado, L M; Alameda, J M [Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, C/ Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Valvidares, S M; Cezar, J C; Brookes, N B, E-mail: cidrosalia.uo@uniovi.e [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, 38043 (France)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous Nd-Co films deposited by DC-magnetron sputtering presented perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) with energies, K{sub N}, of the order of 10{sup 6} erg/cc at RT. To understand the origin of their PMA, we measured the orbital and spin magnetic moments in Co and Nd by XMCD at the Co L{sub 3,2} and Nd M{sub 5,4} edges in two kinds of samples of similar thickness (30 nm) and composition: one compositionally modulated Nd/Co film (CM) with strong PMA (K{sub N} {approx}10{sup 7} erg/cc at 10 K) and a homogenous alloy (A) with not strong enough PMA to see stripe domains for such thickness. The XMCD analysis evidenced the significant role of Nd in the PMA of these films.

  5. Large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of single Co atom on MgO monolayer: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Bin; Shi, Wu-Jun [Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Feng, Min [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zuo, Xu, E-mail: xzuo@nankai.edu.cn [College of Electronic Information and Optical Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Realizing the magnetic bit with a single atom is the ultimate goal for magnetic storage. Based on density functional theory, the magnetic anisotropy (MA) of single Co atom on MgO monolayer has been investigated. Results show that this two dimensional system possesses a large perpendicular MA, about 5.8 meV per Co atom. Besides, there exists remarkable unquenched orbital moments for different magnetization directions, which can be attributed to the reduction of coordination number in two dimensional system and is responsible for the enhanced MA. The Bloch pseudo-wavefunction and band structure of Co d-orbitals have been calculated to elucidate the origin of the perpendicular MA.

  6. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, G.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C) and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C) having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young's and shear moduli, and Poisson's ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young's moduli and Poisson's ratio) of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  7. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe3C and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ghosh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe3C and its alloyed counterparts (M3C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr2FeC and CrFe2C having the crystal structure of Fe3C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT, all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA. Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i single-crystal elastic constants, Cij, of above M3Cs; (ii anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated Cijs, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii isotropic (polycrystalline elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio of M3Cs by homogenization of calculated Cijs; and (iv acoustic Debye temperature, θD, of M3Cs based on calculated Cijs. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  8. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian–Maastrichtian sediments of Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, Tamil Nadu, India: An appraisal to Paleocurrent directions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G Papanna; M Venkateshwarlu; V Periasamy; R Nagendra

    2014-03-01

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and paleocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu sandstone formations and secondary fabric for Kallankurichchi limestone formation. The obtained low degree of anisotropy (), oblate shape AMS ellipsoid and distribution of maximum (1) and minimum (3) susceptibility axes on equal area projection confirm the primary sedimentary fabric for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations. In the case of ferruginous, lower arenaceous, Gryphaea limestone and upper arenaceous limestone beds of Kallankurichchi Formation have recorded more than one fabric. The observed AMS parameters like shape factor () (prolate to oblate), value and random distribution of minimum (3) and maximum (1) susceptibility axes are supported for secondary fabrics in Kallankurichchi Formation as a result of post-depositional processes. Based on petrographic studies, it can be established that 1 AMS axis of biotite mineral could represent the flow direction. The established paleocurrent direction for Sillakkudi is NW–SE direction while Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations recorded NE–SW direction. Overall the paleoflow directions observed for Ariyalur Group is NE–SW to NW–SE.

  9. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) studies of Campanian-Maastrichtian sediments of Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, Tamil Nadu, India: An appraisal to Paleocurrent directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanna, G.; Venkateshwarlu, M.; Periasamy, V.; Nagendra, R.

    2014-03-01

    Oriented samples of sediments from Ariyalur Group, Cauvery Basin, south India, were studied for low field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) measurements to unravel the magnetic fabrics and paleocurrent directions. The results of AMS parameters of the sediments indicate primary depositional fabrics for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu sandstone formations and secondary fabric for Kallankurichchi limestone formation. The obtained low degree of anisotropy ( P j ), oblate shape AMS ellipsoid and distribution of maximum ( K 1) and minimum ( K 3) susceptibility axes on equal area projection confirm the primary sedimentary fabric for Sillakkudi, Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations. In the case of ferruginous, lower arenaceous, Gryphaea limestone and upper arenaceous limestone beds of Kallankurichchi Formation have recorded more than one fabric. The observed AMS parameters like shape factor ( T) (prolate to oblate), q value and random distribution of minimum ( K 3) and maximum ( K 1) susceptibility axes are supported for secondary fabrics in Kallankurichchi Formation as a result of post-depositional processes. Based on petrographic studies, it can be established that K 1 AMS axis of biotite mineral could represent the flow direction. The established paleocurrent direction for Sillakkudi is NW-SE direction while Ottakovil and Kallamedu Formations recorded NE-SW direction. Overall the paleoflow directions observed for Ariyalur Group is NE-SW to NW-SE.

  10. Intraoperative Near-infrared Imaging for Parathyroid Gland Identification by Auto-fluorescence: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leeuw, Frederic; Breuskin, Ingrid; Abbaci, Muriel; Casiraghi, Odile; Mirghani, Haïtham; Ben Lakhdar, Aïcha; Laplace-Builhé, Corinne; Hartl, Dana

    2016-09-01

    Parathyroid glands (PGs) can be particularly hard to distinguish from surrounding tissue and thus can be damaged or removed during thyroidectomy. Postoperative hypoparathyroidism is the most common complication after thyroidectomy. Very recently, it has been found that the parathyroid tissue shows near-infrared (NIR) auto-fluorescence which could be used for intraoperative detection, without any use of contrast agents. The work described here presents a histological validation ex vivo of the NIR imaging procedure and evaluates intraoperative PG detection by NIR auto-fluorescence using for the first time to our knowledge a commercially available clinical NIR imaging device. Ex vivo study on resected operative specimens combined with a prospective in vivo study of consecutive patients who underwent total or partial thyroid, or parathyroid surgery at a comprehensive cancer center. During surgery, any tissue suspected to be a potential PG by the surgeon was imaged with the Fluobeam 800 (®) system. NIR imaging was compared to conventional histology (ex vivo) and/or visual identification by the surgeon (in vivo). We have validated NIR auto-fluorescence with an ex vivo study including 28 specimens. Sensitivity and specificity were 94.1 and 80 %, respectively. Intraoperative NIR imaging was performed in 35 patients and 81 parathyroids were identified. In 80/81 cases, the fluorescence signal was subjectively obvious on real-time visualization. We determined that PG fluorescence is 2.93 ± 1.59 times greater than thyroid fluorescence in vivo. Real-time NIR imaging based on parathyroid auto-fluorescence is fast, safe, and non-invasive and shows very encouraging results, for intraoperative parathyroid identification.

  11. An integrated paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy study of the Oligocene flysch from the Dukla nappe, Outer Western Carpathians, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Dániel; Márton, Emő; Tokarski, Antek K.

    2016-12-01

    The Dukla Nappe belongs to the Outer Western Carpathians, which suffered considerable shortening due to the convergence and collision of the European and African plates. In this paper we present new paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy results from the Polish part of the Dukla Nappe, based on 102 individually oriented cores from nine geographically distributed localities. Susceptibility measurements and mineralogy investigations showed that paramagnetic minerals are important contributors to susceptibility anisotropy (AMS). The AMS fabrics are related to deposition/compression (foliation) and weak tectonic deformation (lineation). The AARM fabric, that of the ferrimagnetic minerals, seems to be a less sensitive indicator of tectonic deformation than the AMS fabric. The inclination-only test points to the pre-folding age of the remanent magnetizations. Seven localities exhibit CCW rotation, a single one shows CW rotation. The CCW rotated paleomagnetic directions form two groups, one showing large, the other moderate CCW rotation. Previously published paleomagentic directions from the Slovak part of the same nappe exhibit smeared distribution between them. The declination of the overall-mean paleomagnetic direction for the Dukla nappe is similar to those observed in the neighbouring Magura and Silesian nappes, but it is of poorer quality. The AMS lineations at several localities are deviating more to the west from the present north than that of the local tectonic strikes. A possible explanation for this is that the AMS lineations were imprinted first, probably still in the Oligocene, while the sediments were soft (ductile deformation) and the folding and tilting took place during the CCW rotation.

  12. An integrated paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy study of the Oligocene flysch from the Dukla nappe, Outer Western Carpathians, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiss Dániel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Dukla Nappe belongs to the Outer Western Carpathians, which suffered considerable shortening due to the convergence and collision of the European and African plates. In this paper we present new paleomagnetic and magnetic anisotropy results from the Polish part of the Dukla Nappe, based on 102 individually oriented cores from nine geographically distributed localities. Susceptibility measurements and mineralogy investigations showed that paramagnetic minerals are important contributors to susceptibility anisotropy (AMS. The AMS fabrics are related to deposition/compression (foliation and weak tectonic deformation (lineation. The AARM fabric, that of the ferrimagnetic minerals, seems to be a less sensitive indicator of tectonic deformation than the AMS fabric. The inclination-only test points to the pre-folding age of the remanent magnetizations. Seven localities exhibit CCW rotation, a single one shows CW rotation. The CCW rotated paleomagnetic directions form two groups, one showing large, the other moderate CCW rotation. Previously published paleomagentic directions from the Slovak part of the same nappe exhibit smeared distribution between them. The declination of the overall-mean paleomagnetic direction for the Dukla nappe is similar to those observed in the neighbouring Magura and Silesian nappes, but it is of poorer quality. The AMS lineations at several localities are deviating more to the west from the present north than that of the local tectonic strikes. A possible explanation for this is that the AMS lineations were imprinted first, probably still in the Oligocene, while the sediments were soft (ductile deformation and the folding and tilting took place during the CCW rotation.

  13. Investigation of span-chordwise bending anisotropy of honeybee forewings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianGuo Ning

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the spanwise and chordwise bending stiffness EI of honeybee forewings were measured by a cantilevered bending test. The test results indicate that the spanwise EI of the forewing is two orders of magnitude larger than the chordwise EI. Three structural aspects result in this span-chordwise bending anisotropy: the distribution of resilin patches, the corrugation along the span and the leading edge vein of the venation. It was found that flexion lines formed by resilin patches revealed through fluorescence microscopy promoted the chordwise bending of the forewing during flapping flight. Furthermore, the corrugation of the wing and leading edge veins of the venation, revealed by micro-computed tomography, determines the relatively greater spanwise EI of the forewing. The span-chordwise anisotropy exerts positive structural and aerodynamic influences on the wing. In summary, this study potentially assists researchers in understanding the bending characteristics of insect wings and might be an important reference for the design and manufacture of bio-inspired wings for flapping micro aerial vehicles.

  14. Finite electric field effects in the large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy surface Pt/Fe/Pt(001): a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujikawa, Masahito; Oda, Tatsuki

    2009-06-19

    We investigate crystalline magnetic anisotropy in the electric field (EF) for the FePt surface which has a large perpendicular anisotropy, by means of the first-principles approach. Anisotropy is reduced linearly with respect to the inward EF, associated with the induced spin density around the Fe layer. Although the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) density reveals large variation around the atoms, the intrinsic contribution to the MAE is found to mainly come from the Fe layer. The surface without the capping Pt layer also shows similar linear dependence.

  15. Role of fluorescence study in diagnosis of reccurent skin cancer (case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The case of diagnosis of recurrent skin cancer using fluorescence methods is reported. The patient who underwent multiple courses of treatment (surgical resection, cryotherapy and laser ablation for multifocal basal cell carcinoma of head. trunk and extremities. The patient represented with multiple whitish scars in the region of surgery, cryotherapy and laser ablation (one of them was in the region of external ear and with multiple foci of hyperemia and skin peeling. The patient underwent fluorescence diagnosis according to developed regimen: alasens was given per os at a dose of 30 mg/kg body weight 4 h before study. In the white light there were no features of recurrent tumor in scar areas. During fluorescence examination there was bright red fluorescence in the area of ear scar, which was intact visually, with no additional fluorescence foci in regions of surgical resection, cryotherapy and laser ablation and other regions. According to cytological study of shave biopsy from fluorescecnse area of ear scar the recurrence of basal cell skin carcinoma was diagnosed. 

  16. The Use of the Fluorescence to the Study of the Water Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Estebanez

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a work proposal now in course that is based on the study of the fluorescence in cyanobacteria and toxicity, and the possibility of detecting their presence in freshwater environment, with a direct application in water assessment. The proposal is a consequence of a previous study about the fluorescence generated by hydrocarbon residue on the sea surface. In the first part of this work we present a review of results obtained from the analysis of hydrocarbon samples from the "prestige" oil spill accident and other referential hydrocarbons. In the second part we show the capability of this technique for the development of probes to explore the water quality.

  17. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Brozas, F.; Crego, A.; Roso, L.; Peralta Conde, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose, we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However, electrons are stopped in the first layers, allowing a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  18. Structural and dynamical aspects of skin studied by multiphoton excitation fluorescence microscopy-based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Bagatolli, Luis

    2013-01-01

    This mini-review reports on applications of particular multiphoton excitation microscopy-based methodologies employed in our laboratory to study skin. These approaches allow in-depth optical sectioning of the tissue, providing spatially resolved information on specific fluorescence probes......' parameters. Specifically, by applying these methods, spatially resolved maps of water dipolar relaxation (generalized polarization function using the 6-lauroyl-2-(N,N-dimethylamino)naphthale probe), activity of protons (fluorescence lifetime imaging using a proton sensitive fluorescence probe--2,7-bis-(2...... excised skin, including applications of fluctuation correlation spectroscopy on transdermal penetration of liposomes are presented and discussed. The data from the different studies reported reveal the intrinsic heterogeneity of skin and also prove these strategies to be powerful noninvasive tools...

  19. Fluorescent spectral studies of the toxic effect of chlororganic pesticides on the biochemical parameters of synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Bekshokov, K. S.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Abdullaeva, N. M.; Israpov, E. Kh.; Gashimov, I. Sh.

    2017-04-01

    The results of the study of the fluorescence spectra of suspensions of synaptosomes, which have been exposed to a chlororganic pesticide, thiamethoxam, at a concentration of 50 MPC during different time periods, at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 290 ± 5/310-600, 340 ± 5/360-700, and 420 ± 5/450-800 nm are given for the first time. It has been demonstrated that the development of intoxication results in weakening of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, NAD(P)·H, derivatives of vitamin B6, and vitamin A and in an increase in the fluorescence of pyridoxic acid, lipofuscin, and flavin and porphyrin complexes. The results of the spectral studies indicate that the toxic effect of the chlororganic pesticide for the functioning of living systems is based on free radical toxicity.

  20. Study on the Interaction between Cephalosporin Drugs and Papain by Spectroscopic Method: Equivalence of Fluorescence Quenching and Enhancement Equation%Study on the Interaction between Cephalosporin Drugs and Papain by Spectroscopic Method: Equivalence of Fluorescence Quenching and Enhancement Equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨曼曼; 席小莉; 杨频

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between two 4th generation of new cephalosporin drugs and papain was studied through spectroscopy method at different temperatures. Their dissociation constants were calculated by using theoretical formula of fluorescence quenching and fluorescence enhancement, respectively, and their corresponding thermodynamic functions, dipole-dipole non-radiative energy-transfer-efficiency and the action distances of acceptor-substrate etc. were calculated further. Analysis reveals that, the quenching on papain by cefpirome and cefepime is basically due to the dipole-dipole non-radiation energy-transfer and certain dynamic collision between donor and acceptor, the interaction between drug and papain is mainly hydrophobic which may provide useful information for pharmacological and metabolic study on papain. In this paper fluorescence quenching is regarded as negative fluorescence enhancement, and two kinds of theoretical formula of fluorescence quenching and fluorescence enhancement were used to calculate the experimental data of fluorescence quenching of a same batch, and very close results were obtained but with certain difference. The results not only display the equivalence of the two theoretical equations when treating acceptor-substrate action, but also show that the thermodynamic data based on the theoretical formula of fluorescence enhancement (4), which is deduced by us, are more reasonable. So we suggest that even in the process of studying the fluorescence quenching between receptor-substrate, using the theoretical formula of fluorescence enhancement (4) can get more reliable results.

  1. Femtosecond three-photon excitation and single-photon timing detection of α-NPO fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, A.; Hatrick, D. A.; Bai, Y.; Birch, D. J. S.

    1997-04-01

    We demonstrate the application of three-photon excitation to fluorescence probe studies using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC). By exciting with 120 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses at 800 nm we have observed fluorescence emission from the scintillator 2-(1-napthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (α-NPO) in solutions and small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). In SUVs the time-resolved excimer emission and fluorescence anisotropy are consistent with a heterogeneous distribution of α-NPO molecules between isolated sites and ground state clusters in a similar manner to that which we reported previously for 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO).

  2. Study on fluorescence properties of carbogenic nanoparticles and their application for the determination of ferrous succinate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Wen [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Du Yingxiang, E-mail: du_yingxiang@126.co [Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicines, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang Yunqing [Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai 264003 (China)

    2010-08-15

    A new type of fluorescent nanomaterial named carbogenic nanoparticles (NPs) has drawn considerable attention recently. In this study, we adopted a direct and simple synthetic method to produce the carbogenic NPs and investigated the fluorescence properties of the as-prepared carbogenic NPs in detail. It was found that the fluorescence of carbogenic NPs was stable with the variance of environmental conditions such as pH, temperature and UV irradiation. More interestingly, we found carbogenic NPs exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards ferric ions. Under optimum conditions, a good linear relationship could be obtained between the fluorescence intensity and concentration of ferric ions in the range of 5.0x10{sup -5}-5.0x10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}, and the limit of detection is 11.2 {mu}mol L{sup -1}. Based on the fluorescence quenching of carbogenic NPs, a rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed for the determination of ferrous succinate. The content of ferrous succinate in commercial tablets determined by the present method was agreed with the spectrophotometric method results and the reproducibility and the recovery of the proposed method were satisfactory.

  3. Bioluminophore and Flavin Mononucleotide Fluorescence Quenching of Bacterial Bioluminescence-A Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yanling; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-11-02

    Bacterial bioluminescence with continuous glow has been applied to the fields of environmental toxin monitoring, drug screening, and in vivo imaging. Nonetheless, the chemical form of the bacterial bioluminophore is still a bone of contention. Flavin mononucleotide (FMN), one of the light-emitting products, and 4a-hydroxy-5-hydro flavin mononucleotide (HFOH), an intermediate of the chemical reactions, have both been assumed candidates for the light emitter because they have similar molecular structures and fluorescence wavelengths. The latter is preferred in experiments and was assigned in our previous density functional study. HFOH displays weak fluorescence in solutions, but exhibits strong bioluminescence in the bacterial luciferase. FMN shows the opposite behavior; its fluorescence is quenched when it is bound to the luciferase. This is the first example of flavin fluorescence quenching observed in bioluminescent systems and is merely an observation, both the quenching mechanism and quencher are still unclear. Based on theoretical analysis of high-level quantum mechanics (QM), combined QM and molecular mechanics (QM/MM), and molecular dynamics (MD), this paper confirms that HFOH in its first singlet excited state is the bioluminophore of bacterial bioluminescence. More importantly, the computational results indicate that Tyr110 in the luciferase quenches the FMN fluorescence via an electron-transfer mechanism.

  4. Studies on influence of light on fluorescence of Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangaraju, K.; Amaladass, P.; Bharathi, K. Shanmuga; Mohanakrishnan, A. K.; Narayanan, V.; Kumar, J.

    2009-03-01

    Tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminum (Alq 3) thin films, the most widely used electron transport/emissive material in the organic electroluminescent (EL) devices, have been deposited on glass substrates by thermal evaporation process. Alq 3 thin films were exposed to light for various time periods under normal ambient. The fluorescence of as-prepared and light exposed Alq 3 thin films and formation of luminescent quencher have been studied using fluorescence, Mass, MALDI-ToF-MS, 1H & 13C NMR, and FT-IR spectroscopy. It is observed that among the three 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ) units in Alq 3 molecule, one HQ unit is affected during the light exposure in the normal ambient. It is found that the affected resultant Alq 3 molecule containing the carbonyl group acts as fluorescent quencher and the energy of excitons in the Alq 3 molecule in the light exposed Alq 3 thin films can be non-radiatively transferred to the neighboring fluorescent quencher, quenching the fluorescence of light exposed Alq 3 thin films in the normal ambient.

  5. Fiber optic fluorescence detection of low-level porphyrin concentrations in preclinical and clinical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mang, Thomas S.; McGinnis, Carolyn; Khan, S.

    1990-07-01

    A significant clinical problem in the local treatment of cutaneous metastases of breast cancer (by any modality--surgery, radiation therapy or photodynainic therapy) is the fact that the disease almost always extends beyond the boundary of visible lesions in the form of microscopic deposits. These deposits may be distant from the site of visible disease but are often in close proximity to it and are manifested sooner or later by the development of recurrent lesions at the border of the treated area, thus the "marginal miss" in radiation therapy, the "rim recurrence" in photodynamic therapy, and the "incisional recurrence" following surgical excision. More intelligent use of these treatment modalities demands the ability to detect microscopic deposits of tumor cells using non-invasive methodology. In vivo fluorescence measurements have been made possible by the development of an extremely sensitive fiber optic in vivo fluorescence photometer. The instrument has been used to verify that fluorescence correlated with injected porphyrin levels in various tissues. The delivery of light to excite and detect background fluorescence as well as photosensitizer fluorescence in tissues has been accomplished using two HeNe lasers emitting at 632.8 nm and 612 nm delivered through a single quartz fiber optic. Chopping at different frequencies, contributions of fluorescence may be separated. Fluorescence is picked up via a 400 micron quartz fiber optic positioned appropriately near the target tissue. Validation of these levels was made by extraction of the drug from the tissues with resultant quantitation. Recently, an extensive study was undertaken to determine if fluorescence could be used for the detection of occult, clinically non-palpable metastases in the lymph node of rats. This unique model allowed for the detection of micrometastases in lymph nodes using very low injected doses of the photosensitizer Photofrin II. Data obtained revealed the ability to detect on the order

  6. Competing magnetic anisotropies in obliquely deposited thin permalloy film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, B.A. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, 31, pr. Imeni Gazety “Krasnoyarskii Rabochii”, Krasnoyarsk 660014 (Russian Federation); Izotov, A.V. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Solovev, P.N., E-mail: platon.solovev@gmail.com [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Distribution of the magnetic anisotropy in thin film prepared by thermal vacuum oblique deposition of permalloy with small off-normal angle of incident in the presence of an external magnetic field has been studied by ferromagnetic resonance technique. On local area of the sample, a mutual compensation of near orthogonal in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropies induced by oblique deposition and by applied magnetic field has been found. Moreover, in addition to the uniaxial (twofold) magnetic anisotropy, fourfold and sixfold magnetic anisotropies have been observed in the sample. To explain the obtained high-order anisotropies, we assumed that the sample has exchange coupled adjacent regions or phases with different parameters of magnetic anisotropy. The results of the micromagnetic analysis of a two-layer model of the sample confirm the hypothesis.

  7. Leucocyte specific antinuclear antibodies. Preparation and fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampert, I A; Evans, D J; Chesterton, C J

    1975-09-11

    Tissue and species specific anti-nuclear sera detectable by immunofluorescence were produced by immunising rabbits with D.N.A.-non-histone protein extract from human leucocytes. This is a potentially valuable method for the morphological study of differentiation.

  8. Employing soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering to study domain sizes and anisotropy in Co/Pd multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagschik, Kai; Frömter, Robert; Bach, Judith; Beyersdorff, Björn; Müller, Leonard; Schleitzer, Stefan; Berntsen, Magnus Hârdensson; Weier, Christian; Adam, Roman; Viefhaus, Jens; Schneider, Claus Michael; Grübel, Gerhard; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-10-01

    It is demonstrated that the magnetic diffraction pattern of the isotropic disordered maze pattern is well described utilizing a gamma distribution of domain sizes in a one-dimensional model. From the analysis, the mean domain size and the shape parameter of the distribution are obtained. The model reveals an average domain size that is significantly different from the value that is determined from the peak position of the structure factor in reciprocal space. As a proof of principle, a wedge-shaped (Cot Å/Pd10 Å)8 multilayer film, that covers the thickness range of the spin-reorientation transition, has been used. By means of soft x-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) and imaging techniques the thickness-driven evolution of the magnetic properties of the cobalt layers is explored. It is shown that minute changes of the domain pattern concerning domain size and geometry can be investigated and analyzed due to the high sensitivity and lateral resolution of the XRMS technique. The latter allows for the determination of the magnetic anisotropies of the cobalt layers within a thickness range of a few angstroms.

  9. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and reflection anisotropy spectroscopy Kerr effect studies of capped magnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunniffe, J. P.; McNally, D.E.; Liberati, M.; Arenholz, E.; McGuinness, C.; McGilp, J. F.

    2010-03-02

    Aligned Co wires grown on Pt(997) under ultra-high vacuum conditions have been capped successfully by the epitaxial growth of Au monolayers (ML) at room temperature. The samples were kept under vacuum except when transferring between apparatus or when making some of the measurements. No degradation of the Co wires was detected during the measurements. The magneto-optic response of the system was measured using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the Co L{sub 2,3} edge and reflection anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS) at near normal incidence, which is sensitive to the normal component of the out-of-plane magnetization via the Kerr effect (MOKE). Capping the wires significantly impacts their magnetic properties. Comparison of the magneto-optic response of the system at X-ray and optical energies reveals small differences that are attributed to the induced moment in the Pt substrate and Au capping layer not picked up by the element specific XMCD measurements. The sensitivity of RAS-MOKE is sufficient to allow the determination of the easy axis direction of the capped wires to within a few degrees. The results for a 6-atom-wide Co wire sample, capped with 6 ML of Au, are consistent with the capped wires possessing perpendicular magnetization.

  10. Study on the violet LED-induced fluorescence spectra of thioredoxin reductase from human brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Lan(兰秀风); Tao Yang(杨涛); Shumei Gao(高淑梅); Xiaosen Luo(骆晓森); Zhonghua Shen(沈中华); Jian Lu(陆建); Xiaowu Ni(倪晓武); Lin Xu(许琳)

    2003-01-01

    The technique of fluorescence spectroscopy is applied to study thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) in the ce;lsof human brain. Experimental results show that, by the violet light emitting diode (LED, λmax=407 nm)light irradiation, TrxR is able to emit three striking spectral bands (528 - 582 nm; 588 - 660 nm; 683 - 700nm). The fluorescence intensity is linear to the concentration of TrxR. The spectrum of denatured TrxR israther different from that of organized TrxR, which reflects the structure change between denatured TrxRand organized TrxR. Furthermore, physical and biochemical mechanisms of fluorescence production forLED light-induced TrxR spectra and its characteristics are analyzed. This paper may be useful to betterunderstand the structure of TrxR, and to provide new spectroscopic information to improve the resolutionfor this kind of biology structure.

  11. Microwave Diagnostics for Studies of Electromagnetic Scattering by Fluorescent Lamp Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang HE; Jian-ping CHEN; Ying WU; Yu-dong CHEN; Xiao-jun ZENC; Hai-chao QIN; Xiao-wu NI

    2010-01-01

    This gaper reports a related microwave diagnostic method that measures both the electron number density and the electron-neutral collision frequency,which are crucial to understand the behavior of microwave traveling in plasma.Arrays of standard commerci fluorescent lamp placed directly against each other in two rows are used to peoduce a plasma layer.Attenuations of microwave by plasma layer are studied experimentally in the frequencies of 1~8 GHz using a synthesized signal generator and a spectrum analyzer.Two wave-polarizations are under investigation:electric field of the wave is either parallel(E-wave)or perprndicular(H-wave)to the fluorescent lamp axis.The electron number density and the electron-neutral collision frequensy of fluorescent lamp plasma are obtained by microwave diagnstics,for the purpose of analyzing microwave scattering characteristics by plasma.

  12. Voltammetry and fluorescence studies on the interaction between Eu (phen)33+ and DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The binding mode of Eu(phen) 33+ with DNA is studied by fluorescence and voltammetric methods. From theScatchard graph and the fluorescence quenching phenomenon, it is concluded that the mode of interaction betweenEu(phen) 33+ and DNA is intercalation bind by inserting the phen π-π conjugate surface between the base pairs of theDNA duplex. Voltammetry was used to confirm the results obtained from the fluorescence method, the result from bothmethods agrees with each other. The binding constant (K) and the binding site size (ns) were calculated from voltammetricdata such as the shifts in potential and limiting currents in the process of adding DNA, according to the positive shifts ofpeak potential. It was considered that the complex of the +2 ion interacted more favorably with the nucleotide bases thanthat of the +3 ion by hydrophobic interaction.

  13. Laser-induced absorption and fluorescence studies of photochromic Schiff bases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kownacki, K.; Mordzinski, A.; Wilbrandt, R.

    1994-01-01

    Three photochromic Schiff bases: N-salicylideneaniline (SA), N-salicylidene-1-naphthylamine (SN), and N,N-bis-(salicylidene)-p-phenylenediamine (Bsp), were studied in acetonitrile by means of steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as semiempirical quantum...... chemical calculations. In all these molecules, the transient absorption and two-step laser-induced fluorescence spectra of long-lived transients are remarkably similar. The photochromic species is tentatively assigned to the non-hydrogen bonded form of the proton transfer reaction product...

  14. A comparative study on fluorescent cholesterol analogs as versatile cellular reporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Betul Can, Fatma; Schneider, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol is a crucial component of cellular membranes, but knowledge of its intracellular dynamics is scarce. Thus, it is of utmost interest to develop tools for visualization of cholesterol organization and dynamics in cells and tissues. For this purpose, many studies make use of fluorescently......-labeled cholesterol analogs. Unfortunately, the introduction of the label may influence the characteristics of the analog, such as its localization, interaction and trafficking in cells, hence it is important to get knowledge of such bias. In this report, we compared different fluorescent lipid analogs...

  15. Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation in vitro and in situ: Absorption and fluorescence studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvezdanovic, Jelena [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: jelite74@yahoo.com; Cvetic, Tijana [Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Takovska 43, Belgrade 11000 (Serbia); Veljovic-Jovanovic, Sonja [Center for Multidisciplinary Studies, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava la, Belgrade 11030 (Serbia); Markovic, Dejan [Faculty of Technology, University of Nish, Bulevar oslobodjenja 124, 16000 Leskovac (Serbia)], E-mail: dejan_markovic57@yahoo.com

    2009-01-15

    Chlorophyll bleaching by UV-irradiation has been studied by absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy in extracts containing mixtures of photosynthetic pigments, in acetone and n-hexane solutions, and in aqueous thylakoid suspensions. Chlorophyll undergoes destruction (bleaching) accompanied by fluorescent transient formation obeying first-order kinetics. The bleaching is governed by UV-photon energy input, as well as by different chlorophyll molecular organizations in solvents of different polarities (in vitro), and in thylakoids (in situ). UV-C-induced bleaching of chlorophylls in thylakoids is probably caused by different mechanisms compared to UV-A- and UV-B-induced bleaching.

  16. A comparative study on fluorescent cholesterol analogs as versatile cellular reporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Betul Can, Fatma; Schneider, Falk

    2016-01-01

    cholesterol analogs. Unfortunately, the introduction of the label may influence the characteristics of the analog, such as its localization, interaction and trafficking in cells, hence it is important to get knowledge of such bias. In this report, we compared different fluorescent lipid analogs......Cholesterol is a crucial component of cellular membranes, but knowledge of its intracellular dynamics is scarce. Thus, it is of utmost interest to develop tools for visualization of cholesterol organization and dynamics in cells and tissues. For this purpose, many studies make use of fluorescently-labeled...

  17. Mantle wedge dynamics from seismic anisotropy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.; Wirth, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle wedge above subducting slabs plays a critical role in many of the physical processes associated with subduction, including water transport into the upper mantle and the generation and transport of melts. Our understanding of mantle wedge dynamics is incomplete; in particular, the mantle flow field above subducting slabs remains poorly understood. Because seismic anisotropy is a consequence of deformation, observations of anisotropy (such as shear wave splitting and P-to-SH converted waves) can constrain the geometry of the wedge flow field. Additionally, because the presence of water (either in nominally anhydrous minerals or as hydrous phases) can have a large effect on anisotropic structure, a detailed understanding of mantle wedge anisotropy can help to constrain processes related to water cycling in subduction systems. We present a global, synoptic view of anisotropy observations in subduction zone mantle wedges, compiled from a large number of individual studies, with the goal of understanding the first-order controls on wedge anisotropy and flow patterns. This compilation allows us to explicitly test the predictions made by many different conceptual models for wedge anisotropy, as well as to explore the relationships between observed anisotropy parameters and other parameters that describe subduction. We find that no simple model can explain all of the trends observed in the global data set. Mantle wedge flow is likely controlled by a combination of downdip motion of the slab, trench migration, ambient mantle flow, small-scale convection, proximity to slab edges, and slab morphology, with the relative contributions of these in any given subduction system controlled by the subduction kinematics and mantle rheology. There is also a likely contribution from B-type olivine and/or serpentinite fabric in many subduction zones, governed by the local thermal structure and volatile distribution.

  18. Influence of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) on paleomagnetic sampling in volcanic glasses: a case study on rheomorphic ignimbrites of the Yellowstone hotspot-track, southern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, D.; Coe, R. S.; Murphy, J.; Bodiford, S.; Kelly, H.; Foster, S.; Spinardi, F.; Reichow, M. K.; Knott, T.; Branney, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale explosive volcanism, associated with the Yellowstone hotspot, occurred in the central Snake River Plain between 12.5-8 Ma. It is characterized by unusually high-temperature, intensely welded, rheomorphic rhyolitic ignimbrites, typical of what is now known as 'Snake River (SR)-type volcanism'. Individual eruption volumes likely exceed 450 km3 but are poorly known due to the difficulty of correlating units between widely spaced (50-200 km) exposures along the north and south of the plain, when some occurred too close-spaced in time for radiometric resolution. Our goal is to use a combination of paleomagnetic, petrographic, chemical and field characterization to establish robust correlations, allowing us to develop a regional stratigraphy, and constrain ignimbrite eruption volumes and frequencies. This presentation focuses on how to sample rheomorphic, SR-type ignimbrites for paleomagnetic studies given the potential effects of hot, rheomorphic deformation. Individual SR-type ignimbrite cooling-units have an upper and lower glassy margins (vitrophyre) enclosing a lithoidal (microcrystalline) zone. We have sampled dozens of ignimbrites in detail and have observed that the lithoidal interiors are preferable to the glassy margins for paleomagnetic studies. We hypothesize that the glassy margins retain an anisotropic fabric related to emplacement compaction and/or shearing that affects their ability to accurately record the magnetic field during cooling. In the lithoidal interiors this anisotropic fabric was overprinted by continued grain growth and/or alteration and, therefore, may accurately record the paleomagnetic field. Paleomagnetic samples from vitrophyres generally have a higher anisotropy in magnetic susceptibility than lithoidal samples. The remanent magnetic directions recorded in samples with high anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility are often deflected away from the site mean and closer to the plane of easy magnetic susceptibility. Since the

  19. Mean-Field Studies of a Mixed Spin-3/2 and Spin-2 and a Mixed Spin-3/2 and Spin-5/2 Ising System with Different Anisotropies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Guo-Zhu; MIAO Hai-Ling

    2009-01-01

    The magnetic properties of a mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 and a mixed spin-3/2 and spin-5/2 Ising ferromag- netic system witfi different anisotropies are studied by means of mean-field theory (MFT). The dependence of the phase diagram on single-ion anisotropy strengths is studied too. In the mixed spin-3/2 and spin-2 Ising model, besides the second-order phase transition, the first order-disorder phase transition and the tricritical line are found. In the mixed spin-3/2 and spin-5/2 Ising model, there is no first-order transition and tricritical line .

  20. Dynamics of red fluorescent dental plaque during experimental gingivitis-A cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, M.H.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Keijser, B.; ten Cate, J.M.; Crielaard, W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The dynamics of red fluorescent plaque (RFP) in comparison to clinical plaque and bleeding scores were studied during an experimental gingivitis protocol in a cohort of healthy participants. Methods: Forty-one participants were monitored for RFP before (24 h plaque), during 14 days

  1. A Validation Study of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging of Lymphatic Vessels in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groenlund, Jacob Hinnerup; Telinius, Niklas; Skov, Soeren Nielsen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging is a new imaging technique that is used to visualize lymphatic vessels in humans. It has a high spatial and temporal resolution, allowing real-time visualization of lymphatic flow. METHODS AND RESULTS: The current study investigated the intra...

  2. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramasesha; Shaon Sahoo; Rajamani Raghunathan; Diptiman Sen

    2009-09-01

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial and spin symmetry adaptation and we illustrate this technique by solving the exchange Hamiltonian of the Cu6Fe8 system. Treating the anisotropy Hamiltonian as perturbation, we compute the and values for various eigenstates of the exchange Hamiltonian. Since, the dipolar contribution to the magnetic anisotropy is negligibly small, we calculate the molecular anisotropy from the single-ion anisotropies of the metal centers. We have studied the variation of and by rotating the single-ion anisotropies in the case of Mn12Ac and Fe8 SMMs in ground and few low-lying excited states of the exchange Hamiltonian. In both the systems, we find that the molecular anisotropy changes drastically when the single-ion anisotropies are rotated. While in Mn12Ac SMM values depend strongly on the spin of the eigenstate, it is almost independent of the spin of the eigenstate in Fe8 SMM. We also find that the value is almost insensitive to the orientation of the anisotropy of the core Mn(IV) ions. The dependence of on the energy gap between the ground and the excited states in both the systems has also been studied by using different sets of exchange constants.

  3. Anisotropy decay measurement of segmental dynamics of the anion binding domain in erythrocyte band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknese, S; Rossi, M; Thevenin, B; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1995-08-22

    Time-resolved anisotropy was utilized to detect nanosecond segmental motions of the band 3 intramembrane domain. Band 3 at lysine 430 was fluorescently labeled in ghost membranes by fluorescein or eosin maleimide treatment of intact human erythrocytes followed by hypotonic lysis. Single lifetimes for fluorescein (3.8-4.1 ns) and eosin (3.2-3.4 ns) were observed. Phase-modulation measurement of anisotropy decay indicated a segmental motion model, r(t) = exp(-t/tau 1c)[r infinity + (ro-r infinity) exp(-t/tau 2c)], defined by rotational correlation times corresponding to band 3 segmental motion (tau 1c, 30-70 ns) and rapid fluorescein motion in its binding pocket (tau 2c, 200-400 ps), and a residual anisotropy (r infinity, 0.23-0.28) describing hindered fluorescein motion. In PBS at pH 7.4, tau 1c, tau 2c, and r infinity were 44 ns, 307 ps, and 0.24, respectively, predicting a steady-state anisotropy of 0.24, in agreement with the measured value of 0.23. Factors that might influence band 3 structure/dynamics were examined. Whereas pH (range 5-10) had little effect on r(t), [NaCl] addition (0-150 mM) remarkably decreased tau 1c from 68 to 44 ns. The decrease in tau 1c correlated with solution ionic strength, and did not depend on osmolality (studied by mannitol addition), or specific anion interactions (comparing Cl, Br, F, SO4, citrate). The ionic strength effect was not observed in fluorescein-labeled carbonic anhydrase and trypsin-cleaved band 3, suggesting a specific effect on intact band 3. Anisotropy decay was relatively insensitive to external lectin or internal 2,3-DPG binding, but was sensitive to temperature, membrane fluidity, urea denaturation, fluid-phase viscosity, and aldehyde fixation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Study on the interaction between diphenhydramine and erythrosin by absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG XiaoLing; LIU ZhongFang; LIU ShaoPu; HU XiaoLi

    2007-01-01

    In pH 4.5 Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer solution, erythrosin (ET) can react with diphenhydramine (DP) to form a 1:1 ion-association complex, which not only results in the change of the absorption spectra, but also results in the great enhancement of resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) and the quenching of fluorescence. Furthermore, a new RRS spectrum will appear, and the maximum RRS wavelength was located at about 580 nm.In this work, the spectral characteristics of the absorption, fluorescence and RRS, the optimum conditions of the reaction and the properties of an analytical chemistry were investigated. A sensitive, simple and new method for the determination of DP by using erythrosin as a probe has been developed. The detection limits for DP were 0.0020 μg/mL for RRS method, 0.088 μg/mL for absorption method and 0.094 μg/mL for fluorophotometry. There was a linear relationship between the absorbance, RRS and fluorescence intensities and the drug concentration in the range of 0.0067-2.0, 0.29-6.4 and 0.31-3.2 μg/mL, respectively. The effects of the interaction of diphenhydramine and erythrosin on the absorption, fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra were discussed. In light polarization experiment, the polarization of RRS at maximum wavelength was measured to be P = 0.9779, and it revealed that the RRS spectrum of DP-ET complex consists mostly of resonance scattering and few resonance fluorescence. In this study, enthalpy of formation and mean polarizability were calculated by AM1 quantum chemistry method. In addition, the reaction mechanism and the reasons for the enhancement of scattering spectra and the energy transfer between absorption, fluorescence and RRS were discussed.

  5. High-pressure study of the basal-plane anisotropy of the upper critical field of the topological superconductor SrxBi2Se3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, A. M.; Pan, Y.; Huang, Y. K.; Naka, T.; de Visser, A.

    2016-10-01

    We report a high-pressure transport study of the upper-critical field Bc 2(T ) of the topological superconductor Sr0.15Bi2Se3 (Tc=3.0 K). Bc 2(T ) was measured for magnetic fields directed along two orthogonal directions, a and a*, in the trigonal basal plane. While superconductivity is rapidly suppressed at the critical pressure pc˜3.5 GPa, the pronounced two-fold basal-plane anisotropy Bc2 a/Bc2 a*=3.2 at T =0.3 K, recently reported at ambient pressure [Pan et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 28632 (2016), 10.1038/srep28632], is reinforced and attains a value of ˜5 at the highest pressure (2.2 GPa). The data reveal that the unconventional superconducting state with broken rotational symmetry is robust under pressure.

  6. Magnetocrystalline anisotropy of pure magnetic semiconductors of MnGeP2 and MnGeAs2: A first-principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Gi-Beom; Yun, Won Seok; Hong, Soon Cheol

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we use the all-electron full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method to investigate the magnetocrystalline anisotropies of pure magnetic MnGeP2 and MnGeAs2 semiconductors. Both MnGeP2 and MnGeAs2 have been calculated to be more stable in their antiferromagnetic (AFM) states than in their ferromagnetic (FM) states, with energy differences of about 230 and 190 meV/Mn, respectively. MnGeP2 and MnGeAs2 exhibit a positive EMCA (magnetization along the z axis) of +52.3 and +122.6 μeV/Mn in their AFM magnetic ground states with a negative EMCA (magnetization on the xy plane) of -71.1 and -177.8 μeV/Mn in their FM states. The EMCA behaviors are analyzed in terms of the electronic structure.

  7. Scanning Kerr microscopy study of current-induced switching in Ta/CoFeB/MgO films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrant, C. J.; Hicken, R. J.; Hao, Qiang; Xiao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Ta/CoFeB/MgO trilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are expected to play a key role in the next generation of current and electric field switched memory and logic devices. In this study, we combine scanning Kerr microscopy with electrical transport measurements to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms of current-induced switching within such devices. We find switching to be a stochastic, domain-wall-driven process, the speed of which is strongly dependent on the switching current. Kerr imaging shows domain nucleation at one edge of the device, which modeling reveals is likely assisted by the out-of-plane component of the Oersted field. Further domain growth, leading to magnetization reversal, may still be dominated by spin torques, but the Oersted field provides an additional mechanism with which to control the switching process.

  8. A first-principles study of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts: Elastic constants, elastic anisotropies, and isotropic elastic moduli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, G., E-mail: g-ghosh@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Robert R. McCormick School of Engineering and Applied Science, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3108 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A comprehensive computational study of elastic properties of cementite (Fe{sub 3}C) and its alloyed counterparts (M{sub 3}C (M = Al, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hf, Mn, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ta, Ti, V, W, Zr, Cr{sub 2}FeC and CrFe{sub 2}C) having the crystal structure of Fe{sub 3}C is carried out employing electronic density-functional theory (DFT), all-electron PAW pseudopotentials and the generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy (GGA). Specifically, as a part of our systematic study of cohesive properties of solids and in the spirit of materials genome, following properties are calculated: (i) single-crystal elastic constants, C{sub ij}, of above M{sub 3}Cs; (ii) anisotropies of bulk, Young’s and shear moduli, and Poisson’s ratio based on calculated C{sub ij}s, demonstrating their extreme anisotropies; (iii) isotropic (polycrystalline) elastic moduli (bulk, shear, Young’s moduli and Poisson’s ratio) of M{sub 3}Cs by homogenization of calculated C{sub ij}s; and (iv) acoustic Debye temperature, θ{sub D}, of M{sub 3}Cs based on calculated C{sub ij}s. We provide a critical appraisal of available data of polycrystalline elastic properties of alloyed cementite. Calculated single crystal properties may be incorporated in anisotropic constitutive models to develop and test microstructure-processing-property-performance links in multi-phase materials where cementite is a constituent phase.

  9. Femtosecond study of light-induced fluorescence increase of the dark chromoprotein asFP595

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettrigkeit, Tanja A. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Feilitzsch, Till von [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Kompa, Christian K. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany); Lukyanov, Konstantin A. [Shemiakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Savitsky, Alexander P. [A.N. Bach Institute of Biochemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Voityuk, Alexander A. [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Institute of Computational Chemistry, Universitat de Girona (Spain); Michel-Beyerle, Maria E. [Department Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, 85747 Garching (Germany)], E-mail: michel-beyerle@ch.tum.de

    2006-04-21

    Femtosecond time-resolved spectroscopy is applied to study the mechanism of the light-induced increase of fluorescence quantum yield of the initially non-fluorescent (dark) chromoprotein asFP595. Spectroscopic and kinetic characteristics of this unique fluorescence 'kindling' phenomenon are: (i) the small Stokes shift of the dark chromophore consistent with either the zwitterion or the anion; (ii) the singlet excited state of the dark chromophore decaying predominantly with a time constant of {approx}320 fs corresponding to a fluorescence quantum yield {phi} {sub Fl} {<=} 10{sup -4}. Since ground state recovery occurs on the same time scale, this radiationless channel is assigned to internal conversion; (iii) the formation of the fluorescent species depending on the sequential absorption of two photons with a delay significantly exceeding the excitation pulse duration of 150 fs; (iv) the fluorescent species showing a red-shift of {approx}20 nm in absorption and emission, and an excited state lifetime of 2.2 ns. The ultrafast internal conversion of the excited dark state is attributed to the proximity of the S{sub 0} and S{sub 1} potential energy surfaces favored by the non-planarity of the chromophore as revealed in recent X-ray structures. Competing with internal conversion two different transformations of the chromophore structure are suggested which may be identified in a future X-ray structural analysis of the the photoconverted fluorescent state. The predominant kindling mechanism may be either (i) trans-cis isomerization or (ii) proton transfer between an excited zwitterion and the protein cleft. For mechanism (ii) the large dipole moment change of about 11 D upon S{sub 0}-S{sub 1} excitation of the chromophore would be crucial in order to initiate protein relaxation and deprotonation of a zwitterion. Both mechanisms are assumed to lead to a metastable planar structure responsible for the long-lived fluorescence of the chromophore &apos

  10. Effects of anisotropy on the two-dimensional inversion procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Wiebke; Pous, Jaume

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we show some of the effects that appear in magnetotelluric measurements over 2-D anisotropic structures, and propose a procedure to recover the anisotropy using 2-D inversion algorithms for isotropic models. First, we see how anisotropy affects the usual interpretation steps: dimensionality analysis and 2-D inversion. Two models containing general 2-D azimuthal anisotropic features were chosen to illustrate this approach: an anisotropic block and an anisotropic layer, both forming part of general 2-D models. In addition, a third model with dipping anisotropy was studied. For each model we examined the influence of various anisotropy strikes and resistivity contrasts on the dimensionality analysis and on the behaviour of the induction arrows. We found that, when the anisotropy ratio is higher than five, even if the strike is frequency-dependent it is possible to decide on a direction close to the direction of anisotropy. Then, if the data are rotated to this angle, a 2-D inversion reproduces the anisotropy reasonably well by means of macro-anisotropy. This strategy was tested on field data where anisotropy had been previously recognized.

  11. Spiculogenesis in the siliceous sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis studied with fluorescent staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, Vadim V; Danilovtseva, Elena N

    2016-04-01

    Siliceous sponges are the most primitive multicellular animals whose skeleton consists of spicules - needle-like constructions from silicon dioxide surrounding organic axial filaments. Mechanisms of spicule formation have been intensively studied due to the high ecological importance of sponges and their interest to materials science. Light and electron microscopy are not appropriate enough to display the process from silicon-enriched cells to mature spicules because of composite structure of the sponge tissues. In this article, spiculogenesis in the siliceous sponge has been studied for the first time with the use of fluorescent microscopy. Fluorescent vital dye NBD-N2 was applied to stain growing siliceous structures in the sponge and primmorph cell system. The main stages of spicule growth in the fresh-water sponge Lubomirskia baicalensis (Pallas, 1773) were visualized: silicon accumulation in sclerocytes; formation of an organic filament protruding from the cell; further elongation of the filament and growth of the spicule in a spindle-like form with enlargement in the center; merger with new sclerocytes and formation of the mature spicule. Fluorescent microscopy combined with SEM allows us to overcome the virtual differentiation between intra- and extracellular mechanisms of spicule growth. The growing spicule can capture silicic acid from the extracellular space and merge with new silicon-enriched cells. Visualization of the growing spicules with the fluorescent dye allows us to monitor sponge viability in ecological or toxicological experiments and to apply genomic, proteomic and biochemical techniques.

  12. The association of plasma fluorescent oxidation products and chronic kidney disease: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebholz, Casey M; Wu, Tianying; Hamm, L Lee; Arora, Robin; Khan, Islam E; Liu, Yanxi; Chen, Chung-Shiuan; Mills, Katherine T; Rogers, Stephanie; Kleinpeter, Myra A; Simon, Eric E; Chen, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Plasma fluorescent oxidation products (FLOP) constitute a stable and easily measured biomarker of cumulative oxidative stress. However, their association with chronic kidney disease (CKD) has not been studied. We examined the association of FLOP and CKD in 201 CKD patients and 201 controls without CKD from the community. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) products): 215.2 (181.3-268.7) vs. 156.6 (139.6-177.3) fluorescent intensity units/ml, p products): 534.8 (379.3-842.4) vs. 269.9 (232.4-410.5) fluorescent intensity units/ml, p products): 51.4 (44.4-66.0) vs. 45.2 (38.3-51.7) fluorescent intensity units/ml, p = 0.002]. Compared with those with a FLOP level below the 75th percentile, participants with a FLOP level above the 75th percentile had increased odds of CKD after adjustment for covariables (FLOP1: odds ratio 13.1, 95% confidence interval 6.2-27.6; FLOP2: odds ratio 5.7, 95% confidence interval 2.9-11.1; FLOP3: odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2-4.7). Levels of FLOP1, FLOP2 and FLOP3 were related to eGFR (p studies are warranted to elucidate its role in the development and progression of CKD. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A De Erausquin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a common, severe and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Indices commonly derived from DTI include (a mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (b fractional anisotropy (FA or relative anisotropy (RA, (c axial diffusivity, and (d radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes, and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased fractional anisotropy in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding.

  14. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  15. Binding of Cu(II) ions to peptides studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowska, Joanna; Żamojć, Krzysztof; Wyrzykowski, Dariusz; Uber, Dorota; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata; Wiczk, Wiesław; Chmurzyński, Lech

    2016-01-15

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching measurements supported by Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) were used to study the interactions of Cu(2+) with four peptides. Two of them were taken from the N-terminal part of the FBP28 protein (formin binding protein) WW domain: Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asp-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9) and its mutant Tyr-Lys-Thr-Ala-Asn-Gly-Lys-Thr-Tyr-NH2 (D9_M) as well as two mutated peptides from the B3 domain of the immunoglobulin binding protein G derived from Streptococcus: Asp-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J1) and Glu-Val-Ala-Thr-Tyr-Thr-NH2 (J2). The measurements were carried out at 298.15K in 20mM 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer solution with a pH of 6. The fluorescence of all peptides was quenched by Cu(2+) ions. The stoichiometry, conditional stability constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interactions of the Cu(2+) ions with D9 and D9_M were determined from the calorimetric data. The values of the conditional stability constants were additionally determined from fluorescence quenching measurements and compared with those obtained from calorimetric studies. There was a good correlation between data obtained from the two techniques. On the other hand, the studies revealed that J1 and J2 do not exhibit an affinity towards metal ions. The obtained results prove that fluorescence quenching experiments may be successfully used in order to determine stability constants of complexes with fluorescent ligands. Finally, based on the obtained results, the coordinating properties of the peptides towards the Cu(2+) ions are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cyanotryptophans as Novel Fluorescent Probes for Studying Protein Conformational Changes and DNA-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, Poulami; Chen, Shengxi; Roy, Basab; Yakovchuk, Petro; Spiering, Michelle M; Alam, Mohammad P; Madathil, Manikandadas M; Bhattacharya, Chandrabali; Benkovic, Stephen J; Hecht, Sidney M

    2015-12-29

    Described herein are the syntheses and photophysical characterization of three novel cyanotryptophans, and their efficient incorporation into proteins as fluorescent probes. Photophysical characteristics indicated that each was significantly brighter and red-shifted in fluorescence emission relative to tryptophan. Each analogue was used to activate a suppressor tRNA transcript and was incorporated with good efficiency into two different positions (Trp22 and Trp74) of Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase (ecDHFR). The Trp analogues could be monitored selectively in the presence of multiple native Trp residues in DHFR. 6-CNTrp (A) formed an efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) pair with l-(7-hydroxycoumarin-4-yl)ethylglycine (HCO, D) at position 17. Further, 6-CNTrp (A) was incorporated into two DNA binding proteins, including the Klenow fragment of DNA polymerase I and an RNA recognition motif (RRM2) of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L-like (hnRNP LL). Using these proteins, we demonstrated the use of FRET involving A as a fluorescence donor and benzo[g]quinazoline-2,4-(1H,3H)-dione 2'-deoxyriboside (Tf) or 4-aminobenzo[g]quinazoline-2-one 2'-deoxyriboside (Cf) as fluorescent acceptors to study the binding interaction of the Klenow fragment with duplex DNA oligomers (labeled with Tf), or the domain-specific association between hnRNP LL and the BCL2 i-motif DNA (labeled with Cf). Thus, the non-natural amino acid could be used as a FRET partner for studying protein-nucleic acid interactions. Together, these findings demonstrate the potential utility of 6-CNTrp (A) as a fluorescence donor for the study of protein conformational events.

  17. Synthesis and fluorescence studies of nine 1,5-benzodiazepine-2,4-dione derivatives: Dual emission and excimer fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qomi, Hamid Reza; Habibi, Azizollah; Shahcheragh, Seyyed Mohammad

    2017-03-01

    The photophysical properties of nine 1,5-benzodiazepine-2,4-dione (BZD) derivatives were investigated using absorption and fluorescence spectral techniques in dimethyl sulfoxide. The trend of red shifts caused by the substitutions had full compliance with the trend of decreasing the calculated band gap (ΔELUMO-HOMO) by semi-empirical AM1 and DFT/B3LYP/6-311 + G* computational methods. The positive solvatochromism of BZD a demonstrated the π-π* nature of the singlet excited state. Dual fluorescence was observed in the emission spectra of BZD f and g, while their spectrum in different concentration showed only one peak short wavelength (SW) in dilute solutions. The main peak in SW around 370 nm was attributed to the monomer of BZD (f* or g*) and the broader emission shifted to the visible region around 400 nm in middle wavelength (MW) to the intermolecular excimer emission of BZD ([f/f]*or [g/g]*). The observed phenomena, such as solvatochromism, dual fluorescence, some red shifts caused by substitution, and larger Stokes shift indicated the existence of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) in the BZDs series. The phosphorescence emission of the BZDs demonstrated their intersystem crossing (ISC) process.

  18. A Study on the Fluorescence System of Sc-BPMPHD-CTMAB and Its Analytical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Introduction The fluorescence of Sc3+ itself in solution is not observed. After complexed with an organic ligand with a chromophore, Sc3+ makes the ligand, which has no or has weak fluorescence, emit strong fluorescence.

  19. Three dimensional solar anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays near the recent solar minimum 23/24

    CERN Document Server

    Modzelewska, R

    2015-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) galactic cosmic ray (GCR) anisotropy has been studied for 2006- 2012. The GCR anisotropy, both in the ecliptic plane and in polar direction, were obtained based on the neutron monitors (NMs) and Nagoya muon telescopes (MT) data. We analyze two dimensional (2D) GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and north-south anisotropy normal to the ecliptic plane. We reveal quasi-periodicities - the annual and 27-days waves in the GCR anisotropy in 2006-2012. We investigate the relationship of the 27-day variation of the GCR anisotropy in the ecliptic plane and in the polar direction with the parameters of solar activity and solar wind.

  20. Study of the anisotropy of an Am-Be source of 111 GBq; Estudio de la anisotropia de una fuente de Am-Be de 111GBq

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez Villapner, R.; Gallego Diaz, E.; Lorente Fillol, A.; Ibanez Fernandez, S.; Guerrero Araque, J. E.

    2011-07-01

    There are two types of anisotropies, the horizontal and vertical, the latter being the most important calibration since it will normally be carried out with the power vertical, 0 90 degree centigrade, as recommended by the standard. Since in most systems is the source position can be rotated about its vertical axis during transport from your accommodation to the point of irradiation, the uncertainty associated with the vertical anisotropy of a neutron source should be into account in any equipment calibration procedure, incorporating an anisotropy factor.

  1. Explorative study of apple juice fluorescence in relation to antioxidant properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarska, Katarzyna; Pawlak-Lemańska, Katarzyna; Khmelinskii, Igor; Sikorska, Ewa

    2016-11-01

    Total fluorescence spectra (excitation-emission matrices, EEM) were recorded for a series of commercial apple juices, including clear and cloudy juices produced from concentrate, cloudy juices that were not from concentrate, and freshly squeezed juices. An exploratory study of the spectra with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed three groups of fluorophores with different emission properties, and these properties were characterized by excitation/emission maxima at 270/315nm, (310, 370)/455nm, and 430/(550, 680)nm, respectively. A regression analysis of the total fluorescence spectra arranged into three-way arrays using N-way partial least squares regression methods (NPLS1 and NPLS2) and an analysis of the unfolded spectra by partial least squares methods (PLS1 and PLS2) revealed quantitative relations between the fluorescence and antioxidant properties of juices. The best models for the total phenolic contents and total antioxidant capacities were obtained by applying the NPLS1 method to the EEM. The model parameters were as follows: R(2)CV=0.802, RPD=2.3 for the total phenolic content and R(2)CV=0.808 and RPD=2.3 for the total antioxidant capacity. These results show the potential use of fluorescence spectroscopy for screening apple juices for their antioxidant properties.

  2. Fluorescence study of bovine serum albumin and Ti and Sn oxide nanoparticles interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togashi, Denisio M.; Ryder, Alan G.; Mc Mahon, Deirdre; Dunne, Peter; McManus, James

    2007-07-01

    Nanochemistry offers stimulating opportunities for a wide variety of applications in the biosciences. Understanding of the interaction of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as proteins is very important as it can help better design and fabricate nanocomposites for applications in diagnostics, drug delivery, and cell monitoring. In this work, the interaction of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and two types of metal oxide nanoparticles (titanium and tin) have been studied using the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan residue from the proteins measured by steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. The nanoparticles which were fabricated using a novel synthetic process have average sizes of ~2 nm (SnO II) and ~6 nm (estimated for TiO II) and have very high solubilities in a variety of solvents. The Stern-Volmer plots indicate an effective quenching process by TiO II nanoparticles whereas SnO II nanoparticles have a lower quenching efficiency for BSA fluorescence. Static quenching is the major contribution in the overall process which may indicate a high degree of association between protein and nanoparticles. The difference in BSA fluorescence quenching efficiency between the two types of nanoparticles can be explained by the non-covalent interaction differences and the thermal stability of protein-nanoparticle associated species for both materials.

  3. Psychophysics and the anisotropy of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Martin

    2015-12-15

    In psychophysics, experimental control over the presented stimuli is an important prerequisite. Due to the anisotropy of time, this prerequisite is not given in psychophysical experiments on time perception. Many important factors (e.g., the direction of perceived time flow) cannot be manipulated in timing experiments. The anisotropy of time is a peculiarity, which distinguishes the time dimension from other perceptual qualities. Here I summarize the anisotropy-related differences between the perception of time and the perception of other qualities. It is discussed to what extent these differences might affect results and interpretations in psychophysical experiments. In conclusion, I argue for a 'view from nowhen' on the psychophysical study of time perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. CMB Anisotropies Total Angular Momentum Method

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-01-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the CMB. Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g.~defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic type parity at small angles and ...

  5. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  6. Versatile single-molecule multi-color excitation and detection fluorescence setup for studying biomolecular dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M. A.

    2011-11-07

    Single-molecule fluorescence imaging is at the forefront of tools applied to study biomolecular dynamics both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the single-molecule fluorescence microscope to conduct simultaneous multi-color excitation and detection is a key experimental feature that is under continuous development. In this paper, we describe in detail the design and the construction of a sophisticated and versatile multi-color excitation and emission fluorescence instrument for studying biomolecular dynamics at the single-molecule level. The setup is novel, economical and compact, where two inverted microscopes share a laser combiner module with six individual laser sources that extend from 400 to 640 nm. Nonetheless, each microscope can independently and in a flexible manner select the combinations, sequences, and intensities of the excitation wavelengths. This high flexibility is achieved by the replacement of conventional mechanical shutters with acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF). The use of AOTF provides major advancement by controlling the intensities, duration, and selection of up to eight different wavelengths with microsecond alternation time in a transparent and easy manner for the end user. To our knowledge this is the first time AOTF is applied to wide-field total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy even though it has been commonly used in multi-wavelength confocal microscopy. The laser outputs from the combiner module are coupled to the microscopes by two sets of four single-mode optic fibers in order to allow for the optimization of the TIRF angle for each wavelength independently. The emission is split into two or four spectral channels to allow for the simultaneous detection of up to four different fluorophores of wide selection and using many possible excitation and photoactivation schemes. We demonstrate the performance of this new setup by conducting two-color alternating excitation single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy

  7. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-15

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v{sub 2}) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s{sub NN})=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v{sub 2} is mainly due to the average p{sub T} increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v{sub 3}) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v{sub 3} is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4}.

  9. Fluorescence studies of a silane gel to be applied as a carrier in optical sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa Miller; Stanislaw Wysocki; Donata Józwik

    2005-01-01

    Results of fluorescence studies on the degree of pyrene and aminopyrene elution from a silane gel by water and ethanol are discussed in the paper. The studies were carried out for gels obtained on glass plates that differed in composition. Silane monomers: TEOS—tetraethylorthosilane, APTES—3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, GPTMS—3-glycidoxypropylmethoxysilane, PDMS—polydimethylsilane, TMAOH—tetraethylammonium hydroxide, water and ethanol were used. A fluorophore was trapped in the gel either phys...

  10. Low lying excitations in odd deformed nucleus studied by nuclear resonance fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A.E. Almeida [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Margraf, J.; Nord, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenphysik] [and others

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear resonance fluorescence experiment was performed on {sup 153} Eu using the Bremsstrahlung beam of the Stuttgart Dynamitron and high resolution Ge-{gamma}-spectrometers. Detailed information was obtained on excitation energies, decay widths, transition probabilities, and branching ratios to study the fragmentation of the M1 scissors mode, and try establishing a systematics to explain the different fragmentation behavior of the dipole strengths in the odd isotopes recently studied. (author) 11 refs., 1 fig.; emilia at axpfep1.if.usp.br

  11. Fluorescence microscopy studies of a peripheral-benzodiazepine-receptor-targeted molecular probe for brain tumor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Laura; Vernier, P. Thomas; Manning, H. Charles; Salemi, Sarah; Li, Aimin; Craft, Cheryl M.; Gundersen, Martin A.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2003-10-01

    This study investigates the potential of a new multi-modal lanthanide chelate complex for specifically targeting brain tumor cells. We report here results from ongoing studies of up-take, sub-cellular localization and binding specificity of this new molecular imaging probe. Fluorescence microscopy investigations in living rat C6 glioma tumor cells demonstrate that the new imaging agent has affinity for glioma cells and binds to mitochondria.

  12. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  13. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  14. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  15. Effects of Surface Anisotropy on Magnetic Vortex Core

    OpenAIRE

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin-lattice simulations.

  16. Experimentally studied laser fluorescence method for remote sensing of plant stress situation induced by improper plants watering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Fedotov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stressful situations of plants can be caused by a lack of nutrients; mechanical damages; diseases; low or high temperatures; lack of illumination; insufficient or excess humidity of the soil; soil salinization; soil pollution by oil products or heavy metals; the increased acidity of the soil; use of pesticides, herbicides, insecticides, etc.At early stages it is often difficult to detect seemingly that the plants are in stressful situations caused by adverse external factors. However, the fluorescent analysis potentially allows detection of the stressful situations of plants by deformation of laser-induced fluorescence spectra. The paper conducts experimental investigations to learn the capabilities of the laser fluorescent method to monitor plant situations at 532nm wavelength of fluorescence excitation in the stressful situations induced by improper watering (at excess of moisture in the soil and at a lack of moisture.Researches of fluorescence spectra have been conducted using a created laboratory installation. As a source to excite fluorescence radiation the second harmonica of YAG:Nd laser is used. The subsystem to record fluorescence radiation is designed using a polychromator and a highly sensitive matrix detector with the amplifier of brightness.Experimental investigations have been conducted for fast-growing and unpretentious species of plants, namely different sorts of salad.Experimental studies of laser-induced fluorescence spectra of plants for 532nm excitement wavelength show that the impact of stressful factors on a plant due to the improper watering, significantly distorts a fluorescence spectrum of plants. Influence of a stressful factor can be shown as a changing profile of a fluorescence spectrum (an identifying factor, here, is a relationship of fluorescence intensities at two wavelengths, namely 685 nm and 740 nm or (and as a changing level of fluorescence that can be the basis for the laser method for monitoring the plant

  17. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  18. Reversible DC Magnetization Measurements of the Superconducting Parameters and Their Anisotropies in the Randomly-Doped Cuprates and Prelude to the Magnetic Resonance Studies of - Cuprates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Jonathan Lynn

    The fact that there is no consensus on the microscopic origin of the high-temperature superconducting phenomenon highlights the need for accurate measurements of the parameters which characterize the superconducting state (i.e., the coherence lengths (Ginzburg-Landau), penetration depths, and critical fields) and their anisotropies in these materials. This dissertation presents the first dc magnetization measurements of these parameters in the electron-doped, infinite-layer superconductor rm Sr_{0.90}La _{0.10}CuO_2 (T _{c} = 40 K). This material is particularly attractive for study because of its simple structure which contains nothing more than the features common to all of the high temperature superconducting copper oxides--a stacking of CuO_2 planes separated by (here, single) ion charge doping layers. From these measurements, xi_{| }(0) (xi_|(0))=46 A (30 A), lambda _{|}(0) (lambda_ |(0))=290 nm (450 nm), and H_{c2|}(0) (H _{c2|}(0))=23.8 T (15.5 T) where | and | are with respect to the CuO_2 planes. The ratio of H_ {c2}'s indicates that rm Sr_{0.90}La_{0.10}CuO _2 is much more isotropic than the other cuprates ((m_{c}/m_{ab })^{1/2}~1.5), and one of the samples measured even displayed a surprising anisotropy of less than one. In light of this surprising inverse anisotropy, the first systematic study of the effects of sample inhomogeneities on these reversible dc magnetization measurements was performed. rm YBa_2Cu_3O_{7 -delta} was used in this study because it can be doped either randomly or uniformly, allowing isolation of the artifacts of the measurement technique due to the random nature of the doping alone. This study demonstrates that neglecting the distribution of superconducting transition temperatures which come from the random doping in this type of analysis leads to errors in the measured parameters of up to 1000%. Efforts to measure the distribution of T_{c}'s and to use this distribution in the analysis have produced mixed results, with the most

  19. Incubation and application of transgenic green fluorescent nude mice in visualization studies on glioma tissue remodeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Jun; LAN Qing; HUANG Qiang; DAI Xing-liang; LU Zhao-hui; FEI Xi-feng; CHEN Hua; ZHANG Quan-bin; ZHAO Yao-dong; WANG Zhi-min; WANG Ai-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary reasons for local recurrence and therapeutic failure in the treatment of malignant gliomas are the invasion and interactions of tumor cells with surrounding normal brain cells.However,these tumor cells are hard to be visualized directly in histopathological preparations,or in experimental glioma models.Therefore,we developed an experimental human dual-color in vivo glioma model,which made tracking solitary invasive glioma cells possible,for the purpose of visualizing the interactions between red fluorescence labeled human glioma cells and host brain cells.This may offer references for further studying the roles of tumor microenvironment during glioma tissue remodeling.Methods Transgenic female C57BL/6 mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were crossed with male Balb/c nude mice.Then sib mating was allowed to occur continuously in order to establish an inbred nude mice strain with 50% of their offspring that are EGFP positive.Human glioma cell lines U87-MG and SU3 were transfected with red fluorescent protein (RFP) gene,and a rat C6 glioma cell line was stained directly with CM-Dil,to establish three glioma cell lines emitting red fluorescence (SU3-RFP,U87-RFP,and C6-CM-Dil).Red fluorescence tumor cells were inoculated via intra-cerebral injection into caudate nucleus of the EGFP nude mice.Tumor-bearing mice were sacrificed when their clinical symptoms appeared,and the whole brain was harvested and snap frozen for further analysis.Confocal laser scanning microscopy was performed to monitor the mutual interactions between tumor cells and host brain cells.Results Almost all the essential tissues of the established EGFP athymic Balb/c nude mice,except hair and erythrocytes,fluoresced green under excitation using a blue light-emitting flashlight with a central peak of 470 nm,approximately 50% of the offsprings were nu/nu EGFP+.SU3-RFP,U87-RFP,and C6-CM-Dil almost 100% expressed red fluorescence under the fluorescence

  20. Laser-based X-ray and electron source for X-ray fluorescence studies

    CERN Document Server

    Brozas, F Valle; Roso, L; Conde, A Peralta

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a modification to conventional X-rays fluorescence using electrons as excitation source, and compare it with the traditional X-ray excitation for the study of pigments. For this purpose we have constructed a laser-based source capable to produce X-rays as well as electrons. Because of the large penetration depth of X-rays, the collected fluorescence signal is a combination of several material layers of the artwork under study. However electrons are stopped in the first layers allowing therefore a more superficial analysis. We show that the combination of both excitation sources can provide extremely valuable information about the structure of the artwork.

  1. The Photochemical Study of HSA and BSA with Resonance Light-Scattering and Fluorescence Spectra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The resonance light-scattering (RLS) of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) is reported for the first time, and applied to study photochemical reaction of HSA and BSA. The fact of photocrosslinking self-association effect in HSA and BSA solutions is identified by the enhancement of RLS. The fluorescence quenching at about 350 nm and 700 nm proves that tryptophan (Trp) residues are one of the photochemical activity sites in HSA and BSA molecules. The Rayleigh scattering (RS) spectra of HSA and BSA that were neglected in fluorescence spectra before are found at about 296 nm, 592 nm and 888 nm for the first time, and are of adventageous to studying the aggregation of HSA or BSA. The possible photochemical reaction mechanism is also proposed.

  2. Chemical responses of single yeast cells studied by fluorescence microspectroscopy under solution-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Osamu; Kim, Haeng-Boo; Kitamura, Noboru

    2002-07-01

    A microspectroscopy system combined with a fluid manifold was developed to manipulate and analyze "single" living cells. A sample buffer solution containing living cells was introduced into a flow cell set on a thermostated microscope stage and a few cells were allowed to attach to the bottom wall of the flow cell. With these living cells being attached to the wall, other floating cells were pumped out by flowing a buffer solution. These procedures made it possible to keep a few cells in the flow cell and to analyze single cells by fluorescence microspectroscopy. The technique was applied to study the time course of staining processes of single living yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells by using two types of a fluorescent probe. The present methodology was shown to be of primary importance for obtaining biochemical/physiological information on single living cells and also for studying cell-to-cell variations in several characteristics.

  3. Sub-cellular structure studied by combined atomic force-fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trache, Andreea

    2009-03-01

    A novel experimental technique that integrates atomic force microscopy (AFM) with fluorescence imaging was used to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins in cellular organization. To understand the mechanism by which living cells sense mechanical forces, and how they respond and adapt to their environment, we developed a new technology able to investigate cellular behavior at sub-cellular level that integrates an AFM with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and fast-spinning disk (FSD) confocal microscopy. Live smooth muscle cells exhibited differences in focal adhesions and actin pattern depending on the extracellular matrix used for substrate coating. Data obtained by using the AFM-optical imaging integrated technique offer novel quantitative information that allows understanding the fundamental processes of cellular reorganization in response to extracellular matrix modulation. The integrated microscope presented here is broadly applicable across a wide range of molecular dynamic studies in any adherent live cells.

  4. Microinjection and Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization Assay for Studying mRNA Export in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Shi, Min; Cheng, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Microinjection and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) assay is a useful method for mRNA export studies, which can overcome the problems of traditional transfection in cells. Here, we describe the method of microinjection and FISH assay applied in investigation of mRNA export. By this method we can estimate the mRNA export kinetics, examining mRNA export in cells with low transfection efficiencies, and observing nuclear export of aberrant RNAs.

  5. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker;

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...

  6. Recognition- and reactivity-based fluorescent probes for studying transition metal signaling in living systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aron, Allegra T; Ramos-Torres, Karla M; Cotruvo, Joseph A; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-08-18

    Metals are essential for life, playing critical roles in all aspects of the central dogma of biology (e.g., the transcription and translation of nucleic acids and synthesis of proteins). Redox-inactive alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc are widely recognized as dynamic signals, whereas redox-active transition metals such as copper and iron are traditionally thought of as sequestered by protein ligands, including as static enzyme cofactors, in part because of their potential to trigger oxidative stress and damage via Fenton chemistry. Metals in biology can be broadly categorized into two pools: static and labile. In the former, proteins and other macromolecules tightly bind metals; in the latter, metals are bound relatively weakly to cellular ligands, including proteins and low molecular weight ligands. Fluorescent probes can be useful tools for studying the roles of transition metals in their labile forms. Probes for imaging transition metal dynamics in living systems must meet several stringent criteria. In addition to exhibiting desirable photophysical properties and biocompatibility, they must be selective and show a fluorescence turn-on response to the metal of interest. To meet this challenge, we have pursued two general strategies for metal detection, termed "recognition" and "reactivity". Our design of transition metal probes makes use of a recognition-based approach for copper and nickel and a reactivity-based approach for cobalt and iron. This Account summarizes progress in our laboratory on both the development and application of fluorescent probes to identify and study the signaling roles of transition metals in biology. In conjunction with complementary methods for direct metal detection and genetic and/or pharmacological manipulations, fluorescent probes for transition metals have helped reveal a number of principles underlying transition metal dynamics. In this Account, we give three recent

  7. Mechanism of formation of volcanic bombs: insights from a pilot study of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and preliminary assessment of analytical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañón-Tapia, Edgardo

    2017-07-01

    Volcanic bombs and achneliths are a special type of pyroclastic fragments formed by mildly explosive volcanic eruptions. Models explaining the general shapes of those particles can be divided in two broad categories. The most popular envisages the acquisition of shapes of volcanic bombs as the result of the rush of air acting on a fluid clot during flight, and it includes many variants. The less commonly quoted model envisages their shapes as the result of forces acting at the moment of ejection of liquid from the magma pool in the conduit, experiencing an almost negligible modification through its travel through air. Quantitative evidence supporting either of those two models is limited. In this work, I explore the extent to which the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) might be useful in the study of mechanisms of formation of volcanic bombs by comparing measurements made on two spindle and two bread-crusted bombs. The results of this pilot study reveal that the degree of anisotropy of spindle bombs is larger, and their principal susceptibility axes are better clustered than on bread-crusted bombs. Also, the orientation of the principal susceptibility axes is consistent with two specific models (one of the in-flight variants and the general ejection model). Consequently, the reported AMS measurements, albeit limited in number, indicate that it is reasonable to focus attention on only two specific models to explain the acquisition of the shapes of volcanic bombs. Based on a parallel theoretical assessment of analytical models, a third alternative is outlined, envisaging volcanic bomb formation as a two-stage process that involves the bursting of large ( m) gas bubbles on the surface of a magma pond. The new model advanced here is also consistent with the reported AMS results, and constitutes a working hypothesis that should be tested by future studies richer in data. Fortunately, since this work also establishes that AMS can be used to determine magnetic

  8. Single-molecule fluorescence study of the inhibition of the oncogenic functionality of STAT3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoxu; Badali, Daniel; Fletcher, Steven; Avadisian, Miriam; Gunning, Patrick; Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2009-06-01

    Signal-Transducer-and-Activator-of-Transcription 3 (STAT3) protein plays an important role in the onset of cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. In this study, we aim to test the effectiveness of a novel peptide drug designed to tether STAT3 to the phospholipid bilayer of the cell membrane and thus inhibit unwanted transcription. As a first step, STAT3 proteins were successfully labelled with tetramethylrhodamine (TMR), a fluorescent dye with suitable photostability for single molecule studies. The effectiveness of labelling was determined using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in a custom built confocal microscope, from which diffusion times and hydrodynamic radii of individual proteins were determined. A newly developed fluorescein derivative label (F-NAc) has been designed to be incorporated into the structure of the peptide drug so that peptide-STAT3 interactions can be examined. This dye is spectrally characterized and is found to be well suited for its application to this project, as well as other single-molecule studies. The membrane localization via high-affinity cholesterol-bound small-molecule binding agents can be demonstrated by encapsulating TMR-labeled STAT3 and inhibitors within a vesicle model cell system. To this end, unilaminar lipid vesicles were examined for size and encapsulation ability. Preliminary results of the efficiency and stability of the STAT3 anchoring in lipid membranes obtained via quantitative confocal imaging and single-molecule spectroscopy using a custom-built multiparameter fluorescence microscope are reported here.

  9. Study on the interaction of morphine chloride with deoxyribonucleic acid by fluorescence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J. F.; Dong, C.

    2009-01-01

    The mode and mechanism of the interaction of morphine chloride, an important alkaloid compound to calf thymus deoxyribonucleic acid (ct DNA) was investigated from absorption and fluorescence titration techniques. Hypochromic effect was founded in the absorption spectra of morphine when concentration of DNA increased. The decreased fluorescence study revealed non-cooperative binding of the morphine to DNA with an affinity of 3.94 × 10 3 M -1, and the stoichiometry of binding was characterized to be about one morphine molecule per nucleotide. Stern-Volmer plots at different temperatures proved that the quenching mechanism was static. Ferrocyanide quenching study showed that the magnitude of KSV of the bound morphine was lower than that of the free one. In addition, it was found that ionic strength could affect the binding of morphine and DNA. Fluorescence polarization and denatured DNA studies also applied strong evidences that morphine molecule was partially intercalated between every alternate base pairs of ct DNA. As observed from above experiments, intercalation was well supported as the binding mode of morphine and ct DNA.

  10. Optical tweezers and non-ratiometric fluorescent-dye-based studies of respiration in sperm mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Timothy; Shi, Linda Z.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Berns, Michael W.

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how the mitochondrial membrane potential affects sperm motility using laser tweezers and a non-ratiometric fluorescent probe, DiOC6(3). A 1064 nm Nd:YVO4 continuous wave laser was used to trap motile sperm at a power of 450 mW in the trap spot. Using customized tracking software, the curvilinear velocity (VCL) and the escape force from the laser tweezers were measured. Human (Homo sapiens), dog (Canis lupis familiaris) and drill (Mandrillus leucophaeus) sperm were treated with DiOC6(3) to measure the membrane potential in the mitochondria-rich sperm midpieces. Sperm from all three species exhibited an increase in fluorescence when treated with the DiOC6(3). When a cyanide inhibitor (CCCP) of aerobic respiration was applied, sperm of all three species exhibited a reduction in fluorescence to pre-dye levels. With respect to VCL and escape force, the CCCP had no effect on dog or human sperm, suggesting a major reliance upon anaerobic respiration (glycolysis) for ATP in these two species. Based on the preliminary study on drill sperm, CCCP caused a drop in the VCL, suggesting potential reliance on both glycolysis and aerobic respiration for motility. The results demonstrate that optical trapping in combination with DiOC6(3) is an effective way to study sperm motility and energetics.

  11. Application of X-ray fluorescence analytical techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Ščančar, Janez; Jaćimović, Radojko; Simčič, Jurij; Pelicon, Primož; Budnar, Miloš; Jeran, Zvonka; Pongrac, Paula; Regvar, Marjana; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina

    2008-11-01

    Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that employs the use of higher plants for the clean-up of contaminated environments. Progress in the field is however handicapped by limited knowledge of the biological processes involved in plant metal uptake, translocation, tolerance and plant-microbe-soil interactions; therefore a better understanding of the basic biological mechanisms involved in plant/microbe/soil/contaminant interactions would allow further optimization of phytoremediation technologies. In view of the needs of global environmental protection, it is important that in phytoremediation and plant biology studies the analytical procedures for elemental determination in plant tissues and soil should be fast and cheap, with simple sample preparation, and of adequate accuracy and reproducibility. The aim of this study was therefore to present the main characteristics, sample preparation protocols and applications of X-ray fluorescence-based analytical techniques (energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—EDXRF, total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry—TXRF and micro-proton induced X-ray emission—micro-PIXE). Element concentrations in plant leaves from metal polluted and non-polluted sites, as well as standard reference materials, were analyzed by the mentioned techniques, and additionally by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The results were compared and critically evaluated in order to assess the performance and capability of X-ray fluorescence-based techniques in phytoremediation and plant biology studies. It is the EDXRF, which is recommended as suitable to be used in the analyses of a large number of samples, because it is multi-elemental, requires only simple preparation of sample material, and it is analytically comparable to the most frequently used instrumental chemical techniques. The TXRF is compatible to FAAS in sample preparation, but relative to AAS it is fast

  12. Effect of the shape anisotropy on the magnetic configuration of (Ga,Mn)As and its evolution with temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Hamaya, K.; Taniyama, T.; Koike, T.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    We study the effect of the shape anisotropy on the magnetic domain configurations of a ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As/GaAs(001) epitaxial wire as a function of temperature. Using magnetoresistance measurements, we deduce the magnetic configurations and estimate the relative strength of the shape anisotropy compared with the intrinsic anisotropies. Since the intrinsic anisotropy is found to show a stronger temperature dependence than the shape anisotropy, the effect of the shape anisotr...

  13. Structural and Magnetic Anisotropy in Amorphous Terbium-Iron Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Todd Clayton

    1995-01-01

    High density, removable media magnetooptic disk drives have recently begun to make significant gains in the information mass storage market. The media in these disks are amorphous rare-earth/transition-metal (RE-TM) alloys. One vital property of these materials is a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; that is, an easy axis of magnetization which is perpendicular to the plane of the film. A variety of theories, sometimes contradictory, have been proposed to account for this surprising presence of an anisotropic property in an amorphous material. Recent research indicates that there is an underlying atomic-scale structural anisotropy which is responsible for the observed magnetic anisotropy. Several different types of structural anisotropy have been proposed to account for the observed magnetic anisotropy, including pair-ordering anisotropy (anisotropic chemical short-range order) and bond orientation anisotropy (an anisotropy in coordination number or distances independent of chemical ordering). We have studied the structural origins of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Tb-Fe thin films by employing high-energy and anomalous dispersion x-ray scattering. The as-deposited films show a clear structural anisotropy, with a preference for Tb-Fe near neighbors to align in the out-of-plane direction. These films also have a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Upon annealing, the magnetic anisotropy energy drops significantly, and we see a corresponding reduction in the structural anisotropy. The radial distribution functions indicate that the number of Tb-Fe near-neighbors increases in the in-plane direction, but does not change in the out-of-plane direction. Therefore, the distribution of Tb-Fe near-neighbors becomes more uniform upon annealing. We propose that the observed reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy is a result of this change in structure. Our results support the pair -ordering anisotropy model of the structural anisotropy

  14. Fluorescence characteristics of 5-amino salicylic acid: An iodide recognition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Priyanka; Suyal, Kanchan; Joshi, Neeraj K.; Joshi, Hem Chandra; Pant, Sanjay

    In this paper we report the effect of iodide on the fluorescence of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA). In the absence of iodide, prominent blue green (BG) emission band at ˜465 nm (broad) is observed in aprotic solvents whereas violet (V) emission at ˜408 nm, blue green (BG) at ˜480 nm and green (G) at ˜500 nm are observed in case of protic solvents. On the addition of iodide ion (I-), the intensity of BG fluorescence is enhanced in case of aprotic solvents. On the other hand the G band is enhanced in protic solvents and decrease in the intensity of the V band is observed. The effect of hydrogen bonding as well as the interplay of neutral and ionic species is invoked to explain the observed results. The study projects the application of this system in iodide recognition in protic/aprotic environments.

  15. Treatability study for removal of leachable mercury in crushed fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostick, W.D.; Beck, D.E.; Bowser, K.T. [and others

    1996-02-01

    Nonserviceable fluorescent lamps removed from radiological control areas at the Oak Ridge Department of Energy facilities have been crushed and are currently managed as mixed waste (hazardous and radiologically contaminated). We present proposed treatment flowsheets and supporting treatability study data for conditioning this solid waste residue so that it can qualify for disposal in a sanitary landfill. Mercury in spent fluorescent lamps occurs primarily as condensate on high-surface-area phosphor material. It can be solubilized with excess oxidants (e.g., hypochlorite solution) and stabilized by complexation with halide ions. Soluble mercury in dechlorinated saline solution is effectively removed by cementation with zero-valent iron in the form of steel wool. In packed column dynamic flow testing, soluble mercury was reduced to mercury metal and insoluble calomel, loading > 1.2 g of mercury per grain of steel wool before an appreciable breakthrough of soluble mercury in the effluent.

  16. Mechanistic study of macrophage activation by LPS stimulation using fluorescence imaging techinques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cuixia; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.; Xing, Da

    2012-03-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a structural component of the outer membrane of gram negative bacteria, has been suggested that stimulates macrophages secrete a wide variety of inflammatory mediators, such as nitric oxide (NO). However, the cellular mechanisms of NO generation in macrophage by LPS stimulation are not well known. In this study, LPS stimulated NO generation in macrophage was determined by measuring fluorescence changes with a NO specific probe DAF-FM DA. Using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques, we found an increase of protein kinase C (PKC) activation was dynamically monitored in macrophages treated with LPS. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus in macrophage was measured by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Moreover, the PKC inhibitor GÖ6983 inhibited LPS-stimulated NF-κB activation and NO production. These results indicated that LPS stimulated NF-κB mediated NO production by activating PKC.

  17. Combined ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy for biological cell membrane transport studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, A. I.; Novak, P.; Velazquez, M. A.; Fleming, T. P.; Korchev, Y. E.

    2013-09-01

    Optical visualization of nanoscale morphological changes taking place in living biological cells during such important processes as endo- and exocytosis is challenging due to the low refractive index of lipid membranes. In this paper we summarize and discuss advances in the powerful combination of two complementary live imaging techniques, ion conductance and fluorescence confocal microscopy, that allows cell membrane topography to be related with molecular-specific fluorescence at high spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the feasibility of the use of ion conductance microscopy to image apical plasma membrane of mouse embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells at a resolution sufficient to depict single endocytic pits. This opens the possibility to study individual endocytic events in embryo trophoblast outgrowth cells where endocytosis plays a crucial role during early stages of embryo development.

  18. The use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting in studying plant development and environmental responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Anthony D; Bonyadi, Roxanna; Gifford, Miriam L

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) is a powerful tool that enables plant growth and development to be studied at the cellular level. Flow cytometry is used to isolate subpopulations of cells, such as those of specific cell types, or cells at particular developmental stages that have been marked with fluorescent proteins. Transgenic technology has given us the ability to generate plants that express fluorescent proteins, not just constitutively in particular cell types, but also dynamically in response to endogenous or external factors. By processing such transgenic lines with FACS, it is possible to isolate distinct populations of cells in a wide range of likely response states for further analysis. This is particularly useful for investigating biological mechanisms in plants because the control of growth and development is manifest at the cell type level. Furthermore, the specificity of the resulting data enables fine modelling of the transcriptional networks that exert systems-level control of the transcriptome; hence key regulators of responses and processes in the plant can be identified. In this review, the current state of the art for FACS methods in plants is explored by means of case studies of research in which cell sorting allowed us to make significant new discoveries.

  19. Chamber bioaerosol study: human emissions of size-resolved fluorescent biological aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhangar, S; Adams, R I; Pasut, W; Huffman, J A; Arens, E A; Taylor, J W; Bruns, T D; Nazaroff, W W

    2016-04-01

    Humans are a prominent source of airborne biological particles in occupied indoor spaces, but few studies have quantified human bioaerosol emissions. The chamber investigation reported here employs a fluorescence-based technique to evaluate bioaerosols with high temporal and particle size resolution. In a 75-m(3) chamber, occupant emission rates of coarse (2.5-10 μm) fluorescent biological aerosol particles (FBAPs) under seated, simulated office-work conditions averaged 0.9 ± 0.3 million particles per person-h. Walking was associated with a 5-6× increase in the emission rate. During both walking and sitting, 60-70% or more of emissions originated from the floor. The increase in emissions during walking (vs. while sitting) was mainly attributable to release of particles from the floor; the associated increased vigor of upper body movements also contributed. Clothing, or its frictional interaction with human skin, was demonstrated to be a source of coarse particles, and especially of the highly fluorescent fraction. Emission rates of FBAPs previously reported for lecture classes were well bounded by the experimental results obtained in this chamber study. In both settings, the size distribution of occupant FBAP emissions had a dominant mode in the 3-5 μm diameter range.

  20. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhou, Tie-ge; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ˜16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  1. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ∼16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  2. Quantitative determination of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in shellfish using prechromatography oxidation and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection: interlaboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawrence, J.F.; Niedzwiadek, B.; Menard, C.; Wezenbeek, P.

    2004-01-01

    An interlaboratory study was conducted for the determination of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins in shellfish. The method used liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection after prechromatographic oxidation of the toxins with hydrogen peroxide and periodate. The PSP toxins studied

  3. Fluorescence and Docking Studies of the Interaction between Human Serum Albumin and Pheophytin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otávio Augusto Chaves

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the North of Brazil (Pará and Amazonas states the leaves of the plant Talinum triangulare (popular: cariru replace spinach as food. From a phytochemical point of view, they are rich in compounds of the group of pheophytins. These substances, related to chlorophyll, have photophysical properties that give them potential application in photodynamic therapy. Human serum albumin (HSA is one of the main endogenous vehicles for biodistribution of molecules by blood plasma. Association constants and thermodynamic parameters for the interaction of HSA with pheophytin from Talinum triangulare were studied by UV-Vis absorption, fluorescence techniques, and molecular modeling (docking. Fluorescence quenching of the HSA’s internal fluorophore (tryptophan at temperatures 296 K, 303 K, and 310 K, resulted in values for the association constants of the order of 104 L∙mol−1, indicating a moderate interaction between the compound and the albumin. The negative values of ΔG° indicate a spontaneous process; ΔH° = 15.5 kJ∙mol−1 indicates an endothermic process of association and ΔS° = 0.145 kJ∙mol−1∙K−1 shows that the interaction between HSA and pheophytin occurs mainly by hydrophobic factors. The observed Trp fluorescence quenching is static: there is initial non-fluorescent association, in the ground state, HSA:Pheophytin. Possible solution obtained by a molecular docking study suggests that pheophytin is able to interact with HSA by means of hydrogen bonds with three lysine and one arginine residues, whereas the phytyl group is inserted in a hydrophobic pocket, close to Trp-214.

  4. Functional energetic landscape in the allosteric regulation of muscle pyruvate kinase. 2. Fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Petr; Lee, J Ching

    2009-10-13

    The energetic landscape of the allosteric regulatory mechanism of rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase (RMPK) was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Four novel insights were uncovered. (1) ADP exhibits a dual property. Depending on the temperature, ADP can regulate RMPK activity by switching the enzyme to either the R or T state. (2) The assumption that ligand binding to RMPK is state-dependent is only correct for PEP but not Phe and ADP. (3) The effect of pH on the regulatory behavior of RMPK is partly due to the complex pattern of proton release or absorption linked to the multiple linked equilibria which govern the activity of the enzyme. (4) The R T equilibrium is accompanied by a significant DeltaC(p), rendering RMPK most sensitive to temperature under physiological conditions. To rigorously test the validity of conclusions derived from the ITC data, in this study a fluorescence approach, albeit indirect, that tracks continuous structural perturbations was employed. Intrinsic Trp fluorescence of RMPK in the absence and presence of substrates phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ADP, and the allosteric inhibitor Phe, was measured in the temperature range between 4 and 45 degrees C. For data analysis, the fluorescence data were complemented by ITC experiments to yield an extended data set allowing more complete characterization of the RMPK regulatory mechanism. Twenty-one thermodynamic parameters were derived to define the network of linked interactions involved in regulating the allosteric behavior of RMPK through global analysis of the ITC and fluorescent data sets. In this study, 27 independent curves with more than 1600 experimental points were globally analyzed. Consequently, the consensus results substantiate not only the conclusions derived from the ITC data but also structural information characterizing the transition between the active and inactive states of RMPK and the antagonism between ADP and Phe binding. The latter observation reveals a

  5. Detection of phospholipid phase separation. A multifrequency phase fluorimetry study of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasassi, T; Conti, F; Glaser, M; Gratton, E

    1984-11-25

    Using multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry and a nonlinear least-squares analysis of lifetime data, we were able to determine the complex decay of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in synthetic phospholipid bilayers. Our results showed a monoexponential decay of DPH in the pure isotropic solvents studied, over a wide temperature range, and a double-exponential decay of DPH in phospholipids, both above and below the transition. During the transition, and in mixed-phase phospholipids, a three-component analysis was successfully accomplished, and the pre-exponential factors of the two main components have been shown to be quantitatively representative of the gel and liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer. The fractional intensity of the shorter lifetime component depends on the modalities of the sample preparation. The factors affecting this component are discussed. From the DPH fluorescence lifetime and from the anisotropy data in L-alpha-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl choline mixtures, a phase diagram was independently constructed. Conclusions about the sensitivity and the partition of the probe between gel and the liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer are derived. Lifetime experiments on DPH in a L-alpha-dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylch oline mixture suggested a general method for the determination and quantitation of the two different phases in the bilayer.

  6. In-plane magnetic anisotropy along the width in amorphous magnetic ribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Garcia, J.A.; Carrizo, J.; Elbaile, L. E-mail: elbaile@pinon.ccu.uniovi.es; Santos, J.D.; Mira, J.; Rivas, J

    2004-05-01

    A study about the variation of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy along the width of the ribbon is carried out in Co- and Fe-based amorphous magnetic ribbons. From the measurements of the anisotropy in as-quenched, mechanical polished and annealed samples the origin of the lack of homogeneity of the in-plane magnetic anisotropy in wide amorphous ribbons is determined. In addition a shape magnetic anisotropy that we think is originated by the edge effect was found.

  7. Implications of primordial power spectra with statistical anisotropy on CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Both the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck observations reported the hemispherical asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuation. The hemispherical asymmetry might be stemmed from the primordial statistical anisotropy during the inflationary era of the universe. In this paper, we study possible implications of the primordial power spectra with dipolar anisotropy on the CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations. We explicitly show that the statistical dipolar anisotropy may induce the off-diagonal (\\(\\ell'\

  8. The magnetic properties of the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain with single-ion anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Gangsan; Zhu, Rengui, E-mail: rgzhu@mail.ahnu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    The magnetic properties of the spin-1 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic chain with exchange anisotropy and single-ion anisotropy are studied by the double-time Green's function method. The determinative equations for the critical temperature, the magnetization, and the zero-field susceptibility are derived analytically. The effects of the anisotropies on the magnetic properties are presented.

  9. A comparative study of metabolic state of stem cells during osteogenic and adipogenic differentiations via fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Ou, Meng-Hsin; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Chiou, Arthur

    2016-10-01

    Cellular metabolic state can serve as a biomarker to indicate the differentiation potential of stem cells into other specialized cell lineages. In this study, two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (2P-FLIM) was applied to determine the fluorescence lifetime and the amounts of the auto-fluorescent metabolic co-factor reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) to elucidate the cellular metabolism of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation processes. 2P-FLIM provides the free to protein-bound NADH ratio which can serve as the indicator of cellular metabolic state. We measured NADH fluorescence lifetime at 0, 7, and 14 days after hMSCs were induced for either osteogenesis or adipogenesis. In both cases, the average fluorescence lifetime increased significantly at day 14 (P stem cells into other specialized cell lineages.

  10. Solvatochromic study of highly fluorescent alkylated isocyanonaphthalenes, their π-stacking, hydrogen-bonding complexation, and quenching with pyridine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Miklós; Rácz, Dávid; Lázár, László; Purgel, Mihály; Ditrói, Tamás; Zsuga, Miklós; Kéki, Sándor

    2014-11-10

    Mono- and dialkylated derivatives of 1-amino-5-isocyanonaphthalene (ICAN) were studied as new members of a multifunctional, easy-to-prepare fluorophore family, which showed excellent solvatochromic properties. The monoallyl derivative and the starting ICAN exhibited strong fluorescence quenching in the presence of small amounts of pyridine. The formation of a hydrogen-bonded ground-state pyridine complex was detected; however, analysis of quantum chemical calculations suggested the presence of an additional π-stacked pyridine complex. The Stern-Volmer plot of the quenching process exhibited a downward curvature and after reaching a minimum the fluorescence intensity increased back to a significant level at high pyridine concentrations. Significant fluorescence was observed even in pure pyridine. A new mechanism and a simple mathematical equation were derived to explain the downward curvature and the remaining fluorescence by the formation of a fluorescent π-stacked complex.

  11. Structure, magnetism, and theoretical study of a mixed-valence Co(II)3Co(III)4 heptanuclear wheel: lack of SMM behavior despite negative magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibotaru, Liviu F; Ungur, Liviu; Aronica, Christophe; Elmoll, Hani; Pilet, Guillaume; Luneau, Dominique

    2008-09-17

    A mixed-valence Co(II)/Co(III) heptanuclear wheel [Co(II)3Co(III)4(L)6(MeO)6] (LH2 = 1,1,1-trifluoro-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-5-aza-hept-3-en-2-one) has been synthesized and its crystal structure determined using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The valence state of each cobalt ion was established by bond valence sum calculations. Studies of the temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility and the field dependence of the magnetization evidence ferromagnetic interactions within the compound. In order to understand the magnetic properties of this Co7 wheel, we performed ab initio calculations for each cobalt fragment at the CASSCF/CASPT2 level, including spin-orbit coupling effects within the SO-RASSI approach. The four Co(III) ions were found to be diamagnetic and to give a significant temperature-independent paramagnetic contribution to the susceptibility. The spin-orbit coupling on the three Co(II) sites leads to separations of approximately 200 cm(-1) between the ground and excited Kramers doublets, placing the Co7 wheel into a weak-exchange limit in which the lowest electronic states are adequately described by the anisotropic exchange interaction between the lowest Kramers doublets on Co(II) sites. Simulation of the exchange interaction was done within the Lines model, keeping the fully ab initio treatment of magnetic anisotropy effects on individual cobalt fragments using a recently developed methodology. A good description of the susceptibility and magnetization was obtained for nearest-neighbor (J1) and next-nearest-neighbor (J2) exchange parameters (1.5 and 5.5 cm(-1), respectively). The strong ferromagnetic interaction between distant cobalt ions arises as a result of low electron-promotion energies in the exchange bridges containing Co(III) ions. The calculations showed a large value of the magnetization along the main magnetic axis (10.1 mu(B)), which is a combined effect of the ferromagnetic exchange interaction and negative magnetic anisotropy on

  12. Different size biomolecules anchoring on porous silicon surface: fluorescence and reflectivity pores infiltration comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovannozzi, Andrea M.; Rossi, Andrea M. [National Institute for Metrological Research, Thermodynamic Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy); Renacco, Chiara; Farano, Alessandro [Ribes Ricecrhe Srl, Via Lavoratori Vittime del Col du Mont 24, 11100 Aosta (Italy); Derosas, Manuela [Biodiversity Srl, Via Corfu 71, 25124 Brescia (Italy); Enrico, Emanuele [National Institute for Metrological Research, Electromagnetism Division, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    The performance of porous silicon optical based biosensors strongly depends on material nanomorphology, on biomolecules distribution inside the pores and on the ability to link sensing species to the pore walls. In this paper we studied the immobilization of biomolecules with different size, such as antibody anti aflatoxin (anti Aflatox Ab, {proportional_to}150 KDa), malate dehydrogenase (MDH, {proportional_to}36KDa) and metallothionein (MT, {proportional_to}6KDa) at different concentrations on mesoporous silicon samples ({proportional_to}15 nm pores diameter). Fluorescence measurements using FITC- labeled biomolecules and refractive index analysis based on reflectivity spectra have been employed together to detect the amount of proteins bound to the surface and to evaluate their diffusion inside the pores. Here we suggest that these two techniques should be used together to have a better understanding of what happens at the porous silicon surface. In fact, when pores dimensions are not perfectly tuned to the protein size a higher fluorescence signal doesn't often correspond to a higher biomolecules distribution inside the pores. When a too much higher concentration of biomolecule is anchored on the surface, steric crowd effects and repulsive interactions probably take over and hinder pores infiltration, inducing a small or absent shift in the fringe pattern even if a higher fluorescence signal is registered. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Optical studies of vaporization and stability of fluorescently labelled perfluorocarbon droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznik, Nikita; Seo, Minseok; Williams, Ross; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Lee, Mike; Matsuura, Naomi; Gariepy, Jean; Foster, F. Stuart; Burns, Peter N.

    2012-11-01

    Droplets of liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) are under study as the next generation of contrast agents for ultrasound (US). These droplets can be selectively vaporized into echogenic gas bubbles in situ by externally applied US, with numerous applications to diagnosis and therapy. However, little is known about the mechanisms of droplet vaporization and the stability of the bubbles so produced. Here we observe optically the vaporization of fluorescent PFC droplets and the stability of the newly created bubbles. Fluorescent markers were used to label selectively either the liquid PFC core or the shell of the droplets. It was found that, following vaporization, the fluorescent marker is quickly expelled from the core of the newly created bubble and is retained on the gas-liquid interface. At the same time, it was shown that bubbles retain the original shells encapsulating their droplet precursors. The efficiency of encapsulation was found to depend strongly on the nature of the stabilizing material itself. These results provide direct evidence of droplet encapsulation post-vaporization, and suggest that the behaviour of the vaporized droplets is strongly dependent on the choice of the stabilizing material for the emulsion.

  14. Study of the interaction between N-confused porphyrin and bovine serum albumin by fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xianyong; Liu, Ronghua; Yi, Rongqiong; Yang, Fengxian; Huang, Haowen; Chen, Jian; Ji, Danhong; Yang, Ying; Li, Xiaofang; Yi, Pinggui

    2011-04-01

    The fluorescence and ultraviolet spectroscopy were explored to study the interaction between N-confused porphyrins (NCP) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) under imitated physiological condition. The experimental results indicated that the fluorescence quenching mechanism between BSA and NCP was static quenching procedure at low NCP concentration at 293 and 305 K or a combined quenching (static and dynamic) procedure at higher NCP concentration at 305 K. The binding constants, binding sites and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG were calculated at different temperatures. The comparison of binding potency of the three NCP to BSA showed that the substituting groups in benzene ring could enhance the binding affinity. From the thermodynamic parameters, we concluded that the action force was mainly hydrophobic interaction. The binding distances between NCP and BSA were calculated using Förster non-radiation energy transfer theory. In addition, the effect of NCP on the conformation of BSA was analyzed using synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

  15. In vitro study of caries detection through sound dentin using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Shimizu, Ayako; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeshige, Fumio; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of proximal surface caries detection using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent, through the sound dentin surrounding the cavity wall after removal of occlusal caries. Extracted sound human molars were ground to prepare horizontal and vertical dentin plates 1.4 mm thick. Extracted carious human molars were reduced in thickness horizontally from the occlusal surfaces until exposure of the dentin caries. The dentin plate was placed on the carious tooth. Before and after gradual thinning of the dentin plate from approximately 1.4 mm to 0.2 mm thick, the dentin caries was measured 10 times through the plate by the laser fluorescence device with a cone-shaped tip or a broad tip. When the dentin plate was reduced to less than 0.3 mm thick (using a combination of a horizontal plate and cone-shaped tip) or 0.2 mm thick (using the other combinations), the values measured with the laser fluorescence device were significantly larger than the values before reducing the thickness of the dentin. Based on these results, the device offers potential use as one of the screening tests for proximal surface caries detection through sound dentin when the sound dentin between tip and caries is thin.

  16. Coexistence of probe conformations in lipid phases-a polarized fluorescence microspectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbančič, Iztok; Ljubetič, Ajasja; Arsov, Zoran; Strancar, Janez

    2013-08-20

    Several well-established fluorescence methods depend on environment-sensitive probes that report about molecular properties of their local environment. For reliable interpretation of experiments, careful characterization of probes' behavior is required. In this study, bleaching-corrected polarized fluorescence microspectroscopy with nanometer spectral peak position resolution was applied to characterize conformations of two alkyl chain-labeled 7-nitro-2-1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl phospholipids in three model membranes, representing the three main lipid phases. The combination of polarized and spectral detection revealed two main probe conformations with their preferential fluorophore dipole orientations roughly parallel and perpendicular to membrane normal. Their peak positions were separated by 2-6 nm because of different local polarities and depended on lipid environment. The relative populations of conformations, estimated by a numerical model, indicated a specific sensitivity of the two probes to molecular packing with cholesterol. The coexistence of probe conformations could be further exploited to investigate membrane organization below microscopy spatial resolution, such as lipid rafts. With the addition of polarized excitation or detection to any environment-sensitive fluorescence imaging technique, the conformational analysis can be directly applied to explore local membrane complexity.

  17. Time-resolved fluorescence studies of nucleotide flipping by restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Robert K; Tamulaitis, Gintautas; Chen, Kai; Kubala, Marta; Siksnys, Virginijus; Jones, Anita C

    2009-11-01

    Restriction enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C, specific for interrupted 5-bp target sequences, flip the central base pair of these sequences into their protein pockets to facilitate sequence recognition and adjust the DNA cleavage pattern. We have used time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of 2-aminopurine-labelled DNA in complex with each of these enzymes in solution to explore the nucleotide flipping mechanism and to obtain a detailed picture of the molecular environment of the extrahelical bases. We also report the first study of the 7-bp cutter, PfoI, whose recognition sequence (T/CCNGGA) overlaps with that of the Ecl18kI-type enzymes, and for which the crystal structure is unknown. The time-resolved fluorescence experiments reveal that PfoI also uses base flipping as part of its DNA recognition mechanism and that the extrahelical bases are captured by PfoI in binding pockets whose structures are quite different to those of the structurally characterized enzymes Ecl18kI, PspGI and EcoRII-C. The fluorescence decay parameters of all the enzyme-DNA complexes are interpreted to provide insight into the mechanisms used by these four restriction enzymes to flip and recognize bases and the relationship between nucleotide flipping and DNA cleavage.

  18. Caffeine and sulfadiazine interact differently with human serum albumin: A combined fluorescence and molecular docking study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mullah Muhaiminul; Sonu, Vikash K.; Gashnga, Pynsakhiat Miki; Moyon, N. Shaemningwar; Mitra, Sivaprasad

    2016-01-01

    The interaction and binding behavior of the well-known drug sulfadiazine (SDZ) and psychoactive stimulant caffeine (CAF) with human serum albumin (HSA) was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. The quenching of protein fluorescence on addition of CAF is due to the formation of protein-drug complex in the ground state; whereas in case of SDZ, the experimental results were explained on the basis of sphere of action model. Although both these compounds bind preferentially in Sudlow's site 1 of the protein, the association constant is approximately two fold higher in case of SDZ (∼4.0 × 104 M-1) in comparison with CAF (∼9.3 × 102 M-1) and correlates well with physico-chemical properties like pKa and lipophilicity of the drugs. Temperature dependent fluorescence study reveals that both SDZ and CAF bind spontaneously with HSA. However, the binding of SDZ with the protein is mainly governed by the hydrophobic forces in contrast with that of CAF; where, the interaction is best explained in terms of electrostatic mechanism. Molecular docking calculation predicts the binding of these drugs in different location of sub-domain IIA in the protein structure.

  19. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time.

  20. Energy transfer in PPV-based conjugated polymers: a defocused widefield fluorescence microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooley, E N; Tilley, A J; White, J M; Ghiggino, K P; Bell, T D M

    2014-04-21

    Both pendant and main chain conjugated MEH-PPV based polymers have been studied at the level of single chains using confocal and widefield fluorescence microscopy techniques. In particular, defocused widefield fluorescence is applied to reveal the extent of energy transfer in these polymers by identifying whether they act as single emitters. For main chain conjugated MEH-PPV, molecular weight and the surrounding matrix play a primary role in determining energy transport processes and whether single emitter behaviour is observed. Surprisingly in polymers with a saturated backbone but containing the same pendant MEH-PPV oligomer on each repeating unit, intra-chain energy transfer to a single emitter is also apparent. The results imply there is chromophore heterogeneity that can facilitate energy funneling to the emitting site. Both main chain conjugated and pendant MEH-PPV polymers exhibit changes in orientation of the emission dipole during a fluorescence trajectory of many seconds, whereas a model MEH-PPV oligomer does not. The results suggest that, in the polymers, the nature of the emitting chromophores can change during the time trajectory.

  1. National Policy for solid waste and reverse logistics of fluorescent lamps after consumption: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Cestari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent lamps are used increasingly today. Considered energy-saving lamps, they become hazardous waste at the end of their life cycle. They are composed partly of mercury, considered harmful to human health. Fluorescent lamps, together with tires and pesticide containers, fall under federal legislation that establishes and regulates their proper disposal. In 2010, Federal Law 12.305 / 2010 was created, establishing the National Policy on Solid Waste (PNRS, making businesses and consumers responsible for the proper disposal of their waste. This article aims to analyze the reverse logistics process of fluorescent lamps post-consumption, in a public education institution. The research used case studies and interviews with managers of the materials administration and warehouse departments of the institution. It was identified that since 2010, the educational institution has not been performing reverse logistics and has been accumulating hazardous material in its warehouses. This paper contributes a suggestion to improve the reverse logistics process and worker safety, and to prevent environmental risks.

  2. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-03-01

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and

  3. Excitation spectroscopy in multispectral optical fluorescence tomography: methodology, feasibility and computer simulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Ahn, Sangtae; Levenson, Richard; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Cherry, Simon R.; Leahy, Richard M.

    2009-08-01

    Molecular probes used for in vivo optical fluorescence tomography (OFT) studies in small animals are typically chosen such that their emission spectra lie in the 680-850 nm wavelength range. This is because tissue attenuation in this spectral band is relatively low, allowing optical photons even from deep sites in tissue to reach the animal surface and consequently be detected by a CCD camera. The wavelength dependence of tissue optical properties within the 680-850 nm band can be exploited for emitted light by measuring fluorescent data via multispectral approaches and incorporating the spectral dependence of these optical properties into the OFT inverse problem—that of reconstructing underlying 3D fluorescent probe distributions from optical data collected on the animal surface. However, in the aforementioned spectral band, due to only small variations in the tissue optical properties, multispectral emission data, though superior for image reconstruction compared to achromatic data, tend to be somewhat redundant. A different spectral approach for OFT is to capitalize on the larger variations in the optical properties of tissue for excitation photons than for the emission photons by using excitation at multiple wavelengths as a means of decoding source depth in tissue. The full potential of spectral approaches in OFT can be realized by a synergistic combination of these two approaches, that is, exciting the underlying fluorescent probe at multiple wavelengths and measuring emission data multispectrally. In this paper, we describe a method that incorporates both excitation and emission spectral information into the OFT inverse problem. We describe a linear algebraic formulation of the multiple wavelength illumination-multispectral detection forward model for OFT and compare it to models that use only excitation at multiple wavelengths or those that use only multispectral detection techniques. This study is carried out in a realistic inhomogeneous mouse atlas

  4. Using Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) to study dynamics of the Structural Maintenance of Chromosome (SMC) complex in vivo

    CERN Document Server

    Badrinarayanan, Anjana

    2016-01-01

    The SMC complex, MukBEF, is important for chromosome organization and segregation in Escherichia coli. Fluorescently tagged MukBEF forms distinct spots (or 'foci') in the cell, where it is thought to carry out most of its chromosome associated activities. This chapter outlines the technique of Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) as a method to study the properties of YFP-tagged MukB in fluorescent foci. This method can provide important insight into the dynamics of MukB on DNA and be used to study its biochemical properties in vivo.

  5. Fully state-selected VMI study of the near-threshold photodissociation of NO(2): variation of the angular anisotropy parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S J; Willitsch, S; Softley, T P

    2007-11-14

    Velocity-map ion imaging (VMI) has been used to study the angular distribution of the NO fragment generated in the photodissociation of NO(2) at a variety of photolysis wavelengths. Images were recorded for the channels NO (2)Pi(1/2) (v = 0, J= 3/2, 11/2 and 21/2) + O ((3)P(2,1)), for excitation energies ranging from the onset (E(avl)/hc = 0 cm(-1)) to E(avl)/hc approximately 900 cm(-1). The angular anisotropy parameter beta was obtained as a function of available energy. Photofragment multiphoton ionization (PHOMPI) spectra were also recorded in the energy range E(avl)/hc = 0-300 cm(-1) for each of these channels. Large fluctuations of beta as a function of E(avl) were found in all observed dissociation channels. These variations are discussed in terms of the lifetimes of the originally photoexcited overlapping resonances in the A(2)B(2) state of NO(2), the dynamics of which are strongly influenced by nonadiabatic coupling with the X[combining tilde](2)A(1) state. The potential use of this photolysis process for production of cold oxygen atoms is discussed.

  6. Applying the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility technique to the study of the tectonic evolution of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Dudzisz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the use of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS method to determine the orientation of the principal tectonic strain directions developed during the formation of the West Spitsbergen Fold-and-Thrust Belt (WSFTB. The AMS measurements and extensive rock-magnetic studies of the Lower Triassic rocks reported here were focused on the recognition of the magnetic fabric, the identification of ferromagnetic minerals and an estimation of the influence of ferro- and paramagnetic minerals on magnetic susceptibility. At most sites, the paramagnetic minerals controlled the magnetic susceptibility, and at only one site the impact of ferromagnetic minerals was higher. The AMS technique documented the presence of different types of magnetic fabrics within the sampled sites. At two sites, a normal (Kmin perpendicular to the bedding magnetic fabric of sedimentary origin was detected. This was associated with a good clustering of the maximum AMS axes imposed by tectonic strain. The Kmax magnetic lineation directions obtained here parallel the general NNW–SSE trend of the WSFTB fold axial traces and thrust fronts. The two other investigated sites possessed mixed and inverted fabrics, the latter of which appear to reflect the presence of iron-bearing carbonates.

  7. Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörgő, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Å; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lim, H; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slunečka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J; White, S N; Willis, N; Winter, D; Woody, C L; Wysocki, M; Xie, W; Yamaguchi, Y L; Yanovich, A; Yasin, Z; Ying, J; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Younus, I; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zaudtke, O; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zimányi, J; Zolin, L

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as...

  8. Substantia nigra fractional anisotropy is not a diagnostic biomarker of Parkinson's disease: A diagnostic performance study and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Fabiana C.C.; Vieira, Gilson; Lucato, Leandro T.; Leite, Claudia C.; Pastorello, Bruno F.; Otaduy, Maria C.G.; Chaim, Khallil T.; Campanholo, Kenia R. [University of Sao Paulo, LIM-44, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sato, Joao R. [University of Sao Paulo, LIM-44, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do ABC, Center of Mathematics, Computation and Cognition, Santo Andre (Brazil); Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson; Novaes, Natalia P. [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); University of Sao Paulo, Department of Neurology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Magalhaes Melo, Luciano; Goncalves, Marcia R.; Reis Barbosa, Egberto [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Neurology, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Pereira do Nascimento, Felipe Barjud; Amaro, Edson [University of Sao Paulo, LIM-44, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Jacobsen Teixeira, Manoel [University of Sao Paulo, Department of Neurosurgery, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso, Ellison Fernando [University of Sao Paulo, LIM-44, Department of Radiology, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Institute of Mathematics and Statistics University of Sao Paulo (IME-USP), Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-06-15

    Our goal was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of substantia nigra fractional anisotropy (SN-FA) for Parkinson's disease (PD) diagnosis in a sample similar to the clinical setting, including patients with essential tremor (ET) and healthy controls (HC). We also performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate mean change in SN-FA induced by PD and its diagnostic accuracy. Our sample consisted of 135 subjects: 72 PD, 21 ET and 42 HC. To address inter-scanner variability, two 3.0-T MRI scans were performed. MRI results of this sample were pooled into a meta-analysis that included 1,432 subjects (806 PD and 626 HC). A bivariate model was used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy measures. In our sample, we did not observe a significant effect of disease on SN-FA and it was uninformative for diagnosis. The results of the meta-analysis estimated a 0.03 decrease in mean SN-FA in PD relative to HC (CI: 0.01-0.05). However, the discriminatory capability of SN-FA to diagnose PD was low: pooled sensitivity and specificity were 72 % (CI: 68-75) and 63 % (CI: 58-70), respectively. There was high heterogeneity between studies (I{sup 2} = 91.9 %). SN-FA cannot be used as an isolated measure to diagnose PD. (orig.)

  9. Study on binding and fluorescence energy transfer efficiency of Rhodamine B with Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid using optical spectroscopy methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonisamy, Jenif Dsouza; Swain, Jitendriya; Dash, Sasmita

    2017-02-01

    This work focuses on the binding efficiency and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) of fluorescent dye Rhodamine B (Rh B) to Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid. The formation of gold nanoparticles inside Rh B doped Pluronic F127 copolymer have been characterized using dynamic light scattering study, HR-TEM images, UV-visible spectra and fluorescence studies. Fluorescence quenching and the constant fluorescence lifetime of the Rhodamine B present in the cavity of Pluronic F127-gold nanohybrid suggested a strong binding ability (3.5 × 103 L mol- 1), static nature of quenching and better energy transfer efficiency of fluorescent dye towards Pluronic F127-gold (Au) nanohybrids.

  10. Compositional variation of magnetic moment, magnetic anisotropy energy and coercivity in Fe(1- x)M x (M = Co/Ni) nanowires: an ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assa Aravindh, S.; Mathi Jaya, S.; Valsakumar, M. C.; Sundar, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    Ab initio simulations are used to investigate the magnetic and electronic properties of freestanding Fe(1- x)M x (M = Co/Ni) nanowires. The stability of the nanowires increases with Co (Ni) addition, as seen from the increase in cohesive energy. With the addition of Co (Ni), the average magnetic moment shows a monotonic decrease, in contrast to the Slater-Pauling behavior observed in bulk Fe-Co/Ni alloys. The magnetic anisotropy energy of the nanowire is observed to change sign, from a parallel alignment of spins along the wire axis, to a perpendicular alignment with the increase of Co and Ni content. The magnetic anisotropy energy variation is seen to be correlated with the orbital moment anisotropy. The coercivity, as calculated using the Jacobs-Bean model is observed to decrease with Co (Ni) addition to the nanowire.

  11. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  12. Mössbauer study on a two-dimensional random mixture with competing spin anisotropies K2Ni1- x Fe x F4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, A.; Anma, T.

    1987-03-01

    Mössbauer measurements have been made on a two-dimensional (2D) random mixture K2Ni1- x Fe x F4 with competing spin anisotropies. The concentration versus temperature phase diagram predicted by Oguchi and Ishikawa for mixed systems with competition between orthorhombic anisotropies has been shown to exist in K2Ni1- x Fe x F4. The coexistence of two kinds of Mössbauer spectra is seen in the transition regions, and is believed to be an intrinsic property of this system.

  13. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  14. CHANGES IN VALUES MEASURED WITH A LASER FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR ENAMEL AND DENTIN ETHCED FOR DIFFERNT TIME INTERVALS - pilot study.

    OpenAIRE

    Radostina Anastasova; Mirela Marinova-Takorova; Vladimir E. Panov

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the presented in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser fluorescent device DIAGNOdent in measuring changes in the level of mineralization of intact enamel surfaces etched for different time intervals and intact dentin etched for 30 sec. Material and methods: The study was performed on extracted human teeth. DIAGNOcam was used to measure the values of laser fluorescence of intact enamel and dentinal surfaces. Then the samples were treated with 37% H2...

  15. Optical modulator based on propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film: proof-of-concept studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo-Hui; Wang, Zheng-Chuang; Weng, Yu-Hua; Xie, Kai-Xin; Chen, Min; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Li, Yao-Qun

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the propagating surface plasmon coupled fluorescent thin film can be utilized as a fluorescence modulator to mimic multiple representative Boolean logic operations. Surface plasmon mediated fluorescence presents characteristic properties including directional and polarized emission, which hold the feasibility in creating a universal optical modulator. In this work, through constructing the thin layer with the specific thickness, surface plasmon mediated fluorescence can be modulated with an ON-OFF ratio by more than 5-fold, under a series of coupling configurations.

  16. Study of Sugar Cane Management Systems in Brazil Using Laser Induced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jader; Villas-Boas, Paulino; Carvalho, Camila; Corá, José Eduardo; Milori, Débora

    2014-05-01

    Brazil is the largest producer of cane sugar, consequently, is a leader in the production of bio-ethanol, a clean and renewable energy that fits the model of sustainable economy as discussed and pursued by our society. Our state of São Paulo concentrates 60% of national production, representing a sizeable share in the range of world production. All this economic potential is closely monitored by the scientific community, which develops numerous studies seeking an improvement in production efficiency and reduced environmental impacts caused by the planting. However, the study of soil samples, in plantation areas, demands results about the content and structural forms of organic matter (OM). Also, the soil carbon stocks depend on the type of management. Our goal is to study OM of soil samples from four sugar cane management systems: (i) unburned cane harvest, (ii) preharvest burned, (iii) addition of sugarcane bagasse ash and (iv) addition of residue from the extraction of sucrose, using Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of solid state. All the emission spectra were acquired using the system called LIFS-405, which consists of a diode laser Coherent, model cube with excitation at 405 nm, maximum output power of 50mJ and a mini-spectrometer, Ocean Optics USB2000-high sensitivity, with range of 194-894 nm and a fiber-optic bundle design (six excitation fibers in a circular path and one central fiber the collect the fluorescence). In this work, we will present the preliminary results evolving the humification index (HLIFS) of soil OM and total carbon amount (TC) for the different types of management. HLIFS shows a close correlation with the humification index of humic acid in solution obtained by means 2D conventional fluorescence spectroscopy.

  17. Preliminary studies of fluorescence image-guided photothermal therapy of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma in vivo using multifunctional gold nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Elham; Singh, Mohan; Zhou, Yu; Gallina, Maria Elena; Zhao, Hailin; Ma, Daqing; Cass, Anthony; Hanna, George; Elson, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    We present a preliminary in vivo study of fluorescence imaging and photothermal therapy (PTT) of human oesophageal adenocarcinoma using multi-functionalised gold nanorods (GNRs). After establishing tumour xenograft in mouse functionalised GNRs were administrated intravenously (IV). Fluorescence imaging was performed to detect the tumour area. The intensity of the fluorescence signal varied significantly across the tumour site and surrounding tissues. PTT was then performed using a 808 nm continuous wave diode laser to irradiate the tumour for 3 minutes, inducing a temperature rise of ~44°C, which photothermally ablated the tumour.

  18. Study on Fluorescence Property of Sparfloxacin Derivatizing System and its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In acid medium, sparfloxacin is oxidized by nitrous acid, then reacts with hydrobromic acid to form a new fluorescence substance, which can emit the strong fluorescence, which is 151 fold more than that of sparfloxacin itself. By this, a new sensitive method for the determination of sparfloxacin in human urine by derivative-synchronous fluorescence is presented with good results.

  19. Synthesis and spectroscopic study of highly fluorescent β-enaminone based boron complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhar, Haribhau S.; Gadilohar, Balu L.; Shankarling, Ganapati S.

    2015-07-01

    The newly synthesized 1, 1, 2-trimethyl-1H benzo[e]indoline based β-enaminone boron complexes exhibited the intense fluorescence (Fmax = 522-547 nm) in solution as well as in solid state (Fmax = 570-586 nm). These complexes exhibited large stoke shift, excellent thermal and photo stability when compared to the boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) colorants. Optimized geometry and orbital distribution in ground states were computed by employing density functional theory (DFT). The cyclic voltammetry study revealed the better electron transport ability of these molecules than current electroluminescent materials like tris(8-hydroxyquinoli-nato)-aluminium (Alq3) and BODIPY, which can find application in electroluminescent devices.

  20. Study the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahong, Chen; Ruxiu, Cai; Ke, Zhang

    2007-05-01

    The intracellular NAD level plays a pivotal role in numerous biological processes such as rhythm, senescence, cancer and death. The study of the intracellular NAD level has been one of the "hotspots" in biomedical research. We investigated the effect of Vitamin K on intracellular NAD level in yeast by fluorescence spectrum in this paper. Plasma membrane redox system of yeast was found to be greatly promoted by the addition of Vitamin K 3 or Vitamin K 1. Ferricyanide reduction catalyzed by Vitamin K was accompanied by the decrease in intracellular NADH concentration and the increase in intracellular NAD level of yeast cells.

  1. QM/MM Studies of Contemporary and Novel Membrane Raft Fluorescent Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Blake

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have studied a number of contemporary and novel membrane probes, selected for their structural similarity to membrane raft components, in order to properly anchor themselves within a sphingolipid/cholesterol rich region. A QM/MM approach was adopted in order to understand the structural and electrostatic influences of fluorescence emission shifts of the probes in different lipid and solvation environments. The proposed modifications to the membrane probes have shown encouraging data relating not only to emission shifts within the membrane, but also their ability to anchor within a membrane raft domain and the stability to internalization within a membrane system.

  2. Multimodality Imaging Probe for Positron Emission Tomography and Fluorescence Imaging Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Pandey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Our goal is to develop multimodality imaging agents for use in cell tracking studies by positron emission tomography (PET and optical imaging (OI. For this purpose, bovine serum albumin (BSA was complexed with biotin (histologic studies, 5(6- carboxyfluorescein, succinimidyl ester (FAM SE (OI studies, and diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA for chelating gallium 68 (PET studies. For synthesis of BSA-biotin-FAM-DTPA, BSA was coupled to (+-biotin N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (biotin-NHSI. BSA- biotin was treated with DTPA-anhydride and biotin-BSA-DTPA was reacted with FAM. The biotin-BSA-DTPA-FAM was reacted with gallium chloride 3 to 5 mCi eluted from the generator using 0.1 N HCl and was passed through basic resin (AG 11 A8 and 150 mCi (100 μL, pH 7–8 was incubated with 0.1 mg of FAM conjugate (100 μL at room temperature for 15 minutes to give 66Ga-BSA-biotin-DTPA-FAM. A shaved C57 black mouse was injected with FAM conjugate (50 μL at one flank and FAM-68Ga (50 μL, 30 mCi at the other. Immediately after injection, the mouse was placed in a fluorescence imaging system (Kodak In-Vivo F, Bruker Biospin Co., Woodbridge, CT and imaged (Λex: 465 nm, Λem: 535 nm, time: 8 seconds, Xenon Light Source, Kodak. The same mouse was then placed under an Inveon microPET scanner (Siemens Medical Solutions, Knoxville, TN injected (intravenously with 25 μCi of 18F and after a half-hour (to allow sufficient bone uptake was imaged for 30 minutes. Molecular weight determined using matrix-associated laser desorption ionization (MALDI for the BSA sample was 66,485 Da and for biotin-BSA was 67,116 Da, indicating two biotin moieties per BSA molecule; for biotin-BSA-DTPA was 81,584 Da, indicating an average of 30 DTPA moieties per BSA molecule; and for FAM conjugate was 82,383 Da, indicating an average of 1.7 fluorescent moieties per BSA molecule. Fluorescence imaging clearly showed localization of FAM conjugate and FAM-68Ga at respective flanks of the mouse

  3. Secondary anisotropies of the CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, Nabila; Silk, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background fluctuations provide a powerful probe of the dark ages of the universe through the imprint of the secondary anisotropies associated with the reionisation of the universe and the growth of structure. We review the relation between the secondary anisotropies and and the primary anisotropies that are directly generated by quantum fluctuations in the very early universe. The physics of secondary fluctuations is described, with emphasis on the ionisation history and the evolution of structure. We discuss the different signatures arising from the secondary effects in terms of their induced temperature fluctuations, polarisation and statistics. The secondary anisotropies are being actively pursued at present, and we review the future and current observational status.

  4. Polarization singularity anisotropy: determining monstardom

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    C points, that is isolated points of circular polarization in transverse fields of varying polarization, are classified morphologically into three distinct types, known as lemons, stars and monstars. These morphologies are interpreted here according to two natural parameters associated with the singularity, namely the anisotropy of the C point, and the polarization azimuth on the anisotropy axis. In addition to providing insight into singularity morphology, this observation applies to the densities of the various morphologies in isotropic random polarization speckle fields.

  5. Study of perpendicular anisotropy L1{sub 0}-FePt pseudo spin valves using a micromagnetic trilayer model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Pin, E-mail: hopin@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore); Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR, 117608 Singapore (Singapore); Evans, Richard F. L.; Chantrell, Roy W. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Han, Guchang [Data Storage Institute, Agency of Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR, 117608 Singapore (Singapore); Chow, Gan-Moog; Chen, Jingsheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117576 Singapore (Singapore)

    2015-06-07

    A trilayer micromagnetic model based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Bloch equation of motion is utilized to study the properties of L1{sub 0}-FePt/TiN/L1{sub 0}-FePt pseudo spin valves (PSVs) in direct comparison with experiment. Theoretical studies give an insight on the crystallographic texture, magnetic properties, reversal behavior, interlayer coupling effects, and magneto-transport properties of the PSVs, in particular, with varying thickness of the top L1{sub 0}-FePt and TiN spacer. We show that morphological changes in the FePt layers, induced by varying the FePt layer thickness, lead to different hysteresis behaviors of the samples, caused by changes in the interlayer and intralayer exchange couplings. Such effects are important for the optimization of the PSVs due to the relationship between the magnetic properties, domain structures, and the magnetoresistance of the device.

  6. Quantitative Studies of Antimicrobial Peptide Pore Formation in Large Unilamellar Vesicles by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy (FCS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2013-01-01

    leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes through transmembrane pores formed by each of the three representative antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The experimental results demonstrate that leakage assays based on fluorescence correlation spectroscopy offer new...... and detailed insight into the size and cooperative nature of transmembrane pores formed by antimicrobial peptides that is not available from the conventional quenching-based leakage assays....... highly warranted. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy is a biophysical technique that can be used to quantify leakage of fluorescent probes of different sizes from large unilamellar vesicle, thereby potentially becoming such a new tool. However, the usage of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy...

  7. Clinical detection studies of Barrett's metaplasia and oesophageal adenocarcinoma by means of laser-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Annika M.; von Holstein, Christer S.; Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Willen, Roger; Walther, Bruno; Svanberg, Katarina

    1995-12-01

    Five patients with Barrett's metaplastic epithelium were investigated by means of laser- induced fluorescence after low-dose i.v. injection (0.35 mg/kg b.w.) of PhotofrinR in connection with endoscopy procedures. The excitation wavelength was 405 nm. Recorded fluorescence spectra were evaluated by forming ratios with the photosensitizer fluorescence as numerator and the autofluorescence as denominator. Two patients had no evidence of malignancy and their fluorescence ratios were consequently rather small, whereas the other three patients had adenocarcinoma and showed considerably higher ratios. The results indicate that laser-induced fluorescence can be used as an aid in detecting malignant transformations in Barrett's metaplasia.

  8. Raman scattering or fluorescence emission? Raman spectroscopy study on lime-based building and conservation materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszowska, Zofia; Malek, Kamilla; Staniszewska-Slezak, Emilia; Niedzielska, Karina

    2016-12-05

    This work presents an in-depth study on Raman spectra excited with 1064 and 532nm lasers of lime binders employed in the past as building materials and revealed today as valuable conservation materials. We focus our interest on the bands of strong intensity, which are present in the spectra of all binders acquired with laser excitation at 1064nm, but absent in the corresponding spectra acquired with laser excitation at 532nm. We suggest, that the first group of spectra represents fluorescence phenomena of unknown origin and the second true Raman scattering. In our studies, we also include two other phases of lime cycle, i.e. calcium carbonate (a few samples of calcite of various origins) and calcium oxide (quicklime) to assess how structural and chemical transformations of lime phases affect the NIR-Raman spectral profile. Furthermore, we analyse a set of carbonated limewashes and lime binders derived from old plasters to give an insight into their spectral characteristics after excitation with the 1064nm laser line. NIR-Raman micro-mapping results are also presented to reveal the spatial distribution of building materials and fluorescent species in the cross-section of plaster samples taken from a 15th century chapel. Our study shows that the Raman analysis can help identify lime-based building and conservation materials, however, a caution is advised in the interpretation of the spectra acquired using 1064nm excitation.

  9. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  10. Effects of surface anisotropy on magnetic vortex core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V., E-mail: engraver@univ.net.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin–lattice simulations. - Highlights: • The shape of magnetic vortex core is essentially influenced by SA (surface anisotropy). • We predict barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex depending on SA. • The variational approach fully describes the vortex core deformation. • We performed spin–lattice simulations to detect SA influence on the vortex core.

  11. Cubic versus spherical magnetic nanoparticles: the role of surface anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Alvarez, G; Qin, J; Sepelák, V; Bergmann, I; Vasilakaki, M; Trohidou, K N; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mikhaylova, M; Muhammed, M; Baró, M D; Nogués, J

    2008-10-08

    The magnetic properties of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) cubic and spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes have been experimentally and theoretically studied. The blocking temperature, T(B), of the nanoparticles depends on their shape, with the spherical ones exhibiting larger T(B). Other low temperature properties such as saturation magnetization, coercivity, loop shift or spin canting are rather similar. The experimental effective anisotropy and the Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the different random surface anisotropy of the two morphologies combined with the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of gamma-Fe2O3 is the origin of these effects.

  12. Review of the anisotropy working group at UHECR-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has recently experienced a jump in statistics as well as improved instrumentation. This has allowed a better sensitivity in searching for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays. In this written version of the presentation given by the inter-collaborative “Anisotropy Working Group” at the International Symposium on Future Directions in UHECR physics at CERN in February 2012, we report on the current status for anisotropy searches in the arrival directions of UHECRs.

  13. Synthesis, photophysical properties and systematic evaluations of new phenanthroimidazole fluorescent probe for bioimaging: Experimental and theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Przemysław; Jędrzejewska, Beata; Pietrzak, Marek; Janek, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the newly synthesized 4'-(1H-phenantro[9,10-d]-imidazol-2-yl)-bifenyl-4-carboaldehyde - PB2 was investigated as a fluorescent dye. For this reason, the spectroscopic properties in solvents of different polarity were studied. The experimental data were supported by quantum-chemical calculations using density functional theory. Measurements and theoretical calculations showed that PB2 compound is characterized by the non-monotonic solvatochromism, strongly polar charge transfer excited state, large Stokes' shift, high fluorescence quantum yield and high fluorescence lifetime. Simulations using AutoDock presented in this study, showed that after conjugation with Concanavalin A in the active site with LYS200, the PB2 possesses the highest probability of binding affinity. Circular dichroism (CD) measurement was performed to monitor the changes of the secondary structure of Concanavalin A induced by the presence of PB2 fluorophore. These results indicate that the addition of PB2 influences the secondary structure of Concanavalin A, but does not affect the interactions with carbohydrate moieties. Finally, by using fluorescence microscopy it was demonstrated that the PB2 is the photostable fluorescent probe and PB2 conjugate Concanavalin A exhibits a blue fluorescence. The results of this study have implications in designing PB2-protein conjugate as a valuable alternative to commercial probes designed for cellular labeling in biological and biomedical research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Monte Carlo study of x-ray fluorescence in x-ray detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, J M; Seibert, J A; Sabol, J M; Tecotzky, M

    1999-06-01

    Advances in digital x-ray detector systems have led to a renewed interest in the performance of x-ray phosphors and other detector materials. Indirect flat panel x-ray detector and charged coupled device (CCD) systems require a more technologically challenging geometry, whereby the x-ray beam is incident on the front side of the scintillator, and the light produced must diffuse to the back surface of the screen to reach the photoreceptor. Direct detector systems based on selenium have also enjoyed a growing interest, both commercially and academically. Monte Carlo simulation techniques were used to study the x-ray scattering (Rayleigh and Compton) and the more prevalent x-ray fluorescence properties of seven different x-ray detector materials, Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2. The redistribution of x-ray energy, back towards the x-ray source, in a forward direction through the detector, and lateral reabsorption in the detector was computed under monoenergetic conditions (1 keV to 130 keV by 1 keV intervals) with five detector thicknesses, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 mg/cm2 (Se was studied from 30 to 1000 mg/cm2). The radial distribution (related to the point spread function) of reabsorbed x-ray energy was also determined. Representative results are as follows: At 55 keV, more (31.3%) of the incident x-ray energy escaped from a 90 mg/cm2Gd2O2S detector than was absorbed (27.9%). Approximately 1% of the total absorbed energy was reabsorbed greater than 0.5 mm from the primary interaction, for 90 mg/cm2 CsI exposed at 100 kVp. The ratio of reabsorbed secondary (fluorescence + scatter) radiation to the primary radiation absorbed in the detectors (90 mg/cm2) (S/P) was determined as 10%, 16%, 2%, 12%, 3%, 3%, and 0.3% for a 100 kVp tungsten anode x-ray spectrum, for the Gd2O2S, CsI, Se, BaFBr, YTaO4, CaWO4, and ThO2 detectors, respectively. The results indicate significant x-ray fluorescent escape and reabsorption in common x-ray detectors. These findings

  15. Steady-state tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy study to probe tertiary structure of proteins in solid powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas K; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain information about protein tertiary structure in solid state by using steady state tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence emission spectroscopy on protein powders. Beta-lactoglobulin (betaLg) and interferon alpha-2a (IFN) powder samples were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy using a front surface sample holder. Two different sets of dried betaLg samples were prepared by vacuum drying of solutions: one containing betaLg, and the other containing a mixture of betaLg and guanidine hydrochloride. Dried IFN samples were prepared by vacuum drying of IFN solutions and by vacuum drying of polyethylene glycol precipitated IFN. The results obtained from solid samples were compared with the emission scans of these proteins in solutions. The emission scans obtained from protein powders were slightly blue-shifted compared to the solution spectra due to the absence of water. The emission scans were red-shifted for betaLg samples dried from solutions containing GuHCl. The magnitude of the shifts in lambda(max) depended on the extent of drying of the samples, which was attributed to the crystallization of GuHCl during the drying process. The shifts in the lambda(max) of the Trp emission spectrum are associated with the changes in the tertiary structure of betaLg. In the case of IFN, the emission scans obtained from PEG-precipitated and dried sample were different compared to the emission scans obtained from IFN in solution and from vacuum dried IFN. The double peaks observed in this sample were attributed to the unfolding of the protein. In the presence of trehalose, the two peaks converged to form a single peak, which was similar to solution emission spectra, whereas no change was observed in the presence of mannitol. We conclude that Trp fluorescence spectroscopy provides a simple and reliable means to characterize Trp microenvironment in protein powders that is related to the tertiary conformation of proteins in the solid state. This study shows

  16. Modalities of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in fine-grained sedimentary rocks deformed in a contraction-dominated setting - A case study of the Central Armorican Domain, Brittany, France

    OpenAIRE

    Haerinck, Tom

    2014-01-01

    An integrated rock-magnetic and mineralogical approach is performed for a case study of low-grade metasedimentary rocks from the Central Armorican Domain (CAD). The objective is twofold. Firstly, gaining a better understanding of the relation between the mineral sources of magnetic susceptibility and the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Secondly, verifying whether the magnetic fabrics have a potential as a regional strain marker. For this goal, a lithostratigraphical reference uni...

  17. Accurate study of FosPeg® distribution in a mouse model using fluorescence imaging technique and fluorescence white monte carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used for quantitative in vivo assessment of drug concentration. Light attenuation in tissue is compensated for through Monte-Carlo simulations. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity, directly proportional to the drug concentration, could be obtained....

  18. Application of synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy to the study of multi-metal oxide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). G.T. Seaborg Inst. for Transactinium Science; McHugo, S.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1998-12-31

    Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microscopy has been used to study multi-metal oxide ceramics that have been designed to sequester radioactive actinide elements for long-term storage and disposal. X-ray fluorescent lines for the various elements have been used for lateral elemental mapping of the materials, and the heterogeneity of the samples is discussed with respect to the elements in the crystallographic phases that have previously been documented by other means of structural and chemical analyses.

  19. Relationship between electrical conductivity anisotropy and fabric anisotropy in granular materials during drained triaxial compressive tests: a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qifei; Revil, André; Li, Zhaofeng; Wang, Yu-Hsing

    2017-07-01

    The anisotropy of granular media and its evolution during shearing are important aspects required in developing physics-based constitutive models in Earth sciences. The development of relationships between geoelectrical properties and the deformation of porous media has applications to the monitoring of faulting and landslides. However, such relationships are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigate the definition of the electrical conductivity anisotropy tensor of granular materials in presence of surface conductivity of the grains. Fabric anisotropy is related to the components of the fabric tensor. We define an electrical anisotropy factor based on the Archie's exponent second-order symmetric tensor m of granular materials. We use numerical simulations to confirm a relationship between the evolution of electrical and fabric anisotropy factors during shearing. To realize the simulations, we build a virtual laboratory in which we can easily perform synthetic experiments. We first simulate drained compressive triaxial tests of loose and dense granular materials (porosity 0.45 and 0.38, respectively) using the discrete element method. Then, the electrical conductivity tensor of a set of deformed synthetic samples is computed using the finite-difference method. The numerical results show that shear strains are responsible for a measurable anisotropy in the bulk conductivity of granular media. The observed electrical anisotropy response, during shearing, is distinct for dense and loose synthetic samples. Electrical and fabric anisotropy factors exhibit however a unique linear correlation, regardless of the shear strain and the initial state (porosity) of the synthetic samples. The practical implication of this finding confirms the usefulness of the electrical conductivity method in studying the fabric tensor of granular media. This result opens the door in using time-lapse electrical resistivity to study non-intrusively the evolution of anisotropy

  20. Preparation of amphiphilic block copolymer containing triazene moieties and fluorescence study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Emil C Buruiana; Andreea L Chibac; Violeta Melinte; Tinca Buruiana

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis via microwave accelerated reversible additionfragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of an amphiphilic block copolymer poly(acrylic acid)-b-poly(dodecylacrylamide-co-1-(phenyl)-3-(2-methacryloyloxyethyl carbamoyloxyethyl)-3-methyltriazene-1) [PAA-b-(PDA-co-PUMA-T)]. The structure and the chemical composition of the block copolymer were confirmed by spectral/thermal analysis. The photoreactivity of the triazene sequences from PAA-b-(PDA-co-PUMA-T) was quantified by UV/vis irradiation in chloroform/dimethylformamide solutions and in thin film, indicating that the solvent polarity modifies with an order of magnitude the rate constant values. The lower rate constant in film state (film = 1.3 × 10−3 s-1), shows that the higher mobility of polymeric chains in solution allow a more rapid orientation, favourable to the triazene bond cleavage. The capability of block copolymer to form micelles in aqueous environment and implicitly, its critical micelle concentration (CMC) was evidenced through fluorescence measurements using pyrene probe (10-6 M), the CMC value being of 4.64 × 10−3 g L-1 PAA--(PDA--PUMA-T) (3.27 × 10−7 M). Experiments of fluorescence quenching with various metal cations (UO$^{2+}_{2}$, Fe2+, Fe3+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Co2+, Pb2+ and Hg2+) suggested that such a block copolymer could find applications as fluorescence-based chemosensor for the detection of iron cations in homogeneous organic solutions or aqueous environments by thin films.

  1. Fluorescence quenching study on the interaction of ferroferric oxide nanoparticles with bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Changchun; Xu, Guangkuan; Feng, Ying; Lu, Linhao; Sun, Wenyuan; Sun, Runguang

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence quenching was used to study the potential interaction mechanism of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) with either hydrophilic ferroferric oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) or hydrophobic Fe3O4 NPs. The experimental results indicated the mechanism between BSA and hydrophilic Fe3O4 NPs was static quenching and the one between BSA and hydrophobic Fe3O4 NPs was dynamic process that was drove by Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET). And the binding parameters for the interaction of BSA with either hydrophilic or hydrophobic Fe3O4 NPs were calculated by using the fluorescence quenching measurement. The binding constant (KA) values of hydrophilic Fe3O4 NPs were 8518.73 ± 23.35 (at 298 K), 1190.31 ± 15.41 (at 306 K) and 321.97 ± 8.57 (at 313 K), respectively. The thermodynamic analysis implied that the intermolecular forces between BSA and hydrophilic Fe3O4 NPs were Van der Waals interaction or hydrogen bond, because the values of ΔH and ΔS between them were negative. While the one of BSA and hydrophobic Fe3O4 NPs involved hydrophobic forces, owing to the positive ΔH and ΔS between them. But they were all enthalpy-driven and exothermic, since their ΔG values were all negative. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy suggested that the conformation of tryptophan residue of BSA was changed in the presence of hydrophilic Fe3O4 NPs or hydrophobic Fe3O4 NPs, because the position of the maximum emission wavelength had a discernible red shift.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  3. Anisotropy tuning with the Wilson flow

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, T; Mages, S; Schafer, A; Szabo, K K

    2012-01-01

    We use the Wilson flow to define the gauge anisotropy at a given physical scale. We demonstrate the use of the anisotropic flow by performing the tuning of the bare gauge anisotropy in the tree-level Symanzik action for several lattice spacings and target anisotropies. We use this method to tune the anisotropy parameters in full QCD, where we also exploit the diminishing effect of a well chosen smearing on the renormalization of the fermion anisotropy.

  4. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  5. Application of the fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of portland cement clinker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montoto San Miguel, Modesto

    1987-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of fluorescence light microscopy in the textural study of Portland cement clinker, specially its porosity, is presented. Principles and types of the technique are commented and the suggested sample preparation method is described. The use of fluorescence microscopy allows an easier study of the clinker porosity, and very proper images for automated quantification can be obtained. Besides, the samples can also be observed by reflected-light polarizing microscopy.

    Se presenta la utilidad de la microscopía óptica de fluorescencia para el estudio textural del clínker de cemento Portland, especialmente su porosidad. Se comentan los fundamentos y modalidades de la técnica, y se describe el método recomendado de preparación de muestras. La utilización de la microscopía de fluorescencia permite un estudio más fácil de la porosidad, obteniéndose imágenes muy apropiadas para su cuantificación mediante técnicas automatizadas. Además, las muestras para fluorescencia pueden ser estudiadas complementariamente por microscopía óptica de polarización por luz reflejada.

  6. Optical absorption of the blue fluorescent protein: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Xabier; Marques, Miguel A L; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2005-09-07

    An extensive study of the optical absorption spectra of the blue fluorescent protein (BFP) is presented. We investigate different protonation states of the chromophore (neutral, anionic, and cationic) and analyze the role of the protein environment and of thermal fluctuations. The role of the environment is 2-fold: (i) it induces structural modifications of the gas-phase chromophore, the most important being the torsion of the imida rings; and (ii) it makes a local-field modification of the external electromagnetic field. It turns out that the torsion of the imida rings shifts significantly the gas-phase spectra to lower energies, whereas the consistent inclusion of the closest residues field produces only minor modifications on the spectra. From all of the configurations studied, the neutral cis-HSD and the anionic HSA seem to be the most likely candidates to explain the experimental spectrum. Furthermore, the present results clearly rule out the presence of the cationic protonation state (HSP) of the chromophore. However, a better description of the measured experimental absorption data may be obtained when the temperature fluctuations of the floppy torsional motion of the two imida rings are included. Our results, together with previous work on the green fluorescent protein, demonstrate the power of combining time-dependent density functional calculations and optical absorption measurements to discern the relevant chemical information on the nature and state of chromopeptides.

  7. Fluorescence quenching study of quercetin interaction with bovine milk xanthine oxidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulzadeh, Farzaneh; Jabary, Hamideh Nadjarpour; Naseri, Abdolhossein; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2009-02-01

    Quercetin is a natural flavonoid with many important therapeutic properties. The interaction of this polyphenolic compound bovine milk xanthine oxidase as one of its major target proteins was studied using fluorescence quenching method for the first time. It was found that the fluorescence quenching of xanthine oxidase occurs through a static mechanism. The results revealed the presence of a single binding site on xanthine oxidase with the binding constant value equals to 1.153 × 10 4 l mol -1 at 310 K and pH 7.4. The thermodynamic parameters were also calculated at different temperatures. The enthalpy and entropy changes were found as -10.661 kJ mol -1 and +43.321 J mol -1 K -1 indicating that both hydrogen binding and hydrophobic are involved in the interaction of this polyphenolic natural compound with xanthine oxidase. The results may provide a ground for further studies with different flavonoids to find a safe alternative for allopurinol, the only xanthine oxidase inhibitor with clinical application.

  8. Comparative Studies of Interactions between Fluorodihydroquinazolin Derivatives and Human Serum Albumin with Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, 3-(fluorobenzylideneamino-6-chloro-1-(3,3-dimethylbutanoyl-phenyl-2,3-dihydroquinazolin-4(1H-one (FDQL derivatives have been designed and synthesized to study the interaction between fluorine substituted dihydroquinazoline derivatives with human serum albumin (HSA using fluorescence, circular dichroism and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results indicated that the FDQL could bind to HSA, induce conformation and the secondary structure changes of HSA, and quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA through a static quenching mechanism. The thermodynamic parameters, ΔH, ΔS, and ΔG, calculated at different temperatures, revealed that the binding was through spontaneous and hydrophobic forces and thus played major roles in the association. Based on the number of binding sites, it was considered that one molecule of FDQL could bind to a single site of HSA. Site marker competition experiments indicated that the reactive site of HSA to FDQL mainly located in site II (subdomain IIIA. The substitution by fluorine in the benzene ring could increase the interactions between FDQL and HSA to some extent in the proper temperature range through hydrophobic effect, and the substitution at meta-position enhanced the affinity greater than that at para- and ortho-positions.

  9. Probing solute-solvent interaction in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids: A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudhir Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2014-03-01

    Rotational diffusion of two organic solutes, coumarin153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP) has been investigated in four ionic liquids (ILs), viz. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate (EMIMTFA), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate (EMIMESU), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIMTFB) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate (EMIMTCB), as a function of temperature. Between the two probes, AP can act as hydrogen-bond-donor to the solvents having hydrogen bond acceptor ability. The results indicate that the rotational dynamics of C153 is mainly governed by the viscosity of the medium. On the other hand, the rotational motion of AP is found to be significantly hindered in the ILs depending on the nature of anions of the ILs. Rotational coupling constant values for AP in the ILs follow the order TFA > ESU > TCB > TFB. The slower rotational motion of AP in these ILs has been attributed to the specific hydrogen bonding interaction between AP and anions of ILs.

  10. Using Fluorescence Spectroscopy to Evaluate Hill Parameters and Heterogeneity of Ligand Binding to Cytochromes P450

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Glenn A.; Carlson, Benjamin; Hansen, Jennifer; Mihelc, Elaine; Martin, Martha V.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2009-03-01

    The cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are hemoproteins that oxidize many drugs and carcinogens. Binding interactions of two CYPs with Nile Red, pyrene, and alpha-naphthoflavone were studied using fluorescence quenching. Upon interaction with CYPs, fluorescence from pyrene excited-state dimers was quenched more efficiently than fluorescence from pyrene monomers. Quenching data was fit to the Hill equation to determine binding affinities and the Hill parameter n for the interaction of substrates with CYPs. All ligands showed strong binding to the CYPs, especially alpha-naphthoflavone, but exhibited little or no cooperativity in the interaction. Modified Stern-Volmer plots were used to confirm binding affinities, and suggested heterogeneous populations of amino acid fluorophores. Fluorescence anisotropy experiments suggest that CYP molecules tumble more rapidly when alpha-naphthoflavone is added.

  11. Does crystallographic anisotropy prevent the conventional treatment of aqueous mineral reactivity? A case study based on K-feldspar dissolution kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollet-Villard, Marion; Daval, Damien; Ackerer, Philippe; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Wild, Bastien; Knauss, Kevin G.; Fritz, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    Which conceptual framework should be preferred to develop mineral dissolution rate laws, and how the aqueous mineral reactivity should be measured? For over 30 years, the classical strategy to model solid dissolution over large space and time scales has relied on so-called kinetic rate laws derived from powder dissolution experiments. In the present study, we provide detailed investigations of the dissolution kinetics of K-feldspar as a function of surface orientation and chemical affinity which question the commonplace belief that elementary mechanisms and resulting rate laws can be retrieved from conventional powder dissolution experiments. Nanometer-scale surface measurements evidenced that K-feldspar dissolution is an anisotropic process, where the face-specific dissolution rate satisfactorily agrees with the periodic bond chain (PBC) theory. The chemical affinity of the reaction was shown to impact differently the various faces of a single crystal, controlling the spontaneous nucleation of etch pits which, in turn, drive the dissolution process. These results were used to develop a simple numerical model which revealed that single crystal dissolution rates vary with reaction progress. Overall, these results cast doubt on the conventional protocol which is used to measure mineral dissolution rates and develop kinetic rate laws, because mineral reactivity is intimately related to the morphology of dissolving crystals, which remains totally uncontrolled in powder dissolution experiments. Beyond offering an interpretive framework to understand the large discrepancies consistently reported between sources and across space scales, the recognition of the anisotropy of crystal reactivity challenges the classical approach for modeling dissolution and weathering, and may be drawn upon to develop alternative treatments of aqueous mineral reactivity.

  12. Global fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity together with segmented brain volumes assemble a predictive discriminant model for young and elderly healthy brains: a pilot study at 3T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee Guadalupe; Becerra-Laparra, Ivonne; Cortez-Conradis, David; Roldan-Valadez, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Several parameters of brain integrity can be derived from diffusion tensor imaging. These include fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD). Combination of these variables using multivariate analysis might result in a predictive model able to detect the structural changes of human brain aging. Our aim was to discriminate between young and older healthy brains by combining structural and volumetric variables from brain MRI: FA, MD, and white matter (WM), gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes. This was a cross-sectional study in 21 young (mean age, 25.71±3.04 years; range, 21–34 years) and 10 elderly (mean age, 70.20±4.02 years; range, 66–80 years) healthy volunteers. Multivariate discriminant analysis, with age as the dependent variable and WM, GM and CSF volumes, global FA and MD, and gender as the independent variables, was used to assemble a predictive model. The resulting model was able to differentiate between young and older brains: Wilks’ λ = 0.235, χ2 (6) = 37.603, p = .000001. Only global FA, WM volume and CSF volume significantly discriminated between groups. The total accuracy was 93.5%; the sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were 91.30%, 100%, 100% and 80%, respectively. Global FA, WM volume and CSF volume are parameters that, when combined, reliably discriminate between young and older brains. A decrease in FA is the strongest predictor of membership of the older brain group, followed by an increase in WM and CSF volumes. Brain assessment using a predictive model might allow the follow-up of selected cases that deviate from normal aging. PMID:27027893

  13. Study on the competitive reaction between bovine serum albumin and neomycin with ponceau S as fluorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Baosheng, E-mail: lbs@hbu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Medical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis, Ministry of Education, Center of Physics and Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China); Xue Chunli; Wang Jing; Yang Chao; Zhao Fengli; Lv Yunkai [Key Laboratory of Medical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnosis, Ministry of Education, Center of Physics and Chemistry, Hebei University, Baoding 071002 (China)

    2010-11-15

    A competitive reaction exists between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and neomycin (NM) when ponceau S (PS) is chosen as fluorescent probe. This reaction was studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The static fluorescence quenching process between BSA and PS was confirmed and the binding constant, the number of binding sites and type of interaction forces between BSA and PS were obtained. It was observed that when NM was added into BSA-PS system, the relative fluorescence intensity of BSA was recovered gradually with increase in concentration of NM, which shows that there existed competitive reaction between BSA and NM. According to competitive reaction mechanism, the equilibrium concentration of PS, the binding constant and the type of interaction forces between PS and NM were obtained.

  14. Multispectral fluorescence guided surgery; a feasibility study in a phantom using a clinical-grade laparoscopic camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Willigen, Danny M; van den Berg, Nynke S; Buckle, Tessa; KleinJan, Gijs H; Hardwick, James C; van der Poel, Henk G; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb

    2017-01-01

    Although the possibilities in image guided surgery are advancing rapidly, complex surgical procedures such as nerve sparing prostatectomy still lack precision regarding differentiation between diseased and delicate anatomical structures. Here, the use of complementary fluorescent tracers in combination with a dedicated multispectral fluorescence camera system could support differentiation between healthy and diseased tissue. In this study, we provide proof of concept data indicating how a modified clinical-grade fluorescence laparoscope can be used to sensitively detect white light and three fluorescent dyes (fluorescein, Cy5, and ICG) in a sequential fashion. Following detailed analysis of the system properties and detection capabilities, the potential of laparoscopic three-color multispectral imaging in combination with white light imaging is demonstrated in a phantom set-up for prostate cancer.

  15. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunn, Amoret L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fritz, Brad G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-07-01

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  16. Shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    H. Gomonay; Kondovych, S.; Loktev, V.

    2013-01-01

    High fraction of the surface atoms considerably enhances the influence of size and shape on the magnetic and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Shape effects in ferromagnetic nanoparticles are well understood and allow to set and control the parameters of a sample that affect its magnetic anisotropy during production. In the present paper we study the shape effects in the other widely used magnetic materials -- antiferromagnets, -- which possess vanishingly small or zero macroscopic magn...

  17. Random anisotropy induced by structural disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, B.; Labarta, A.; Badia, F.; Tejada, J.

    1992-02-01

    As a direct consequence of the structural disorder, inherent to the amorphous state, local electrostatic fields are highly irregular. Due to the interplay between those highly irregular local electrostatic fields and the aspherical 4f electron clouds of the rare earth atoms, local anisotropy axis, directed along directions that vary randomly in space, may be generated. These directions are determined by the local arrangement of atoms; therefore, some information about amorphous structure may be obtained through the study of the magnetization curve.

  18. Cytotoxicity and fluorescence studies of silica-coated CdSe quantum dots for bioimaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vibin, Muthunayagam [University of Kerala, Department of Biochemistry (India); Vinayakan, Ramachandran [National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology (CSIR), Photosciences and Photonics (India); John, Annie [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing (India); Raji, Vijayamma; Rejiya, Chellappan S.; Vinesh, Naresh S.; Abraham, Annie, E-mail: annieab2@yahoo.co.in [University of Kerala, Department of Biochemistry (India)

    2011-06-15

    The toxicological effects of silica-coated CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were investigated systematically on human cervical cancer cell line. Trioctylphosphine oxide capped CdSe QDs were synthesized and rendered water soluble by overcoating with silica, using aminopropyl silane as silica precursor. The cytotoxicity studies were conducted by exposing cells to freshly synthesized QDs as a function of time (0-72 h) and concentration up to micromolar level by Lactate dehydrogenase assay, MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide] assay, Neutral red cell viability assay, Trypan blue dye exclusion method and morphological examination of cells using phase contrast microscope. The in vitro analysis results showed that the silica-coated CdSe QDs were nontoxic even at higher loadings. Subsequently the in vivo fluorescence was also demonstrated by intravenous administration of the QDs in Swiss albino mice. The fluorescence images in the cryosections of tissues depicted strong luminescence property of silica-coated QDs under biological conditions. These results confirmed the role of these luminescent materials in biological labeling and imaging applications.

  19. Cytotoxicity and fluorescence studies of silica-coated CdSe quantum dots for bioimaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibin, Muthunayagam; Vinayakan, Ramachandran; John, Annie; Raji, Vijayamma; Rejiya, Chellappan S.; Vinesh, Naresh S.; Abraham, Annie

    2011-06-01

    The toxicological effects of silica-coated CdSe quantum dots (QDs) were investigated systematically on human cervical cancer cell line. Trioctylphosphine oxide capped CdSe QDs were synthesized and rendered water soluble by overcoating with silica, using aminopropyl silane as silica precursor. The cytotoxicity studies were conducted by exposing cells to freshly synthesized QDs as a function of time (0-72 h) and concentration up to micromolar level by Lactate dehydrogenase assay, MTT [3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide] assay, Neutral red cell viability assay, Trypan blue dye exclusion method and morphological examination of cells using phase contrast microscope. The in vitro analysis results showed that the silica-coated CdSe QDs were nontoxic even at higher loadings. Subsequently the in vivo fluorescence was also demonstrated by intravenous administration of the QDs in Swiss albino mice. The fluorescence images in the cryosections of tissues depicted strong luminescence property of silica-coated QDs under biological conditions. These results confirmed the role of these luminescent materials in biological labeling and imaging applications.

  20. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadhira, Vebi, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Kurniadi, Deddy, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Juliastuti, E., E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id; Sutiswan, Adeline, E-mail: vebi@tf.itb.ac.id [Instrumentation and Control Research Group, Faculty of Industrial Technology, Institute Technology of Bandung, Ganesha 10 40132 Bandung (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  1. Study of continuous-wave domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography for quality control on agricultural produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadhira, Vebi; Kurniadi, Deddy; Juliastuti, E.; Sutiswan, Adeline

    2014-03-01

    The importance of monitoring the quality of vegetables and fruits is prosperity by giving a competitive advantage for producer and providing a more healthy food for consumer. Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT) is offering the possibility to detect the internal defects of the agricultural produce quality. Fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (FDOT) is the development of DOT, offering the possibilities to improve spatial resolution and to contrast image. The purpose of this research is to compare FDOT and DOT in forward analysis with continuous wave approach. The scattering and absorbing parameters of potatoes are used to represent the real condition. The object was illuminated by the NIR source from some positions on the boundary of object. A set of NIR detector are placed on the peripheral position of the object to measure the intensity of propagated or emitted light. In the simulation, we varied a condition of object then we analyzed the sensitivity of forward problem. The result of this study shows that FDOT has a better sensitivity than DOT and a better potential to monitor internal defects of agricultural produce because of the contrast value between optical and fluorescence properties of agricultural produce normal tissue and defects.

  2. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of cobalt thin films on different substrates using CW-MOKE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vijay, E-mail: shuklavs@rrcat.gov.in [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Mukherjee, C. [Mechanical and Optical Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Chari, R. [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Rai, S. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramnna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Bindra, K.S. [Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Banerjee, A. [BARC training school at RRCAT and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Cobalt thin films were deposited on GaAs, Si and Glass substrates by RF-magnetron sputtering. The structure was studied using atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were determined with the magneto-optic Kerr effect. The deposited films have in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and after annealing the anisotropy reduces. The reduction in anisotropy may be due to release of stress and the remaining anisotropy after annealing may be due to shape anisotropy of the particulates. - Highlights: • Deposited cobalt thin films on different substrates and annealed at 300 °C. • Characterized as-grown and annealed films by GIXRD, AFM and MOKE. • Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy observed for all the samples. • Decrease in anisotropy on annealing may be due to release of stress during deposition.

  3. Fluorescence studies of interaction between flavonol p-coumaroylglucoside tiliroside and bovine serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Cui, Shuya; Liu, Jia qin

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the interaction between flavonol p-coumaroylglucoside tiliroside and BSA was investigated by fluorescence quenching spectra, synchronous fluorescence spectra, and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra under simulative physiological conditions. It was proved that the fluorescence quenching of BSA by tiliroside was mainly a result of the formation of a tiliroside-BSA complex. The modified Stern-Volmer quenching constant and the corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S at different temperatures were calculated. The results indicated that electrostatic interactions were the predominant intermolecular forces in stabilizing the complex. The distance r = 3.95 nm between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (tiliroside) was obtained according to Förster's nonradioactive energy transfer theory. The synchronous fluorescence and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra results showed the microenvironment and conformation of BSA were changed in the binding reaction.

  4. Primordial anisotropies from cosmic strings during inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Sadr, Alireza Vafaei; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we study the imprint of an individual primordial cosmic string within a Hubble patch on the inflationary power spectrum. A straight cosmic string induces two distinct contributions to the curvature perturbations power spectrum. The first type of correction respects the translation invariance while violating isotropy. This generates quadrupolar statistical anisotropy in cosmic microwave background maps, which is constrained by the Planck data. The second contribution breaks both homogeneity and isotropy, generating a dipolar power asymmetry in the variance of temperature fluctuations with its amplitude falling on small scales. We show that the strongest constraint on the tension of primordial cosmic strings is obtained from the quadrupolar anisotropy and argue that the mass scale of the underlying theory responsible for the formation of the string cannot be much higher than the grand unified theory scale. The predictions for the diagonal and off-diagonal components of the cosmic microwave background angular power spectrum induced by the string are presented.

  5. Optical anisotropy in GaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, A.; Karabulut, O.; Akinoglu, B.G.; Aslan, B.; Turan, R. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01

    Optical anisotropy of the layer semiconductor GaSe has been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The PL spectra are dominated by two closely positioned emission bands resulting from the free exciton and the bound exciton connected direct band edge of GaSe. Photoluminescence and transmission spectra of GaSe crystals have been measured for two cases in which the propagation vector k is perpendicular (k perpendicular to c) and parallel to the c-axis (k//c). Peak position of the PL emission band and the onset of the transmission have been found to be significantly different for these two cases. This observed anisotropy is related to anisotropic band structure and the selection rules for the optical absorption in layered GaSe. FTIR transmission spectrum is in good agreement with PL results. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Anisotropy of transport in bulk Rashba metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosco, Valentina; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    The recent experimental discovery of three-dimensional (3D) materials hosting a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling calls for the theoretical investigation of their transport properties. Here we study the zero-temperature dc conductivity of a 3D Rashba metal in the presence of static diluted impurities. We show that, at variance with the two-dimensional case, in 3D systems, spin-orbit coupling affects dc charge transport in all density regimes. We find in particular that the effect of spin-orbit interaction strongly depends on the direction of the current, and we show that this yields strongly anisotropic transport characteristics. In the dominant spin-orbit coupling regime where only the lowest band is occupied, the conductivity anisotropy is governed entirely by the anomalous component of the renormalized current. We propose that measurements of the conductivity anisotropy in bulk Rashba metals may give a direct experimental assessment of the spin-orbit strength.

  7. Study on the toxic interactions of Ni{sup 2+} with DNA using neutral red dye as a fluorescence probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Li [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Rutao, E-mail: rutaoliu@sdu.edu.c [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China); Teng Yue [Shandong Key Laboratory of Water Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Shandong University (China); CRC for Environment and Health, Shandong Province, 27 Shanda South Road, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The interaction between Ni{sup 2+} and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was investigated in simulated physiological buffer (pH 7.4) using the Neutral Red (NR) dye as a spectral probe by UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as CD spectra. The experimental results showed that the conformational changes in DNA helix induced by Ni{sup 2+} are the reason for the fluorescence quenching of the DNA-NR system. From the experimental results, conclusion can be drawn that Ni{sup 2+} can cause structural changes of ctDNA and bind with DNA by electrostatic interaction. At the same time, the paper proved that conformation changes of DNA can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems. - Research Highlights: The formation of new non-fluorescence complex or competing binding sites between small molecules and probe are usually the reason of fluorescence quenching in DNA-probe systems. This study proved that conformation changes of DNA induced by Ni{sup 2+} can also lead to the fluorescence decrease of DNA-probe systems.

  8. Effect of ethanol-water mixture on the structure and dynamics of lysozyme: A fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2014-03-01

    Effect of ethanol-water mixture on the hydrodynamic radius (rH) and conformational dynamics of lysozyme has been studied by circular dichroism, emission spectra, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. For this purpose, the protein lysozyme is covalently labeled near the active site with a fluorescent probe, alexa 488. The ethanol molecules are sequestered near the hydrophobic tryptophan residues as indicated by the blue shift of the emission maximum of tryptophan. It is observed that both size (rH) and time constant of conformational relaxation (τR) of lysozyme oscillate with increase in ethanol concentration. The rH of the protein fluctuates from 19 Å in the native state, to a minimum of 13 Å, and a maximum of 29 Å. It is proposed that the oscillating behavior arises from competition between mutual interaction among protein, ethanol, and water. The fluorescence intensity fluctuates because of quenching of the fluorescence of the probe (alexa) by the free amino group of certain residues (e.g., tryptophan). Rate of inter-conversion (folding dynamics) between the open (fluorescent) and closed (non-fluorescent) form has been determined and is found to exhibit similar oscillation with variation in ethanol content.

  9. Binding of hairpin polyamides to DNA studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for DNA nanoarchitectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Chayan K.; Parui, Partha P.; Brutschy, Bernhard [University of Frankfurt, Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Frankfurt (Germany); Schmidt, Thorsten L.; Heckel, Alexander [University of Frankfurt, Cluster of Excellence Macromolecular Complexes, c/o Institute for Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    We have recently constructed a ''DNA strut'' consisting of two DNA-binding hairpin polyamides of Dervan-type connected via a long flexible linker and were able to show that this strut can be used to sequence-selectively connect DNA helices. This approach provides a second structural element (besides the Watson-Crick base pairing) for the assembly of higher-order DNA nanoarchitectures from smaller DNA building blocks. Since none of the existing analytical techniques for studying this kind of system were found suitable for detection and quantification of the formation of the resulting complexes, we chose fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In the present study we show that FCS allowed us in a versatile and fast way to investigate the binding of Dervan polyamides to DNA. In particular it also shows its power in the quantitative detection of the formation of multimeric complexes and the in investigation of binding under nonphysiological conditions. (orig.)

  10. Binding of TNT to amplifying fluorescent polymers: an ab initio and molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enlow, Mark A

    2012-03-01

    Molecular modeling techniques were employed to study the interaction of trinitrotoluene with an amplifying fluorescent polymer used in explosive sensor devices. The pentiptycene moiety present in these polymers appears to be the most energetically favorable binding site for trinitrotoluene. Surface features of the polymer suggest that the small cavity feature of the pentiptycene moiety may be more available for binding to analyte compounds due to steric crowding about the large cavity. Binding energies between model binding sites of the polymer and various analyte compounds were more rigorously estimated by semiempirical and ab initio techniques. Binding energies were found to be largest with trinitrotoluene and other nitroaromatic compounds. Electrostatic and π-stacking interactions between trinitrotoluene and the model host were investigated by studying a series of modified host compounds.

  11. Spatially frustrated S = 1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single ion anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism, I study the S = 1 square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, at zero temperature, with spatially anisotropic nearest-neighbor couplings frustrated by a next-nearest neighbor interaction and single ion anisotropy. The phase diagram at zero temperature is presented. My calculations show two magnetically ordered phases separated by a quantum-disordered region for all values of the anisotropy.

  12. [Study on the characters of phytoplankton chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra based on fourth-derivative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Su, Rong-Guo; Wang, Xiu-Lin; Zhu, Chen-Jian

    2007-11-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra of six phytoplankton species, belonging to Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta, were dealt by fourth-derivative analysis with the Matlab program. The results show that between 350 nm and 550 nm six fluorescence peaks were found in the fourth-derivative spectra, which are representatives of non-pigments, chlorophylls and carotenoides respectively. The method makes Bacillariophyta and Dinophyta more distinguishable when the fourth-derivative spectra are compared with the chlorophyll fluorescence excitation spectra. It can be used not only to discriminate the two groups of algaes, but also to reduce the effect of noise. The fluorescence peaks in the fourth-derivative spectra are proved to be stable.

  13. Enhancement of single-molecule fluorescence signals by colloidal silver nanoparticles in studies of protein translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharill, Shashank; Chen, Chunlai; Stevens, Benjamin; Kaur, Jaskiran; Smilansky, Zeev; Mandecki, Wlodek; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2011-01-25

    Metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) increased total photon emission of Cy3- and Cy5-labeled ribosomal initiation complexes near 50 nm silver particles 4- and 5.5-fold, respectively. Fluorescence intensity fluctuations above shot noise, at 0.1-5 Hz, were greater on silver particles. Overall signal-to-noise ratio was similar or slightly improved near the particles. Proximity to silver particles did not compromise ribosome function, as measured by codon-dependent binding of fluorescent tRNA, dynamics of fluorescence resonance energy transfer between adjacent tRNAs in the ribosome, and tRNA translocation induced by elongation factor G.

  14. Dynamics of the higher lying excited states of cyanine dyes. An ultrafast fluorescence study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarin, Cesar A; Villabona-Monsalve, Juan P; López-Arteaga, Rafael; Peon, Jorge

    2013-06-20

    The electronic relaxation dynamics of the second singlet excited states of several cyanine dyes was studied through the femtosecond fluorescence up-conversion technique. Our interest in these molecules comes from the potential applications of systems with upper excited singlet states with a long lifetime, which can include electron and energy transfer from the higher lying singlets after one- or two-photon absorption. We studied three series of cyanines with 4-quinolyl, 2-quinolyl, or benzothiazolyl type end groups, each with varying sp(2) carbon conjugation lengths in the methinic bridge. The dynamics after electronic excitation to singlet states above the fluorescent state vary significantly as a function of cyanine structure and conjugation length. In particular, for the 4-quinolyl series the cyanine with an intermediate conjugation length (three methinic carbons) has the slowest S2 decays with lifetimes of 5.4 ps in ethanol and 6.6 ps in ethylene glycol. On the other hand, we observed that the 2-quinolyl family has S2 decay times in the subpicosecond range independent of the conjugation length between the end groups. The slowest internal conversion was observed for the benzothiazolyl type cyanine with five methinic carbons, with an S2 lifetime of 17.3 ps in ethanol. For the planar cyanines of this study we observed for the first time a clear systematic trend in the S2 decay times which closely follow the energy gap law. It was also demonstrated that a slow S2 decay is as well observed upon excitation through degenerate two-photon absorption with near-IR pulses. The present study isolates the most important variables for the design of cyanines with long S2 lifetimes.

  15. First-principles study of electric field and structural strain impact on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Fe/MgO interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fatima; Yang, Hongxin; Dieny, Bernard; Chshiev, Mairbek

    2015-03-01

    Electric-field (EF) control of magnetic anisotropy is promising in the context of establishing low-energy consumption memory devices since it allows EF-assisted switching of magnetization in magnetic tunnel junctions with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). Using first-principles calculations, we demonstrate that both the EF and structural strain induce changes of the PMA in Fe/MgO interfaces which originally exhibit strong PMA. Namely, we find that the PMA change in response to strain is much larger than that induced by applied EF. This suggests that the EF control of PMA is caused not only by charge accumulation and depletion mechanism but rather mediated by structural modifications occurring at the interface in agreement with recent experimental reports. In addition, using atomic and orbital-resolved analysis of PMA, we elucidate the effect of both the EF and structural strain on PMA showing in particular that it extends beyond the interfacial layer.

  16. Ga+ ion irradiation-induced changes in magnetic anisotropy of a Pt/Co/Pt thin film studied by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liedke M. O.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ga+ ion irradiation-induced changes in magnetic anisotropy of a Pt/Co/Pt ultrathin film are investigated by means of the X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD technique. A large difference in the Co orbital moment is observed between out-of-plane and in-plane directions of the film at moderate Ga+ fluences of ~1-2×1014 ions/cm2, which corresponds to the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA, while further increased fluences reduce the orbital moment difference, resulting in in-plane magnetization. In contrast, at much higher Ga+ fluences of ~5×1015 ions/cm2, at which PMA is observed again, no significant difference is found in the orbital moment of Co between out-of-plane and in-plane directions. Different origins are thus suggested for the appearance of PMA induced by the irradiation between moderate and high Ga+ fluences.

  17. Study of high density polyethylene under UV irradiation or mechanical stress by fluorescence spectroscopy; Etude du comportement du polyethylene haute densite sous irradiation ultraviolette ou sollicitation mecanique par spectroscopie de fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douminge, L.

    2010-05-15

    Due to their diversity and their wide range of applications, polymers have emerged in our environment. For technical applications, these materials can be exposed to aggressive environment leading to an alteration of their properties. The effects of this degradation are linked to the concept of life duration, corresponding to the time required for a property to reach a threshold below which the material becomes unusable. Monitoring the ageing of polymer materials constitute a major challenge. Fluorescence spectroscopy is a technique able to provide accurate information concerning this issue. In this study, emphasis was placed on the use of fluorescence spectroscopy to study the phenomena involved in either the UV radiation or mechanical stresses of a polymer. In the case of high density polyethylene, the lack of intrinsic fluorescent signal leads to the use of a dye. This dye gives a fluorescent response depending on its microenvironment. All modifications in the macromolecular chain generate a shift of the fluorescent peak. This work can be dissociated in two major parts, on one hand the influence of UV aging on the fluorescent response and in another hand the influence of mechanical stresses. In the first part, complementary analyses like FTIR or DSC are used to correlate fluorescent results with known photo degradation mechanisms. The results show the great sensibility of the technique to the microstructural rearrangement in the polymer. In the second part, the dependence between the stress and the fluorescence emission gives opportunity to evaluate internal stresses in the material during cyclic solicitations. (author)

  18. A comparative study of gallstones from children and adults using FTIR spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marks Robert S

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cholelithiasis is the gallstone disease (GSD where stones are formed in the gallbladder. The main function of the gallbladder is to concentrate bile by the absorption of water and sodium. GSD has high prevalence among elderly adults. There are three major types of gallstones found in patients, White, Black and Brown. The major chemical component of white stones is cholesterol. Black and brown stones contain different proportions of cholesterol and bilirubin. The pathogenesis of gallstones is not clearly understood. Analysis of the chemical composition of gallstones using various spectroscopic techniques offers clues to the pathogenesis of gallstones. Recent years has seen an increasing trend in the number of cases involving children. The focus of this study is on the analysis of the chemical composition of gallstones from child and adult patients using spectroscopic methods. Methods In this report, we present FTIR spectroscopic studies and fluorescence microscopic analysis of gallstones obtained from 67 adult and 21 child patients. The gallstones were removed during surgical operations at Soroka University Medical Center. Results Our results show that black stones from adults and children are rich in bilirubin. Brown stones are composed of varying amounts of bilirubin and cholesterol. Green stones removed from an adult, which is rare, was found to be composed mainly of cholesterol. Our results also indicated that cholesterol and bilirubin could be the risk factors for gallstone formation in adults and children respectively. Fluorescence micrographs showed that the Ca-bilirubinate was present in all stones in different quantities and however, Cu-bilirubinate was present only in the mixed and black stones. Conclusions Analysis based on FTIR suggest that the composition of black and brown stones from both children and adults are similar. Various layers of the brown stone from adults differ by having varying quantities of

  19. Biochemical activity of a fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G: Molecular modeling, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Masum, Abdulla; Chakraborty, Maharudra; Ghosh, Soumen; Laha, Dipranjan; Karmakar, Parimal; Islam, Md Maidul; Mukhopadhyay, Subrata

    2016-11-01

    Interaction of CT DNA with Rhodamine 6G (R6G) has been studied using molecular docking, electrochemical, spectroscopic and thermodynamic methods. From the study, it was illustrated that Rhodamine 6G binds to the minor groove of CT DNA. The binding was cooperative in nature. Circular voltametric study showed significant change in peak current and peak potential due to complexation. All the studies showed that the binding constant was in the order of 10(6)M(-1). Circular dichroic spectra showed significant conformational change on binding and DNA unwind during binding. Thermodynamic study showed that binding was favored by negative enthalpy and positive entropy change. From thermodynamic study it was also observed that several positive and negative free energies played significant role during binding and the unfavorable conformational free energy change was overcame by highly negative hydrophobic and salt dependent free energy changes. The experimental results were further validated using molecular docking study and the effect of structure on binding has been studied theoretically. From docking study it was found that the hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonds played a significant role during binding. The dye was absorbed by cell and this phenomenon was studied using fluorescent microscope. Cell survivability test showed that the dye active against Human Breast Cancer cells MDA-MB 468. ROS study showed that the activity is due to the production of reactive oxygen.

  20. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic subfabrics of some minerals: an introductory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrouda, František; Chadima, Martin; Ježek, Josef; Pokorný, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility measured in alternating field can in general be resolved into a component that is in-phase with the applied field and a component that is out-of-phase. While in non-conductive diamagnetic, paramagnetic and many ferromagnetic materials the phase is effectively zero, in some ferromagnetic minerals, such as pyrrhotite, hematite, titanomagnetite or small magnetically viscous grains of magnetite, it is clearly non-zero. The anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility (opAMS) can then be used as a tool for the direct determination of the magnetic subfabrics of the minerals with non-zero phase. The error in determination of out-of-phase susceptibility non-linearly increases with decreasing phase angle. This may result in imprecise determination of the opAMS in specimens with very low phase angle. The degree of opAMS is higher than that of ipAMS, which may in contrast result in slightly increasing precision n the opAMS determination. It is highly recommended to inspect the results of the statistical tests of each specimen and to exclude the specimens whose opAMS is determined with insufficient precision from further processing. In rocks, whose magnetism is dominated by the mineral with non-zero out-of-phase susceptibility, the principal directions of the opAMS and ipAMS are virtually coaxial, while the degree of opAMS is higher than that of ipAMS. In some specific cases, the opAMS provides us with similar data to those provided by anisotropies of low-field dependent susceptibility and frequency-dependent susceptibility. The advantage of the opAMS compared to the other two anisotropies is its simultaneous measurement with the ipAMS during one measuring process, while the other two anisotropies require the AMS measurements in several fields or at least at two operating frequencies.

  1. Tuning Exchange Anisotropy of Exchange-Biased System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; HU Jing-Guo; R.L.Stamps

    2008-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy in FM/AFM bilayers has given a lot of static magnetization properties such as enhanced coercivity and magnetization loop shifts.These phenomena are primarily from the effective anisotropies intro-duced into a ferromagnet by exchange coupling with a strongly anisotropic antiferromagnet.These effective anisotropies can also be used to explain the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.In this article,the dynamic con-sequences such as exchange-induced susceptibility,exchange-induced permeability,and the corresponding domain wall characteristics in the exchange-biased structures of ferromagnet/antiferromagnetl/antiferromagnet2 are studied.The results show that the second antiferromagnetic layer can largely affect the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.Especially in the ease of critical temperature,the effects become more obvious.Practically,the exchange anisotropy of biased bilayer system can be tuned by exchange coupling with the second antiferromagnetic layer.

  2. Analysis of North Sky Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Elizabeth; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cosmic Ray anisotropy, no experiment has definitively discovered the source of this unexpected phenomenon. Studying the cosmic rays' neutral daughter particles with pointing capabilities, like neutrinos, could shed new light. This can be done at two levels; a source which produces cosmic rays must also produce high energy astrophysical neutrinos, and low energy atmospheric neutrinos are made when the cosmic rays interact with the atmosphere. This analysis focuses on atmospheric neutrinos detected by IceCube, a Cherenkov detector instrumenting a kilometer cubed of glacial ice at the South Pole. The anisotropy and its energy dependence have been studied in the Southern sky using atmospheric muons by IceCube. In the North, gamma ray detectors, such as HAWC, and Argo-YBJ, have observed this anisotropy in cosmic ray showers. Thus far, no single- detector full-sky map exists of the anisotropy. Using IceCube's neutrino data, we can complement these studies with an exploration of the northern sky anisotropy at higher energies of cosmic rays. This could bring us much closer to understanding the complete picture of this anisotropy across energy levels and the whole sky.

  3. Feasibility study of Compton cameras for x-ray fluorescence computed tomography with humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Ahmad, Moiz; Chinn, Garry; Xing, Lei

    2016-12-21

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a promising imaging technique able to depict the spatial distributions of low amounts of molecular agents in vivo. Currently, the translation of the technique to preclinical and clinical applications is hindered by long scanning times as objects are scanned with flux-limited narrow pencil beams. The study presents a novel imaging approach combining x-ray fluorescence imaging with Compton imaging. Compton cameras leverage the imaging performance of XFCT and abolish the need for pencil beam excitation. The study examines the potential of this new imaging approach on the base of Monte-Carlo simulations. In the work, it is first presented that the particular option of slice/fan-beam x-ray excitation has advantages in image reconstruction in regard of processing time and image quality compared to traditional volumetric Compton imaging. In a second experiment, the feasibility of the approach for clinical applications with tracer agents made from gold nano-particles is examined in a simulated lung scan scenario. The high energy of characteristic x-ray photons from gold is advantageous for deep tissue penetration and has lower angular blurring in the Compton camera. It is found that Doppler broadening in the first detector stage of the Compton camera adds the largest contribution on the angular blurring; physically limiting the spatial resolution. Following the analysis of the results from the spatial resolution test, resolutions in the order of one centimeter are achievable with the approach in the center of the lung. The concept of Compton imaging allows one to distinguish to some extent between scattered photons and x-ray fluorescent photons based on their difference in emission position. The results predict that molecular sensitivities down to 240 pM l(-1) for 5 mm diameter lesions at 15 mGy for 50 nm diameter gold nano-particles are achievable. A 45-fold speed up time for data acquisition compared to traditional pencil beam XFCT could

  4. Feasibility study of Compton cameras for x-ray fluorescence computed tomography with humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernekohl, Don; Ahmad, Moiz; Chinn, Garry; Xing, Lei

    2016-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence imaging is a promising imaging technique able to depict the spatial distributions of low amounts of molecular agents in vivo. Currently, the translation of the technique to preclinical and clinical applications is hindered by long scanning times as objects are scanned with flux-limited narrow pencil beams. The study presents a novel imaging approach combining x-ray fluorescence imaging with Compton imaging. Compton cameras leverage the imaging performance of XFCT and abolish the need for pencil beam excitation. The study examines the potential of this new imaging approach on the base of Monte-Carlo simulations. In the work, it is first presented that the particular option of slice/fan-beam x-ray excitation has advantages in image reconstruction in regard of processing time and image quality compared to traditional volumetric Compton imaging. In a second experiment, the feasibility of the approach for clinical applications with tracer agents made from gold nano-particles is examined in a simulated lung scan scenario. The high energy of characteristic x-ray photons from gold is advantageous for deep tissue penetration and has lower angular blurring in the Compton camera. It is found that Doppler broadening in the first detector stage of the Compton camera adds the largest contribution on the angular blurring; physically limiting the spatial resolution. Following the analysis of the results from the spatial resolution test, resolutions in the order of one centimeter are achievable with the approach in the center of the lung. The concept of Compton imaging allows one to distinguish to some extent between scattered photons and x-ray fluorescent photons based on their difference in emission position. The results predict that molecular sensitivities down to 240 pM l-1 for 5 mm diameter lesions at 15 mGy for 50 nm diameter gold nano-particles are achievable. A 45-fold speed up time for data acquisition compared to traditional pencil beam XFCT could

  5. Giant dielectric anisotropy via homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    A random mixture of two isotropic dielectric materials, one composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_a$ and the other composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_b$, was considered in the long wavelength regime. The permittivity dyadic of the resulting homogenized composite material (HCM) was estimated using the Bruggeman homogenization formalism. The HCM was an orthorhombic biaxial material if the symmetry axes of the two populations of spheroids were mutually perpendicular and a uniaxial material if these two axes were mutually aligned. The degree of anisotropy of the HCM, as gauged by the ratio of the eigenvalues of the HCM's permittivity dyadic, increased as the shape of the constituent particles became more eccentric. The greatest degrees of HCM anisotropy were achieved for the limiting cases wherein the constituent particles were shaped as needles or discs. In these instances explicit formulas for the HCM anisotropy were derived from t...

  6. Anisotropy in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been found in many regions of the Earth's interior. Its presence in the Earth's crust has been known since the 19th century, and is due in part to the alignment of anisotropic crystals in rocks, and in part to patterns in the distribution of fractures and pores. In the upper mantle, seismic anisotropy was discovered 50 years ago, and can be attributed for the most part, to the alignment of intrinsically anisotropic olivine crystals during large scale deformation associated with convection. There is some indication for anisotropy in the transition zone, particularly in the vicinity of subducted slabs. Here we focus on the deep Earth - the lower mantle and core, where anisotropy is not yet mapped in detail, nor is there consensus on its origin. Most of the lower mantle appears largely isotropic, except in the last 200-300 km, in the D″ region, where evidence for seismic anisotropy has been accumulating since the late 1980s, mostly from shear wave splitting measurements. Recently, a picture has been emerging, where strong anisotropy is associated with high shear velocities at the edges of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the central Pacific and under Africa. These observations are consistent with being due to the presence of highly anisotropic MgSiO3 post-perovskite crystals, aligned during the deformation of slabs impinging on the core-mantle boundary, and upwelling flow within the LLSVPs. We also discuss mineral physics aspects such as ultrahigh pressure deformation experiments, first principles calculations to obtain information about elastic properties, and derivation of dislocation activity based on bonding characteristics. Polycrystal plasticity simulations can predict anisotropy but models are still highly idealized and neglect the complex microstructure of polyphase aggregates with strong and weak components. A promising direction for future progress in understanding the origin of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle

  7. Review of Fluorescence-Based Velocimetry Techniques to Study High-Speed Compressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathel, Brett F.; Johansen, Criag; Inman, Jennifer A.; Jones, Stephen B.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews five laser-induced fluorescence-based velocimetry techniques that have been used to study high-speed compressible flows at NASA Langley Research Center. The techniques discussed in this paper include nitric oxide (NO) molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV), nitrogen dioxide photodissociation (NO2-to-NO) MTV, and NO and atomic oxygen (O-atom) Doppler-shift-based velocimetry. Measurements of both single-component and two-component velocity have been performed using these techniques. This paper details the specific application and experiment for which each technique has been used, the facility in which the experiment was performed, the experimental setup, sample results, and a discussion of the lessons learned from each experiment.

  8. Designed plasmonic nanocatalysts for the reduction of eosin Y: absorption and fluorescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komalam, Abha; Muraleegharan, Lekha Girija; Subburaj, Suganthi; Suseela, Suji; Babu, Aswathy; George, Sony

    2012-10-01

    In this work, we report a one-step green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by microwave irradiation using nontoxic and biodegradable polysaccharide chitosan as a reducing and stabilizing agent. The interaction between gold nanoparticles with the amine group of chitosan was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, and the stability of the nanoparticle is ascertained by zeta potential measurements. Transmission electron microscopy photograph and dynamic light scattering measurements confirmed the average size of gold nanoparticles as 25 nm. The ability of the synthesised gold nanoparticles as a catalyst for the reduction of eosin dye in the presence of NaBH4 was monitored by means of spectrofluorometry and spectrophotometry. It is found that the NaBH4-induced reduction of eosin is enhanced in the presence of AuNPs even without a catalyst. Time-resolved fluorescence decay studies also confirmed the reduction of eosin in the presence of AuNPs.

  9. Structural study and fluorescent property of a novel organic microporous crystalline material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Zhao; Yang, Bingqin; Yang, Meipan; Zhang, Binglin, E-mail: yangbq@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Northwest University (China)

    2014-01-15

    A novel microporous organic material [(2-{2-[2-(bis-methoxycarbonylmethylamino)phenoxy] ethoxy}-4-benzimidazole-phenyl)methoxycarbonylmethylamino]acetic acid methyl ester 6 was synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), electron spray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS), X-ray powder diffraction (PXRD), {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR. 6 crystallizes in the centrosymmetric monoclinic space group C2/c, with unit cell parameters a = 35.648(3) Å, b = 14.3240(12) Å, c = 15.3693(13) Å, a = 90.00, ß = 94.8190(10), γ = 90.00, V = 7820.16 Å{sup 3} and Z = 8 at 296(2) K. As indicated by crystal packing, the molecular conjugation planes arrange along the c axis to form micropores due to the hydrogen bonds. In addition, the fluorescent spectrum and luminescence lifetime were studied for 6. (author)

  10. Two-photon fluorescence imaging and femtosecond laser microsurgery to study drosophila dorsal closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayil K. N., Anisha; Pereira, Andrea; Mathew, Manoj; Artigas, David; Martín Blanco, Enrique; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2008-02-01

    Dorsal closure is a key morphogenic process that occurs at the last stages of Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis. It involves a well coordinated rearrangement and movement of tissues that resemble epithelial wound healing in mammals. The cell dynamics and intracellular signaling pathways that accompany hole closure are expected to be similar during would healing providing a model system to study epithelial healing. Here we demonstrate the use of two-photon fluorescence microscope together with femtosecond laser ablation to examine the epithelial wound healing during embryonic dorsal closure. By using tightly focused NIR femtosecond pulses of subnanojoule energy we are able to produce highly confined microsurgery on the epithelial cells of a developing embryo. We observed that drosophila epidermis heals from the laser wounds with increased activity of actin near the wound edges.

  11. Interaction of phosphorus dendrimers with HIV peptides—Fluorescence studies of nano-complexes formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciepluch, Karol, E-mail: ciepluch@biol.uni.lodz.pl [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Ionov, Maksim [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland); Majoral, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination du CNRS (LCC), 205 Route de Narbonne, F-31077 Toulouse cedex 4 (France); Muñoz-Fernández, Maria Angeles [Laboratorio InmunoBiología Molecular, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (Spain); Bryszewska, Maria [Department of General Biophysics, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska Street 141/143, 90-236 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, dendrimers emerge as an alternative approach for delivery of HIV peptides to dendritic cells. Gp160, NH-EIDNYTNTIYTLLEE-COOH; P24, NH-DTINEEAAEW-COOH and Nef, NHGMDDPEREVLEWRFDSRLAF-COOH peptides were complexed with two types of positively charged phosphorus-containing dendrimers (CPD). Fluorescence polarization, dynamic light scattering, transmission and electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were chosen to evaluate the dendriplexes stability. We were able to show that complexes were stable in time and temperature. This is crucial for using these peptide/dendrimer nano-complexes in a new vaccine against HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: • The phosphorus dendrimers as nanocarriers of HIV-peptides are proposed. • The complexes of dendrimers and HIV-peptides were stable in time, temperature. • The results convince that phosphorus dendrimers could be consider as anti-HIV vaccine candidates.

  12. Containerless laser-induced fluorescence study of vaporization and optical properties for sapphire and alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nordine, P.C.; Schiffman, R.A. (Midwest Research Institute, Kansas City, MO (USA) Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (USA))

    1988-09-01

    Evaporation of aluminum oxide was studied from 1,800 to 2,327 K by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of Al atom vapor over sapphire and alumina spheres that were levitated in an argon gas jet and heated with a continuous wave CO{sub 2} laser. Optical properties were determined from apparent specimen temperatures measured with an optical pyrometer and true temperatures deduced from the LIF intensity versus temperature measurements using the known temperature dependence of the Al atom vapor concentration in equilibrium with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The effects of impurities and dissolved oxygen on the high-temperature optical properties of aluminum oxide were discussed.

  13. SYNTHESIS AND FLUORESCENCE STUDY OF SELF—AGGREGATION PROCESS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION OF HYDROPHOBILIZED POLYSACCHARIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAONingning; YUYaoting; 等

    2000-01-01

    Cholesterol modified dextran(CHD) having self-aggrgation or self-assembly property was synthesized from cholesterol and 1,6-hexyldiisocyanate.The degree of substitution of cholesteryl moiety in dextran main line is 3-5 cholesterols the 100 glucose units.We have prepared water solution of CHD using probe type sonifier and N-Phenyl-a-naphthylamine(PNA) as a fluorescent probe to study CHD self-aggregate process.For each solution of two samples,we found that the maximum emission of PNA in CHD concentration.This change corresponds to the formation of micelle-like clusters self-aggregated by the cholesterol moiety once the CHD concentration.This change corresponds to the formation of micelle-like clusters self-aggregated by the cholesterol moiety once the CHD concentration exceeds 0.01mg/ml.

  14. Study of adsorption kinetics for fluorescent whitening agent on fiber surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG XianNan; HUANG YanGui; CHAI XinSheng; WEI Wei

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics for a stilbene derivative type fluorescent whitening agent (FWA) on fiber surfaces was studied based on a real-time spectroscopic measurement system. Results showed that the time-dependent behavior of FWA agrees to that of a mono-molecular adsorption layer on fiber surfaces, as characterized in Langmuir-type expression. The adsorption has two distinguishable stages include-ing initial fast phase with the primary constant of 1.51×1014 and the later near-equilibrium phase with the secondary constant of 4.96×10-4, The maximum amount of FWA adsorbed on fiber surfaces is 1.67×10-4g (per dry weight based fiber) in the initial phase. A mathematical model of adsorption kinetics was therefore established and evaluated, This model is important for the optimization of FWA applica-tion in papermaking.

  15. Study of adsorption kinetics for fluorescent whitening agent on fiber surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics for a stilbene derivative type fluorescent whitening agent (FWA) on fiber surfaces was studied based on a real-time spectroscopic measurement system. Results showed that the time-dependent behavior of FWA agrees to that of a mono-molecular adsorption layer on fiber surfaces,as characterized in Langmuir-type expression. The adsorption has two distinguishable stages includ-ing initial fast phase with the primary constant of 1.51×1014 and the later near-equilibrium phase with the secondary constant of 4.96×10-4. The maximum amount of FWA adsorbed on fiber surfaces is 1.67×10-4g (per dry weight based fiber) in the initial phase. A mathematical model of adsorption kinetics was therefore established and evaluated. This model is important for the optimization of FWA applica-tion in papermaking.

  16. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the i