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Sample records for fluorescence anisotropy decay

  1. One- and two-photon excited fluorescence lifetimes and anisotropy decays of green fluorescent proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We have used one- (OPE) and two-photon (TPE) excitation with time-correlated single-photon counting techniques to determine time-resolved fluorescence intensity and anisotropy decays of the wild-type Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and two red-shifted mutants, S65T-GFP and RSGFP. WT-GFP and S65T-GFP exhibited a predominant approximately 3 ns monoexponential fluorescence decay, whereas for RSGFP the main lifetimes were approximately 1.1 ns (main component) and approximately 3.3 ns. The anisotr...

  2. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EII(mtl) in detergent micelles. Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, D S; Broos, J; Visser, A J; van Hoek, A; Robillard, G T

    1997-04-22

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C domain of the enzyme [Swaving Dijkstra et al. (1996) Biochemistry 35, 6628-6634]. Since no fluorescent impurities are present in these mutants, the changes in fluorescence and anisotropy could be related with changes in the tryptophan microenvironment. Tryptophans at positions 30 and 42 showed changes in fluorescence intensity decay upon binding mannitol, which were reflected in the changes in lifetime distribution patterns. The disappearance of the shortest-lived decay component in these mutants, as well as in the mutant with a single tryptophan at position 109, indicates a change in the local environment such that quenching via neighboring side chains or solvent is reduced. Phosphorylation at histidine 554 and cysteine 384, located in the cytoplasmatic A and B domains of EII(mtl), respectively, induced an increase in the average fluorescence lifetimes of all of the tryptophans. The effect was most pronounced for tryptophans 30 and 109 which show large increases in the average fluorescence lifetime mainly due to loss of short-lived decay components. A correlation time distribution of the individual tryptophans deduced from an analysis of the anisotropy decay showed that they differed in their rotational mobility with tryptophan 30 showing the least local flexibility. Phosphorylation resulted in immobilization of W109 which, together with changes in the average fluorescence lifetime, is evidence for a conformational coupling between the phosphorylated B domain and the C domain. The influence of mannitol binding on the rotational behavior of the tryptophans is limited; it induces more internal flexibility at all tryptophan positions. A rotational correlation time of 30 ns

  3. Study of the Combined Effect of Ibuprofen and Cholesterol on the Microviscosity and Ordering of Model Lipid Membranes by Timeresolved Measurement of Fluorescence Anisotropy Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefimova, S. L.; Tkacheva, T. N.; Kasian, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The timeresolved fluorescence anisotropy decay of perylene incorporated into the lipid Ladipalmitoylphosphatidylch oline (DPPC) membrane has been studied to evaluate the membranotropic action of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug, ibuprofen, and the combined effect of ibuprofen and cholesterol. The rotation correlation times (φ) and limiting anisotropy (r∞ ) permit an independent estimation of the effects of these additives on the microviscosity and ordering of model lipid membranes in different phase states. Ibuprofen was shown to cause a significant decrease in the DPPC membrane microviscosity in the gel phase with hardly any effect on the liquidcrystal phase. However, in both phases, ibuprofen diminishes the ordering of the lipid hydrophobic chains. A marked additive effect is noted when ibuprofen is embedded in the liquid membrane enriched with cholesterol, which manifests itself in substantial fluidization and disordering or the liquid membrane by the action of the components on the lipid membrane. Ibuprofen in the liquidcrystal phase causes leveling of the fluidizing and ordering effects of cholesterol.

  4. Monitoring changes of cellular metabolism and microviscosity in vitro based on time-resolved endogenous fluorescence and its anisotropy decay dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; Li, Dong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2010-05-01

    Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is a well-known metabolic coenzyme and endogenous fluorophore. In this study, we develop a system that simultaneously measures time- and wavelength-resolved fluorescence to extract free and protein-bound NADH signals from total cellular fluorescence. We analyze temporal characteristics of NADH fluorescence in a mixture of NADH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as well as in living cell samples. The results show that in both the NADH/LDH mixture and cell samples, a fraction of free NADH and protein-bound components can be identified. The extracted free and bound NADH signals are confirmed by time-resolved measurement of anisotropy decay of NADH fluorescence, based on the fact that free NADH is a small fluorescent molecule with much shorter rotational diffusion time than bound NADH. The ratio of free NADH signal to bound NADH signal is very different between normal and cancer cervical epithelial cells. In addition, the ratio changes significantly when the cell samples are treated with a mitochondrial inhibitor or uncoupler, demonstrating that the method is sensitive to monitor cellular metabolic activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the microviscosity for relatively small molecules such as NADH in cells could be extracted from wavelength- and time-resolved NADH fluorescence of living cell samples.

  5. Characterization of the heterogeneity and specificity of interpolypeptide interactions in amyloid protofibrils by measurement of site-specific fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Anjali; Udgaonkar, Jayant B; Krishnamoorthy, G

    2009-10-30

    The aggregation of proteins often results in highly ordered fibrillar structures. While significant insights have been obtained on structural aspects of amyloid fibrils, little is known about the structures of protofibrils, which are presumed to be the precursors of fibrils. An understanding of the molecular mechanism of the formation of protofibrils and fibrils requires information on the landscape of interpeptide interactions. This work addresses this question by using, as a model protein, barstar, which forms protofibrils and fibrils at low (environment-sensitive fluorophore, 5-((((2-iodoacetyl)amino)ethyl)amino)naphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (1,5-IAEDANS), attached to specific locations in the protein. Firstly, it was observed that barstar, when labeled at certain locations with 1,5-IAEDANS, did not form mixed protofibrils with the corresponding unlabeled protein. Labeled and unlabeled proteins formed protofibrils as separate populations. A two-population model of fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics exhibiting a 'dip-and-rise' behavior was the main readout in arriving at this conclusion. Additional support for this conclusion came from the fluorescence lifetime of the probe 1,5-IAEDANS. Subsequently, the location of the fluorophore was moved along the length of the protein in nine mutant proteins, and the capability to form mixed fibrils was assessed. The results revealed that about two-thirds of the protein sequence at the C-terminal end of the protein was intimately involved in the formation of ordered protofibrils, probably forming the core, while the remaining one-third of the protein (i.e., the N-terminal region) remained largely noninteractive and flexible. This methodology can be used as a general strategy to identify regions of a given protein sequence involved in interprotein interactions in amyloid protofibrils.

  6. Fluorescence anisotropy of acridinedione dyes in glycerol: Prolate model of ellipsoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Indirapriyadharshini; P Ramamurthy

    2007-03-01

    Time-dependent reorientations of resorcinol-based acridinidione (ADR) dyes in glycerol were studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. The difference between fluorescence anisotropy decays recorded at 460 nm when exciting at 250 nm and those obtained when exciting at 394 nm are reported. When exciting at 394 nm, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is bi-exponential, while on exciting at 250 nm a mono-exponential fluorescence anisotropy decay is observed. We interpret this in terms of different directions of the absorption dipole at 394 and 250 nm with the emission dipole respectively, which is experimentally validated and further analysed as a prolate model of ellipsoid.

  7. Dynamic fluorescence spectroscopy on single tryptophan mutants of EIImtl in detergent micelles : Effects of substrate binding and phosphorylation on the fluorescence and anisotropy decay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaving Dijkstra, Dolf; Broos, J.; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; van Hoek, A.; Robillard, George

    1997-01-01

    The effects of substrate and substrate analogue binding and phosphorylation on the conformational dynamics of the mannitol permease of Escherichia coli were investigated, using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on mutants containing five single tryptophans situated in the membrane-embedded C d

  8. Interaction of aromatic compounds with Photobacterium leiognathi luciferase: fluorescence anisotropy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kudryasheva, N.S.; Nemtseva, E.V.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Hoek, van A.

    2003-01-01

    The time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence techniques were employed to elucidate possible interactions of four aromatic compounds (anthracene, POPOP, MSB and 1,4-naphthalendiol) with bacterial luciferase. Fluorescence spectra and fluorescence anisotropy decays of these compounds were studied in

  9. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  10. Nanoparticle Sizing and Potential Quality Control of Sols Using a Unique Fluorescence Anisotropy Probe and 3D Contour Anisotropy Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karolin, Jan; Geddes, Chris D

    2015-03-19

    Spectroscopic properties of the particle sizing fluorophore Dipole Blue are reported. The probe is cationic in nature, highly water-soluble, and strongly adheres to anionic silica surfaces by electrostatic interactions, as is demonstrated here by Ludox SM 30. The probe has a distinct absorbance band centered at 320 nm, and the fluorescence emission band is Stokes-shifted 100 nm with a peak centered at 426 nm. From time-correlated single-photon counting experiments, the fluorescence lifetime was found to be adequately described by a three-exponential decay model with an intensity-averaged lifetime of 15.6 ns. Perrin graph analysis of steady-state anisotropy shows the presence of silica particles with a radius of (5.44 ± 0.16) nm, which, considering the distribution of particle sizes, is in reasonable agreement with 3.5 nm found from dynamic light scattering experiments.

  11. Anisotropy decay measurement of segmental dynamics of the anion binding domain in erythrocyte band 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknese, S; Rossi, M; Thevenin, B; Shohet, S B; Verkman, A S

    1995-08-22

    Time-resolved anisotropy was utilized to detect nanosecond segmental motions of the band 3 intramembrane domain. Band 3 at lysine 430 was fluorescently labeled in ghost membranes by fluorescein or eosin maleimide treatment of intact human erythrocytes followed by hypotonic lysis. Single lifetimes for fluorescein (3.8-4.1 ns) and eosin (3.2-3.4 ns) were observed. Phase-modulation measurement of anisotropy decay indicated a segmental motion model, r(t) = exp(-t/tau 1c)[r infinity + (ro-r infinity) exp(-t/tau 2c)], defined by rotational correlation times corresponding to band 3 segmental motion (tau 1c, 30-70 ns) and rapid fluorescein motion in its binding pocket (tau 2c, 200-400 ps), and a residual anisotropy (r infinity, 0.23-0.28) describing hindered fluorescein motion. In PBS at pH 7.4, tau 1c, tau 2c, and r infinity were 44 ns, 307 ps, and 0.24, respectively, predicting a steady-state anisotropy of 0.24, in agreement with the measured value of 0.23. Factors that might influence band 3 structure/dynamics were examined. Whereas pH (range 5-10) had little effect on r(t), [NaCl] addition (0-150 mM) remarkably decreased tau 1c from 68 to 44 ns. The decrease in tau 1c correlated with solution ionic strength, and did not depend on osmolality (studied by mannitol addition), or specific anion interactions (comparing Cl, Br, F, SO4, citrate). The ionic strength effect was not observed in fluorescein-labeled carbonic anhydrase and trypsin-cleaved band 3, suggesting a specific effect on intact band 3. Anisotropy decay was relatively insensitive to external lectin or internal 2,3-DPG binding, but was sensitive to temperature, membrane fluidity, urea denaturation, fluid-phase viscosity, and aldehyde fixation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Sol-gel particle growth studied using fluorescence anisotropy: An alternative to scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David J. S.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2000-08-01

    The aggregation of silica particles during hydrogel polymerization has been observed in situ with angstrom resolution using the combined fluorescence anisotropy decay of solvated and bound dye. Primary particles of mean hydrodynamic radius ~1.5 nm are found to be present within 20 min of mixing sodium silicate solution and sulfuric acid. Clustering then occurs during siloxane polymerization to produce after ~30 h secondary particles with a mean radius up to ~4.5 nm at a growth rate that depends on silicate concentration and time to microgelation tg. Subsequent condensation to ~4 nm radius occurs within 1 week as particle syneresis dominates.

  13. Determination of metal ions by fluorescence anisotropy exhibits a broad dynamic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard B.; Maliwal, Badri P.; Fierke, Carol A.

    1998-05-01

    Recently, we have shown that metal ions free in solution may be determined at low levels by fluorescence anisotropy (polarization) measurements. Anisotropy measurements enjoy the advantages of wavelength ratiometric techniques for determining metal ions such as calcium, because anisotropy measurements are ratiometric as well. Furthermore, fluorescence anisotropy may be imaged in the microscope. An advantage of anisotropy not demonstrated for wavelength ratiometric approaches using indicators such as Fura-2 and Indo-1 is that under favorable circumstances anisotropy-based determinations exhibit a much broader dynamic range in metal ion concentration. Determinations of free Zn(II) in the picomolar range are demonstrated.

  14. Fluorescence anisotropy (polarization): from drug screening to precision medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hairong; Wu, Qian; Berezin, Mikhail Y.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fluorescence anisotropy (FA) is one of the major established methods accepted by industry and regulatory agencies for understanding the mechanisms of drug action and selecting drug candidates utilizing a high-throughput format. Areas covered This review covers the basics of FA and complementary methods, such as fluorescence lifetime anisotropy and their roles in the drug discovery process. The authors highlight the factors affecting FA readouts, fluorophore selection, and instrumentation. Furthermore, the authors describe the recent development of a successful, commercially valuable FA assay for Long QT syndrome drug toxicity to illustrate the role that FA can play in the early stages of drug discovery. Expert opinion Despite the success in drug discovery, the FA-based technique experiences competitive pressure from other homogeneous assays. That being said, FA is an established yet rapidly developing technique, recognized by academic institutions, the pharmaceutical industry, and regulatory agencies across the globe. The technical problems encountered in working with small molecules in homogeneous assays are largely solved, and new challenges come from more complex biological molecules and nanoparticles. With that, FA will remain one of the major work-horse techniques leading to precision (personalized) medicine. PMID:26289575

  15. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of the Interaction Between DNA and a Peptide Truncated from the p53 Protein Core Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengxuan; Liang, Gaiting; Liu, Zhen; Zu, Lily

    2014-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy spectroscopy was applied to study the interaction between a peptide truncated from the binding site of tumor suppressor p53 protein and the DNAs covalently labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) dye. Fluorescence intensity quenching and changes of anisotropy decay lifetime were monitored when FAM labeled DNA formed complex with the peptide. The results demonstrated that the sequence of DNA could not define the binding specificity between the peptide and DNA. But the anisotropy decay of FAM can be used to examine the binding affinity of the peptide to DNA. The fluorescent dynamics of FAM can also be used to represent the rigidity of the complex formed between the peptide and DNA.

  16. Detecting gamma-ray anisotropies from decaying dark matter. Prospects for Fermi LAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarra, Alejandro; Tran, David [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Weniger, Christoph [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-09-15

    Decaying dark matter particles could be indirectly detected as an excess over a simple power law in the energy spectrum of the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background. Furthermore, since the Earth is not located at the center of the Galactic dark matter halo, the exotic contribution from dark matter decay to the diffuse gamma-ray flux is expected to be anisotropic, offering a complementary method for the indirect search for decaying dark matter particles. In this paper we discuss in detail the expected dipole-like anisotropies in the dark matter signal, taking also into account the radiation from inverse Compton scattering of electrons and positrons from dark matter decay. A different source for anisotropies in the gamma-ray flux are the dark matter density fluctuations on cosmic scales. We calculate the corresponding angular power spectrum of the gamma-ray flux and comment on observational prospects. Finally, we calculate the expected anisotropies for the decaying dark matter scenarios that can reproduce the electron/positron excesses reported by PAMELA and the Fermi LAT, and we estimate the prospects for detecting the predicted gamma-ray anisotropy in the near future. (orig.)

  17. Fluorescence decay time measurement - a new optical sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Sonja; Lippitsch, Max E.

    1994-02-01

    Optical sensors often suffer from poor long-term stability. This drawback can be overcome by using fluorescence decay-time measurement as the sensing principle. In this way calibration- free chemical sensors can be developed. The sensing scheme has been used so far mainly in connection with dynamic quenching, for example in oxygen sensors. We have succeeded in extending it to ground-state indicator-analyte reactions, thus obtaining stable optical sensors for decay-time sensing of various analytes.

  18. Fluorescence decay-time constants in organic liquid scintillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrodán Undagoitia, T; von Feilitzsch, F; Oberauer, L; Potzel, W; Ulrich, A; Winter, J; Wurm, M

    2009-04-01

    The fluorescence decay-time constants have been measured for several scintillator mixtures based on phenyl-o-xylylethane (PXE) and linear alkylbenzene (LAB) solvents. The resulting values are of relevance for the physics performance of the proposed large-volume liquid scintillator detector Low Energy Neutrino Astronomy (LENA). In particular, the impact of the measured values to the search for proton decay via p-->K(+)nu is evaluated in this work.

  19. Decaying neutron propagation in the Galaxy and the Cosmic Ray anisotropy at 1 EeV

    CERN Document Server

    Bossa, M; Roulet, E; Bossa, Matias; Mollerach, Silvia; Roulet, Esteban

    2003-01-01

    We study the cosmic ray arrival distribution expected from a source of neutrons in the galactic center at energies around 1 EeV and compare it with the anisotropy detected by AGASA and SUGAR. Besides the point-like signal in the source direction produced by the direct neutrons, an extended signal due to the protons produced in neutron decays is expected. This associated proton signal also leads to an excess in the direction of the spiral arm. For realistic models of the regular and random galactic magnetic fields, the resulting anisotropy as a function of the energy is obtained. We find that for the anisotropy to become sufficiently suppressed below E\\sim 10^{17.9}eV, a significant random magnetic field component is required, while on the other hand, this also tends to increase the angular spread of the associated proton signal and to reduce the excess in the spiral arm direction. The source luminosity required in order that the right ascension anisotropy be 4% for the AGASA angular exposure corresponds to a ...

  20. Fluorescence anisotropy characterization of urine in the diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Brindha, Elumalai; Sivabalan, Shanmugam; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Koteeswaran, Dornadula; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is considered as the second most commonly occurring malignancy among women, next to breast cancer. It is well known that most of the cancer patients diagnosed with advanced stages and there is a pressing need for improved methods to detect cancer at its initial stages. Many techniques have been adopted for the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Among these, fluorescence polarization spectroscopy is a complementary technique of fluorescence spectroscopy which helps us to elucidate the spectral characteristics which highly depend on pH, viscosity and local environment. Since urine has many metabolites and the measurement of native fluorescence of urine, in principle, able to provide an indication of a number of health conditions, attempts were made to study fluorescence anisotropic characterization of the human urine of cervical cancer patients and normal subjects. Significant differences were observed between the anisotropic and polarization values of cancer subjects and normal subjects.

  1. Steady-State Fluorescence Anisotropy to Investigate Flavonoids Binding to Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Christine M.; Strollo, Christen M.

    2007-01-01

    The steady-state fluorescence anisotropy is employed to study the binding of protein of a model protein, human serum albumin, to a commonly used flavonoid, quercetin. The experiment describes the thermodynamics, as well as the biochemical interactions of such binding effectively.

  2. Global analysis of fluorescence decays to probe the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Jean

    2014-03-11

    The aim of this review is to introduce the reader first to the mathematical complexity associated with the analysis of fluorescence decays acquired with solutions of macromolecules labeled with a fluorophore and its quencher that are capable of interacting with each other via photophysical processes within the macromolecular volume, second to the experimental and mathematical approaches that have been proposed over the years to handle this mathematical complexity, and third to the information that one can expect to retrieve with respect to the internal dynamics of such fluorescently labeled macromolecules. In my view, the ideal fluorophore-quencher pair to use in studying the internal dynamics of fluorescently labeled macromolecules would involve a long-lived fluorophore, a fluorophore and a quencher that do not undergo energy migration, and a photophysical process that results in a change in fluorophore emission upon contact between the excited fluorophore and quencher. Pyrene, with its ability to form an excimer on contact between excited-state and ground-state species, happens to possess all of these properties. Although the concepts described in this review apply to any fluorophore and quencher pair sharing pyrene's exceptional photophysical properties, this review focuses on the study of pyrene-labeled macromolecules that have been characterized in great detail over the past 40 years and presents the main models that are being used today to analyze the fluorescence decays of pyrene-labeled macromolecules reliably. These models are based on Birks' scheme, the DMD model, the fluorescence blob model, and the model free analysis. The review also provides a step-by-step protocol that should enable the noneducated user to achieve a successful decay analysis exempt of artifacts. Finally, some examples of studies of pyrene-labeled macromolecules are also presented to illustrate the different types of information that can be retrieved from these fluorescence decay

  3. Phasor approaches simplify the analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data in protein denaturation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bader, A.N.; Visser, N.V.; Amerongen, van H.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2014-01-01

    The intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan is frequently used to investigate the structure of proteins. The analysis of tryptophan fluorescence data is challenging: fluorescence (anisotropy) decays typically have multiple lifetime (correlation time) components and fluorescence spectra are broad and ex

  4. Axion decay and anisotropy of near-IR extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yan; Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Chen, Xuelei; Zemcov, Michael; Smidt, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The extragalactic background light is expected to be comprised of the cumulative radiation from all galaxies and active galactic nuclei over the cosmic history. In addition to point sources, EBL also contains information from diffuse sources of radiation. An example is the intra-halo light, associated with diffuse stars in dark matter halos resulting from galaxy mergers and tidal interactions, identified based on measurements involving the angular power spectrum of infrared background anisotropies. The angular power spectra of the near-infrared intensities could still contain additional signals and a complete understanding of the nature of the IR background is still lacking in the literature. Here we explore the constraints that can be placed on the decay products associated with particle decays, especially candidate dark matter models involving axions that trace dark matter halos of galaxies. Axions with a mass around a few eV will decay via two photons with wavelengths in the near-IR band, and will leave a ...

  5. Confocal fluorescence anisotropy and FRAP imaging of α-synuclein amyloid aggregates in living cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Julia Roberti

    Full Text Available We assessed the intracellular association states of the Parkinson's disease related protein α-synuclein (AS in living cells by transfection with a functional recombinant mutant protein (AS-C4 bearing a tetracysteine tag binding the fluorogenic biarsenical ligands FlAsH and ReAsH, The aggregation states of AS-C4 were assessed by in situ microscopy of molecular translational mobility with FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and of local molecular density with confocal fluorescence anisotropy (CFA. FRAP recovery was quantitative and rapid in regions of free protein, whereas AS in larger aggregates was>80% immobile. A small 16% recovery characterized by an apparent diffusion constant of 0.03-0.04 µm(2/s was attributed to the dynamics of smaller, associated forms of AS-C4 and the exchange of mobile species with the larger immobile aggregates. By CFA, the larger aggregates exhibited high brightness and very low anisotropy, consistent with homoFRET between closely packed AS, for which a Förster distance (R(o of 5.3 nm was calculated. Other bright regions had high anisotropy values, close to that of monomeric AS, and indicative of membrane-associated protein with both low mobility and low degree of association. The anisotropy-fluorescence intensity correlations also revealed regions of free protein or of small aggregates, undetectable by conventional fluorescence imaging alone. The combined strategy (FRAP+CFA provides a highly sensitive means for elucidating both the dynamics and structural features of protein aggregates and other intracellular complexes in living cells, and can be extended to other amyloid systems and to drug screening protocols.

  6. Study the effects of divalent metallic ions on the combination of DNA and histones with fluorescence anisotropy assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YuYing; WANG PengYe; DOU ShuoXing; XIE Ping; XI XuGuang

    2007-01-01

    The effects of divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) on the interaction between DNA and histone are studied using a fluorescence anisotropy assay. Fluorescence anisotropies of DNA and DNA-histone in the presence of divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) are measured. The results indicate that histone reduces the fluorescence anisotropy of lambda DNA while the divalent ions (Mn2+, Mg2+, Ca2+) significantly enhance the fluorescence anisotropy. Compared to the case of DNA incubated with histone alone, there are more histones binding to DNA when divalent ion, histone and DNA are incubated together. We also find that Mn2+ makes the DNA-histone complexes more condensed than the other ions do.

  7. Estimation of multiexponential fluorescence decay parameters using compressive sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sejung; Lee, Joohyun; Lee, Youmin; Lee, Minyung; Lee, Byung-Uk

    2015-09-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is a microscopic imaging technique to present an image of fluorophore lifetimes. It circumvents the problems of typical imaging methods such as intensity attenuation from depth since a lifetime is independent of the excitation intensity or fluorophore concentration. The lifetime is estimated from the time sequence of photon counts observed with signal-dependent noise, which has a Poisson distribution. Conventional methods usually estimate single or biexponential decay parameters. However, a lifetime component has a distribution or width, because the lifetime depends on macromolecular conformation or inhomogeneity. We present a novel algorithm based on a sparse representation which can estimate the distribution of lifetime. We verify the enhanced performance through simulations and experiments.

  8. Measurement of drug-target engagement in live cells by two-photon fluorescence anisotropy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, Claudio; Fumene Feruglio, Paolo; Brand, Christian; Lee, Sungon; Nibbs, Antoinette E; Stapleton, Shawn; Shah, Sunil; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Reiner, Thomas; Mazitschek, Ralph; Weissleder, Ralph

    2017-07-01

    The ability to directly image and quantify drug-target engagement and drug distribution with subcellular resolution in live cells and whole organisms is a prerequisite to establishing accurate models of the kinetics and dynamics of drug action. Such methods would thus have far-reaching applications in drug development and molecular pharmacology. We recently presented one such technique based on fluorescence anisotropy, a spectroscopic method based on polarization light analysis and capable of measuring the binding interaction between molecules. Our technique allows the direct characterization of target engagement of fluorescently labeled drugs, using fluorophores with a fluorescence lifetime larger than the rotational correlation of the bound complex. Here we describe an optimized protocol for simultaneous dual-channel two-photon fluorescence anisotropy microscopy acquisition to perform drug-target measurements. We also provide the necessary software to implement stream processing to visualize images and to calculate quantitative parameters. The assembly and characterization part of the protocol can be implemented in 1 d. Sample preparation, characterization and imaging of drug binding can be completed in 2 d. Although currently adapted to an Olympus FV1000MPE microscope, the protocol can be extended to other commercial or custom-built microscopes.

  9. Fluorescent decay time of a new types of inorganic CeF sub 3 scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Xue Hong Bi

    2002-01-01

    The authors presents the measurements of the fluorescent decay-time constants of a new types of inorganic CeF sub 3 scintillators produced by Beijing Glass Institute, using gamma pulse-source method. The fast and slow components about 10 ns and 32 ns were obtained. The equivalent decay-times of the CeF sub 3 scintillator about 22 ns indicates that the thinner scintillator has the faster fluorescence decay

  10. A fluorescence anisotropy method for measuring protein concentration in complex cell culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-04-22

    The rapid, quantitative analysis of the complex cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is of critical importance. Requirements for cell culture media composition profiling, or changes in specific analyte concentrations (e.g. amino acids in the media or product protein in the bioprocess broth) often necessitate the use of complicated analytical methods and extensive sample handling. Rapid spectroscopic methods like multi-dimensional fluorescence (MDF) spectroscopy have been successfully applied for the routine determination of compositional changes in cell culture media and bioprocess broths. Quantifying macromolecules in cell culture media is a specific challenge as there is a need to implement measurements rapidly on the prepared media. However, the use of standard fluorescence spectroscopy is complicated by the emission overlap from many media components. Here, we demonstrate how combining anisotropy measurements with standard total synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (TSFS) provides a rapid, accurate quantitation method for cell culture media. Anisotropy provides emission resolution between large and small fluorophores while TSFS provides a robust measurement space. Model cell culture media was prepared using yeastolate (2.5 mg mL(-1)) spiked with bovine serum albumin (0 to 5 mg mL(-1)). Using this method, protein emission is clearly discriminated from background yeastolate emission, allowing for accurate bovine serum albumin (BSA) quantification over a 0.1 to 4.0 mg mL(-1) range with a limit of detection (LOD) of 13.8 μg mL(-1). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  12. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Peloso, Marco; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-01-01

    We examine the cosmological correlators induced by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy, e.g., in presence of the coupling ${\\cal L} = f(\\phi) ( - \\frac{1}{4} F^2 + \\frac{\\gamma}{4} F \\tilde{F} )$ between the inflaton $\\phi$ and a vector field with vacuum expectation value ${\\bf A}$. For a suitably chosen function $f$, the energy in the vector field $\\rho_{\\rm A}$ does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, $P_\\zeta ( {\\bf k}) = P(k)[ 1 + g_* ( \\hat{\\bf k} \\cdot \\hat{\\bf A})^2]$, and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first $3$ Legendre polynomials, $B_\\zeta(k_1, k_2, k_3) = \\sum_L c_L P_L (\\hat{\\bf k}_1 \\cdot \\hat{\\bf k}_2) P(k_1) P(k_2) + 2~{\\rm perms} $, with $c_0 : c_1 : c_2 = 2 : -3 : 1$ ($c_1 \

  13. Fluorescence anisotropy excitation by polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, J.; Patas, A.; Althoff, J.; Lindinger, A.

    2016-08-01

    We report improved fluorescence contrast between dyes by two-photon excitation with polarization-shaped laser pulses after transmission through a kagome fiber utilizing the anisotropy of the dye molecules. Particularly phase- and polarization-tailored pulse shapes are employed for two-photon excited fluorescence of dyes in a liquid environment at the distal end of the kagome fiber. The distortions due to the optical fiber properties are precompensated in order to receive predefined polarization-shaped laser pulses after the kagome fiber. This enables to optimally excite one dye in one polarization direction and simultaneously the other dye in the other polarization direction. The presented method has a high potential for endoscopic applications due to the unique properties of kagome fibers for guiding ultrashort laser pulses.

  14. Kinetics of Fluorescence Decay in Er3 + :YAG under 408.6 nm Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The violet and green fluorescence spectra and the kinetics of fluorescence decay in Er3 + :YAG crystal under408.6 nm excitation were investigated by the time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence technique. The influence of multiphonon and energy transfer on the fluorescence decay of the 4S3/2 multiplet were theoretically analyzed. A good agreement of the measured and the simulated decay curves was achieved. The continuous profile variety of the decay curves in the region from 548 to 561.2 nm is found and it originates from the fluorescence overlap of 2G9/2 and 4S3/2 and the intensity ratio dominates the profile.

  15. Fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene and its cationic Trimethylamino derivative in liquid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes: opposing responses to isoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Steven C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of action of volatile general anesthetics has not yet been resolved. In order to identify the effects of isoflurane on the membrane, we measured the steady-state anisotropy of two fluorescent probes that reside at different depths. Incorporation of anesthetic was confirmed by shifting of the main phase transition temperature. Results In liquid crystalline dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, isoflurane (7-25 mM in the bath increases trimethylammonium-diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy by ~0.02 units and decreases diphenylhexatriene anisotropy by the same amount. Conclusions The anisotropy data suggest that isoflurane decreases non-axial dye mobility in the headgroup region, while increasing it in the tail region. We propose that these results reflect changes in the lateral pressure profile of the membrane.

  16. A nomogram for deconvolution of single exponential fluorescence decays.

    OpenAIRE

    Rockley, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    An extremely rapid technique for deconvolving single exponential luminescence decay data is described that involves essentially no mathematical manipulation of the experimental data. The method permits "real time" measurement of deconvolved luminescence lifetimes with conventional pulsed, lifetime-fluorometers and phosphorimeters. The method assumes that the true luminescence decay of the chromophore is accurately represented by a single exponential decay function.

  17. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling Script L = f(phi) ( - 1/4 F2 + γ/4 F ~F ) between the inflaton phi and a vector field with vacuum expectation value A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρA does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, Pζ(k) = P(k)[1+g*(hat kṡÂ)2], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, Bζ(k1, k2, k3) = ∑L cL PL (hat k1 ṡ hat k2) P(k1) P(k2) + 2 perms , with c0:c1:c2=2-3:1 (c1≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c1 contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to langleal1m1a*l2m2rangle, with |l1 - l2| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |l1 - l2| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g*, c0, c1 and c2), translate into the upper limit ρA / ρphi lesssim 10-9 at 0γ=. We find that the upper limit on the vector energy density becomes much more stringent as γ grows.

  18. A fluorescence anisotropy assay for the muscarinic M1 G-protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwiler, Kristin G; De Rosier, Therese; Hanson, Bonnie; Vogel, Kurt W

    2010-06-01

    In the search for new chemical entities that interact with G-proteincoupled receptors (GPCRs), assays that quantify efficacy and affinity are employed. Traditional methods for measuring affinity involve radiolabeled ligands. To address the need for homogeneous biochemical fluorescent assays to characterize orthosteric ligand affinity and dissociation rates, we have developed a fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay for the muscarinic M1 receptor that can be conducted in a 384-well plate. We used membranes from a muscarinic M1 cell line optimized for high-throughput functional assays and the previously characterized fluorescent antagonist BODIPY FL pirenzepine. The affinities of reference compounds were determined in the competitive FA assay and compared with those obtained with a competitive filter-based radioligand-binding assay using [(3)H] N-methylscopolamine. The IC(50) values produced from the FA assay were well-correlated with the radioligand-binding K(i) values (R(2) = 0.98). The dissociation of the BODIPY FL pirenzepine was readily monitored in real time using the FA assay and was sensitive to the presence of the allosteric modulator gallamine. This M1 FA assay offers advantages over traditional radioligandbinding assays as it eliminates radioactivity while allowing investigation of orthosteric or allosteric muscarinic M1 ligands in a homogeneous format.

  19. Fluorescence-Detected Ultrafast Free-Induction Decay in Powdered Rare Earth Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Qi; DAI De-Chang; YU Xiang-Yang; QIU Zhi-Ren; ZHOU Jian-Ying; YAN Chun-Hua; CHEN Zhi-Da

    2000-01-01

    Fluorescence interferometry is developed and applied to study ultrafast amplitude and phase dynamics for fleeinduction decay in powdered rare earth solids. The time-resolved phase dynamics of free-induction decay throughout the decaying process is accurately determined by using a novel dual-channel correlation technique and subpicosecond dephasing time is measured for Nd3+ solids at room temperature. The phase dynamics is well simulated with linear coherent polarization theory.

  20. Liposome fluidization and melting point depression by pressurized CO2 determined by fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothun, Geoffrey D; Knutson, Barbara L; Strobel, Herbert J; Nokes, Sue E

    2005-01-18

    The influence of CO2 on the bilayer fluidity of liposomes, which are representative of model cellular membranes, was examined for the first time at the elevated pressures (up to 13.9 MPa) associated with CO2-based processing of liposomes and microbial sterilization. Fluidization and melting point depression of aqueous dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes by pressurized CO2 (present as an excess phase) were studied by steady-state fluorescence anisotropy using the membrane probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). Isothermal experiments revealed reversible, pressure-dependent fluidization of DPPC bilayers at temperatures corresponding to near-gel (295 K) and fluid (333 K) phases at atmospheric pressure, where the gel-to-fluid phase transition (Tm) occurs at approximately 315 K. Isobaric measurements (PCO2 =1.8, 7.0, and 13.9 MPa) of DPH anisotropy demonstrate substantial melting point depression (DeltaTm = -4.8 to -18.5 K) and a large broadening of the gel-fluid phase transition region, which were interpreted using conventional theories of melting point depression. Liposome fluidity is influenced by CO2 accumulation in the hydrocarbon core and polar headgroup region, as well as the formation of carbonic acid and/or the presence of buffering species under elevated CO2 pressure.

  1. Localized surface plasmon-influenced fluorescence decay in dye-doped metallo-dielectric opals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Dipak [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Vijaya, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Centre for Lasers and Photonics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2016-01-14

    Well-ordered opaline photonic crystals are grown by inward growing self-assembly method from Rhodamine B dye-doped polystyrene colloids. Subsequent to self-assembly, the crystals are infiltrated with gold nanoparticles of 40 nm diameter. Measurements of the stopband features and photoluminescence intensity from these crystals are supplemented by fluorescence decay time analysis. The fluorescence decay times from the dye-doped photonic crystals before and after the infiltration are dramatically different from each other. A lowered fluorescence decay time was observed for the case of gold infiltrated crystal along with an enhanced emission intensity. Double-exponential decay nature of the fluorescence from the dye-doped crystal gets converted into single-exponential decay upon the infiltration of gold nanoparticles due to the resonant radiative process resulting from the overlap of the surface plasmon resonance with the emission spectrum. The influence of localized surface plasmon due to gold nanoparticles on the increase in emission intensity and decrease in decay time of the emitters is established.

  2. Porphyrin involvement in redshift fluorescence in dentin decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, A.; Panayotov, I.; Levallois, B.; Cloitre, T.; Gergely, C.; Bec, N.; Larroque, C.; Tassery, H.; Cuisinier, F.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the porphyrin involvement in the red fluorescence observed in dental caries with Soprolife® light-induced fluorescence camera in treatments mode (SOPRO, ACTEON Group, La Ciotat, France) and Vistacam® camera (DÜRR DENTAL AG, Bietigheim-Bissingen, Germany). The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) was used to rand the samples. Human teeth cross-sections, ranked from ICDAS score 0 to 6, were examined by epi-fluorescence microscopy and Confocal Raman microscopy. Comparable studies were done with Protoporphyrin IX, Porphyrin I and Pentosidine solutions. An RGB analysis of Soprolife® images was performed using ImageJ Software (1.46r, National Institutes of Health, USA). Fluorescence spectroscopy and MicroRaman spectroscopy revealed the presence of Protoporphyrin IX, in carious enamel, dentin and dental plaque. However, the presence of porphyrin I and pentosidine cannot be excluded. The results indicated that not only porphyrin were implicated in the red fluorescence, Advanced Glygation Endproducts (AGEs) of the Maillard reaction also contributed to this phenomenon.

  3. Investigating the allosteric reverse signalling of PARP inhibitors with microsecond molecular dynamic simulations and fluorescence anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Jean-Rémy; Carotti, Andrea; Passeri, Daniela; Filipponi, Paolo; Liscio, Paride; Camaioni, Emidio; Pellicciari, Roberto; Gioiello, Antimo; Macchiarulo, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The inhibition of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family members is a strategy pursued for the development of novel therapeutic agents in a range of diseases, including stroke, cardiac ischemia, cancer, inflammation and diabetes. Even though some PARP-1 inhibitors have advanced to clinical setting for cancer therapy, a great deal of attention is being devoted to understand the polypharmacology of current PARP inhibitors. Besides blocking the catalytic activity, recent works have shown that some PARP inhibitors exhibit a poisoning activity, by trapping the enzyme at damaged sites of DNA and forming cytotoxic complexes. In this study we have used microsecond molecular dynamics to study the allosteric reverse signalling that is at the basis of such an effect. We show that Olaparib, but not Veliparib and HYDAMTIQ, is able to induce a specific conformational drift of the WGR domain of PARP-1, which stabilizes PARP-1/DNA complex through the locking of several salt bridge interactions. Fluorescence anisotropy assays support such a mechanism, providing the first experimental evidence that HYDAMTIQ, a potent PARP inhibitor with neuroprotective properties, is less potent than Olaparib to trap PARP-1/DNA complex.

  4. Effect of sodium deoxycholate and sodium cholate on DPPC vesicles: A fluorescence anisotropy study with diphenylhexatriene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usharani Subuddhi; Ashok K Mishra

    2007-03-01

    Effects of two bile salts, namely sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), on DPPC small unilamellar vesicles have been investigated using the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy () of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a tool. It was found that the variation of is sensitive enough to monitor different stages of interaction of bile salts with DPPC vesicles. NaDC induced significant changes in the membrane well below its CMC (6 mM). Even at 4 mM, which is still lower than the CMC, the phospholipids were completely solubilised by the NaDC micelles. The effect of NaC on DPPC vesicles, however, was much less significant, especially in the sub-micellar concentration regime. Being more hydrophilic NaC does not interact with the membrane efficiently. Complete solubilisation of phospholipids took place only when the concentration of NaC was above its CMC (16 mM). The experiments also showed that the bile salt-induced changes of vesicle structure were strongly dependent on the concentration of the bile salt and not on the molar ratio of lipid and bile salt.

  5. Fluorescence Spectrum and Decay Measurement for Hsil VS Normal Cytology Differentiation in Liquid Pap Smear Supernatant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gegzna, V.; Juodkazis, S.; Jursenas, S.; Miasojedovas, S.; Kurtinaitiene, R.; Rimiene, J.; Vaitkus, J.

    2009-06-01

    Cervical smear material contains endo and exocervical cells, mucus and inflammative, immune cells in cases of pathology. Just not destroyed keratinocytes lay on the glass for microscopy. Liquid cytology supernatant apart other diagnostics could be used for photodiagnostic. The spectroscopic parameters suitable for Normal and HSIL cytology groups supernatant differentiation are demonstrated. The dried liquid PAP supernatant fractions—sediment and liquid were investigated. Excitation and emission matrices (EEM), supernatant fluorescence decay measured under 280 nm diode short pulse excitation and fluorescence spectroscopy by excitation with 355 nm laser light were analyzed. The differences between Normal and HSIL groups were statistically proven in the certain spectral regions. Fluorescence decay peculiarities show spectral regions consisting of few fluorophores. Obtained results on fluorescence differences in Normal and HSIL groups' supernatant shows the potency of photodiagnosis application in cervical screening.

  6. Human skin auto-fluorescence decay as a function of irradiance and skin type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreczeny, Martin P.; Bates, Rebecca; Fitch, Rick M.; Galen, Karen P.; Ge, Jiajia; Dorshow, Richard B.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to establish measurement conditions under which endogenous skin fluorescence ("auto-fluorescence") is relatively invariant, so that changes in exogenous agents can be accurately determined. Fluorescence emission was measured on the volar forearm of 36 subjects, chosen to be equally representative of all 6 Fitzpatrick skin types. All subjects were exposed to approximately 40 minutes of optical excitation at 450 and 500 nm with 4 irradiances between 0.3 and 9 mW/cm2. Both non-optically-induced (e.g. tissue settling and fluctuation) and optically-induced variations were observed in the measured fluorescence and mechanisms explaining these effects are proposed. The optically-induced auto-fluorescence decay was independent of skin type when excited at 450 nm, but significantly dependent on skin type when excited at 500 nm. Further, the extent of decay over time was linearly related to irradiance at 500 nm, but at 450 nm was non-linear, with the extent of decay rolling off between 2 and 9 mW/cm2. In order to maintain the auto-fluorescence signal within 95% of its original value over a 30 minute period, the excitation at 450 nm would need to be limited to 1.5 mW/cm2, while excitation at 500 nm should be limited to 5 mW/cm2.

  7. Variations in the heterogeneity of the decay of the fluorescence in six procyanidin dimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donghwan Cho; Rujiang Tian; Lawrence J. Porter; Richard W. Hemingway; Wayne L. Mattice

    1990-01-01

    The decay of the fluorescence has been measured in 1,4-dioxane for six dimers of (2R,3R)-(-)-epicatechin and (2R,3S)-(+)-catechin, hereafter denoted simply epicatechin and catechin. The dimers are epicatechin-(4β→8)-catechin, epicatechin-(4β→8)-epicatechin...

  8. The application of time decay characteristics of laser-induced fluorescence in the classification of vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Yang, Jian; Shi, Shuo; Du, Lin; Sun, Jia; Song, Shalei

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the time decay of the chlorophyll fluorescence intensity (TDCFI) of vegetation was measured based on laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) technology with a 355 nm laser serving as the excitation light source. The pseudo-color diagram of the TDCFI (PDTDCFIs) was proposed for use as a characteristic fingerprint for the analysis of various plant species based on variations in the fluorescence intensity over time. Compared with the steady-state fluorescence spectra, two-dimensional PDTDCFIs contained more spectral information, including variations in both the shape of the laser-induced fluorescence spectra and the relative intensity. The experimental results demonstrated that the PDTDCFIs of various plant species show distinct differences, and this was successfully applied in the classification of plant species. Therefore, the PDTDCFIs of plants could provide researchers with a more reliable and useful tool for the characterization of vegetation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Development of a homogeneous fluorescence anisotropy assay to monitor and measure FtsZ assembly in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reija, Belén; Monterroso, Begoña; Jiménez, Mercedes; Vicente, Miguel; Rivas, Germán; Zorrilla, Silvia

    2011-11-01

    We present here a fluorescence anisotropy method for the quantification of the polymerization of FtsZ, an essential protein for cytokinesis in prokaryotes whose GTP-dependent assembly initiates the formation of the divisome complex. Using Alexa 488 labeled wild-type FtsZ as a tracer, the assay allows determination of the critical concentration of FtsZ polymerization from the dependence of the measured steady-state fluorescence anisotropy on the concentration of FtsZ. The incorporation of the labeled protein into FtsZ polymers and the lack of spectral changes on assembly were independently confirmed by time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Critical concentration values determined by this new assay are compatible with those reported previously under the same conditions by other well-established methods. As a proof of principle, data on the sensitivity of the assay to changes in FtsZ assembly in response to Mg(2+) concentration or to the presence of high concentrations of Ficoll 70 as crowding agent are shown. The proposed method is sensitive, low sample consuming, rapid, and reliable, and it can be extended to other cooperatively polymerizing systems. In addition, it can help to discover new antimicrobials that may interfere with FtsZ polymerization because it can be easily adapted to systematic screening assays.

  10. On the origin of multiexponential fluorescence decays from 2-aminopurine-labeled dinucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Jacob M; Philip, Abbey M; Hariharan, Mahesh; Kohler, Bern

    2016-10-21

    The fluorescent probe 2-aminopurine (2Ap) has been used for decades to study local conformational fluctuations in DNA. Steady-state and time-resolved measurements of 2Ap fluorescence have been used to predict specific conformational states through suitable modeling of the quenching of the fluorescence of a 2Ap residue incorporated site-specifically into a DNA strand. The success of this approach has been limited by a lack of understanding of the precise factors responsible for the complex, multiexponential decays observed experimentally. In this study, dinucleotides composed of 2Ap and adenine were studied by the time-correlated single-photon counting technique to investigate the causes of heterogeneous emission kinetics. Contrary to previous reports, we argue that emission from 2Ap that is stacked with a neighboring base contributes negligibly to the emission signals recorded more than 50 ps after excitation, which are instead dominated by emission from unstacked 2Ap. We find that the decay kinetics can be modeled using a continuous lifetime distribution, which arises from the inherent distance dependence of electron transfer rates without the need to postulate a small number of discrete states with decay times derived from multiexponential fits. These results offer a new perspective on the quenching of 2Ap fluorescence and expand the information that can be obtained from experiments.

  11. A systems-theory approach to the analysis of multiexponential fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenfeld, J; Ford, C C

    1979-04-01

    A mathematical model of the fluorescence decay experiment based on linear systems theory is presented. The model suggests an experimental technique that increases the probability of correctly determining the decay constants of a multicomponent system. The use of moment methods for data analysis improves accuracy by combining information obtained from several discrete experiments. Examples are presented to show that the analysis of a three component system composed of known standards is improved as the number of experimental determinations is increased from one to four. The discrete measurements are made by changing the excitation and emission wavelengths.

  12. Employing the fluorescence anisotropy and quenching kinetics of tryptophan to hunt for residual structures in denatured proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish Kumar; Rajaram Swaminathan

    2007-03-01

    Residual structures in denatured proteins have acquired importance in recent years owing to their role as protein-folding initiation sites. Locating these structures in proteins has proved quite formidable, requiring techniques like NMR. Here in this report, we take advantage of the ubiquitous presence of tryptophan residues in residual structures to hunt for their presence using steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The surface accessibility and rotational dynamics of tryptophan in putative residual structures among ten different proteins, namely glucagon, melittin, subtilisin carlsberg, myelin basic protein, ribonuclease T1, human serum albumin, barstar mutant, bovine serum albumin, lysozyme and Trp-Met-Asp-Phe-NH2 peptide, was studied using steady state fluorescence quenching and anisotropy, respectively. Five proteins, namely ribonuclease T1, bovine serum albumin, melittin, barstar and hen egg white lysozyme appear likely to possess tryptophan(s) in hydrophobic clusters based on their reduced bimolecular quenching rates and higher steady-state anisotropy in proportion to their chain length. We also show that the fluorescence emission maximum of tryptophan is insensitive to the presence of residual structures.

  13. Translational and rotational motions of albumin sensed by a non-covalent associated porphyrin under physiological and acidic conditions: a fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time resolved anisotropy study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andrade, S.M.; Costa, S.M.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between a free-base, anionic water-soluble porphyrin, TSPP, and the drug carrier protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy (TRFA) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) at two different pH-values. Both rotational correlatio

  14. Decay of the resonance fluorescence following pulsed excitation of a weakly disordered excitonic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    1993-12-01

    A study is made of the decay of the resonance fluorescence following pulsed excitation of a weakly disordered system whose optical excitations are Frenkel excitons. The disorder is characterized by a Gaussian distribution of optical transition frequencies with no correlation between different sites. The duration of the resonant pulse is taken to be short in comparison with the reciprocal of the optical linewidth, and the wavelength of the light is assumed to be large in comparison with either the size of the array or the exciton mean free path associated with the disorder. In the limit where σ, the standard deviation of the Gaussian distribution, is much less than the exciton bandwidth, the integrated intensity of the fluorescence decays non-exponentially and is characterized by universal functions of σ xt, where x= 4/3, 2, and 4 in one, two, and three dimensions, respectively. Analytic approximations to the scaling functions in two and three dimensions are presented.

  15. Dynamics of glass-forming liquids. XIX. Rise and decay of field induced anisotropy in the non-linear regime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young-Gonzales, Amanda R; Samanta, Subarna; Richert, Ranko

    2015-09-14

    For glycerol and three monohydroxy alcohols, we have measured the non-linear dielectric effects resulting from the application and removal of a high dc bias electric field. The field effects are detected by virtue of a small amplitude harmonic field, from which time resolved changes in the dielectric loss are derived. The changes in permittivity are dominated by modifications of the time constants (rather than amplitudes) which display two contributions: a heating-like decrease of relaxation times that originates from the time dependent field when the bias is switched on and off and a slowing down of the dynamics resulting from the field induced reduction of configurational entropy. As observed for the electro-optical Kerr effect, the rise of the entropy change is slower than its decay, a feature that we rationalize on the basis of the quadratic dependence of the entropy change on polarization. For glycerol, the observed steady state level of the field induced shift of the glass transition temperature (+84 mK) matches the expectation based on the entropy change and its impact on dynamics via the Adam-Gibbs relation (+88 mK). For the alcohols, these non-linear effects rise and decay on the time scales of the prominent dielectric Debye process, underscoring the relation of these features to polarization anisotropy, opposed to mechanical or enthalpy relaxation which are orders of magnitude faster in these systems. A model is discussed which captures the observed magnitudes as well as time dependences in a near quantitative fashion. It is demonstrated that the high bias field modifies the response of polarization to the ac field, including a temporary change in the low field susceptibility.

  16. Comparison of microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate micelles in the presence of inorganic and organic salts: a time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, G B

    2005-11-08

    Microenvironments of aqueous sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) micelles was examined in the presence of additives such as sodium chloride and p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) by monitoring the fluorescence anisotropy decays of two hydrophobic probes, 2,5-dimethyl-1,4-dioxo-3,6-diphenylpyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DMDPP) and coumarin 6 (C6). It has been well-established that SDS micelles undergo a sphere-to-rod transition and that their mean hydrodynamic radius increases from 19 to 100 A upon the addition of 0.0-0.7 M NaCl at 298 K. A similar size and shape transition is induced by PTHC at concentrations that are 20 times lower compared to that of NaCl. This study was undertaken to find out how the microviscosity of the micelles is influenced under these circumstances. It was noticed that the microviscosity of the SDS/NaCl system increased by approximately 45%, whereas there was a less than 10% variation in the microviscosity of the SDS/PTHC system. The large increase in the microviscosity of the former system with salt concentration has been rationalized on the basis of the high concentration of sodium ions in the headgroup region of the micelles and their ability to strongly coordinate with the water present in this region, which decreases the mobility of the probe molecules.

  17. Fluorescence anisotropy of DNA/DAPI complex: torsional dynamics and geometry of the complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Barcellona, ML; Gratton, E

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescence depolarization of synthetic polydeoxynucleotide/4'-6- diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride complexes has been investigated as a function of dye/polymer coverage. At low coverage, fluorescence depolarization is due to local torsional motions of the DNA segment where the dye resides. At relatively high coverage, fluorescence depolarization is dominated by energy transfer to other dye molecules along the DNA. The extent of the observed depolarization due to torsional motion depe...

  18. Analysis of simulated fluorescence intensities decays by a new maximum entropy method algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Rosario; Altucci, Carlo; Velotta, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    A new algorithm for the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) is proposed for recovering the lifetime distribution in time-resolved fluorescence decays. The procedure is based on seeking the distribution that maximizes the Skilling entropy function subjected to the chi-squared constraint χ(2) ~ 1 through iterative linear approximations, LU decomposition of the Hessian matrix of the lagrangian problem and the Golden Section Search for backtracking. The accuracy of this algorithm has been investigated through comparisons with simulated fluorescence decays both of narrow and broad lifetime distributions. The proposed approach is capable to analyse datasets of up to 4,096 points with a discretization ranging from 100 to 1,000 lifetimes. A good agreement with non linear fitting estimates has been observed when the method has been applied to multi-exponential decays. Remarkable results have been also obtained for the broad lifetime distributions where the position is recovered with high accuracy and the distribution width is estimated within 3%. These results indicate that the procedure proposed generates MEM lifetime distributions that can be used to quantify the real heterogeneity of lifetimes in a sample.

  19. Single molecule fluorescence imaging as a technique for barium tagging in neutrinoless double beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, B. J. P.; McDonald, A. D.; Nygren, D. R.

    2016-12-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of ~ 1028 years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba++ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba++ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation and fluorescence in xenon gas. If a successful barium ion tag can be developed using SMFI adapted for high pressure xenon gas detectors, the first essentially zero background, ton-scale neutrinoless double beta decay technology could be realized.

  20. Investigation of β-lactam antibacterial drugs, β-lactamases, and penicillin-binding proteins with fluorescence polarization and anisotropy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B.

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the uses of fluorescence polarization and anisotropy for the investigation of bacterial penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), which are the targets of β-lactam antibacterial drugs (penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams), and of the β-lactamase enzymes that destroy these drugs and help to render bacterial pathogens resistant to them. Fluorescence polarization and anisotropy-based methods for quantitation of β-lactam drugs are also reviewed. A particular emphasis is on methods for quantitative measurement of the interactions of β-lactams and other inhibitors with PBPs and β-lactamases.

  1. A sensitive fluorescence anisotropy method for detection of lead (II) ion by a G-quadruplex-inducible DNA aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dapeng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Yin, Lei; Meng, Zihui [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yu, Anchi [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872 (China); Guo, Lianghong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Wang, Hailin, E-mail: hlwang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A fluorescence anisotropy approach for detection of Pb{sup 2+} was developed. •The strategy was based on binding-induced allosteric conformational change of aptamer probe. •The sensing mechanism was established by testing the photoinduced electron transfer interaction. -- Abstract: Sensitive and selective detection of Pb{sup 2+} is of great importance to both human health and environmental protection. Here we propose a novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for sensing Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution by a G-rich thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The TBA labeled with 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR) at the seventh thymine nucleotide was used as a fluorescent probe for signaling Pb{sup 2+}. It was found that the aptamer probe had a high FA in the absence of Pb{sup 2+}. This is because the rotation of TMR is restricted by intramolecular interaction with the adjacent guanine bases, which results in photoinduced electron transfer (PET). When the aptamer probe binds to Pb{sup 2+} to form G-quadruplex, the intramolecular interaction should be eliminated, resulting in faster rotation of the fluorophore TMR in solution. Therefore, FA of aptamer probe is expected to decrease significantly upon binding to Pb{sup 2+}. Indeed, we observed a decrease in FA of aptamer probe upon Pb{sup 2+} binding. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetime measurement were used to verify the reliability and reasonability of the sensing mechanism. By monitoring the FA change of the aptamer probe, we were able to real-time detect binding between the TBA probe and Pb{sup 2+}. Moreover, the aptamer probe was exploited as a recognition element for quantification of Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution. The change in FA showed a linear response to Pb{sup 2+} from 10 nM to 2.0 μM, with 1.0 nM limit of detection. In addition, this sensing system exhibited good selectivity for Pb{sup 2+} over other metal ions. The method is simple

  2. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-02-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  3. Resolution of heterogeneous fluorescence emission signals and decay lifetime measurement on fluorochrome-labeled cells by phase-sensitive FCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinkamp, J.A.; Crissman, H.A.

    1993-01-01

    A phase-sensitive flow cytometer has been developed to resolve signals from heterogeneous fluorescence emission spectra and quantify fluorescence decay times on cells labeled with fluorescent dyes. This instrument combines flow cytometry (FCM) and fluorescence spectroscopy measurement principles to provide unique capabilities for making phase-resolved measurements on single cells in flow, while preserving conventional FCM measurement capabilities. Stained cells are analyzed as they pass through an intensity-modulated (sinusoid) laser excitation beam. Fluorescence is measured orthogonally using a s barrier filter to block scattered laser excitation light, and a photomultiplier tube detector output signals, which are shifted in phase from a reference signal and amplitude demodulated, are processed by phase-sensitive detection electronics to resolve signals from heterogeneous emissions and quantify decay lifetimes directly. The output signals are displayed as frequency distribution histograms and bivariate diagrams using a computer-based data acquisition system. Results have demonstrated signal phase shift, amplitude demodulation, and average measurement of fluorescence lifetimes on stained cells; a detection limit threshold of 300 to 500 fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); fluorescence measurement precision of 1.3% on alignment fluorospheres and 3.4% on propidium iodide (PI)-stained cells; the resolution of PI and FITC signals from cells stainedin combination with PI and FITC, based on differences in their decay lifetimes; and the ability to measure single decay nines by the two-phase, phase comparator, method.

  4. The photoluminescence of a fluorescent lamp: didactic experiments on the exponential decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, Pasquale; Gratton, Luigi; Malgieri, Massimiliano; Oss, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    The lifetimes of the photoluminescent compounds contained in the coating of fluorescent compact lamps are usually measured using specialised instruments, including pulsed lasers and/or spectrofluorometers. Here we discuss how some low cost apparatuses, based on the use of either sensors for the educational lab or commercial digital photo cameras, can be employed to the same aim. The experiments do not require that luminescent phosphors are hazardously extracted from the compact fluorescent lamp, that also contains mercury. We obtain lifetime measurements for specific fluorescent elements of the bulb coating, in good agreement with the known values. We also address the physical mechanisms on which fluorescence lamps are based in a simplified way, suitable for undergraduate students; and we discuss in detail the physics of the lamp switch-off by analysing the time dependent spectrum, measured through a commercial fiber-optic spectrometer. Since the experiment is not hazardous in any way, requires a simple setup up with instruments which are commonly found in educational labs, and focuses on the typical features of the exponential decay, it is suitable for being performed in the undergraduate laboratory.

  5. Biotin and biotin analogues specifically modify the fluorescence decay of avidin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, G; Pugliese, L; Rosato, N; Toma, L; Bolognesi, M; Finazzi-Agrò, A

    1994-09-30

    Avidin, a basic tetrameric glycoprotein, isolated from hen egg-white, binds up to four molecules of biotin with exceptionally high affinity. The presence of tryptophanyl residues in the active site pointed out the opportunity of correlating the protein fluorescence with biotin binding. We have performed both steady state and dynamic fluorescence experiments using biotin or biotin-derived molecules (biotinamine, diaminobiotin and iminobiotin) as ligands. The fluorescence decay data can only be fitted by two continuous distributions of lifetimes which may reflect the presence of static or dynamic microheterogeneity in the environment of the tryptophan residues. We observed that the binding of biotin, biotinamine and iminobiotin reduces the widths of both distributions to discrete lifetimes thus indicating a more homogenous environment for the emitting tryptophan residues. Instead, the binding of diaminobiotin, which lacks the imidazolone ring, affects one lifetime distribution only. The binding of biotin also affects the rotational correlation time of avidin, which becomes shorter, suggesting a more compact structure of the ligated protein. The utility of analyzing the fluorescence in terms of distributions appears to be further warranted.

  6. Flexibility of Enzymes Suspended in Organic Solvents Probed by Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy. Evidence That Enzyme Activity and Enantioselectivity Are Directly Related to Enzyme Flexibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Jaap; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Verboom, Willem; Hoek, Arie van; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1995-01-01

    A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study on the molecular flexibility of active-site labeled anthraniloyl-α-chymotrypsin, dansylsubtilisin Carlsberg, and native subtilisin Carlsberg, suspended in organic solvents, is described. The internal rotational mobility of the fluorophore in the

  7. Assessment of the mode of action of polyhexamethylene biguanide against Listeria innocua by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeau, Elise; Dumas, Emilie; Adt, Isabelle; Degraeve, Pascal; Noël, Claude; Girodet, Christophe; Oulahal, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a cationic biocide. The antibacterial mode of action of PHMB (at concentrations not exceeding its minimal inhibitory concentration) upon Listeria innocua LRGIA 01 was investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Fourier transformed infrared spectra of bacteria treated with or without PHMB presented some differences in the lipids region: the CH(2)/CH(3) (2924 cm(-1)/2960 cm(-1)) band areas ratio significantly increased in the presence of PHMB. Since this ratio generally reflects membrane phospholipids and membrane microenvironment of the cells, these results suggest that PHMB molecules interact with membrane phospholipids and, thus, affect membrane fluidity and conformation. To assess the hypothesis of PHMB interaction with L. innocua membrane phospholipids and to clarify the PHMB mode of action, we performed fluorescence anisotropy experiments. Two probes, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and its derivative 1-[4-(trimethyl-amino)-phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene (TMA-DPH), were used. DPH and TMA-DPH incorporate inside and at the surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, respectively. When PHMB was added, an increase of TMA-DPH fluorescence anisotropy was observed, but no changes of DPH fluorescence anisotropy occurred. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PHMB molecules perturb L. innocua LRGIA 01 cytoplasmic membrane by interacting with the first layer of the membrane lipid bilayer.

  8. Cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon: A novel efficient signal translator for sensitive fluorescence anisotropy bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Pan; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-15

    Due to its unique features such as high sensitivity, homogeneous format, and independence on fluorescent intensity, fluorescence anisotropy (FA) assay has become a hotspot of study in oligonucleotide-based bioassays. However, until now most FA probes require carefully customized structure designs, and thus are neither generalizable for different sensing systems nor effective to obtain sufficient signal response. To address this issue, a cleavable DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was successfully engineered for signal amplified FA bioassay, via combining the unique stable structure of molecular beacon and the large molecular mass of streptavidin. Compared with single DNA strand probe or conventional molecular beacon, the DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon exhibited a much higher FA value, which was potential to obtain high signal-background ratio in sensing process. As proof-of-principle, this novel DNA-protein hybrid molecular beacon was further applied for FA bioassay using DNAzyme-Pb(2+) as a model sensing system. This FA assay approach could selectively detect as low as 0.5nM Pb(2+) in buffer solution, and also be successful for real samples analysis with good recovery values. Compatible with most of oligonucleotide probes' designs and enzyme-based signal amplification strategies, the molecular beacon can serve as a novel signal translator to expand the application prospect of FA technology in various bioassays.

  9. Studying Biological Tissue with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging: Microscopy, Endoscopy, and Complex Decay Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Jan; Elson, Daniel S.; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Lee, K. C. Benny; Vlandas, Alexis; Gambaruto, Giovanni L.; Léveque-Fort, Sandrine; Lever, M. John; Tadrous, Paul J.; Stamp, Gordon W. H.; Wallace, Andrew L.; Sandison, Ann; Watson, Tim F.; Alvarez, Fernando; French, Paul M. W.

    2003-06-01

    We have applied fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to the autofluorescence of different kinds of biological tissue in vitro , including animal tissue sections and knee joints as well as human teeth, obtaining two-dimensional maps with functional contrast. We find that fluorescence decay profiles of biological tissue are well described by the stretched exponential function (StrEF), which can represent the complex nature of tissue. The StrEF yields a continuous distribution of fluorescence lifetimes, which can be extracted with an inverse Laplace transformation, and additional information is provided by the width of the distribution. Our experimental results from FLIM microscopy in combination with the StrEF analysis indicate that this technique is ready for clinical deployment, including portability that is through the use of a compact picosecond diode laser as the excitation source. The results obtained with our FLIM endoscope successfully demonstrated the viability of this modality, though they need further optimization. We expect a custom-designed endoscope with optimized illumination and detection efficiencies to provide significantly improved performance.

  10. Time resolved fluorescence anisotropy of basic dyes bound to poly(methacrylic acid in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Hueder Paulo M. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of atactic poly(methacrylic acid, PMAA, with molecular weights in the range of (1.6 to 3.4 x 10(5 g mol-1, and labeled with the fluorescent dyes 9-aminoacridine or Nile blue were studied by photophysical measurements as a function of solvent viscosity and polarity. The conformational behavior of the PMAA chain segments around the fluorescent probe was reported by the change in the rotational diffusion of the dyes. Ethylene glycol swells the polymer chain compared with the more contracted conformation of PMAA in 50% water/ethylene glycol. The change in the rotational relaxation time of the dye bound to PMAA with the decrease of water content in the solvent mixture indicates a progressive expansion of polymer chain to a more open coil form in solution.

  11. Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

  12. Architecture of polyglutamine-containing fibrils from time-resolved fluorescence decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlein, Christoph; Miettinen, Markus S; Borwankar, Tejas; Bürger, Jörg; Mielke, Thorsten; Kumke, Michael U; Ignatova, Zoya

    2014-09-26

    The disease risk and age of onset of Huntington disease (HD) and nine other repeat disorders strongly depend on the expansion of CAG repeats encoding consecutive polyglutamines (polyQ) in the corresponding disease protein. PolyQ length-dependent misfolding and aggregation are the hallmarks of CAG pathologies. Despite intense effort, the overall structure of these aggregates remains poorly understood. Here, we used sensitive time-dependent fluorescent decay measurements to assess the architecture of mature fibrils of huntingtin (Htt) exon 1 implicated in HD pathology. Varying the position of the fluorescent labels in the Htt monomer with expanded 51Q (Htt51Q) and using structural models of putative fibril structures, we generated distance distributions between donors and acceptors covering all possible distances between the monomers or monomer dimensions within the polyQ amyloid fibril. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we systematically scanned all possible monomer conformations that fit the experimentally measured decay times. Monomers with four-stranded 51Q stretches organized into five-layered β-sheets with alternating N termini of the monomers perpendicular to the fibril axis gave the best fit to our data. Alternatively, the core structure of the polyQ fibrils might also be a zipper layer with antiparallel four-stranded stretches as this structure showed the next best fit. All other remaining arrangements are clearly excluded by the data. Furthermore, the assessed dimensions of the polyQ stretch of each monomer provide structural evidence for the observed polyQ length threshold in HD pathology. Our approach can be used to validate the effect of pharmacological substances that inhibit or alter amyloid growth and structure.

  13. Single Molecule Fluorescence Imaging as a Technique for Barium Tagging in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, B J P; Nygren, D R

    2016-01-01

    Background rejection is key to success for future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. To achieve sensitivity to effective Majorana lifetimes of $\\sim10^{28}$ years, backgrounds must be controlled to better than 0.1 count per ton per year, beyond the reach of any present technology. In this paper we propose a new method to identify the birth of the barium daughter ion in the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{136}$Xe. The method adapts Single Molecule Fluorescent Imaging, a technique from biochemistry research with demonstrated single ion sensitivity. We explore possible SMFI dyes suitable for the problem of barium ion detection in high pressure xenon gas, and develop a fiber-coupled sensing system with which we can detect the presence of bulk Ba$^{++}$ ions remotely. We show that our sensor produces signal-to-background ratios as high as 85 in response to Ba$^{++}$ ions when operated in aqueous solution. We then describe the next stage of this R\\&D program, which will be to demonstrate chelation...

  14. Correlation of tryptophan fluorescence intensity decay parameters with sup 1 H NMR-determined rotamer conformations: (tryptophan sup 2 )oxytocin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, J.B.A.; Schwartz, G.P.; Laws, W.R. (Mount Sinai, New York, NY (United States)); Wyssbrod, H.R.; Porter, R.A. (Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)); Michaels, C.A. (Swarthmore Coll., PA (United States))

    1992-02-18

    While the fluorescence decay kinetics of tyrosine model compounds can be explained in terms of heterogeneity derived from the three ground-state {chi}{sup 1} rotamers, a similar correlation has yet to be directly observed for a tryptophan residue. In addition, the asymmetric indole ring might also lead to heterogeneity from {chi}{sup 2} rotations. In this paper, the time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence properties of (tryptophan{sup 2})oxytocin at pH 3 are presented and compared with {sup 1}H NMR results. According to the unrestricted analyses of individual fluorescence decay curves taken as a function of emission wavelength-independent decay constants, only three exponential terms are required. In addition, the preexponential weighting factors (amplitudes) have the same relative relationship (weights) as the {sup 1}H NMR-determined {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations of the indole side chain. {sup 15}N was used in heteronuclear coupling experiments to confirm the rotamer assignments. Inclusion of a linked function restricting the decay amplitudes to the {chi}{sup 1} rotamer populations in the individual decay curve analyses and in the global analysis confirms this correlation. According to qualitative nuclear Overhauser data, there are two {chi}{sup 2} populations.

  15. Distribution of fluorescence decay times for 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate in human oxyhemoglobin A1b solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazdou, A. S.; Sobchuk, A. N.; Syakhovich, V. E.; Bokut, O. S.; Kvasyuk, E. I.; Bushuk, B. A.; Bokut, S. B.

    2012-07-01

    We have studied complex formation between molecules of the fluorescent probe 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and the major form (A1) and a minor form (Ab) of hemoglobin. The contribution of the longlived component f3 to the kinetic curves for fluorescence decay in HbA1b solutions is 0.021-0.036, which indicates a dramatic decrease (compared with HbA1) in the accessibility of the central cavity of HbA1b for binding 1,8-ANS. Disappearance of the long-lived component f3 in the fluorescence decay kinetics of 1,8-ANS in HbA1b solutions in the presence of inositol hexaphosphate (IHP) suggests that the regulatory region of HbA1b is completely inaccessible for interaction both with the negatively charged molecules of the probe and with natural regulators of the transport function for this form of the heme protein.

  16. Elliptic azimutal anisotropy of electrons from heavy-flavour decays in Pb-Pb collisions at a SNN = 2.76 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida

    This thesis presents measurements of the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy of electrons from heavy-flavour decays with the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE). The measurement is performed for the first time in Pb-Pb collisions at center-of-mass energy per colliding nucleon pair psNN = 2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies sufficiently high temperature and/or energy density can be achieved to form the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), the state of matter predicted by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) in which quarks and gluons are deconfined from hadrons. One of the most important probes of the QGP formation is the elliptic azimuthal anisotropy, which is quantified by the second harmonic v2 of the particle azimuthal angle distribution with respect to the angle of the reaction plane, which is defined by the impact parameter direction and the beam direction. In addition, heavy quarks (charm and beauty) serve as a sensitive probe of the QGP properties since they ar...

  17. Development of windows based software to analyze fluorescence decay with time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) setup

    CERN Document Server

    Mallick, M B; Ravindranath, S V G

    2002-01-01

    A VUV spectroscopic facility for studies in photophysics and photochemistry is being set up at INDUS-I synchrotron source, CAT, Indore. For this purpose, a data acquisition system based on time-correlated single photon counting method is being developed for fluorescence lifetime measurement. To estimate fluorescence lifetime from the data collected with this sytem, a Windows based program has been developed using Visual Basic 5.0. It uses instrument response function (IRF) and observed decay curve and estimates parameters of single exponential decay by least square analysis and Marquardt method as convergence mechanism. Estimation of parameters was performed using data collected with a commercial setup. Goodness of fit was judged by evaluating chi R sup 2 , weighted residuals and autocorrelation function. Performance is compared with two commercial software packages and found to be satisfactory.

  18. Toxicant induced changes on delayed fluorescence decay kinetics of cyanobacteria and green algae: a rapid and sensitive biotest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Leunert

    Full Text Available Algal tests have developed into routine tools for testing toxicity of pollutants in aquatic environments. Meanwhile, in addition to algal growth rates, an increasing number of fluorescence based methods are used for rapid and sensitive toxicity measures. The present study stresses the suitability of delayed fluorescence (DF as a promising parameter for biotests. DF is based on the recombination fluorescence at the reaction centre of photosystem II, which is emitted only by photosynthetically active cells. We analyzed the effects of three chemicals (3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU, 3,5 Dichlorophenol (3,5 DCP and copper on the shape of the DF decay kinetics for potential use in phytoplankton toxicity tests. The short incubation tests were done with four phytoplankton species, with special emphasis on the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. All species exhibited a high sensitivity to DCMU, but cyanobacteria were more affected by copper and less by 3,5 DCP than the tested green algae. Analyses of changes in the DF decay curve in response to the added chemicals indicated the feasibility of the DF decay approach as a rapid and sensitive testing tool.

  19. Ultrafast fluorescent decay induced by metal-mediated dipole-dipole interaction in two-dimensional molecular aggregates

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Qing; Nam, Sang Hoon; Xiao, Jun; Liu, Yongmin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Nicholas X

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional molecular aggregate (2DMA), a thin sheet of strongly interacting dipole molecules self-assembled at close distance on an ordered lattice, is a fascinating fluorescent material. It is distinctively different from the single or colloidal dye molecules or quantum dots in most previous research. In this paper, we verify for the first time that when a 2DMA is placed at a nanometric distance from a metallic substrate, the strong and coherent interaction between the dipoles inside the 2DMA dominates its fluorescent decay at picosecond timescale. Our streak-camera lifetime measurement and interacting lattice-dipole calculation reveal that the metal-mediated dipole-dipole interaction shortens the fluorescent lifetime to about one half and increases the energy dissipation rate by ten times than expected from the noninteracting single-dipole picture. Our finding can enrich our understanding of nanoscale energy transfer in molecular excitonic systems and may designate a new direction for developing fast a...

  20. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy of Bicyclo[1.1.1]pentane/Tolane-Based Molecular Rods Included in Tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolloni, Marco; Kaleta, Jiří; Mašát, Milan; Dron, Paul I; Shen, Yongqiang; Zhao, Ke; Rogers, Charles T; Shoemaker, Richard K; Michl, Josef

    2015-04-23

    We examine the fluorescence anisotropy of rod-shaped guests held inside the channels of tris(o-phenylenedioxy)cyclotriphosphazene (TPP) host nanocrystals, characterized by powder X-ray diffraction and solid state NMR spectroscopy. We address two issues: (i) are light polarization measurements on an aqueous colloidal solution of TPP nanocrystals meaningful, or is depolarization by scattering excessive? (ii) Can measurements of the rotational mobility of the included guests be performed at low enough loading levels to suppress depolarization by intercrystallite energy transfer? We find that meaningful measurements are possible and demonstrate that the long axis of molecular rods included in TPP channels performs negligible vibrational motion.

  1. Comparative study of the fatty acid binding process of a new FABP from Cherax quadricarinatus by fluorescence intensity, lifetime and anisotropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayao Li

    Full Text Available Fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs are small cytosolic proteins, largely distributed in invertebrates and vertebrates, which accomplish uptake and intracellular transport of hydrophobic ligands such as fatty acids. Although long chain fatty acids play multiple crucial roles in cellular functions (structural, energy metabolism, regulation of gene expression, the precise functions of FABPs, especially those of invertebrate species, remain elusive. Here, we have identified and characterized a novel FABP family member, Cq-FABP, from the hepatopancreas of red claw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. We report the characterization of fatty acid-binding affinity of Cq-FABP by four different competitive fluorescence-based assays. In the two first approaches, the fluorescent probe 8-Anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate (ANS, a binder of internal cavities of protein, was used either by directly monitoring its fluorescence emission or by monitoring the fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring between the single tryptophan residue of Cq-FABP and ANS. The third and the fourth approaches were based on the measurement of the fluorescence emission intensity of the naturally fluorescent cis-parinaric acid probe or the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy measurements of a fluorescently labeled fatty acid (BODIPY-C16, respectively. The four methodologies displayed consistent equilibrium constants for a given fatty acid but were not equivalent in terms of analysis. Indeed, the two first methods were complicated by the existence of non specific binding modes of ANS while BODIPY-C16 and cis-parinaric acid specifically targeted the fatty acid binding site. We found a relationship between the affinity and the length of the carbon chain, with the highest affinity obtained for the shortest fatty acid, suggesting that steric effects primarily influence the interaction of fatty acids in the binding cavity of Cq-FABP. Moreover, our results show that the binding affinities

  2. Nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy studies of intermolecular interactions in bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide and its mixtures with various cosolvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Prabhat Kumar; Nanda, Raju; Seth, Sudipta; Ghosh, Arindam; Sarkar, Moloy

    2016-09-01

    Keeping in mind the potential usefulness of mixed ionic liquid (IL)-cosolvents systems in several industrial applications, intermolecular interactions between a borate-based IL, bis(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-3-ium-3-yl)dihydroborate bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([BIMIMDBA][TF2N]), and its binary mixtures with several molecular solvents has been investigated through NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy. Analysis of the 1H chemical shifts (δ/ppm) and translational diffusion coefficients (D) of the IL in different solvent mixtures demonstrate interplay of nonspecific (ion-dipole) and specific (hydrogen bonding) interactions in governing the properties of these mixtures. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data provide evidence in favour of different IL-solvent interaction for different IL-cosolvent systems.

  3. Detection of decay in fresh-cut lettuce using hyperspectral imaging and chlorophyll fluorescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresh-cut lettuce sold in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is a desirable, but highly perishable product. Decay of tissue can start a few days after processing and may be difficult to detect by quick visual observation. A system for early detection of decay and gradual evaluation of its progress ...

  4. Zero-field splitting of the first excited triplet state in biradicals estimated from magnetic effects on the fluorescence decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeJeune, V.; Despres, A.; Migirdicyan, E. (Universite Paris-Sud, Orsay (France))

    1990-12-27

    The fluorescence decay of matrix-isolated m-xylylene biradicals is nonexponential and attributed to the emission from different sublevels of the first excited triplet state. In the presence of a magnetic field, the lifetime of the slow decay component decreases. Its dependence as a function of a weak magnetic field can be calculated for different values of the zero-field splitting parameter D. The best fitting value is {vert bar}D{vert bar} = 0.04 {plus minus} 0.01 cm{sup {minus}1}. This D value is found to be significantly larger in the first excited triplet state than in the ground state of the m-xylylene biradicals.

  5. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on monomeric and self-associated melittin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, A.; Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Grondelle, van R.; Kraayenhof, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropic and magic-angle fluorescence decay of the single tryptophan (Trp) residue of melittin, a bee venom peptide, was investigated by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy using a streak camera setup. The peptide was dissolved either in distilled water or in Hepes/NaOH buffer containing lo

  6. Experimental study of multi-photon contamination on the measurement of fluorescent decay time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the measurement of fluorescent lifetime based on time correlation-single photon counting technique by means of TAC, due to the contamination of multi-photons a deviation of fluorescent lifetime measured from the expected value is experimentally studied. A correction function instead of a simple exponential function is used to fit the experiment data. The validation of the correction function is checked using the experimental data of several test samples: YAP, NaI(T1) and LSO. The results show that the correction function well fits the data and the reasonable fluorescent lifetimes are obtained.

  7. Effect of sucrose on chemically and thermally induced unfolding of domain-I of human serum albumin: Solvation dynamics and fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rajeev; Sengupta, Bhaswati; Sen, Pratik

    2016-04-01

    The present study is devoted to understand the effect of sucrose on the hydration dynamics and rotational relaxation dynamics within the domain-I of HSA during chemically as well as thermally induced unfolding. It has been observed that the average solvation time become slower in the presence of sucrose for the lower concentrations of GnHCl, however at higher concentrations of GnHCl the effect of sucrose is almost negligible. From the time resolved fluorescence anisotropy it has been observed that in the lower concentration region of GnHCl the sucrose induced stabilization is small as compared to the higher concentrations of GnHCl. We have concluded that the hydration dynamics plays an important role in the sucrose induced stabilization process at the low concentration region; whereas environmental restriction is responsible at the higher concentration of GnHCl. However, we have observed a negligible stabilizing effect of sucrose towards the temperature induced unfolding.

  8. Fluorescence quenching and photobleaching in Au/Rh6G nanoassemblies: impact of competition between radiative and non-radiative decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, L.; Ye, F.; Hu, J.; Popov, S.; Friberg, A. T.; Muhammed, M.

    2011-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching from nanoassemblies formed by Rhodamine 6G and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of 2.6 nm radius has been investigated. The presence of Au NPs also induces long-term degradation of the photostability (photobleaching) of Rhodamine 6G used as gain medium in a Fabry-Perot laser cavity. We found that the degradation gets profound when the Au NPs concentration is significantly increased. Calculation of the radiative rate and direct time-resolved measurement of the fluorescence decay indicates that both the decrease of radiative decay rate and increase of non-radiative decay rate are responsible for the fluorescence quenching and photostability degradation. An energy transfer from the dye molecules to gold nanoparticles is dominating within the small distance between them and suppresses the quantum efficiency of Rhodamine 6G drastically. In long time scale, the photobleaching rate was slowing down, and laser output intensity reached a stabilized level which depends on the gold nanoparticles concentration.

  9. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies of azadioxatriangulenium (ADOTA) fluorophore in silica and PVA thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chib, Rahul; Raut, Sangram; Shah, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    in silica thin films and PVA films were studied by means of steady-state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. We have found that the azadioxatriangulenium entrapped in silica thin film has a wider fluorescence lifetime distribution (Lorentzian distribution), lower fluorescence efficiencies, shorter....... In contrast to the PVA matrices, the porous silica films allow restricted rotations of Azadioxatriangulenium molecules, which result in faster and complex fluorescence anisotropy decays suggesting energy migration among dye molecules....

  10. Size influence on the fluorescence decay time of ZnS:Mn2+ nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Jing; ZHANG Gao-feng; XING Tong-yan; XU Jian-ping; ZHANG Xiao-song; HUANG Qing-song

    2012-01-01

    ZnS:Mn2+ nanocrystals (NCs) with particle size from 1.9 nm to 3.2 nm are synthesized via chemical precipitation method with different [S2-]/[Zn2+] ratios.The size-dependent decay for Mn emission exhibits a double exponential behavior.And two lifetime values,in millisecond time domain,can both be shortened with size increasing,which is attributed to enhanced interaction between host and Mn2+ impurity.A molecular structure model is proposed to interpret the tendency of two lifetime components,which is correlated to the number of S vacancy (Vs) defects around Mn2+.

  11. Development of Functional Fluorescent Molecular Probes for the Detection of Biological Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshio Suzuki

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review is confined to sensors that use fluorescence to transmit biochemical information. Fluorescence is, by far, the most frequently exploited phenomenon for chemical sensors and biosensors. Parameters that define the application of such sensors include intensity, decay time, anisotropy, quenching efficiency, and luminescence energy transfer. To achieve selective (biomolecular recognition based on these fluorescence phenomena, various fluorescent elements such as small organic molecules, enzymes, antibodies, and oligonucleotides have been designed and synthesized over the past decades. This review describes the immense variety of fluorescent probes that have been designed for the recognitions of ions, small and large molecules, and their biological applications in terms of intracellular fluorescent imaging techniques.

  12. Guided fluorescence diagnosis of childhood caries: preliminary measures correlate with depth of carious decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoshchuk, Mari-Alina; Zhang, Liang; Dickinson, Brian A.; Ridge, Jeremy S.; Kim, Amy S.; Baltuck, Camille T.; Nelson, Leonard Y.; Berg, Joel H.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2014-02-01

    The current rise in childhood caries worldwide has increased the demand for portable technologies that can quickly and accurately detect and diagnose early stage carious lesions. These lesions, if identified at an early stage, can be reversed with remineralization treatments, education, and improvements in home care. A multi-modal optical prototype for detecting and diagnosing occlusal caries demineralization in vivo has been developed and pilot tested. The device uses a 405-nm laser as a scanned illumination source to obtain high resolution and high surface contrast reflectance images, which allows the user to quickly image and screen for any signs of demineralized enamel. When a suspicious region is located, the device can be switched to perform dual laser fluorescence spectroscopy using 405-nm and 532-nm laser excitations. These spectra are used to compute an auto-fluorescence (AF) ratio of the suspicious region and the percent difference of AF ratios from a healthy region of the same tooth. The device was tested on 7 children's teeth in vivo with clinically diagnosed carious lesions. Lesion depth was then visually estimated from the video image using the 405-nm scanned light source, and within a month the maximum drill depth was assessed by a clinician. The researcher and clinicians were masked from previous measurements in a blinded study protocol. Preliminary results show that the ratiometric percent difference measurement of the AF spectrum of the tooth correlates with the severity of the demineralization as assessed by the clinician after drilling.

  13. Vibration-insensitive temperature sensing system based on fluorescence decay and using a digital processing approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, H.; Zhao, W.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K. T. V.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Wei, C.; Mulrooney, J.; Clifford, J.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Lewis, E.; Degner, M.; Ewald, H.; Lochmann, S. I.; Bramann, G.; Merlone Borla, E.; Faraldi, P.; Pidria, M.

    2006-07-01

    A fluorescence-based temperature sensor system using a digital signal processing approach has been developed and evaluated in operation on a working automotive engine. The signal processing approach, using the least-squares method, makes the system relatively insensitive to intensity variations in the probe and thus provides more precise measurements when compared to a previous system designed using analogue phase-locked detection. Experiments carried out to determine the emission temperatures of a running car engine have demonstrated the effectiveness of the sensor system in monitoring exhaust temperatures up to 250 °C, and potentially higher. This paper was presented at the 13th International Conference on Sensors and Their Applications, held in Chatham, Kent, on 6-7 September 2005.

  14. Steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of quinine sulfate dication bound to sodium dodecylsulfate micelles: Fluorescent complex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sunita; Pant, Debi D., E-mail: ddpant@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in

    2014-01-15

    Interaction of quinine sulfate dication (QSD) with anionic, sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) surfactant has been studied at different premicellar, micellar and postmicellar concentrations in aqueous phase using steady state, time-resolved fluorescence and fluorescence anisotropy techniques. At premicellar concentrations of SDS, the decrease in absorbance, appearance of an extra fluorescence band at lower wavelengths and tri-exponential decay behavior of fluorescence, are attributed to complex formation between QSD molecules and surfactant monomers. At postmicellar concentrations the red shift in fluorescence spectrum, increase in quantum yield and increase in fluorescence lifetimes are attributed to incorporation of solute molecules to micelles. At lower concentrations of SDS, a large shift in fluorescence is observed on excitation at the red edge of absorption spectrum and this is explained in terms of distribution of ion pairs of different energies in the ground state and the observed fluorescence lifetime behavior corroborates with this model. The temporal fluorescence anisotropy decay of QSD in SDS micelles allowed determination of restriction on the motion of the fluorophore. All the different techniques used in this study reveal that the photophysics of QSD is very sensitive to the microenvironments of SDS micelles and QSD molecules reside at the water-micelle interface. -- Highlights: • Probe molecule is very sensitive to microenvironment of micelles. • Highly fluorescent ion-pair formation has been observed. • Modulated photophysics of probe molecule in micellar solutions has been observed. • Probe molecules strongly bind with micelles and reside at probe–micelle interface.

  15. A deconvolution procedure for determination of a fluorescence decay waveform applicable to a band-limited measurement system that has a time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Tetsuo; Shibata, Hironobu; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    We propose a deconvolution procedure used for deriving a true fluorescence decay waveform, which is applicable to a band-limited measurement system that has a time delay. In general, the fluorescence decay response has a time delay over the excitation light pulse mainly due to the wavelength dependence of the time delay of the response of a photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the frequency band is limited instrumentally or often should be cut off purposely at a relatively low frequency to eliminate high frequency noise. In order to extrapolate such a band-limited response function and to perform a deconvolution procedure in a frequency domain, finally, we introduce a delay time parameter in the conventional Gerchberg-Papoulis (GP) algorithm. We also demonstrate that the Hilbert-transform (HT)-based extrapolation method that we have proposed quite recently is equivalent to the GP algorithm. Simulation and experimental results show that the new method is effective.

  16. Initial stages of beta-amyloid Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 oligomerization observed using fluorescence decay and molecular dynamics analyses of tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Mariana; Kubiak-Ossowska, Karina; Birch, David J. S.; Rolinski, Olaf J.

    2013-03-01

    The development of Alzheimer’s disease is associated with the aggregation of the beta-amyloid peptides Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42. It is believed that the small oligomers formed during the early stages of the aggregation are neurotoxic and involved in the process of neurodegeneration. In this paper we use fluorescence decay measurements of beta-amyloid intrinsic fluorophore tyrosine (Tyr) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the early stages of oligomer formation for the Aβ1-40 and Aβ1-42 peptides in vitro. We demonstrate that the lifetime distributions of the amyloid fluorescence decay efficiently describe changes in the complex Tyr photophysics during the peptide aggregation and highlight the differences in aggregation performance of the two amyloids. Tyr fluorescence decay is found to be a more sensitive sensor of Aβ1-40 aggregation than Aβ1-42 aggregation. The MD simulation of the peptide aggregation is compared with the experimental data and supports a four-rotamer model of Tyr.

  17. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryzunov, Y.A. E-mail: grysunov@sci.lebedev.ru; Syrejshchikova, T.I.; Komarova, M.N.; Misionzhnik, E.Yu.; Uzbekov, M.G.; Molodetskich, A.V.; Dobretsov, G.E.; Yakimenko, M.N

    2000-06-21

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using 'amplitude standard' method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ('bright' K-35 molecules with {tau}{sub 1}=8.0{+-}0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ({tau}{sub 2}=1.44{+-}0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  18. Serum albumin binding sites properties in donors and in schizophrenia patients: the study of fluorescence decay of the probe K-35 using S-60 synchrotron pulse excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryzunov, Yu. A.; Syrejshchikova, T. I.; Komarova, M. N.; Misionzhnik, E. Yu; Uzbekov, M. G.; Molodetskich, A. V.; Dobretsov, G. E.; Yakimenko, M. N.

    2000-06-01

    The properties of serum albumin obtained from donors and from paranoid schizophrenia patients were studied with the fluorescent probe K-35 (N-carboxyphenylimide of dimethylaminonaphthalic acid) and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy on the SR beam station of the S-60 synchrotron of the Lebedev Physical Institute. The mean fluorescence quantum yield of K-35 in patients serum was decreased significantly by 25-60% comparing with donors. The analysis of pre-exponential factors of fluorescence decay using "amplitude standard" method has shown that in patient sera the fraction of K-35 molecules bound with albumin and inaccessible to fluorescence quenchers ("bright" K-35 molecules with τ1=8.0±0.4 ns) is 1.2-3 times less than in the donor sera. The fraction of K-35 molecules with partly quenched fluorescence ( τ2=1.44±0.22 ns) was significantly increased in schizophrenia patients. The results obtained suggest that the properties of binding region in serum albumin molecules of acute paranoid schizophrenia patients change significantly.

  19. Femtosecond fluorescence studies of DNA/RNA constituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavsson, T; Banyasz, A; Markovitsi, D [Laboratoire Francis Perrin, CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/SPAM - CNRS URA 2453 CEA/Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Improta, R, E-mail: thomas.gustavsson@cea.fr [Permanent address : Istituto Biostrutture e Bioimmagini - CNR, Via Mezzocannone 16, 80134 Napoli (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    In this overview, femtosecond fluorescence studies of various DNA constituents are presented, ranging from the monomeric chromophores to different model helices. In order to interpret the experimental results in terms of fundamental processes on the molecular scale they are discussed in the light of recent theoretical calculations. The ultrafast fluorescence decay observed for the monomers is explained by the involvement of highly efficient conical intersections (CI) between the first singlet excited state and the ground state. For the model helices, the picture is more complex, but fluorescence anisotropy data reveal collective effects.

  20. Fluorescence decay of singlet excited-state of safranine T and its interaction with ground-state of pyridinthiones in micelles and homogeneous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kemar, Maged A; Khedr, Rehab A; Etaiw, Safaa El-Din H

    2002-11-01

    The fluorescence decays of safranine T were studied in different homogeneous solvents and heterogeneous micellar solutions. It has been found that micellization leads to an increase in the lifetime. The lifetime distributions were studied in micelles and homogeneous media. It was found that the different half-width distributions of the dye in different micelles are related to the different orientation of the dye in different micelles. Also, the fluorescence quenching of safranine T by 4,6-disubstituted-3-cyanopyridin-2(1H)-thiones was studied in chloroform, methanol and acetonitrile as well as in different micelles. In heterogeneous media the kq values for quenching of safranine T by thiones in various micelles increase on the following order: kq(CTAB) safranine T and therefore the quenching process will be less significant.

  1. Activated barrier crossing dynamics in the non-radiative decay of NADH and NADPH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blacker, Thomas S., E-mail: t.blacker@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Marsh, Richard J., E-mail: richard.marsh@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Duchen, Michael R., E-mail: m.duchen@ucl.ac.uk [Research Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bain, Angus J., E-mail: a.bain@ucl.ac.uk [Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX), University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: ► NADH and NADPH have a high rate of non-radiative excited state decay. ► Conformational relaxation is shown to be a significant non-radiative pathway. ► The Kramers equation describes the barrier crossing dynamics of the relaxation. ► Conformational restriction upon enzyme binding will alter NAD(P)H lifetimes. - Abstract: In live tissue, alterations in metabolism induce changes in the fluorescence decay of the biological coenzyme NAD(P)H, the mechanism of which is not well understood. In this work, the fluorescence and anisotropy decay dynamics of NADH and NADPH were investigated as a function of viscosity in a range of water–glycerol solutions. The viscosity dependence of the non-radiative decay is well described by Kramers and Kramers–Hubbard models of activated barrier crossing over a wide viscosity range. Our combined lifetime and anisotropy analysis indicates common mechanisms of non-radiative relaxation in the two emitting states (conformations) of both molecules. The low frequencies associated with barrier crossing suggest that non-radiative decay is mediated by small scale motion (e.g. puckering) of the nicotinamide ring. Variations in the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and NADPH when bound to different enzymes may therefore be attributed to differing levels of conformational restriction upon binding.

  2. Fluorescence depolarization analysis of thermal phase transition in DPPC and DMPG aqueous dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Amando Siuiti, E-mail: amandosi@ffclrp.usp.br; Rodrigues, Ana Paula; Moreira Pazin, Wallance; Berardi Barioni, Marina

    2015-02-15

    We performed an overall analysis of steady state, kinetic and dynamical parameters of phospholipids labeled with 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl (NBD), to investigate the structural changes accompanying the phase transition of dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) vesicles, under low and high ionic strength conditions. For comparison, we also performed experiments on dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles, which exhibit a well-defined thermal phase transition. Fluorescence parameters alone (lifetime, pre-exponential factor, rotational correlation times, and initial anisotropy) do not describe the thermal behavior of the vesicles. Combination of intensity decay and anisotropy decay data allows the calculation of mean anisotropy values, and among the several parameters obtained from time-resolved measurements, the main contribution to the mean anisotropy comes from the residual anisotropy, obtained as the limit value at long times. The results of calculations were comparable to the steady state measurements, and allowed the observation of the dependence between the thermal phase transition in DMPG and the ionic strength of the medium. The presence of NaCl affects the lipid packing leading to structural constraints onto the probes that are systematically higher than those observed in low ionic strength. In low ionic strength the long rotational correlation time of the NBD-PE (NBD-phosphatidylethanolamine) probe presents peculiar behavior, showing transient changes along the broad gel–fluid transition, that occurs parallel to the modifications in the scattering intensity. - Highlights: • Time-resolved data were combined to calculate mean values of fluorescence anisotropy. • Fluorescence structural parameters describe lipid vesicles thermal phase transition. • Calculated fluorescence anisotropy describes ionic strength effects in DMPG bilayers.

  3. Expanding the potential of standard flow cytometry by extracting fluorescence lifetimes from cytometric pulse shifts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Ruofan; Naivar, Mark A; Wilder, Mark; Houston, Jessica P

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements provide information about the fluorescence relaxation, or intensity decay, of organic fluorophores, fluorescent proteins, and other inorganic molecules that fluoresce...

  4. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  5. Rapid global fitting of large fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy datasets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean C Warren

    Full Text Available Fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM is widely applied to obtain quantitative information from fluorescence signals, particularly using Förster Resonant Energy Transfer (FRET measurements to map, for example, protein-protein interactions. Extracting FRET efficiencies or population fractions typically entails fitting data to complex fluorescence decay models but such experiments are frequently photon constrained, particularly for live cell or in vivo imaging, and this leads to unacceptable errors when analysing data on a pixel-wise basis. Lifetimes and population fractions may, however, be more robustly extracted using global analysis to simultaneously fit the fluorescence decay data of all pixels in an image or dataset to a multi-exponential model under the assumption that the lifetime components are invariant across the image (dataset. This approach is often considered to be prohibitively slow and/or computationally expensive but we present here a computationally efficient global analysis algorithm for the analysis of time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC or time-gated FLIM data based on variable projection. It makes efficient use of both computer processor and memory resources, requiring less than a minute to analyse time series and multiwell plate datasets with hundreds of FLIM images on standard personal computers. This lifetime analysis takes account of repetitive excitation, including fluorescence photons excited by earlier pulses contributing to the fit, and is able to accommodate time-varying backgrounds and instrument response functions. We demonstrate that this global approach allows us to readily fit time-resolved fluorescence data to complex models including a four-exponential model of a FRET system, for which the FRET efficiencies of the two species of a bi-exponential donor are linked, and polarisation-resolved lifetime data, where a fluorescence intensity and bi-exponential anisotropy decay model is applied to the analysis

  6. Fluorescence studies with malate dehydrogenase from rhizobium japonicum 3I1B-143 bacteroids: a two-tryptophan containing protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiron, Camillo A.; Eftink, Maurice R.; Waters, James K.; Emerich, David W.

    1990-05-01

    A number of fluorescence studies, both of trp residues and bound NADH, have been reported for porcine MDH. The large number of trp residues (6) complicates the interpretation of some studies. To circumvent this we have performed studies with a two tryptophan (per subunit) MDH from Rhizobium japonicum 311B-143 bacteroids. We have performed phase/modulation fluorescence lifetime measurements, as a function of temperature and added quencher KI, in order to resolved the 1.3 ns (blue) and 6.6 ns (red) contributions from the two classes of trp residues. Anisotropy decay studies have also been performed. The binding of NADH dynamically quenches the fluorescence of both tip residues, but, unlike mammalian cytoplasmic and mitochondrial MDH, there is not a large enhancement in fluorescence of bound NADH upon forming a ternary complex with either tartronic acid or D-malonate.

  7. Polarization properties of fluorescent BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Sangram; Chib, Rahul; Rich, Ryan; Shumilov, Dmytro; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2013-03-01

    BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and studied their steady state and time resolved fluorescence properties including polarization behavior in different solvents: glycerol, propylene glycol and water. We demonstrated that the nanocluster absorption spectrum can be separated from the extinction spectrum by subtraction of Rayleigh scattering. The nanocluster absorption spectrum is well approximated by three Gaussian components. By a comparison of the emissions from BSA Au25 clusters and rhodamine B in water, we estimated the quantum yield of nanoclusters to be higher than 0.06. The fluorescence lifetime of BSA Au25 clusters is long and heterogeneous with an average value of 1.84 μs. In glycerol at -20 °C the anisotropy is high, reaching a value of 0.35. However, the excitation anisotropy strongly depends on the excitation wavelengths indicating a significant overlap of the different transition moments. The anisotropy decay in water reveals a correlation time below 0.2 μs. In propylene glycol the measured correlation time is longer and the initial anisotropy depends on the excitation wavelength. BSA Au25 clusters, due to long lifetime and high polarization, can potentially be used in studying large macromolecules such as protein complexes with large molecular weight.BSA protected gold nanoclusters (Au25) are attracting a great deal of attention due to their unique spectroscopic properties and possible use in biophysical applications. Although there are reports on synthetic strategies, spectroscopy and applications, little is known about their polarization behavior. In this study, we synthesized the BSA protected Au25 nanoclusters and

  8. Drug/protein interactions studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Markovitsi, Dimitra; Vayá, Ignacio; Bonancía, Paula; Jiménez, M. C.; Miranda, Miguel A.

    2014-09-01

    We report here on a recent time-resolved fluorescence study [1] of the interaction between flurbiprofen (FBP), a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and human serum albumin (HSA), the main transport protein in the human body. We compare the results obtained for the drug-protein complex with those of various covalently linked flurbiprofentryptophan dyads having well-defined geometries. In all cases stereoselective dynamic fluorescence quenching is observed, varying greatly from one system to another. In addition, the fluorescence anisotropy decays also display a clear stereoselectivity. For the drug-protein complexes, this can be interpreted in terms of the protein microenvironment playing a significant role in the conformational relaxation of FBP, which is more restricted in the case of the (R)- enantiomer.

  9. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  10. Comment on ‘A novel method for fast and robust estimation of fluorescence decay dynamics using constrained least-square deconvolution with Laguerre expansion’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongliang; Day-Uei Li, David

    2017-02-01

    This comment is to clarify that Poisson noise instead of Gaussian noise shall be included to assess the performances of least-squares deconvolution with Laguerre expansion (LSD-LE) for analysing fluorescence lifetime imaging data obtained from time-resolved systems. Moreover, we also corrected an equation in the paper. As the LSD-LE method is rapid and has the potential to be widely applied not only for diagnostic but for wider bioimaging applications, it is desirable to have precise noise models and equations.

  11. Fluorescence, Decay Time, and Structural Change of Laser Dye Cresyl Violet in Solution due to Microwave Irradiation at GSM 900/1800 Mobile Phone Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Bayrakceken

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave irradiation at GSM 900/1800 MHz mobile phone frequencies affects the electronic structure of cresyl violet in solution. These changes are important because laser-dye cresyl violet strongly bonds to DNA- and RNA-rich cell compounds in nerve tissues. The irradiation effects on the electronic structure of cresyl violet and its fluorescence data were all obtained experimentally at room temperature. For most laser dyes, this is not a trivial task because laser dye molecules possess a relatively complex structure. They usually consist of an extended system of conjugated double or aromatic π-bonds with attached auxochromic (electron donating groups shifting the absorption band further towards longer wavelength. Because of the intrinsically high degree of conjugation, the vibrational modes of the molecular units couple strongly with each other. We found that the fluorescence quantum yield was increased from to due to intramolecular energy hopping of cresyl violet in solution which is exposed to microwave irradiation at mobile phone frequencies, and the photonic product cannot be used as a laser dye anymore.

  12. Reply to Comment: ‘A novel method for fast and robust estimation of fluorescence decay dynamics using constrained least-square deconvolution with Laguerre expansion’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Qi, Jinyi; Marcu, Laura

    2017-02-01

    In this response we underscore that the instrumentation described in the original publication (Liu et al 2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 843–65) was based on pulse-sampling technique, while the comment by Zhang et al is based on the assumption that a time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) instrumentation was used. Therefore the arguments made in the comment are not applicable to the noise model reported by Liu et al. As reported in the literature (Lakowicz 2006 Principles of Fluorescence Spectroscopy (New York: Springer)), while in the TCSPC the experimental noise can be estimated from Poisson statistics, such an assumption is not valid for pulse-sampling (transient recording) techniques. To further clarify this aspect, we present here a comprehensive noise model describing the signal and noise propagation of the pulse sampling time-resolved fluorescence detection. Experimental data recorded in various conditions are analyzed as a case study to demonstrate the noise model of our instrumental system. In addition, regarding the statement of correcting equation (3) in Liu et al (2012 Phys. Med. Biol. 57 843–65), the notation of discrete time Laguerre function in the original publication was clear and consistent with literature conventions (Marmarelis 1993 Ann. Biomed. Eng. 21 573–89, Westwick and Kearney 2003 Identification of Nonlinear Physiological Systems (Hoboken, NJ: Wiley)). Thus, it does not require revision.

  13. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 <γ< -2.6. Conclusions: Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  14. Polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy of DNA-DAPI complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellona, Maria Luisa; Gammon, Seth; Hazlett, Theodore; Digman, Michelle A; Gratton, Enrico

    2004-11-01

    We discuss the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy for the measurement of relatively slow rotations of large macromolecules in solution or attached to other macromolecular structures. We present simulations and experimental results to illustrate the range of rotational correlation times and diffusion times that the technique can analyze. In particular, we examine various methods to analyze the polarization fluctuation data. We have found that by first constructing the polarization function and then calculating the autocorrelation function, we can obtain the rotational motion of the molecule with very little interference from the lateral diffusion of the macromolecule, as long as the rotational diffusion is significantly faster than the lateral diffusion. Surprisingly, for common fluorophores the autocorrelation of the polarization function is relatively unaffected by the photon statistics. In our instrument, two-photon excitation is used to define a small volume of illumination where a few molecules are present at any instant of time. The measurements of long DNA molecules labeled with the fluorescent probe DAPI show local rotational motions of the polymers in addition to translation motions of the entire polymer. For smaller molecules such as EGFP, the viscosity of the solution must be increased to bring the relaxation due to rotational motion into the measurable range. Overall, our results show that polarized fluorescence correlation spectroscopy can be used to detect fast and slow rotational motion in the time scale from microsecond to second, a range that cannot be easily reached by conventional fluorescence anisotropy decay methods.

  15. Light-Enhanced Fluorescence of Multi-Level Cavitands Possessing Pyridazine Upper rim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosi, Tibor Zoltan; Makkai, Geza; Kegl, Timea; Matyus, Peter; Kollar, Laszlo; Erostyak, Janos

    2016-03-01

    Completely different fluorescence behaviour of cavitands based on a same calix[4]resorcinarene compound was observed. While the fluorescence intensity of the parent compound, tetramethyl-cavitand (1) slowly faded as a result of UV-light exposure, the emission of the three-level cavitand with pyridazine moieties at the upper rim (5a) was enhanced by the excitation in the UV-region. The structure of fluorescence emission (characterized by excitation-emission matrices) and the absorption of 5a remained unaltered. The analysis of fluorescence decay curves reveals the presence of two separated components assigned to two individual emitting species. The measured significant increase of the average lifetime and quantum yield is the consequence of the UV-light induced transition between the different states of 5a. These observations can be explained by the structural difference between 5a and 1. As a counterpart of the naked cavitand (1) with methyl substituents at the upper rim only, 5a has three additional moieties benzene, triazole and pyridazine levels. Computational studies proved the existence of two conformational isomers of 5a. Upon ultraviolet light excitation a "dark" to "light" conformational transition occurs between the two isomers. This hypothesis was confirmed by anisotropy decay measurements.

  16. Observational constrains on a decaying cosmological term

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, R; Ichiki, K; Nakamura, Riou; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of a universe with a decaying cosmological term (vacuum energy) that is assumed to be a function of the scale factor. In this model, while the cosmological term increases to the early universe, the radiation energy density is lower than the model with the cosmological "constant". We find that the effects of the decaying cosmological term on the expansion rate at the redshift z<2 is negligible. However, the decrease in the radiation density affects on the thermal history of the universe; e.g. the photon decoupling occurs at higher $z$ compared to the case of the standard \\Lambda CDM model. As a consequence, a decaying cosmological term affects on the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. We show the angular power spectrum in D\\Lambda CDM model and compare with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data.

  17. Convivial Decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohn, Marisa

    2016-01-01

    in the life of infrastructure we can observe common issues associated with aging infrastructures – hardware’s material decay, programming languages and software tools reaching end of support, obsolete managerial methodologies, etc. Such a case of infrastructural decay reveals how work of infrastructure...... maintenance may reach the limits of repair and shift from repair-as-sustaining into a mode of repair- into-decay, actively working towards the end-of-life. What this reveals is that, rather than infrastructural decay being a natural by-product of time’s passing, there is active work that goes into producing......This paper discusses the empirical case of an aging and obsolescent infrastructure supporting a space science mission that is currently approaching a known end. Such a case contributes to our understanding of the degrading path at the end-of-life of an infrastructure. During this later stage...

  18. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Hikosaka, Koki

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  19. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Kevin H.

    2014-07-14

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K-edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence, and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylene-like backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  20. Molecular anisotropy effects in carbon K-edge scattering: Depolarized diffuse scattering and optical anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Kortright, Jeffrey B.

    2014-09-01

    Some polymer properties, such as conductivity, are very sensitive to short- and intermediate-range orientational and positional ordering of anisotropic molecular functional groups, and yet means to characterize orientational order in disordered systems are very limited. We demonstrate that resonant scattering at the carbon K edge is uniquely sensitive to short-range orientation correlations in polymers through depolarized scattering at high momentum transfers, using atactic polystyrene as a well-characterized test system. Depolarized scattering is found to coexist with unpolarized fluorescence and to exhibit pronounced anisotropy. We also quantify the spatially averaged optical anisotropy from low-angle reflectivity measurements, finding anisotropy consistent with prior visible, x-ray absorption, and theoretical studies. The average anisotropy is much smaller than that in the depolarized scattering and the two have different character. Both measurements exhibit clear spectral signatures from the phenyl rings and the polyethylenelike backbone. Discussion focuses on analysis considerations and prospects for using this depolarized scattering for studies of disorder in soft condensed matter.

  1. Seal Out Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Decay (Caries) > Seal Out Tooth Decay Seal Out Tooth Decay Main Content What are dental sealants? How are ... fix decayed teeth. Back to Top What causes tooth decay? Germs in the mouth use the sugar in ...

  2. Finite-size anisotropy in statistically uniform porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Koza, Zbigniew; Khalili, Arzhang

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of the permeability tensor in statistically uniform porous media of sizes used in typical computer simulations is studied. Although such systems are assumed to be isotropic by default, we show that de facto their anisotropic permeability can give rise to significant changes of transport parameters such as permeability and tortuosity. The main parameter controlling the anisotropy is $a/L$, being the ratio of the obstacle to system size. Distribution of the angle $\\alpha$ between the external force and the volumetric fluid stream is found to be approximately normal, and the standard deviation of $\\alpha$ is found to decay with the system size as $(a/L)^{d/2}$, where $d$ is the space dimensionality. These properties can be used to estimate both anisotropy-related statistical errors in large-scale simulations and the size of the representative elementary volume.

  3. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  4. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  5. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1994-01-01

    This book reviews the study of b quarks and also looks at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - including measurement of the ""B"" lifetime and observations of b -> u transitions - as well as the more mundane results of hadronic and semileptonic transitions are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. Synthesizing the experimental and theoretical information, the authors d

  6. B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Stone, Sheldon

    1992-01-01

    The study of b quarks has now reached a stage where it is useful to review what has been learned so far and also to look at the implications of future studies. The most important observations thus far - measurement of the "B" lifetime, B 0 - B 0 mixing, and the observation of b? u transitions, as well as more mundane results on hadronic and semileptonic transitions - are described in detail by experimentalists who have been closely involved with the measurements. Theoretical progress in understanding b quark decays, including the mechanisms of hadronic and semileptonic decays, are described. S

  7. Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy: advanced studies of fluorescence dynamics, lifetime imaging, clinical sensing, two-photon excitation, and light quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Malak, Henryk M.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Szmacinski, Henryk; Kusba, Jozef; Akkaya, Engin; Terpetschnig, Ewald A.; Johnson, Michael L.

    1994-08-01

    The Center for Fluorescence Spectroscopy (CFS) is a multi-user facility providing state of the art time-resolved fluorescence instrumentation and software for scientists, whose research can be enhanced by such experimental data. The CFS is a national center, supported by the National Center for Research Resources Division of the National Institutes of Health, and in part by the National Science Foundation. Both time-domain (TD) and frequency- domain (FD) measurements (10 MHz to 10 Ghz) are available, with a wide range of excitation and emission wavelengths (UV to NIR). The data can be used to recover distances and site-to-site diffusion in protein, interactions between macromolecules, accessibility of fluorophores to quenchers, and the dynamic properties of proteins, membranes and nucleic acids. Current software provides for analysis of multi-exponential intensity and anisotropy decays, lifetime distribution, distance distributions for independent observation of fluorescence donors and acceptors, transient effects in collisional quenching, phase-modulation spectra and time-resolved emission spectra. Most programs provide for global analysis of multiple data sets obtained under similar experimental conditions. Data can be analyzed on-site by connection with the CFS computers through the internet. During six years of operation we have established scientific collaborations with over 30 academic and industrial groups in the United States. These collaborations have resulted in 63 scientific papers.

  8. Magnetic anisotropy in nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbach, M

    2001-01-01

    method for solving the LDA Kohn-Sham equation. This extended code allows us to perform fully relativistic calculations to enable us to investigate the spin orbit coupling effects leading to anisotropies and potentially non collinear ordering of magnetic moments in these systems of magnetic inclusions in copper. With this approach we find that depending on the orientation of the atoms along the 100 or 110 direction in copper the ground state orientation of the magnetic moments in the chain is either perpendicular or parallel to the chain direction, when the magnetic dipolar interaction energy is added to the final ab initio result. In this thesis we investigate the effect of magnetic anisotropies in nanostructured materials. The main emphasis in our work presented here is on systems that have an underlying one dimensional structure, like nanowires or atomic chains. In a simple classical one dimensional model we show the rich ground state structure of magnetic orientations one might expect to find in such syste...

  9. Can decaying particle explain cosmic infrared background excess?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Kohri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently the CIBER experiment measured the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB flux and claimed an excess compared with integrated emission from galaxies. We show that the CIB spectrum can be fitted by the additional photons produced by the decay of a new particle. However, it also contributes too much to the anisotropy of the CIB, which is in contradiction with the anisotropy measurements by the CIBER and Hubble Space Telescope.

  10. Can decaying particle explain cosmic infrared background excess?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Moroi, Takeo; Nakayama, Kazunori

    2017-09-01

    Recently the CIBER experiment measured the diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) flux and claimed an excess compared with integrated emission from galaxies. We show that the CIB spectrum can be fitted by the additional photons produced by the decay of a new particle. However, it also contributes too much to the anisotropy of the CIB, which is in contradiction with the anisotropy measurements by the CIBER and Hubble Space Telescope.

  11. Excited-state dynamics of dGMP measured by steady-state and femtosecond fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miannay, Francois-Alexandre; Gustavsson, Thomas; Banyasz, Akos; Markovitsi, Dimitra

    2010-03-11

    The room-temperature fluorescence of 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate (dGMP) in aqueous solution is studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The steady-state fluorescence spectrum of dGMP shows one band centered at 334 nm but has an extraordinary long red tail, extending beyond 700 nm. Both the fluorescence quantum yield and the relative weight of the 334 nm peak increase with the excitation wavelength. The initial fluorescence anisotropy after excitation at 267 nm is lower than 0.2 for all emission wavelengths, indicating an ultrafast S(2) --> S(1) internal conversion. The fluorescence decays depend strongly on the emission wavelength, getting longer with the wavelength. A rise time of 100-150 fs was observed for wavelengths longer than 450 nm, in accordance with a gradual red shift of the time-resolved spectra. The results are discussed in terms of a relaxation occurring mainly on the lowest excited (1)pi pi*-state surface toward a conical intersection with the ground state, in line with recent theoretical predictions. Our results show that the excited-state population undergoes a substantial "spreading out" before reaching the CI, explaining the complex dynamics observed.

  12. Seasonal anisotropy in handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory V; Martin, Maryanne

    2008-01-01

    The preference for using either the left or the right hand has been linked to important human characteristics such as language lateralisation within the cerebral hemispheres, and evidence has been reported that the proportions of different types of handedness may be influenced by factors such as levels of maternal hormones and anxiety. Under such influences, it is possible in principle that distributions of handedness provide evidence of seasonal anisotropy, that is, variation in the direction of handedness for births in different parts of the year. The results of a number of studies are compared here, and shown to provide evidence of a significant tendency for the incidence of left-handed people to be higher among those born in the spring and ensuing months (March-July in the northern hemisphere) than among those born in the remainder of the year, at least among the male population.

  13. Optical spectroscopy and tooth decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, P.; De, T.; Singh, R.

    2005-11-01

    Optical spectroscopy in the ultraviolet, visible and mid-infrared spectral regions has been used to discriminate between healthy and diseased teeth of patients in the age range 15-75 years. Spectral scans of absorbance versus wavenumber and fluorescence intensity versus wavelength have been recorded and investigated for caries and periodontal disease. Such optical diagnostics can prove very useful in the early detection and treatment of tooth decay.

  14. Secondary anisotropies of the CMB

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, Nabila; Silk, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    The Cosmic Microwave Background fluctuations provide a powerful probe of the dark ages of the universe through the imprint of the secondary anisotropies associated with the reionisation of the universe and the growth of structure. We review the relation between the secondary anisotropies and and the primary anisotropies that are directly generated by quantum fluctuations in the very early universe. The physics of secondary fluctuations is described, with emphasis on the ionisation history and the evolution of structure. We discuss the different signatures arising from the secondary effects in terms of their induced temperature fluctuations, polarisation and statistics. The secondary anisotropies are being actively pursued at present, and we review the future and current observational status.

  15. Polarization singularity anisotropy: determining monstardom

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    C points, that is isolated points of circular polarization in transverse fields of varying polarization, are classified morphologically into three distinct types, known as lemons, stars and monstars. These morphologies are interpreted here according to two natural parameters associated with the singularity, namely the anisotropy of the C point, and the polarization azimuth on the anisotropy axis. In addition to providing insight into singularity morphology, this observation applies to the densities of the various morphologies in isotropic random polarization speckle fields.

  16. Fluorescence metrology of silica sol-gels - The effect of D2O and inorganic salts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D J S Birch; C D Geddes

    2000-06-01

    We have developed a new method for measuring in-situ the growth of the nanometre-size silica particles which lead to the formation of sol-gel glasses. This technique is based on the decay of fluorescence polarisation anisotropy due to Brownian rotation of dye molecules bound to the particles. Results to date give near ångstrom resolution and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach both for providing industrial quality control and helping fundamental research. Our approach has several key advantages over traditional techniques for nanometre metrology, such as small angle X-ray and neutron scattering and electron microscopy. In this paper we present silica particle growth dynamics in a hydrogel as detected by two near-infrared dyes, the effect of adding D2O on the hydrodynamic radius and the effect of salt addition.

  17. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  18. Anisotropy tuning with the Wilson flow

    CERN Document Server

    Borsanyi, S; Fodor, Z; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, T; Mages, S; Schafer, A; Szabo, K K

    2012-01-01

    We use the Wilson flow to define the gauge anisotropy at a given physical scale. We demonstrate the use of the anisotropic flow by performing the tuning of the bare gauge anisotropy in the tree-level Symanzik action for several lattice spacings and target anisotropies. We use this method to tune the anisotropy parameters in full QCD, where we also exploit the diminishing effect of a well chosen smearing on the renormalization of the fermion anisotropy.

  19. Reconnection and electron temperature anisotropy in sub-proton scale plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haynes, C.T.; Burgess, D.; Camporeale, E.

    2014-01-01

    Turbulent behavior at sub-proton scales in magnetized plasmas is important for a full understanding of the energetics of astrophysical flows such as the solar wind. We study the formation of electron temperature anisotropy due to reconnection in the turbulent decay of sub-proton scale fluctuations u

  20. Decay of passive scalar fluctuations in axisymmetric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Katsunori; Davidson, Peter A.; Kaneda, Yukio

    2016-11-01

    Passive scalar fluctuations in axisymmetric Saffman turbulence are examined theoretically and numerically. Theoretical predictions are verified by direct numerical simulation (DNS). According to the DNS, self-similar decay of the turbulence and the persistency of the large-scale anisotropy are found for its fully developed turbulence. The DNS confirms the time-independence of the Corrsin integral.

  1. Effect of anisotropy on HBT radii using leptonpair interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Mohanty, Payal; Roy, Pradip K

    2014-01-01

    The effect of initial state momentum-space anisotropy on invariant mass dependence of HBT radii extracted from the leptonpair interferometry is presented here. We have studied the Bose-Einstein Correlation Function (BECF) for two identical virtual photons decaying to leptonpairs at most central collision of LHC energy having fixed transverse momentum of one of the virtual photons ($k_{1T}$= 2 GeV). The {\\em free streaming interpolating} model with fixed initial condition has been used for the evolution in anisotropic Quark Gluon Plasma (aQGP) and the relativistic (1+2)d hydrodynamics model with cylindrical symmetry and longitudinal boost invariance has been used for both isotropic Quark Gluon Plasma (iQGP) and hadronic phases. We found a significant change in the spatial and temporal dimension of the evolving system in presence of initial state momentum-space anisotropy.

  2. Anisotropies in the gravitational wave background from preheating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Laura; Figueroa, Daniel G; Rajantie, Arttu

    2013-07-05

    We investigate the anisotropies in the gravitational wave (GW) background produced at preheating after inflation. Using lattice field theory simulations of a massless preheating model, we show that the GW amplitude depends sensitively on the value of the decay product field χ coupled to the inflaton φ, with the only requisite that χ is light during inflation. We find a strong anisotropy in the amplitude of the GW background on large angular scales, the details of which strongly depend on the reheating dynamics. We expect similar conclusions for a wide class of inflationary models with light scalar fields. If future direct detection GW experiments are capable of detecting the GW produced by preheating, they should also be able to detect this effect. This could eventually provide a powerful way to distinguish between different inflationary and preheating scenarios.

  3. Fluorescent behavior of B-phycoerythrin in microemulsions of aerosol OT/water/isooctane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, Ruperto; Tobaruela, Diego J; Talavera, Eva M; Orte, Angel; Alvarez-Pez, Jose M

    2003-07-15

    Taking advantage of its unusual fluorescent properties, the incorporation of B-phycoerythrin (B-PE) in aerosol OT (AOT, sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulphosuccinate)/water/isooctane microemulsions was investigated by following their steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence as a function of the water-to-surfactant molar ratio, w(0). The fluorescent intensity at 575 nm increased continuously with increasing water content, saturating at a w(0) around 35 and staying practically constant at w(0)> or =40. The steady-state anisotropy showed an initial increase with increasing water content until w(0)=23 and then decreased strongly, staying practically constant when w(0)> or =40. The values of the fluorescent parameters, anisotropy and fluorescent intensity, were unchanged when the water content of the system increased in the range between w(0)=40 to 50. This implies the effective incorporation of B-PE in the microemulsion droplets with w(0)> or =40, as well as the equilibrium of the dispersion at these water/surfactant ratios, since higher water content does not affect the main surrounding microenvironment of the protein. The overall incorporation in the microemulsion droplets caused minor spectroscopic changes with respect to biliprotein in aqueous solution of 20 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, such as a blue absorption shift of 3 nm and an emission shift of 1.5 nm, as well as a slight increase in excitation anisotropy spectrum mainly caused by a decrease in protein mobility. Therefore, there are no important interactions between the chromophores and the AOT sulfonate head groups. Emission intensity decays followed complex kinetics in both aqueous and dispersion media. The stability with time and temperature of the biliprotein in the microemulsion was higher than in the aqueous solution. All the results can be explained in terms of B-PE inclusion in the water droplets of AOT microemulsions where the protein has similar configuration and conformation to that in

  4. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  5. Semileptonic Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luth, Vera G.; /SLAC

    2012-10-02

    The following is an overview of the measurements of the CKM matrix elements |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub ub}| that are based on detailed studies of semileptonic B decays by the BABAR and Belle Collaborations and major advances in QCD calculations. In addition, a new and improved measurement of the ratios R(D{sup (*)}) = {Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}({bar B} {yields} D{sup (*)}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) is presented. Here D{sup (*)} refers to a D or a D* meson and {ell} is either e or {mu}. The results, R(D) = 0.440 {+-} 0.058 {+-} 0.042 and R(D*) = 0.332 {+-} 0.024 {+-} 0.018, exceed the Standard Model expectations by 2.0{sigma} and 2.7{sigma}, respectively. Taken together, they disagree with these expectations at the 3.4{sigma} level. The excess of events cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  6. Giant dielectric anisotropy via homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Mackay, Tom G

    2014-01-01

    A random mixture of two isotropic dielectric materials, one composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_a$ and the other composed of oriented spheroidal particles of relative permittivity $\\epsilon_b$, was considered in the long wavelength regime. The permittivity dyadic of the resulting homogenized composite material (HCM) was estimated using the Bruggeman homogenization formalism. The HCM was an orthorhombic biaxial material if the symmetry axes of the two populations of spheroids were mutually perpendicular and a uniaxial material if these two axes were mutually aligned. The degree of anisotropy of the HCM, as gauged by the ratio of the eigenvalues of the HCM's permittivity dyadic, increased as the shape of the constituent particles became more eccentric. The greatest degrees of HCM anisotropy were achieved for the limiting cases wherein the constituent particles were shaped as needles or discs. In these instances explicit formulas for the HCM anisotropy were derived from t...

  7. Anisotropy in the deep Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, Barbara; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2017-08-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been found in many regions of the Earth's interior. Its presence in the Earth's crust has been known since the 19th century, and is due in part to the alignment of anisotropic crystals in rocks, and in part to patterns in the distribution of fractures and pores. In the upper mantle, seismic anisotropy was discovered 50 years ago, and can be attributed for the most part, to the alignment of intrinsically anisotropic olivine crystals during large scale deformation associated with convection. There is some indication for anisotropy in the transition zone, particularly in the vicinity of subducted slabs. Here we focus on the deep Earth - the lower mantle and core, where anisotropy is not yet mapped in detail, nor is there consensus on its origin. Most of the lower mantle appears largely isotropic, except in the last 200-300 km, in the D″ region, where evidence for seismic anisotropy has been accumulating since the late 1980s, mostly from shear wave splitting measurements. Recently, a picture has been emerging, where strong anisotropy is associated with high shear velocities at the edges of the large low shear velocity provinces (LLSVPs) in the central Pacific and under Africa. These observations are consistent with being due to the presence of highly anisotropic MgSiO3 post-perovskite crystals, aligned during the deformation of slabs impinging on the core-mantle boundary, and upwelling flow within the LLSVPs. We also discuss mineral physics aspects such as ultrahigh pressure deformation experiments, first principles calculations to obtain information about elastic properties, and derivation of dislocation activity based on bonding characteristics. Polycrystal plasticity simulations can predict anisotropy but models are still highly idealized and neglect the complex microstructure of polyphase aggregates with strong and weak components. A promising direction for future progress in understanding the origin of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle

  8. NANO-MULTILAYERS WITH HIGH PERPENDICULAR ANISOTROPY FOR MAGNETIC RECORDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Yang; B.H. Li; K. Kang; T. Suzuki

    2003-01-01

    (FePt/Ag)n nano-multilayers were deposited on MgO (100) single crystal with laser ablation and then subjected to annealing. FePt L1o grains with (001) texture and thus a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy constant Ku of the order of 106J/m3 were formed. A thick Ag layer is found to be favorable for decreasing the dispersion of the easy axis for magnetization. The measurement of time decay of magnetization gave rise to a small activation volume of the order of 10-25 m3, showing the promising of being the recording medium for future high density perpendicular recording.

  9. Alpha Anisotropy Studies of Near-Spherical and Deformed Nuclei

    CERN Multimedia

    Van Duppen, P

    2002-01-01

    % IS329 \\\\ \\\\ Although it was the first decay mode to be discovered, the process of $\\alpha$-particle emission is still poorly understood. A few years ago the first systematic study of anisotropic $\\alpha$-decay triggered renewed theoretical interest. Nevertheless, today the theories are still not adequate enough and more experimental data are urgently needed. We therefore measure the $\\alpha$-anisotropies of the favoured transitions of a number of near-spherical Rn and At isotopes, and of deformed nuclei near A=220. As the different models yield contradictory predictions for the transitions that are investigated, the measurements will allow to discern on their validity. They will at the same time provide the necessary basis for further theoretical developments.

  10. Fluorescence spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool used by scientists from many disciplines. During the last decades there have been important developments on distinct fluorescence methods, particularly those related to the study of biological phenomena. This chapter discusses...

  11. Contrasting Response of Two Dipolar Fluorescence Probes in a Leucine-Based Organogel and Its Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soumya, Sivalingam; Seth, Sudipta; Paul, Sneha; Samanta, Anunay

    2015-08-03

    The microenvironments of a leucine-based organogel are probed by monitoring the fluorescence behavior of coumarin 153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP). The steady-state data reveals distinctly different locations of the two molecules in the gel. Whereas AP resides close to the hydroxyl moieties of the gelator and engages in hydrogen-bonding interactions, C153 is found in bulk-toluene-like regions. In contrast to C153, AP exhibits excitation-wavelength-dependent emission, indicating that the environments of the hydrogen-bonded AP molecules are not all identical. A two-component fluorescence decay of AP in gel, unlike C153, supports this model. A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study of the rotational motion of the molecules also reveals the strong association of only AP with the gelator. That AP influences the critical gelation concentration implies its direct involvement in the gel-formation process. The results highlight the importance of guest-gelator interactions in gels containing guest molecules.

  12. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  13. Extended wavelength anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) measurements: better filters, validation standards, and Rayleigh scatter removal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayou-Boucau, Yannick; Ryder, Alan G.

    2017-09-01

    Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) provides valuable insights into multi-fluorophore proteins (Groza et al 2015 Anal. Chim. Acta 886 133-42). Fluorescence anisotropy adds to the multidimensional fluorescence dataset information about the physical size of the fluorophores and/or the rigidity of the surrounding micro-environment. The first ARMES studies used standard thin film polarizers (TFP) that had negligible transmission between 250 and 290 nm, preventing accurate measurement of intrinsic protein fluorescence from tyrosine and tryptophan. Replacing TFP with pairs of broadband wire grid polarizers enabled standard fluorescence spectrometers to accurately measure anisotropies between 250 and 300 nm, which was validated with solutions of perylene in the UV and Erythrosin B and Phloxine B in the visible. In all cases, anisotropies were accurate to better than ±1% when compared to literature measurements made with Glan Thompson or TFP polarizers. Better dual wire grid polarizer UV transmittance and the use of excitation-emission matrix measurements for ARMES required complete Rayleigh scatter elimination. This was achieved by chemometric modelling rather than classical interpolation, which enabled the acquisition of pure anisotropy patterns over wider spectral ranges. In combination, these three improvements permit the accurate implementation of ARMES for studying intrinsic protein fluorescence.

  14. Magnetic anisotropy of lecithin membranes. A new anisotropy susceptometer.

    OpenAIRE

    Scholz, F.; Boroske, E; Helfrich, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cylindrical giant vesicles prepared from egg lecithin and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) are oriented in an external magnetic field and observed by phase contrast microscopy. The anisotropic part of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the lecithin membrane is determined from the distribution of angles between the magnetic field and the long cylinder axis due to thermal fluctuations. The anisotropy of DMPC is found to be larger by a factor of 2 than that of egg lecithin. This...

  15. Where is magnetic anisotropy field pointing to?

    CERN Document Server

    Gutowski, Marek W

    2013-01-01

    The desired result of magnetic anisotropy investigations is the determination of value(s) of various anisotropy constant(s). This is sometimes difficult, especially when the precise knowledge of saturation magnetization is required, as it happens in ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) studies. In such cases we usually resort to `trick' and fit our experimental data to the quantity called \\emph{anisotropy field}, which is strictly proportional to the ratio of the searched anisotropy constant and saturation magnetization. Yet, this quantity is scalar, simply a number, and is therefore of little value for modeling or simulations of the magnetostatic or micromagnetic structures. Here we show how to `translate' the values of magnetic anisotropy constants into the complete vector of magnetic anisotropy field. Our derivation is rigorous and covers the most often encountered cases, from uniaxial to cubic anisotropy.

  16. Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goltsev, Vasilij; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Chernev, Petko; Strasser, Reto J

    2009-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a very efficient photochemical process. Nevertheless, plants emit some of the absorbed energy as light quanta. This luminescence is emitted, predominantly, by excited chlorophyll a molecules in the light-harvesting antenna, associated with Photosystem II (PS II) reaction centers. The emission that occurs before the utilization of the excitation energy in the primary photochemical reaction is called prompt fluorescence. Light emission can also be observed from repopulated excited chlorophylls as a result of recombination of the charge pairs. In this case, some time-dependent redox reactions occur before the excitation of the chlorophyll. This delays the light emission and provides the name for this phenomenon-delayed fluorescence (DF), or delayed light emission (DLE). The DF intensity is a decreasing polyphasic function of the time after illumination, which reflects the kinetics of electron transport reactions both on the (electron) donor and the (electron) acceptor sides of PS II. Two main experimental approaches are used for DF measurements: (a) recording of the DF decay in the dark after a single turnover flash or after continuous light excitation and (b) recording of the DF intensity during light adaptation of the photosynthesizing samples (induction curves), following a period of darkness. In this paper we review historical data on DF research and recent advances in the understanding of the relation between the delayed fluorescence and specific reactions in PS II. An experimental method for simultaneous recording of the induction transients of prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence and decay curves of DF in the millisecond time domain is discussed.

  17. Radioactivity-synchronized fluorescence enhancement using a radionuclide fluorescence-quenched dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Mikhail Y; Guo, Kevin; Teng, Bao; Edwards, W Barry; Anderson, Carolyn J; Vasalatiy, Olga; Gandjbakhche, Amir; Griffiths, Gary L; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-08

    We demonstrate the first evidence of radioactivity-synchronized fluorescence quenching of a near-infrared light-emitting dye by a radionuclide, (64)Cu, and subsequent fluorescence enhancement upon (64)Cu decay to the daughter isotopes (64)Ni and (64)Zn. The dynamic switch from high radioactivity and low fluorescence to low radioactivity and high fluorescence is potentially useful for developing complementary multimodal imaging and detection platforms for chemical, environmental, and biomedical applications as well as for unraveling the mechanisms of metal-induced dynamic fluorescence changes.

  18. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  19. Environment-induced anisotropy and sensitivity of the radical pair mechanism in the avian compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Alejandro; Cornelio, Marcio F.; de Oliveira, Marcos C.

    2015-07-01

    Several experiments over the years have shown that the earth's magnetic field is essential for orientation in birds' migration. The most promising explanation for this orientation is the photo-stimulated radical pair (RP) mechanism. In order to define a reference frame for the orientation task radicals must have an intrinsic anisotropy. We show that this kind of anisotropy and consequently the entanglement in the model are not necessary for the proper functioning of the compass. Classically correlated initial conditions for the RP, subjected to a fast decoherence process, are able to provide the anisotropy required. Even a dephasing environment can provide the necessary frame for the compass to work and also implies fast decay of any quantum correlation in the system without damaging the orientation ability. This fact significantly expands the range of applicability of the RP mechanism providing more elements for experimental search.

  20. EFFECT OF SANDSTONE ANISOTROPY ON ITS HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Fořt

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Each type of natural stone has its own geological history, formation conditions, different chemical and mineralogical composition, which influence its possible anisotropy. Knowledge in the natural stones anisotropy represents crucial information for the process of stone quarrying, its correct usage and arrangement in building applications. Because of anisotropy, many natural stones exhibit different heat and moisture transport properties in various directions. The main goal of this study is to analyse several anisotropy indices and their effect on heat transport and capillary absorption. For the experimental determination of the anisotropy effect, five types of sandstone coming from different operating quarries in the Czech Republic are chosen. These materials are often used for restoration of culture heritage monuments as well as for other building applications where they are used as facing slabs, facade panels, decoration stones, paving, etc. For basic characterization of studied materials, determination of their bulk density, matrix density and total open porosity is done. Chemical composition of particular sandstones is analysed by X-Ray Fluorescence. Anisotropy is examined by the non-destructive measurement of velocity of ultrasonic wave propagation. On the basis of ultrasound testing data, the relative anisotropy, total anisotropy and anisotropy coefficient are calculated. Then, the measurement of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity in various directions of samples orientation is carried out. The obtained results reveal significant differences between the parameters characterizing the heat transport in various directions, whereas these values are in accordance with the indices of anisotropy. Capillary water transport is described by water absorption coefficient measured using a sorption experiment, which is performed for distilled water and 1M NaCl water solution.  The measured data confirm the effect of anisotropy which is

  1. Anisotropy indices and the effects on the hydric behaviour of natural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Rafael; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Varas, Maria Jose; Gomez-Heras, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Building stone is an anisotropic material. Each type of rock (granite, limestone, slate, marble, etc.) has a different anisotropy, which is related to its own geological history, i.e. formation conditions and alteration processes. Knowing the anisotropy of natural stone is a matter of interest for determining the most adequate way to extract it from the quarry, for a better use during its manufacture or processing, to determine the quality of elements to be used as ashlars/masonry or as ornamental elements carving, as well to their arrangement in a structure. At the same time, materiaĺs anisotropy will condition the placing of, for instance, anchorages in dressing stone slabs. Anisotropy of natural stone controls water entry and its mobility, together with atmospheric pollutantśs, processes that favour the stone decay in building works, mainly those that shows a marked directional component, as it is the case of capillary water absorption. Water tends to be absorbed differently along the distinct main anisotropy directions, which are principally marked due to the arrangement and distribution of porosity in the rock. The aim of this study is to perform a comparative analysis of the various anisotropy indices commonly used when dealing with natural stone, determined by ultrasonic propagation techniques, in order to establish how anisotropy (by means of these indices) affect the process of capillary water absorption. Different type of natural stones have been selected, according to their traditional use for the construction of buildings in the region of Madrid (Spain). Their petrophysical properties have been determined (density, porosity, water absorption, etc), as well as ultrasonic transmission velocity has been measured along the three spatial directions of the test specimens (from 50 to 100 for each petrological type). According to this, the stone specimens were classified in different anisotropy levels or classes. Results show that stones with the highest

  2. Galaxy clusters and microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Quilis, V; Sáez, D

    1995-01-01

    Previous estimates of the microwave background anisotropies produced by freely falling spherical clusters are discussed. These estimates are based on the Swiss-Cheese and Tolman-Bondi models. It is proved that these models give only upper limits to the anisotropies produced by the observed galaxy clusters. By using spherically symmetric codes including pressureless matter and a hot baryonic gas, new upper limits are obtained. The contributions of the hot gas and the pressureless component to the total anisotropy are compared. The effects produced by the pressure are proved to be negligible; hence, estimations of the cluster anisotropies based on N-body simulations are hereafter justified. After the phenomenon of violent relaxation, any realistic rich cluster can only produce small anisotropies with amplitudes of order 10^{-7}. During the rapid process of violent relaxation, the anisotropies produced by nonlinear clusters are expected to range in the interval (10^{-6},10^{-5}). The angular scales of these anis...

  3. Quantitative assessment of diffusional kurtosis anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, G Russell; Helpern, Joseph A; Tabesh, Ali; Jensen, Jens H

    2015-04-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) measures the diffusion and kurtosis tensors to quantify restricted, non-Gaussian diffusion that occurs in biological tissue. By estimating the kurtosis tensor, DKI accounts for higher order diffusion dynamics, when compared with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and consequently can describe more complex diffusion profiles. Here, we compare several measures of diffusional anisotropy which incorporate information from the kurtosis tensor, including kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA) and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), with the diffusion tensor-derived fractional anisotropy (FA). KFA and GFA demonstrate a net enhancement relative to FA when multiple white matter fiber bundle orientations are present in both simulated and human data. In addition, KFA shows net enhancement in deep brain structures, such as the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, where FA indicates low anisotropy. Thus, KFA and GFA provide additional information relative to FA with regard to diffusional anisotropy, and may be particularly advantageous for the assessment of diffusion in complex tissue environments.

  4. ANISOTROPIC RADIATIVE DECAY OF InP SELF-ASSEMBLED QUANTUM DOTS

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Strong optical anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra and time resolvedPL spectra is observed in InP self-assembled quantum dots (SADs) embedded inGaInP matrix. From the TEM study, the origin of the optical anisotropy appearsto be due to the formation of composition modulation planes in GaInP matrix.We also studied the size dependence of the radiative decay time. In the vicinityof the PL peak from InP SADs, slowdown of the PL decay time was observed ondecreasing the detection energy...

  5. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-Gao; QIAN Xia; LIU Wei; LIU Chuan-lin; ZHAN Wen-Shan

    2000-01-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  6. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gao; Qian, Xia; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Zhan, Wen-Shan

    2000-07-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  7. Statistical Anisotropy from Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We review an inflationary scenario with the anisotropic expansion rate. An anisotropic inflationary universe can be realized by a vector field coupled with an inflaton, which can be regarded as a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. We show generality of anisotropic inflation and derive a universal property. We formulate cosmological perturbation theory in anisotropic inflation. Using the formalism, we show anisotropic inflation gives rise to the statistical anisotropy in primordial fluctuations. We also explain a method to test anisotropic inflation using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB).

  8. Weak decays. [Lectures, phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  9. decays to baryons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Torsten Leddig

    2012-11-01

    From inclusive measurements, it is known that about 7% of all mesons decay into final states with baryons. In these decays, some striking features become visible compared to mesonic decays. The largest branching fractions come with quite moderate multiplicities of 3–4 hadrons. We note that two-body decays to baryons are suppressed relative to three- and four-body decays. In most of these analyses, the invariant baryon–antibaryon mass shows an enhancement near the threshold. We propose a phenomenological interpretation of this quite common feature of hadronization to baryons.

  10. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-05-24

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures.

  11. Surface magnetic anisotropy in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Rubio, H.; Elbaile, L.; Iglesias, R. (Univ. de Oviedo (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-11-01

    The total in-plane magnetic anisotropy and the in-plane surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been measured in nearly-zero magnetostrictive amorphous ribbons in as-quenched state. The magnetostatic energy of a two-dimensional square-lattice of parallelepipeds or ellipsoids, whose dimensions are determined by the parameters characterizing the roughness, is evaluated. From the results obtained, they can conclude that the in-plane surface anisotropy can be magnetostatic in origin but it has little influence on the total in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the ribbon.

  12. FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DISTRIBUTIONS IN PROTEINS

    OpenAIRE

    ALCALA, JR; Gratton, E; PRENDERGAST, FG

    1987-01-01

    The fluorescence lifetime value of tryptophan residues varies by more than a factor of 100 in different proteins and is determined by several factors, which include solvent exposure and interactions with other elements of the protein matrix. Because of the variety of different elements that can alter the lifetime value and the sensitivity to the particular environment of the tryptophan residue, it is likely that non-unique lifetime values result in protein systems. The emission decay of most ...

  13. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-15

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v{sub 2}) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s{sub NN})=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v{sub 2} is mainly due to the average p{sub T} increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v{sub 3}) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v{sub 3} is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4}.

  14. Alignment, vibronic level splitting, and coherent coupling effects on the pump-probe polarization anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric R; Jonas, David M

    2011-04-28

    The pump-probe polarization anisotropy is computed for molecules with a nondegenerate ground state, two degenerate or nearly degenerate excited states with perpendicular transition dipoles, and no resonant excited-state absorption. Including finite pulse effects, the initial polarization anisotropy at zero pump-probe delay is predicted to be r(0) = 3/10 with coherent excitation. During pulse overlap, it is shown that the four-wave mixing classification of signal pathways as ground or excited state is not useful for pump-probe signals. Therefore, a reclassification useful for pump-probe experiments is proposed, and the coherent anisotropy is discussed in terms of a more general transition dipole and molecular axis alignment instead of experiment-dependent ground- versus excited-state pathways. Although coherent excitation enhances alignment of the transition dipole, the molecular axes are less aligned than for a single dipole transition, lowering the initial anisotropy. As the splitting between excited states increases beyond the laser bandwidth and absorption line width, the initial anisotropy increases from 3/10 to 4/10. Asymmetric vibrational coordinates that lift the degeneracy control the electronic energy gap and off-diagonal coupling between electronic states. These vibrations dephase coherence and equilibrate the populations of the (nearly) degenerate states, causing the anisotropy to decay (possibly with oscillations) to 1/10. Small amounts of asymmetric inhomogeneity (2 cm(-1)) cause rapid (130 fs) suppression of both vibrational and electronic anisotropy beats on the excited state, but not vibrational beats on the ground electronic state. Recent measurements of conical intersection dynamics in a silicon napthalocyanine revealed anisotropic quantum beats that had to be assigned to asymmetric vibrations on the ground electronic state only [Farrow, D. A.; J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 144510]. Small environmental asymmetries likely explain the observed absence

  15. Measurements of the anisotropy in permalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkel, Kees J.

    1988-01-01

    A measurement system is described, which accurately determines the anisotropy field H/sub k/ and the orientation of the easy-axis in a permalloy film or in any material showing magnetization induced resistance anisotropy. An accuracy of 0.1% in H/sub k/ and 0.1 degrees in easy-axis orientation is re

  16. Photosynthetic membrane development studied using picosecond fluorescence kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karukstis, K.K.; Sauer, K.

    1983-01-01

    Using measurements of the kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence emission, the development of the photosynthetic membrane during etioplast-to-chloroplast differentiation was investigated. Tthe chlorophyll fluorescence decay kinetics of pea chloroplasts from plants grown under intermittent (2 min light-118 min dark) and continuous light regimes were monitored with a single-proton timing system with picosecond resolution. The changes in the fluorescence yields and decay kinetics were associated with known structural and organizational developmental phenomena in the chloroplast. This correlation provides a more detailed assignment of the origins of the fluorescence decay components than has been previously obtained by studying only mature chloroplasts. In particular, the analysis of the variable kinetics and multiexponential character of the fluorescence emission during thylakoid development focuses on the organization of photosynthetic units and the degree of communication between reaction centers in the same photosystem. These results further demonstrate that the age of etiolated tissue is critical to plastid development.

  17. Optical and diamagnetic anisotropy of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, A. L.; Vora, P. M.; Lou, Z.; Johnson, A. T.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    We have recently shown that graphene oxide (GO) emits a broad photoluminescence (PL) band in both solid and aqueous preparations. The origin of this PL is not yet well understood, but for absorptive and emissive optical processes originating in the two dimensional GO plane, one expects an in-plane polarization. Studies of optical anisotropy can therefore help to clarify the origin of the PL. Here we use a method of optical nanomagnetometry (Torrens, et al, JACS 129, p. 252 (2007)) to extract these quantities, also determining the magnetic anisotropy. We find that when aqueous preparations of GO are placed in a magnetic field, diamagnetically induced alignment leads to marked linear polarization anisotropy of absorbance and photoluminescence. By taking six optical measurements at each magnetic field, we are able to extract the intrinsic polarization anisotropies of optical absorption and emission of GO flakes and to quantify the orbital diamagnetic anisotropy. We discuss how these quantities give insight into electronic delocalization in these systems.

  18. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  19. Texture induced microwave background anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrill, Julian; Copeland, Edmund J.; Liddle, Andrew R.; Stebbins, Albert; Veeraraghavan, Shoba

    1994-03-01

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and non-linear sigma model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60-75\\% and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  20. Seepage Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ore dumps are heterogeneous bodies with anisotropic seepage characteristics because of the ore segregation.In an indoor experiment, a dump was constructed with three strata, where the horizontal and vertical seepage experiments were carried out.Horizontals flow are regarded as phreatic plan flows without penetration.Its seepage law satifies the Dupuit equation.With parallel lay seepage model, the equivalent seepage coefficient in the horizontal flow was obtained and was equivalent to the weighted mean of the seepage coefficient of each stratum.An unsaturated flow appeared in the vertical experiment, with a hydraulic gradient of 1.The vertical flow was equivalent to the seepage model that moved in vertical bedding; its equivalent seepage coefficient depended on the stratum with the minimum seepage coefficient.That the experiment showed clear anisotropy in a heterogeneous body was obvious with an anisotropic coefficient between 63 and 155, which is 25 to 100 times larger than that of a homogeneous body.

  1. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  2. Effective Majorana neutrino decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Lucia [Instituto de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria,Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay); Romero, Ismael; Peressutti, Javier; Sampayo, Oscar A. [Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Departamento de Fisica, Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas de Mar del Plata (IFIMAR) CONICET, UNMDP, Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2016-08-15

    We study the decay of heavy sterile Majorana neutrinos according to the interactions obtained from an effective general theory. We describe the two- and three-body decays for a wide range of neutrino masses. The results obtained and presented in this work could be useful for the study of the production and detection of these particles in a variety of high energy physics experiments and astrophysical observations. We show in different figures the dominant branching ratios and the total decay width. (orig.)

  3. Correlated oscillations of the magnetic anisotropy energy and orbital moment anisotropy in thin films: The role of quantum well states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandratskii, L. M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the first-principles study of the correlated behavior of the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) and orbital moment anisotropy (OMA) as the functions of the thickness N of the Fe film. The work is motivated by recent experimental studies combining photoemission, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism, and magnetic anisotropy measurements. In agreement with experiment, the correlated oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) are obtained that have their origin in the formation of the 3d quantum well states (QWS) confined in the films. The main contribution to the oscillation amplitude comes from the surface layer. This is an interesting feature of the phenomenon consisting in the peculiar dependence of the physical quantities on the thickness of the film. We demonstrate that the band structure of the bulk Fe does not reflect adequately the properties of the 3d QWS in thin films and, therefore, does not provide the basis for understanding the oscillations of MAE (N ) and OMA (N ) . A detailed point-by-point analysis in the two-dimensional (2D) Brillouin zone (BZ) of the film shows that the contribution of the Γ point, contrary to a rather common expectation, does not play an important role in the formation of the oscillations. Instead, the most important contributions come from a broad region of the 2D BZ distant from the center of the BZ. Combining symmetry arguments and direct calculations we show that orbital moments of the electronic states possess nonzero transverse components orthogonal to the direction of the spin magnetization. The account for this feature is crucial in the point-by-point analysis of the OMA. On the basis of the calculations for noncollinear spin configurations we suggest interpretations of two interesting experimental findings: fast temperature decay of the oscillation amplitude in MAE (N ) and unexpectedly strong spin mixing of the initial states of the photoemission process.

  4. Detection of phospholipid phase separation. A multifrequency phase fluorimetry study of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasassi, T; Conti, F; Glaser, M; Gratton, E

    1984-11-25

    Using multifrequency phase and modulation fluorometry and a nonlinear least-squares analysis of lifetime data, we were able to determine the complex decay of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) in synthetic phospholipid bilayers. Our results showed a monoexponential decay of DPH in the pure isotropic solvents studied, over a wide temperature range, and a double-exponential decay of DPH in phospholipids, both above and below the transition. During the transition, and in mixed-phase phospholipids, a three-component analysis was successfully accomplished, and the pre-exponential factors of the two main components have been shown to be quantitatively representative of the gel and liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer. The fractional intensity of the shorter lifetime component depends on the modalities of the sample preparation. The factors affecting this component are discussed. From the DPH fluorescence lifetime and from the anisotropy data in L-alpha-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl choline mixtures, a phase diagram was independently constructed. Conclusions about the sensitivity and the partition of the probe between gel and the liquid-crystalline phases of the bilayer are derived. Lifetime experiments on DPH in a L-alpha-dilauroyl-phosphatidylcholine/L-alpha-dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylch oline mixture suggested a general method for the determination and quantitation of the two different phases in the bilayer.

  5. General Constraints on Dark Matter Decay from the Cosmic Microwave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Slatyer, Tracy R

    2016-01-01

    Precise measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background can be used to constrain the annihilation and decay of dark matter. In this work, we demonstrate via principal component analysis that the imprint of dark matter decay on the cosmic microwave background can be approximately parameterized by a single number for any given dark matter model. We develop a simple prescription for computing this model-dependent detectability factor, and demonstrate how this approach can be used to set model-independent bounds on a large class of decaying dark matter scenarios. We repeat our analysis for decay lifetimes shorter than the age of the universe, allowing us to set constraints on metastable species other than the dark matter decaying at early times, and decays that only liberate a tiny fraction of the dark matter mass energy. We set precise bounds and validate our principal component analysis using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach and Planck 2015 data.

  6. Anisotropy of rare-earth magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Skomski; D.J.Sellmyer

    2009-01-01

    Rare-earth intermetallics such as Nd2FeI4B and Sm-Co are widely used as high-performance permanent magnets,because they combine high magnetocrystalline anisotropy with reasonable magnetization and Curie temperature.The anisotropy is a combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and electrostatic crystal-field interactions.The main contribution comes from the rare-earth 4f electrons,which are well-screened from the crystalline environment but exhibit a strong spin-orbit coupling.In this limit,the magnetocrystalline anisotropy has a very transparent physical interpretation,the anisotropy energy essentially being equal to the energy of Hund's-rules 4f ion in the crystal field.The corresponding expression for the lowest-order uniaxial anisotropy constant K1 is used to discuss rare-earth substitutions,which have recently attracted renewed interest due to shifts in the rare-earth production and demand.Specific phenomena reviewed in this article are the enhancement of the anisotropy of Sm2Fe17 due to interstitial nitrogen,the use of Sm-Co magnets for high-temperature applications,and the comparison of rare-earth single-ion anisotropy with other single-ion and two-ion mechanisms.

  7. Observation of semileptonic decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Cronström, H. I.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Reidenbach, M.; Reiner, R.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hölscher, A.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Seidel, S. C.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1993-04-01

    Observation of the semileptonic decay of the charmed baryon ? in the decay channel ? has been made using the ARGUS detector at the e+e- storage ring DORIS II at DESY. The cross section times branching ratio was found to be ?.

  8. Double beta decay experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2011-01-01

    The present status of double beta decay experiments is reviewed. The results of the most sensitive experiments are discussed. Proposals for future double beta decay experiments with a sensitivity to the $$ at the level of (0.01--0.1) eV are considered.

  9. Rare Semileptonic Charm Decays

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of charm mesons decaying semileptonically via Flavor Changing Neutral Currents is presented. We calculate the Wilson coefficients within the Standard Model. A window in the decay distribution, where physics beyond the Standard Model could be measured is identified. Exemplary, we study effects of leptoquark models.

  10. Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

    1994-04-01

    Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

  11. Effect of anisotropy on small magnetic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred; Sil, Shreekantha; Entel, Peter; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.104438

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dipolar interaction and local uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetic response of small spin clusters where spins are located on the vertices of icosahedron, cuboctahedron, tetrahedron and square geometry have been investigated. We consider the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy and dipolar interaction and apply numerical exact diagonalization technique in order to study the influence of frustration and anisotropy on the ground state properties of the spin-clusters. The ground state magnetization, spin-spin correlation and several thermodynamic quantities such as entropy and specific heat are calculated as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  12. Fluorescent microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembaum, A.

    1978-01-01

    Latex particles with attached antibodies have potential biochemical and environmental applications. Human red blood cells and lymphocytes have been labeled with fluorescent microspheres by either direct or indirect immunological technique. Immunolatex spheres can also be used for detecting and localizing specific cell surface receptors. Hormones and toxins may also be bondable.

  13. Investigation of span-chordwise bending anisotropy of honeybee forewings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianGuo Ning

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the spanwise and chordwise bending stiffness EI of honeybee forewings were measured by a cantilevered bending test. The test results indicate that the spanwise EI of the forewing is two orders of magnitude larger than the chordwise EI. Three structural aspects result in this span-chordwise bending anisotropy: the distribution of resilin patches, the corrugation along the span and the leading edge vein of the venation. It was found that flexion lines formed by resilin patches revealed through fluorescence microscopy promoted the chordwise bending of the forewing during flapping flight. Furthermore, the corrugation of the wing and leading edge veins of the venation, revealed by micro-computed tomography, determines the relatively greater spanwise EI of the forewing. The span-chordwise anisotropy exerts positive structural and aerodynamic influences on the wing. In summary, this study potentially assists researchers in understanding the bending characteristics of insect wings and might be an important reference for the design and manufacture of bio-inspired wings for flapping micro aerial vehicles.

  14. Fluorescent nanodiamonds as highly stable biomarker for endotoxin verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Burg, Jan Michael; Lilholt, Maria; Maeder, Ulf; Beer, Sebastian; Salzig, Denise; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (ND) provide advantageous properties as a fluorescent biomarker for in vitro and in vivo studies. The maximum fluorescence occurs around 700 nm, they do not show photobleaching or blinking and seem to be nontoxic. After a pretreatment with strong acid fluorescent ND can be functionalized and coupled to endotoxin. Endotoxin is a decay product of bacteria and causes strong immune reactions. Therefore endotoxin has to be removed for most applications. An effective removal procedure is membrane filtration. The endotoxin, coupled to fluorescent ND can be visualized by using confocal microscopy which allows the investigation of the separation mechanisms of the filtration process within the membranes.

  15. Anisotropy and Corotation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments.

  16. Cellulose and the Control of Growth Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias I. Baskin

    2004-04-01

    The authors research aims to understand morphogenesis, focusing on growth anisotropy, a process that is crucial to make organs with specific and heritable shapes. For the award, the specific aims were to test hypotheses concerning how growth anisotropy is controlled by cell wall structure, particularly by the synthesis and alignment of cellulose microfibrils, the predominant mechanical element in the cell wall. This research has involved characterizing the basic physiology of anisotropic expansion, including measuring it at high resolution; and second, characterizing the relationship between growth anisotropy, and cellulose microfibrils. Important in this relationship and also to the control of anisotropic expansion are structures just inside the plasma membrane called cortical microtubules, and the research has also investigated their contribution to controlling anisotropy and microfibril alignment. In addition to primary experimental papers, I have also developed improved methods relating to these objectives as well as written relevant reviews. Major accomplishments in each area will now be described.

  17. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-08

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core.

  18. Magnetic anisotropies of rare-earth compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenhaupt, M.; Rotter, M.; Kramp, S.

    2000-03-01

    There are two kinds of magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth compounds: the single-ion anisotropy caused by the crystal field (CF) and the anisotropy of the two-ion interactions. Both types of anisotropy have to be considered to arrive at a consistent description of the magnetic properties of the orthorhombic intermetallic compound NdCu 2. From the analysis of NdCu 2 we can derive predictions for the type of ordering in other isostructural RCu 2 compounds, that agree well with experimental results: If the magnetic moments point into the crystallographic b-direction, an ordering wave vector of (2/3 0 0) is expected. If the moments are oriented perpendicular to b then the ordering wave vector is (2/3 1 0) .

  19. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    1997-01-01

    We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed perturbations in a universe dominated by cold dark matter. Using a gauge invariant linear perturbation analysis, we solve the perturbation equations on super-horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds. We find that perturbations induced by seeds -- under very mild restrictions -- are nearly isocurvature. Thus, compensation, which is mainly the consequence of physically sensible initial conditions, is very generic. We then restrict our study to the case of scaling sources, motivated by global scalar fields. We parameterize the energy momentum tensor of the source by ``seed functions'' and calculate the Sachs-Wolfe and acoustic contributions to the CMB anisotropies. We discuss the dependence of the anisotropy spectrum on the parameters of the model considered. Even within the restricted class of models investigated in this work, we find a surprising variety of results for the position and height of the first ac...

  20. Solid State NMR and Fluorescence Studies of Conjugated Polymer Nanocomposties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao Jun JING; Liu Sheng CHEN; Yi SHI; Xi Gao JIN

    2005-01-01

    13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of a conjugated polymer MEH-PPV in polymer/layered silicate nanocomposites together with the steady state fluorescence emission and transient fluorescence decay measurements have been investigated. The T1 values of the conjugated carbons decrease dramatically according to the reduction of polymer concentration in the nano composites, while the fluorescence life times (τ) show a linear prolonging tendency. The results are explained from the point of view of molecular dynamics.

  1. Weak Decay of Hypernuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Alberico, W M

    2004-01-01

    The focus of these Lectures is on the weak decay modes of hypernuclei, with special attention to Lambda-hypernuclei. The subject involves many fields of modern theoretical and experimental physics, from nuclear structure to the fundamental constituents of matter and their interactions. The various weak decay modes of Lambda-hypernuclei are described: the mesonic mode and the non-mesonic ones. The latter are the dominant decay channels of medium--heavy hypernuclei, where, on the contrary, the mesonic decay is disfavoured by Pauli blocking effect on the outgoing nucleon. In particular, one can distinguish between one-body and two-body induced decays. Theoretical models employed to evaluate the (partial and total) decay widths of hypernuclei are illustrated, and their results compared with existing experimental data. Open problems and recent achievements are extensively discussed, in particular the determination of the ratio Gamma_n/Gamma_p, possible tests of the Delta I=1/2 rule in non-mesonic decays and the pu...

  2. Higher-order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model: Disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekoes, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Csanad, Mate [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Csoergo, Tamas [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary); KRF, Gyoengyoes (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii. (orig.)

  3. Higher order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model -- disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Lökös, Sándor; Csörgő, Tamás; Tomášik, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii.

  4. Axions from wall decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S; Hagmann, C; Sikivie, P

    2001-01-08

    The authors discuss the decay of axion walls bounded by strings and present numerical simulations of the decay process. In these simulations, the decay happens immediately, in a time scale of order the light travel time, and the average energy of the radiated axions is {approx_equal} 7m{sub a} for v{sub a}/m{sub a} {approx_equal} 500. is found to increase approximately linearly with ln(v{sub a}/m{sub a}). Extrapolation of this behavior yields {approx_equal} 60 m{sub a} in axion models of interest.

  5. Rare decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lafferty, George

    2015-01-01

    We review recent results from the LHCb experiment on studies of particle decays that are forbidden or rare in the Standard Model. The studies include searches for lepton flavour violating decays of the $\\tau$ lepton and the $B$ and $D$ mesons, and of $B$ and $D$ meson decays that would be mediated by Majorana neutrinos. Results are also presented for the rare processes $B_s \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ and $B^0 \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$, $D^0 \\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$, $b \\to s\\gamma$ transitions, and $B \\to K^{(*)}\\mu^+\\mu^-$.

  6. Non-leptonic decays of beauty decays

    CERN Document Server

    Bigi, Ikaros I; Shifman, M; Uraltsev, N; Vainshtein, A I

    1994-01-01

    "Anyone who keeps the ability to see beauty never grows old" (Franz Kafka). In the last few years considerable progress has been achieved in our understanding of the decays of heavy flavour hadrons. One can now calculate inclusive transition rates in QCD proper through an expansion in inverse powers of the heavy flavour quark mass without recourse to phenomenological assumptions. The non-perturbative contributions are treated systematically in this way; they are found to produce corrections of order a few percent in beauty decays, i.e. typically somewhat smaller than the perturbative corrections. One finds, among other things: (a) The lifetime of $B^-$ mesons is predicted to be longer than that of $B^0$ mesons by several percent. (b) The QCD prediction for the semileptonic branching ratio of $B$ mesons appears to exceed present experimental values.

  7. Weak decays and double beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholson, H.W.

    1983-08-01

    Work to measure the ..sigma../sup +/ 0 degree differential cross section in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. ..sigma../sup +/..pi../sup -/ at several incident K/sup -/ momenta between 600 and 800 MeV/c as well as the asymmetries in the decays of polarized ..sigma../sup +/'s into protons and neutral pions and of polarized ..sigma../sup -/'s into neutrons and negative pions in collaboration with experimenters from Yale, Brookhaven, and the University of Pittsburgh (Brookhaven experiment 702) has been completed. Data from this experiment is currently being analyzed at Yale. Work is currently underway to develop and construct an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay in thin foils of Mo/sup 100/ in collaboration with experimenters from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Development work on the solid state silicon detectors should be complete in the next six months and construction should e well underway within the next year.

  8. RKKY-like contributions to the magnetic anisotropy energy: 3 d adatoms on Pt(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhassoune, Mohammmed; Dias, Manuel dos Santos; Zimmermann, Bernd; Dederichs, Peter H.; Lounis, Samir

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic anisotropy energy defines the energy barrier that stabilizes a magnetic moment. Utilizing density-functional-theory-based simulations and analytical formulations, we establish that this barrier is strongly modified by long-range contributions very similar to Friedel oscillations and Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida interactions. Thus, oscillations are expected and observed, with different decaying factors and highly anisotropic in realistic materials, which can switch nontrivially the sign of the magnetic anisotropy energy. This behavior is general, and for illustration we address the transition-metal adatoms, Cr, Mn, Fe, and Co deposited on a Pt(111) surface. We explain, in particular, the mechanisms leading to the strong site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy observed for Fe adatoms on a Pt(111) surface as revealed previously via first-principles-based simulations and inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy [A. A. Khajetoorians et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 157204 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.157204]. The same mechanisms are probably active for the site dependence of the magnetic anisotropy energy obtained for Fe adatoms on Pd or Rh(111) surfaces and for Co adatoms on a Rh(111) surface [P. Blonski et al., Phys. Rev. B 81, 104426 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.81.104426].

  9. Cosmic microwave background constraints on a decaying cosmological term related to the thermal evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Riou; Ichiki, Kiyotomo

    2008-01-01

    We constrain the thermal evolution of the universe with a decaying cosmological term by using the method of the analysis for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observation data. The cosmological term is assumed to be a function of the scale factor that increases toward the early universe, and the radiation energy density is lower compared to that in the model with the standard cosmological "constant" (LCDM). The decrease in the radiation density affects the thermal history of the universe; e.g. the photon decoupling occurs at higher-z compared to the case of the standard LCDM model. As a consequence, a decaying cosmological term affects the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. Thanks to the Markov-chain Monte Carlo method, we compare the angular power spectrum in the decaying LCDM model with the CMB data, and we get severe constraints on parameters of the model.

  10. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  11. CLEO Results B Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Cassel, David G

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of many Standard Model constants are clouded by uncertainties in nonperturbative QCD parameters that relate measurable quantities to the underlying parton-level processes. Generally these QCD parameters have been obtained from model calculations with large uncertainties that are difficult to quantify. The CLEO Collaboration has taken a major step towards reducing these uncertainties in determining the CKM matrix elements Vcb and Vub using new measurements of the branching fraction and photon energy spectrum of B -> s gamma decays. This report includes: the new CLEO measurements of B -> s gamma decays, Vcb, and Vub; the first results from CLEO III data -- studies of B -> K pi, pi pi, and K Kbar decays; mention of some other recent CLEO B decay results; and plans for operating CESR and CLEO in the charm threshold region.

  12. RARE KAON DECAYS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LITTENBERG, L.

    2005-07-19

    Lepton flavor violation (LFV) experiments have probed sensitivities corresponding to mass scales of well over 100 TeV, making life difficult for models predicting accessible LFV in kaon decay and discouraging new dedicated experiments of this type.

  13. Neutrinoless double beta decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kai Zuber

    2012-10-01

    The physics potential of neutrinoless double beta decay is discussed. Furthermore, experimental considerations as well as the current status of experiments are presented. Finally, an outlook towards the future, work on nuclear matrix elements and alternative processes is given.

  14. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, T.T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for the Early Universe

    2007-06-15

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3){sub C} gauge interactions. (orig.)

  15. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  16. Inflaton decay in supergravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, M.; Takahashi, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Yanagida, T.T. [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics]|[Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Research Center for the Early Universe

    2007-06-15

    We discuss inflaton decay in supergravity, taking account of the gravitational effects. It is shown that, if the inflaton has a nonzero vacuum expectation value, it generically couples to any matter fields that appear in the superpotential at the tree level, and to any gauge sectors through anomalies in the supergravity. Through these processes, the inflaton generically decays into the supersymmetry breaking sector, producing many gravitinos. The inflaton also directly decays into a pair of the gravitinos. We derive constraints on both inflation models and supersymmetry breaking scenarios for avoiding overproduction of the gravitinos. Furthermore, the inflaton naturally decays into the visible sector via the top Yukawa coupling and SU(3){sub C} gauge interactions. (orig.)

  17. Time resolved multiphoton excited fluorescence probes in model membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Y

    2000-01-01

    Using the time-correlated single-photon counting technique, this thesis reports on a time-resolved fluorescence study of several fluorescent probes successfully employed in membrane research. Concentration and temperature effects on fluorescence anisotropy parameters are demonstrated by DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and PPO in DPPC lipid bilayers. Fluorescence anisotropy has shown that trans-stilbene and Rhd 800 have a two-site location in membranes. Multiphoton induced fluorescence of DPH, p-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl in liposomes was measured using 800nm excitation with a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire laser. P-terphenyl, alpha-NPO and v-biphenyl are new probes for membranes. Comparison of one and multiphoton excitation results has demonstrated higher initial anisotropy with multiphoton excitation than with one-photon excitation. The rotational times were identical for one and multiphoton excitation, indicating the absence of significant local heating or sample perturbation. Excimer formation of alpha-NPO w...

  18. Streamer chamber: pion decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1992-01-01

    The real particles produced in the decay of a positive pion can be seen in this image from a streamer chamber. Streamer chambers consist of a gas chamber through which a strong pulsed electric field is passed, creating sparks as a charged particle passes through it. A magnetic field is added to cause the decay products to follow curved paths so that their charge and momentum can be measured.

  19. Open Flavor Strong Decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Tecocoatzi, H.; Bijker, R.; Ferretti, J.; Galatà, G.; Santopinto, E.

    2016-10-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the results of a QM calculation of the open-flavor strong decays of **** light nucleon resonances. These are the results of a recent calculation, where we used a modified ^3P_0 model for the amplitudes and the U(7) algebraic model and the hypercentral quark model to predict the baryon spectrum. The decay amplitudes are compared with the existing experimental data.

  20. Laser assisted {alpha} decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda Cortes, Hector Mauricio

    2012-02-01

    Excited or short-lived nuclei often decay by emitting alpha particles that are assumed to be preformed inside the nucleus and confined in the nuclear potential well. In this picture, {alpha} decay refers to the tunneling of the alpha particle through the potential barrier. In this thesis we investigate for the first time how strong laser fields can assist the tunneling of the alpha particle and thus influence the nuclear decay. Generally speaking, laser-assisted {alpha} decay can be described as laser-assisted tunneling of a quasistationary state, i.e, a slowly decaying state. Our theoretical treatment is developed starting from the complex trajectory formulation of the well-known strong-field approximation used to describe laser-induced ionization. We extend this formulation and develop a method to treat the decay of quasistationary states. The effect of both static and optical and X-ray monochromatic fields on the lifetimes and {alpha}-particle emission spectra are investigated for a number of {alpha}-emitting nuclei. We find that even at strong intensities, the laser-induced acceleration of the {alpha} decay is negligible, ranging from a relative modification in the decay rate of 10{sup -3} for static fields of electric field strengths of 10{sup 15} V/m, to 10{sup -8} for strong optical fields with intensities of 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}, and to 10{sup -6} for strong X-ray fields with laser intensities around 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2}. However, the effect of the external field is visible in the spectrum of emitted alpha particles, leading in the case of optical fields even to rescattering phenomena for intensities approaching 6 x 10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}. The dynamics of the alpha particle in laser fields of intensities below the rescattering limit is investigated.

  1. Solar Neutrino Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Acker, A; Acker, Andy; Pakvasa, Sandip

    1994-01-01

    We re-examine the neutrino decay solution to the solar neutrino problem in light of the new data from Gallex II and Kamiokande III. We compare the experimental data with the solar models of Bahcall and Pinsonneault and Turck-Chieze and find that neutrino decay is ruled out as a solution to the solar neutrino problem at better than the 98\\% c.l. even when solar model uncertainties are taken into account.

  2. Aspects of B decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven

    2011-03-04

    B-meson decays are a good probe for testing the flavour sector of the standard model of particle physics. The standard model describes at present all experimental data satisfactorily, although some ''tensions'' exist, i.e. two to three sigma deviations from the predictions, in particular in B decays. The arguments against the standard model are thus purely theoretical. These tensions between experimental data and theoretical predictions provide an extension of the standard model by new physics contributions. Within the flavour sector main theoretical uncertainties are related to the hadronic matrix elements. For exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays QCD sum rule techniques, which are suitable for studying hadronic matrix elements, however, with substantial, but estimable hadronic uncertainties, are used. The exploration of new physics effects in B-meson decays is done in an twofold way. In exclusive semileptonic anti B {yields} D{sup (*)}l anti {nu} decays the effect of additional right-handed vector as well as left- and right-handed scalar and tensor hadronic current structures in the decay rates and the form factors are studied at the non-recoil point. As a second approach one studied the non-leptonic B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}J/{psi}{phi} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} decays discussing CP violating effects in the time-dependent decay amplitudes by considering new physics phase in the B{sup 0}- anti B{sup 0} mixing phase. (orig.)

  3. Dynamics of bolaamphiphilic fluorescent polyenes in lipid bilayers from polarization emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, A Ulises; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Quesada, Ernesto; Vélez, Marisela

    2006-06-20

    The rotational motions of the biamphiphilic polyenes (bolapolyenes) dimethyl all-(E)-octacosa-10,12,14,16,18-pentaenedioate (DE28:5) and dimethyl all-(E)-tetratriaconta-13,15,17,19,21-pentaenedioate (DE34:5), with head-to-head distances of 34 and 42A, respectively, have been examined by fluorescence anisotropy methods. The membrane-spanning bolapolyenes, which contain a central emitting pentaene group tethered to two methoxycarbonyl opposite polar heads by symmetric C(8) (DE28:5) and C(11) (DE34:5) polymethylene chains, were dispersed in lipid bilayers of DPPC or DMPC, and the stationary and picosecond-resolved emission was recorded as a function of temperature. In fluid-phase DMPC bilayers, three relaxation times could be determined, assigned to fast (0.2 and 2ns) single-bond isomerization processes localized on the alkyl chains, and to whole-molecule oscillations ( approximately 11ns), respectively. The anisotropy decay parameters were further analyzed in terms of a diffusive model for wobbling in a Gaussian ordering potential, to assess the anchoring effect of the symmetric polar heads. In this way, the average rotational diffusion constant of the bolapolyenes, D( perpendicular), could be estimated as 0.022-0.026rad(2) ns(-1) (DMPC bilayers, 35 degrees Celsius), a value that is only 1/3 of that corresponding to the related pentaene fatty acid spanning a single membrane monolayer. In contrast, the amplitude of the equilibrium orientational distribution (theta(half-cone) approximately 50 degrees ) is very similar for both the transmembrane and the single-headed polyenes. The reorientational oscillations of the central emitting group in the bolapolyenes necessarily would produce large-amplitude (2-5A) and very fast (ns) translational motions of the polar heads.

  4. Mantle wedge dynamics from seismic anisotropy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.; Wirth, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle wedge above subducting slabs plays a critical role in many of the physical processes associated with subduction, including water transport into the upper mantle and the generation and transport of melts. Our understanding of mantle wedge dynamics is incomplete; in particular, the mantle flow field above subducting slabs remains poorly understood. Because seismic anisotropy is a consequence of deformation, observations of anisotropy (such as shear wave splitting and P-to-SH converted waves) can constrain the geometry of the wedge flow field. Additionally, because the presence of water (either in nominally anhydrous minerals or as hydrous phases) can have a large effect on anisotropic structure, a detailed understanding of mantle wedge anisotropy can help to constrain processes related to water cycling in subduction systems. We present a global, synoptic view of anisotropy observations in subduction zone mantle wedges, compiled from a large number of individual studies, with the goal of understanding the first-order controls on wedge anisotropy and flow patterns. This compilation allows us to explicitly test the predictions made by many different conceptual models for wedge anisotropy, as well as to explore the relationships between observed anisotropy parameters and other parameters that describe subduction. We find that no simple model can explain all of the trends observed in the global data set. Mantle wedge flow is likely controlled by a combination of downdip motion of the slab, trench migration, ambient mantle flow, small-scale convection, proximity to slab edges, and slab morphology, with the relative contributions of these in any given subduction system controlled by the subduction kinematics and mantle rheology. There is also a likely contribution from B-type olivine and/or serpentinite fabric in many subduction zones, governed by the local thermal structure and volatile distribution.

  5. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Dixit, Gopal; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-01

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the Ge0.25 Si0.75 on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to facets on the surface.

  6. Modeling elastic anisotropy in strained heteroepitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Gopal Krishna; Ranganathan, Madhav

    2017-09-20

    Using a continuum evolution equation, we model the growth and evolution of quantum dots in the heteroepitaxial Ge on Si(0 0 1) system in a molecular beam epitaxy unit. We formulate our model in terms of evolution due to deposition, and due to surface diffusion which is governed by a free energy. This free energy has contributions from surface energy, curvature, wetting effects and elastic energy due to lattice mismatch between the film and the substrate. In addition to anisotropy due to surface energy which favors facet formation, we also incorporate elastic anisotropy due to an underlying crystal lattice. The complicated elastic problem of the film-substrate system subjected to boundary conditions at the free surface, interface and the bulk substrate is solved by perturbation analysis using a small slope approximation. This permits an analysis of effects at different orders in the slope and sheds new light on the observed behavior. Linear stability analysis shows the early evolution of the instability towards dot formation. The elastic anisotropy causes a change in the alignment of dots in the linear regime, whereas the surface energy anisotropy changes the dot shapes at the nonlinear regime. Numerical simulation of the full nonlinear equations shows the evolution of the surface morphology. In particular, we show, for parameters of the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] on Si(0 0 1), the surface energy anisotropy dominates the shapes of the quantum dots, whereas their alignment is influenced by the elastic energy anisotropy. The anisotropy in elasticity causes a further elongation of the islands whose coarsening is interrupted due to [Formula: see text] facets on the surface.

  7. Fluorescence kinetics of Trp-Trp dipeptide and its derivatives in water via ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Menghui; Yi, Hua; Chang, Mengfang; Cao, Xiaodan; Li, Lei; Zhou, Zhongneng; Pan, Haifeng; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Sanjun; Xu, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Ultrafast fluorescence dynamics of Tryptophan-Tryptophan (Trp-Trp/Trp2) dipeptide and its derivatives in water have been investigated using a picosecond resolved time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) apparatus together with a femtosecond resolved upconversion spectrophotofluorometer. The fluorescence decay profiles at multiple wavelengths were fitted by a global analysis technique. Nanosecond fluorescence kinetics of Trp2, N-tert-butyl carbonyl oxygen-N'-aldehyde group-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan (NBTrp2), l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (Trp2Me), and N-acetyl-l-tryptophan-l-tryptophan methyl ester (NATrp2Me) exhibit multi-exponential decays with the average lifetimes of 1.99, 3.04, 0.72 and 1.22ns, respectively. Due to the intramolecular interaction between two Trp residues, the "water relaxation" lifetime was observed around 4ps, and it is noticed that Trp2 and its derivatives also exhibit a new decay with a lifetime of ∼100ps, while single-Trp fluorescence decay in dipeptides/proteins shows 20-30ps. The intramolecular interaction lifetime constants of Trp2, NBTrp2, Trp2Me and NATrp2Me were then calculated to be 3.64, 0.93, 11.52 and 2.40ns, respectively. Candidate mechanisms (including heterogeneity, solvent relaxation, quasi static self-quenching or ET/PT quenching) have been discussed.

  8. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  9. Evanescent wave induced fluorescence. A tool for quantitative interfacial analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, C D

    2000-01-01

    Time-resolved angle-resolved evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectroscopy (EWIFS) has been used, for the first time, to determine interfacial concentration distributions of molecular species. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that in dynamic systems the non-radiative fluorescence decay coefficients of molecular species are effected only in a minor way by the presence of a dielectric interface. Consequently, measurements of interfacial fluorescence decay times are used to probe variations in molecular fluorescence quantum efficiencies, caused by the presence of an interface. The understanding of these variations is combined with angle-resolved evanescent wave theory. Examination of derived theoretical models using simulated data demonstrates that angle-resolved EWIFS is capable of measuring interfacial interactions on a nanometer scale. An evanescent wave induced fluorescence spectrometer is designed and fabricated to allow the measurement of the time-integrated and time-resolved interfacial emission. ...

  10. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  11. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Unal, Caner

    2014-01-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the "solid" must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initia...

  12. Psychophysics and the anisotropy of time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Martin

    2015-12-15

    In psychophysics, experimental control over the presented stimuli is an important prerequisite. Due to the anisotropy of time, this prerequisite is not given in psychophysical experiments on time perception. Many important factors (e.g., the direction of perceived time flow) cannot be manipulated in timing experiments. The anisotropy of time is a peculiarity, which distinguishes the time dimension from other perceptual qualities. Here I summarize the anisotropy-related differences between the perception of time and the perception of other qualities. It is discussed to what extent these differences might affect results and interpretations in psychophysical experiments. In conclusion, I argue for a 'view from nowhen' on the psychophysical study of time perception. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. CMB Anisotropies Total Angular Momentum Method

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-01-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the CMB. Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g.~defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic type parity at small angles and ...

  14. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  15. ANISOTROPY DETERMINATIONS IN EXCHANGE SPRING MAGNETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEWIS,L.H.; HARLAND,C.L.

    2002-08-18

    Ferromagnetic nanocomposites, or ''exchange spring'' magnets, possess a nanoscaled microstructure that allows intergrain magnetic exchange forces to couple the constituent grains and alter the system's effective magnetic anisotropies. While the effects of the anisotropy alterations are clearly seen in macroscopic magnetic measurement, it is extremely difficult to determine the detailed effects of the system's exchange coupling, such as the interphase exchange length, the inherent domain wall widths or the effective anisotropies of the system. Clarification of these materials parameters may be obtained from the ''micromagnetic'' phenomenological model, where the assumption of magnetic reversal initiating in the magnetically-soft regions of the exchange-spring maqet is explicitly included. This approach differs from that typically applied by other researchers and allows a quantitative estimate of the effective anisotropies of an exchange spring system. Hysteresis loops measured on well-characterized nanocomposite alloys based on the composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B + {alpha}-Fe at temperatures above the spin reorientation temperature were analyzed within the framework of the micromagnetic phenomenological model. Preliminary results indicate that the effective anisotropy constant in the material is intermediate to that of bulk {alpha}-Fe and bulk Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and increases with decreasing temperature. These results strongly support the idea that magnetic reversal in nanocomposite systems initiates in the lower-anisotropy regions of the system, and that the soft-phase regions become exchange-hardened by virtue of their proximity to the magnetically-hard regions.

  16. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  17. Precocious diagnose of dental decay using laser fluorescence: Part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén Borda, Celso; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Chein Villacampa, Silvia; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Biosocial. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Perales Zamora, Segundo; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Pediátrica. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Ventosilla Huasupoma, María; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Villavicencio Gastelú, Jorge; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Medico Quirúrgico. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Rivas Butrón, Carlos; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Medico Quirúrgico. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Alvarado Menacho, Sergio; Departamento Académico de Estomatología Rehabilitadora. Facultad de Odontología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú.; Guillén Astete, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The difficulty for lhe diagnosis of carieo lessions in temporal teelh has made lhis work improve in a closer diagnosis using the F1uorescence of!he Laser. As we know lhe most sensitive part for caries is the Oclusal surface, because of !he characleristic morphology lhat this piece presents, make lhe micro organisms and rest oí íoad to stay. Normally !he caries diagnosis on !he oclusal surface is determinated by a combination of different techniques lhat includes lhe intra oral exam wilh lhe u...

  18. Suppressed Charmed B Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoek, Hella Leonie [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-06-02

    This thesis describes the measurement of the branching fractions of the suppressed charmed B0 → D*- a0+ decays and the non-resonant B0 → D*- ηπ+ decays in approximately 230 million Υ(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events. The data have been collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California. Theoretical predictions of the branching fraction of the B0 → D*- a{sub 0}+ decays show large QCD model dependent uncertainties. Non-factorizing terms, in the naive factorization model, that can be calculated by QCD factorizing models have a large impact on the branching fraction of these decay modes. The predictions of the branching fractions are of the order of 10-6. The measurement of the branching fraction gives more insight into the theoretical models. In general a better understanding of QCD models will be necessary to conduct weak interaction physics at the next level. The presence of CP violation in electroweak interactions allows the differentiation between matter and antimatter in the laws of physics. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the CKM matrix that describes the weak interaction between quarks. Relations amongst the CKM matrix elements are used to present the two relevant parameters as the apex of a triangle (Unitarity Triangle) in a complex plane. The over-constraining of the CKM triangle by experimental measurements is an important test of the Standard Model. At this moment no stringent direct measurements of the CKM angle γ, one of the interior angles of the Unitarity Triangle, are available. The measurement of the angle γ can be performed using the decays of neutral B mesons. The B0 → D*- a0+ decay is sensitive to the angle γ and, in comparison to the current decays that are being employed, could significantly

  19. Holographic Glueball Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Brünner, Frederic; Rebhan, Anton

    2014-01-01

    We announce new results on glueball decay rates in the Sakai-Sugimoto model, a realization of holographic QCD from first principles that has only one coupling constant and an overall mass scale as free parameters. We extend a previous investigation by Hashimoto, Tan, and Terashima who have considered the lowest scalar glueball which arises from a somewhat exotic polarization of supergravity modes and whose mass is uncomfortably small in comparison with lattice results. On the other hand, the scalar glueball dual to the dilaton turns out to have a mass of about twice the mass of the rho meson (1487 MeV), very close to the scalar meson $f_0(1500)$ that is frequently interpreted as predominantly glue. Calculating the decay rate into two pions we find a surprisingly good agreement with experimental data for the $f_0(1500)$. We have also obtained decay widths for tensor and excited scalar glueballs, indicating universal narrowness.

  20. Beta and muon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, A.; Pascual, P.

    1967-07-01

    These notes represent a series of lectures delivered by the authors in the Junta de Energia Nuclear, during the Spring term of 1965. They were devoted to graduate students interested in the Theory of Elementary Particles. Special emphasis was focussed into the computational problems. Chapter I is a review of basic principles (Dirac equation, transition probabilities, final state interactions.) which will be needed later. In Chapter II the four-fermion punctual Interaction is discussed, Chapter III is devoted to the study of beta-decay; the main emphasis is given to the deduction of the formulae corresponding to electron-antineutrino correlation, electron energy spectrum, lifetimes, asymmetry of electrons emitted from polarized nuclei, electron and neutrino polarization and time reversal invariance in beta decay. In Chapter IV we deal with the decay of polarized muons with radiative corrections. Chapter V is devoted to an introduction to C.V.C. theory. (Author)

  1. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  2. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Haifeng; Zhang, Shuqing; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-12-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic phonon scattering was theoretically studied using deformation potential theory. Based on the Boltzmann equation with the relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was derived, showing that the influence of effective mass on mobility anisotropy is larger than those of deformation potential constant or elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic two-dimensional materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC2N , MXene, TiS3, and GeCH3) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio is overestimated by the previously described method.

  3. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  4. Flavor changing nucleon decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Muramatsu, Yu

    2017-04-01

    Recent discovery of neutrino large mixings implies the large mixings in the diagonalizing matrices of 5 bar fields in SU (5) grand unified theory (GUT), while the diagonalizing matrices of 10 fields of SU (5) are expected to have small mixings like Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. We calculate the predictions of flavor changing nucleon decays (FCND) in SU (5), SO (10), and E6 GUT models which have the above features for mixings. We found that FCND can be the main decay mode and play an important role to test GUT models.

  5. Double Beta Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, Steven R

    2011-01-01

    At least one neutrino has a mass of about 50 meV or larger. However, the absolute mass scale for the neutrino remains unknown. Furthermore, the critical question: Is the neutrino its own antiparticle? is unanswered. Studies of double beta decay offer hope for determining the absolute mass scale. In particular, zero-neutrino double beta decay (\\BBz) can address the issues of lepton number conservation, the particle-antiparticle nature of the neutrino, and its mass. A summary of the recent results in \\BBz, and the related technologies will be discussed in the context of the future \\BBz\\ program.

  6. 异丙醇-水配合液的荧光偏振和时间分辨特性%Fluorescence Polarization and Time Resolved Characteristics of Isopropanol-water Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩彩芹; 段培同; 吴斌; 刘莹; 骆晓森; 倪晓武

    2011-01-01

    The polarization fluorescence spectra of isopropanol-water mixture excited by ultraviolet light was studied experimentally. The decay process of fluorescence intensity was detected at different center emission peaks. The curve was fitted by an exponential function and the processing data was obtained by deconvolution. Both the polarization degree and fluorescence lifetime were calculated, and mathematical characterization was performed for the fluorescence counts decay curves. The fluorescence emission and polarization characteristics were discussed. It is found that the isopropanol-water mixture excited by ultraviolet light obtains partially polarized fluorescence with certain molecular orientation. The polarization degree and anisotropy degree are 0.542 and 0.441, respectively. Induced by exciting light with wavelengths of 220 nm and 232 nm, the fluorescence lifetime of isopropanol-water mixture at peaks of 277, 284, 293,309 nm is about 17 ns. While the average fluorescence lifetime at peaks of 328 nm, 345 nm and 362 nm is around 21, 22, 16 ns, respectively. It is related with the molecular cluster structure relative stability of isopropanol-water mixture by the action of hydrogen bond. The research will contribute to the study of the molecular characteristic of isopropanol-water cluster.%研究了紫外光照射下异丙醇-水配合液的偏振荧光光谱,以及不同荧光峰处光子强度随时间的衰变过程,计算了偏振度并讨论了其偏振特性,测试了不同峰位对应的荧光寿命并分析了其荧光发射特性.结果表明,异丙醇-水配合液在紫外光激励下发射的荧光为具有确定分子取向的部分偏振光,偏振度和各向异性度分别为0.542和0.441.在波长为220 nm和232 nm的激发光照射下,荧光峰位于277,284,293,309 nm,对应寿命均约为17 ns.而328,345,362 nm荧光峰对应的平均寿命分别约为21,22,16 ns,这与氢键作用下异丙醇和水形成团簇结构的相对稳定性有关.

  7. The fluorescence and dynamics properties in phenoxy-phthalocyanines liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Cheng-Bao; Yan, Xiao-Yan; Tan, Ming-Yue; Li, Jin; Sun, Wen-Jun; Yang, Shou-Bin

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the one/two-photon fluorescence and excited state dynamics properties of two synthesized phenoxy-phthalocyanines (Pc1 and Pc2) using mild reaction coordination method. The results show that the fast decay component in the time-resolved fluorescence technique dynamics comes from the intramolecular vibrational relaxation, the slower ones from the internal conversion. Furthermore, in comparison with one-photon fluorescence spectra, the red shift of two-photon fluorescence spectra can be explained by the reabsorption effect of molecules. The samples are expected to be a potential candidate for optical applications and photodynamic therapy.

  8. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of the green fluorescent protein chromophore and its kindling fluorescent protein analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Kiri; Heisler, Ismael A; Conyard, Jamie; Dixon, Tara; Page, Philip C Bulman; Meech, Stephen R

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins exhibit a very diverse range of photochemical behaviour, from efficient fluorescence through photochromism to photochemical reactivity. Remarkably this diverse behaviour arises from chromophores which have very similar structures. Here we describe measurements and modelling of the excited state dynamics in the chromophores of GFP (HBDI) and the kindling fluorescent protein, KFP (FHBMI). The methods are ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy with sub 50 fs time resolution and the modelling is based on the Smoluchowski equation. The excited state decays of both chromophores are very fast, longer for their anions than for the neutral form and independent of wavelength. Detailed studies show the mean fluorescence wavelength to be independent of time. The excited state decay times are also observed to be a very weak function of solvent polarity and viscosity. These results are modelled utilising recently calculated potential energy surfaces for the ground and excited states as a function of the twist coordinates about the two bridging bonds of the chromophore. For FHBMI and the scarce data on the neutral HBDI the calculations are not successful suggesting the need for refinement of these potential energy surfaces. For HBDI in methanol the simulation is successful provided a strong dependence of the radiationless decay rate on the coordinate is assumed. Such dependence should be included in future calculations of excited state dynamics. When the simulations are extended to more viscous solvents they fail to reproduce the observed weak viscosity dependence. The implications of these results for the nature of the coordinate leading to radiationless decay in the chromophore and for the photodynamics of fluorescent proteins are discussed.

  9. Attention decay in science

    CERN Document Server

    Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta; Ghosh, Rumi; Huberman, Bernardo A; Kaski, Kimmo; Fortunato, Santo

    2015-01-01

    The exponential growth in the number of scientific papers makes it increasingly difficult for researchers to keep track of all the publications relevant to their work. Consequently, the attention that can be devoted to individual papers, measured by their citation counts, is bound to decay rapidly. In this work we make a thorough study of the life-cycle of papers in different disciplines. Typically, the citation rate of a paper increases up to a few years after its publication, reaches a peak and then decreases rapidly. This decay can be described by an exponential or a power law behavior, as in ultradiffusive processes, with exponential fitting better than power law for the majority of cases. The decay is also becoming faster over the years, signaling that nowadays papers are forgotten more quickly. However, when time is counted in terms of the number of published papers, the rate of decay of citations is fairly independent of the period considered. This indicates that the attention of scholars depends on th...

  10. Measurements of heavy-flavour decay leptons with ALICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present measurements of electrons and muons from heavy-flavour hadron decays at central and forward rapidity performed by the ALICE Collaboration in p–Pb (√sNN = 5.02 TeV and Pb–Pb collisions (√sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are reconstructed using several detectors of the ALICE central barrel. Muons are reconstructed using the muon spectrometer at forward rapidity (2.5 < y < 4. The nuclear modification factors in Pb–Pb (RAA and in p–Pb (RpPb collisions, and the azimuthal anisotropy (v2 in Pb– Pb collisions will be discussed. Theoretical predictions are compared with the data. In addition, the measurement of the azimuthal correlation between electrons from heavyflavour hadron decays and charged hadrons in p–Pb collisions will be shown.

  11. Photonic mode density effects on single-molecule fluorescence blinking

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F D; Bocchio, N; Gaul, F; Pomozzi, A; Kreiter, M

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the influence of the photonic mode density (PMD) on the triplet dynamics of individual chromophores on a dielectric interface by comparing their response in the presence and absence of a nearby gold film. Lifetimes of the excited singlet state were evaluated in ordet to measure directly the PMD at the molecules position. Triplet state lifetimes were simultaneously determined by statistical analysis of the detection time of the fluorescence photons. The observed singlet decay rates are in agreement with the predicted PMD for molecules with different orientations. The triplet decay rate is modified in a fashion correlated to the singlet decay rate. These results show that PMD engineering can lead to an important suppression of the fluorescence, introducing a novel aspect of the physical mechanism to enhance fluorescence intensity in PMD-enhancing systems such as plasmonic devices.

  12. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  13. Effective anisotropy through traveltime and amplitude matching

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-08-05

    Introducing anisotropy to seismic wave propagation reveals more realistic physics of our Earth\\'s subsurface as compared to the isotropic assumption. However wavefield modeling, the engine of seismic inverse problems, in anisotropic media still suffers from computational burdens, in particular with complex anisotropy such as transversely isotropic (TI) and Orthorhombic anisotropy. We develop effective isotropic velocity and density models to package the effects of anisotropy such that the wave propagation behavior using these effective models approximate those of the original anisotropic model. We build these effective models through the high frequency asymptotic approximation based on the eikonal and transport equations. We match the geometrical behavior of the wave-fields, given by traveltimes, from the anisotropic and isotropic eikonal equations. This matching yields the effective isotropic velocity that approximates the kinematics of the anisotropic wavefield. Equivalently, we calculate the effective densities by equating the anisotropic and isotropic transport equations. The effective velocities and densities are then fed into the isotropic acoustic variable density wave equation to obtain cheaper anisotropic wavefields. We justify our approach by testing it on an elliptical anisotropic model. The numerical results demonstrate a good matching of both traveltime and amplitude between anisotropic and effective isotropic wavefields.

  14. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker;

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...

  15. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of Earth's inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Arwen

    2014-01-01

    Seismic observations provide strong evidence that Earth's inner core is anisotropic, with larger velocity in the polar than in the equatorial direction. The top 60-80 km of the inner core is isotropic; evidence for an innermost inner core is less compelling. The anisotropy is most likely due to alig

  16. Anisotropy of a cubic ferromagnet at criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlis, A.; Sokolov, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Critical fluctuations change the effective anisotropy of cubic ferromagnet near the Curie point. If the crystal undergoes phase transition into orthorhombic phase and the initial anisotropy is not too strong, reduced anisotropy of nonlinear susceptibility acquires at Tc the universal value δ4*=2/v* 3 (u*+v*) where u* and v* are coordinates of the cubic fixed point on the flow diagram of renormalization group equations. In the paper, the critical value of the reduced anisotropy is estimated within the pseudo-ɛ expansion approach. The six-loop pseudo-ɛ expansions for u*, v*, and δ4* are derived for the arbitrary spin dimensionality n . For cubic crystals (n =3 ) higher-order coefficients of the pseudo-ɛ expansions obtained turn out to be so small that use of simple Padé approximants yields reliable numerical results. Padé resummation of the pseudo-ɛ series for u*, v*, and δ4* leads to the estimate δ4*=0.079 ±0.006 , indicating that detection of the anisotropic critical behavior of cubic ferromagnets in physical and computer experiments is certainly possible.

  17. Azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I P Lokhtin; S V Petrushanko; L I Sarycheva; A M Snigirev

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of hard partons in quark–gluon plasma, created initially in nuclear overlap zone in collisions with non-zero impact parameter. The calculations are performed for semi-central Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energy.

  18. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of Earth's inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Arwen

    2014-01-01

    Seismic observations provide strong evidence that Earth's inner core is anisotropic, with larger velocity in the polar than in the equatorial direction. The top 60-80 km of the inner core is isotropic; evidence for an innermost inner core is less compelling. The anisotropy is most likely due to

  19. Plastic Anisotropy Prediction by Ultrasonic Texture Data

    OpenAIRE

    Serebryany, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy parameters (R coefficient and height of ears of the drawn cup) have been calculated from ultrasonic orientation distribution function (ODF) coefficients on the basis of Taylor theory for low carbon steel and aluminium alloy sheets. The ODF coefficients were defined by Sayers method and using the iterative procedure on the basis of measurement of bulk longitudinal and shear wave time delays.

  20. A holistic view of unstable dark matter. Spectral and anisotropy signatures in astrophysical backgrounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Le

    2010-11-15

    The nature of dark matter is one of the key outstanding problems in both particle and astrophysics. If dark matter decays or annihilates into electrons and positrons, it can affect diffuse radiation backgrounds observed in astrophysics. In this thesis, we propose a new, more general analysis of constraints on dark matter models. For any decaying dark matter model, constraints on mass and lifetime can be obtained by folding the specific dark matter decay spectrum with a response function. We derive these response functions from full-sky radio surveys and Fermi-LAT gamma-ray observations as well as from the local positron fluxes measured by the PAMELA satellite experiment and apply them to place constraints on some specific dark matter decay models. We also discuss the influence of astrophysical uncertainties on the response function, such as the uncertainties from propagation models and from the spatial distribution of the dark matter. Moreover, an anisotropy analysis of full-sky emission gamma-ray and radio maps is performed to identify possible signatures of annihilating dark matter. We calculate angular power spectra of the cosmological background of synchrotron emission from dark matter annihilations into electron positron pairs. We compare the power spectra with the anisotropy of astrophysical and cosmological radio backgrounds, from normal galaxies, radio-galaxies, galaxy cluster accretion shocks, the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds. In addition, we develop a numerical tool to compute gamma-ray emission from such electrons and positrons diffusing in the smooth host halo and in substructure halos with masses down to 10{sup -6}M{sub s}un. We show that, unlike the total gamma-ray angular power spectrum observed by Fermi-LAT, the angular power spectrum from the inverse Compton scattering is exponentially suppressed below an angular scale determined by the diffusion length of electrons and positrons. (orig.)

  1. Magnetization of superparamagnetics in the state of mechanical anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Ugulava, Archil; Chkhaidze, Simon; Kekutia, Shalva; Rostomashvili, Zurab

    2015-01-01

    The internal energy of magnetic anisotropy for some nanoparticles dominates over the thermal energy even at room temperature. Strong magnetic anisotropy of nanoparticles can significantly affect the process of magnetization of the magnetic fluid. This influence is substantial if the system of nanoparticles is in a state of mechanical anisotropy in which the anisotropy axes of the particles have the same direction. In this work, it is shown that the magnetization curve of the magnetic fluid in...

  2. Surface contribution to the anisotropy of magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Garanin, D. A.; Kachkachi, H.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the contribution of the Neel surface anisotropy to the effective anisotropy of magnetic nanoparticles of spherical shape cut out of a simple cubic lattice. The effective anisotropy arises because deviations of atomic magnetizations from collinearity and thus the energy depends on the orientation of the global magnetization. The result is second order in the Neel surface anisotropy, scales with the particle volume and has cubic symmetry with preferred directions [+-1,+-1,+-1].

  3. Multi-scale characterization of topographic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. G.; Koons, P. O.; Osti, B.; Upton, P.; Tucker, G. E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the every-direction variogram analysis (EVA) method for quantifying orientation and scale dependence of topographic anisotropy to aid in differentiation of the fluvial and tectonic contributions to surface evolution. Using multi-directional variogram statistics to track the spatial persistence of elevation values across a landscape, we calculate anisotropy as a multiscale, direction-sensitive variance in elevation between two points on a surface. Tectonically derived topographic anisotropy is associated with the three-dimensional kinematic field, which contributes (1) differential surface displacement and (2) crustal weakening along fault structures, both of which amplify processes of surface erosion. Based on our analysis, tectonic displacements dominate the topographic field at the orogenic scale, while a combination of the local displacement and strength fields are well represented at the ridge and valley scale. Drainage network patterns tend to reflect the geometry of underlying active or inactive tectonic structures due to the rapid erosion of faults and differential uplift associated with fault motion. Regions that have uniform environmental conditions and have been largely devoid of tectonic strain, such as passive coastal margins, have predominantly isotropic topography with typically dendritic drainage network patterns. Isolated features, such as stratovolcanoes, are nearly isotropic at their peaks but exhibit a concentric pattern of anisotropy along their flanks. The methods we provide can be used to successfully infer the settings of past or present tectonic regimes, and can be particularly useful in predicting the location and orientation of structural features that would otherwise be impossible to elude interpretation in the field. Though we limit the scope of this paper to elevation, EVA can be used to quantify the anisotropy of any spatially variable property.

  4. Pn Anisotropy in Old Pacific Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, N.; Forsyth, D. W.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Pn is the high frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within old oceanic lithosphere, which is also known as Po. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (~150-160Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the PLATE experiment (Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment). More than 5 or 6 Pn phases per day are recorded on these ocean bottom seismometers generated by earthquakes in western Pacific subduction zones during one year of deployment; we used 512 Pn phases from earthquakes with locations reported in routine bulletins. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed at a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. The spreading rates on both limbs were ~ 70mm/yr, and the current plate motion direction in the hotspot coordinate frame is WNW. Our overall goal is to identify the pattern of fossil anisotropy in the old oceanic lithosphere, and dynamically generated anisotropy in underlying asthenosphere using both body waves and surface waves. Using high frequency waves (3-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of backazimuth. In the western array, where the spreading direction is parallel to the absolute plate motion direction, we find clear Pn anisotropy with velocities varying from ~8.5 km/s in the spreading direction to ~ 8.0 km/s perpendicular to the spreading direction. However, in the eastern array where the fossil spreading direction is perpendicular to the current plate motion, the velocity variations as a function of backazimuth are much less obvious. This may be due to heterogeneity of anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere, with the fast direction changing from the fossil direction at shallow levels to the absolute direction at greater depth.

  5. Fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A., E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)

    2010-02-08

    The fluorescence spectroscopic behaviour of folic acid (FA) in 4 M HCl (dominant bi-cationic form), 0.1 M HCl (bi-cationic and cationic form), citric acid-NaOH pH 6 buffer (neutral form), 0.1 M and 4 M KOH (anionic form), and trifluoroacetic acid is studied. The thermal stability is investigated. Absolute absorption cross-section spectra are determined and compared with fluorescence excitation spectra. Intrinsic fluorescence quantum distributions and fluorescence quantum yields are extracted from fluorescence spectra measurements. The temporal fluorescence decay after picosecond pulse excitation is studied. The fluorescence quenching mechanisms for the different ionic forms of FA are discussed: excited-state proton release for bi-cationic FA, photo-physical non-radiative relaxation for cationic FA, and photo-induced intra-molecular electron transfer for neutral and anionic FA. Aerobic FA in 4 M KOH at elevated temperature dehydrated to 9,10-dehydro-folic acid. Its photo-dynamics was governed by twisted intra-molecular charge transfer and photo-isomerisation.

  6. Mean fluorescence lifetime and its error

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiserova, Eva [Department of Mathematical Analysis and Applications of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Kubala, Martin, E-mail: mkubala@prfnw.upol.cz [Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, tr. 17. listopadu 12, CZE-77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2012-08-15

    Mean excited-state lifetime is one of the fundamental fluorescence characteristics and enters as an important parameter into numerous calculations characterizing molecular interactions, such as e.g. FRET or fluorescence quenching. Our experiments demonstrated that the intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic, in contrast to the amplitude-weighted one, which value is dependent on the data quality and particularly on the used fitting model. For the first time, we also report the procedure for the error estimation for both the intensity- and amplitude-weighted mean fluorescence lifetimes. Furthermore, we present a method for estimation of the mean fluorescence lifetime directly from the fluorescence-decay curve recorded by TCSPC (Time-Correlated Single-Photon Counting) method. For its simplicity and low computational demands, it could be a useful tool in the high-throughput applications, such as FACS, FLIM-FRET or HPLC detectors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intensity-weighted mean fluorescence lifetime is very robust characteristic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The amplitude-weighted mean lifetime depends on the selection of fitting model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rigorous procedure for estimation of confidence intervals for mean lifetime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean lifetime can be estimated directly from the TCSPC histogram.

  7. Fluorescence of fullerene derivatives at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.K.; Shiu, L.L.; Chien, K.M.; Luh, T.Y.; Lin, T.I. (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China))

    1995-01-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of fullerene (C[sub 60]) and its derivatives C[sub 60]C[sub 4]H[sub 6], C[sub 60]C[sub 5]H[sub 6], C[sub 60]CHCO[sub 2]Et, and C[sub 60]NCO[sub 2]Et at room temperature were investigated. Breaking the structural symmetry of C[sub 60] results in enhancing the fluorescence quantum yield 2-3-fold in some derivatives. Thus, the room temperature fluorescence of fullerene compounds could be detected more rapidly. New absorption bands and altered fluorescence spectra were observed in the derivatives. The Stokes' shifts of the derivatives are small, about 4-5 nm, compared to 68 nm for the parent compound. The time-resolved fluorescence decay study indicates that all four fullerene derivatives have a single fluorescence lifetime of ca. 1.2-1.4 as, which is about the same as that for C[sub 60] (ca. 1.3 ns). Aliphatic solvents have little influence on the absorption or fluorescence spectral profile except on the extinction coefficient whereas aromatic and polar solvents strongly interact with the fullerene derivatives, causing a peak broadening effect. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Rare B decays at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Kluit, P M

    2001-01-01

    The results of the LEP experiments for rare B decays will be reviewed, covering hadronic final states, radiative and other rare decays and results for the inclusive charmless branching ratio. (8 refs).

  9. Experimental study of void space, permeability and elastic anisotropy in crustal rocks under ambient and hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Philip Michael

    Anisotropy in the physical and transport properties of crustal rocks is a key influence on crustal evolution and energy resource management. Data from deep seismic soundings, borehole logging and laboratory measurement all show that the physical properties of the earth are anisotropic. Such anisotropy generally results from the superposition of fabric development during diagenesis and/or petrogenesis, and the application of anisotropic tectonic stresses. This leads to an aligned crack and pore fabric in crustal rocks that, in turn, leads to seismic velocity anisotropy and permeability anisotropy. This thesis describes an experimental study which aims to investigate the relationships between pressure, pore fabric geometry and seismic and permeability anisotropy under hydrostatic pressures from room pressure to ~4km depth equivalence within the Earth's crust. Firstly, pore fabric analyses of three representative crustal rock types is presented. These rock types represent a range of crack and pore fabrics. The average void space shape and orientation is determined 3-D using the methods of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and velocity anisotropy. Scanning electron microscopy and fluorescent-dye crack imaging techniques further aid in the void space characterisation. Secondly, the development and application of an apparatus capable of contemporaneously measuring elastic wave velocity, porosity and permeability at effective pressures of up to 100 MPa is described. Results are analysed in terms of applied effective pressure and the rock pore fabric type and orientation. Finally, the laboratory data are used to test models that attempt to predict geophysical parameters such as permeability and elastic wave velocity from microstructural attributes. This multi-facetted analysis allows a number of conclusions to be drawn, expanding the state-of-the-art in how the pore fabric microstructure of crustal rock is represented by the methods of elastic wave velocity and

  10. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A De Erausquin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a common, severe and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Indices commonly derived from DTI include (a mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (b fractional anisotropy (FA or relative anisotropy (RA, (c axial diffusivity, and (d radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes, and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased fractional anisotropy in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding.

  11. Origin of tryptophan fluorescence lifetimes. Part 2: fluorescence lifetimes origin of tryptophan in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albani, J R

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence intensity decays of L-tryptophan in proteins dissolved in pH 7 buffer, in ethanol and in 6 M guanidine pH 7.8 and in lyophilized proteins were measured. In all protein conditions, three lifetimes were obtained along the emission spectrum (310-410 nm). The two shortest lifetimes are in the same range of those obtained for L-Trp in water or in ethanol. Thus, these two lifetimes originate from specific two sub-structures existing in the excited state and are inherent to the tryptophan structure independently of the surrounding environment (amino acids residues, solvent, etc.) In proteins, the third lifetime originates from the interactions that are occurring between tryptophan residues and neighboring amino acids. Populations of these lifetimes are independent of the excitation wavelength and thus originate from pre-defined sub structures existing in the excited state and put into evidence after tryptophan excitation. Fluorescence decay studies of different tripeptides having a tryptophan residue in second position show that the best analysis is obtained with two fluorescence lifetimes. Consequently, this result seems to exclude the possibility that peptide bond induces the third fluorescence lifetimes. Indole dissolved in water and/or in ethanol emits with two fluorescence lifetimes that are completely different from those observed for L-Trp. Absence of the third lifetime in ethanol demonstrates that indole behaves differently when compared to tryptophan. Thus, it seems not adequate to attribute fluorescence lifetime or fluorescence properties of tryptophan to indole ring and to compare tryptophan fluorescence properties in proteins to molecules having close structures such as NATA which fluoresces with one lifetime.

  12. CP-violations in decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Sakai

    2006-11-01

    Recent results on CP-violation measurements in decays from energy asymmetric -factory experiments are reported. Thanks to large accumulated data samples, CP-violations in decays in mixing-decay interference and direct CP-violation are now firmly established. The measurements of three angles of the unitarity triangle from CP-violations of decays are quite consistent with the Standard Model expectations. These results strongly support the validity of the Kobayashi-Maskawa prescription of CP-violation.

  13. Visible neutrino decay at DUNE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coloma, Pilar [Fermilab; Peres, Orlando G. [ICTP, Trieste

    2017-05-09

    If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \\emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\

  14. Rare beauty decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258140

    2015-01-01

    In this contribution we review the most recent measurements of the LHCb experiment in the field of rare decays of B mesons. In particular the first observation of the $B^0_s \\to µ^+ µ^-$,­ decay, the angular analysis of $B^0_d \\to K*l^+l^-$ decays and the test of lepton universality in $B^+ \\to K^+ l^+ l^-$ decays are presented.

  15. Simultaneous Fluorescence and Phosphorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Karolina; Buschmann, Volker; Hille, Carsten

    2015-09-22

    In living cells, there are always a plethora of processes taking place at the same time. Their precise regulation is the basis of cellular functions, since small failures can lead to severe dysfunctions. For a comprehensive understanding of intracellular homeostasis, simultaneous multiparameter detection is a versatile tool for revealing the spatial and temporal interactions of intracellular parameters. Here, a recently developed time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) board was evaluated for simultaneous fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM/PLIM). Therefore, the metabolic activity in insect salivary glands was investigated by recording ns-decaying intrinsic cellular fluorescence, mainly related to oxidized flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the μs-decaying phosphorescence of the oxygen-sensitive ruthenium-complex Kr341. Due to dopamine stimulation, the metabolic activity of salivary glands increased, causing a higher pericellular oxygen consumption and a resulting increase in Kr341 phosphorescence decay time. Furthermore, FAD fluorescence decay time decreased, presumably due to protein binding, thus inducing a quenching of FAD fluorescence decay time. Through application of the metabolic drugs antimycin and FCCP, the recorded signals could be assigned to a mitochondrial origin. The dopamine-induced changes could be observed in sequential FLIM and PLIM recordings, as well as in simultaneous FLIM/PLIM recordings using an intermediate TCSPC timing resolution.

  16. Excitation relaxation dynamics and energy transfer in fucoxanthin-chlorophyll a/c-protein complexes, probed by time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Yokono, Makio; Mimuro, Mamoru; Nagao, Ryo; Tomo, Tatsuya

    2014-09-01

    In algae, light-harvesting complexes contain specific chlorophylls (Chls) and keto-carotenoids; Chl a, Chl c, and fucoxanthin (Fx) in diatoms and brown algae; Chl a, Chl c, and peridinin in photosynthetic dinoflagellates; and Chl a, Chl b, and siphonaxanthin in green algae. The Fx-Chl a/c-protein (FCP) complex from the diatom Chaetoceros gracilis contains Chl c1, Chl c2, and the keto-carotenoid, Fx, as antenna pigments, in addition to Chl a. In the present study, we investigated energy transfer in the FCP complex associated with photosystem II (FCPII) of C. gracilis. For these investigations, we analyzed time-resolved fluorescence spectra, fluorescence rise and decay curves, and time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy data. Chl a exhibited different energy forms with fluorescence peaks ranging from 677 nm to 688 nm. Fx transferred excitation energy to lower-energy Chl a with a time constant of 300fs. Chl c transferred excitation energy to Chl a with time constants of 500-600fs (intra-complex transfer), 600-700fs (intra-complex transfer), and 4-6ps (inter-complex transfer). The latter process made a greater contribution to total Chl c-to-Chl a transfer in intact cells of C. gracilis than in the isolated FCPII complexes. The lower-energy Chl a received excitation energy from Fx and transferred the energy to higher-energy Chl a. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  17. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies of tyrosine environment and ligand binding of plant calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Gautam; Thompson, Faith; Puett, David

    1990-05-01

    Recent studies in our laboratories have focused on using tyrosine (Tyr) fluorescence of calmodulin (CaM) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence of CaM-bound peptdies as intrinsic probes of structure and interactions of this Ca2+ regulatory protein. Plant CaM contains a single Tyr (Tyr.-l38) and vertebrate CaM contains two (Tyr-99 and Tyr-.l38). Neither protein contains Trp. The fluorescence properties of Tyr-138 of wheat-germ CaM is sensitive to conformational changes induced by perturbations such as Ca2+ ligation or depletion, and pH changes. Effects of these perturbations on quantum yield, lifetime and dynamic quenching of Tyr-l38 fluorescence are reported. We have also studied binding of amphiphilic peptides to wheat-germ CaM. A comparison of wheat CaM induced changes in the fluorescence properties of a single Trp of these peptides with those induced by bovine testes CaM indicate general similarities of the peptide binding surfaces of plant and mammalian CaMs. Frequency domain measurements of decay of intensity and anisotropy have suggested some orientational freedom and local motion of the Trp residue of CaM-bound peptide, independent of the overall protein motion, even when the Trp is expected to be buried in the doubly apolar protein-peptide interface. Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous calcium binding protein which is believed to regulate several different enzymes in diverse cells (Klee et al., 1982). Much of the structural work to date has been carried out on mammalian CaM. However, CaM has also been isolated from plant and invertebrate sources, and a high degree of sequence homology with vertebrate CaM has been found. The amino acid sequence of wheat germ CaM shows eleven substitutions, two insertions and one deletion compared with the 148.-residue bovine brain CaM (Toda et al., 1985). Specific differences with mammalian CaM at two sites make plant CaM attractive for fluorescence spectroscopic studies. These are: (1) The presence of a single tyrosine residue (Tyr

  18. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  19. Electroweak penguin B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Nikodem, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Flavour Changing Neutral Currents (FCNC) are sensitive probes for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM), so-called New Physics. An example of a FCNC is the $b \\to s$ quark transition described by the electroweak penguin Feynman diagram shown in Figure 1. In the SM such FCNC are only allowed with a loop structure (as e:g: shown in the figure) and not by tree level processes. In the loops heavy particles appear virtually and do not need to be on shell. Therefore also not yet discovered heavy particles with up to a mass $\\mathcal{O}$(TeV) could virtually contribute significantly to observables. Several recent measurements of electroweak penguin B decays exhibit interesting tensions with SM predictions, most prominently in the angular observable $P'_5$ 5 of the decay $B^0 \\to K^{*0} \\mu^+ \\mu^1$[1], which triggered a lot of discussion in the theory community [2]-[14].

  20. Decay of Hoyle state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bhattacharya; T K Rana; C Bhattacharya; S Kundu; K Banerjee; T K Ghosh; G Mukherjee; R Pandey; P Roy

    2014-11-01

    The prediction of Hoyle state was necessitated to explain the abundance of carbon, which is crucial for the existence of life on Earth and is the stepping stone for understanding the abundance of other heavier elements. After the experimental confirmation of its existence, soon it was realized that the Hoyle state was `different’ from other excited states of carbon, which led to intense theoretical and experimental activities over the past few decades to understand its structure. In recent times, precision, high statistics experiments on the decay of Hoyle state have been performed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, to determine the quantitative contributions of various direct 3 decay mechanisms of the Hoyle state. The present results have been critically compared with those obtained in other recent experiments and their implications have been discussed.

  1. Polarisation Sensitive Single Molecule Fluorescence Detection with Linear Polarised Excitation Light and Modulated Polarisation Direction Applied to Multichromophoric Entities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gensch, T.; Hofkens, J.; Köhn, F.; Vosch, T.; Herrmann, A.; Müllen, K.; Schryver, F.C. De

    2001-01-01

    Recently, investigations of the fluorescence properties of a multichromophoric dendritic entity at the single molecule level have revealed multiple fluorescence levels, collective off-states, variations of the polarisation, large shifts in the spectral position and changes in the fluorescence decay

  2. Teleportation via decay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bose; P L Knight; M B Plenio; V Vedral

    2001-02-01

    We present a rare example of a decay mechanism playing a constructive role in quantum information processing. We show how the state of an atom trapped in a cavity can be teleported to a second atom trapped in a distant cavity by the joint detection of photon leakage from the cavities. The scheme, which is probabilistic, requires only a single three level atom in a cavity. We also show how this scheme can be modified to a teleportation with insurance.

  3. Charmless B decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martens Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available During 2011, LHCb has collected an integrated luminosity of 1.1 fb−1, giving rise to a large variety of measurements. Amongst these, measurements of CP violation in B decays play a central role. In particular CP violation measurements in charmless transitions of B mesons are of interest since they provide new or improved constraints on new physics contributions. These proceedings concentrate on LHCb results made publicin the first half of the year 2012.

  4. Decays of s neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Barradas, J E

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), we discussed possible two body decay modes for the s neutrino v, one charged and other neutral: v -> l sub x sub 1 sup + sup - and v -> vx sub 1 sup 0 , respectively. Exploring a range of possible values for its mass, and for the chargino x sub i sup + sup - and neutralino x sub j sup 0 masses as well. We present the specific calculation for branching ratios, which are analyzed numerically. (Author)

  5. Radioactive decay data tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    The estimation of radiation dose to man from either external or internal exposure to radionuclides requires a knowledge of the energies and intensities of the atomic and nuclear radiations emitted during the radioactive decay process. The availability of evaluated decay data for the large number of radionuclides of interest is thus of fundamental importance for radiation dosimetry. This handbook contains a compilation of decay data for approximately 500 radionuclides. These data constitute an evaluated data file constructed for use in the radiological assessment activities of the Technology Assessments Section of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The radionuclides selected for this handbook include those occurring naturally in the environment, those of potential importance in routine or accidental releases from the nuclear fuel cycle, those of current interest in nuclear medicine and fusion reactor technology, and some of those of interest to Committee 2 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the estimation of annual limits on intake via inhalation and ingestion for occupationally exposed individuals.

  6. Multifluid magnetohydrodynamic turbulent decay

    CERN Document Server

    Downes, Turlough P

    2011-01-01

    It is generally believed that turbulence has a significant impact on the dynamics and evolution of molecular clouds and the star formation which occurs within them. Non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects are known to influence the nature of this turbulence. We present the results of a suite of 512-cubed resolution simulations of the decay of initially super-Alfvenic and supersonic fully multifluid MHD turbulence. We find that ambipolar diffusion increases the rate of decay of the turbulence while the Hall effect has virtually no impact. The decay of the kinetic energy can be fitted as a power-law in time and the exponent is found to be -1.34 for fully multifluid MHD turbulence. The power spectra of density, velocity and magnetic field are all steepened significantly by the inclusion of non-ideal terms. The dominant reason for this steepening is ambipolar diffusion with the Hall effect again playing a minimal role except at short length scales where it creates extra structure in the magnetic field. Interestingl...

  7. Decays of heavy quarks

    CERN Document Server

    Rizzo, T G

    1979-01-01

    The weak decay of heavy b and t quarks is discussed using the mixing angles obtained in Fritzsch's model (1978). The author finds that the decay b to c dominates over b to u for 7decay is found to be an insignificant source of multimuons in nu interactions and suitably small in nu interactions, consistent with the data of the CERN-Dortmund-Heidelberg-Saclay and Harvard-Pennsylvania-Wisconsin- Fermilab collaborations. Several branching ratios for exotic final states produced via b quarks in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are discussed. (23 refs).

  8. Charmless b decays at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donega, Mauro; /Geneva U.

    2005-07-01

    The authors report on the charmless B decays measurements performed on 180 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. This paper describes: the first observation of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and the measurement of the direct Cp asymmetry in the ({bar B}){sub d} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay; the first evidence of the decay mode B{sub s} {yields} {phi}{phi} and the branching ratio and Cp asymmetry for the B{sup {+-}} {yields} {phi}K{sup {+-}} decay.

  9. Anisotropy and Strong-Coupling Effects on the Collective Mode Spectrum of Chiral Superconductors: Application to Sr2RuO4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Avery Sauls

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent theories of Sr2RuO4 based on the interplay of strong interactions, spin-orbit coupling and multi-band anisotropy predict chiral or helical ground states with strong anisotropy of the pairing states, with deep minima in the excitation gap, as well as strong phase anisotropy for the chiral ground state. We develop time-dependent mean field theory to calculate the Bosonic spectrum for the class of 2D chiral superconductors spanning 3He-A to chiral superconductors with strong anisotropy. Chiral superconductors support a pair of massive Bosonic excitations of the time-reversed pairs labeled by their parity under charge conjugation. These modes are degenerate for 2D 3He-A. Crystal field anisotropy lifts the degeneracy. Strong anisotropy also leads to low-lying Fermions, and thus to channels for the decay of the Bosonic modes. Selection rules and phase space considerations lead to large asymmetries in the lifetimes and hybridization of the Bosonic modes with the continuum of un-bound Fermion pairs. We also highlight results for the excitation of the Bosonic modes by microwave radiation that provide clear signatures of the Bosonic modes of an anisotropic chiral ground state.

  10. Fluorescence properties of porcine odorant binding protein Trp 16 residue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albani, Jihad Rene, E-mail: Jihad-Rene.Albani@univ-lille1.f [Laboratoire de Biophysique Moleculaire, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2010-11-15

    Summary: The present work deals with fluorescence studies of adult porcine odorant binding protein at pH=7.5. At this pH, the protein is a dimer, each monomer contains one tryptophan residue. Our results show that tryptophan residue displays significant motions and emits with three fluorescence lifetimes. Decay associated spectra showed that the three lifetime's components emanate from sub-structures surrounded by the same microenvironment.

  11. Magnetic anisotropy of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy due to grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni has been studied by simulating experimental magnetization data with the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory. In the model the grain boundary magnetic anisotropy energy is expressed as the sum of the uniaxial anisotropy and the cubic anisotropy, characterized by Kua and Kca anisotropy constants. By comparing the calculated magnetization with the experimental magnetization measurements at finite temperatures, the values of Kua and Kca can be determined. For nanocrystalline Ni it is found that with increasing temperature Kua decreases and Kca increases. At low temperatures Kua dominates the grain boundary anisotropy energy, whereas Kca is very small and it can be neglected. At room temperature Kua and Kca are of the same order with the corresponding ratio Kua /Kca ≈ 1.9 , both coefficients are much larger than the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant.

  12. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of two-dimensional Rashba ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Whan; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Hyun-Woo; Stiles, M. D.

    2016-11-01

    We compute the magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy within two-dimensional Rashba models. For a ferromagnetic free-electron Rashba model, the magnetic anisotropy is exactly zero regardless of the strength of the Rashba coupling, unless only the lowest band is occupied. For this latter case, the model predicts in-plane anisotropy. For a more realistic Rashba model with finite band width, the magnetic anisotropy evolves from in-plane to perpendicular and back to in-plane as bands are progressively filled. This evolution agrees with first-principles calculations on the interfacial anisotropy, suggesting that the Rashba model captures energetics leading to anisotropy originating from the interface provided that the model takes account of the finite Brillouin zone. The results show that the electron density modulation by doping or an external voltage is more important for voltage-controlled magnetic anisotropy than the modulation of the Rashba parameter.

  13. IceCube neutrinos, decaying dark matter, and the Hubble constant

    CERN Document Server

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Goldberg, Haim; Huang, Xing; Marfatia, Danny; da Silva, Luiz H M; Weiler, Thomas J

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological parameters deduced from the Planck measurements of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background are at some tension with direct astronomical measurements of various parameters at low redshifts. Very recently, it has been conjectured that this discrepancy can be reconciled if a certain fraction of dark matter is unstable and decays between recombination and the present epoch. Herein we show that if the superheavy relics have a branching into neutrinos B (X \\to \

  14. Column: Factors Affecting Data Decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Fairbanks

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In nuclear physics, the phrase decay rate is used to denote the rate that atoms and other particles spontaneously decompose. Uranium-235 famously decays into a variety of daughter isotopes including Thorium and Neptunium, which themselves decay to others. Decay rates are widely observed and wildly different depending on many factors, both internal and external. U-235 has a half-life of 703,800,000 years, for example, while free neutrons have a half-life of 611 seconds and neutrons in an atomic nucleus are stable.We posit that data in computer systems also experiences some kind of statistical decay process and thus also has a discernible decay rate. Like atomic decay, data decay fluctuates wildly. But unlike atomic decay, data decay rates are the result of so many different interplaying processes that we currently do not understand them well enough to come up with quantifiable numbers. Nevertheless, we believe that it is useful to discuss some of the factors that impact the data decay rate, for these factors frequently determine whether useful data about a subject can be recovered by forensic investigation.(see PDF for full column

  15. Microwave Anisotropies from Texture Seeded Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Zhou, Z H

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave anisotropies in a scenario of large scale structure formation with cold dark matter and texture are discussed and compared with recent observational results of the COBE satellite. A couple of important statistical parameters are determined. The fluctuations are slightly non gaussian. The quadrupole anisotropy is $1.5\\pm 1.2\\times 10^{-5}$ and the fluctuations on a angular scale of 10 degrees are $ (3.8\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$. The COBE are within about one standard deviation of the typical texture + CDM model discussed in this paper. Furthermore, we calculate fluctuations on intermediate scales (about 2 degrees) with the result $\\De T/T(\\theta \\sim 2^o) = 3.9\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-5}$. Collapsing textures are modeled by spherically symmetric field configurations. This leads to uncertainties of about a factor of~2.

  16. Physics of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), especially of its frequency spectrum and its anisotropies, both in temperature and in polarization, have played a key role in the development of modern cosmology and our understanding of the very early universe. We review the underlying physics of the CMB and how the primordial temperature and polarization anisotropies were imprinted. Possibilities for distinguishing competing cosmological models are emphasized. The current status of CMB experiments and experimental techniques with an emphasis toward future observations, particularly in polarization, is reviewed. The physics of foreground emissions, especially of polarized dust, is discussed in detail, since this area is likely to become crucial for measurements of the B modes of the CMB polarization at ever greater sensitivity.

  17. CMB anisotropies from primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, A

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the right strength can leave a signature on the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization. Potentially observable contributions to polarization B-modes are generated by vorticity and gravitational waves sourced by the magnetic anisotropic stress. We compute the corresponding CMB transfer functions in detail including the effect of neutrinos. The shear rapidly causes the neutrino anisotropic stress to cancel the stress from the magnetic field, suppressing the production of gravitational waves and vorticity on super-horizon scales after neutrino decoupling. A significant large scale signal from tensor modes can only be produced before neutrino decoupling, and the actual amplitude is somewhat uncertain. Plausible values suggest primordial nearly scale invariant fields of ~ 10^(-10)G today may be observable from their large scale tensor anisotropy. They can be distinguished from primordial gravitational waves by their non-Gaussianity. Vector mode vorticity sources B-m...

  18. Primordial anisotropies from cosmic strings during inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazayeri, Sadra; Sadr, Alireza Vafaei; Firouzjahi, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we study the imprint of an individual primordial cosmic string within a Hubble patch on the inflationary power spectrum. A straight cosmic string induces two distinct contributions to the curvature perturbations power spectrum. The first type of correction respects the translation invariance while violating isotropy. This generates quadrupolar statistical anisotropy in cosmic microwave background maps, which is constrained by the Planck data. The second contribution breaks both homogeneity and isotropy, generating a dipolar power asymmetry in the variance of temperature fluctuations with its amplitude falling on small scales. We show that the strongest constraint on the tension of primordial cosmic strings is obtained from the quadrupolar anisotropy and argue that the mass scale of the underlying theory responsible for the formation of the string cannot be much higher than the grand unified theory scale. The predictions for the diagonal and off-diagonal components of the cosmic microwave background angular power spectrum induced by the string are presented.

  19. Optical anisotropy in GaSe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seyhan, A.; Karabulut, O.; Akinoglu, B.G.; Aslan, B.; Turan, R. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06531, Ankara (Turkey)

    2005-09-01

    Optical anisotropy of the layer semiconductor GaSe has been studied by photoluminescence (PL) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The PL spectra are dominated by two closely positioned emission bands resulting from the free exciton and the bound exciton connected direct band edge of GaSe. Photoluminescence and transmission spectra of GaSe crystals have been measured for two cases in which the propagation vector k is perpendicular (k perpendicular to c) and parallel to the c-axis (k//c). Peak position of the PL emission band and the onset of the transmission have been found to be significantly different for these two cases. This observed anisotropy is related to anisotropic band structure and the selection rules for the optical absorption in layered GaSe. FTIR transmission spectrum is in good agreement with PL results. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat $\\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\\Lambda$CDM) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of >68,000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino backgrou...

  1. Anisotropy of transport in bulk Rashba metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosco, Valentina; Grimaldi, Claudio

    2017-05-01

    The recent experimental discovery of three-dimensional (3D) materials hosting a strong Rashba spin-orbit coupling calls for the theoretical investigation of their transport properties. Here we study the zero-temperature dc conductivity of a 3D Rashba metal in the presence of static diluted impurities. We show that, at variance with the two-dimensional case, in 3D systems, spin-orbit coupling affects dc charge transport in all density regimes. We find in particular that the effect of spin-orbit interaction strongly depends on the direction of the current, and we show that this yields strongly anisotropic transport characteristics. In the dominant spin-orbit coupling regime where only the lowest band is occupied, the conductivity anisotropy is governed entirely by the anomalous component of the renormalized current. We propose that measurements of the conductivity anisotropy in bulk Rashba metals may give a direct experimental assessment of the spin-orbit strength.

  2. Out-of-equilibrium biomolecular interactions monitored by picosecond fluorescence in microfluidic droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Sacha; Carvalho, Alain; Vola, Jean-Pierre; Boudier, Christian; Mély, Yves; Haacke, Stefan; Léonard, Jérémie

    2014-05-21

    We developed a new experimental approach combining Time-Resolved Fluorescence (TRF) spectroscopy and Droplet Microfluidics (DμF) to investigate the relaxation dynamics of structurally heterogeneous biomolecular systems. Here DμF was used to produce with minimal material consumption an out-of-equilibrium, fluorescently labeled biomolecular complex by rapid mixing within the droplets. TRF detection was implemented with a streak camera to monitor the time evolution of the structural heterogeneity of the complex along its relaxation towards equilibrium while it propagates inside the microfluidic channel. The approach was validated by investigating the fluorescence decay kinetics of a model interacting system of bovine serum albumin and Patent Blue V. Fluorescence decay kinetics are acquired with very good signal-to-noise ratio and allow for global, multicomponent fluorescence decay analysis, evidencing heterogeneous structural relaxation over several 100 ms.

  3. Measurement of the thermopower anisotropy in iron arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, T., E-mail: fujii@crc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Shirachi, T. [Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Asamitsu, A. [Cryogenic Research Center, the University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Department of Applied Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ashikaga Institute of Technology, 268-1 Omae, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • In this study, in order to investigate the origin of the in-plane anisotropy, the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower was measured for the detwined single crystals of BFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. And, we found no anisotropy in the thermopower above T{sub AFO}, although there is a large anisotropy in the resistivity. This result gives evidence that the anisotropy in the resistivity arise from the anisotropy of the scattering time, and the energy dependence of the scattering time can be considered negligible. In the case of iron pnictides, the proposed orbital ordering more likely results in an anisotropy of electronic structure below T{sub AFO}, whereas the spin-nematic ordering leads to an anisotropy of electron scattering above T{sub AFO}. Therefore, our results suggest that nematicity above T{sub AFO} results from anisotropic magnetic scattering. - Abstract: We investigated the in-plane anisotropy of the thermopower and electrical resistivity on detwinned single crystals of BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The in-plane anisotropy of the resistivity was clearly observed far above the magnetostructural transition temperature T{sub AFO}. While, the thermopower showed the in-plane anisotropy only below T{sub AFO}. These results are associated with the different origin of the anisotropy above and below T{sub AFO}. Since the thermopower does not depend on the scattering time, the anisotropy of the resistivity above T{sub AFO} is considered to be due to the anisotropic scattering. On the other hand, the anisotropy in the thermopower below T{sub AFO} is ascribed to the reconstructed Fermi surface.

  4. Shape-induced anisotropy in antiferromagnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    H. Gomonay; Kondovych, S.; Loktev, V.

    2013-01-01

    High fraction of the surface atoms considerably enhances the influence of size and shape on the magnetic and electronic properties of nanoparticles. Shape effects in ferromagnetic nanoparticles are well understood and allow to set and control the parameters of a sample that affect its magnetic anisotropy during production. In the present paper we study the shape effects in the other widely used magnetic materials -- antiferromagnets, -- which possess vanishingly small or zero macroscopic magn...

  5. Pn anisotropy in Mesozoic western Pacific lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Natsumi; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hajewski, Christina J.; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2014-04-01

    Pn is the high-frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within the old oceanic lithosphere. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (150-160 Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment. We use Pn phases from 403 earthquakes during the 1 year of deployment to measure apparent velocities across the arrays. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed near a fast-spreading, ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. Using high-frequency waves (5-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of azimuth. In the western array, we find Pn anisotropy with velocities ranging from ~8.7 km/s in the back azimuth (θ) direction of 310° to ~7.7 km/s at ~350°. In the eastern array, the velocity ranges from ~8.5 km/s in back azimuth direction of ~210° to ~7.7 km/s at 260° and ~310°. We observe rapid velocity changes with azimuth in the both arrays requiring sinusoidal variations of roughly equal amplitude as a function of both 2θ and 4θ, which is not expected for the orthorhombic symmetry of olivine or orthopyroxene. The fastest directions on the two limbs are roughly orthogonal to each other suggesting the dominance of fossil anisotropy, but the fast directions of the 2θ components are skewed counterclockwise from the spreading directions. We speculate that the rapid azimuthal variations may be caused by vertical stratification with changing anisotropy with depth in the oceanic lithosphere.

  6. Random anisotropy induced by structural disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, B.; Labarta, A.; Badia, F.; Tejada, J.

    1992-02-01

    As a direct consequence of the structural disorder, inherent to the amorphous state, local electrostatic fields are highly irregular. Due to the interplay between those highly irregular local electrostatic fields and the aspherical 4f electron clouds of the rare earth atoms, local anisotropy axis, directed along directions that vary randomly in space, may be generated. These directions are determined by the local arrangement of atoms; therefore, some information about amorphous structure may be obtained through the study of the magnetization curve.

  7. Anisotropy of the monomer random walk in a polymer melt: local-order and connectivity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernini, S.; Leporini, D.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk of a bonded monomer in a polymer melt is anisotropic due to local order and bond connectivity. We investigate both effects by molecular-dynamics simulations on melts of fully-flexible linear chains ranging from dimers (M  =  2) up to entangled polymers (M  =  200). The corresponding atomic liquid is also considered a reference system. To disentangle the influence of the local geometry and the bond arrangements, and to reveal their interplay, we define suitable measures of the anisotropy emphasising either the former or the latter aspect. Connectivity anisotropy, as measured by the correlation between the initial bond orientation and the direction of the subsequent monomer displacement, shows a slight enhancement due to the local order at times shorter than the structural relaxation time. At intermediate times—when the monomer displacement is comparable to the bond length—a pronounced peak and then decays slowly as t -1/2, becoming negligible when the displacement is as large as about five bond lengths, i.e. about four monomer diameters or three Kuhn lengths. Local-geometry anisotropy, as measured by the correlation between the initial orientation of a characteristic axis of the Voronoi cell and the subsequent monomer dynamics, is affected at shorter times than the structural relaxation time by the cage shape with antagonistic disturbance by the connectivity. Differently, at longer times, the connectivity favours the persistence of the local-geometry anisotropy, which vanishes when the monomer displacement exceeds the bond length. Our results strongly suggest that the sole consideration of the local order is not enough to understand the microscopic origin of the rattling amplitude of the trapped monomer in the cage of the neighbours.

  8. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  9. Dynamical anisotropy of the optical propagation paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Pisklin, Maksim V.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of laser beam intensity profile spatial modulations over a model tropospheric path with the controlled meteorological parameters was studied. Influence of the underlying surface temperature as well as the side wind load were considered. The increase of dynamic anisotropic disturbances saturation with the path length was observed. Spatio-temporal correlation characteristics of the directivity pattern in the signal beam registration plane were obtained. Proposed method of the experimental samples analysis on the base of chronogram with the following definition of the dynamic structure tensors array allows to estimate local and averaged projections of the flow velocities over the chosen spatio-temporal region and to restore their geometry in the zone of intersection with the signal beam. Additional characteristics suggested for the diagonalized local structure tensors such as local energy capacity and local structuredness are informative for the estimation of the inhomogeneities spatial dimensions, time of access through the section considered, the dynamics of energetic jets. The concepts of rotational and translational dynamic anisotropy are introduced to discriminate the types of the changes of the local ellipsoids axes orientation as well as their values. Rotational anisotropy shows itself in the changes of the local ellipsoids orientation, thus characterizing the illumination variation over the beam cross-section. Translational anisotropy describes the difference between the axes values for local ellipsoids.

  10. Effective surface anisotropy in polycrystalline ferromagnetic nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holanda, J.; Campos, C.L.A.V.; Franca, C.A.; Padrón-Hernández, E., E-mail: padron@df.ufpe.br

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Here we make a mixing of two models. A macroscopic and a microscopic model. • The principal idea in this paper is to write the free magnetic energy for a soft magnetic cylindrical nanowire and make the comparison with our previous models. • The model is tested to determine the effective constant in Ni nanowires. - Abstract: Here we express the effective surface anisotropy for soft ferromagnetic nanowires as the function of the micro-structural behaviors. Many papers about these systems determine the reversal modes for the magnetization to explain magnetic properties of the nanowires. Our previous works related morphological structure with magnetic properties. The principal idea in this paper is to write the free magnetic energy for a soft magnetic cylindrical nanowire and make the comparison with our previous models. In this way we include the macroscopic effective anisotropy due to the disordered atoms and ignoring other microstructure terms related in our previous works. From this idea and our last model to these systems, we made an association that permit to express the effective anisotropy in function of the principal morphological characteristics of nanowires. The model is tested to determine the numerical value of the mentioned constant in Ni nanowires obtained by electrodeposition in porous anodic aluminum oxide membranes using the Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  11. Anisotropy analyses of population distribution patterns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Benyang; YU Shixiao; WANG Yongfan

    2007-01-01

    Direction-dependence,or anisotropy,of spatial distribution patterns of vegetation is rarely explored due to neglect of this ecological phenomenon and the paucity of methods dealing with this issue.This paper proposes a new approach to anisotropy analysis of spatial distribution patterns of plant populations on the basis of the data resampling technique (DRT) combined with Ripley's L index.Using the ArcView Geographic Information System (GIS) platform,a case study was carried out by selecting the population of Pinus massoniana from a needle- and broad-leaved mixed forest community in the Heishiding Nature Reserve,Guangdong Province.Results showed that the spatial pattern of the P massoniana population was typically anisotropic with different patterns in different directions.The DRT was found to be an effective approach to the anisotropy analysis of spatial patterns of plant populations.By employing resampling sub-datasets from the original dataset in different directions,we could overcome the difficulty in the direct use of current non-angular methods of pattern analysis.

  12. Anisotropy of ice Ih: Developement of fabric and effects of anisotropy on deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    The anisotropy arising from preferred crystal orientation of ice I h is examined. To understand plastic anisotropy of polycrystalline materials it is necessary to examine the behavior at the single crystal level. Ice crystals have extremely strong plastic anisotropy that strongly influences the bulk behavior. There are several ways to relate single crystal deformation to the bulk behavior. Two approaches are used here. The first one is to assume a homogeneous stress throughout the bulk, which allows us to derive analytical relations between stress and strain rate. The anisotropy affects the strain rate-stress relationship significantly. For example strongly anisotropic ice, with a vertically symmetric fabric, can deform transversely to the applied stress in pure shear, be nearly undeformable in vertical compression, and shear easily in simple shear. The second approach takes the interaction between neighboring crystals into account, and recrystallization processes are also considered. Comparison of fabric evolution using the model and fabric from the GRIP ice core indicates that nearest neighbor interaction is necessary to explain observations. Quantification of the interaction is complicated by recrystallization processes. A consistent method of characterizing measured fabric is needed to verify models of fabric development. Here the elastic anisotropy of ice plays a central role, and relations between fabric and elastic wave velocities are used to characterize fabric. As always, several other methods are possible, but comparison indicates that sonic measurements give an accurate estimate for deformation effects from vertically symmetric fabric especially in simple shear. The deformation of the borehole at Dye 3, Greenland, has been measured with borehole inclinometry. Sonic velocity measurements done in the borehole allow us to model the deformation using an anisotropic flow law. Anisotropy alone cannot explain all the deformation. The additional processes

  13. Fundamentals of fluorescence and fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, David E

    2013-01-01

    This chapter discusses the fundamental physics of fluorescence. The application of fluorescence to microscopy represents an important transition in the development of microscopy, particularly as it applies to biology. It enables quantitating the amounts of specific molecules within a cell, determining whether molecules are complexing on a molecular level, measuring changes in ionic concentrations within cells and organelles, and measuring molecular dynamics. This chapter also discusses the issues important to quantitative measurement of fluorescence and focuses on four of quantitative measurements of fluorescence--boxcar-gated detection, streak cameras, photon correlation, and phase modulation. Although quantitative measurement presents many pitfalls to the beginner, it also presents significant opportunities to one skilled in the art. This chapter also examines how fluorescence is measured in the steady state and time domain and how fluorescence is applied in the modern epifluorescence microscope.

  14. Is Radioactive Decay Really Exponential?

    CERN Document Server

    Aston, Philip J

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12,550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3,000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in atmospheric levels of 14C. We note that predicted atmospheric variation (assuming exponential decay) does not agree with results from modelling, and that theoretical quantum mechanics does not predict exact exponential decay. We give mathematical arguments that non-exponential decay should be expected for slowly decaying isotopes and explore the consequences of non-exponential decay. We propose an experimental test of this prediction of non-exponential decay for 14C. If confirmed, a foundation stone of current dating meth...

  15. Hadronic Decays of Charm

    CERN Document Server

    Stenson, K

    2002-01-01

    Recent hadronic charm decay results from fixed-target experiments are presented. New measurements of the D0 to K-K+K-pi+ branching ratio are shown as are recent results from Dalitz plot fits to D+ to K-K+pi+, pi+pi-pi+, K-pi+pi+, K+pi-pi+ and D_s+ to pi+pi-pi+, K+pi-pi+. These fits include measurements of the masses and widths of several light resonances as well as strong evidence for the existence of two light scalar particles, the pipi resonance sigma and the Kpi resonance kappa.

  16. Rare B Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, P.D.; /Victoria U.

    2006-02-24

    Recent results from Belle and BaBar on rare B decays involving flavor-changing neutral currents or purely leptonic final states are presented. Measurements of the CP asymmetries in B {yields} K*{gamma} and b {yields} s{gamma} are reported. Also reported are updated limits on B{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}, B{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu} and the recent measurement of B {yields} X{sub s}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}.

  17. Optical anisotropy in packed isotropic spherical particles: indication of nanometer scale anisotropy in packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the origin of birefringence in colloidal films of spherical silica particles. Although each particle is optically isotropic in shape, colloidal films formed by drop drying demonstrated birefringence. While periodic particle structures were observed in silica colloidal films, no regular pattern was found in blended films of silica and latex particles. However, since both films showed birefringence, regular film structure patterns were not required to exhibit birefringence. Instead, we propose that nanometer-scale film structure anisotropy causes birefringence. Due to capillary flow from the center to the edge of a cast suspension, particles are more tightly packed in the radial direction. Directional packing results in nanometer-scale anisotropy. The difference in the interparticle distance between radial and circumferential axes was estimated to be 10 nm at most. Nanometer-scale anisotropy in colloidal films and the subsequent optical properties are discussed.

  18. Fabrication of electrodeposited Co nanowire arrays with perpendicular anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge Shihui E-mail: zhangzz@lzu.edu.cn; Ma Xiao; Li Chao; Li Wei

    2001-05-01

    Co nanowire arrays have been electrodeposited into polycarbonate membranes with nanosized pores at different voltages. By means of X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, their microstructures and magnetic properties were investigated at full length. The sample prepared at -1.2 V, 250 mA/cm{sup 2} shows perpendicular anisotropy, but the one deposited at -1.0V, 125 mA/cm{sup 2} has no perpendicular anisotropy. This different magnetic behavior can be explained from their different microstructures. X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction evidence that the former sample is amorphous, and the latter is polycrystalline. In the polycrystalline sample, due to the competition of shape anisotropy and magnetocrystal anisotropy, the sample does not display perpendicular anisotropy. But magnetocrystal anisotropy is very small in amorphous sample, therefore, shape anisotropy plays a dominant role which leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy because of shape anisotropy. Furthermore, applying a magnetic field during deposition, Co grains will preferentially grow with c-axis along the wire axis, which also leads to strong perpendicular anisotropy.

  19. Biological applications of confocal fluorescence polarization microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Chad E.

    Fluorescence polarization microscopy is a powerful modality capable of sensing changes in the physical properties and local environment of fluorophores. In this thesis we present new applications for the technique in cancer diagnosis and treatment and explore the limits of the modality in scattering media. We describe modifications to our custom-built confocal fluorescence microscope that enable dual-color imaging, optical fiber-based confocal spectroscopy and fluorescence polarization imaging. Experiments are presented that indicate the performance of the instrument for all three modalities. The limits of confocal fluorescence polarization imaging in scattering media are explored and the microscope parameters necessary for accurate polarization images in this regime are determined. A Monte Carlo routine is developed to model the effect of scattering on images. Included in it are routines to track the polarization state of light using the Mueller-Stokes formalism and a model for fluorescence generation that includes sampling the excitation light polarization ellipse, Brownian motion of excited-state fluorophores in solution, and dipole fluorophore emission. Results from this model are compared to experiments performed on a fluorophore-embedded polymer rod in a turbid medium consisting of polystyrene microspheres in aqueous suspension. We demonstrate the utility of the fluorescence polarization imaging technique for removal of contaminating autofluorescence and for imaging photodynamic therapy drugs in cell monolayers. Images of cells expressing green fluorescent protein are extracted from contaminating fluorescein emission. The distribution of meta-tetrahydroxypheny1chlorin in an EMT6 cell monolayer is also presented. A new technique for imaging enzyme activity is presented that is based on observing changes in the anisotropy of fluorescently-labeled substrates. Proof-of-principle studies are performed in a model system consisting of fluorescently labeled bovine

  20. Investigation of high-contrast velocity selective optical pumping resonance at the cycling transition of Cs using fluorescence technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Saswati; Ray, Biswajit; Ghosh, Pradip Narayan; Cartaleva, Stefka; Slavov, Dimitar

    2015-12-01

    A high contrast (∼48%) Velocity Selective Optical Pumping (VSOP) resonance at the closed transition Fg=4→Fe=5 of Cs-D2 line is obtained in the fluorescence signal under co-propagating pump-probe configuration. We use a 5.2 μm cell operating at reduced temperature (∼55 °C) and the intensity of the pump-laser is kept lower than that of the probe-laser. The observed sharp narrow structure is suitable for side-arms frequency-locking of the cooling- (i.e. probe-) laser in a cold atom experiment, with possibility for "-Γ" to "-4Γ" red-detuning and "+Γ" to "+10Γ" blue-detuning using the standard properties of the commercially available electronics. We have developed a theoretical model corresponding to the thin cell, incorporating the atomic time-of-flight dependent optical pumping decay rate to describe the dimensional anisotropy of the thin cell. The model shows good qualitative agreement with the observation and simulates as well the cases of cells with smaller thickness. It also describes correctly the temperature dependence of the line broadening and shows the potential for further optimization and red-shift detuning above "-4Γ". It may be of interest for further development of miniaturized modules, like the recently developed portable small magneto-optical traps.

  1. Optical spectroscopy of a highly fluorescent aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Cheng, P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c and a similar model compound, Mg-methyl bacteriopheophorbide d, form several types of aggregates in nonpolar solvents. One of these aggregates is highly fluorescent, with a quantum yield higher than that of the monomer. This aggregate is also unusual in that it shows a rise time in its fluorescence emission decay at certain wavelengths, which is ascribed to a change in conformation of the aggregate. An analysis of fluorescence depolarization data is consistent with either a linear aggregate of four or five monomers or preferably a cyclic arrangement of three dimers.

  2. Finding of Optimal Calcium Ion Probes for Fluorescence Lifetime Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiki, Keisuke; Azuma, Hiroki; Yoshioka, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Araki, Tsutomu

    We have investigated the fluorescence lifetime properties of 8 calcium ion probes, calcium-green-1, calcium green-2, calcium green-5N, calcium orange, oregon green 488 BAPTA-6F, fluo-3, fluo-4, and fluo-5N. We found that the decay time of calcium green-5N varied more sensitively with calcium concentration than calcium green-1 which was known to be a highly sensitive probe. We have also found that the center of observable range of calcium concentration by fluorescence lifetime measurement is lower than that by fluorescence intensity measurement.

  3. The nature of multiphoton fluorescence from red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saytashev, Ilyas; Murphy, Michael; Osseiran, Sam; Spence, Dana M.; Evans, Conor L.; Dantus, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    We report on the nature of multiphoton excited fluorescence observed from human erythrocytes (red blood cells RBC's) and their "ghosts" following 800nm sub-15 fs excitation. The detected optical signal is assigned as two-photon excited fluorescence from hemoglobin. Our findings are supported by wavelength-resolved fluorescence lifetime decay measurements using time-correlated single photon counting system from RBC's, their ghosts as well as in vitro samples of various fluorophores including riboflavin, NADH, NAD(P)H, hemoglobin. We find that low-energy and short-duration pulses allow two-photon imaging of RBC's, but longer more intense pulses lead to their destruction.

  4. Higgs decay to fermions (CMS)

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    A search for high mass Higgs boson of the MSSM decaying into two fermions using the first 2015 data at 13 TeV is presented. The four final decay channels of mu \\tau_h, e \\tau_h, \\tau_h \\tau_h and e mu is used. The limits on production cross section times branching ratio has been set.Other results from Run1 and different searches and measurements involving Higgs decays fermions will also be reviewed.

  5. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    OpenAIRE

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling $\\Gamma\\sim\\Gamma_{CDL}^{2}$, where $\\Gamma_{CDL}$ is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable i...

  6. Reviews in fluorescence 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2011-01-01

    ""Reviews in Fluorescence 2010"", the seventh volume of the book serial from Springer, serves as a comprehensive collection of current trends and emerging hot topics in the field of fluorescence and closely related disciplines. It summarizes the year's progress in fluorescence and its applications, with authoritative analytical reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. ""Reviews in Fluorescence"" offers an essential reference material for any lab working in the fluoresc

  7. Principles of fluorescence techniques

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence techniques are being used and applied increasingly in academics and industry. The Principles of Fluorescence Techniques course will outline the basic concepts of fluorescence techniques and the successful utilization of the currently available commercial instrumentation. The course is designed for students who utilize fluorescence techniques and instrumentation and for researchers and industrial scientists who wish to deepen their knowledge of fluorescence applications. Key scientists in the field will deliver theoretical lectures. The lectures will be complemented by the direct utilization of steady-state and lifetime fluorescence instrumentation and confocal microscopy for FLIM and FRET applications provided by leading companies.

  8. Competing magnetic anisotropies in obliquely deposited thin permalloy film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, B.A. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, 31, pr. Imeni Gazety “Krasnoyarskii Rabochii”, Krasnoyarsk 660014 (Russian Federation); Izotov, A.V. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Solovev, P.N., E-mail: platon.solovev@gmail.com [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Distribution of the magnetic anisotropy in thin film prepared by thermal vacuum oblique deposition of permalloy with small off-normal angle of incident in the presence of an external magnetic field has been studied by ferromagnetic resonance technique. On local area of the sample, a mutual compensation of near orthogonal in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropies induced by oblique deposition and by applied magnetic field has been found. Moreover, in addition to the uniaxial (twofold) magnetic anisotropy, fourfold and sixfold magnetic anisotropies have been observed in the sample. To explain the obtained high-order anisotropies, we assumed that the sample has exchange coupled adjacent regions or phases with different parameters of magnetic anisotropy. The results of the micromagnetic analysis of a two-layer model of the sample confirm the hypothesis.

  9. Extending Velocity Channel Analysis for Studying Turbulence Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Kandel, Dinesh; Pogosyan, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the fluctuations in the velocity slices of Position-Position- Velocity (PPV) spectroscopic data from Doppler broadened lines, i.e. Velocity Channel Analysis (VCA) introduced by Lazarian & Pogosyan (2000), to study anisotropy of the underlying velocity and density turbulence statistics that arises from the presence of magnetic field. In particular, we study analytically how the measurable anisotropy of the statistics of the channel map fluctuations changes with the thickness of velocity channels. In agreement with the earlier VCA studies we find that the anisotropy of the thick channels reflects the anisotropy of the density field, while the relative contribution of density and velocity fluctuations to the thin velocity channels depends on the density spectral slope. We show that the anisotropies arising from Alfven, slow and fast modes are different, in particular, the anisotropy in PPV created by fast modes is opposite to that created by Alfven and slow modes and this can be use...

  10. Plasmonic Molecular Nanohybrids—Spectral Dependence of Fluorescence Quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Olejnik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate strong spectral dependence of the efficiency of fluorescence quenching in molecular systems composed of organic dyes and gold nanoparticles. In order to probe the coupling with metallic nanoparticles we use dyes with varied spectral overlap between the plasmon resonance and their absorption. Hybrid molecular structures were obtained via conjugation of metallic nanoparticles with the dyes using biotin-streptavidin linkage. For dyes featuring absorption above the plasmon excitation in gold nanoparticles, laser excitation induces minute changes in the fluorescence intensity and its lifetime for both conjugated and non-conjugated mixtures, which are the reference. In contrast, when the absorption of the dye overlaps with the plasmon resonance, the effect is quite dramatic, reaching 85% and 95% fluorescence quenching for non-conjugated and conjugated mixtures, respectively. The degree of fluorescence quenching strongly depends upon the concentration of metallic nanoparticles. Importantly, the origin of the fluorescence quenching is different in the case of the conjugated mixture, as evidenced by time-resolved fluorescence. For conjugated mixtures of dyes resonant with plasmon, excitation features two-exponential decay. This is in contrast to the single exponential decay measured for the off-resonant configuration. The results provide valuable insight into spectral dependence of the fluorescence quenching in molecular assemblies involving organic dyes and metallic nanoparticles.

  11. CMB Spectral Distortions from the Scattering of Temperature Anisotropies

    OpenAIRE

    Stebbins, Albert

    2007-01-01

    Thomson scattering of CMBR temperature anisotropies will cause the spectrum of the CMBR to differ from blackbody even when one resolves all anisotropies. A formalism for computing the anisotropic and inhomogeneous spectral distortions of intensity and polarization is derived in terms of Lorentz invariant central moments of the temperature distribution. The formalism is non-perturbative, requiring neither small anisotropies nor small metric or matter inhomogeneities; but it does assume cold el...

  12. Programming magnetic anisotropy in polymeric microactuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiyun; Chung, Su Eun; Choi, Sung-Eun; Lee, Howon; Kim, Junhoi; Kwon, Sunghoon

    2011-10-01

    Polymeric microcomponents are widely used in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and lab-on-a-chip devices, but they suffer from the lack of complex motion, effective addressability and precise shape control. To address these needs, we fabricated polymeric nanocomposite microactuators driven by programmable heterogeneous magnetic anisotropy. Spatially modulated photopatterning was applied in a shape-independent manner to microactuator components by successive confinement of self-assembled magnetic nanoparticles in a fixed polymer matrix. By freely programming the rotational axis of each component, we demonstrate that the polymeric microactuators can undergo predesigned, complex two- and three-dimensional motion.

  13. Cosmology with cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarun Sourdeep

    2006-10-01

    Measurements of CMB anisotropy and, more recently, polarization have played a very important role in allowing precise determination of various parameters of the `standard' cosmological model. The expectation of the paradigm of inflation and the generic prediction of the simplest realization of inflationary scenario in the early Universe have also been established - `acausally' correlated initial perturbations in a flat, statistically isotropic Universe, adiabatic nature of primordial density perturbations. Direct evidence for gravitational instability mechanism for structure formation from primordial perturbations has been established. In the next decade, future experiments promise to strengthen these deductions and uncover the remaining crucial signature of inflation - the primordial gravitational wave background.

  14. Adsorbate Azimuthal Orientation from Reflectance Anisotropy Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, B. G.; Power, J. R.; Cole, R. J.; Perry, C. C.; Chen, Q.; Haq, S.; Bertrams, Th.; Richardson, N. V.; Weightman, P.

    1998-05-01

    We have determined the azimuthal orientation of an adsorbate on a metal surface from an intramolecular-transition-derived feature in reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy (RAS). Adsorption of 9-anthracene carboxylic acid onto p\\(2×1\\)O/Cu110 led to an ordered structure with a strong (2%), derivativelike feature at 4.5 eV. Fresnel theory predicts the measured intensity, functional behavior, and sense of the RAS signal for the molecule aligned along [110]. IR measurements confirm that the molecular plane is perpendicular to the surface and STM measurements support the azimuthal orientation. We reassign the sense of the clean Cu(110) surface RA spectrum.

  15. Altered Fractional Anisotropy in Early Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silky Singh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Huntington's disease (HD is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease best known for chorea. The disorder includes numerous other clinical features including mood disorder, eye movement abnormalities, cognitive disturbance, pendular knee reflexes, motor impersistence, and postural instability. We describe a mild case of HD early in the disease course with depression and subtle neurological manifestations. In addition, we review MRI and diffusion tensor imaging features in this patient. The bicaudate ratio, a measure of caudate atrophy, was increased. Fractional anisotropy values of the bilateral caudate and putamen were increased, signifying neurodegeneration of these structures in HD.

  16. Theoretical Compton profile anisotropies in molecules and solids. VI. Compton profile anisotropies and chemical binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matcha, R.L.; Pettitt, B.M.

    1979-03-15

    An interesting empirical relationship between zero point Compton profile anisotropies ..delta..J (0) and nuclear charges is noted. It is shown that, for alkali halide molecules AB, to a good approximation ..delta..J (0) =N ln(Z/sub b//Z/sub a/).

  17. A Complete Treatment of CMB Anisotropies in a FRW Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; White, M; Zaldarriaga, M; Hu, Wayne; Seljak, Uros; White, Martin; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the total angular momentum method for computing Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies to Friedman-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spaces with arbitrary geometries. This unifies the treatment of temperature and polarization anisotropies generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations of the fluid, seed, or a scalar field, in a universe with constant comoving curvature. The resulting formalism generalizes and simplifies the calculation of anisotropies and, in its integral form, allows for a fast calculation of model predictions in linear theory for any FRW metric. With this work, the perturbation theory of CMB temperature and polarization anisotropy formation through gravitational instability in an FRW universe may be considered complete.

  18. Computing magnetic anisotropy constants of single molecule magnets

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramasesha; Shaon Sahoo; Rajamani Raghunathan; Diptiman Sen

    2009-09-01

    We present here a theoretical approach to compute the molecular magnetic anisotropy parameters, and for single molecule magnets in any given spin eigenstate of exchange spin Hamiltonian. We first describe a hybrid constant -valence bond (VB) technique of solving spin Hamiltonians employing full spatial and spin symmetry adaptation and we illustrate this technique by solving the exchange Hamiltonian of the Cu6Fe8 system. Treating the anisotropy Hamiltonian as perturbation, we compute the and values for various eigenstates of the exchange Hamiltonian. Since, the dipolar contribution to the magnetic anisotropy is negligibly small, we calculate the molecular anisotropy from the single-ion anisotropies of the metal centers. We have studied the variation of and by rotating the single-ion anisotropies in the case of Mn12Ac and Fe8 SMMs in ground and few low-lying excited states of the exchange Hamiltonian. In both the systems, we find that the molecular anisotropy changes drastically when the single-ion anisotropies are rotated. While in Mn12Ac SMM values depend strongly on the spin of the eigenstate, it is almost independent of the spin of the eigenstate in Fe8 SMM. We also find that the value is almost insensitive to the orientation of the anisotropy of the core Mn(IV) ions. The dependence of on the energy gap between the ground and the excited states in both the systems has also been studied by using different sets of exchange constants.

  19. Effects of anisotropy on the two-dimensional inversion procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, Wiebke; Pous, Jaume

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we show some of the effects that appear in magnetotelluric measurements over 2-D anisotropic structures, and propose a procedure to recover the anisotropy using 2-D inversion algorithms for isotropic models. First, we see how anisotropy affects the usual interpretation steps: dimensionality analysis and 2-D inversion. Two models containing general 2-D azimuthal anisotropic features were chosen to illustrate this approach: an anisotropic block and an anisotropic layer, both forming part of general 2-D models. In addition, a third model with dipping anisotropy was studied. For each model we examined the influence of various anisotropy strikes and resistivity contrasts on the dimensionality analysis and on the behaviour of the induction arrows. We found that, when the anisotropy ratio is higher than five, even if the strike is frequency-dependent it is possible to decide on a direction close to the direction of anisotropy. Then, if the data are rotated to this angle, a 2-D inversion reproduces the anisotropy reasonably well by means of macro-anisotropy. This strategy was tested on field data where anisotropy had been previously recognized.

  20. The study of the shape anisotropy in patterned permalloy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Dong; Zhai Ya; Zhai Hong-Ru

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a systematic ferromagnetic resonance study shows that an in-plane magnetic anisotropy in the patterned micron octagon permalloy (Ni80Fe20) elements is mainly determined by the element geometry. The easy-axis is along the edge of the elements, and the hard-axis is along the diagonal. The shape anisotropy of the octagon elements is determined by square and equilateral octagon, and the theoretical calculation was studied on the shape anisotropy. The shape anisotropy of rectangular was calculated by using the same theory.

  1. Fluorescence lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystals and organic labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabolle, Markus; Kapusta, Peter; Nann, Thomas; Shu, Xu; Ziegler, Jan; Resch-Genger, Ute

    2009-09-15

    The potential of semiconducting nanocrystals or so-called quantum dots (QDs) for lifetime multiplexing has not been investigated yet, despite the increasing use of QDs in (bio)analytical detection, biosensing, and fluorescence imaging and the obvious need for simple and cost-effective tools and strategies for the simultaneous detection of multiple analytes or events. This is most likely related to their multiexponential decay behavior as for multiplex chromophores, typically monoexponential decay kinetics are requested. The fluorescence decay kinetics of various mixtures of a long-lived, multiexponentially decaying CdSe QD and a short-lived organic dye were analyzed, and a model was developed for the quantification of these labels from the measured complex decay kinetics as a first proof-of-concept for the huge potential of these labels for lifetime multiplexing. In a second step, we evaluated the potential of mixtures of two types of QDs, varying in constituent material to realize distinguishable, yet multiexponential decay kinetics and similar absorption and emission spectra. Strategies for lifetime multiplexing with nanocrystalline labels were derived on the basis of these measurements.

  2. Signatures of statistical decay

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, D; Bowman, D R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Hagberg, E; Laforest, R; Pouliot, J; Walker, R B; Horn, D; Bowman, D R; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Hagberg, E; Laforest, R; Pouliot, J; Walker, R B

    1995-01-01

    The partition of decay energy between the kinetic energy of reaction products and their Q-value of formation is obtained in a statistical derivation appropriate to highly excited nuclei, and is shown to be in a constant ratio. We measure the kinetic energy fraction, R = \\Sigma E_{kin}/(\\Sigma E_{kin} + \\Sigma Q_0), over a wide range of excitation energy for well-defined systems formed in the Cl + C reaction at 35A MeV. Relationships between excitation energy, charged-particle multiplicity, and intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity, observed in this work and in recent experiments by a number of other groups, follow from the derivation of the average kinetic energies and Q-values.

  3. U(IV) fluorescence spectroscopy. A new speciation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Susanne; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    We combined absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to study the speciation of U(IV) in solution in concentrations down to 10{sup -6} M uranium. With our time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence setup we could determine the fluorescence decay time of U(IV) in perchloric as well as in chloric acid with 2.6 ± 0.3 ns at room temperature and 148.4 ± 6.5 ns at liquid nitrogen temperature. For the U(IV) sulfate system, we observed a bathochromic shift and a peak shape modification in the fluorescence spectra with increasing sulfate concentration in solution. Thus, the potential of U(IV) fluorescence for speciation analysis could be proven.

  4. Laser induced fluorescence photobleaching anemometer for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G R

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a novel, non-intrusive fluid velocity measurement method based on photobleaching of a fluorescent dye for microfluidic devices. The residence time of the fluorescent dye in a laser beam depends on the flow velocity and approximately corresponds to the decaying time of the photobleaching of the dye in the laser beam. The residence time is inversely proportional to the flow velocity. The fluorescence intensity increases with the flow velocity due to the decrease of the residence time. A calibration curve between fluorescence intensity and known flow velocity should be obtained first. The calibration relationship is then used to calculate the flow velocity directly from the measured fluorescence intensity signal. The new method can measure the velocity very quickly and is easy to use. It is demonstrated for both pressure driven flow and electroosmotic flow.

  5. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Verveer, P.J.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy techniques allow the quantification of fluorescent molecules present at the nanomolar concentration level. After a brief introduction to the technique, this chapter presents a protocol including background information in order to measure and quantify the molecul

  6. Gelation in free-radical crosslinking copolymerization; fast transient fluorescence study

    OpenAIRE

    Ö. Pekcan; D. Kaya

    2002-01-01

    The fast transient fluorescence (FTRF) technique was used to study the sol-gel phase transition in free-radical crosslinking copolymerization (FCC) in two different monomeric systems. Pyrene (Py) was used as a fluorescence probe for the in situ polymerization experiments. The fluorescence lifetimes of Py from its decay traces were measured and used to monitor the gelation process. Monomer consumption profiles were determined during gelation process using Stern-Volmer model. Gelations...

  7. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  8. Scattered and Fluorescent Photon Track Reconstruction in a Biological Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria N. Kholodtsova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate analysis of biological tissue deep regions is important for tumor targeting. This paper is concentrated on photons’ paths analysis in such biotissue as brain, because optical probing depth of fluorescent and excitation radiation differs. A method for photon track reconstruction was developed. Images were captured focusing on the transparent wall close and parallel to the source fibres, placed in brain tissue phantoms. The images were processed to reconstruct the photons most probable paths between two fibres. Results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations and diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation. It was shown that the excitation radiation optical probing depth is twice more than for the fluorescent photons. The way of fluorescent radiation spreading was discussed. Because of fluorescent and excitation radiation spreads in different ways, and the effective anisotropy factor, geff, was proposed for fluorescent radiation. For the brain tissue phantoms it were found to be 0.62±0.05 and 0.66±0.05 for the irradiation wavelengths 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. These calculations give more accurate information about the tumor location in biotissue. Reconstruction of photon paths allows fluorescent and excitation probing depths determination. The geff can be used as simplified parameter for calculations of fluorescence probing depth.

  9. Steady state anisotropy two-photon microscopy resolves multiple, spectrally similar fluorophores, enabling in vivo multilabel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubach, J Matthew; Vinegoni, Claudio; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-08-01

    The use of spectrally distinguishable fluorescent dyes enables imaging of multiple targets. However, in two-photon microscopy, the number of fluorescent labels with distinct emission spectra that can be effectively excited and resolved is constrained by the confined tuning range of the excitation laser and the broad and overlapping nature of fluorophore two-photon absorption spectra. This limitation effectively reduces the number of available imaging channels. Here, we demonstrate that two-photon steady state anisotropy imaging (2PSSA) offers the capability to resolve otherwise unresolvable fluorescent tracers both in live cells and in mouse tumor models. This approach expands the number of biological targets that can be imaged simultaneously, increasing the total amount of information that can be obtained through imaging.

  10. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  11. Anisotropy and Heterogeneity Interaction in Shear Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, M.; Schmid, D. W.

    2009-04-01

    Rocks are heterogeneous on many different scales and deformation may introduce a coexistence of heterogeneity and anisotropy in shear zones. A competent inclusion embedded in a laminated matrix is a typical example. Indisputably, the presence of a mechanical heterogeneity leads to a flow perturbation and consequently to a deflection of the lamination in its vicinity. Assuming a passive response of the matrix phase, the pattern formation around rigid objects has been modeled in two and three dimensions using analytical solutions. Yet, the laminas may be mechanically distinct, leading to an effectively anisotropic rheology of the matrix. The feedback of an evolving matrix structure on the inclusion motion cannot be precluded in this case. In our study elliptical inclusions of varying aspect ratios are embedded in a laminated linear viscous host and subject to a large simple shear deformation in finite element numerical simulations. Increasing the viscosity ratio of the weak and strong lamina significantly changes the pattern characteristics in the matrix. The structural evolution around an inclusion proves to have a major impact on the inclusion motion, leading to the stabilization of elongated inclusions at antithetic orientations. We provide a comparison of two different modeling approaches. In the first approach discrete layers are introduced in the matrix and the large strain evolution of individual minute layers is resolved. Next, the matrix is modeled as an anisotropic medium using an evolving director field that locally describes the anisotropy direction. The length scale of layering can be restored in this model using the micropolar medium formulation.

  12. Random magnetic anisotropy: Switching and coercivity behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, A.; Paul, D. I.

    1990-05-01

    Starting from a Hamiltonian based on the random magnetic anisotropy model to describe the magnetic characteristics of amorphous materials such as TbFe2, we determine the low-temperature dependence of the coercivity as well as the magnetization dynamics of these materials. Our model features clusters, each characterized by its anisotropy direction. The exchange energy term entering the Hamiltonian is represented by an effective exchange interaction acting in the intercluster regions. Our Hamiltonian has a minimum in each of the two opposite hemispheres defined by the applied field. We derive the temperature-dependent coercivity by calculating the field necessary to have the one metastable minimum disappear. Our results agree well with experimental data for reasonable values of the parameters. We study the dynamics of the magnetization at 0 K by performing a numerical integration of the equations of motion derived from our Hamiltonian augmented by a Gilbert and Kelly damping term. The average magnetization of the material is reevaluated at each integration step in order for the mean-field approximation for exchange to remain physically meaningful. We obtain the time dependence of the magnetization, determine the switching fields and switching times, and study the influence of the exchange on the results.

  13. A fully covariant description of CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, P K S

    1997-01-01

    Starting from the exact non-linear description of matter and radiation, a fully covariant and gauge-invariant formula for the observed temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CBR) radiation, expressed in terms of the electric ($E_{ab}$) and magnetic ($H_{ab}$) parts of the Weyl tensor, is obtained by integrating photon geodesics from last scattering to the point of observation today. This improves and extends earlier work by Russ et al where a similar formula was obtained by taking first order variations of the redshift. In the case of scalar (density) perturbations, $E_{ab}$ is related to the harmonic components of the gravitational potential $\\Phi_k$ and the usual dominant Sachs-Wolfe contribution $\\delta T_R/\\bar{T}_R\\sim\\Phi_k$ to the temperature anisotropy is recovered, together with contributions due to the time variation of the potential (Rees-Sciama effect), entropy and velocity perturbations at last scattering and a pressure suppression term important in low density universes. We a...

  14. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Arroja, Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by $P_h({\\bf k}) = P_h^{(0)}(k) [ 1 + \\sum_{LM} f_L(k) g_{LM} Y_{LM} (\\hat{\\bf k}) ]$, where $P_h^{(0)}(k)$ is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with $f_0(k) = f_2(k) \\propto k^{-2}$ are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 2$ in $TT$, $TE$, $EE$ and $BB$, and $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 1$ in $TB$ and $EB$. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic varian...

  15. Anisotropy in thin Canning sheet metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, D. W. A.

    2003-03-01

    The in-plane anisotropy of ductile sheet metal may be characterised by r-values within a uniform tensile strain range. In iow ductiiity material, tensile failure occurs by the formation of an inciined groove within which the plasticity is localised. Under these conditions, where lateral and axial displacements cannot determine an r-value reliably, the inclination of the local groove is used. Anisotropy is characterised from an orthotropic yield criterion within three r-values, found from tension tests at 0^{circ}, 45^{circ} and 90^{circ} to the roll. Application to bi-axial stress states are made from elliptical bulge forming. The theory may reprcduce the pressure-height curves and pole strain paths provided an equivalence exists between flow curves from tension and bulge tests. Otherwise, the circular bulge test is better for providing the hardening parameters and fracture strain for use in in biaxial stress applications. There appears to be no advantage in using other non-quadratic yield criteria except by the addition of linear and cubic terms.

  16. Anisotropy Studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, E M

    2009-01-01

    An anisotropy signal for the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) of more than 99% confidence level was established using data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory. Cosmic rays with energy above $\\sim 6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV show a correlation with the positions of extragalactic nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), being maximum for sources at less than $\\sim$100 Mpc and angular separation of a few degrees. The evolution of the correlation signal with the energy shows that the departure from anisotropy coincides with the flux suppression observed in the spectrum, being therefore consistent with the hypothesis that the correlated events have their origin in extragalactic sources close enough to avoid significant interaction with the cosmic microwave background (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect). Even though the observed signal cannot unambiguously identify AGNs as the production sites of UHECRs, the potential sources have to be distributed in a similar way. A number of additional st...

  17. The nature versus nurture of anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W

    1994-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of cosmic microwave background measurements on various scales, there is real hope that the number of acceptable models for structure formation will be limited to a very few in the near future. Yet any given model can always be saved by introducing and tuning extraneous free parameters. To better understand this question of ``nature versus nurture'' for temperature fluctuations, it is useful to know not only the general features of anisotropy predictions but also their causes. Extracting the physical content of our other works, we present here a {\\it simple} account of cosmic microwave background anisotropies on all scales. In particular, we show that analytic approximations can trace the structure of the so-called ``Doppler peaks,'' which arise due to the {\\it adiabatic} oscillations in the photon-baryon fluid. We also show how the finite thickness of the last scattering surface and the Silk damping mechanism can be described in a unified way by photon diffusion. In order to pr...

  18. Texture and anisotropy analysis of Qusaiba shales

    KAUST Repository

    Kanitpanyacharoen, Waruntorn

    2011-02-17

    Scanning and transmission electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, microtomography and ultrasonic velocity measurements were used to characterize microstructures and anisotropy of three deeply buried Qusaiba shales from the Rub\\'al-Khali basin, Saudi Arabia. Kaolinite, illite-smectite, illite-mica and chlorite show strong preferred orientation with (001) pole figure maxima perpendicular to the bedding plane ranging from 2.4-6.8 multiples of a random distribution (m.r.d.). Quartz, feldspars and pyrite crystals have a random orientation distribution. Elastic properties of the polyphase aggregate are calculated by averaging the single crystal elastic properties over the orientation distribution, assuming a nonporous material. The average calculated bulk P-wave velocities are 6.2 km/s (maximum) and 5.5 km/s (minimum), resulting in a P-wave anisotropy of 12%. The calculated velocities are compared with those determined from ultrasonic velocity measurements on a similar sample. In the ultrasonic experiment, which measures the effects of the shale matrix as well as the effects of porosity, velocities are smaller (P-wave maximum 5.3 km/s and minimum 4.1 km/s). The difference between calculated and measured velocities is attributed to the effects of anisotropic pore structure and to microfractures present in the sample, which have not been taken into account in the matrix averaging. © 2011 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  19. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  20. Anisotropy and Crystalline Structure in Polyaniline Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minto, C. D. G.; Vaughan, A. S.

    1996-03-01

    Films of polyaniline -- camphor sulphonic acid cast from m-cresol exhibit transport properties characteristic of a material stradelling the metal/insulator transition. This improvement in properties over traditional methods of polyaniline production has been suggested as being caused by the macromolecule adopting an expanded coil configuration in this solvent. Such films have been shown to be semi--crystalline and are presumed to be completely isotropic. We present here new results which demonstrate that such films are in fact appreciably aligned. X-ray scattering is utilised to expose the presence of molecular anisotropy within such films, the polymers forming a stacked structure with the molecules preferentially oriented parallel to the plane of the film. Similar measurements confirm that the molecules are randomly oriented within this plane. Such alignment considerably improves the transport properties. Anisotropy and the crystalline structure within these films, those cast from chloroform and those using the isolated enantiomeric counter ion are quantified and discussed. The results demonstrate that improved transport properties have arisen as a result of both polymer--solvent interactions and as a result of improved chain alignment.

  1. Scanning anisotropy parameters in complex media

    KAUST Repository

    Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2011-03-21

    Parameter estimation in an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium offers many challenges; chief among them is the trade-off between inhomogeneity and anisotropy. It is especially hard to estimate the anisotropy anellipticity parameter η in complex media. Using perturbation theory and Taylor’s series, I have expanded the solutions of the anisotropic eikonal equation for transversely isotropic (TI) media with a vertical symmetry axis (VTI) in terms of the independent parameter η from a generally inhomogeneous elliptically anisotropic medium background. This new VTI traveltime solution is based on a set of precomputed perturbations extracted from solving linear partial differential equations. The traveltimes obtained from these equations serve as the coefficients of a Taylor-type expansion of the total traveltime in terms of η. Shanks transform is used to predict the transient behavior of the expansion and improve its accuracy using fewer terms. A homogeneous medium simplification of the expansion provides classical nonhyperbolic moveout descriptions of the traveltime that are more accurate than other recently derived approximations. In addition, this formulation provides a tool to scan for anisotropic parameters in a generally inhomogeneous medium background. A Marmousi test demonstrates the accuracy of this approximation. For a tilted axis of symmetry, the equations are still applicable with a slightly more complicated framework because the vertical velocity and δ are not readily available from the data.

  2. UA1: W particle decay

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    This image of the UA1 central detector shows the real tracks left by decay products of a W into a tau and a tau-neutrino. The tau decays into charged particles, as seen by the isolated pencil-jet in the central detector. The UA1 detector ran on the SPS accelerator at CERN between 1981 and 1993.

  3. Strong decays of qqq baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R; Leviatan, A

    1997-01-01

    We study strong decays of nonstrange baryons by making use of the algebraic approach to hadron structure. Within this framework we derive closed expressions for decay widths in an elementary-meson emission model and use these to analyze the experimental data for $N^* \\rightarrow N + \\pi$, $N^* + \\pi$, $\\Delta^* \\rightarrow \\Delta + \\pi$ and $\\Delta^* \\rightarrow \\Delta +

  4. CP violation in kaon decays

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, G

    1996-01-01

    We review the Standard Model predictions of CP violation in kaon decays. We present an elementary introduction to Chiral Perturbation Theory, four--quark effective hamiltonians and the relation among them. Particular attention is devoted to $K\\to 3\\pi$, $K\\to 2\\pi \\gamma$ and $K\\to \\pi \\bar{f} f$ decays.

  5. Welding the CNGS decay tube

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    3.6 km of welds were required for the 1 km long CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) decay tube, in which particles produced in the collision with a proton and a graphite target will decay into muons and muon neutrinos. Four highly skilled welders performed this delicate task.

  6. Beauty hadron decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In these proceedings, I will report the recent results on properties, production and decays of beauty baryons, as well as measurements of B + c meson decays, based on data collected by the LHCb collaboration at the LHC collider in 2011–2012.

  7. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  8. Instantons and nonleptonic hyperon decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvat, D.; Narancic, Z. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Electrical Engineering, University of Zagreb, 41000 Zagreb (Croatia); Tadic, D. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Zagreb, 41000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    1995-06-01

    The instanton-induced term is included in an analysis of nonleptonic strangeness-changing hyperon decays. The same type of analysis has led previously to a reasonable qualitative, and to some extent quantitative, description of the decay amplitudes. The instanton contributions do not improve old results. Data favor a very small instanton influence.

  9. Fluorescent Polystyrene Sulfonate for Polyelectrolyte Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberty, Wayne; Tong, Xiaowei; Balamurugan, Sreelatha; Zhang, Donghui; Russo, Paul

    2012-02-01

    The slow-mode decay found by dynamic light scattering for polyelectrolytes in low-salt conditions has perplexed investigators since its first observation. Many characterization methods have suggested temporary or transient aggregation, although there is still no consensus on the cause. Many different polyelectrolytes demonstrate the slow-mode decay, but the sodium salt of polystyrene sulfonate (NaPSS) is the most popular choice for study. Commercially available NaPSS may have hydrophobic patches due to incomplete sulfonation leading to associations apart from any putative ionic mechanisms. Therefore, essentially full sulfonation, or ``patchless'', NaPSS should be synthesized. To facilitate fluorescence measurements, which can provide new insights to the slow-mode phenomenon, the material must be rendered fluorescent (F-NaPSS). Several approaches to F-NaPSS have appeared; some labeled a previously synthesized NaPSS without concern for its hydrophobic patches. Other strategies include a free radical copolymerization of styrene sulfonate and a vinyl amine to provide side chains viable for labeling. This method is successful, but yields only small amounts of nearly monodisperse polymer after fractionation. In this presentation, a high-yield synthesis of fully sulfonated, low-polydispersity, fluorescently tagged polymer will be discussed.

  10. Novel aspects of fluorescence lifetime for molecules positioned close to metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussenegg, F. R.; Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Reinisch, H.; Riegler, M.

    1987-10-01

    On metal surfaces with submicroscopic corrugations, surface-enhanced optical processes can be observed. Results obtained by picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy for dye molecules in the proximity (0-50 nm) of silver islands films are reported. It is demonstrated how the rather complex dependence of the integral fluorescence intensity on the distance dye-islands, can be resolved in the contributions of different mechanisms by analysing the fluorescence decay curves at various distances. It turns out, that the enhancement of absorption influences only the peak fluorescence intensity without changing the decay time, while the enhancement of emission and dissipative losses reduces the decay time. Thus time-resolved spectroscopy opens the possibility to test theoretical concepts on surface enhancement and provides basic data for tailoring molecule-metal structures with well-defined surface-enhancement properties.

  11. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Jun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal–dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle’s surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES, plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF. As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF. First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC and down-conversion (DC nanoparticles (NPs are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  12. Recent Progress on Plasmon-Enhanced Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jun; Zhang, Zhenglong; Zheng, Hairong; Sun, Mentao

    2015-12-01

    The optically generated collective electron density waves on metal-dielectric boundaries known as surface plasmons have been of great scientific interest since their discovery. Being electromagnetic waves on gold or silver nanoparticle's surface, localised surface plasmons (LSP) can strongly enhance the electromagnetic field. These strong electromagnetic fields near the metal surfaces have been used in various applications like surface enhanced spectroscopy (SES), plasmonic lithography, plasmonic trapping of particles, and plasmonic catalysis. Resonant coupling of LSPs to fluorophore can strongly enhance the emission intensity, the angular distribution, and the polarisation of the emitted radiation and even the speed of radiative decay, which is so-called plasmon enhanced fluorescence (PEF). As a result, more and more reports on surface-enhanced fluorescence have appeared, such as SPASER-s, plasmon assisted lasing, single molecule fluorescence measurements, surface plasmoncoupled emission (SPCE) in biological sensing, optical orbit designs etc. In this review, we focus on recent advanced reports on plasmon-enhanced fluorescence (PEF). First, the mechanism of PEF and early results of enhanced fluorescence observed by metal nanostructure will be introduced. Then, the enhanced substrates, including periodical and nonperiodical nanostructure, will be discussed and the most important factor of the spacer between molecule and surface and wavelength dependence on PEF is demonstrated. Finally, the recent progress of tipenhanced fluorescence and PEF from the rare-earth doped up-conversion (UC) and down-conversion (DC) nanoparticles (NPs) are also commented upon. This review provides an introduction to fundamentals of PEF, illustrates the current progress in the design of metallic nanostructures for efficient fluorescence signal amplification that utilises propagating and localised surface plasmons.

  13. Decay pathways for excitations in a conjugated oligofluorene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesely, Elizabeth Jane

    Oligofluorenes are promising candidates for light emitting applications due to their efficient blue emission, solubility, and chemical purity. The decay routes for some excitations in the fluorescent oligofluorene F(MB)10F(EH)2 are investigated. Geminate recombination of photogenerated charge pairs to form luminescent singlet excitons represents a significant contribution (> 10%) to the overall fluorescence quantum yield. This suggests a substantial yield of charge pair generation in spite of a large exciton binding energy. I propose that the unusual decay dynamics of the delayed fluorescence is the result of the interconversion between singlet and triplet polaron pairs on the submicrosecond timescale (˜500 ns). A model that includes activated recombination from singlet polaron pairs with a distribution of barriers centered 0.2 eV below the excited state produces a fit to the decay of the delayed fluorescence. Results from the model suggest that a large (90% at 296 K) fraction of photoexcited polaron pairs return to form singlet excitons so that this pathway cannot account for the dramatic reduction of fluorescence yields in thin films relative to those in dilute solution. The model also predicts that the ratio of singlet to triplet excitons formed from the recombination of spin randomized charge pairs is greater than that predicted by spin statistics at 296 K, and increases with temperature. The quenching of photoluminescence in F(MB)10F(EH)2 by fluorenone-like defects is also studied through deliberate incorporation of the defects into a solid sample. The results are consistent with a mechanism responsible for part of the quenching of the fluorescence in the oligofluorene samples being exciton migration to defects followed by the trapping of a charge from the exciton on the defect. The defects emit weak, delayed luminescence. The mechanism for the excitation of the defects is similar to that of delayed fluorescence in a pristine sample, which includes the

  14. Femtosecond three-photon excitation and single-photon timing detection of α-NPO fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, A.; Hatrick, D. A.; Bai, Y.; Birch, D. J. S.

    1997-04-01

    We demonstrate the application of three-photon excitation to fluorescence probe studies using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC). By exciting with 120 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses at 800 nm we have observed fluorescence emission from the scintillator 2-(1-napthyl)-5-phenyloxazole (α-NPO) in solutions and small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) of L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). In SUVs the time-resolved excimer emission and fluorescence anisotropy are consistent with a heterogeneous distribution of α-NPO molecules between isolated sites and ground state clusters in a similar manner to that which we reported previously for 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO).

  15. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  16. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy at a Molecule-Metal Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bairagi, K.; Bellec, A.; Repain, V.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that a C60 overlayer enhances the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a Co thin film, inducing an inverse spin reorientation transition from in plane to out of plane. The driving force is the C60/Co interfacial magnetic anisotropy that we have measured quantitatively in situ...

  17. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation anisotropy of shales, Whitby, United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, A.; Houben, M.E.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Barnhoorn, A.

    2015-01-01

    We have conducted ultrasonic experiments, between 0.3 and 1 MHz, to measure velocity and attenuation (Q−1) anisotropy of P- and S-waves in dry Whitby Mudstone samples as a function of stress. We found the degree of anisotropy to be as large as 70% for velocity and attenuation. The sensitivity of P-w

  18. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation anisotropy of shales, Whitby, United Kingdom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhubayev, Alimzhan; Houben, M.E.; Smeulders, David; Barnhoorn, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted ultrasonic experiments, between 0.3 and 1 MHz, to measure velocity and attenuation (Q−1) anisotropy of P- and S-waves in dry Whitby Mudstone samples as a function of stress. We found the degree of anisotropy to be as large as 70% for velocity and attenuation. The sensitivity of P-w

  19. Effects of Surface Anisotropy on Magnetic Vortex Core

    OpenAIRE

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V.; Sheka, Denis D.; Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin-lattice simulations.

  20. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México D.F., México (Mexico); Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI (United States); Pogosyan, D., E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: pogosyan@ualberta.ca [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  1. Anisotropy Spectra for Enantiomeric Differentiation of Biomolecular Building Blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Amanda C.; Meinert, Cornelia; Bredehoft, Jan H.;

    2013-01-01

    light. This chapter will: (1) present the theory and configuration of anisotropy spectroscopy; (2) explain experimentally recorded anisotropy spectra of selected chiral biomolecules such as amino acids; and (3) discuss the relevance of these spectra for the investigation of the origin of the molecular...

  2. Semileptonic and leptonic $B$ decays, circa 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    We summarize the status of semileptonic and leptonic $B$ decays, including $|V_{cb}|$ and $|V_{ub}|$ exclusive and inclusive determinations, decays to excited states of the charm meson spectrum and decays into $\\tau$ leptons.

  3. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Mota, David F. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Arroja, Frederico, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it, E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  4. Coasting characteristic of the flywheel system under anisotropy effect of bulk high temperature superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J. F.; Li, Y.

    2014-10-01

    High-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) array with aligned growth section boundary (GSB) pattern (AGSBP) exhibits larger levitation force and suppression of levitation force decay above a permanent magnet guideway (PMG) compared with misaligned GSB pattern (MGSBP) has been studied in maglev train application (Zheng et al., 2013). This result maybe helpful and support a new way for the HTS bearing design for flywheel systems. So, in this paper, we further examine this growth anisotropy effect on the maglev performance of flywheel system. Levitation force and coasting time were investigated from the point-view of HTS flywheel applications. The GS/GSB alignment of AGSBP bulk HTSCs produces larger levitation force than that of MGSBP, but the coasting time is shorter than that of MGSBP, that is to say, the electric magnetic drag force with AGSBP is larger than that of MGSBP. This result may also exist in the maglev guideline when the maglev train stops freely.

  5. Anisotropy Effect on Levitation Performance of Bulk High-Tc Superconductors Above a Permanent Magnet Guideway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jun; Liao, Xinglin; Jing, Hailian; Lin, Qunxu; Ma, Guangtong; Yen, Fei; Wang, Suyu; Wang, Jiasu

    The anisotropy properties of bulk high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) are taken into consideration for the application of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) Maglev systems, which are especially based on the different flux-trapping capabilities as well as critical current density, Jc, values between the growth section boundary (GSB) and the growth sections (GS) in bulk superconductors. By adjusting the angle between the GSB of bulk HTSCs and the strongest magnetic field position of a permanent magnet guideway (PMG), the levitation force and its relaxation processes are compared at different field-cooling conditions. Experimental results show that the levitation capability and the suppression of levitation force decay can be enhanced by optimizing the GS/GSB alignment of every bulk HTSC above the PMG. Meanwhile, our conclusions may provide references to other HTS maglev systems with small levitation gaps, i.e., superconducting magnetic bearings.

  6. Measurement of Single Electron Event Anisotropy in Au+Au Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, S S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, Alberto; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Yu A; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S R; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Büsching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; D'Enterria, D G; Dávid, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, Abhay A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Chenawi, K F; Enokizono, A; Enyo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L A; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Zeev; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, Hans Åke; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E P; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Bösing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V P; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A G; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Man'ko, V I; Mao, Y; Martínez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E A; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Muhlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V A; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saitô, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sørensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarjan, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torie, H A; Towell, R S; Tserruya, Itzhak; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjo, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszpremi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E A; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L S

    2005-01-01

    The transverse momentum dependence of the azimuthal anisotropy parameter v_2, the second harmonic of the azimuthal distribution, for electrons at mid-rapidity (|eta| < 0.35) has been measured with the PHENIX detector in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The measurement was made with respect to the reaction plane defined at high rapidities (|eta| = 3.1 -- 3.9). From the result we have measured the v_2 of electrons from heavy flavor decay after subtraction of the v_2 of electrons from other sources such as photon conversions and Dalitz decay from light neutral mesons. We observe a non-zero single electron v_2 with a 90% confidence level in the intermediate p_T region.

  7. Nonleptonic Bc→VV decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Susmita; Dash, P. C.; Priyadarsini, M.; Naimuddin, Sk.; Barik, N.

    2013-11-01

    We study the exclusive nonleptonic Bc→VV decays, within the factorization approximation, in the framework of the relativistic independent quark model, based on a confining potential in the scalar-vector harmonic form. The weak form factors are extracted from the overlap integral of meson wave functions derived in the relativistic independent quark model. The predicted branching ratios for different Bc-meson decays are obtained in a wide range, from a tiny value of O(10-6) for Bc→D*D(s)* to a large value of 24.32% for Bc→Bs*ρ-, in general agreement with other dynamical-quark-model predictions. The decay modes Bc→Bs*ρ- and Bc→B*ρ- with high branching ratios of 24.32% and 1.73%, respectively, obtained in this model should be detectable at the LHC and Tevatron in the near future. The b→c, u induced decays are predicted predominantly in the longitudinal mode, whereas the c¯→s¯, d¯ induced decays are obtained in a slightly higher transverse mode. The CP-odd fractions (R⊥) for different decay modes are predicted and those for color-favored Bc→D*D*, D*Ds* decays indicate significant CP violation in this sector.

  8. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Zhou, Tie-ge; Shao, Bin; Zuo, Xu; Feng, Min

    2016-05-01

    Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ˜16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  9. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy at a Molecule-Metal Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagi, K; Bellec, A; Repain, V; Chacon, C; Girard, Y; Garreau, Y; Lagoute, J; Rousset, S; Breitwieser, R; Hu, Yu-Cheng; Chao, Yen Cheng; Pai, Woei Wu; Li, D; Smogunov, A; Barreteau, C

    2015-06-19

    We demonstrate that a C(60) overlayer enhances the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of a Co thin film, inducing an inverse spin reorientation transition from in plane to out of plane. The driving force is the (60)/Co interfacial magnetic anisotropy that we have measured quantitatively in situ as a function of the (60) coverage. Comparison with state-of-the-art ab initio calculations show that this interfacial anisotropy mainly arises from the local hybridization between (60) p(z) and Co d(z(2)) orbitals. By generalizing these arguments, we also demonstrate that the hybridization of (60) with a Fe(110) surface decreases the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. These results open the way to tailor the interfacial magnetic anisotropy in organic-material-ferromagnet systems.

  10. Carrier-dependent magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Lu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using first-principles calculation based on density functional theory, we study the magnetic anisotropy of Gd-adsorbed graphene and its dependence on carrier accumulation. We show that carrier accumulation not only impacts the magnitude of magnetic anisotropy but also switches its sign. Hole accumulation enhances the perpendicular anisotropy up to ∼16 meV per Gd atom, while electron accumulation switches the anisotropy from perpendicular to in-plane direction. Moreover, we find that the first order perturbation of spin-orbit coupling interaction induces a pseudo-gap at Γ for the perpendicular magnetization, which leads to the the anomalous magnetic anisotropy for the neutral composite. Our findings pave the way for magneto-electric materials based on rare-earth-decorated graphene for voltage-controlled spintronics.

  11. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co85Cr15/Pt multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pol Hwang; Baohe Li; Tao Yang; Zhonghai Zhai; Fengwu Zhu

    2004-01-01

    The CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. The effects of prepared condition on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were investigated. The results show that the thickness of Pt underlayer has a great effect on the microstructure and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers.When the thickness of Pt underlayer increases, Pt(111) and CoCr(002) peaks of both CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers increase and the bilayer periodicity of the multilayers is improved. The effective magnetic anisotropy of (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer was much larger than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. The (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers has a stronger perpendicular magnetic anisotropy than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. This is ascribed to the interface magnetic anisotropy of the multilayers.

  12. MIRD radionuclide data and decay schemes

    CERN Document Server

    Eckerman, Keith F

    2007-01-01

    For all physicians, scientists, and physicists working in the nuclear medicine field, the MIRD: Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes updated edition is an essential sourcebook for radiation dosimetry and understanding the properties of radionuclides. Includes CD Table of Contents Decay schemes listed by atomic number Radioactive decay processes Serial decay schemes Decay schemes and decay tables This essential reference for nuclear medicine physicians, scientists and physicists also includes a CD with tabulations of the radionuclide data necessary for dosimetry calculations.

  13. Fluorescence temperature sensing on rotating samples in the cryogenic range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, F.; Devillers, R.

    1999-07-01

    A surface temperature measurement technique for rotating samples is proposed. It is based on the concept of fluorescence thermometry. The fluorescent and phosphorescent phenomena have been applied in thermometry for ambient and high-temperature measurement but not the cryogenic domain, which is explored using thermocouple- or platinum resistor-based thermometers. However, thermal behavior of Yb2+ ions in fluoride matrices seems to be interesting for thermometry in the range 20-120 K. We present here a remote sensing method which uses fluorescence behavior of Yb2+ ion-doped fluoride crystals. The fluorescence decay time of such crystals is related to its temperature. Since we developed a specific sol-gel process (OrMoSils) to make strongly adherent fluorescent layers, we applied the fluorescence thermometry method for rotating object surface temperature measurement. The main application is the monitoring of surface temperature of the ball bearing or turbopump axis in liquid propulsion rocket engines. Our method is presented and discussed, and we give some experimental results. An accurate calibration of the decay time of CaF2:Yb2+ versus temperature is also given.

  14. Statistical anisotropy in the inflationary universe

    CERN Document Server

    Shtanov, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    During cosmological inflation, quasiclassical perturbations are permanently generated on super-Hubble spatial scales, their power spectrum being determined by the fundamental principles of quantum field theory. By the end of inflation, they serve as primeval seeds for structure formation in the universe. At early stages of inflation, such perturbations break homogeneity and isotropy of the inflationary background. In the present paper, we perturbatively take into account this quasiclassical background inhomogeneity of the inflationary universe while considering the evolution of small-scale (sub-Hubble) quantum modes. As a result, the power spectrum of primordial perturbations develops statistical anisotropy, which can subsequently manifest itself in the large-scale structure and cosmic microwave background. The statistically anisotropic contribution to the primordial power spectrum is predicted to have almost scale-invariant form dominated by a quadrupole. Theoretical expectation of the magnitude of this anis...

  15. Texture-induced microwave background anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrill, J.; Copeland, E.J.; Liddle, A.R.; Stebbins, A.; Veeraraghavan, S. (School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom) Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College of Science and Technology, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom) NASA/Fermilab Astrophysics Center, Fermi National Accelerator Laoratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States) NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 685, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States) Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States))

    1994-08-15

    We use numerical simulations to calculate the cosmic microwave background anisotropy induced by the evolution of a global texture field, with special emphasis on individual textures. Both spherically symmetric and general configurations are analyzed, and in the latter case we consider field configurations which exhibit unwinding events and also ones which do not. We compare the results given by evolving the field numerically under both the expanded core (XCORE) and nonlinear [sigma] model (NLSM) approximations with the analytic predictions of the NLSM exact solution for a spherically symmetric self-similar (SSSS) unwinding. We find that the random unwinding configuration spots' typical peak height is 60--75 % and angular size typically only 10% of those of the SSSS unwinding, and that random configurations without an unwinding event nonetheless may generate indistinguishable hot and cold spots. A brief comparison is made with other work.

  16. Anisotropy of light propagation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Hermann, Marcus; Essenpreis, Matthias; Farrell, Thomas J.; Krämer, Uwe; Patterson, Michael S.

    2000-10-01

    Using spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectometry, a directional dependence was found in the propagation of visible and near infrared light through human skin in vivo. The skin's reduced scattering coefficient µ's varies by up to a factor of two between different directions of propagation at the same position. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by the preferential orientation of collagen fibres in the dermis, as described by Langer's skin tension lines. Monte Carlo simulations that examine the effect of partial collagen fibre orientation support this hypothesis. The observation has consequences for non-invasive diagnostic methods relying on skin optical properties, and it could be used non-invasively to determine the direction of lines of cleavage in order to minimize scars due to surgical incisions.

  17. Rational approach to anisotropy of sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    1998-11-01

    The paper presents a constitutive model for the three-dimensional deformation-strength behaviour of inherently anisotropic sand. Based on non-linear tensorial functions, the model is developed without recourse to the concepts in plasticity theory such as yield surface and plastic potential. Benefited from the fact that no decomposition of strain into elastic and plastic parts is assumed, a unified treatment of anisotropic behaviour of deformation and strength is achieved. Anisotropy is characterized by a vector normal to the bedding plane. The extension of the constitutive model is furnished by incorporating the vector under consideration of the principle of objectivity and the condition of material symmetry. Distinct features of the model are its elegant formulation and its simple structure involving few material parameters. Model performance and comparison with experiments show that the model is capable of capturing the salient behaviour of anisotropic sand.

  18. PAPPA: Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A; Fixsen, D; Hinshaw, G F; Limon, M; Moseley, S H; Phillips, N; Sharp, E; Wollack, E J; U-Yen, K; Cao, N; Stevenson, T; Hsieh, W; Devlin, M; Dicker, S; Semisch, C; Irwin, K

    2006-01-01

    The Primordial Anisotropy Polarization Pathfinder Array (PAPPA) is a balloon-based instrument to measure the polarization of the cosmic microwave background and search for the signal from gravity waves excited during an inflationary epoch in the early universe. PAPPA will survey a 20 x 20 deg patch at the North Celestial Pole using 32 pixels in 3 passbands centered at 89, 212, and 302 GHz. Each pixel uses MEMS switches in a superconducting microstrip transmission line to combine the phase modulation techniques used in radio astronomy with the sensitivity of transition-edge superconducting bolometers. Each switched circuit modulates the incident polarization on a single detector, allowing nearly instantaneous characterization of the Stokes I, Q, and U parameters. We describe the instrument design and status.

  19. Pseudo exchange bias due to rotational anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrmann, A., E-mail: andrea.ehrmann@fh-bielefeld.de [Faculty of Engineering and Mathematics, Bielefeld University of Applied Sciences, 33619 Bielefeld (Germany); Komraus, S.; Blachowicz, T.; Domino, K. [Institute of Physics – Center for Science and Education, Silesian University of Technology, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Nees, M.K.; Jakobs, P.J.; Leiste, H. [Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mathes, M.; Schaarschmidt, M. [ACCESS e. V., 57072 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Ferromagnetic nanostructure arrays with particle dimensions between 160 nm and 400 nm were created by electron-beam lithography. The permalloy structures consist of rectangular-shaped walls around a square open space. While measuring their magnetic properties using the Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect (MOKE), in some angular regions an exchange bias (EB) seemed to appear. This paper gives an overview of possible reasons for this “pseudo exchange bias” and shows experimentally and by means of micromagnetic simulations that this effect can be attributed to unintentionally measuring minor loops. - Highlights: • Pseudo exchange bias can be found in square Py nanorings of different dimensions. • Pseudo exchange bias stems from unintentionally measuring minor loops. • New approach in explaining “real” exchange bias effect in coupled FM/AFM systems. • Theoretical base to explain other measurements of a rotational anisotropy.

  20. CMB Anisotropies from a Gradient Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    A pure gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect at linear level. We confirm this by showing that its contribution to the dipolar power asymmetry of CMB anisotropies vanishes, if Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To this end, the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit is extended to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. At second order, a gradient mode generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce a quadrupole moment. For instance in a matter-dominated model it is equal to 5/18 times the square of the linear gradient part. This quadrupole can be cancelled by superposing a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a non-linear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  1. Attempts to Simulate Anisotropies of Solar Wind Fluctuations Using MHD with a Turning Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjoy; Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    We examine a "two-component" model of the solar wind to see if any of the observed anisotropies of the fields can be explained in light of the need for various quantities, such as the magnetic minimum variance direction, to turn along with the Parker spiral. Previous results used a 3-D MHD spectral code to show that neither Q2D nor slab-wave components will turn their wave vectors in a turning Parker-like field, and that nonlinear interactions between the components are required to reproduce observations. In these new simulations we use higher resolution in both decaying and driven cases, and with and without a turning background field, to see what, if any, conditions lead to variance anisotropies similar to observations. We focus especially on the middle spectral range, and not the energy-containing scales, of the simulation for comparison with the solar wind. Preliminary results have shown that it is very difficult to produce the required variances with a turbulent cascade.

  2. Nanomagnets with high shape anisotropy and strong crystalline anisotropy: perspectives on magnetic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, H; Jaafar, M; Llobet, J; Esteve, J; Vázquez, M; Asenjo, A; del Real, R P; Plaza, J A

    2011-12-16

    We report on a new approach for magnetic imaging, highly sensitive even in the presence of external, strong magnetic fields. Based on FIB-assisted fabricated high-aspect-ratio rare-earth nanomagnets, we produce groundbreaking magnetic force tips with hard magnetic character where we combine a high aspect ratio (shape anisotropy) together with strong crystalline anisotropy (rare-earth-based alloys). Rare-earth hard nanomagnets are then FIB-integrated to silicon microcantilevers as highly sharpened tips for high-field magnetic imaging applications. Force resolution and domain reversing and recovery capabilities are at least one order of magnitude better than for conventional magnetic tips. This work opens new, pioneering research fields on the surface magnetization process of nanostructures based either on relatively hard magnetic materials-used in magnetic storage media-or on materials like superparamagnetic particles, ferro/antiferromagnetic structures or paramagnetic materials.

  3. Cusp effects in meson decays

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, Bastian

    2009-01-01

    The pion mass difference generates a pronounced cusp in the pi0 pi0 invariant mass distribution of K+ --> pi0 pi0 pi+ decays. As originally pointed out by Cabibbo, an accurate measurement of the cusp may allow one to pin down the S-wave pion-pion scattering lengths to high precision. We present the non-relativistic effective field theory framework that permits to determine the structure of this cusp in a straightforward manner, including the effects of radiative corrections. Applications of the same formalism to other decay channels, in particular eta and eta' decays, are also discussed.

  4. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  5. Inconclusive Inclusive Nonleptonic $B$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, A F; Dunietz, Isard; Falk, Adam F.; Wise, Mark B.; Dunietz, Isard

    1995-01-01

    We reconsider the conflict between recent calculations of the semileptonic branching ratio of the $B$ meson and the experimentally measured rate. Such calculations depend crucially on the application of ``local duality'' in nonleptonic decays, and we discuss the relation of this assumption to the weaker assumptions required to compute the semileptonic decay rate. We suggest that the discrepancy between theory and experiment might be due to the channel with two charm quarks in the final state, either because of a small value for $m_c$ or because of a failure of local duality. We examine the experimental consequences of such solutions for the charm multiplicity in $B$ decays.

  6. Inconclusive inclusive nonleptonic B decays

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, A F; Dunietz, Isard; Adam F Falk; Mark B Wise; Isard Dunietz

    1995-01-01

    We reconsider the conflict between recent calculations of the semileptonic branching ratio of the B meson and the experimentally measured rate. Such calculations depend crucially on the application of ``local duality'' in nonleptonic decays, and we discuss the relation of this assumption to the weaker assumptions required to compute the semileptonic decay rate. We suggest that the discrepancy between theory and experiment might be due to the channel with two charm quarks in the final state, either because of a small value for m_c or because of a failure of local duality. We examine the experimental consequences of such solutions for the charm multiplicity in B decays.

  7. Decays of the b quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Edward H.; Poling, Ronald A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0- overlineB0 mi xing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent.

  8. Charm counting in b decays

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Carrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Alemany, R; Bazarko, A O; Bonvicini, G; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Moneta, L; Oest, T; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Abbaneo, D; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Bauer, C; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Köksal, A; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    The inclusive production of charmed particles in Z -> bb decays has been measured from the yield of D^0, D^+, D^+_s and Lambda_{c}^+ decays in a sample of qq events with high b purity collected with the ALEPH detector from 1992 to 1995. From these measurements, adding the charmonia production rate and an estimate of the charmed strange baryon contribution, the average number of charm quarks per b decay is determined to be n_c = 1.230 \\pm 0.036 \\pm 0.038 \\pm 0.053 where the uncertainties are due to statistics, systematic effects and branching ratios, respectively.

  9. Specific solute solvent interactions and dual fluorescence of electron donor substituted bis-pyrazoquinoline in binary mixed solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotkiewicz, Krystyna; Rettig, Wolfgang; Köhler, Gottfried; Rechthaler, Karl; Danel, Andrzej; Grabka, Danuta

    2004-12-01

    Some extended electron donor and acceptor substituted π-electron systems, composed of a dimethyl- or diethylanilino (DMA or DEA, respectively) group as electron donor and bis-pyrazoloquinoline (DPPQ) or bis-pyrazolopyridine (DMPP) derivatives as acceptors, were studied with the aim to elucidate the contributions of various solute interactions with solvent molecules upon intramolecular charge separation. Steady state and time resolved fluorescence studies were performed for DMA-DPPQ, DMA-DMPP and DEA-DMPP in alcohols and their binary mixtures with heptane. The decay kinetics of the fluorescence of DMA-DPPQ was also studied in neat 1-propanol in dependence of the temperature between 170 and 293 K. Several different fluorescent species, which were ascribed to different complexes with alcohol molecules, contribute to the fluorescence of the various compounds in these binary mixtures and account for the complex fluorescence decay. A simplified consecutive model is proposed to explain the decay behaviour of the excited species.

  10. Theoretical Compton profile anisotropies in molecules and solids. IV. Parallel--perpendicular anisotropies in alkali fluoride molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matcha, R.L.; Pettitt, B.M.; Ramirez, B.I.; McIntire, W.R.

    1979-07-15

    Calculations of Compton profiles and parallel--perpendicular anisotropies in alkali fluorides are presented and analyzed in terms of molecular charge distributions and wave function character. It is found that the parallel profile associated with the valence pi orbital is the principal factor determining the relative shapes of the total profile anisotropies in the low momentum region.

  11. Origin of magnetization-induced anisotropy of magnetic films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Han-Min; Chong-Oh Kim; Taek-Dong Lee; Hyo-Jin Kim

    2007-01-01

    It is proposed that the magnetization-induced anisotropy of magnetic films of cubic crystal structure originates from the anisotropy of atomic pair ordering, shape anisotropy, and strain anisotropy resulting from the constraint of the magnetostriction strain imposed on the film by the substrate. Calculated are the three anisotropy constants and their sum K vs temperature for Ni, Fe, and 55%Ni-Fe films; the room temperature (RT) constants vs the substrate temperature Tt during deposition or annealing after deposition for Ni and 50%Ni-Co films; the RT constants vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni films with Tt = RT, 250℃ and 450℃, Co-Ni films at Tt = RT, 100℃ and 320℃, and Fe-Co films with Tt = RT and 300℃; the spread of RT K vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni films; and RT △K/K vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni and Co-Ni films, where △K denotes the variation of K of the film that is detached from its substrate. The calculated curves well accord with the measurements. The irrelevancy of K to the substrate material and the fast kinetics of the annealing in a field applied in the direction of the hard axis are explained reasonably.The anisotropies of Fe and Ni films originate mainly from the shape anisotropy and the strain anisotropy, respectively. The major anisotropy component in many cases depends not only on composition fraction but also on Tt . For example, the RT anisotropy of 40-70%Ni-Fe films, when Tt is RT, mostly comes from the anisotropy of atomic pair ordering while it stems mostly from the shape anisotropy when Tt is 450 ℃. The most important cause of the spread in values of K is the spread of the intrinsic anisotropic stresses superimposed on the intrinsic isotropic planar stress. It is suggested that the field cooling induced magnetic anisotropy originating from the induced crystal texture observed in the bulk alloys is also a major origin for Co and Co-rich alloy films of hexagonal crystal structure.

  12. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  13. Mechanisms of Fluorescence Quenching of Pr3+-Doped PbWO4 Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Feibing; Luo Zundu; Huang Yidong

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence decay curves of the 3P0 and 1D2 manifolds in Pr3+ doped PbWO4 crystal were measured at room temperature and fluorescence lifetimes of both manifolds were estimated. Combining with the radiative lifetimes of the manifolds calculated on the basis of the modified J-O theory, the main mechanisms for the fluorescence quenching of the manifolds were analyzed. The multi-phonon relaxation and the cross-relaxation energy transfer are the major reasons for the fluorescence quenching of the 3P0 and 1D2 manifolds, respectively. The Inokuti-Hirayama model was used to analyze the fluorescence decay curve of the 1D2 manifold and the cross-relaxation of dipole-dipole interaction was confirmed. Consequently, the 3P0 manifold is more favorable as an upper laser level than the 1D2 manifold.

  14. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  15. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra of cis-stilbene in hexane and acetonitrile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajadi, M.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Garbin, E.; Ernsting, N. P.; Kovalenko, S. A.

    2010-04-01

    Transient fluorescence spectra from cis-stilbene in solution are recorded with 0.24 ps instrument response by a Kerr-Shutter upon excitation at 283 and 267 nm. The fluorescence decay shows no dependence on the excitation wavelength and proceeds monoexponentially with 0.21 ps in acetonitrile and 0.75 ps in hexane. No spectral shift or distortion of the fluorescence band is observed during the decay. Fluorescence contribution from 4a,4b-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP), produced in a competing reaction channel, was not detectable. From comparison with trans-fluorescence, the emission oscillator strength of cis-stilbene is determined to be 0.19 in hexane and 0.21 in acetonitrile.

  16. The Search for Proton Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshak, Marvin L.

    1984-01-01

    Provides the rationale for and examples of experiments designed to test the stability of protons and bound neutrons. Also considers the unification question, cosmological implications, current and future detectors, and current status of knowledge on proton decay. (JN)

  17. \\tau lepton decays and CVC

    OpenAIRE

    Cherepanov, V. A.; Eidelman, S. I.

    2009-01-01

    We use experimental data on $e^+e^- \\to \\eta (\\eta^{\\prime})\\pi^+\\pi^-$ and conservation of vector current to estimate the branching fractions of $\\tau^-$ decay to $\\eta (\\eta^{\\prime})\\pi^-\\pi^0\

  18. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  19. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachlechner, Thomas C.

    2013-05-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between massless thermal modes and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble may lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and thermal photon interactions has the exponential scaling \\Gamma \\sim \\Gamma _{CDL}^{2}, where ΓCDL is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. For the lowest metastable initial state an efficient quantum Zeno effect occurs due to thermal radiation of temperatures as low as the de Sitter temperature. This strong decoherence effect is a consequence of gravitational interactions with light external mode. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincaré recurrence in de Sitter space.

  20. Decoherence delays false vacuum decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bachlechner, Thomas C

    2012-01-01

    We show that gravitational interactions between thermal de Sitter photons and a nucleating Coleman-de Luccia bubble lead to efficient decoherence and strongly suppress metastable vacuum decay for bubbles that are small compared to the Hubble radius. The vacuum decay rate including gravity and photon interactions has the exponential scaling $\\Gamma\\sim \\Gamma_{0}^{2}$, where $\\Gamma_{0}$ is the Coleman-de Luccia decay rate neglecting photon interactions. This strong decoherence effect is a generic consequence of gravitational interactions with light external modes. We argue that efficient decoherence does not occur for the case of Hawking-Moss decay. This observation is consistent with requirements set by Poincare recurrence in de Sitter space.

  1. Higher Order Top Squark Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Porod, Werner

    1997-01-01

    Within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model we study the three bod= y decay of the lighter top squark into a b-quark, a W-boson and the lightes= t neutralino and compare this decay with the flavour changing two body deca= y of the lighter top squark into a c-quark and the lightest neutralino. We do = this for scenarios where two body decays at tree level are forbidden for the l= ight top squark. We give the complete analysis for the three body and compare = it with the mentioned two body decay. We discuss our numerical results in vi= ew of the upgraded Tevatron, the LHC and a 500~GeV $e^+ e^-$ Linear Collider.

  2. Engineering out motion: a surface disulfide bond alters the mobility of tryptophan 22 in cytochrome b5 as probed by time-resolved fluorescence and 1H NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storch, E M; Grinstead, J S; Campbell, A P; Daggett, V; Atkins, W M

    1999-04-20

    In the accompanying paper [Storch et al. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 5054-5064] equilibrium denaturation studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to investigate localized dynamics on the surface of cytochrome b5 (cyt b5) that result in the formation of a cleft. In those studies, an S18C:R47C disulfide mutant was engineered to inhibit cleft mobility. Temperature- and urea-induced denaturation studies revealed significant differences in Trp 22 fluorescence between the wild-type and mutant proteins. On the basis of the results, it was proposed that wild type populates a conformational ensemble that is unavailable to the disulfide mutant and is mediated by cleft mobility. As a result, the solvent accessibility of Trp 22 is decreased in S18C:R47C, suggesting that the local environment of this residue is less mobile due to the constraining effects of the disulfide on cleft dynamics. To further probe the structural effects on the local environment of Trp 22 caused by inhibition of cleft formation, we report here the results of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence quenching, differential phase/modulation fluorescence anisotropy, and 1H NMR studies. In Trp fluorescence experiments, the Stern-Volmer quenching constant increases in wild type versus the oxidized disulfide mutant with increasing temperature. At 50 degrees C, KSV is nearly 1.5-fold greater in wild type compared to the oxidized disulfide mutant. In the reduced disulfide mutant, KSV was the same as wild type. The bimolecular collisional quenching constant, kq, for acrylamide quenching of Trp 22 increases 2.7-fold for wild type and only 1.8-fold for S18C:R47C, upon increasing the temperature from 25 to 50 degrees C. The time-resolved anisotropy decay at 25 degrees C was fit to a double-exponential decay for both the wild type and S18C:R47C. Both proteins exhibited a minor contribution from a low-amplitude fast decay, consistent with local motion of Trp 22. This component was more prevalent in

  3. Resolving environmental microheterogeneity and dielectric relaxation in fluorescence kinetics of protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolinski, Olaf J.; McLaughlin, Damien; Birch, David J. S.; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav

    2016-09-01

    The fluorescence intensity decay of protein is easily measurable and reports on the intrinsic fluorophore-local environment interactions on the sub-nm spatial and sub-ns temporal scales, which are consistent with protein activity in numerous biomedical and industrial processes. This makes time-resolved fluorescence a perfect tool for understanding, monitoring and controlling these processes at the molecular level, but the complexity of the decay, which has been traditionally fitted to multi-exponential functions, has hampered the development of this technique over the last few decades. Using the example of tryptophan in HSA we present the alternative to the conventional approach to modelling intrinsic florescence intensity decay in protein where the key factors determining fluorescence decay, i.e. the excited-state depopulation and the dielectric relaxation (Toptygin and Brand 2000 Chem. Phys. Lett. 322 496-502), are represented by the individual relaxation functions. This allows quantification of both effects separately by determining their parameters from the global analysis of a series of fluorescence intensity decays measured at different detection wavelengths. Moreover, certain pairs of the recovered parameters of tryptophan were found to be correlated, indicating the influence of the dielectric relaxation on the transient rate of the electronic transitions. In this context the potential for the dual excited state depopulation /dielectric relaxation fluorescence lifetime sensing is discussed.

  4. Strange decays from strange resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bijker, R

    2001-01-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, Delta, Sigma, Lambda, Xi and Omega families in a collective string-like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for lowlying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), Sigma(1750), Lambda(1405), Lambda(1670) and Lambda(1800).

  5. Strange decays from strange resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Leviatan, A. [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2001-07-01

    We discuss the mass spectrum and strong decays of baryon resonances belonging to the N, {delta}, {sigma}, {lambda}, {xi} and {omega} families in a collective string- like model for the nucleon. We find good overall agreement with the available data. Systematic discrepancies are found for low-lying S-wave states, in particular in the strong decays of N(1535), N(1650), {sigma}(1750), {lambda}{sup *}(1405), {lambda}(1670) and {lambda}(1800). (Author)

  6. $D$ leptonic and semileptonic decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Hailong

    2015-01-01

    Based on 2.92 fb$^{-1}$ data taken at the center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt s=3.773$ GeV with the BESIII detector, we report recent results on the decay constant $f_{D^+}$, the hadronic form factors, as well as the quark mixing matrix elements $|V_{cs(d)}|$, which are extracted from analyses of the leptonic decay $D^+ \\to \\mu^+\

  7. CP violation in sbottom decays

    CERN Document Server

    Deppisch, Frank F

    2010-01-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and tops. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable, and analyze the feasibility of their observation at the LHC. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases.

  8. CP violation in sbottom decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Kittel, Olaf

    2010-06-01

    We study CP asymmetries in two-body decays of bottom squarks into charginos and top quarks. These asymmetries probe the SUSY CP phases of the sbottom and the chargino sector in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). We identify the MSSM parameter space where the CP asymmetries are sizeable. As a result, potentially detectable CP asymmetries in sbottom decays are found, which motivates further detailed experimental studies for probing the SUSY CP phases at the LHC.

  9. $\\Upsilon$ production in Z Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Ahlen, S P; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alverson, G; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Baksay, L; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Banicz, K; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Baschirotto, A; Basile, M; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biland, A; Bilei, G M; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böck, R K; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Boucham, A; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Boutigny, D; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Busenitz, J K; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada-Canales, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chekanov, S V; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, M; Chiefari, G; Chien, C Y; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Cohn, H O; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Commichau, V; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, Akos; Dai, T S; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Degré, A; Deiters, K; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; DiBitonto, Daryl; Diemoz, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, Michael; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dorne, I; Dova, M T; Drago, E; Duchesneau, D; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Easo, S; Efremenko, Yu V; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Ernenwein, J P; Extermann, Pierre; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, Marta; Fenyi, B; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, P H; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gerald, J; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Goldfarb, S; Goldstein, J; Gong, Z F; Gougas, Andreas; Gratta, Giorgio; Grünewald, M W; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Hartmann, B; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Van Hoek, W C; Hofer, H; Hong, S J; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Hu, G; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jenkes, K; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kasser, A; Khan, R A; Kamrad, D; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kapustinsky, J S; Karyotakis, Yu; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, D H; Kim, J K; Kim, S C; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kirkby, A; Kirkby, D; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopp, A; Korolko, I; Koutsenko, V F; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Landi, G; Lapoint, C; Lassila-Perini, K M; Laurikainen, P; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Leggett, C; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levchenko, P M; Li Chuan; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lu, W; Lü, Y S; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mangla, S; Marchesini, P A; Marin, A; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; McNally, D; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mi, Y; Mihul, A; Van Mil, A J W; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moore, R; Morganti, S; Moulik, T; Mount, R; Müller, S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Nahn, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nippe, A; Nisati, A; Nowak, H; Oh, Yu D; Opitz, H; Organtini, G; Ostonen, R; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paolucci, P; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Peach, D; Pei, Y J; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Petrak, S; Pevsner, A; Piccolo, D; Pieri, M; Pinto, J C; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Produit, N; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Rahal-Callot, G; Raja, N; Rancoita, P G; Rattaggi, M; Raven, G; Razis, P A; Read, K; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rosselet, P; Van Rossum, W; Roth, S; Rubio, Juan Antonio; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Sarkar, S; Sassowsky, M; Sauvage, G; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schmitz, P; Schneegans, M; Scholz, N; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwenke, J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shukla, J; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Sopczak, André; Soulimov, V; Smith, B; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Strauch, K; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Susinno, G F; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Tang, X W; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonutti, M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tuchscherer, H; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Viertel, Gert M; Vivargent, M; Völkert, R; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, J C; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Wittgenstein, F; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xu, J; Xu, Z Z; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yao, X Y; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zemp, P; Zeng, Y; Zhang, Z; Zhang, Z P; Zhou, B; Zhou, Y; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zichichi, Antonino; Ziegler, F

    1997-01-01

    We have searched for evidence of Upsilon production in 3.5 million hadronic Z decays collected by the L3 detector at LEP in 1991-1995. No signals are observed for the decay chain Z -> Upsilon X; Upsilon -> l+l- (l= e, mu), therefore upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the following Z branching fractions: BR (Z -> Upsilon(1S) X) Upsilon(2S) X) Upsilon(3S) X) < 9.4 x 10**-5.

  10. Multiboson production in W' decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar-Saavedra, J A

    2015-01-01

    In models with an extra $\\text{SU}(2)_R$ gauge group and an extended scalar sector, the cascade decays of the $W'$ boson can provide various multiboson signals. In particular, diboson decays $W' \\to WZ$ can be suppressed while $W' \\to WZX$, with $X$ one of the scalars present in the model, can reach branching ratios around 4%. We discuss these multiboson signals focusing on possible interpretations of the ATLAS excess in fat jet pair production.

  11. Laboratory measurements of the viscous anisotropy of olivine aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L N; Zimmerman, M E; Kohlstedt, D L

    2012-12-20

    A marked anisotropy in viscosity develops in Earth's mantle as deformation strongly aligns the crystallographic axes of the individual grains that comprise the rocks. On the basis of geodynamic simulations, processes significantly affected by viscous anisotropy include post-glacial rebound, foundering of lithosphere and melt production above subduction zones. However, an estimate of the magnitude of viscous anisotropy based on the results of deformation experiments on single crystals differs by three orders of magnitude from that obtained by grain-scale numerical models of deforming aggregates with strong crystallographic alignment. Complicating matters, recent experiments indicate that deformation of the uppermost mantle is dominated by dislocation-accommodated grain-boundary sliding, a mechanism not activated in experiments on single crystals and not included in numerical models. Here, using direct measurements of the viscous anisotropy of highly deformed polycrystalline olivine, we demonstrate a significant directional dependence of viscosity. Specifically, shear viscosities measured in high-strain torsion experiments are 15 times smaller than normal viscosities measured in subsequent tension tests performed parallel to the torsion axis. This anisotropy is approximately an order of magnitude larger than that predicted by grain-scale simulations. These results indicate that dislocation-accommodated grain-boundary sliding produces an appreciable anisotropy in rock viscosity. We propose that crystallographic alignment imparts viscous anisotropy because the rate of deformation is limited by the movement of dislocations through the interiors of the crystallographically aligned grains. The maximum degree of anisotropy is reached at geologically low shear strain (of about ten) such that deforming regions of the upper mantle will exhibit significant viscous anisotropy.

  12. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  13. Explaining the highly enantiomeric photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylate bound to human serum albumin using time-resolved anisotropy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Denis; Kato, Hanako; Nishijima, Masaki; Fukuhara, Gaku; Mori, Tadashi; Inoue, Yoshihisa; Bohne, Cornelia

    2013-01-09

    The mechanism for the high enantiomeric excess (ee) (80-90%) observed in the photocyclodimerization of 2-anthracenecarboxylate (AC) in the chiral binding sites of human serum albumin (HSA) was studied using fluorescence anisotropy. A long rotational correlation time of 36 ns was observed for the excited states of the ACs bound to the HSA site responsible for the high ee, suggesting that the ACs have restricted rotational mobility in this site. The ACs in this site have the same prochiral face protected by the protein, and this protection is responsible for the high ee observed. These insights provide a strategy for the rational design of supramolecular photochirogenic systems.

  14. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    , were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane....../water interface. For instance, when glycerophospholipid containing membranes undertake a solid ordered (gel) to liquid disordered phase transition the fluorescence emission maximum of these probes shift ~ 50 nm with a significant change in their fluorescence lifetime. Furthermore, the fluorescence parameters...... of LAURDAN and PRODAN are exquisitely sensitive to cholesterol effects, allowing interpretations that correlate changes in membrane packing with membrane hydration. Different membrane model systems as well as innate biological membranes have been studied with this family of probes allowing interesting...

  15. Effects of surface anisotropy on magnetic vortex core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pylypovskyi, Oleksandr V., E-mail: engraver@univ.net.ua [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Sheka, Denis D. [Taras Shevchenko National University of Kiev, 01601 Kiev (Ukraine); Kravchuk, Volodymyr P.; Gaididei, Yuri [Institute for Theoretical Physics, 03143 Kiev (Ukraine)

    2014-06-01

    The vortex core shape in the three dimensional Heisenberg magnet is essentially influenced by a surface anisotropy. We predict that depending of the surface anisotropy type there appears barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex core along the magnet thickness. Our theoretical study is well confirmed by spin–lattice simulations. - Highlights: • The shape of magnetic vortex core is essentially influenced by SA (surface anisotropy). • We predict barrel- or pillow-shaped deformation of the vortex depending on SA. • The variational approach fully describes the vortex core deformation. • We performed spin–lattice simulations to detect SA influence on the vortex core.

  16. Complete treatment of CMB anisotropies in a FRW universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne; Seljak, Uroš; White, Martin; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    1998-03-01

    We generalize the total angular momentum method for computing cosmic microwave background anisotropies to Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spaces with arbitrary geometries. This unifies the treatment of temperature and polarization anisotropies generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations of the fluid, seed, or a scalar field, in a universe with constant comoving curvature. The resulting formalism generalizes and simplifies the calculation of anisotropies and, in its integral form, allows for a fast calculation of model predictions in linear theory for any FRW metric.

  17. Cubic versus spherical magnetic nanoparticles: the role of surface anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Alvarez, G; Qin, J; Sepelák, V; Bergmann, I; Vasilakaki, M; Trohidou, K N; Ardisson, J D; Macedo, W A A; Mikhaylova, M; Muhammed, M; Baró, M D; Nogués, J

    2008-10-08

    The magnetic properties of maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) cubic and spherical nanoparticles of similar sizes have been experimentally and theoretically studied. The blocking temperature, T(B), of the nanoparticles depends on their shape, with the spherical ones exhibiting larger T(B). Other low temperature properties such as saturation magnetization, coercivity, loop shift or spin canting are rather similar. The experimental effective anisotropy and the Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the different random surface anisotropy of the two morphologies combined with the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of gamma-Fe2O3 is the origin of these effects.

  18. CPO-induced seismic anisotropy in UHP eclogites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) eclogites often show strong plastic deformation and anisotropy of seismic properties. We report in this paper the seismic velocity and anisotropy of eclogite calculated from the crystallographic preferred orientations (CPOs) of constituent minerals (garnet, omphacite, quartz and rutile) and single crystal elastic properties. We also compared the calculated results with the measured results in similar eclogites. Our results suggest that (1) Except that garnet is a seismically quasi-isotropic mineral, omphacite, quartz, coesite and rutile all have strong seismic anisotropies (AVp = 23.0%―40.9%, Max. AVs = 18.5%―47.1%). They are the major sources for anisotropy in eclogite. The average seismic velocities are fast in garnet and rutile, moderate in omphacite and coesite, and slow in quartz. (2) The deformed eclogites have the maximum Vp (8.33―8.75 km/s) approximately parallel to foliation and lineation, the minimum Vp (8.25―8.62 km/s) approximately normal to foliation and lineation and the Vp anisotropies of 1.0―1.7%. Their Vs are 4.93―4.97 km/s. The corresponding maximum anisotropies (0.73%―1.78%) of Vs are at 45° to both foliation and lineation and the minimum anisotropies at positions normal to lineation on the foliation plane. The Vs1 polarization planes are approximately parallel to foliation. The mean Vp and Vs of eclogite under UHP peak metamorphism conditions (P = 3―5 GPa, T = 900―1100℃) are estimated to be 3.4%―7.2% and 6.3%―12.1% higher than those at ambient pressure and temperature conditions, respectively. (3) Omphacite component dominates the anisotropy of eclogite while garnet component reduces the anisotropy and increases the seismic velocities. Quartz component has a small effect on the anisotropy but reduces the seismic velocities of eclogite. The effect of rutile component is negligible on seismic properties of eclogite due to its trivial volume fraction. (4) The increase of volume fraction of omphacite

  19. Review of the anisotropy working group at UHECR-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanov A.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs has recently experienced a jump in statistics as well as improved instrumentation. This has allowed a better sensitivity in searching for anisotropies in the arrival directions of cosmic rays. In this written version of the presentation given by the inter-collaborative “Anisotropy Working Group” at the International Symposium on Future Directions in UHECR physics at CERN in February 2012, we report on the current status for anisotropy searches in the arrival directions of UHECRs.

  20. Texture induced magnetic anisotropy in Fe3O4 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Er; Huang, Zhaocong; Zheng, Jian-Guo; Yue, Jinjin; Chen, Leyi; Wu, Xiumei; Sui, Yunxia; Zhai, Ya; Tang, Shaolong; Du, Jun; Zhai, Hongru

    2015-10-01

    This letter reports a free energy density model for textured films in which the related physical concept and expression of magneto-texture anisotropy energy are presented. The structural characterization and out-of-plane angular dependence ferromagnetic resonance of strongly textured Fe3O4 films were systematically investigated. We found that the typical free energy density model for polycrystalline film cannot be applied to the textured films. With the introduction of magneto-texture anisotropy energy in the free energy density model for thin films, we simulated and quantitatively determined the competing anisotropies in (111)-textured Fe3O4 films.

  1. Canonical Transform Method for Treating Strongly Anisotropy Magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, J. F.; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    1977-01-01

    An infinite-order perturbation approach to the theory of magnetism in magnets with strong single-ion anisotropy is given. This approach is based on a canonical transformation of the system into one with a diagonal crystal field, an effective two-ion anisotropy, and reduced ground-state corrections....... A matrix-element matching procedure is used to obtain an explicit expression for the spin-wave energy to second order. The consequences of this theory are illustrated by an application to a simple example with planar anisotropy and an external magnetic field. A detailed comparison between the results...

  2. A Theoretical Diagnosis on Light Speed Anisotropy from GRAAL Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lingli, Zhou

    2012-01-01

    The light speed anisotropy, i.e., the variation of the light speed with respect to direction in an "absolute" reference frame, is a profound issue in physics. The one-way experiment, performed at the GRAAL facility of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, reported results on the light speed anisotropy by Compton scattering of laser photons on high-energy electrons. We show in this paper that the azimuthal distribution of the GRAAL experiment data can be elegantly reproduced by a new theory of Lorentz invariance violation or space-time anisotropy, based on a general principle of physical independence of the mathematical background manifold.

  3. Anisotropies of Gravitational Wave Backgrounds: A Line Of Sight Approach

    CERN Document Server

    Contaldi, Carlo R

    2016-01-01

    In the weak field regime, gravitational waves can be considered as being made up of collisionless, relativistic tensor modes that travel along null geodesics of the perturbed background metric. We work in this geometric optics picture to calculate the anisotropies in gravitational wave backgrounds resulting from astrophysical and cosmological sources. Our formalism yields expressions for the angular power spectrum of the anisotropies. We show how the anisotropies are sourced by intrinsic, Doppler, Sachs-Wolfe, and Integrated Sachs-Wolfe terms in analogy with Cosmic Microwave Background photons.

  4. Engineering Curvature-Induced Anisotropy in Thin Ferromagnetic Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretiakov, Oleg A.; Morini, Massimiliano; Vasylkevych, Sergiy; Slastikov, Valeriy

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of large curvature and dipolar energy in thin ferromagnetic films with periodically modulated top and bottom surfaces on magnetization behavior. We predict that the dipolar interaction and surface curvature can produce perpendicular anisotropy which can be controlled by engineering special types of periodic surface structures. Similar effects can be achieved by a significant surface roughness in the film. We demonstrate that, in general, the anisotropy can point in an arbitrary direction depending on the surface curvature. Furthermore, we provide simple examples of these periodic surface structures to show how to engineer particular anisotropies in thin films.

  5. Growth of Co Nanomagnet Arrays with Enhanced Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Laura; Ilyn, Maxim; Magaña, Ana; Vitali, Lucia; Ortega, José Enrique

    2016-01-01

    A trigon structure formed by submonolayer gadolinium deposition onto Au(111) is revealed as a robust growth template for Co nanodot arrays. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and X‐Ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism measurements evidence that the Co nanoislands behave as independent magnetic entities with an out‐of‐plane easy axis of anisotropy and enhanced magnetic anisotropy values, as compared to other self‐organized Co nanodot superlattices. The large strain induced by the lattice mismatch at the interface between Co and trigons is discussed as the main reason for the increased magnetic anisotropy of the nanoislands. PMID:27711268

  6. Solitary structures with ion and electron thermal anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Khusroo, Murchana

    2015-01-01

    Formation of electrostatic solitary structures are analysed for a magnetised plasma with ion and electron thermal anisotropies. The ion thermal anisotropy is modelled with the help of the Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) double adiabatic equations of state while the electrons are treated as inertia-less species with an anisotropic bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. A negative electron thermal anisotropy $(T_{e\\perp}/T_e{\\parallel}>1)$ is found to help form large amplitude solitary structures which are in agreement with observational data.

  7. Luminescence Decay Dynamics and Trace Biomaterials Detection Potential of Surface-Functionalized Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kwan H; Aijmo, Jacob; Ma, Lun; Yao, Mingzhen; Zhang, Xing; Como, John; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J; Huang, Juyang; Chen, Wei

    2008-10-22

    We have studied the luminescence decay and trace biomaterials detection potential of two surface-functionalized nanoparticles, poly(ethylene glycol) bis(carboxymethyl) ether-coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb (~20 nm) and thioglycolic acid-coated ZnS/Mn (~5 nm). Upon UV excitation, these nanoparticles emitted fluorescence peaking at 540 and 597 nm, respectively, in solution. Fluorescence imaging revealed that these nanoparticles targeted the trace biomaterials from fingerprints that were deposited on various nonporous solid substrates. Highly ordered, microscopic sweat pores within the friction ridges of the fingerprints were labeled with good spatial resolutions by the nanoparticles on aluminum and polymethylpentene substrates, but not on glass or quartz. In solution, these nanoparticles exhibited multicomponent fluorescence decays of resolved lifetimes ranging from nano-to microseconds and of average lifetimes of ~24 and 130 micros for the coated LaF(3):Ce,Tb and ZnS:Mn, respectively. The long microsecond-decay components are associated with the emitters at or near the nanocrystal core surface that are sensitive to the size, surface-functionalization, and solvent exposure of the nanoparticles. When the nanoparticles were bound to the surface of a solid substrate and in the dried state, a decrease in the microsecond decay lifetimes was observed, indicative of a change in the coating environment of the nanocrystal surface upon binding and solvent removal. The average decay lifetimes for the surface-bound ZnS:Mn in the dried state were ~60, 30, and 11 micros on quartz, aluminum, and polymethylpentene, respectively. These values were still 2 orders of magnitude longer than the typical fluorescence decay background of most substrates (e.g., ~0.36 micros for polymethylpentene) in trace forensic evidence detections. We conclude that coated ZnS: Mn nanoparticles hold great promise as a nontoxic labeling agent for ultrasensitive, time-gated, trace evidence detections in nanoforensic

  8. Rise-Time of FRET-Acceptor Fluorescence Tracks Protein Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhoud, Simon; Westphal, Adrie H.; van Mierlo, Carlo P. M.; Visser, Antonie J. W. G.; Borst, Jan Willem

    2014-01-01

    Uniform labeling of proteins with fluorescent donor and acceptor dyes with an equimolar ratio is paramount for accurate determination of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) efficiencies. In practice, however, the labeled protein population contains donor-labeled molecules that have no corresponding acceptor. These FRET-inactive donors contaminate the donor fluorescence signal, which leads to underestimation of FRET efficiencies in conventional fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based FRET experiments. Such contamination is avoided if FRET efficiencies are extracted from the rise time of acceptor fluorescence upon donor excitation. The reciprocal value of the rise time of acceptor fluorescence is equal to the decay rate of the FRET-active donor fluorescence. Here, we have determined rise times of sensitized acceptor fluorescence to study the folding of double-labeled apoflavodoxin molecules and show that this approach tracks the characteristics of apoflavodoxinʼs complex folding pathway. PMID:25535076

  9. FLIMX: A Software Package to Determine and Analyze the Fluorescence Lifetime in Time-Resolved Fluorescence Data from the Human Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, Matthias; Schweitzer, Dietrich; Peters, Sven; Sauer, Lydia; Hammer, Martin; Haueisen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (FLIO) is a new technique for measuring the in vivo autofluorescence intensity decays generated by endogenous fluorophores in the ocular fundus. Here, we present a software package called FLIM eXplorer (FLIMX) for analyzing FLIO data. Specifically, we introduce a new adaptive binning approach as an optimal tradeoff between the spatial resolution and the number of photons required per pixel. We also expand existing decay models (multi-exponential, stretched exponential, spectral global analysis, incomplete decay) to account for the layered structure of the eye and present a method to correct for the influence of the crystalline lens fluorescence on the retina fluorescence. Subsequently, the Holm-Bonferroni method is applied to FLIO measurements to allow for group comparisons between patients and controls on the basis of fluorescence lifetime parameters. The performance of the new approaches was evaluated in five experiments. Specifically, we evaluated static and adaptive binning in a diabetes mellitus patient, we compared the different decay models in a healthy volunteer and performed a group comparison between diabetes patients and controls. An overview of the visualization capabilities and a comparison of static and adaptive binning is shown for a patient with macular hole. FLIMX’s applicability to fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is shown in the ganglion cell layer of a porcine retina sample, obtained by a laser scanning microscope using two-photon excitation. PMID:26192624

  10. Texture and anisotropy of ferroelectric bismuth titanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jacob Leo

    Ferroelectric bismuth titanate, Na0.5Bi4.5 Ti4O15, is a piezoelectric ceramic used as an electromechanical sensor in high temperature environments (T piezoelectric constant, d33, is relatively low in randomly oriented ceramics. Crystallographic texturing is often employed to increase the piezoelectric constant because the spontaneous polarization axes of the grains are better aligned. This research distinguishes between the crystallographic texture induced to the grains from tape casting and crystallographic texture induced to the ferroelectric domains from electrical poling. Novel quantitative approaches describe texture of both types independently using conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources as well as time-of-flight neutron diffraction with multiple detectors. Furthermore, methods are developed to describe the combined effect of a ferroelectric texture superimposed on a paraelectric texture. Texture of the paraelectric crystallographic axes was induced by novel processing approaches. An alternative to using plate-shaped template particles was developed utilizing calcined powder. Paraelectric texture develops from particle settling and strong surface energy anisotropy during sintering. The 00l textures induced from this process are on the order of two to four multiples of a random distribution. These textures create property anisotropies between the casting plane and normal directions of 6.4 and 5.7 in piezoelectric d33 constant and remanent polarization, respectively. Texture of the ferroelectric crystallographic axes was induced by electrical poling at different temperatures and in different orientations. Ceramics with an initial paraelectric texture can exhibit greater change in the domain volume fractions during electrical poling than randomly oriented ceramics. This is demonstrated by applying novel quantitative approaches to reflection X-ray spectra from many sample directions. Because orthorhombic Na0.5Bi 4.5Ti4O15 has two ferroelectric domains that

  11. Heavy hadron decays with conserved heavy flavour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theoretische Physik 1, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet, Universitaet Siegen, Walter-Flex-Strasse 3, D-57068 Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the decays of heavy hadrons where the heavy quark acts as a spectator and the light quark decays in a weak transition. For these s → u or d → u decays we show that the decay rates can be reliably computed.

  12. Exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers with the uniaxial anisotropy being misaligned with the exchange anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI YuHao; YUN GuoHong

    2009-01-01

    Using the principle of minimal energy and S-W model, the exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers has been investigated when the uniaxial anisotropy is misaligned with the exchange anisotropy. According to the relation between the energy of the bilayer and the orientation of ferromagnetic magnetization, it is found that the bilayer will be in the monostable state or bistable state when the external field is absent in the initial magnetization state. The monostable state or bistable state of the bilayer, which determines the angular dependence of exchange bias directly, is controlled by the competition between the exchange anisotropy and uniaxial anisotropy. When the applied field is parallel to the intrinsic easy axes and intrinsic hard axes, one of the switching fields of the hysteresis loop shows an abrupt change, while the other keep continuous by analyzing the magnetization reversal processes. Consequently, the exchange bias field and the coercivity will show a jump phenomenon.The numerical calculations indicate that both the magnitude and direction of the exchange anisotropy will significantly affect the angular dependence of exchange bias. The jump phenomenon of exchange bias is an intrinsic property of the bilayer, which is dependent on the interracial exchange-coupling constant, the orientation of the exchange anisotropy, the thickness and uniaxial anisotropy constant of the ferromagnetic layer.

  13. Exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic bilayers with the uniaxial anisotropy being misaligned with the exchange anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using the principle of minimal energy and S-W model,the exchange bias for ferromagnetic/antiferro-magnetic bilayers has been investigated when the uniaxial anisotropy is misaligned with the exchange anisotropy. According to the relation between the energy of the bilayer and the orientation of ferro-magnetic magnetization,it is found that the bilayer will be in the monostable state or bistable state when the external field is absent in the initial magnetization state. The monostable state or bistable state of the bilayer,which determines the angular dependence of exchange bias directly,is controlled by the competition between the exchange anisotropy and uniaxial anisotropy. When the applied field is parallel to the intrinsic easy axes and intrinsic hard axes,one of the switching fields of the hysteresis loop shows an abrupt change,while the other keep continuous by analyzing the magnetization reversal processes. Consequently,the exchange bias field and the coercivity will show a jump phenomenon. The numerical calculations indicate that both the magnitude and direction of the exchange anisotropy will significantly affect the angular dependence of exchange bias. The jump phenomenon of exchange bias is an intrinsic property of the bilayer,which is dependent on the interfacial exchange-coupling constant,the orientation of the exchange anisotropy,the thickness and uniaxial anisotropy constant of the ferromagnetic layer.

  14. Fluorescence properties of dyes adsorbed to silver islands, investigated by picosecond techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, A.; Lippitsch, M. E.; Draxler, S.; Riegler, M.; Aussenegg, F. R.

    1985-02-01

    The fluorescence properties of dye molecules (rhodamine 6G and erythrosin) adsorbed on pure glass surfaces and on silver islands films are investigated by cw and picosecond time-resolved methods. On pure glass surfaces we observe concentration quenching below a critical intermolecular distance (reduction of the fluorescence power per molecule as well as shortened and non-exponential fluorescence decay). On silver islands films the shortening in fluorescence lifetime is more drastic and is nearly independent of the intermolecular distance. This behavior suggests an electrodynamic interaction between dye monomers and plasmons in the metal particles, modified by a damping influence of dye dimers.

  15. Kaons in flavour tagged B decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Bittner, M.; Eckstein, P.; Paulini, M. G.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Seeger, M.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Chechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1994-09-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the e + e - storage ring DORIS II, flavour-dependent kaon production in B meson decays has been studied. Using the leptons as flavour tags, it has been possible to separately measure the multiplicities of K +, K - and K {/s 0} in inclusive B decays and in semileptonic B decays. The kaon production in semileptonic B decays was further used to estimate the ratio of charmed decays over all decays, and thus also the fraction of charmless B decays.

  16. Anisotropy studies around the galactic centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abraham, J; Aguirre, C; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allison, P; Alvarez, C; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anchordoqui, Luis A; Anjos, J C; Aramo, C; Arisaka, K; Armengaud, E; Arneodo, F; Arqueros, F; Asch, T; Asorey, H; Atulugama, B S; Aublin, J; Ave, M; Avila, G; Bacelar, J; Backer, T; Badagnani, D O; Barbosa-Ademarlaudo, F; Barbosa, H M J; Barkhausen, M; Barnhill, D; Barroso, S L C; Bauleo, P; Beatty, J; Beau, T; Becker, B R; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Ben Zvi, S; Bérat, C; Bergmann, T; Bernardini, P; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Blanch-Bigas, O; Blanco, F; Blasi, P; Bleve, C; Blümer, H; Boghrat, P; Bohacova, M; Bonifazi, C; Bonino, R; Boratav, M; Brack, J; Brunet, J M; Buchholz, P; Busca, N G; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cai, B; Camin, D V; Capdevielle, J N; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chauvin, J; Chiavassa, A; Chinellato, J A; Chou, A; Chye, J; Claes, D; Clark, P D J; Clay, R W; Clay, S B; Connolly, B; Cordier, A; Cotti, U; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; Dagoret-Campagne, S; Dang Quang, T; Darriulat, Pierre; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; De Almeida, R M; De Carvalho, L A; De Donato, C; De Jong, S J; De Mello Junior, W J M; De Mello-Neto, J R T; De Mitri, I; De Oliveira, M A L; De Souza, V; Del Peral, L; Deligny, O; Della Selva, A; Delle Fratte, C; Dembinski, H; Di Giulio, C; Diaz, J C; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dornic, D; Dorofeev, A; Dova, M T; D'Urso, D; Duvernois, M A; Engel, R; Epele, L N; Erdmann, M; Escobar, C O; Etchegoyen, A; Ewers, A; Facal San Luis, P; Falcke, H; Fauth, A C; Fazio, D; Fazzini, N; Fernández, A; Ferrer, F; Ferry, S; Fick, B; Filevich, A; Filipcic, A; Fleck, I; Fokitis, E; Fonte, R; Fuhrmann, D; Fulgione, W; García, B; Garcia-Pinto, D; Garrard, L; Garrido, X; Geenen, H; Gelmini, G; Gemmeke, H; Geranios, A; Ghia, P L; Giller, M; Gitto, J; Glass, H; Gobbi, F; Gold, M S; Gomez Albarracin, F; Gomez Berisso, M; Gómez-Herrero, R; Goncalvesdo Amaral, M; Gongora, J P; González, D; Gonzalez, J G; González, M; Gora, D; Gorgi, A; Gouffon, P; Grassi, V; Grillo, A; Grunfeld, C; Grupen, C; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Gutíerrez, J; Hague, J D; Hamilton, J C; Harakeh, M N; Harari, D; Harmsma, S; Hartmann, S; Harton, J L; Haungs, A; Healy, M D; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Hojvat, C; Homola, P; Horandel, J; Horneffer, A; Horvat, M; Hrabovsky, M; Huege, T; Iarlori, M; Insolia, A; Kaducak, M; Kalashev, O; Kampert, K H; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Knapik, R; Knapp, J; Koang, D H; Kolotaev, Yu; Kopmann, A; Krömer, O; Kuhlman, S; Kuijpers, J; Kunka, N; Kusenko, A; Lachaud, C; Lago, B L; Lebrun, D; Lebrun, P; Lee, J; Letessier-Selvon, A A; Leuthold, M; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Longo, G; López, R; López-Aguera, A; Lucero, A; Maldera, S; Malek, M; Maltezos, S; Mancarella, G; Mancenido, M E; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Maris, I C; Martello, D; Martínez, N; Martínez, J; Martínez, O; Mathes, H J; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurin, G; Maurizio, D; Mazur, P O; McCauley, T; McEwen, M; McNeil, R R; Medina, G; Medina, M C; Medina Tanco, G; Meli, A; Melo, D; Menichetti, E; Menshikov, A; Meurer, C; Meyhandan, R; Micheletti, M I; Miele, G; Miller, W; Mollerach, S; Monasor, M; Monnier Ragaigne, D; Montanet, François; Morales, B; Morello, C; Moreno, E; Morris, C; Mostafa, M; Muller, M A; Mussa, R; Navarra, G; Nellen, L; Newman-Holmes, C; Newton, D; Nguyen Thi, T; Nichol, R; Nierstenhofer, N; Nitz, D; Nogima, H; Nosek, D; Nozka, L; Oehlschläger, J; Ohnuki, T; Olinto, A; Oliveira, L F A; Olmos-Gilbaja, V M; Ortiz, M; Ostapchenko, S; Otero, L; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Parente, G; Parizot, E; Parlati, S; Patel, M; Paul, T; Payet, K; Pech, M; Pekala, J; Pelayo, R; Pepe, I M; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Petrinca, P; Petrov, Y; Pham Ngoc, D; Pham Thi, T N; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pisanti, O; Porter, T A; Pouryamout, J; Prado Junior, L; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Rautenberg, J; Reis, H C; Reucroft, S; Revenu, B; Rídky, J; Risi, A; Risse, M; Rivière, C; Rizi, V; Robbins, S; Roberts, M; Robledo, C; Rodríguez, G; Rodriguez Frias, D; Rodríguez-Martino, J; Rodriguez Rojo, J; Ros, G; Rosado, J; Roth, M; Roucelle, C; Rouille-d'Orfeuil, B; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Salina, G; Sánchez, F; Santander, M; Santos, E M; Sarkar, S; Sato, R; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schmidt, T; Scholten, O; Schovanek, P; Schussler, F; Sciutto, S J; Scuderi, M; Semikoz, Dmitry V; Sequeiros, G; Shellard, R C; Siffert, B B; Sigl, G; Skelton, P; Slater, W; Smetniansky De Grande, N; Smialkowski, A; Smida, R; Smith, B E; Snow, G R; Sokolsky, P; Sommers, P; Sorokin, J; Spinka, H; Strazzeri, E; Stutz, A; Suárez, F; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Tamashiro, A; Tamburro, A; Tascau, O; Ticona, R; Timmermans, C; Tkaczyk, W; Todero Peixoto, C J; Tonachini, A; Torresi, D; Travnicek, P; Tripathi, A; Tristram, G; Tscherniakhovski, D; Tueros, M; Tunnicliffe, V; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Valdés-Galicia, J F; Valino, I; Valore, L; Vanden Berg, A M; Van Elewyck, V; Vázquez, R A; Veberic, D; Veiga, A; Velarde, A; Venters, T; Verzi, V; Videla, M; Villaseñor, L; Vo Van, T; Vorobiov, S; Voyvodic, L; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Waldenmaier, T; Walker, P; Warner, D; Watson, A A; Westerhoff, S; Wiebusch, C; Wieczorek, G J; Wiencke, L; Wilczynska, B; Wilczynski, H; Wileman, C; Winnick, M G; Xu, J; Yamamoto, T; Younk, P; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zech, A; Zepeda, A; Zha, M; Ziolkowski, M

    2006-01-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius $A$. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the `hybrid' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  17. Anisotropy studies around the galactic centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J. C.; Aramo, C.; Arisaka, K.; Armengaud, E.; Arneodo, F.; Arqueros, F.; Asch, T.; Asorey, H.; Atulugama, B. S.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avila, G.; Bacelar, J.; Bäcker, T.; Badagnani, D.; Barbosa, A. F.; Barbosa, H. M. J.; Barkhausen, M.; Barnhill, D.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Bauleo, P.; Beatty, J.; Beau, T.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Benzvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bergmann, T.; Bernardini, P.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanch-Bigas, O.; Blanco, F.; Blasi, P.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boghrat, P.; Boháčová, M.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Boratav, M.; Brack, J.; Brunet, J. M.; Buchholz, P.; Busca, N. G.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Cai, B.; Camin, D. V.; Capdevielle, J. N.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazón, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chou, A.; Chye, J.; Claes, D.; Clark, P. D. J.; Clay, R. W.; Clay, S. B.; Connolly, B.; Cordier, A.; Cotti, U.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Quang, T. Dang; Darriulat, P.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Carvalho, L. A.; de Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; de Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, M. A. L.; de Souza, V.; Del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Della Selva, A.; Delle Fratte, C.; Dembinski, H.; di Giulio, C.; Diaz, J. C.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dornic, D.; Dorofeev, A.; Dova, M. T.; D'Urso, D.; Duvernois, M. A.; Engel, R.; Epele, L.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Etchegoyen, A.; Ewers, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazio, D.; Fazzini, N.; Fernández, A.; Ferrer, F.; Ferry, S.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fleck, I.; Fokitis, E.; Fonte, R.; Fuhrmann, D.; Fulgione, W.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garrard, L.; Garrido, X.; Geenen, H.; Gelmini, G.; Gemmeke, H.; Geranios, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giller, M.; Gitto, J.; Glass, H.; Gobbi, F.; Gold, M. S.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Herrero, R.; Gonçalves Do Amaral, M.; Gongora, J. P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, M.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Grassi, V.; Grillo, A.; Grunfeld, C.; Grupen, C.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Gutiérrez, J.; Hague, J. D.; Hamilton, J. C.; Harakeh, M. N.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Healy, M. D.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Hojvat, C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J.; Horneffer, A.; Horvat, M.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Iarlori, M.; Insolia, A.; Kaducak, M.; Kalashev, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapik, R.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kolotaev, Y.; Kopmann, A.; Krömer, O.; Kuhlman, S.; Kuijpers, J.; Kunka, N.; Kusenko, A.; Lachaud, C.; Lago, B. L.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, J.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Leuthold, M.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Longo, G.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Lucero, A.; Maldera, S.; Malek, M.; Maltezos, S.; Mancarella, G.; Manceñido, M. E.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Martello, D.; Martinez, N.; Martínez, J.; Martínez, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurin, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; McCauley, T.; McEwen, M.; McNeil, R. R.; Medina, G.; Medina, M. C.; Medina Tanco, G.; Meli, A.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Meurer, Chr.; Meyhandan, R.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miele, G.; Miller, W.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Muller, M. A.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Nellen, L.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Newton, D.; Thi, T. Nguyen; Nichol, R.; Nierstenhöfer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nogima, H.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ohnuki, T.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, L. F. A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Ostapchenko, S.; Otero, L.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parlati, S.; Patel, M.; Paul, T.; Payet, K.; Pech, M.; PeĶala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrov, Y.; Pham Ngoc, D.; Pham Thi, T. N.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pisanti, O.; Porter, T. A.; Pouryamout, J.; Prado, L.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Rautenberg, J.; Reis, H. C.; Reucroft, S.; Revenu, B.; Řídký, J.; Risi, A.; Risse, M.; Rivière, C.; Rizi, V.; Robbins, S.; Roberts, M.; Robledo, C.; Rodriguez, G.; Rodríguez Frías, D.; Rodriguez Martino, J.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roucelle, C.; Rouillé-D'Orfeuil, B.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Santander, M.; Santos, E. M.; Sarkar, S.; Sato, R.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, T.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schüssler, F.; Sciutto, S. J.; Scuderi, M.; Semikoz, D.; Sequeiros, G.; Shellard, R. C.; Siffert, B. B.; Sigl, G.; Skelton, P.; Slater, W.; de Grande, N. Smetniansky; Smiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Smith, B. E.; Snow, G. R.; Sokolsky, P.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Spinka, H.; Strazzeri, E.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Tamashiro, A.; Tamburro, A.; Tascau, O.; Ticona, R.; Timmermans, C.; Tkaczyk, W.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tonachini, A.; Torresi, D.; Travnicek, P.; Tripathi, A.; Tristram, G.; Tscherniakhovski, D.; Tueros, M.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Elewyck, V.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Veiga, A.; Velarde, A.; Venters, T.; Verzi, V.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vo van, T.; Vorobiov, S.; Voyvodic, L.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Waldenmaier, T.; Walker, P.; Warner, D.; Watson, A. A.; Westerhoff, S.; Wiebusch, C.; Wieczorek, G.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Wileman, C.; Winnick, M. G.; Xu, J.; Yamamoto, T.; Younk, P.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zech, A.; Zepeda, A.; Zha, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-04-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ‘hybrid’ data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  18. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.

    2006-07-01

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  19. Pressure-anisotropy-driven microturbulence and magnetic-field evolution in shearing, collisionless plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Melville, S; Kunz, M W

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear state of a high-beta collisionless plasma is investigated when an imposed linear shear amplifies or diminishes a uniform magnetic field, driving pressure anisotropies and hence firehose/mirror instabilities. The evolution of the resulting microscale turbulence is considered when the shear is switched off or reversed after one shear time (mimicking local behaviour of a macroscopic flow), so a new macroscale configuration is superimposed on the microscale state left behind by the previous one. There is a threshold value of plasma beta: when $\\beta\\ll\\Omega/S$ (ion cyclotron frequency/shear rate), the emergence of firehose/mirror fluctuations driven unstable by shear and their disappearance when the shear is removed/reversed are quasi-instantaneous compared to the shear time, viz., the decay time of these fluctuations is $\\sim\\beta/\\Omega \\ll 1/S$ (this result follows from the free decay of the fluctuations being constrained by the same marginal-stability thresholds as their growth). In contrast, w...

  20. Relationship between electrical conductivity anisotropy and fabric anisotropy in granular materials during drained triaxial compressive tests: a numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qifei; Revil, André; Li, Zhaofeng; Wang, Yu-Hsing

    2017-07-01

    The anisotropy of granular media and its evolution during shearing are important aspects required in developing physics-based constitutive models in Earth sciences. The development of relationships between geoelectrical properties and the deformation of porous media has applications to the monitoring of faulting and landslides. However, such relationships are still poorly understood. In this study, we first investigate the definition of the electrical conductivity anisotropy tensor of granular materials in presence of surface conductivity of the grains. Fabric anisotropy is related to the components of the fabric tensor. We define an electrical anisotropy factor based on the Archie's exponent second-order symmetric tensor m of granular materials. We use numerical simulations to confirm a relationship between the evolution of electrical and fabric anisotropy factors during shearing. To realize the simulations, we build a virtual laboratory in which we can easily perform synthetic experiments. We first simulate drained compressive triaxial tests of loose and dense granular materials (porosity 0.45 and 0.38, respectively) using the discrete element method. Then, the electrical conductivity tensor of a set of deformed synthetic samples is computed using the finite-difference method. The numerical results show that shear strains are responsible for a measurable anisotropy in the bulk conductivity of granular media. The observed electrical anisotropy response, during shearing, is distinct for dense and loose synthetic samples. Electrical and fabric anisotropy factors exhibit however a unique linear correlation, regardless of the shear strain and the initial state (porosity) of the synthetic samples. The practical implication of this finding confirms the usefulness of the electrical conductivity method in studying the fabric tensor of granular media. This result opens the door in using time-lapse electrical resistivity to study non-intrusively the evolution of anisotropy

  1. Fluorescence antibunching microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Osip

    2011-01-01

    Breaking the diffraction limit in microscopy by utilizing quantum properties of light has been the goal of intense research in the recent years. We propose a quantum superresolution technique based on non-classical emission statistics of fluorescent markers, routinely used as contrast labels for bio-imaging. The technique can be readily implemented using standard fluorescence microscopy equipment.

  2. Fluorescence of atopic allergens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berrens, L.

    1967-01-01

    Purified atopic allergens have been found to emit flue fluorescence upon irradiation with ultraviolet light of 365 mμ wavelength. The maximum of fluorescence is in the region 445–490 mμ and the intensity is of the same order of magnitude for different atopic allergens. Synthetic model compounds, inc

  3. Fluorescent Lamp Replacement Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Light-emitting diode, LED, lighting, fluorescent, waste reduction, energy conservation, net zero , mercury 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Center (ATC) to assess the benefits of converting fluorescent tube lighting to light-emitting diode (LED) technology. The report documents the waste ...1-15 SECTION 2. SUBTESTS 2.1 HAZARDOUS WASTE REDUCTION

  4. LEDs for fluorescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, I.T.; Garini, Y.; Dietrich, H.R.C.; Van Oel, W.; Liqui Lung, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional light sources for fluorescence microscopy have been mercury lamps, xenon lamps, and lasers. These sources have been essential in the development of fluorescence microscopy but each can have serious disadvantages: lack of near monochromaticity, heat generation, cost, lifetime of the light

  5. In-trap decay spectroscopy for {beta}{beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Thomas

    2011-01-18

    The presented work describes the implementation of a new technique to measure electron-capture (EC) branching ratios (BRs) of intermediate nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. This technique has been developed at TRIUMF in Vancouver, Canada. It facilitates one of TRIUMF's Ion Traps for Atomic and Nuclear science (TITAN), the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) that is used as a spectroscopy Penning trap. Radioactive ions, produced at the radioactive isotope facility ISAC, are injected and stored in the spectroscopy Penning trap while their decays are observed. A key feature of this technique is the use of a strong magnetic field, required for trapping. It radially confines electrons from {beta} decays along the trap axis while X-rays, following an EC, are emitted isotropically. This provides spatial separation of X-ray and {beta} detection with almost no {beta}-induced background at the X-ray detector, allowing weak EC branches to be measured. Furthermore, the combination of several traps allows one to isobarically clean the sample prior to the in-trap decay spectroscopy measurement. This technique has been developed to measure ECBRs of transition nuclei in {beta}{beta} decays. Detailed knowledge of these electron capture branches is crucial for a better understanding of the underlying nuclear physics in {beta}{beta} decays. These branches are typically of the order of 10{sup -5} and therefore difficult to measure. Conventional measurements suffer from isobaric contamination and a dominating {beta} background at theX-ray detector. Additionally, X-rays are attenuated by the material where the radioactive sample is implanted. To overcome these limitations, the technique of in-trap decay spectroscopy has been developed. In this work, the EBIT was connected to the TITAN beam line and has been commissioned. Using the developed beam diagnostics, ions were injected into the Penning trap and systematic studies on injection and storage optimization were performed. Furthermore, Ge

  6. Loop quantum cosmology: Anisotropies and inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    In this dissertation we extend the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology from the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times to cosmological models which allow anisotropies and inhomogeneities. Specifically, we consider the cases of the homogeneous but anisotropic Bianchi type I, II and IX models with a massless scalar field as well as the vacuum, inhomogeneous, linearly polarized Gowdy T3 model. For each case, we derive the Hamiltonian constraint operator and study its properties. In particular, we show how in all of these models the classical big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved due to quantum gravity effects. Since the Bianchi models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz conjecture regarding the nature of generic space-like singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of the Bianchi cosmologies are likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of such singularities in quantum gravity. In addition, the results obtained here provide an important step toward the full loop quantization of cosmological space-times that allow generic inhomogeneities; this would provide falsifiable predictions that could be compared to observations.

  7. Twinning anisotropy of tantalum during nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, Saurav, E-mail: S.GOEL@qub.ac.uk [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Beake, Ben [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dalton Research Institute, Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15GD (United Kingdom); Chan, Chi-Wai [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom); Haque Faisal, Nadimul [School of Engineering, Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen AB10 7GJ (United Kingdom); Dunne, Nicholas [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen' s University, Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-11

    Unlike other BCC metals, the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline Tantalum (Ta) during compression is regulated by deformation twinning. Whether or not this twinning exhibits anisotropy was investigated through simulation of displacement-controlled nanoindentation test using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. MD data was found to correlate well with the experimental data in terms of surface topography and hardness measurements. The mechanism of the transport of material was identified due to the formation and motion of prismatic dislocations loops (edge dislocations) belonging to the 1/2〈111〉 type and 〈100〉 type Burgers vector family. Further analysis of crystal defects using a fully automated dislocation extraction algorithm (DXA) illuminated formation and migration of twin boundaries on the (110) and (111) orientation but not on the (010) orientation and most importantly after retraction all the dislocations disappeared on the (110) orientation suggesting twinning to dominate dislocation nucleation in driving plasticity in tantalum. A significant finding was that the maximum shear stress (critical Tresca stress) in the deformation zone exceeded the theoretical shear strength of Ta (Shear modulus/2π~10.03 GPa) on the (010) orientation but was lower than it on the (110) and the (111) orientations. In light of this, the conventional lore of assuming the maximum shear stress being 0.465 times the mean contact pressure was found to break down at atomic scale.

  8. $\\Lambda$-inflation and CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Lukash, V N

    2000-01-01

    We explore a broad class of three-parameter inflationary models, called the cosmic gravitational waves consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations, the non-power-law wing-like spectrum of matter density perturbations, high efficiency of these models to meet current observational tests, and others. We show that a parity contribution of the gravitational waves and adiabatic density perturbations into the large-scale temperature anisotropy, T/S $\\sim 1$, is a common feature of are reached in models where (i) the local spectrum shape of density perturbations is flat or slightly red ($n_S{}_\\sim^< 1$), and (ii) the residual potential energy of the inflaton is near the GUT scale ($V_0^{{1/4}} \\sim 10^{16} GeV$). The conditions to find large T/S in the paradigm of cosmic inflation and the relationship of T/S to the ratio of the power spectra, $r$, and to the inflationary $\\gamma$ and Hubble parameters, are discussed. We argue that a simple estimate, T/S$\\simeq 3r\\sime...

  9. Studies of anisotropy of iron based superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jason A. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    To study the electronic anisotropy in iron based superconductors, the temperature dependent London penetration depth, Δλ(T), have been measured in several compounds, along with the angular dependent upper critical field, Hc2(T). Study was undertaken on single crystals of Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 with x=0.108 and x=0.127, in the overdoped range of the doping phase diagram, characterized by notable modulation of the superconducting gap. Heavy ion irradiation with matching field doses of 6 T and 6.5 T respectively, were used to create columnar defects and to study their effect on the temperature Δλ(T). The variation of the low-temperature penetration depth in both pristine and irradiated samples was fitted with a power-law function Δλ(T) = ATn. Irradiation increases the magnitude of the pre-factor A and decreases the exponent n, similar to the effect on the optimally doped samples. This finding supports the universal s ± scenario for the whole doping range.

  10. Anisotropy in the Interaction of Ultracold Dysprosium

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    The nature of the interaction between ultracold atoms with a large orbital and spin angular momentum has attracted considerable attention. It was suggested that such interactions can lead to the realization of exotic states of highly correlated matter. Here, we report on a theoretical study of the competing anisotropic dispersion, magnetic dipole-dipole, and electric quadrupole-quadrupole forces between two dysprosium atoms. Each dysprosium atom has an orbital angular momentum L=6 and magnetic moment $\\mu=10\\mu_B$. We show that the dispersion coefficients of the ground state adiabatic potentials lie between 1865 a.u. and 1890 a.u., creating a non-negligible anisotropy with a spread of 25 a.u. and that the electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction is weak compared to the other interactions. We also find that for interatomic separations $R< 50\\,a_0$ both the anisotropic dispersion and magnetic dipole-dipole potential are larger than the atomic Zeeman splittings for external magnetic fields of order 10 G to ...

  11. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  12. Patchy polymer colloids with tunable anisotropy dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; Hilhorst, Jan; Heinen, Maria A P; Hoogenraad, Mathijs J; Luigjes, Bob; Kegel, Willem K

    2011-06-09

    We present the synthesis of polymer colloids with continuously tunable anisotropy dimensions: patchiness, roughness, and branching. Our method makes use of controlled fusion of multiple protrusions on highly cross-linked polymer particles produced by seeded emulsion polymerization. Carefully changing the synthesis conditions, we can tune the number of protrusions, or branching, of the obtained particles from spheres with one to three patches to raspberry-like particles with multiple protrusions. In addition to that, roughness is generated on the seed particles by adsorption of secondary nucleated particles during synthesis. The size of the roughness relative to the smooth patches can be continuously tuned by the initiator, surfactant, and styrene concentrations. Seed colloids chemically different from the protrusions induce patches of different chemical nature. The underlying generality of the synthesis procedure allows for application to a variety of seed particle sizes and materials. We demonstrate the use of differently sized polyNIPAM (poly-N-isopropylacrylamide), as well as polystyrene and magnetite filled polyNIPAM seed particles, the latter giving rise to magnetically anisotropic colloids. The high yield together with the uniform, anisotropic shape make them interesting candidates for use as smart building blocks in self-assembling systems.

  13. Nanoscale magnetic ratchets based on shape anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jizhai; Keller, Scott M.; Liang, Cheng-Yen; Carman, Gregory P.; Lynch, Christopher S.

    2017-02-01

    Controlling magnetization using piezoelectric strain through the magnetoelectric effect offers several orders of magnitude reduction in energy consumption for spintronic applications. However strain is a uniaxial effect and, unlike directional magnetic field or spin-polarized current, cannot induce a full 180° reorientation of the magnetization vector when acting alone. We have engineered novel ‘peanut’ and ‘cat-eye’ shaped nanomagnets on piezoelectric substrates that undergo repeated deterministic 180° magnetization rotations in response to individual electric-field-induced strain pulses by breaking the uniaxial symmetry using shape anisotropy. This behavior can be likened to a magnetic ratchet, advancing magnetization clockwise with each piezostrain trigger. The results were validated using micromagnetics implemented in a multiphysics finite elements code to simulate the engineered spatial and temporal magnetic behavior. The engineering principles start from a target device function and proceed to the identification of shapes that produce the desired function. This approach opens a broad design space for next generation magnetoelectric spintronic devices.

  14. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  15. Microstructural, Magnetic Anisotropy, and Magnetic Domain Structure Correlations in Epitaxial FePd Thin Films with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skuza, J. R.; Clavero, C.; Yang, K.; Wincheski, B.; Lukaszew, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    L1(sub 0)-ordered FePd epitaxial thin films were prepared using dc magnetron sputter deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The films were grown with varying thickness and degree of chemical order to investigate the interplay between the microstructure, magnetic anisotropy, and magnetic domain structure. The experimentally measured domain size/period and magnetic anisotropy in this high perpendicular anisotropy system were found to be correlated following the analytical energy model proposed by Kooy and Enz that considers a delicate balance between the domain wall energy and the demagnetizing stray field energy.

  16. Collagen fibers mediate MRI-detected water diffusion and anisotropy in breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakkad, Samata; Zhang, Jiangyang; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacob, Desmond; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Jacobs, Michael A; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers play an important role in tumor interstitial macromolecular transport and cancer cell dissemination. Our goal was to understand the influence of Col1 fibers on water diffusion, and to examine the potential of using noninvasive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to indirectly detect Col1 fibers in breast lesions. We previously observed, in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts engineered to fluoresce under hypoxia, relatively low amounts of Col1 fibers in fluorescent hypoxic regions. These xenograft tumors together with human breast cancer samples were used here to investigate the relationship between Col1 fibers, water diffusion and anisotropy, and hypoxia. Hypoxic low Col1 fiber containing regions showed decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to normoxic high Col1 fiber containing regions. Necrotic high Col1 fiber containing regions showed increased ADC with decreased FA values compared to normoxic viable high Col1 fiber regions that had increased ADC with increased FA values. A good agreement of ADC and FA patterns was observed between in vivo and ex vivo images. In human breast cancer specimens, ADC and FA decreased in low Col1 containing regions. Our data suggest that a decrease in ADC and FA values observed within a lesion could predict hypoxia, and a pattern of high ADC with low FA values could predict necrosis. Collectively the data identify the role of Col1 fibers in directed water movement and support expanding the evaluation of DTI parameters as surrogates for Col1 fiber patterns associated with specific tumor microenvironments as companion diagnostics and for staging.

  17. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  18. Decays of the vector glueball

    CERN Document Server

    Giacosa, Francesco; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2016-01-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons. By setting the mass of this yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by Lattice QCD, many branching ratios can be computed and represent a parameter-free prediction of our approach. We find that the decay mode $\\omega\\pi\\pi$ should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain $\\mathcal{O}\\rightarrow b_{1}\\pi\\rightarrow$ $\\omega\\pi\\pi$ and through the direct coupling $\\mathcal{O}\\rightarrow\\omega\\pi\\pi$)$.$ Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into $\\pi KK^{\\ast}(892)$ is sizable. Moreover, the decays into $\\rho\\pi$ and $K^{\\ast}(892)K$ are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the $\\rho\\pi$ puzzle of the charmonium state $\\psi(2S)$ thank to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA exper...

  19. CRBRP decay heat removal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hottel, R. E.; Louison, R.; Boardman, C. E.; Kiley, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Decay Heat Removal Systems for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are designed to adequately remove sensible and decay heat from the reactor following normal shutdown, operational occurrences, and postulated accidents on both a short term and a long term basis. The Decay Heat Removal Systems are composed of the Main Heat Transport System, the Main Condenser and Feedwater System, the Steam Generator Auxiliary Heat Removal System (SGAHRS), and the Direct Heat Removal Service (DHRS). The overall design of the CRBRP Decay Heat Removal Systems and the operation under normal and off-normal conditions is examined. The redundancies of the system design, such as the four decay heat removal paths, the emergency diesel power supplies, and the auxiliary feedwater pumps, and the diversities of the design such as forced circulation/natural circulation and AC Power/DC Power are presented. In addition to overall design and system capabilities, the detailed designs for the Protected Air Cooled Condensers (PACC) and the Air Blast Heat Exchangers (ABHX) are presented.

  20. Axisymmetric equilibria with pressure anisotropy and plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelias, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    In this Master thesis we investigate the influence of pressure anisotropy and incompressible flow of arbitrary direction on the equilibrium properties of magnetically confined, axisymmetric toroidal plasmas. The main novel contribution is the derivation of a pertinent generalised Grad-Shafranov equation. This equation includes six free surface functions and recovers known Grad-Shafranov-like equations in the literature as well as the usual static, isotropic one. The form of the generalised equation indicates that pressure anisotropy and flow act additively on equilibrium. In addition, two sets of analytical solutions, an extended Solovev one with a plasma reaching the separatrix and an extended Hernegger-Maschke one for a plasma surrounded by a fixed boundary possessing an X-point, are constructed, particularly in relevance to the ITER and NSTX tokamaks. Furthermore, the impacts both of pressure anisotropy, through an anisotropy function assumed to be uniform on the magnetic surfaces, and plasma flow, via the...

  1. Is the magnetic anisotropy proportional to the orbital moment?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skomski, R; Kashyap, A; Enders, A

    2011-04-01

    The relation between orbital moment and magnetic anisotropy is investigated by model calculations, which show that only a part of the spin-orbit coupling contributes to the anisotropy. A large part of the anisotropy energy, about 50% for iron series elements and nearly 100% for rare-earths, is stored in the nonrelativistic part of the Hamiltonian. A feature important for x-ray magnetic circular dichroism is that the orbital moment of heavy atoms rotates with the spin moment, whereas in light atoms, the orbital moment is recreated in each different direction. In the discussion, we consider three examples of current interest in different areas of magnetism, namely, spin-orbit coupling in Gd3+ and Eu2+, surface anisotropy of Nd2Fe14B, and multiferroic magnetization switching using rare-earths. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3562445

  2. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  3. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  4. Optical Anisotropy and Molecular Orientation of Neutralized Curdlan Gels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasuyuki Maki; Hideki Okamura; Toshiaki Dobashi

    2017-01-01

    Curdlan gels were prepared by dialyzing its alkaline solutions in HCl solutions, and its optical anisotropy and molecular orientation in the gel were investigated by birefringence and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS...

  5. Microstructure, Slip Systems and Yield Stress Anisotropy in Plastic Deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Grethe; You, Ze Sheng; Lu, Lei

    The highly anisotropic microstructures in nanotwinned copper produced by electrodeposition provide an excellent opportunity to evaluate models for microstructurally induced mechanical anisotropy. A crystal plasticity model originally developed for the integration of deformation induced dislocation...

  6. Low-temperature magnetic anisotropy in micas and chlorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Bender Koch, Christian; Lorenz, Wolfram E A;

    2014-01-01

    of magnetic susceptibility. Because diamagnetic and paramagnetic susceptibility are both linearly dependent on field, separation of the anisotropic contributions requires understanding how the degree of anisotropy of the paramagnetic susceptibility changes as a function of temperature. Note that diamagnetic...... of approximately 6.3-8.7 for individual samples of muscovite, phlogopite and chlorite on cooling from RT to 77 K and between 11.2 and 12.4 for biotite. A decrease in temperature enhances the paramagnetic anisotropy in a mineral. Biotite exhibits a relatively stronger enhancement due to the onset of magnetic......Phyllosilicates, such as micas and chlorite, are common rock-forming minerals and often show preferred orientation in deformed rocks. In combination with single-crystal anisotropy, this leads to anisotropy of physical properties in the rock, such as magnetic susceptibility. In order to effectively...

  7. Tuning Exchange Anisotropy of Exchange-Biased System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan; HU Jing-Guo; R.L.Stamps

    2008-01-01

    Exchange anisotropy in FM/AFM bilayers has given a lot of static magnetization properties such as enhanced coercivity and magnetization loop shifts.These phenomena are primarily from the effective anisotropies intro-duced into a ferromagnet by exchange coupling with a strongly anisotropic antiferromagnet.These effective anisotropies can also be used to explain the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.In this article,the dynamic con-sequences such as exchange-induced susceptibility,exchange-induced permeability,and the corresponding domain wall characteristics in the exchange-biased structures of ferromagnet/antiferromagnetl/antiferromagnet2 are studied.The results show that the second antiferromagnetic layer can largely affect the dynamic consequences of exchange-biased bilayers.Especially in the ease of critical temperature,the effects become more obvious.Practically,the exchange anisotropy of biased bilayer system can be tuned by exchange coupling with the second antiferromagnetic layer.

  8. Polarimetric investigation of materials with both linear and circular anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naydenova, I.; Nikolova, L.; Todorov, T.;

    1997-01-01

    We investigate light propagation through materials with both linear and circular anisotropy and find the relation of the amplitude and polarization transfer functions to the four anisotropic characteristics: linear circular birefringence, and linear and circular dichroism. We determine these four...

  9. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  10. CoTaZr/Pd multilayer with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Chang Lau

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel perpendicularly magnetized thin film [Co91.5Ta4.5Zr4/Pd]5 multilayer, which exhibits strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy when grown on 5 nm of Pd and Ru seed layers. The Pd-seeded multilayer annealed at 300 °C shows an effective uniaxial anisotropy constant, Keff = 1.1 MJ m−3, with an anisotropy field as high as 1.6 T. The perpendicular anisotropy is sustained on annealing at 400 °C for 1 h. X-ray diffraction on multilayers with 30 repeats suggests that the use of amorphous CoTaZr reduces the stress of the stack, compared to [Co/Pd] multilayer.

  11. Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulleregan, Alice; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel; Ogetree, D.F.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Brenner, J.; Dubois, J.M.

    2008-06-25

    We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested both in nanometer size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) tips as well as in macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disc tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

  12. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borriello, Enrico [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cuoco, Alessandro [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  13. Monitoring membrane hydration with 2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes fluorescent probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis

    2015-01-01

    A family of polarity sensitive fluorescent probes (2-(dimethylamino)-6-acylnaphtalenes, i.e. LAURDAN, PRODAN, ACDAN) was introduced by Gregorio Weber in 1979, with the aim to monitor solvent relaxation phenomena on protein matrices. In the following years, however, PRODAN and particularly LAURDAN......, were used to study membrane lateral structure and associated dynamics. Once incorporated into membranes, the (nanosecond) fluorescent decay of these probes is strongly affected by changes in the local polarity and relaxation dynamics of restricted water molecules existing at the membrane/water...

  14. Anisotropy signature in extended images from reverse-time migration

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul

    2012-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the earth, i.e. at common-image-point gathers (CIPs), carry enough information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in CIPs, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography.

  15. Cosmic microwave background anisotropies seeded by incoherent sources

    CERN Document Server

    Riazuelo, A; Riazuelo, Alain; Deruelle, Nathalie

    2000-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background anisotropies produced by active seeds, such as topological defects, have been computed recently for a variety of models by a number of authors. In this paper we show how the generic features of the anisotropies caused by active, incoherent, seeds (that is the absence of acoustic peaks at small scales) can be obtained semi-analytically, without entering into the model dependent details of their formation, structure and evolution.

  16. Spatially frustrated S = 1 Heisenberg antiferromagnet with single ion anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, A. S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Using the SU(3) Schwinger boson formalism, I study the S = 1 square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, at zero temperature, with spatially anisotropic nearest-neighbor couplings frustrated by a next-nearest neighbor interaction and single ion anisotropy. The phase diagram at zero temperature is presented. My calculations show two magnetically ordered phases separated by a quantum-disordered region for all values of the anisotropy.

  17. Ice-Templated W-Cu Composites with High Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Röthlisberger, André; Häberli, Sandra; Galinski, Henning; Dunand, David C.; Spolenak, Ralph

    2017-01-01

    Controlling anisotropy in self-assembled structures enables engineering of materials with highly directional response. Here, we harness the anisotropic growth of ice walls in a thermal gradient to assemble an anisotropic refractory metal structure, which is then infiltrated with Cu to make a composite. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate on the specific example of tungsten-copper composites the effect of anisotropy on the electrical and mechanical properties. The results are com...

  18. Ferromagnetic resonance of nanocrystal chains with competitive and cooperative anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulialias, D.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of cellular magnetic dipoles by chain assemblies of nearly equidimensional, stable single domain magnetite nanocrystals aligned along their [111] easy axes is a common property encountered in many magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). The development of such dipoles permits the navigation of MTB along the geomagnetic field towards favourable habitats, a process also referred to as magnetotaxis. An important characteristic is the anisotropy within the chains, which mainly consists of the magnetocrystalline and the shape anisotropy. The two anisotropy contributions can be cooperative or competitive depending on the orientation with respect to the chain axis. The change in the relative orientation between the two anisotropy contributions caused by the Verwey transition TV, can be used to unambigously detect MTB and their fossil remains. Ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) is a well-established method to probe magnetic anisotropy in absolute units. Here, we use X- and Q-band FMR spectroscopy and numerical simulation to analyze the MTB species of Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 with elongated magnetosomes aligned along the [100] hard axis. In this special case, the magnetotaxis above TV is strongly affected by the shape anisotropy of the nanocrystals and it is competitive to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Below TV, the change of the easy axis [111] to [100] generates a cooperative system, which can be considered as the optimal case for magnetotaxis, i.e., shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies are nearly parallel to the MTB chain axis. In summary, the nanocrystal assembly in RS-1 provides another step towards a better understanding of the physics behind magnetotaxis.

  19. Modeling plasma pressure anisotropy's effect on Saturn's global magnetospheric dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, M.; Harnett, E. M.; Winglee, R.

    2014-12-01

    A 3D multi-fluid, multi-scale plasma model with a complete treatment of plasma pressure anisotropy is employed to study global magnetospheric dynamics at Saturn. Cassini has observed anisotropies in the Saturnian magnetosphere, and analyses have showed correlations between anisotropy and plasma convection, ring current structure and intensity, confinement of plasma to the equatorial plane, as well as mass transport to the outer magnetosphere. The energization and transport of plasma within Saturn's magnetosphere is impactful upon the induced magnetic environments and atmospheres of potentially habitable satellites such as Enceladus and Titan. Recent efforts to couple pressure anisotropy with 3D multi-fluid plasma modeling have shown a significant move towards matching observations for simulations of Earth's magnetosphere. Our approach is used to study the effects of plasma pressure anisotropy on global processes of the Saturnian magnetosphere such as identifying the effect of pressure anisotropy on the centrifugal interchange instability. Previous simulation results have not completely replicated all aspects of the structure and formation of the interchange 'fingers' measured by Cassini at Saturn. The related effects of anisotropy, in addition to those mentioned above, include contribution to formation of MHD waves (e.g. reduction of Alfvén wave speed) and formation of firehose and mirror instabilities. An accurate understanding of processes such as the interchange instability is required if a complete picture of mass and energy transport at Saturn is to be realized. The results presented here will detail how the inclusion of a full treatment of pressure anisotropy for idealized solar wind conditions modifies the interchange structure and shape of the tail current sheet. Simulation results are compared to observations made by Cassini.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence measurements on CdSe quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Győri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report on photoluminescence decay measurements on CdSe quantum dots (QDs as a function of size in the diameter range of 2.1 to 3.5 nm. The nanoparticles were synthesized by the kinetic growth method from CdO and elemental Se precursors. We studied the effects of growth time on the diameter, emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime of the synthesized QDs. The decay time measurements were performed using single shot time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence techniques using a Nd:YAG laser system. Two different decay times were measured on each CdSe sample, a fast one and a relatively slow one. The slow decay was found to be size dependent whereas the fast one was independent of the QD diameter.