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Sample records for fluid-rock interactions implications

  1. Review of Rare Earths and Fluid-Rock Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌其聪; 刘丛强

    2002-01-01

    As demonstrated by a great amount of geologic and experimental evidences, RE of rock systems may be mobilized during fluid-rock interaction when solutions are rich in F-, Cl-, CO32-, HCO3-, CO2, HPO42-, HS-, S2-, SO42-, though little has been known about the mobilizing mechanism of these anions or ligands. The fractionation of RE resulted from hydrothermal alterations, i. e., fluid-rock interactions, are distinctive. One set of field data implies the preferential mobility of the LRE, while another set of field observations demonstrates the dominant mobilization of the HRE, and some theoretical prediction is not consistent with the field evidence. The Eu anomalies caused by fluid-rock interaction are complex and compelling explanation is not available due to inadequate experimental approaches. To know the exact behavior of RE during fluid-rock interaction and to solve the contradiction between some theoretical predictions and field observations, the following works remain to be done: (1) experimental investigations of RE mobility and fractionation as a function of fluid chemistry, e.g., the activity of F-, Cl-, CO32-, HCO3-, CO2, HPO42-, HS-, S2-, SO42-, etc.; (2) experimental determination of RE mobility and fractionation as a function of T, P, pH, Eh and water/rock ratios; (3) investigation of the mechanism and the controlling factors of RE partitioning between hydrothermal minerals and fluids. It was demonstrated that RE mobility is a potentially useful method for exploration.

  2. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  3. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  4. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  5. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2009-04-01

    Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be

  6. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  7. Sedimentary basin geochemistry and fluid/rock interactions workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    Fundamental research related to organic geochemistry, fluid-rock interactions, and the processes by which fluids migrate through basins has long been a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Geosciences program. Objectives of this program were to emphasize those principles and processes which would be applicable to a wide range of problems associated with petroleum discovery, occurrence and extraction, waste disposal of all kinds, and environmental management. To gain a better understanding of the progress being made in understanding basinal fluids, their geochemistry and movement, and related research, and to enhance communication and interaction between principal investigators and DOE and other Federal program managers interested in this topic, this workshop was organized by the School of Geology and Geophysics and held in Norman, Oklahoma in November, 1991.

  8. Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

    2009-04-01

    Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be

  9. Using Neutrons to Study Fluid-Rock Interactions in Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, V. H.; McFarlane, J.; Anovitz, L. M.; Gordon, A.; Hale, R. E.; Hunt, R. D.; Lewis, S. A., Sr.; Littrell, K. C.; Stack, A. G.; Chipera, S.; Perfect, E.; Bilheux, H.; Kolbus, L. M.; Bingham, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    Recovery of hydrocarbons by hydraulic fracturing depends on complex fluid-rock interactions that we are beginning to understand using neutron imaging and scattering techniques. Organic matter is often thought to comprise the majority of porosity in a shale. In this study, correlations between the type of organic matter embedded in a shale and porosity were investigated experimentally. Selected shale cores from the Eagle Ford and Marcellus formations were subjected to pyrolysis-gas chromatography, Differential Thermal Analysis/Thermogravimetric analysis, and organic solvent extraction with the resulting affluent analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The pore size distribution of the microporosity (~1 nm to 2 µm) in the Eagle Ford shales was measured before and after solvent extraction using small angle neutron scattering. Organics representing mass fractions of between 0.1 to 1 wt.% were removed from the shales and porosity generally increased across the examined microporosity range, particularly at larger pore sizes, approximately 50 nm to 2 μm. This range reflects extraction of accessible organic material, including remaining gas molecules, bitumen, and kerogen derivatives, indicating where the larger amount of organic matter in shale is stored. An increase in porosity at smaller pore sizes, ~1-3 nm, was also present and could be indicative of extraction of organic material stored in the inter-particle spaces of clays. Additionally, a decrease in porosity after extraction for a sample was attributed to swelling of pores with solvent uptake. This occurred in a shale with high clay content and low thermal maturity. The extracted hydrocarbons were primarily paraffinic, although some breakdown of larger aromatic compounds was observed in toluene extractions. The amount of hydrocarbon extracted and an overall increase in porosity appeared to be primarily correlated with the clay percentage in the shale. This study complements fluid transport neutron

  10. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  11. Rare-earth-element minerals in martian breccia meteorites NWA 7034 and 7533: Implications for fluid-rock interaction in the martian crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Ma, Chi; Beckett, John R.; Chen, Yang; Guan, Yunbin

    2016-10-01

    low Yb content relative to Gd and Dy in xenotime suggest the possible formation of xenotime as a byproduct of fluid-zircon reactions. On the basis of relatively fresh apatite grains and lithic clasts in the same samples, we propose that the fluid-rock/mineral reactions occurred in the source rocks before their inclusion in NWA 7034 and 7533. Additionally, monazite-bearing apatite and REE-mineral-bearing clasts are possibly derived from different crustal origins. Thus, our results imply the wide-occurrence of hydrothermal fluids in the martian crust at 1 Ga or older, which were probably induced by impacts or large igneous intrusions.

  12. COTHERM: Modelling fluid-rock interactions in Icelandic geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thien, Bruno; Kosakowski, Georg; Kulik, Dmitrii

    2014-05-01

    field by Gudmundsson & Arnorsson [3] and by Icelandic partners of the COTHERM project suggests that the concept of partial equilibrium with instantaneous precipitation of secondary minerals is not sufficient to satisfactorily describe the experimental data. Considering kinetic controls also for secondary minerals appears as indispensable to properly describe the geothermal system evolution using a reactive transport modelling approach [4]. [1] Kulik D.A., Wagner T., Dmytrieva S.V., Kosakowski G., Hingerl F.F., Chudnenko K.V., Berner U., 2013. GEM-Selektor geochemical modeling package: revised algorithm and GEMS3K numerical kernel for coupled simulation codes. Computational Geosciences 17, 1-24. http://gems.web.psi.ch. [2] Palandri, J.L., Kharaka, Y.K., 2004. A compilation of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics for application to geochemical modelling. U.S.Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA, pp. 1-64. [3] Gudmundsson B.T., Arnorsson S., 2005. Secondary mineral-fluid equilibria in the Krafla and Namafjall geothermal systems, Iceland. Applied Geochememistry 20, 1607-1625. [4] Kosakowski, G., & Watanabe, N., 2013. OpenGeoSys-Gem: A numerical tool for calculating geochemical and porosity changes in saturated and partially saturated media. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C. doi:10.1016/j.pce.2013.11.008

  13. Lake-groundwater relationships and fluid-rock interaction in the East African Rift Valley: isotopic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, W. George; Gizaw, Berhanu; Arusei, Musa K.

    1996-05-01

    The assessment of water resources in the Rift Valley environment is important for population, agriculture and energy-related issues and depends on a good understanding of the relationship between freshwater lakes and regional groundwater. This can be hampered by the amount of fluid-rock interaction which occurs throughout the rift, obscuring original hydrochemical signatures. However, O and H stable isotope ratios can be used as tracers of infiltration over sometimes considerable distances, while showing that the volcanic edifices of the rift floor have varying effects on groundwater flow patterns. Specific cases from Kenya and Ethiopia are considered, including Lakes Naivasha, Baringo, Awasa and Zwai. In addition to their physical tracing role, stable isotopes can reveal information about processes of fluid-rock interaction. The general lack of O isotope shifting in rift hydrothermal systems suggests a high water:rock ratio, with the implication that these systems are mature. Carbon isotope studies on the predominantly bicarbonate waters of the rift show how they evolve from dilute meteoric recharge to highly alkaline waters, via the widespread silicate hydrolysis promoted by the flux of mantle carbon dioxide which occurs in most parts of the rift. There appears to be only minor differences in the C cycle between Kenya and Ethiopia.

  14. Impact of fluid-rock chemical interactions on tracer transport in fractured rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Liu, H-H; Spycher, N; Kennedy, B M

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate the impact of chemical interactions, in the form of mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, on tracer transport in fractured rocks. When a tracer is introduced in fractured rocks, it moves through the fracture primarily by advection and it also enters the stagnant water of the surrounding rock matrix through diffusion. Inside the porous rock matrix, the tracer chemically interacts with the solid materials of the rock, where it can precipitate depending on the local equilibrium conditions. Alternatively, it can be dissolved from the solid phase of the rock matrix into the matrix pore water, diffuse into the flowing fluids of the fracture and is advected out of it. We show that such chemical interactions between the fluid and solid phases have significant impact on tracer transport in fractured rocks. We invoke the dual-porosity conceptualization to represent the fractured rocks and develop a semi-analytical solution to describe the transient transport of tracers in interacting fluid-rock systems. To test the accuracy and stability of the semi-analytical solution, we compare it with simulation results obtained with the TOUGHREACT simulator. We observe that, in a chemically interacting system, the tracer breakthrough curve exhibits a pseudo-steady state, where the tracer concentration remains more or less constant over a finite period of time. Such a pseudo-steady condition is not observed in a non-reactive fluid-rock system. We show that the duration of the pseudo-state depends on the physical and chemical parameters of the system, and can be exploited to extract information about the fractured rock system, such as the fracture spacing and fracture-matrix interface area.

  15. Fluids in crustal deformation: Fluid flow, fluid-rock interactions, rheology, melting and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Olivier; Rolland, Yann

    2016-11-01

    Fluids exert a first-order control on the structural, petrological and rheological evolution of the continental crust. Fluids interact with rocks from the earliest stages of sedimentation and diagenesis in basins until these rocks are deformed and/or buried and metamorphosed in orogens, then possibly exhumed. Fluid-rock interactions lead to the evolution of rock physical properties and rock strength. Fractures and faults are preferred pathways for fluids, and in turn physical and chemical interactions between fluid flow and tectonic structures, such as fault zones, strongly influence the mechanical behaviour of the crust at different space and time scales. Fluid (over)pressure is associated with a variety of geological phenomena, such as seismic cycle in various P-T conditions, hydrofracturing (including formation of sub-horizontal, bedding-parallel veins), fault (re)activation or gravitational sliding of rocks, among others. Fluid (over)pressure is a governing factor for the evolution of permeability and porosity of rocks and controls the generation, maturation and migration of economic fluids like hydrocarbons or ore forming hydrothermal fluids, and is therefore a key parameter in reservoir studies and basin modeling. Fluids may also help the crust partially melt, and in turn the resulting melt may dramatically change the rheology of the crust.

  16. Geochemical simulation of fluid rock interactions to predict flowback water compostions during hydraulic fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Michael; Vieth-Hillebrand, Andrea; Wilke, Franziska D. H.

    2017-04-01

    Black shales are a heterogeneous mixture of minerals, organic matter and formation water and little is actually known about the fluid-rock interactions during hydraulic fracturing and their effects on composition of flowback and produced water. Geochemical simulations have been performed based on the analyses of "real" flowback water samples and artificial stimulation fluids from lab experiments with the aim to set up a chemical process model for shale gas reservoirs. Prediction of flowback water compositions for potential or already chosen sites requires validated and parameterized geochemical models. For the software "Geochemist's Workbench" (GWB) data bases are adapted and amended based on a literature review. Evaluation of the system has been performed in comparison with the results from laboratory experiments. Parameterization was done in regard to field data provided. Finally, reaction path models are applied for quantitative information about the mobility of compounds in specific settings. Our work leads to quantitative estimates of reservoir compounds in the flowback based on calibrations by laboratory experiments. Such information is crucial for the assessment of environmental impacts as well as to estimate human- and ecotoxicological effects of the flowback waters from a variety of natural gas shales. With a comprehensive knowledge about potential composition and mobility of flowback water, selection of water treatment techniques will become easier.

  17. Fluid-rock interaction and thermochemical evolution of the eastern Alice Springs Orogen, central Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, Jan; Hand, Martin; Raimondo, Tom; Kelsey, David

    2017-04-01

    The Harts Range rift and basement complex is located in the eastern Alice Springs Orogen, central Australia. For the period 450-320 Ma, this tectonic domain is characterised by large-scale deformation of the Harts Range Group rift sequence and pervasive reworking of its underlying basement. Fluid-rock interaction is evidenced by extensive pegmatite intrusion and retrogression occurring episodically throughout this 130 Myr period, possibly coeval with prograde upper-amphibolite facies metamorphism. The orthogneiss-dominated Entia Gneiss Complex (EGC) represents basement structurally underlying the Harts Range Group, and has evidence for associated deformation and fluid ingress between 390-320 Ma. The EGC also contains metapelites at various structural levels of the mid- to lower-crust, providing a means to constrain the thermobarometric record during a period of significant rheological weakening. Despite existing studies, the source of fluid that contributed to pervasive deformation and metamorphism is unresolved. Additionally, the role of fluid in the episodic history of crustal melting, and ultimately the generation of large-scale tectonic reworking in the Harts Range Group, remains unclear. In this contribution, we integrate U-Pb monazite geochronology, geochemistry, petrography and phase equilibria forward modelling from various metapelitic rocks at different structural levels of the Entia Gneiss Complex. Preliminary data show that the timing of metamorphism coincides with pegmatite crystallisation ages. These constraints form the basis for understanding the conditions and timing at which fluid flow occurred, and the potential sources of the fluid will be constrained by stable isotope analyses (δ18O and δD). The combination of in situ geochronological data with petrographic observations linked to P - T models is vital in providing temporal constraints on the physical and thermal evolution of the reworking event.

  18. The fate of carbon and CO2 - fluid-rock interaction during subduction metamorphism of serpentinites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Manuel D.; Garrido, Carlos J.; López Sánchez-Vizcaíno, Vicente; Marchesi, Claudio; Hidas, Károly

    2016-04-01

    Given to its large relevance for present and past climate studies, the deep carbon cycle received increasing attention recently. However, there are still many open questions concerning total mass fluxes and transport processes between the different carbon reservoirs in the Earth's interior. One key issue is the carbon transfer from the subducting slab into fluids and rocks in the slab and mantle wedge. This transfer is controlled by the amount and speciation of stable carbon-bearing phases, which have a strong impact on the pH, redox conditions and trace-element budget of slab fluids. As recent experiments and thermodynamic modeling have shown, water released from dehydrating serpentinites has a great potential to produce CO2-enriched slab fluids by dissolution of carbonate minerals. To constrain the fate of carbon and CO2-fluid-rock interactions during subduction metamorphism of serpentinites, we have studied carbonate-bearing serpentinites recording different prograde evolutions from antigorite schists to Chl-harzburgites in high-P massifs of the Nevado-Filabride Complex (Betic Cordillera, S. Spain). Our results indicate that dissolution of dolomite in marbles in contact with dehydrating serpentinites is spatially limited during prograde metamorphism of carbonate-bearing serpentinites, but it can lead to the formation of silicate-rich zones in marbles close to the contacts. In lower grade serpentinite massifs (1.0-1.5 GPa / 550 °C), the presence of marble lenses in contact with antigorite schists appears to promote local dehydration of serpentinite coupled with carbonation of antigorite, forming Cpx-Tr-Chl-bearing high grade ophicarbonate zones. At the Cerro del Almirez ultramafic massif, where a dehydration front from antigorite-serpentinite to prograde Chl-harzburgite is preserved (1.9 GPa / 680 °C), a significant amount of carbon is retained in prograde Chl-harzburgites and Tr-Dol-marble lenses. This observation is at odds with thermodynamic models that

  19. Fluid-rock interactions related to metamorphic reducing fluid flow in meta-sediments: example of the Pic-de-Port-Vieux thrust (Pyrenees, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincal, Vincent; Buatier, Martine; Charpentier, Delphine; Lacroix, Brice; Lanari, Pierre; Labaume, Pierre; Lahfid, Abdeltif; Vennemann, Torsten

    2017-09-01

    In orogens, shortening is mainly accommodated by thrusts, which constitute preferential zones for fluid-rock interactions. Fluid flow, mass transfer, and mineralogical reactions taking place along thrusts have been intensely investigated, especially in sedimentary basins for petroleum and uranium research. This study combines petrological investigations, mineralogical quantifications, and geochemical characterizations with a wide range of analytical tools with the aim of defining the fluid properties (nature, origin, temperature, and redox) and fluid-host rock interactions (mass transfers, recrystallization mechanisms, and newly formed synkinematic mineralization) in the Pic-de-Port-Vieux thrust fault zone (Pyrenees, Spain). We demonstrate that two geochemically contrasted rocks have been transformed by fluid flow under low-grade metamorphism conditions during thrusting. The hanging-wall Triassic red pelite was locally bleached, while the footwall Cretaceous dolomitic limestone was mylonitized. The results suggest that thrusting was accompanied by a dynamic calcite recrystallization in the dolomitic limestone as well as by leaching of iron via destabilization of iron oxides and phyllosilicate crystallization in the pelite. Geochemical and physical changes highlighted in this study have strong implications on the understanding of the thrust behavior (tectonic and hydraulic), and improve our knowledge of fluid-rock interactions in open fluid systems in the crust.

  20. Carbon Dioxide - rock interaction: from molecular observations to theorised interactions in fluid-rock systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcara, Massimo; Borgia, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    Current global warming theories have produced some benefits: among them, detailed studies on CO2 and its properties, possible applications and perspectives. Starting from its use as a "green solvent" (for instance in decaffeination process), to enhance system in oil recovery, to capture and storage enough amount of CO2 in geological horizon. So, a great debate is centred around this molecule. One More useful research in natural horizon studies is its theorised use in Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as the only working fluid. In any case, the CO2 characteristics should be deeply understood, before injecting a molecule prone to change easily its aggregation state at relatively shallow depth. CO2 Rock interaction becomes therefore a focal point in approaching research sectors linked in some manner to natural or induced presence of carbon dioxide in geological horizons. Possible chemical interactions between fluids and solids have always been a central topic in defining evolution of the system as a whole in terms of dissolutions, reactions, secondary mineral formation and, in case of whichever plant, scaling. Questions arise in case of presence of CO2 with host rocks. Chemical and molecular properties are strategic. CO2 Rock interactions are based on eventual solubility capability of pure liquid and supercritical CO2 seeking and eventually quantifying its polar and/or ionic solvent capabilities. Single molecule at STP condition is linear, with central carbon atom and oxygen atoms at opposite site on a straight line with a planar angle. It has a quadrupolar moment due to the electronegativity difference between carbon and oxygen. As soon as CO2 forms bond with water, it deforms even at atmospheric pressure, assuming an induced dipole moment with a value around 0.02 Debye. Hydrated CO2 forms a hydrophilic bond; it deforms with an angle of 178 degrees. Pure CO2 forms self aggregates. In the simplest case a dimer, with two molecules of CO2 exerting mutual attraction

  1. Fluid-rock geochemical interaction for modelling calibration in geothermal exploration in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deon, Fiorenza; Barnhoorn, Auke; Lievens, Caroline; Ryannugroho, Riskiray; Imaro, Tulus; Bruhn, David; van der Meer, Freek; Hutami, Rizki; Sibarani, Besteba; Sule, Rachmat; Saptadij, Nenny; Hecker, Christoph; Appelt, Oona; Wilke, Franziska

    2017-04-01

    Indonesia with its large, but partially unexplored geothermal potential is one of the most interesting and suitable places in the world to conduct geothermal exploration research. This study focuses on geothermal exploration based on fluid-rock geochemistry/geomechanics and aims to compile an overview on geochemical data-rock properties from important geothermal fields in Indonesia. The research carried out in the field and in the laboratory is performed in the framework of the GEOCAP cooperation (Geothermal Capacity Building program Indonesia- the Netherlands). The application of petrology and geochemistry accounts to a better understanding of areas where operating power plants exist but also helps in the initial exploration stage of green areas. Because of their relevance and geological setting geothermal fields in Java, Sulawesi and the sedimentary basin of central Sumatra have been chosen as focus areas of this study. Operators, universities and governmental agencies will benefit from this approach as it will be applied also to new green-field terrains. By comparing the characteristic of the fluids, the alteration petrology and the rock geochemistry we also aim to contribute to compile an overview of the geochemistry of the important geothermal fields in Indonesia. At the same time the rock petrology and fluid geochemistry will be used as input data to model the reservoir fluid composition along with T-P parameters with the geochemical workbench PHREEQC. The field and laboratory data are mandatory for both the implementation and validation of the model results.

  2. Visualizing Advective and Diffusive Phenomena in Fluid-Rock Interaction using Thermochromic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinle, B.; Cardiff, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    The presence of fractures plays an essential role in hydrogeologic transport, as well as geothermal and hydrocarbon industries, as fractures introduce new pathways for flow and transport in host rocks. Transport through these features is often highly non-Fickian, due to the combination of both heterogeneous advection and matrix diffusion. Fracture aperture distributions and contact areas control the ability of fluids to flow through a fracture, and to interact with host rock. The heterogeneous nature of these fracture apertures often lead to preferential fluid pathways that control the prevalence of advective and diffusive processes within the fracture network. To understand how preferential fluid pathways affect these transport processes in detail, an innovative approach is introduced for visualizing advective and diffusive phenomena through the use of thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCs). An artificial fracture with the ability to have its surface roughness altered is constructed and heterogeneous flow and diffusion of heat is observed directly using these TLCs. The surfaces are digitized and simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics where particle tracing is used to determine arrival time curves in the absence of host rock diffusion. The resulting combination of the visual results from lab experiments and particle statistics from the computer model provide a unique method for assessing the impact of both heterogeneous advection and matrix-diffusion on tracer breakthrough in fractures, across a variety of fracture geometries. Figure 1. Image of advective (left) and diffusive (right) phenomena occurring simultaneously as fluid flows through the artificial fracture.

  3. Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies of metamorphic fluid-rock interactions in the Dabie Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅斌; 郑永飞; 李一良; 肖益林; 龚冰

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen and oxygen isotope studies were carried out on mineral separates from high to ultrahigh pressure metamorphic rocks at Huangzhen and Shuanghe in the eastern Dabie Mountains, East China. The δ 18O values of eelogites cover a wide range of-5‰ to+9‰, but the δD values of micas fall within a narrow range of -85‰ to -70‰. Both equilibrium and disequilibrium oxygen isotope fractionations were observed between quartz and the other minerals, with reversed fractionations between omphacite and garnet in some eclogite samples. The δ 18O values of -5‰ to -1‰ for some of the eclogites represent the oxygen isotope compositions of their protoliths which underwent meteoric water-rock interaction prior to plate subduction. The preservation of oxygen isotope heterogeneity in the eclogites implies a channelized flow of fluids during progressive metamorphism caused by rapid subduetion. Retrograde metamorphism has caused oxygen and hydrogen isotope disequilibria between some of the minerals, but the f

  4. Geochronology and Fluid-Rock Interaction Associated with the Nopal I Uranium Deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Fayek; P. Goodell; M. Ren; A. Simmons

    2005-07-11

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca District, Mexico, largely consists of secondary U{sup 6+} minerals, which occur within a breccia pipe mainly hosted by the 44 Ma Nopal and Colorados volcanic formations. These two units overly the Pozos conglomerate formation and Cretaceous limestone. Three new vertical diamond drill holes (DDHs) were recently drilled at Nopal I. DDH-PB1 with continuous core was drilled through the Nopal I deposit and two additional DDHs were drilled {approx}50 m on either side of the cored hole. These DDHs terminate 20 m below the current water table, thus allowing the detection of possible gradients in radionuclide contents resulting from transport from the overlying uranium deposit. Primary uraninite within the main ore body is rare and fine-grained ({approx}50 micrometers), thus making geochronology of the Nopal I deposit very difficult. Uranium, lead and oxygen isotopes can be used to study fluid-uraninite interaction, provided that the analyses are obtained on the micro-scale. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) permits in situ measurement of isotopic ratios with a spatial resolution on the scale of a few {micro}m. Preliminary U-Pb results show that uraninite from the main ore body gives an age of 32 {+-} 8 Ma, whereas uraninite from the uraniferous Pozos conglomerate that lies nearly 100 m below the main ore body and 25 meters above the water table, gives a U-Pb age that is <1 Ma. Oxygen isotopic analyses show that uraninite from the ore body has a {delta}{sup 18}O = -10.8{per_thousand}, whereas the uraninite within the Pozos conglomerate has a {delta}{sup 18}O = +1.5{per_thousand}. If it is assumed that both uraninites precipitated from meteoric water ({delta}{sup 18}O = -7{per_thousand}), then calculated precipitation temperatures are 55 C for the uraninite from the ore body and 20 C for uraninite hosted by the Pozos conglomerate. These temperatures are consistent with previous studies that calculated precipitation

  5. Rare-Earth Minerals in Martian Meteorite NWA 7034/7533: Evidence for Fluid-Rock Interaction in the Martian Crust

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yang; Ma, Chi; Chen, Yang; Beckett, John; Guan, Yunbin

    2015-01-01

    Monazite, chevkinite-perrierite and xenotime are common rare-earth minerals in terrestrial rocks and important repositories for the rare-earth-elements (REE). Liu and Ma [1-2] reported finding monazite, chevkinite-perrierite and xenotime in NWA 7034/7533, the ‘Black Beauty’ meteorite. Here, we provide a more detailed textural and compositional analysis of these minerals; our results suggest an origin via fluid-rock interaction.

  6. Assessing Fault Slip Behavior and the History of Fluid-Rock Interaction of The Rodeo Cove Thrust, Franciscan Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, H.; Goodwin, L. B.; Tobin, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Internal mechanical properties and stress conditions in subduction megathrusts remain poorly understood. We present a study of fault rocks and veins to elucidate controls on fault slip behavior in the Rodeo Cove thrust zone, a fossil plate boundary exposed in two coastal outcrops of the Mesozoic Franciscan accretionary complex: Rodeo Beach (RB) and Black Sand Beach (BSB). Thrusts imbricate mechanically distinct lithologic units including pillow basalt, radiolarian chert, black shale, and greywacke. Locally large vein-to-rock ratios record significant fluid flux and mineral precipitation during deformation. Cross-cutting relations at outcrop- and micro-scale reveal a complex history of fluid-rock interaction followed by brittle shearing. At RB, fault-related deformation is commonly concentrated in altered basalts in which original, isotropic igneous microstructures are preserved but rocks are more commonly foliated. These structures are locally disrupted by foliation-parallel and cross-cutting calcite veins as well as calcite-cemented breccia. Veins are less common at BSB, where they are found in altered basalt and greywacke near black shales. Stable isotope chemistry of calcite records differing fluid sources at these two locations. At RB, δ18O values range from 17.5—22.4‰ SMOW compared to 16.9—21.4‰ SMOW at BSB. These relatively high δ18O values may reflect upward movement of metamorphic fluids along the fault. The RB δ13C values (-2.0—+2.9‰ VPDB) are similar to those of marine carbonates precipitated from seawater and are considerably higher than the BSB values (-16.8—+3.0‰ VPDB), which suggest a possible biogenic source of carbon consistent with fluid interaction with black shale. Optical cathodoluminescence of calcite reveals complex internal structures that will be correlated with quantitative chemical analysis using an electron microprobe. Anastomosing localized brittle shear zones of foliated cataclasite or gouge cut veins at RB and

  7. Microbial Fluid-Rock Interactions in Chalk Samples and Salinity Factor in Divalent Ca2+ ions Release for Microbial Enhanced Oil Recovery Purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jimoh, Ismaila Adetunji; Rudyk, Svetlana Nikolayevna; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen

    2011-01-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments were performed on chalk samples from Danish sector of the North Sea to study microbial fluid-rock interactions with carbonate rock and to evaluate the dissolution of rock matrix (CaCO3). Result showed that the average concentration of Ca2+ ions after microbial...... fluid interactions with chalk samples in media of salinity 40-100g/l increased from initial average concentration of 203 mg/l at the start of the experiment to 1178 mg/l in 28 days. 3-D surface plot (salinity, Ca2+, pH) with time revealed delineation of the measured salinity into two groups...

  8. Two stages of fluid-rock interaction in UHP marbles (Dabie Shan, China): grain-scale processes and map-scale metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzenitz, N. H.; Romer, R. L.; Grasemann, B.; Rhede, D.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid-mediated element mobility during ultra-deep subduction and exhumation of continental crust results in characteristic isotope signatures of UHP rocks. In the Dabie UHP complex large volumes of meta-carbonates show unusually unradiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios, as low as 0.7037 (Romer et al. 2003). The mineral reaction history, combined with the initial Sr isotopic record of prograde and retrograde phases of the meta-carbonates provide evidence for two stages of fluid-rock interaction during exhumation along the subduction zone. To constrain (i) the mechanisms of fluid transport through the rocks, (ii) the source of the fluid(s) and (iii) the timing of fluid-rock interactions, a calcsilicate marble has been investigated at the grain-scale. A crucial advantage of the studied sample is the record of the initial Sr isotopic signature of the carbonate rock preserved in the core of a large pre-UHP titanite (U-Pb crystallization age of 244±2 Ma, Wawrzenitz et al., 2006). Based on the results of microdrilling, ID TIMS and mineral chemical investigations, two pulses of infiltration of external fluids distinct in their Sr isotopic composition are inferred. During the first stage, fluids with very low 87Sr/86Sr values induced dissolution-precipitation reactions resulting in the isotopically homogeneous phases clinozoisite, titanite, amphibole and calcite, that replace the UHP assemblage (garnet, omphacite, rutile, phengite, aragonite, coesite) in the marble. The source of the very unradiogenic fluids may be the dehydrating young mafic rocks from the downgoing slab. Dissolution-precipitation reactions resulted in a high porosity, and efficiently supported material transport through the carbonate rock and isotope chemical exchange among fluids and rocks. This first stage of fluid-infiltration is recorded by a U-Pb isochron age (224±2 Ma, Wawrzenitz et al., 2006) of titanite, clinozoisite, feldspar, epidote from a marble from the same unit, assuming a common pressure

  9. Effects of fluid-rock interactions in arkosic sandstones: Long-term direct monitoring of changes in permeability, electrical conductivity, and pore fluid chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, A.; Milsch, H.

    2009-04-01

    In the context of low enthalpy geothermal energy production from deep sedimentary reservoirs laboratory experiments and simulations in the system quartz-feldspar-water were conducted. To constrain the effect of fluid-rock interactions on permeability under hydrothermal in situ conditions an interdisciplinary approach covering petrophysical, petrological and hydrogeochemical methods was applied. Long-term flow-through experiments were conducted under hydrostatic pressure conditions in a HPT-permeameter. Two arkosic sandstones, one pure quartz arenite (Fontainebleau) as well as one sandwich sample containing a quartz-feldspar powder of defined grain size and composition were investigated. The pore fluid was distilled water. At a maximum temperature of 160°C both permeability and electrical rock conductivity were simultaneously monitored. The maximum run duration was three months. Complementary batch experiments were performed with quartz-feldspar powders to constrain the mechanisms and kinetics of potentially occurring hydrothermal reactions. The resulting fluids were analysed with ICP-OES and the reacted powders were characterised with XRD and SEM. Additionally, the hydrothermal reactions were modelled with PHREEQC. It will be demonstrated that permeability decreases in the course of the experiments. However, compared to similar experiments conducted under deviatoric stress conditions (Tenthorey et al., 1998) the decrease in permeability is low. For both arkosic sandstones and at stagnant flow conditions the electrical rock conductivity showed an asymptotical increase indicating that the respective pore fluid approaches a saturation state. Furthermore, fluid samples taken at the end of the Fontainebleau experiment exhibit supersaturation with respect to quartz. In addition, PHREEQC simulations of the feldspar-quartz-water equilibrium indicate that different clay minerals and gibbsite are supersaturated in the resulting fluid. Consequently and despite the sluggish

  10. Detrital zircon without detritus: a result of 496-Ma-old fluid-rock interaction during the gold-lode formation of Passagem, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Alexandre Raphael; Zeh, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Zircon and xenotime occur in tourmaline-rich hydrothermal pockets in the auriferous lode of Passagem de Mariana, a world-class gold deposit. Zircon grains show pristine oscillatory zoning, but many of them are altered, exhibiting porous domains filled with graphite. Uranium-Pb dating of zircon, using in-situ laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, yields ages between 3.2 and 2.65 Ga, which match those for detrital zircon of the footwall quartzite of the > 2.65-Ga-old Moeda Formation. Discordant analyses point to zircon-age resetting during the Brasiliano orogeny at ca. 500 Ma. This interpretation is supported by U-Pb dating of euhedral xenotime immediately adjacent to altered zircon within the same tourmaline pocket. The xenotime grains give a Concordia age of 496.3 ± 2.0 Ma, which is identical to that determined for monazite of a quartz-hematite vein-type deposit (i.e., jacutinga lode) in the region (Itabira), another important mineralisation style of gold. The occurrence of relatively abundant inherited detrital zircon, but absence of rock fragments in the tourmaline pocket investigated here, implies that detrital material was completely replaced by tourmaline. The graphite overprint on the altered detrital zircon attests to a reducing fluid, which was likely formed by fluid-rock interaction with carbonaceous phyllite of the Batatal Formation, the host rock of the Passagem lode.

  11. Simulation of fluid-rock interactions in a geothermal basin. Final report. [QUAGMR (quasi-active geothermal reservoir)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, S.K.; Blake, T.R.; Brownell, D.H. Jr.; Nayfeh, A.H.; Pritchett, J.W.

    1975-09-01

    General balance laws and constitutive relations are developed for convective hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. A fully interacting rock-fluid system is considered; typical rock-fluid interactions involve momentum and energy transfer and the dependence of rock porosity and permeability upon the fluid and rock stresses. The mathematical model also includes multiphase (water/steam) effects. A simple analytical model is employed to study heat transfer into/or from a fluid moving in a porous medium. Numerical results show that for fluid velocities typical of geothermal systems (Reynolds number much less than 10), the fluid and the solid may be assumed to be in local thermal equilibrium. Mathematical formalism of Anderson and Jackson is utilized to derive a continuum species transport equation for flow in porous media; this method allows one to delineate, in a rigorous manner, the convective and diffusive mechanisms in the continuum representation of species transport. An existing computer program (QUAGMR) is applied to study upwelling of hot water from depth along a fault; the numerical results can be used to explain local temperature inversions occasionally observed in bore hole measurements.

  12. Fracture-related fluid migration and fluid-rock interaction in outcrop analogues of Buntsandstein reservoir rocks (southern Thuringia and northern Hesse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Norbert; Kley, Jonas; Köster, Jens; Wendler, Jens

    2010-05-01

    Suitable reservoir rocks for carbon capture and storage (CCS) in saline aquifers must be porous, permeable and reside at depths below c. 800 m in structurally simple, preferrably unfaulted settings. In central Europe, the Lower and particularly Middle Buntsandstein are regionally extensive stratigraphic units which often meet these requirements. While often deeply buried, the Buntsandstein is exposed at the surface and easily accessible in other areas. We have studied the evidence for natural fluid flux in Buntsandstein reservoir outcrop analogues and drill cores of southern Thuringia and northern Hesse. The clearest sign of fluid-rock interaction is local bleaching of the red sandstones. In the field and on drill cores we did not observe bleaching along faults, but commonly along joints. There, the bleached fringes may have sharp or diffuse boundaries and can be traced along individual joints for a few dm to m. They are most often observed on small joints and fine cracks. Using 3D laser scanning, photostereogrammetry and manual measurements we established the geometric properties of the joint systems. The joint systems always comprise several joint sets, but in southern Thuringia bleaching is restricted to one north-trending set. Mining reports and geological maps show that basalt dikes of Tertiary age in this region also trend north. In the underground salt mines of the Werra potassium district, potassium salt minerals show bleaching at the contacts with the dikes. Also, CO2 is found trapped within rock salt along north-trending fractures, sometimes causing violent gas eruptions during mining operations. Taken together, these observations suggest that the bleaching along north-trending joints in the Buntsandstein is causally related to the migration of CO2-bearing fluids associated with the basalt volcanism. However, the Fe-releasing process may depend on admixtures of other phases, most likely hydrocarbons released from bituminous Zechstein carbonates

  13. Fluid-rock interaction and evolution of a high-pressure/low-temperature vein system in eclogite from New Caledonia: insights into intraslab fluid flow processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl

    2016-11-01

    A complex high-pressure/low-temperature vein system that cross-cuts eclogitic host rocks of the Pouébo Eclogite Melange (northern New Caledonia) records the prograde blueschist-to-eclogite transition and associated formation of garnet-quartz-phengite veins. Geothermobarometry (Grt-Cpx-Ph, Zr-in-rutile) and pseudosection calculations indicate peak metamorphic conditions of ca. 540 °C and 1.9-2.2 GPa. Petrological and geochemical observations as well as pseudosection modelling suggest that the main vein network is formed by dehydration processes that collected internally derived fluids related to the breakdown of hydrous phases (amphibole, chlorite, epidote) during prograde metamorphism. The lower solid volume of the newly formed phases and the associated increase in pore fluid pressure lead to the formation of veins that allowed for accumulation and channelized evacuation of these fluids. Such veins do not show metasomatic alteration selvages because the fluid-rock system had been in chemical equilibrium. A second vein type (transport veins) records the superimposed influx of external fluids with slightly different composition that most likely are related to similar dehydration reactions in other parts of the subducting slab. Due to the source-rock-imposed compositional differences, these fluids are not in equilibrium with the infiltrated rock volume and induce the formation of distinct metasomatic selvages by dissolution-precipitation processes. Mass-balance calculations show that Ca, Na and Li are added to the selvage by the external fluid. LILE and to a lesser extend also HREE are mobilized and removed from the selvage. The LREE are predominantly buffered by newly formed minerals (e.g. epidote). Petrological evidence implies that the studied vein system formed while the sample was still part of a coherent subducting slab. Rb-Sr geochronology indicates that this occurred at 38.2 ± 0.3 Ma. This age is ca. 6 myr younger than the hitherto presumed peak metamorphic

  14. The seismogenic Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Italian Southern Alps): quantitative 3D characterization of the fault/fracture network, mapping of evidences of fluid-rock interaction, and modelling of the hydraulic structure through the seismic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistacchi, A.; Mittempergher, S.; Di Toro, G.; Smith, S. A. F.; Garofalo, P. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ) was exhumed from 8 km depth, where it was characterized by seismic activity (pseudotachylytes) and hydrous fluid flow (alteration halos and precipitation of hydrothermal minerals in veins and cataclasites). Thanks to glacier-polished outcrops exposing the 400 m-thick fault zone over a continuous area > 1.5 km2, the fault zone architecture has been quantitatively described with an unprecedented detail, providing a rich dataset to generate 3D Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models and simulate the fault zone hydraulic properties. The fault and fracture network has been characterized combining > 2 km of scanlines and semi-automatic mapping of faults and fractures on several photogrammetric 3D Digital Outcrop Models (3D DOMs). This allowed obtaining robust probability density functions for parameters of fault and fracture sets: orientation, fracture intensity and density, spacing, persistency, length, thickness/aperture, termination. The spatial distribution of fractures (random, clustered, anticlustered…) has been characterized with geostatistics. Evidences of fluid/rock interaction (alteration halos, hydrothermal veins, etc.) have been mapped on the same outcrops, revealing sectors of the fault zone strongly impacted, vs. completely unaffected, by fluid/rock interaction, separated by convolute infiltration fronts. Field and microstructural evidence revealed that higher permeability was obtained in the syn- to early post-seismic period, when fractures were (re)opened by off-fault deformation. We have developed a parametric hydraulic model of the GLFZ and calibrated it, varying the fraction of faults/fractures that were open in the post-seismic, with the goal of obtaining realistic fluid flow and permeability values, and a flow pattern consistent with the observed alteration/mineralization pattern. The fraction of open fractures is very close to the percolation threshold of the DFN, and the permeability tensor is strongly anisotropic

  15. From vein precipitates to deformation and fluid rock interaction within a SSZ: Insights from the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheuz, Peter; Quandt, Dennis; Kurz, Walter

    2017-04-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) expeditions 352 and 351 drilled through oceanic crust of the Philippine Sea plate. The two study areas are located near the outer Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore arc and in the Amami Sankaku Basin. The primary objective was to improve our understanding of supra-subduction zones (SSZ) and the process of subduction initiation. The recovered drill cores during IODP expedition 352 represent approximately 50 Ma old fore arc basalts (FAB) and boninites revealing an entire volcanic sequence of a SSZ. Expedition 351 drilled FAB like oceanic crust similar in age to the FABs of expedition 352. In this study we present data on vein microstructures, geochemical data and isotopic signatures of vein precipitates to give new insights into fluid flow and precipitation processes and deformation within the Izu-Bonin fore arc. Veins formed predominantly as a consequence of hydrofracturing resulting in the occurrence of branched vein systems and brecciated samples. Along these hydrofractures the amount of altered host rock fragments varies and locally alters the host rock completely to zeolites and carbonates. Subordinately extensional veins released after the formation of the host rocks. Cross-cutting relationships of different vein types point to multiple fracturing events subsequently filled with minerals originating from a fluid with isotopic seawater signature. Based on vein precipitates, their morphology and their growth patterns four vein types have been defined. Major vein components are (Mg-) calcite and various zeolites determined by Raman spectra and electron microprobe analyses. Zeolites result from alteration of volcanic glass during interaction with a seawaterlike fluid. Type I veins which are characterized by micritic infill represent neptunian dykes. They predominantly occur in the upper levels of drill cores being the result of an initial volume change subsequently to crystallization of the host rocks. Type II veins are

  16. Experimental investigations and geochemical modelling of site-specific fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions in underground storage of CO2/H2/CH4 mixtures: the H2STORE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Pilz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    work packages hosted at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) focus on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions triggered by CO2, H2 and their mixtures. Laboratory experiments expose core samples to hydrogen and CO2/hydrogen mixtures under site-specific conditions (temperatures up to 200 °C and pressure up to 300 bar). The resulting qualitative and, whereas possible, quantitative data are expected to ameliorate the precision of predictive geochemical and reactive transport modelling, which is also performed within the project. The combination of experiments, chemical and mineralogical analyses and models is needed to improve the knowledge about: (1) solubility model and mixing rule for multicomponent gas mixtures in high saline formation fluids: no data are namely available in literature for H2-charged gas mixtures in the conditions expected in the potential sites; (2) chemical reactivity of different mineral assemblages and formation fluids in a broad spectrum of P-T conditions and composition of the stored gas mixtures; (3) thermodynamics and kinetics of relevant reactions involving mineral dissolution or precipitation. The resulting amelioration of site characterization and the overall enhancement in understanding the potential processes will benefit the operational reliability, the ecological tolerance, and the economic efficiency of future energy storing plants, crucial aspects for public acceptance and for industrial investors.

  17. Fluid-rock interactions in seismic faults : implications from the structures and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of drilling cores from the rupture of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Ma, Shengli; Chen, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/370819071; Chen, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    We describe the structural features and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the fault rocks recovered from boreholes at the Golden River site on the Yingxiu–Beichuan fault, which activated and slipped along a 240 km-long main surface rupture zone during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The

  18. Fluid-rock interactions in seismic faults : implications from the structures and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of drilling cores from the rupture of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, Qingbao; Yang, Xiaosong; Ma, Shengli; Chen, J.; Chen, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    We describe the structural features and mineralogical and geochemical compositions of the fault rocks recovered from boreholes at the Golden River site on the Yingxiu–Beichuan fault, which activated and slipped along a 240 km-long main surface rupture zone during the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The fa

  19. High-grade contact metamorphism in the Reykjanes geothermal system: Implications for fluid-rock interactions at mid-oceanic ridge spreading centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Naomi; Schiffman, Peter; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2011-08-01

    Granoblastic hornfels identified in cuttings from the Reykjanes seawater-dominated hydrothermal system contains secondary pyroxene, anorthite, and hornblendic amphibole in locally equilibrated assemblages. Granoblastic assemblages containing secondary orthopyroxene, olivine, and, locally, cordierite and spinel occur within groups of cuttings that show dominantly greenschist facies hydrothermal alteration. Granoblastic plagioclase ranges continuously in composition from An54 to An96, in contrast with relict igneous plagioclase that ranges from An42 to An80. Typical hydrothermal clinopyroxene compositions range from Wo49En3Fs48 to Wo53En30Fo17; clinopyroxene from the granoblastic grains is less calcic with an average composition of Wo48En27Fs25. The hornfels is interpreted to form during contact metamorphism in response to dike emplacement, resulting in local recrystallization of previously hydrothermally altered basalts. Temperatures of granoblastic recrystallization estimated from the 2-pyroxene geothermometer range from 927°C to 967°C. Redox estimates based on the 2-oxide oxybarometer range from log fO2 of -13.4 to -15.9. Granoblastic hornfels comprised of clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and calcic plagioclase have been described in a number of ancient hydrothermal systems from the conductive boundary layer between the hydrothermal system and the underlying magma source, most notably in Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole 1256D, Ocean Drilling Program Hole 504B, and in the Troodos and Oman ophiolites. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of high-grade contact metamorphism from an active geothermal system and the first description of equilibrated amphibole-absent pyroxene hornfels facies contact metamorphism in any mid-ocean ridge (MOR) hydrothermal system. This contribution describes how these assemblages develop through metamorphic reactions and allows us to predict that higher-temperature assemblages may also be present in MOR systems.

  20. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2001-07-13

    This semi-annual report briefly summarizes the progress since the 1st Annual Report issued September, 2000 and the next annual report. More detailed results will be in the annual reports. The main emphasis on fluid properties was on measurements of the relaxation time and self-diffusion coefficient of ethane and propane. Ethane is similar to methane while propane is more similar to the higher alkanes. The ratio of T1 and T2 is demonstrated to be a function of both viscosity and the NMR frequency. The diffusion-induced T2 in a uniform magnetic gradient was simulated in one dimension to seek improved understanding NMR diffusion in restricted geometry. Analytical solutions can be found for this system if the correct region of validity is used. Estimation of permeability of vuggy carbonates has been problematic because the pore body size does not correlate well with pore throat size. CT scans and CPMG NMR measurements were made on a set of vuggy carbonate rocks.

  1. Highly refractory peridotites in Songshugou, Qinling orogen: Insights into partial melting and melt/fluid-rock reactions in forearc mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yi; Song, Shuguang; Su, Li; Jung, Haemyeong; Niu, Yaoling

    2016-05-01

    melting and melt/fluid-rock interactions in the forearc setting.

  2. Biological Implications of Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Gene-environment interaction (G x E) has been treated as both a statistical phenomenon and a biological reality. It is argued that, although there are important statistical issues that need to be considered, the focus has to be on the biological implications of G x E. Four reports of G x E deriving from the Dunedin longitudinal study are used as…

  3. Multiphase fluid-rock reactions among supercritical carbon dioxide, brine, aquifer, and caprock: relevance to geologic sequestration of carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaszuba, J. P. (John P.); Janecky, D. R. (David R.); Snow, M. G. (Marjorie G.)

    2004-01-01

    The reactive behavior of a multiphase fluid (supercritical CO{sub 2} and brine) under physical-chemical conditions relevant to geologic storage and sequestration in a carbon repository is largely unknown. Experiments were conducted in a flexible cell hydrothermal apparatus to evaluate multiphase fluid-rock (aquifer plus caprock) reactions that may impact repository integrity.

  4. Hemoglobin interacting proteins and implications of spectrin hemoglobin interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Avik; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-10-14

    In this report we have analyzed interacting partners of hemoglobin inside erythrocyte and sought possible implications of hemoglobin-spectrin interaction. Our list of identified cytosolic hemoglobin interacting proteins includes redox regulators like peroxiredoxin-2, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1, flavin reductase and chaperones like HSP70, α-hemoglobin stabilizing protein. Others include metabolic enzymes like carbonic anhydrase-1, selenium binding protein-1, purine nucleoside phosphorylase and nucleoside diphosphate kinase. Additionally, various membrane proteins like α and β spectrin, ankyrin, band3, protein4.1, actin and glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase have been shown to interact with hemoglobin. Our result indicates that major membrane skeleton protein spectrin, that also has a chaperone like activity, helps to fold the unstable alpha-globin chains in vitro. Taken together our results could provide insight into a protein network evolved around hemoglobin molecule inside erythrocyte that may add a new perspective in understanding the hemoglobin function and homeostasis.

  5. Behaviors of Rare Earths during Fluid-Rock Interaction and Its Significance of Geochemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌其聪; 刘丛强

    2001-01-01

    Rare earths in ores, altered and unaltered sericite phyllite, altered and unaltered dacite porphyry were determined in order to examine behaviors of rare earths in hydrothermal alteration associating with ore-forming processes of Yinshan deposit. It is not sufficient to show the mobility only by the absolute abundance of trace elements changes before and after alteration. This can simply result from dilution or concentration if other elements are added to or removed from the rock. As shown by that in Yinshan deposit, less than 20% of the increment of RE was caused by the "condensed" of leaching some of major elements (e.g. Si, Na) from the rock. The principal factor which should be responsible for the higher contents of RE in altered rock is the addition of RE into the rock by hydrothermal fluids. Eu is selectively leached from the altered sericite phyllite by a mild acidity and reducing fluid which is characterized by much lower LRE/HRE ratio and a large positive Eu anomaly. A major effect on the RE patterns is the tendency to develop relatively flatter chondrite-normalized patterns. The RE characteristics may be used to distinguish between small and large ore bodies at a later stage of exploration.

  6. Quantitative measure of the variation in fault rheology due to fluid-rock interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpied, M.L.; Marone, C.J.; Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.; King, D.P.

    1998-01-01

    We analyze friction data from two published suites of laboratory tests on granite in order to explore and quantify the effects of temperature (T) and pore water pressure (Pp) on the sliding behavior of faults. Rate-stepping sliding tests were performed on laboratory faults in granite containing "gouge" (granite powder), both dry at 23?? to 845??C [Lockner et al., 1986], and wet (Pp = 100 MPa) at 23?? to 600??C [Blanpied et al., 1991, 1995]. Imposed slip velocities (V) ranged from 0.01 to 5.5 ??m/s, and effective normal stresses were near 400 MPa. For dried granite at all temperatures, and wet granite below -300??C, the coefficient of friction (??) shows low sensitivity to V, T, and Pp. For wet granite above -350??, ?? drops rapidly with increasing T and shows a strong, positive rate dependence and protracted strength transients following steps in V, presumably reflecting the activity of a water-aided deformation process. By inverting strength data from velocity stepping tests we determined values for parameters in three formulations of a rate- and state-dependent constitutive law. One or two state variables were used to represent slip history effects. Each velocity step yielded an independent set of values for the nominal friction level, five constitutive parameters (transient parameters a, b1, and b2 and characteristic displacements Dcl and Dc2), and the velocity dependence of steady state friction ?????ss/??? In V = a-b1-b2. Below 250??, data from dry and most wet tests are adequately modeled by using the "slip law" [Ruina, 1983] and one state variable (a = 0.003 to 0.018, b = 0.001 to +0.018, Dc ??? 1 to 20 ??m). Dried tests above 250?? can also be fitted with one state variable. In contrast, wet tests above 350?? require higher direct rate dependence (a = 0.03 to 0.12), plus a second state variable with large, negative amplitude (b2 = -0.03 to -0.14) and large characteristic displacement (Dc2 = 300 to >4000 ??m). Thus the parameters a, b1, and b2 for wet granite show a pronounced change in their temperature dependence in the range 270?? to 350??C, which may reflect a change in underlying deformation mechanism. We quantify the trends in parameter values from 25?? to 600??C by piecewise linear regressions, which provide a straightforward means to incorporate the full constitutive response of granite into numerical models of fault slip. The modeling results suggest that the succeptibility for unstable (stick-slip) sliding is maximized between 90?? and 360??C, in agreement with laboratory observations and consistent with the depth range of earthquakes on mature faults in the continental crust.

  7. Fluid-rock reactions in an evaporitic melange, Permian Haselgebirge, Austrian Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotl, C.; Longstaffe, F.J.; Ramseyer, K.; Kunk, M.J.; Wiesheu, R.

    1998-01-01

    Tectonically isolated blocks of carbonate rocks present within the anhydritic Haselgebirge melange of the Northern Calcareous Alps record a complex history of deformation and associated deep-burial diagenetic to very low-grade metamorphic reactions. Fluids were hot (up to ~ 250 ??C) and reducing brines charged with carbon dioxide. Individual carbonate outcrops within the melange record different regimes of brine-rock reactions, ranging from pervasive dolomite recrystallization to dedolomitization. Early diagenetic features in these carbonates were almost entirely obliterated. Matrix dolomite alteration was related to thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) recognized by the replacement of anhydrite by calcite + pyrite ?? native sulphur. Pyrite associated with TSR is coarsely crystalline and characterized by a small sulphur isotope fractionation relative to the precursor Permian anhydrite. Carbonates associated with TSR show low Fe/Mn ratios reflecting rapid reaction of ferrous iron during sulphide precipitation. As a result, TSR-related dolomite and calcite typically show bright Mn(II)-activated cathodoluminescence in contrast to the dull cathodoluminescence of many (ferroan) carbonate cements in other deep-burial settings. In addition to carbonates and sulphides, silicates formed closely related to TSR, including quartz, K-feldspar, albite and K-mica. 40Ar/39Ar analysis of authigenic K-feldspar yielded mostly disturbed step-heating spectra which suggest variable cooling through the argon retention interval for microcline during the Late Jurassic. This timing coincides with the recently recognized subduction and closure of the Meliata-Hallstatt ocean to the south of the Northern Calcareous Alps and strongly suggests that the observed deep-burial fluid-rock reactions were related to Jurassic deformation and melange formation of these Permian evaporites.

  8. Dissolution and Precipitation in Sandstones: A Link Between Fluid-Rock Reactions, Electrical Rock Conductivity, and Permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Ansgar; Milsch, Harald

    2010-05-01

    Geothermal energy production from deep sedimentary reservoirs interferes with thermodynamic fluid-mineral equilibria. Different dissolution and/or precipitation reactions might thus be induced, which affect the rock physical transport properties electrical rock conductivity σrock and permeability k. In general, this work addresses the risk assessment for geothermal energy production from deep sedimentary reservoirs in terms of formation damage. In this context it is important to constrain the processes leading to potential changes in k, evaluate whether they occur under in-situ T - p - X conditions, and - if yes - provide tools to monitor changes in the physico-chemical properties of the fluid-rock system. In the model system quartz-feldspar-water we conducted long-term hydrothermal flow-through and batch experiments under hydrostatic pressure conditions. The temperature range applied in the experiments covered 70 to 160° C to simulate conditions pertaining to a low enthalpy geothermal energy production scenario. The evolutions of σrock and k of feldspar-rich Rotliegend sandstone samples and analogue materials were monitored by means of a HPT-permeameter. Concentrations of the system's major cations ci (i = Na+, Al3+, Si4+, K+, Ca2+) in the (pore)fluids were measured using ICP-OES and were correlated to the electrical fluid conductivity σfluid. Microstructural and mineralogical investigations on the solid phases were performed by SEM and XRD, respectively. In the first part of this study we investigated the relationship between σrock and the chemical saturation state of this specific fluid-rock system. It can be demonstrated that σrock is qualitatively dependent on changes in σfluid. Thus, monitoring of easily accessible σrock can be used to get insights into the chemical evolution of the present fluid-rock system. Hydrogeochemical modeling of the resulting porefluids showed that the system is supersaturated with respect to clay minerals and gibbsite

  9. Some Implications of Human-Structure Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2013-01-01

    On structures, humans may be active which may cause structural vibrations as human activity can excite structural vibration modes. However, humans may also be passive (sitting or standing on the structure). The paper addresses this subject and explores the implications of having passive humans pr...

  10. Implications of interaction between Humans and Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    as structural damping and therefore also structural vibration levels). The paper addresses this subject and explores implications of having passive humans present on the structure. In experimental tests with a laboratory floor it is examined to which degree the posture of humans passively sitting on the floor......Many civil engineering structures are occupied by humans, and often humans are considered as a static load in calculations. However, active humans on structures can cause structural vibrations. Passive humans might also be present on that structure and they do change the structural system (such...... influences the damping added to the floor. A numerical case study explores how passive humans may influence vibration levels of a floor....

  11. Annexin-Phospholipid Interactions. Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Turnay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexins constitute an evolutionary conserved multigene protein superfamily characterized by their ability to interact with biological membranes in a calcium dependent manner. They are expressed by all living organisms with the exception of certain unicellular organisms. The vertebrate annexin core is composed of four (eight in annexin A6 homologous domains of around 70 amino acids, with the overall shape of a slightly bent ring surrounding a central hydrophilic pore. Calcium- and phospholipid-binding sites are located on the convex side while the N-terminus links domains I and IV on the concave side. The N-terminus region shows great variability in length and amino acid sequence and it greatly influences protein stability and specific functions of annexins. These proteins interact mainly with acidic phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, but differences are found regarding their affinity for lipids and calcium requirements for the interaction. Annexins are involved in a wide range of intra- and extracellular biological processes in vitro, most of them directly related with the conserved ability to bind to phospholipid bilayers: membrane trafficking, membrane-cytoskeleton anchorage, ion channel activity and regulation, as well as antiinflammatory and anticoagulant activities. However, the in vivo physiological functions of annexins are just beginning to be established.

  12. The Implications of Interactions for Science and Philosophy

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenson, Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Reductionism has dominated science and philosophy for centuries. Complexity has recently shown that interactions---which reductionism neglects---are relevant for understanding phenomena. When interactions are considered, reductionism becomes limited in several aspects. In this paper, I argue that interactions imply non-reductionism, non-materialism, non-predictability, non-Platonism, and non-nihilism. As alternatives to each of these, holism, informism, adaptation, contextuality, and meaningfulness are put forward, respectively. A worldview that includes interactions not only describes better our world, but can help to solve many open scientific, philosophical, and social problems caused by implications of reductionism.

  13. Implication of Abduction: Complexity without Organized Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiura, Moto

    2010-11-01

    interaction between their elements. On the other hand, power law distribution which is derived from the incomplete parameter estimation and the linearity bias is not based on a mechanism of system itself but on relationship between data on the system and observer of the data. Consequently, our research suggests that complexity expressed by a power law distribution can be derived from the incomplete parameter estimation which is a numerical aspect of abduction and is different from SOC mechanisms.

  14. Experimental Constraints on Fluid-Rock Reactions during Incipient Serpentinization of Harzburgite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, F.; Grozeva, N. G.; Seewald, J.; McCollom, T. M.; Humphris, S. E.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Berquo, T. S.; Kahl, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    The exposure of mantle peridotite to water at crustal levels leads to a cascade of interconnected dissolution-precipitation and reduction-oxidation reactions - a process referred to as serpentinization. These reactions have major implications for microbial life through the provision of hydrogen (H2). To simulate incipient serpentinization and the release of H2 under well-constrained conditions, we reacted uncrushed harzburgite with chemically modified seawater at 300°C and 35 MPa for ca. 1.5 years (13441 hours), monitored changes in fluid chemistry over time, and examined the secondary mineralogy at the termination of the experiment. Approximately 4 mol % of the protolith underwent alteration forming serpentine, accessory magnetite, chlorite, and traces of calcite and heazlewoodite. Alteration textures bear remarkable similarities to those found in partially serpentinized abyssal peridotites. Neither brucite nor talc precipitated during the experiment. Given that the starting material contained ~3.8 times more olivine than orthopyroxene on a molar basis, mass balance requires that dissolution of orthopyroxene was significantly faster than dissolution of olivine. However, the H2 release rate was not uniform, slowing from ~2 nmol H2(aq) gperidotite-1 s-1 at the beginning of the experiment to ~0.2 nmol H2(aq) gperidotite-1 s-1 at its termination. Serpentinization consumed water but did not release significant amounts of dissolved species (other than H2) suggesting that incipient hydration reactions involved a volume increase of ~40%. The reduced access of water to olivine surfaces due to filling of fractures and coating of primary minerals with alteration products led to decreased rates of serpentinization and H2 release. While this concept might seem at odds with completely serpentinized seafloor peridotites, reaction-driven fracturing offers an intriguing solution to the seemingly self-limiting nature of serpentinization. Indeed, the reacted sample revealed a

  15. Fluid-rock interaction in retrograde granulites of the Southern Marginal Zone, Limpopo high grade terrain, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Marten Huizenga

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluid infiltration into retrograde granulites of the Southern Marginal Zone (Limpopo high grade terrain is exemplified by hydration reactions, shear zone hosted metasomatism, and lode gold mineralisation. Hydration reactions include the breakdown of cordierite and orthopyroxene to gedrite + kyanite, and anthophyllite, respectively. Metamorphic petrology, fluid inclusions, and field data indicate that a low H2O-activity carbon-saturated CO2-rich and a saline aqueous fluid infiltrated the Southern Marginal Zone during exhumation. The formation of anthophyllite after orthopyroxene established a regional retrograde anthophyllite-in isograd and occurred at P-T conditions of ∼6 kbar and 610 °C, which fixes the minimum mole fraction of H2O in the CO2-rich fluid phase at ∼0.1. The maximum H2O mole fraction is fixed by the lower temperature limit (∼800 °C for partial melting at ∼0.3. C-O-H fluid calculations show that the CO2-rich fluid had an oxygen fugacity that was 0.6 log10 units higher than that of the fayalite-magnetite-quartz buffer and that the CO2/(CO2+CH4 mole ratio of this fluid was 1. The presence of dominantly relatively low density CO2-rich fluid inclusions in the hydrated granulites indicates that the fluid pressure was less than the lithostatic pressure. This can be explained by strike slip faulting and/or an increase of the rock permeability caused by hydration reactions.

  16. Interactions In Online Education Implications For Theory & Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Askim KURT

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This book was edited by, Charles Juwah, Senior EducationDevelopment Officer at Robert Gordon University, where heruns the postgraduate learning and teaching qualificationcourse. It was published by Routledge in 2006.Interaction is very important in open and flexible learning,and apparent at all levels of engagement, whether betweenstudents, students and tutors, online learning materials orinterfacing with the learning environment. A student whoactively engages with learning materials, interactions helpto improve learning by fortifying knowledge and providingcontext, encouraging reflection, questioning and deeplyunderstanding of a subject.This book provides international perspectives on key topics including analyzing and designing e-learning interactions, social and conceptual dimensions of learning, interactions in online discussions, interactions in pair learning, and professional development of online facilitators. In this book a collection of research and innovative case material drawn from practitioners and academicians and it covers the theory and the practical implications of related issues. It is essential reading for all those involved in the design,implementation, management and use of open and flexible learning.

  17. Implications of Genotype by Environment Interactions in Dairy Sheep Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu Gavojdian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Small ruminants are the most extensively farmed livestock species in Europe, as a result being extremely exposed to natural hazards which leads to strong interactions between genotype and environment. Aim of the current review was to outline and discuss the main welfare issues and economic implications with regards to the genotype by environment interactions in dairy sheep. Researches concerning the additive genetic effect on milk yield, shown that this accounts only for 10%, while the milk production is 90% influenced by environmental factors, highlighting the major role that management and nutrition play in the dairy production of sheep. Nowadays, dairy sheep breeds (e.g. Eastern Friesian and Lacaune, are being introduced and reared in various countries under an extremely wide range of rearing conditions, without adequate knowledge on their acclimatization to the new specific conditions. It was concluded that a welfare assessment protocol for dairy sheep does not exist up today, moreover, there is a serious lack of data concerning the genetic and environmental factors affecting the welfare status of dairy sheep at farm level under different production systems.

  18. Implications to Input of English Teaching Brought By Interaction Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪; 童心

    2011-01-01

    @@ While discussing Krashen's input theory, it is very easy to find that the problems appear in English teaching are related with the theory, and they have provided beneficial implications for the solu- tions to the problems.

  19. Pedagogical implications on interactive techniques of teaching non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    vocabulary acquisition and promote the development of lexical skills. Interactive ... Interactive teaching, which presupposes using role plays, solving specific problems (case .... terminology of different branches: medicine, economics, engineering, transport, sport, music, construction, etc. ..... feedback from their group-mates.

  20. Aqueous geochemistry in icy world interiors: Equilibrium fluid, rock, and gas compositions, and fate of antifreezes and radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neveu, Marc; Desch, Steven J.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    2017-09-01

    The geophysical evolution of many icy moons and dwarf planets seems to have provided opportunities for interaction between liquid water and rock (silicate and organic solids). Here, we explore two ways by which water-rock interaction can feed back on geophysical evolution: the production or consumption of antifreeze compounds, which affect the persistence and abundance of cold liquid; and the potential leaching into the fluid of lithophile radionuclides, affecting the distribution of a long-term heat source. We compile, validate, and use a numerical model, implemented with the PHREEQC code, of the interaction of chondritic rock with pure water and with C, N, S-bearing cometary fluid, thought to be the materials initially accreted by icy worlds, and describe the resulting equilibrium fluid and rock assemblages at temperatures, pressures, and water-to-rock ratios of 0-200 ° C, 1-1000 bar, and 0.1-10 by mass, respectively. Our findings suggest that water-rock interaction can strongly alter the nature and amount of antifreezes, resulting in solutions rich in reduced nitrogen and carbon, and sometimes dissolved H2, with additional sodium, calcium, chlorine, and/or oxidized carbon. Such fluids can remain partially liquid down to 176 K if NH3 is present. The prominence of Cl in solution seems to hinge on its primordial supply in ices, which is unconstrained by the meteoritical record. Equilibrium assemblages, rich in serpentine and saponite clays, retain thorium and uranium radionuclides unless U-Cl or U-HCO3 complexing, which was not modeled, significantly enhances U solubility. However, the radionuclide 40 K can be leached at high water:rock ratio and/or low temperature at which K is exchanged with ammonium in minerals. We recommend the inclusion of these effects in future models of the geophysical evolution of ocean-bearing icy worlds. Our simulation products match observations of chloride salts on Europa and Enceladus; CI chondrites mineralogies; the observation of

  1. Climate Change and Interacting Stressors: Implications for Coral Reef Management in American Samoa (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA announced the release of the final document, Climate Change and Interacting Stressors: Implications for Coral Reef Management in American Samoa. This report provides a synthesis of information on the interactive effects of climate change and other stressors on the reef...

  2. Interaction between angiogenin and fibulin 1: evidence and implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhang; Xiangwei Gao; Chunhua Weng; Zhengping XU

    2008-01-01

    Angiogenin is an angiogenic factor involved in tumorigenesis.However, the mechanism of angiogenin's action remains elusive. In the present study, we identified fibulin 1, an extra-cellular matrix and plasma glycoprotein, as an angiogenin-interacting molecule by yeast two-hybrid screening. This interaction was further confirmed by two different approaches. First, fibnlin 1 was co-immunoprecipitated with angiogenin by anti-angiogenin monoclonal antibody in vitro,suggesting angiogenin binds with fibulin 1 directly. Then fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis showed that fibulin 1 interacted with angiogenin in COS-7 cells, showing that the binding could occur in a cellular context. As fibulin 1 plays an important role in cell proliferation, migration,adhesion, and stabilizes new-forming blood vessel wall, the interaction between fibulin I and angiogenin might under-line one possible mechanism of angiogenin in angiogenesis and/or tumorigenesis.

  3. Gene x environment interactions as dynamical systems: clinical implications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah S. Knox

    2015-01-01

    The etiology and progression of the chronic diseases that account for the highest rates of mortality in the US, namely, cardiovascular diseases and cancers, involve complex gene x environment interactions...

  4. Thyroid-adrenergic interactions: physiological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, J Enrique; Bianco, Suzy D C

    2008-02-01

    The sympathoadrenal system, including the sympathetic nervous system and the adrenal medulla, interacts with thyroid hormone (TH) at various levels. Both systems are evolutionary old and regulate independent functions, playing probably independent roles in poikilothermic species. With the advent of homeothermy, TH acquired a new role, which is to stimulate thermogenic mechanisms and synergize with the sympathoadrenal system to produce heat and maintain body temperature. An important part of this new function is mediated through coordinated and, most of the time, synergistic interactions with the sympathoadrenal system. Catecholamines can in turn activate TH in a tissue-specific manner, most notably in brown adipose tissue. Such interactions are of great adaptive value in cold adaptation and in states needing high-energy output. Conversely, in states of emergency where energy demand should be reduced, such as disease and starvation, both systems are turned down. In pathological states, where one of the systems is fixed at a high or a low level, coordination is lost with disruption of the physiology and development of symptoms. Exaggerated responses to catecholamines dominate the manifestations of thyrotoxicosis, while hypothyroidism is characterized by a narrowing of adaptive responses (e.g., thermogenic, cardiovascular, and lipolytic). Finally, emerging results suggest the possibility that disrupted interactions between the two systems contribute to explain metabolic variability, for example, fuel efficiency, energy expenditure, and lipolytic responses.

  5. Spacecraft charging and plasma interaction implications for large space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E.; Stauber, M.; Rossi, M.; Fischbein, W.

    1978-01-01

    Specific discharge mechanisms, plasma interactions, and scale effects associated with very large spacecraft are studied. The large area, low density character, and extensive use of non-conducting materials is thought to have a major impact on the performance and survivability of many large space systems.

  6. Microbial interactions in cheese: implications for cheese quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlinger, Françoise; Mounier, Jérôme

    2009-04-01

    The cheese microbiota, whose community structure evolves through a succession of different microbial groups, plays a central role in cheese-making. The subtleties of cheese character, as well as cheese shelf-life and safety, are largely determined by the composition and evolution of this microbiota. Adjunct and surface-ripening cultures marketed today for smear cheeses are inadequate for adequately mimicking the real diversity encountered in cheese microbiota. The interactions between bacteria and fungi within these communities determine their structure and function. Yeasts play a key role in the establishment of ripening bacteria. The understanding of these interactions offers to enhance cheese flavour formation and to control and/or prevent the growth of pathogens and spoilage microorganisms in cheese.

  7. Triactome: neuro-immune-adipose interactions. Implication in vascular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Nikov Chaldakov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the precise interactions of nerves, immune cells and adipose tissue account for cardiovascular and metabolic biology is a central aim of biomedical research at present. A long standing paradigm holds that the vascular wall is composed of three concentric tissue coats (tunicae: intima, media, and adventitia. However, large- and medium-sized arteries, where usually atherosclerotic lesions develop, are consistently surrounded by periadventitial adipose tissue, we recently designated tunica adiposa (in brief, adiposa like intima, media, adventitia. According to present paradigm, atherosclerosis is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease featured by endothelial dysfunction/intimal thickening, medial atrophy and adventitial lesions associated with adipose dysfunction, whereas hypertension is characterized by hyperinnervation-associated medial thickening due to smooth muscle cell hypertrophy/hyperplasia. Periadventitial adipose tissue expansion is associated with increased infiltration of immune cells, both adipocytes and immunocytes secreting pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory (metabotrophic signaling proteins collectively dubbed adipokines. However, the role of perivascular nerves and their interactions with immune cells and paracrine adipose tissue is not yet evaluated in such an integrated way. The present review attempts to briefly highlight the findings in basic and translational sciences in this area focusing on neuro-immune-adipose interactions, herein referred to as triactome. Triactome-targeted pharmacology may provide a novel therapeutic approach in cardiovascular disease.

  8. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  9. Diet-Microbiota Interactions and Their Implications for Healthy Living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B. Jeffery

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that diet influences the health of an individual and that a diet rich in plant-based foods has many advantages in relation to the health and well-being of an individual. What has been unclear until recently is the large contribution of the gut microbiota to this effect. As well as providing basic nutritional requirements, the long-term diet of an animal modifies its gut microbiota. In adults, diets that have a high proportion of fruit and vegetables and a low consumption of meat are associated with a highly diverse microbiota and are defined by a greater abundance of Prevotella compared to Bacteroides, while the reverse is associated with a diet that contains a low proportion of plant-based foods. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that the effect of the microbial ecology of the gut goes beyond the local gut immune system and is implicated in immune-related disorders, such as IBS, diabetes and inflamm-ageing. In this review, we investigate the evidence that a balanced diet leads to a balanced, diverse microbiota with significant consequences for healthy ageing by focusing on conditions of interest.

  10. Chemical and boron isotope microanalysis of tourmalines as a guide to fluid-rock interaction in the Habachtal emerald deposit, Tauern Window, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, R. B.; Krienitz, M.-S.; Grundmann, G.; Wiedenbeck, M.

    2009-04-01

    Tourmalines from the Habachtal emerald deposit in the Eastern Alps formed together with emerald in a ductile shear zone during blackwall metasomatism between pelitic country rocks and a serpentinite body. Electron microprobe and secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses provide a record of chemical and B-isotope variations in tourmalines which represent an idealized profile from metapelites into the blackwall sequence of biotite and chlorite schists. Tourmaline is intermediate schorl-dravite in the country rock and become increasingly dravitic in the blackwall zones, while F and Cr contents increase and Al drops. Metasomatic tourmaline from blackwall zones is typically zoned optically and chemically, with rim compositions rich in Mg, Ti, Ca and F compared with the cores. The total range in delta-11B values is -13.8 to -5.1 permil and the within-sample variations are typically 3 to 5 permil. Both of these ranges are beyond the reach of closed-system fractionation at the estimated 500-550C conditions of formation, and at least two boron components with contrasting isotopic composition are indicated. A key observation from tourmaline core analyses is a systematic shift in delta-11B from the country rock (-14 to -10 permil) to the inner blackwall zones (-9 to -5 permil). We suggest that two separate fluids were channeled and partially mixed in the Habachtal shear zone during blackwall alteration and tourmaline-emerald mineralization. A regional metamorphic fluid carried isotopically light boron as observed in the metapelite country rocks. The other fluid is derived from the serpentinite association and has isotopically heavier boron typical for MORB or altered oceanic crust.

  11. Tourmaline geochemistry and δ11B variations as a guide to fluid-rock interaction in the Habachtal emerald deposit, Tauern Window, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbull, Robert B.; Krienitz, Marc-Sebastian; Grundmann, Günter; Wiedenbeck, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Tourmalines from the Habachtal emerald deposit in the Eastern Alps formed together with emerald in a ductile shear zone during blackwall metasomatism between pelitic country rocks and a serpentinite body. Electron microprobe and secondary ion mass spectrometric (SIMS) analyses provide a record of chemical and B-isotope variations in tourmalines which represent an idealized profile from metapelites into the blackwall sequence of biotite and chlorite schists. Tourmaline is intermediate schorl-dravite in the country rock and become increasingly dravitic in the blackwall zones, while F and Cr contents increase and Al drops. Metasomatic tourmaline from blackwall zones is typically zoned optically and chemically, with rim compositions rich in Mg, Ti, Ca and F compared with the cores. The total range in δ11B values is -13.8 to -5.1‰ and the within-sample variations are typically 3-5‰. Both of these ranges are beyond the reach of closed-system fractionation at the estimated 500-550°C conditions of formation, and at least two boron components with contrasting isotopic composition are indicated. A key observation from tourmaline core analyses is a systematic shift in δ11B from the country rock (-14 to -10‰) to the inner blackwall zones (-9 to -5‰). We suggest that two separate fluids were channeled and partially mixed in the Habachtal shear zone during blackwall alteration and tourmaline-emerald mineralization. A regional metamorphic fluid carried isotopically light boron as observed in the metapelite country rocks. The other fluid is derived from the serpentinite association and has isotopically heavier boron typical for MORB or altered oceanic crust.

  12. Evolution of fluid-rock interactions: fluid inclusion, isotopic, and major/minor element chemistry of hydrothermally altered volcanic rock in core RN-17B, Reykjanes, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A. P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Schiffman, P.; Marks, N. E.; Fridleifsson, G. O.

    2011-12-01

    The Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland, hosts a seawater-dominated geothermal system. Previous studies indicate an evolution of the system from meteoric to seawater. The inclined 4-inch diameter RN-17B drill core was collected from 2798.5 m to 2808.5 m (~2555 m below surface) at in situ temperature of approximately 330°C. Samples for this study were obtained from the Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP). The core contains hydrothermally altered rocks of basaltic composition. Hydrothermal alteration ranges from upper greenschist to lower amphibolite grade, dependent on protolith size and composition. Veins in the core grade inward from radial epidote + acicular hornblende + titanite + pyrite, to clearer equant and compositionally zoned epidote vein centers. Felted amphibole replaces hyaloclastite and smaller crystalline clasts within the core, but is absent from the centers of crystalline pillow basalt fragments. Amphibole in vein selvages and vesicle fillings is green and acicular. Electron microprobe analyses of amphibole indicate it spans a compositional range of ferrohornblende through paragasite. The pistacite component (Xps) of vein epidote ranges from 16.5 to 36.7. The Xps component shows both normal and reverse zoning within single epidote crystals across this range, and follows no distinct pattern. Vein epidote adjacent to the wall rock has a higher aluminum concentration than vein centers. This may be due to mobilization of aluminum from plagioclase in the wall rock during albitization. Solutions flowing through open fractures may have lower Al-content and thus precipitate more Fe-rich epidote than those next to the fracture walls. Primary fluid inclusions in epidote range in size from <1 to 10 μm in diameter. Secondary fluid inclusions are <1 μm in diameter and not measurable. Calculated fluid inclusion salinities range from 0.5 to 7.6 weight percent NaCl, with lower salinities adjacent to the wall rock and higher salinities in the vein centers. Homogenization temperature (Th) measurements fall into 3 categories: 1) non-homogenizing adjacent to vein walls; 2) inwards of vein wall (Th = 383.6 to 401.5°C); and 3) the vein center (Th = 344.9 to 378.3°C). Laser ablation ICP-MS spot measurements of strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr) ratios decrease from the vein edges (0.70500) to the vein centers (0.70400). 87Sr/86Sr isotope ratios are overall shifted away from oceanic basalt values towards seawater values. Lower 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the vein centers indicate an evolution of the system to lower water/rock ratios. If this conclusion is correct, lower water/rock ratio may be responsible for salinities greater than seawater in the vein centers following wall rock hydration.

  13. Evolution of fluid-rock interaction in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland: Evidence from Iceland Deep Drilling Project core RN-17B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Andrew P. G.; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Schiffman, Peter; Marks, Naomi; Friðleifsson, Guðmundur Ómar

    2015-09-01

    We describe the lithology and present spatially resolved geochemical analyses of samples from the hydrothermally altered Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP) drill core RN-17B. The 9.3 m long RN-17B core was collected from the seawater-dominated Reykjanes geothermal system, located on the Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland. The nature of fluids and the location of the Reykjanes geothermal system make it a useful analog for seafloor hydrothermal processes, although there are important differences. The recovery of drill core from the Reykjanes geothermal system, as opposed to drill cuttings, has provided the opportunity to investigate evolving geothermal conditions by utilizing in-situ geochemical techniques in the context of observed paragenetic and spatial relationships of alteration minerals. The RN-17B core was returned from a vertical depth of ~ 2560 m and an in-situ temperature of ~ 345 °C. The primary lithologies are basaltic in composition and include hyaloclastite breccia, fine-grained volcanic sandstone, lithic breccia, and crystalline basalt. Primary igneous phases have been entirely pseudomorphed by calcic plagioclase + magnesium hornblende + chlorite + titanite + albitized plagioclase + vein epidote and sulfides. Despite the extensive hydrothermal metasomatism, original textures including hyaloclastite glass shards, lithic clasts, chilled margins, and shell-fragment molds are superbly preserved. Multi-collector LA-ICP-MS strontium isotope ratio (87Sr/86Sr) measurements of vein epidote from the core are consistent with seawater as the dominant recharge fluid. Epidote-hosted fluid inclusion homogenization temperature and freezing point depression measurements suggest that the RN-17B core records cooling through the two-phase boundary for seawater over time to current in-situ measured temperatures. Electron microprobe analyses of hydrothermal hornblende and hydrothermal plagioclase confirm that while alteration is of amphibolite-grade, it is in disequilibrium and the extent of alteration is dependent upon protolith type and water/rock ratio. Alteration in the RN-17B core bares many similarities to that of Type II basalts observed in Mid-Atlantic Ridge samples.

  14. Fluid-rock interaction controlling clay-mineral crystallization in quartz-rich rocks and its influence on the seismicity of the Carboneras fault area (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Espinosa, R.; Abad, I.; Jimenez-Millan, J.; Lorite-Herrera, M.

    2009-04-01

    The Carboneras Fault zone is one of the longest fault in the Betic Cordillera (SE Spain) and it would be a good candidate to generate large magnitude earthquakes (Gracia et al., 2006). Seismicity in the region is characterised by low to moderate magnitude events, although large destructive earthquakes have occurred, which reveals significant earthquake and tsunami hazards (Masana et al., 2004). Due to the internal architecture of the fault zone, shear lenses of post-orogenic sediments of Miocene and Pliocene age including marls and sandstones sequences are juxtaposed to the predominant slaty gouges of the Alpine basement. Microcataclasites and gouges of the quartz-rich post-orogenic sediments are also developed as cm- to m-scale bands, allowing the comparison between the deformed materials and their protoliths. Red, yellow and white sandstones and their respective cataclasites can be identified. This communication is concerned with the clay mineral crystallization events in these materials and its possible influence on the seismicity model of the region. The presence of phyllosilicates in fault zones as either neoformed or inherited clays is commonly related with fluid circulation and a mechanically weak fault behaviour (e.g., Wang, 1984). A critical factor for the understanding of the mechanical role of clays in fault rocks is to determine the timing of formation of mineral assemblages and microstructure of fault rocks and protolith. The effects of post-faulting alteration limit inferences about fault behaviour that can be made from exhumed rocks. The Carboneras fault zone provides good opportunities to study mineral processes enhanced by deformation, given that it is located in a region of arid climate and shows outcroppings of quartzitic rocks included in slaty rocks. Combined XRD, optical microscopy and SEM analyses reveal that deformed quartzitic rocks are enriched in phyllosilicates, increasing especially the amount of chlorite. The samples strongly damaged are characterised also by the presence of dolomite and gypsum. The deformation is highly localized, developing phyllosilicate-rich bands highly foliated due to the presence of fine-sized aligned clays (chlorite and mica). In some undeformed lenses of the cataclastic rocks, variable-sized patches of phyllosilicates containing random oriented stacks of chlorite and mica are developed. BSE images reveal that the stacks are made of two intergrown compositional types of chlorite. These results lead to conclude that limited clay growth during faulting occurred. The absence of significant compositional differences between undeformed and deformed phyllosilicates suggests that whereas fluids were present during strike-slip faulting, fluids were not preferentially focused along the quartz-rich rocks of the fault zone by phyllosilicates avoiding the development of the synkinematic clay alteration process. However, clays played an important role for the mechanical behaviour of the quartzitic rocks in the fault zone. Deformation is highly localized in chlorite-rich sandstones. These sandstones show substantial clay crystallization which texture can be related with a hydrothermal origin before strike-slip faulting, likely associated with the volcanic activity of the area leading to form of chlorite/mica patches. These data indicate that, although elevated fluid pressure confined by clay fabric cannot be appealed for the mechanical behaviour of the sandstones of the Carboneras fault, clay fabrics developed during deformation dominated the fault-weakening mechanism. We consider that lubricating properties of phyllosilicates in the quartzitic rocks were an important factor controlling movement mechanisms promoting the predominance of creep as regards seismic stick-slip (Bedrosian et al., 2004) reducing the possibility of larger seismogenic events that nucleate on localized fault planes developed within quartzitic rocks contained within the fault zone. Finally the crystallization of dolomite and gypsum in the highly damaged areas of the microcataclasites could be related with rec

  15. JV Task 77 - Health Implications of Mercury - Selenium Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas Ralstion; Laura Raymond

    2007-12-15

    Exposure to mercury (Hg) commonly results from eating fish containing bioaccumulated methylmercury (MeHg). However, conflicting observations and conclusions have arisen from the ongoing human studies of MeHg exposure from fish consumption. Resolving these uncertainties has important implications for human health since significant nutritional benefits will be lost if fish consumption is needlessly avoided. Selenium (Se), an important nutrient that is abundant in ocean fish, has a potent protective effect against Hg toxicity. This protective effect was thought to be due to the high binding affinities between Hg and Se resulting in Se sequestration of Hg to prevent its harmful effects. However, it is imperative to consider the opposing effect of Hg on Se physiology. Crucial proteins that require Se normally protect the brain and hormone-producing glands from oxidative damage. MeHg is able to cross all biological barriers and enter cells in these tissues, where its high Se affinity results in Se sequestration. Sequestration in association with Hg prevents Se from participating in proteins that perform essential antioxidant activities. Supplemental dietary Se is able to replace Se sequestered by Hg and maintain normal antioxidant protection of brain and glands. The goal of this research project was to assess the potency of normal dietary levels of Se in protection against MeHg toxicity. Results from this project indicate that MeHg toxicity is only evident in situations resulting in Hg occurring in high molar excess of Se. Additionally, the common method of MeHg risk assessments using measurements of toenail and blood levels of Hg was shown to provide an accurate reflection of Hg exposure but did not accurately indicate risk of toxicity resulting from that exposure. Instead, Hg:Se molar ratios are proposed as a superior means of assessing risks associated with MeHg exposure.

  16. An n→π* interaction in aspirin: implications for structure and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Amit; Kamer, Kimberli J; Raines, Ronald T

    2011-10-07

    Stereoelectronic effects modulate molecular structure, reactivity, and conformation. We find that the interaction between the ester and carboxyl moieties of aspirin has a previously unappreciated quantum mechanical character that arises from the delocalization of an electron pair (n) of a donor group into the antibonding orbital (π*) of an acceptor group. This interaction affects the physicochemical attributes of aspirin and could have implications for its pharmacology.

  17. Coupled Chemical and Thermal Processes During Contact Metamorphism: Constraining Rates and Duration with Time-Dependent 3-D Heat and Mass Transport Modeling of Fluid-Rock Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutrow, B. L.; Henry, D.; Gable, C. W.; Heydari, E.; Travis, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    (layered). Thus, reactions converting cal + qtz require fast reaction rates to produce pct coupling the effects of far-from-equilibrium fluids with heat during the episode which returned to background Ts in 10 yr. Such calculations place time constraints on the rates and duration of coupled processes active in fluid-rock systems.

  18. No Place to Play: Implications for the Interaction of Parents and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sheridan

    1997-01-01

    Uses J Bowbly's (1969) theory of attachment as a framework for considering the implications of a lack of outdoor access for parental strategies and for the interaction of parents and children in low-income families. It argues that having access to outdoor play opportunities is supportive of healthy child development and responsive parenting and…

  19. No Place to Play: Implications for the Interaction of Parents and Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Sheridan

    1997-01-01

    Uses J Bowbly's (1969) theory of attachment as a framework for considering the implications of a lack of outdoor access for parental strategies and for the interaction of parents and children in low-income families. It argues that having access to outdoor play opportunities is supportive of healthy child development and responsive parenting and…

  20. The Interactional Approach to The Teaching Of Writing and Its Implications for Second Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Amin Lestari

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a language skill which is relatively difficult to acquire. A number of efforts have been made to develop the students’ writing skill, among others is by applying different approaches to the teaching of writing. This article discusses the interactional approach to the teaching of writing and its implications for second language acquisition.

  1. The Interactional Approach to the Teaching of Writing and Its Implications for Second Language Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Amin Lestari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing is a language skill which is relatively difficult to acquire. A number of efforts have been made to develop the students' writing skill, among others is by applying different approaches to the teaching of writing. This article discusses the interactional approach to the teaching of writing and its implications for second language acquisition.  

  2. Wave "Coherency" and Implications for Wave-Particle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurutani, Bruce; Singh Lakhina, Gurbax; Bhanu, Remya; Lee, Lou-Chuang

    2016-07-01

    Wave "coherency" was introduced in 2009 by Tsurutani et al. (JGR, doi:10.1029/2008JA013353, 2009) to describe the waves detected in the ~10 to 100 ms duration subelements which are the fundamental components of ~0.1 to 0.5 s chorus "elements". In this talk we will show examples of what we mean by coherency, quasi-coherency and incoherency for a variety of magnetospheric plasma waves. We will show how to measure coherency/quasicoherency quantitatively for electromagnetic whistler mode chorus, electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, plasmaspheric hiss and linearly polarized magnetosonic waves. If plasma waves are coherent, their interactions with resonant particles will be substantially different. Specific examples will be used to show that the pitch angle scattering rates for energetic charged particles is roughly 3 orders of magnitude faster than the Kennel-Petschek diffusion (which assumes incoherent waves) rate. We feel that this mechanism is the only one that can explain ~ 0.1- 0.5 s bremsstrahlung x-ray microbursts.

  3. Gas interaction effects on lunar bonded particles and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for an experimental investigation of gas-interaction effects on different Apollo 11 and Apollo 12 lunar-soil samples containing bonded particles. In the experiments, lunar fines were exposed to pure O2, pure water vapor, HCl, NH3, N2, HCOOH, and CH3NH2, in order to observe whether bonded particles would separate. In addition, repeated gas adsorption/desorption measurements were performed to determine the nature and reactive properties of the particle surfaces, and surface areas were measured for comparison with analogous terrestrial samples to determine whether the surface areas of highly radiation-damaged particles were larger or smaller. It is found that N2 is apparently ineffective in separating bonded particles and that the ratio of Apollo 11 to Apollo 12 bonded particles separated by a particular gas exposure ranges from 2.5 to 3.0. Possible reasons for differences in material surface properties at the two Apollo sites are considered, and it is concluded that material from a certain depth at some other site was transported to the Apollo 12 site and mixed with the original material in recent years (considerably less than 2000 years ago).

  4. Interactions between MSCs and Immune Cells: Implications for Bone Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy K. Kovach

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is estimated that, of the 7.9 million fractures sustained in the United States each year, 5% to 20% result in delayed or impaired healing requiring therapeutic intervention. Following fracture injury, there is an initial inflammatory response that plays a crucial role in bone healing; however, prolonged inflammation is inhibitory for fracture repair. The precise spatial and temporal impact of immune cells and their cytokines on fracture healing remains obscure. Some cytokines are reported to be proosteogenic while others inhibit bone healing. Cell-based therapy utilizing mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs is an attractive option for augmenting the fracture repair process. Osteoprogenitor MSCs not only differentiate into bone, but they also exert modulatory effects on immune cells via a variety of mechanisms. In this paper, we review the current literature on both in vitro and in vivo studies on the role of the immune system in fracture repair, the use of MSCs in the enhancement of fracture healing, and interactions between MSCs and immune cells. Insight into this paradigm can provide valuable clues in identifying cellular and noncellular targets that can potentially be modulated to enhance both natural bone healing and bone repair augmented by the exogenous addition of MSCs.

  5. Interactions between CO2, minerals, and toxic ions: Implications for CO2 leakage from deep geological storage (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, F.; Montes-Hernandez, G.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term injection of carbon dioxide into geological underground reservoirs may lead to leakage events that will enhance fluid-rock interactions and question the safety of these repositories. If injection of carbon dioxide into natural reservoirs has been shown to mobilize some species into the pore fluid, including heavy metals and other toxic ions, the detailed interactions remain still debated because two main processes could interact and modify fluid composition: on the one hand dissolution/precipitation reactions may release/incorporate trace elements, and on the other hand adsorption/desorption reactions on existing mineral surfaces may also mobilize or trap these elements. We analyze here, through laboratory experiments, a scenario of a carbon dioxide reservoir that leaks into a fresh water aquifer through a localized leakage zone such as a permeable fault zone localized in the caprock and enhance toxic ions mobilization. Our main goal is to evaluate the potential risks on potable water quality. In a series of experiments, we have injected carbon dioxide into a fresh water aquifer-like medium that contained carbonate and/or iron oxide particles, pure water, and various concentrations of trace elements (copper, arsenic, cadmium, and selenium, in various states of oxidation). This analogue and simplified medium has been chosen because it contains two minerals (calcite, goethite) widespread found in freshwater aquifers. The surface charge of these minerals may vary with pH and therefore control how trace elements are adsorbed or desorbed, depending on fluid composition. Our experiments show that these minerals could successfully prevent the remobilization of adsorbed Cu(II), Cd(II), Se(IV), and As(V) if carbon dioxide is intruded into a drinking water aquifer. Furthermore, a decrease in pH resulting from carbon dioxide intrusion could reactivate the adsorption of Se(IV) and As(V) if goethite and calcite are sufficiently available in the aquifer. Our

  6. Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity: interactions, implications, and recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterson CA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catherine A Peterson Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, USA Abstract: Vitamin D deficiency and childhood obesity have been classified as epidemics throughout the world, and both share some common risk factors including poor diet and inactivity. Observational and clinical studies show that vitamin D status and fat mass are inversely correlated. It is not clear whether vitamin D deficiency contributes to, or is a consequence of obesity, or whether there are regulatory interactions between excess adiposity and vitamin D activity. The effects of this deficiency in childhood obesity appear to have negative influences on overall health, including insulin resistance, inflammation, and impeded bone mineralization, as well as increased future risk of type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and osteoporosis. The rather ubiquitous distribution of the vitamin D receptor and the 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1a-hydroxylase throughout the body, including evidence for a role of vitamin D in adipogenesis and adipocyte metabolism, may in part explain these widespread effects. Most of the findings to date suggest that the vitamin D needs of obese children are greater than the nonobese. Although ultraviolet B-induced skin synthesis is a main source of vitamin D, its use is neither feasible nor prudent due to limited sun availability for many and concerns for skin cancer. Likewise, obtaining adequate vitamin D from natural food sources alone is generally not achievable, and even in countries that allow fortification, vitamin D intakes are low. Therefore, in obese children, vitamin D supplementation is warranted. Weight loss interventions using energy restriction and physical activity may also improve the poor vitamin D status associated with obesity. More research is needed to define optimal vitamin D status in this vulnerable population, including investigations to determine the efficacy of vitamin D

  7. Interactions between biomaterials and the sclera: Implications on myopia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, James

    Myopia prevalence has steadily climbed worldwide in recent decades with the most dramatic impact in East Asian countries. Treatments such as eyeglasses, contact lenses, and laser surgery for the refractive error are widely available, but none cures the underlying cause. In progressive high myopia, invasive surgical procedures using a scleral buckle for mechanical support are performed since the patient is at risk of becoming blind. The treatment outcome is highly dependent on the surgeon's skills and the patient's myopia progression rate, with limited choices in buckling materials. This dissertation, in four main studies, represents efforts made to control high myopia progression through the exploration and development of biomaterials that influence scleral growth. First, mRNA expression levels of the chick scleral matrix metalloproteinases, tissue-inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases, and transforming growth factor-beta 2 were assessed for temporal and defocus power effects. The first study elucidated the roles that these factors play in scleral growth regulation and suggested potential motifs that can be incorporated in future biomaterials design. Second, poly(vinyl-pyrrolidone) as injectable gels and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) as solid strips were implanted in chicks to demonstrate the concept of posterior pole scleral reinforcements. This second study found that placing appropriate biomaterials at the posterior pole of the eye could directly influence scleral remodeling by interacting with the host cells. Both studies advanced the idea that scleral tissue remodeling could be potentially controlled by well-designed biomaterials. These findings led to the exploration of biomimetic hydrogels comprising enzymatically-degradable semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (edsIPNs) to determine their biocompatibility and effects on the chick posterior eye wall. This third study demonstrated the feasibility of stimulating scleral growth by applying biomimetic

  8. Interactions between the Lateral Habenula and the Hippocampus: Implication for Spatial Memory Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Goutagny, Romain; Loureiro, Michael; Jackson, Jesse; Chaumont, Joseph; Williams, Sylvain; Isope, Philippe; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Lecourtier, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic structure connected with both the basal ganglia and the limbic system and that exerts a major influence on midbrain monoaminergic nuclei. The current view is that LHb receives and processes cortical information in order to select proper strategies in a variety of behavior. Recent evidence indicates that LHb might also be implicated in hippocampus-dependent memory processes. However, if and how LHb functionally interacts with the dorsal hippocampus ...

  9. Interactions between the Lateral Habenula and the Hippocampus: Implication for Spatial Memory Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Goutagny, Romain; Loureiro, Michael; Jackson, Jesse; Chaumont, Joseph; Williams, Sylvain; Isope, Philippe; Kelche, Christian; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; Lecourtier, Lucas

    2013-01-01

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is an epithalamic structure connected with both the basal ganglia and the limbic system and that exerts a major influence on midbrain monoaminergic nuclei. The current view is that LHb receives and processes cortical information in order to select proper strategies in a variety of behavior. Recent evidence indicates that LHb might also be implicated in hippocampus-dependent memory processes. However, if and how LHb functionally interacts with the dorsal hippocampus ...

  10. Macroeconomic policy interaction: State dependency and implications for financial stability in UK: A systemic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ali Nasir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The association between economic and financial stabilities and influence of macroeconomic policies on the financial sector creates scope of active policy role in financial stability. As a contribution to the existing body of knowledge, this study has analysed the implications of macroeconomic policy interaction/coordination for financial stability, proxied by financial assets, i.e. equity and bonds price oscillation. The critical review and analysis of the existing literature on the subject suggests that there is also ample evidence of interdependence between monetary and fiscal policies and this interrelation necessitates coordination between them for the sake of financial stability. There is also a case for analysing the symmetry of financial markets responses to macroeconomic policy interaction. On methodological and empirical grounds, it is vital to test the robustness of policy recommendations to overcome the limitation of a single empirical approach (Jeffrey–Lindley’s paradox. Hence, the Frequentist and Bayesian approaches should be used in commentary manner. The policy interaction and optimal policy combination should also be analysed in the context of institutional design and major financial events to gain insight into the implications of policy interaction in the periods of stable economic and financial environments as well as period of financial and economic distress.

  11. Dynamics of coupled mutualistic and antagonistic interactions, and their implications for ecosystem management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgelin, E; Loeuille, N

    2014-04-07

    Understanding the interplay of antagonistic and mutualistic interactions is an important challenge for predicting the fate of ecological communities. So far, studies of propagation of disturbances have focused on a single interaction type (antagonistic or mutualistic), leaving out part of the natural diversity. We develop a model that describes the dynamics of a plant species interacting with one antagonistic (e.g. an herbivore) and one mutualistic (e.g. a pollinator) species confronted to a perturbation to assess how each interaction type will affect the other. We analyze the effect of additional mortality as a press perturbation acting on the plant's partners. We study how the intensity of the disturbance and the relative sensitivities of partner species determine community structure, as well as extinction orders. We show that due to indirect effects between the two types of interactions, additional mortality on both pollinators and herbivores can either decrease or increase their densities. The presence of pollinators can stabilize the antagonistic interaction by preventing cyclic dynamics in the plant-herbivore system. We propose explanatory mechanisms based on indirect effects and discuss the implications of our results for the conservation of interactions and communities. Our results suggest that, in agricultural landscapes, direct effects of insecticides on herbivore densities can be fully offset by indirect effects mediated through pollinators. The loss of pollinators, due to insecticide use, can also destabilize the dynamics of insect herbivores.

  12. Phage-Phagocyte Interactions and Their Implications for Phage Application as Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Jończyk-Matysiak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phagocytes are the main component of innate immunity. They remove pathogens and particles from organisms using their bactericidal tools in the form of both reactive oxygen species and degrading enzymes—contained in granules—that are potentially toxic proteins. Therefore, it is important to investigate the possible interactions between phages and immune cells and avoid any phage side effects on them. Recent progress in knowledge concerning the influence of phages on phagocytes is also important as such interactions may shape the immune response. In this review we have summarized the current knowledge on phage interactions with phagocytes described so far and their potential implications for phage therapy. The data suggesting that phage do not downregulate important phagocyte functions are especially relevant for the concept of phage therapy.

  13. Interactants' beliefs in teletandem: Implications for the teaching of Portuguese as a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Adriane Henschel Pobbe RAMOS

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Based on the principles of autonomy and reciprocity, Teletandem connects language teaching with technology, by furthering interaction between college students aiming at providing a virtual context for language teaching and learning. A system of beliefs and values can emerge in this fruitful environment and such emergence can directly affect the process. This study aims to investigate the belief system, which emerges out of Teletandem mediation sessions, and to discuss its implications for the teaching of Portuguese as a foreign language from the perspective of Critical Discourse Analysis.

  14. Ultrashort laser pulse–matter interaction: Implications for high energy materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Venugopal Rao

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of ultrashort [nanosecond (ns)/picosecond (ps)/femtosecond (fs)] pulses with materials is an exhaustive area of research with underlying, and often extremely rich, physics along with a plethora of applications evolving from it. High-energy materials (HEMs) are chemical compounds or mixture of compounds which, under suitable initiation, undergoes a very rapid exothermic and self-propagating decomposition. Herein, we describe the interaction of laser pulses with materials and its implications for studies on HEMs in four parts: (a) ns and fs laserinduced breakdown spectroscopic (LIBS) studies of HEMs towards understanding the molecular dynamics and discrimination, (b) ps/fs pulses interaction with metallic solids towards the production of nanoparticles, nanostructures and their utility in identifying explosive molecules using surface-enhanced Raman scattering studies, (c) interaction of laser pulses with the bulk and surface of glasses and polymers producing micro- and nanostructures for microfluidic/lab-on-a-chip applications, and (d) ultrafast spectroscopic studies for comprehending the excited state dynamics towards elucidation of vibrational dynamics in HEMs. Several applications resulting from these interactions will be discussed in detail.

  15. Clinical drugs that interact with St. John's wort and implication in drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Yuan Ming; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie Changli; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2008-01-01

    St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum, SJW) is one of the most commonly used herbal antidepressants for the treatment of minor to moderate depression. A major safety concern about SJW is its ability to alter the pharmacokinetics and/or clinical response of a variety of clinically important drugs that have distinctive chemical structure, mechanism of action and metabolic pathways. This review highlights and updates the knowledge on clinical interactions of prescribed drugs with SJW and the implication in drug development. A number of clinically significant interactions of SJW have been identified with conventional drugs, including anticancer agents (imatinib and irinotecan), anti-HIV agents (e.g. indinavir, lamivudine and nevirapine), anti-inflammatory agents (e.g. ibuprofen and fexofenadine), antimicrobial agents (e.g. erythromycin and voriconazole), cardiovascular drugs (e.g. digoxin, ivabradine, warfarin, verapamil, nifedipine and talinolol), central nervous system agents (e.g. amitriptyline, buspirone, phenytoin, methadone, midazolam, alprazolam, and sertraline), hypoglycaemic agents (e.g. tolbutamide and gliclazide), immuno-modulating agents (e.g. cyclosporine and tacrolimus), oral contraceptives, proton pump inhibitor (e.g. omeprazole), respiratory system agent (e.g. theophylline), statins (e.g. atorvastatin and pravastatin). Both pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic components may play a role in the interactions of drugs with SJW. For pharmacokinetic changes of drugs by SJW, induction of cytochrome P450s (e.g. CYP2C9 and 3A4) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) are considered the major mechanism. Thus, it is not a surprise that many drugs that interact with SJW are substrates of CYP3A4, CYP2C9 and P-gp. A comprehensive understanding of clinical drugs that interact with SJW has important implications in drug development. New drugs may be designed to minimize interactions with SJW; and new SJW formulations may be designed to avoid drug interactions. Further clinical and

  16. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, W.K.; Fry, R.J.M.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of presentations and discussions which took place at the US Department of Energy/Commission of European Communities (DOE/CEC) workshop on ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection,'' held at San Diego, California, January 21-22, 1987, is provided. The Department has traditionally supported fundamental research on interactions of ionizing radiation with different biological systems and at all levels of biological organization. The aim of this workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection.

  17. Restoring fish ecological quality in estuaries: Implication of interactive and cumulative effects among anthropogenic stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teichert, Nils; Borja, Angel; Chust, Guillem; Uriarte, Ainhize; Lepage, Mario

    2016-01-15

    Estuaries are subjected to multiple anthropogenic stressors, which have additive, antagonistic or synergistic effects. Current challenges include the use of large databases of biological monitoring surveys (e.g. the European Water Framework Directive) to help environmental managers prioritizing restoration measures. This study investigated the impact of nine stressor categories on the fish ecological status derived from 90 estuaries of the North East Atlantic countries. We used a random forest model to: 1) detect the dominant stressors and their non-linear effects; 2) evaluate the ecological benefits expected from reducing pressure from stressors; and 3) investigate the interactions among stressors. Results showed that largest restoration benefits were expected when mitigating water pollution and oxygen depletion. Non-additive effects represented half of pairwise interactions among stressors, and antagonisms were the most common. Dredged sediments, flow changes and oxygen depletion were predominantly implicated in non-additive interactions, whereas the remainder stressors often showed additive impacts. The prevalence of interactive impacts reflects a complex scenario for estuaries management; hence, we proposed a step-by-step restoration scheme focusing on the mitigation of stressors providing the maximum of restoration benefits under a multi-stress context.

  18. Intraguild interactions implicating invasive species: Harmonia axyridis as a model species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis, F.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanisms that result in the success of exotic species will contribute to predicting future invasions and managing invaded systems. Exotic animal species, whether introduced accidentally or deliberately, may impact communities of native species through different intraguild interactions. As an effective generalist predator of aphids and other soft-body pests the harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis Pallas has been a successful biological control agent. This species was deliberately introduced into several countries for biological control of different arthropods pests, but it was also introduced accidentally into several other countries. It became an invasive species, affecting the dynamic and composition of several guilds through direct or indirect interactions. In this paper we will specifically review the existing data on mechanisms of intraguild interactions, within exotic guilds, that result in the success of H. axyridis as an invasive alien. We will use these studies to interpret the observed population declines in predator diversity in the field, and predict species at risk in regions not yet invaded. Finally, we will review the available data on the impact of intraguild interactions implicating H. axyridis on pest biocontrol.

  19. Interactions between grape skin cell wall material and commercial enological tannins. Practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Cano-Lechuga, Mario; Ruiz-García, Yolanda; Gómez-Plaza, Encarna

    2014-01-01

    Commercial enological tannins were used to investigate the role that cell wall material plays in proanthocyanidin adsorption. Insoluble cell wall material, prepared from the skin of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Monastrell berries, was combined with solutions containing six different commercial enological tannins (proanthocyanidin-type tannins). Analysis of the proanthocyanidins in the solution, after fining with cell wall material, using phloroglucinolysis and size exclusion chromatography, provided quantitative and qualitative information on the non-adsorbed compounds. Cell wall material showed strong affinity for the proanthocyanidins, one of the commercial tannins being bound up to 61% in the experiment. Comparison of the molecular mass distribution of the commercial enological tannins in solution, before and after fining, suggested that cell walls affinity for proanthocyanidins was more related with the proanthocyanidin molecular mass than with their percentage of galloylation. These interactions may have some enological implications, especially as regards the time of commercial tannins addition to the must/wine.

  20. Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interaction and their implication in clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palleria Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-drug interactions (DDIs are one of the commonest causes of medication error in developed countries, particularly in the elderly due to poly-therapy, with a prevalence of 20-40%. In particular, poly-therapy increases the complexity of therapeutic management and thereby the risk of clinically important DDIs, which can both induce the development of adverse drug reactions or reduce the clinical efficacy. DDIs can be classify into two main groups: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic. In this review, using Medline, PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library and Reference lists we searched articles published until June 30 2012, and we described the mechanism of pharmacokinetic DDIs focusing the interest on their clinical implications.

  1. Plant-insect interactions under bacterial influence: ecological implications and underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugio, Akiko; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David; Simon, Jean-Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Plants and insects have been co-existing for more than 400 million years, leading to intimate and complex relationships. Throughout their own evolutionary history, plants and insects have also established intricate and very diverse relationships with microbial associates. Studies in recent years have revealed plant- or insect-associated microbes to be instrumental in plant-insect interactions, with important implications for plant defences and plant utilization by insects. Microbial communities associated with plants are rich in diversity, and their structure greatly differs between below- and above-ground levels. Microbial communities associated with insect herbivores generally present a lower diversity and can reside in different body parts of their hosts including bacteriocytes, haemolymph, gut, and salivary glands. Acquisition of microbial communities by vertical or horizontal transmission and possible genetic exchanges through lateral transfer could strongly impact on the host insect or plant fitness by conferring adaptations to new habitats. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and molecular tools have dramatically enhanced opportunities to characterize the microbial diversity associated with plants and insects and have unveiled some of the mechanisms by which symbionts modulate plant-insect interactions. Here, we focus on the diversity and ecological consequences of bacterial communities associated with plants and herbivorous insects. We also highlight the known mechanisms by which these microbes interfere with plant-insect interactions. Revealing such mechanisms in model systems under controlled environments but also in more natural ecological settings will help us to understand the evolution of complex multitrophic interactions in which plants, herbivorous insects, and micro-organisms are inserted.

  2. Interactions between amyloid-β and Tau fragments promote aberrant aggregates: implications for amyloid toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Thanh D; Economou, Nicholas J; Chamas, Ali; Buratto, Steven K; Shea, Joan-Emma; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-09-25

    We have investigated at the oligomeric level interactions between Aβ(25-35) and Tau(273-284), two important fragments of the amyloid-β and Tau proteins, implicated in Alzheimer's disease. We are able to directly observe the coaggregation of these two peptides by probing the conformations of early heteroligomers and the macroscopic morphologies of the aggregates. Ion-mobility experiment and theoretical modeling indicate that the interactions of the two fragments affect the self-assembly processes of both peptides. Tau(273-284) shows a high affinity to form heteroligomers with existing Aβ(25-35) monomer and oligomers in solution. The configurations and characteristics of the heteroligomers are determined by whether the population of Aβ(25-35) or Tau(273-284) is dominant. As a result, two types of aggregates are observed in the mixture with distinct morphologies and dimensions from those of pure Aβ(25-35) fibrils. The incorporation of some Tau into β-rich Aβ(25-35) oligomers reduces the aggregation propensity of Aβ(25-35) but does not fully abolish fibril formation. On the other hand, by forming complexes with Aβ(25-35), Tau monomers and dimers can advance to larger oligomers and form granular aggregates. These heteroligomers may contribute to toxicity through loss of normal function of Tau or inherent toxicity of the aggregates themselves.

  3. Gene-by-Environment Interactions in Pancreatic Cancer: Implications for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Rick J; Tan, Xiang-Lin; Petersen, Gloria M

    2015-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) has been estimated to have higher incidence and correspondingly higher mortality rates in more developed regions worldwide. Overall, the age-adjusted incidence rate is 4.9/10(5) and age-adjusted mortality rate is at 4.8/10(5). We review here our current knowledge of modifiable risk factors (cigarette smoking, obesity, diet, and alcohol) for PC, genetic variants implicated by genome-wide association studies, possible genetic interactions with risk factors, and prevention strategies to provide future research directions that may further our understanding of this complex disease. Cigarette smoking is consistently associated with a two-fold increased PC risk. PC associations with dietary intake have been largely inconsistent, with the potential exception of certain unsaturated fatty acids decreasing risk and well-done red meat or meat mutagens increasing risk. There is strong evidence to support that obesity (and related measures) increase risk of PC. Only the heaviest alcohol drinkers seem to be at an increased risk of PC. Currently, key prevention strategies include avoiding tobacco and excessive alcohol consumption and adopting a healthy lifestyle. Screening technologies and PC chemoprevention are likely to become more sophisticated, but may only apply to those at high risk. Risk stratification may be improved by taking into account gene environment interactions. Research on these modifiable risk factors is key to reducing the incidence of PC and understanding who in the population can be considered high risk.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction dressed by electronic correlations near charge ordering. Possible implications for cobaltates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foussats, A [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura and Instituto de Fisica Rosario (UNR-CONICET), Avenida Pellegrini 250-2000 Rosario (Argentina); Greco, A [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura and Instituto de Fisica Rosario (UNR-CONICET), Avenida Pellegrini 250-2000 Rosario (Argentina); Bejas, M [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Ingenieria y Agrimensura and Instituto de Fisica Rosario (UNR-CONICET), Avenida Pellegrini 250-2000 Rosario (Argentina); Muramatsu, A [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik III, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-12-20

    We consider possible routes to superconductivity on the basis of the t-J-V model plus phonons on the triangular lattice. We studied the stability conditions for the homogeneous Fermi liquid (HFL) phase against different broken symmetry phases. Besides the {radical}3 x{radical}3 CDW phase, triggered by the nearest-neighbour Coulomb interaction V, we have found that the HFL is unstable, at very low doping, against a bond-ordered phase due to J. We also discuss the occurrence of phase separation at low doping and V. The interplay between the electron-phonon interaction and correlations near the {radical}3 x{radical}3 CDW leads to superconductivity in the unconventional next-nearest-neighbour f-wave (NNN-f) channel with a dome shape for T{sub c} around x{approx}0.35, and with values of a few kelvin. Near the bond-ordered phase at low doping we found tendencies to superconductivity with d-wave symmetry for finite J and x<0.15. Possible implications for cobaltates are discussed.

  5. PAK4 interacts with p85 alpha: implications for pancreatic cancer cell migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Helen; Thillai, Kiruthikah; Whale, Andrew; Arumugam, Prabhu; Eldaly, Hesham; Kocher, Hemant M.; Wells, Claire M.

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4) is amplified in pancreatic cancer tissue. PAK4 is a member of the PAK family of serine/threonine kinases, which act as effectors for several small GTPases, and has been specifically identified to function downstream of HGF-mediated c-Met activation in a PI3K dependent manner. However, the functionality of PAK4 in pancreatic cancer and the contribution made by HGF signalling to pancreatic cancer cell motility remain to be elucidated. We now find that elevated PAK4 expression is coincident with increased expression levels of c-Met and the p85α subunit of PI3K. Furthermore, we demonstrate that pancreatic cancer cells have a specific motility response to HGF both in 2D and 3D physiomimetic organotypic assays; which can be suppressed by inhibition of PI3K. Significantly, we report a specific interaction between PAK4 and p85α and find that PAK4 deficient cells exhibit a reduction in Akt phosphorylation downstream of HGF signalling. These results implicate a novel role for PAK4 within the PI3K pathway via interaction with p85α. Thus, PAK4 could be an essential player in PDAC progression representing an interesting therapeutic opportunity. PMID:28205613

  6. Specific and non-specific interactions of ParB with DNA: implications for chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James A; Pastrana, Cesar L; Butterer, Annika; Pernstich, Christian; Gwynn, Emma J; Sobott, Frank; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Dillingham, Mark S

    2015-01-01

    The segregation of many bacterial chromosomes is dependent on the interactions of ParB proteins with centromere-like DNA sequences called parS that are located close to the origin of replication. In this work, we have investigated the binding of Bacillus subtilis ParB to DNA in vitro using a variety of biochemical and biophysical techniques. We observe tight and specific binding of a ParB homodimer to the parS sequence. Binding of ParB to non-specific DNA is more complex and displays apparent positive co-operativity that is associated with the formation of larger, poorly defined, nucleoprotein complexes. Experiments with magnetic tweezers demonstrate that non-specific binding leads to DNA condensation that is reversible by protein unbinding or force. The condensed DNA structure is not well ordered and we infer that it is formed by many looping interactions between neighbouring DNA segments. Consistent with this view, ParB is also able to stabilize writhe in single supercoiled DNA molecules and to bridge segments from two different DNA molecules in trans. The experiments provide no evidence for the promotion of non-specific DNA binding and/or condensation events by the presence of parS sequences. The implications of these observations for chromosome segregation are discussed.

  7. Grazer Functional Roles, Induced Defenses, and Indirect Interactions: Implications for Eelgrass Restoration in San Francisco Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T. Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the individual and interactive roles of consumer species is more than academic when the host plant is a subject of intense conservation interest. In a mesocosm experiment, we compared effects of common invertebrate grazers in San Francisco Bay seagrass (Zostera marina, eelgrass beds, finding that some species (a native opisthobranch, Phyllaplysia taylori; a native isopod, Idotea resecata; and an introduced gastropod, Ilyanassa obsoleta enhanced eelgrass growth through removal of epiphytic algae, as is often predicted for small invertebrate grazers on seagrasses, while one (an introduced caprellid amphipod, Caprella cf. drepanochir had neutral effects. In contrast, the putatively-introduced gammaridean amphipod, Ampithoe valida, had strong negative effects on eelgrass (in addition to epiphytes through consumption, as we had previously observed in the field during restoration programs. We tested whether other common grazer species could influence the effects of the eelgrass-grazing Ampithoe, and found that Idotea induced production of phenolic compounds and limited eelgrass damage by Ampithoe, without affecting Ampithoe abundance. These results have implications for restoration strategies, and contribute to a growing awareness of the importance of trait-mediated indirect grazer interactions through grazer-induced changes in plant traits, providing the first example in a seagrass system.

  8. Normal male childhood and adolescent sexual interactions: implications for sexual orientation of the individual with intersex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peter A; Houk, Christopher P

    2005-03-01

    Data provided by 24 adult men, 20 heterosexual and four homosexual, concerning parental, religious, geographic and explicit sexual innuendos, comments and childhood experiences are presented and discussed in an attempt to consider some of the multiple factors impacting the development of sexual orientation. All of the study subjects were normally developed males and were presumed to have been exposed to normal male levels of androgens prenatally. Since the experiences and perceptions reported are conditioned by a unique social environment that has been superimposed on a normal male typical prenatal CNS differentiation, the experiences of these men suggest that affirmation of masculinity, and openness in the realm of social and sexual interaction, may enhance the formation of a heterosexual orientation. Conversely, sexually explicit feedback with critical implications occurred commonly among the homosexual men, which they interpreted as implying an insufficient masculinity. Both innate factors and social influences impact sexual orientation; in some instances males appear to have been homosexual from early childhood onward, while in other cases there appears to have been some degree of conditioning and choice in sexual orientation. Regarding the intersexed male, this suggests that social interactions, particularly those provided by parents, have a major influence on the development of sexual orientation in the child, while all persons involved in these children's lives and particularly those who nurture must be prepared for any sexual orientation that develops.

  9. Specific noncovalent interactions at protein-ligand interface: implications for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, P; Huang, J; Tian, F

    2012-01-01

    Specific noncovalent interactions that are indicative of attractive, directional intermolecular forces have always been of key interest to medicinal chemists in their search for the "glue" that holds drugs and their targets together. With the rapid increase in the number of solved biomolecular structures as well as the performance enhancement of computer hardware and software in recent years, it is now possible to give more comprehensive insight into the geometrical characteristics and energetic landscape of certain sophisticated noncovalent interactions present at the binding interface of protein receptors and small ligands based on accumulated knowledge gaining from the combination of two quite disparate but complementary approaches: crystallographic data analysis and quantum-mechanical ab initio calculation. In this perspective, we survey massive body of published works relating to structural characterization and theoretical investigation of three kinds of strong, specific, direct, enthalpy-driven intermolecular forces, including hydrogen bond, halogen bond and salt bridge, involved in the formation of protein-ligand complex architecture in order to characterize their biological functions in conferring affinity and specificity for ligand recognition by host protein. In particular, the biomedical implications of raised knowledge are discussed with respect to potential applications in rational drug design.

  10. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  11. State-dependent blocker interactions with the CFTR chloride channel: implications for gating the pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is subject to voltage-dependent open-channel block by a diverse range of cytoplasmic anions. However, in most cases the ability of these blocking substances to influence the pore opening and closing process has not been reported. In the present work, patch clamp recording was used to investigate the state-dependent block of CFTR by cytoplasmic Pt(NO2)4(2-) ions. Two major effects of Pt(NO2)4(2-) were identified. First, this anion caused fast, voltage-dependent block of open channels, leading to an apparent decrease in single-channel current amplitude. Secondly, Pt(NO2)4(2-) also decreased channel open probability due to an increase in interburst closed times. Interestingly, mutations in the pore that weakened (K95Q) or strengthened (I344K, V345K) interactions with Pt(NO2)4(2-) altered blocker effects both on Cl(-) permeation and on channel gating, suggesting that both these effects are a consequence of Pt(NO2)4(2-) interaction with a single site within the pore. Experiments at reduced extracellular Cl(-) concentration hinted that Pt(NO2)4(2-) may have a third effect, possibly increasing channel activity by interfering with channel closure. These results suggest that Pt(NO2)4(2-) can enter from the cytoplasm into the pore inner vestibule of both open and closed CFTR channels, and that Pt(NO2)4(2-) bound in the inner vestibule blocks Cl(-) permeation as well as interfering with channel opening and, perhaps, channel closure. Implications for the location of the channel gate in the pore, and the operation of this gate, are discussed.

  12. [Clopidogrel--proton pump inhibitors drug interaction: implications to clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes-Carvalho, Ricardo; Albuquerque, Aníbal

    2010-10-01

    Recent studies have raised the concern that proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) could potentially interfere with clopidogrel antiplatelet effect. This association is frequent in clinical practice and is recommended by recent consensus guidelines in patients taking dual antiplatelet therapy to prevent gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Clopidogrel is a pro-drug which needs to be metabolized into its active metabolite, by cytochrome P450, especially by CYP2C19 isoenzyme. Various PPIs can inhibit CYP2C19, which could possibly decrease clopidogrel bioactivation process and, therefore, its antiplatelet effect. Various platelet function studies have shown that omeprazol can significantly decrease clopidogrel inhibitory effect on platelet P2Y12 receptor, leading to an increase in the number of patients who are "nonresponders" to clopidogrel. These pharmacokinetic studies also shown that this is not probably a class effect of PPIs, because they are metabolized to varying degrees by CYP2C19. The clinical impact of these observations remains uncertain, because various observational studies have shown conflicting results, and remains to demonstrate if PPIs can really increase the risk of cardiovascular events in patients taking clopidogrel. In this review we will discuss the pharmacokinetic basis underlying this drug interaction, the effect of different PPIs on platelet function tests and we will analyze in detail the potential clinical implications of using this association, both on cardiovascular and gastrointestinal events. Until further data is available, some clinical strategies can be recommended: (1) individual gastrointestinal risk assessment, with PPIs administration only to patients on dual anti-platelet therapy with additional GI risk factors; (2) preferential use of PPIs that have shown less interference with clopidogrel efficacy; (3) wide separation of PPI and clopidogrel dosing to minimize the risk of interaction (PPI may be given before breakfast and clopidogrel at

  13. Implications of Nitrogen-Climate Interactions for Ambient Air Pollution and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeuber, R.; Peel, J. L.; Garcia, V.; Neas, L.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOX) are important components of ambient and indoor air pollution and are emitted from a range of combustion sources, including on-road mobile sources, electric power generators, and non-road mobile sources. While anthropogenic sources dominate, NOX is also formed by lightning and wildland fires and is emitted by soil. Reduced nitrogen (e.g., ammonia, NH3) is also emitted by various sources, including fertilizer application and animal waste decomposition. NOX, ozone and PM2.5 pollution related to atmospheric emissions of nitrogen and other pollutants can cause premature death and a variety of serious health effects. Climate change is expected to impact how nitrogen-related pollutants affect human health. For example, changes in temperature and precipitation patterns are projected to both lengthen the ozone season and intensify high ozone episodes in some areas. Other climate-related changes may increase the atmospheric release of nitrogen compounds through impacts on wildfire regimes, soil emissions, and biogenic emissions from terrestrial ecosystems. This session will examine the potential human health implications of climate change and nitrogen cycle interactions related to ambient air pollution.

  14. Interactions between nanostructured calcium hydroxide and acrylate copolymers: implications in cultural heritage conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, Emiliano; Chelazzi, David; Rocchigiani, Giulia; Baglioni, Piero; Poggi, Giovanna; Dei, Luigi

    2013-08-06

    The interactions between an acrylic copolymer, poly ethylmethacrylate/methylacrylate (70:30) (Poly(EMA/MA), and Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles were investigated in order to establish the reciprocal influence of these two compounds on their peculiar properties. The carbonation kinetics of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles by atmospheric CO2 was investigated by FTIR and SEM measurements and compared to that of a nanocomposite film. CaCO3 formation occurred even in the presence of the copolymer, but only after an induction period of ca. 200 h and with a lower reaction rate. Some implications in cultural heritage conservation dealing with application of nanolime on artifacts previously treated with acrylic copolymers were discussed. Contact angle measurements, mechanical cohesion properties, and water vapor permeability allowed us to conclude that the optimum behavior of nanolime with respect to transpiration was not compromised by the presence of the copolymer, and the behavior in terms of mechanical properties recovery by the application of Ca(OH)2 nanoparticles remained excellent even in the presence of poly(EMA/MA).

  15. Implications of the atmosphere-soil interaction for the design of earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruge Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of most geotechnical structures is highly governed by environmental factors, particularly in tropical regions where there are very pronounced dry and wet seasons. Design of earth retaining structures generally tend to be too conservative due to the uncertainty generated by the incorporation of environmental variables. Those variables control the soil unsaturated response and in addition to the known insufficiency of the basic models used in traditional designs they are responsible for conservative designs. Rainfall is the main aspect that affects the soil properties of a particular site. It modifies the soil suction potential, according to the degree of saturation caused by the soil-atmosphere interaction. Currently, state-of-the-art numerical tools allow to simulate the influence of those variables in the behaviour of earth retaining structures. This paper analyses the possible implications of the use of numerical simulations for the design, which include, in the mathematical formulation, the suction as a main parameter. The hypoplastic model for unsaturated response was used. Numerical simulations performed with the use of traditional and modern constitutive models obtained encouraging results that reveal the importance of include suction in design processes.

  16. Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

  17. Biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1 and possible implications for HSV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Joshua T; Gottlieb, Sami L

    2017-09-25

    Development of a safe and effective vaccine against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) has the potential to limit the global burden of HSV-2 infection and disease, including genital ulcer disease and neonatal herpes, and is a global sexual and reproductive health priority. Another important potential benefit of an HSV-2 vaccine would be to decrease HIV infections, as HSV-2 increases the risk of HIV-1 acquisition several-fold. Acute and chronic HSV-2 infection creates ulcerations and draws dendritic cells and activated CD4+ T cells into genital mucosa. These cells are targets for HIV entry and replication. Prophylactic HSV-2 vaccines (to prevent infection) and therapeutic vaccines (to modify or treat existing infections) are currently under development. By preventing or modifying infection, an effective HSV-2 vaccine could limit HSV-associated genital mucosal inflammation and thus HIV risk. However, a vaccine might have competing effects on HIV risk depending on its mechanism of action and cell populations generated in the genital mucosa. In this article, we review biologic interactions between HSV-2 and HIV-1, consider HSV-2 vaccine development in the context of HIV risk, and discuss implications and research needs for future HSV vaccine development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Interactions between laponite and microbial biofilms in porous media: implications for colloid transport and biofilm stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Morales, C Felipe; Leis, Andrew P; Strathmann, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2004-09-01

    Quartz sand columns and sand-filled microscope flow cells were used to investigate the transport characteristics of the clay colloid laponite, and a biofilm-forming bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81. Separate experiments were performed with each particle to determine their individual transport characteristics in clean sand columns. In a second set of experiments, bacterial biofilms were formed prior to introduction of the clay colloids. In the independent transport experiments, bacteria and laponite each conformed to known physicochemical principles. A sodium chloride concentration of 7 x 10(-2) M caused complete retention of the laponite within the sand columns. P. aeruginosa SG81 was generally less influenced by ionic strength effects; it showed relatively low mobility at all ionic strengths tested and some (albeit reduced) mobility when introduced to the columns in 1M NaCl, the highest concentration tested, but nevertheless showed reproducible trends. Under conditions favourable to laponite retention and biofilm stability (7 x 10(-2) MNaCl), laponite suspensions were able to remobilise a portion of the attached bacterial biomass. At low ionic strength, the profile of laponite elution was also altered in the presence of a P. aeruginosa biofilm. These observations suggest that while a reduction in ionic strength has a dominant influence on the mobilisation of biological and inorganic colloids, the presence of laponite and biomass can have a distinct influence on the mobility of both types of colloids. Since these events are likely to occur in subsurface environments, our results suggest that colloid-biofilm interactions will have implications for colloid-bound contaminant transport and the remobilisation of pathogens.

  19. Soil-water interactions: implications for the sustainability of urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, António J. D.; Ferreira, Carla S. S.; Walsh, Rory P. D.

    2015-04-01

    Cities have become recently the home for more than half of the world's population. Cities are often seen as ecological systems just a short step away from collapse [Newman 2006]. Being a human construction, cities disrupt the natural cycles and the patterns of temporal and spatial distribution of environmental and ecological processes. Urbanization produces ruptures in biota, water, energy and nutrients connectivity that can lead to an enhanced exposure to disruptive events that hamper the wellbeing and the resilience of urban communities in a global change context. And yet, mankind can't give up of these structures one step away from collapse. In this paper we visit the ongoing research at the Ribeira dos Covões peri-urban catchment, as the basis to discuss several important processes and relations in the water-soil interface: A] the impact of the build environment and consequently the increase of the impervious area on the generation and magnitude of hydrological processes at different scales, the impact on flash flood risk and the mitigation approaches. B] the pollutant sources transport and fade in urban areas, with particular emphasis in the role of vegetation and soils in the transmission of pollutants from the atmosphere to the soil and to the water processes. C] the use and the environmental services of the urban ecosystems (where the relations of water, soil and vegetation have a dominate role) to promote a better risk and resources governance. D] the special issue of urban agriculture, where all the promises of sustainability and threats to wellbeing interact, and where the soil and water relations in urban areas are more significant and have the widest and deepest implications.

  20. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces.

  1. Integrating nature and nurture : Implications of person-environment correlations and interactions for developmental psychopathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutter, M; Dunn, J; Plomin, R; Simonoff, E; Pickles, A; Maughan, B; Ormel, J; Meyer, J; Eaves, L

    1997-01-01

    The developmental interplay between nature and nurture is discussed, with particular reference to implications for research in developmental psychopathology. The general principles include individual differences in reactivity to the environment, two-way interplay between intraindividual biology and

  2. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Chandramohan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower. Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD.

  3. Predicting Allosteric Effects from Orthosteric Binding in Hsp90-Ligand Interactions: Implications for Fragment-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Andreas; Nordlund, Paer; Jansson, Anna; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2016-01-01

    A key question in mapping dynamics of protein-ligand interactions is to distinguish changes at binding sites from those associated with long range conformational changes upon binding at distal sites. This assumes a greater challenge when considering the interactions of low affinity ligands (dissociation constants, KD, in the μM range or lower). Amide hydrogen deuterium Exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS) is a robust method that can provide both structural insights and dynamics information on both high affinity and transient protein-ligand interactions. In this study, an application of HDXMS for probing the dynamics of low affinity ligands to proteins is described using the N-terminal ATPase domain of Hsp90. Comparison of Hsp90 dynamics between high affinity natural inhibitors (KD ~ nM) and fragment compounds reveal that HDXMS is highly sensitive in mapping the interactions of both high and low affinity ligands. HDXMS reports on changes that reflect both orthosteric effects and allosteric changes accompanying binding. Orthosteric sites can be identified by overlaying HDXMS onto structural information of protein-ligand complexes. Regions distal to orthosteric sites indicate long range conformational changes with implications for allostery. HDXMS, thus finds powerful utility as a high throughput method for compound library screening to identify binding sites and describe allostery with important implications for fragment-based ligand discovery (FBLD). PMID:27253209

  4. Nociception affects motor output: a review on sensory-motor interaction with focus on clinical implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijs, J.; Daenen, L.; Cras, P.; Struyf, F.; Roussel, N.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Research has provided us with an increased understanding of nociception-motor interaction. Nociception-motor interaction is most often processed without conscious thoughts. Hence, in many cases neither patients nor clinicians are aware of the interaction. It is aimed at reviewing the sci

  5. Perspectives on the Design of Human-Computer Interactions: Issues and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavora, Mark J.; Hannafin, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Considers several perspectives on interaction strategies for computer-aided learning; examines dimensions of interaction; and presents a model for the design of interaction strategies. Topics include pacing; navigation; mental processes; cognitive and physical responses; the role of quality and quantity; a conceptual approach; and suggestions for…

  6. Interaction Design for and with the Lived Body: Some Implications of Merleau-Ponty’s Phenomenology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanæs, Dag

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, Paul Dourish proposed the term embodied interaction to describe a new paradigm for interaction design that focuses on the physical, bodily, and social aspects of our interaction with digital technology. Dourish used Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of perception as the theoretical basis...... for his discussion of the bodily nature of embodied interaction. This article extends Dourish’s work to introduce the human-computer interaction community to ideas related to Merleau-Ponty’s concept of the lived body. It also provides a detailed analysis of two related topics: (1) embodied perception...

  7. Structure of the yeast histone H3-ASF1 interaction: implications for chaperone mechanism, species-specific interactions, and epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaufman Paul D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histone H3/H4 chaperone Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1 is required for the establishment and maintenance of proper chromatin structure, as well as for genome stability in eukaryotes. Asf1 participates in both DNA replication-coupled (RC and replication-independent (RI histone deposition reactions in vitro and interacts with complexes responsible for both pathways in vivo. Asf1 is known to directly bind histone H3, however, high-resolution structural information about the geometry of this interaction was previously unknown. Results Here we report the structure of a histone/histone chaperone interaction. We have solved the 2.2 Å crystal structure of the conserved N-terminal immunoglobulin fold domain of yeast Asf1 (residues 2–155 bound to the C-terminal helix of yeast histone H3 (residues 121–134. The structure defines a histone-binding patch on Asf1 consisting of both conserved and yeast-specific residues; mutation of these residues abrogates H3/H4 binding affinity. The geometry of the interaction indicates that Asf1 binds to histones H3/H4 in a manner that likely blocks sterically the H3/H3 interface of the nucleosomal four-helix bundle. Conclusion These data clarify how Asf1 regulates histone stoichiometry to modulate epigenetic inheritance. The structure further suggests a physical model in which Asf1 contributes to interpretation of a "histone H3 barcode" for sorting H3 isoforms into different deposition pathways.

  8. Interactions of Economics of Science and Science Education: Investigating the Implications for Science Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran, Sibel; Mugaloglu, Ebru Z.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been upsurge of interest in the applications of interdisciplinary perspectives on science in science education. Within this framework, the implications of the so-called "economics of science" is virtually an uncharted territory. In this paper, we trace a set of arguments that provide a dialectic engagement with…

  9. Fluid Source-based Modeling of Melt Initiation within the Subduction Zone Mantle Wedge: Implications for Geochemical Trends in Arc Lavas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, L. B.; Asimow, P. D.; Antoshechkina, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    The GyPSM-S (Geodynamic and Petrological Synthesis Model for Subduction) scheme couples a petrological model (pHMELTS) with a 2D thermal and variable viscosity flow model (ConMan), to describe and compare fundamental processes occurring within subduction zones. Here we supplement basic GyPSM-S models with a more sophisticated treatment of trace element partitioning in the fluid phase and of melt transport regimes to investigate the influences of slab fluid source lithology and fluid transport mechanisms on melt geochemistry, the implications of mantle source depletion related to fluid fluxing, and potential melt migration processes. Changing model parameters indicate that slab age and slab dip are the primary controls on slab-adjacent low-viscosity channel (LVC) shape and thickness, due to changes in the fluid release patterns. Slab age and convergence velocity, which contribute to the slab thermal structure, are significant for the locations of dehydration reactions within the different lithological layers of the slab. The fluid source lithology determines the fluid flux and the fluid-mobile trace element input to the wedge. This study focuses on two cases that represent extremes within our model set, an old slab with a low rate of convergence and and a relatively young slab with a higher rate of convergence. Results are compared to actual geochemical datasets for the Izu-Bonin intra-oceanic subduction system and the Central Costa Rican part of the Central American arc. We find that there is a progression of geochemical characteristics described in studies of cross-arc and along-arc lavas that can be duplicated assuming (i) limited fluid-rock interaction within the mantle wedge and (ii) that melt migration preserves the spatial distinction among melts initiated in different areas of the wedge. Specifically, volcanic front lavas have significant contributions from shallower slab fluid sources, and rear-arc lavas have significant contributions from deeper slab fluid

  10. Ants at Plant Wounds: A Little-Known Trophic Interaction with Evolutionary Implications for Ant-Plant Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Michael; Fornoff, Felix; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Blüthgen, Nico

    2017-09-01

    Extrafloral nectaries (EFNs) allow plants to engage in mutualisms with ants, preventing herbivory in exchange for food. EFNs occur scattered throughout the plant phylogeny and likely evolved independent from herbivore-created wounds subsequently visited by ants collecting leaked sap. Records of wound-feeding ants are, however, anecdotal. By surveying 38,000 trees from 40 species, we conducted the first quantitative ecological study of this overlooked behavior. Ant-wound interactions were widespread (0.5% of tree individuals) and occurred on 23 tree species. Interaction networks were opportunistic, closely resembling ant-EFN networks. Fagaceae, a family lacking EFNs, was strongly overrepresented. For Fagaceae, ant occurrence at wounds correlated with species-level leaf damage, potentially indicating that wounds may attract mutualistic ants, which supports the hypothesis of ant-tended wounds as precursors of ant-EFN mutualisms. Given that herbivore wounds are common, wound sap as a steadily available food source might further help to explain the overwhelming abundance of ants in (sub)tropical forest canopies.

  11. Beyond feedback control: the interactive use of performance management systems. Implications for process innovation in Italian healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demartini, Chiara; Mella, Piero

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows how the use of performance management systems affects managers' perception of satisfaction, the effectiveness of the control system and the performance related to process innovation. An exploratory empirical research has been conducted on 85 managers operating in Italian healthcare organizations. Empirical findings put forward that the interactive--as opposed to diagnostic--use of performance management systems enhances managerial satisfaction with the control system and managerial perception of effectiveness. The present study then showed that it is not the control itself that is an obstacle to innovation in organizations in general (and in health organizations in particular) but the diagnostic use of the control mechanisms, which impedes the interaction between the control personnel and those subject to the control. Finally, this paper addresses managerial implications and further research avenues.

  12. The interactions of composting and biochar and their implications for soil amendment and pollution remediation: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haipeng; Lai, Cui; Zeng, Guangming; Liang, Jie; Chen, Jin; Xu, Jijun; Dai, Juan; Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Junfeng; Chen, Ming; Lu, Lunhui; Hu, Liang; Wan, Jia

    2016-10-17

    Compost and biochar, used for the remediation of soil, are seen as attractive waste management options for the increasing volume of organic wastes being produced. This paper reviews the interaction of biochar and composting and its implication for soil amendment and pollution remediation. The interaction of biochar and composting affect each other's properties. Biochar could change the physico-chemical properties, microorganisms, degradation, humification and gas emission of composting, such as the increase of nutrients, cation exchange capacity (CEC), organic matter and microbial activities. The composting could also change the physico-chemical properties and facial functional groups of biochar, such as the improvement of nutrients, CEC, functional groups and organic matter. These changes would potentially improve the efficiency of the biochar and composting for soil amendment and pollution remediation. Based on the above review, this paper also discusses the future research required in this field.

  13. Constraints on Electron-quark Contact Interactions and Implications to models of leptoquarks and Extra Z Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Cheung, K

    2001-01-01

    We update the global constraint on four-fermion $ee q q$ contact interactions. In this update, we included the published data of H1 and ZEUS for the 94--96 run in the $e^+ p$ mode and the newly published data of H1 for the 1999 run in the $e^- p$ mode. Other major changes are the new LEPII data on hadronic cross sections above 189 GeV, and the atomic parity violation measurement on Cesium because of a new and improved atomic calculation, which drives the data within $1\\sigma$ of the standard model value. The global data do not show any evidence for contact interactions, and we obtain 95% C.L. limits on the compositeness scale. A limit of $\\Lambda^{eu}_{LL+(-)} > 23 (12.5)$ TeV is obtained. Implications to models of leptoquarks and extra Z bosons are examined.

  14. Unraveling eclogite-facies fluid-rock interaction using thermodynamic modelling and whole-rock experiments: the in-situ eclogitization of metapelites from Val Savenca (Sesia Zone, Western Alps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentsch, Marie; Tropper, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A common feature of HP and UHP terranes is the subduction of crustal rocks to great depths. Previous investigations have shown that this process is triggered by fluids present during an eclogite-facies metamorphic overprint. An examples is exposed in the metapelites at Val Savenca in the Sesia-Lanzo Zone, Italy where Alpine eclogite-facies metamorphism and fluid flow led to partial transformation of Variscan amphibolite-eclogite facies metapelites (garnet + biotite + sillimanite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + quartz) to zoisite ± jadeite + kyanite + phengite + quartz. This transformation took place under P-T conditions of 1.7 - 2.1 GPa at 600°C and low a(H2O) of 0.3-0.6. The replacement of plagioclase by jadeite + zoisite + kyanite + quartz takes place also along former fractures. Biotite is replaced by the assemblage phengite + omphacite ± kyanite adjacent to former plagioclase, otherwise by phengite + rutile/titanite. Garnet and clinopyroxene show variable compositions depending in which micro-domain (plagioclase or biotite) they grew. The extreme development of microdomains can best be studied by thermodynamic pseudosection modelling of individual microdomains using stoichiometric mixtures of protolith minerals from this domain and the program DOMINO (De Capitani & Petrakakis, 2010). The aim of these calculations was: 1.) to reproduce the observed mineral assemblage and 2.) to provide constraints on the amount of fluid present in the transformation. The results so far indicate that the amount of fluid was very low, otherwise paragonite would have formed instead of jadeite and reproduction of the observed mineral assemblage has only been partly successful so far since biotite is still stable in the calculations. In addition to understand the role of fluids in the mineralogical and textural transformation piston-cylinder experiments with a fresh, natural orthogneiss granulite from the Moldanubic Unit in upper Austria with the assemblage garnet + biotite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + sillimanite + quarz were carried out. The experiments were conducted using H2O-NaCl fluids at 600°C and 2 GPa for 2-4 days. The fluids had the compositions X(H2O) = 1.0, 0.9, 0.8 and 0.7. Oxygen fugacity was either unbuffered or buffered at NNO in the experiments. The results clearly show increasing reaction progress with increasing salinity in the fluid. Biotite breaks down in the experiments along the reaction: 3anorthite + 2K-feldspar + phlogopite + H2O = 3diopside + 3muscovite. Clinopyroxene composition also changes as a function of NaCl content in the fluid. Omphacite core forms in the experiments at X(H2O) = 1, in all other experiments, only jadeite occurs. Lack of continuous omphacite growth occurs since the anorthite component of plagioclase goes readily into solution, thus producing zoisite needles only upon quench. These experiments so far show that the biotite breakdown reaction is similar to the one observed in the natural samples and that brines highly effective promote reaction progress in subduction zone processes. DE CAPITANI & PETRAKAKIS, K. (2010): American Mineralogist, 95, 1006-1016.

  15. Hunter-gatherer inter-band interaction rates: implications for cumulative culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim R Hill

    Full Text Available Our species exhibits spectacular success due to cumulative culture. While cognitive evolution of social learning mechanisms may be partially responsible for adaptive human culture, features of early human social structure may also play a role by increasing the number potential models from which to learn innovations. We present interview data on interactions between same-sex adult dyads of Ache and Hadza hunter-gatherers living in multiple distinct residential bands (20 Ache bands; 42 Hadza bands; 1201 dyads throughout a tribal home range. Results show high probabilities (5%-29% per year of cultural and cooperative interactions between randomly chosen adults. Multiple regression suggests that ritual relationships increase interaction rates more than kinship, and that affinal kin interact more often than dyads with no relationship. These may be important features of human sociality. Finally, yearly interaction rates along with survival data allow us to estimate expected lifetime partners for a variety of social activities, and compare those to chimpanzees. Hadza and Ache men are estimated to observe over 300 men making tools in a lifetime, whereas male chimpanzees interact with only about 20 other males in a lifetime. High intergroup interaction rates in ancestral humans may have promoted the evolution of cumulative culture.

  16. Hunter-gatherer inter-band interaction rates: implications for cumulative culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kim R; Wood, Brian M; Baggio, Jacopo; Hurtado, A Magdalena; Boyd, Robert T

    2014-01-01

    Our species exhibits spectacular success due to cumulative culture. While cognitive evolution of social learning mechanisms may be partially responsible for adaptive human culture, features of early human social structure may also play a role by increasing the number potential models from which to learn innovations. We present interview data on interactions between same-sex adult dyads of Ache and Hadza hunter-gatherers living in multiple distinct residential bands (20 Ache bands; 42 Hadza bands; 1201 dyads) throughout a tribal home range. Results show high probabilities (5%-29% per year) of cultural and cooperative interactions between randomly chosen adults. Multiple regression suggests that ritual relationships increase interaction rates more than kinship, and that affinal kin interact more often than dyads with no relationship. These may be important features of human sociality. Finally, yearly interaction rates along with survival data allow us to estimate expected lifetime partners for a variety of social activities, and compare those to chimpanzees. Hadza and Ache men are estimated to observe over 300 men making tools in a lifetime, whereas male chimpanzees interact with only about 20 other males in a lifetime. High intergroup interaction rates in ancestral humans may have promoted the evolution of cumulative culture.

  17. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Abdalla, E.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Pavón, D.

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  18. Dark Matter and Dark Energy Interactions: Theoretical Challenges, Cosmological Implications and Observational Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, B; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavon, D

    2016-01-01

    Models where Dark Matter and Dark Energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  19. Dark matter and dark energy interactions: theoretical challenges, cosmological implications and observational signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B; Abdalla, E; Atrio-Barandela, F; Pavón, D

    2016-09-01

    Models where dark matter and dark energy interact with each other have been proposed to solve the coincidence problem. We review the motivations underlying the need to introduce such interaction, its influence on the background dynamics and how it modifies the evolution of linear perturbations. We test models using the most recent observational data and we find that the interaction is compatible with the current astronomical and cosmological data. Finally, we describe the forthcoming data sets from current and future facilities that are being constructed or designed that will allow a clearer understanding of the physics of the dark sector.

  20. Adaptability of protein structures to enable functional interactions and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Turkan; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-12-01

    Several studies in recent years have drawn attention to the ability of proteins to adapt to intermolecular interactions by conformational changes along structure-encoded collective modes of motions. These so-called soft modes, primarily driven by entropic effects, facilitate, if not enable, functional interactions. They represent excursions on the conformational space along principal low-ascent directions/paths away from the original free energy minimum, and they are accessible to the protein even before protein-protein/ligand interactions. An emerging concept from these studies is the evolution of structures or modular domains to favor such modes of motion that will be recruited or integrated for enabling functional interactions. Structural dynamics, including the allosteric switches in conformation that are often stabilized upon formation of complexes and multimeric assemblies, emerge as key properties that are evolutionarily maintained to accomplish biological activities, consistent with the paradigm sequence→structure→dynamics→function where 'dynamics' bridges structure and function.

  1. Oxygen isotopic compositions of zircons from pyroxenite of Daoshichong, Dabieshan: Implications for crust-mantle interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Oxygen isotopic compositions of zircons from pyroxenite (~145 Ma) of Daoshichong, Dabieshan have been measured by an ion microprobe. Both within the single grain and among different grains, oxygen isotopic ratios are homogeneous, δ 18O = (7.66‰±0.46)‰ (1 SD, 1 σ = 0.10, n = 22). High δ 18O values indicate that the mantle-derived parent magma of Daoshichong pyroxenite have undergone interaction with crustal materials. Combing with other geochemical constraints, the way of crust-mantle interaction is suggested to be source mixing other than crustal contamination. The time interval between crust-mantle interaction and formation of the parent magma of Daoshichong pyroxenite is less than several million years. The crustal component involving in crust-mantle interaction is mafic lower crust, and the parent magma of pyroxenite possibly contain large proportion (>37%) of such lower crust.

  2. Interactions between Histamine H3 and Dopamine D2 Receptors and the Implications for Striatal Function

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antonio; Justinova, Zuzana; Barnes, Chanel; Canela, Enric I.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Leurs, Rob; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The striatum contains a high density of histamine H3 receptors, but their role in striatal function is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated antagonistic interactions between striatal H3 and dopamine D1 receptors at the biochemical level, while contradictory results have been reported about interactions between striatal H3 and dopamine D2 receptors. In the present study, by using reserpinized mice, we demonstrate the existence of behaviorally significant antagonistic postsynap...

  3. DNA Origami Reorganizes upon Interaction with Graphite: Implications for High-Resolution DNA Directed Protein Patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudur Rahman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a long history of the study of the interaction of DNA with carbon surfaces, limited information exists regarding the interaction of complex DNA-based nanostructures with the important material graphite, which is closely related to graphene. In view of the capacity of DNA to direct the assembly of proteins and optical and electronic nanoparticles, the potential for combining DNA-based materials with graphite, which is an ultra-flat, conductive carbon substrate, requires evaluation. A series of imaging studies utilizing Atomic Force Microscopy has been applied in order to provide a unified picture of this important interaction of structured DNA and graphite. For the test structure examined, we observe a rapid destabilization of the complex DNA origami structure, consistent with a strong interaction of single-stranded DNA with the carbon surface. This destabilizing interaction can be obscured by an intentional or unintentional primary intervening layer of single-stranded DNA. Because the interaction of origami with graphite is not completely dissociative, and because the frustrated, expanded structure is relatively stable over time in solution, it is demonstrated that organized structures of pairs of the model protein streptavidin can be produced on carbon surfaces using DNA origami as the directing material.

  4. Interactions of fines with base fractions of oil and its implication in smart water flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate...... reservoirs. This study shows that addition of water and crude oil on calcite fines leads to formation of soluble oil emulsions in the water phase. Formation of these emulsions and its implication in EOR has been experimentally analyzed....

  5. Hypervalent Nonbonded Interactions of a Divalent Sulfur Atom. Implications in Protein Architecture and the Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyoshi Isozumi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In organic molecules a divalent sulfur atom sometimes adopts weak coordination to a proximate heteroatom (X. Such hypervalent nonbonded S···X interactions can control the molecular structure and chemical reactivity of organic molecules, as well as their assembly and packing in the solid state. In the last decade, similar hypervalent interactions have been demonstrated by statistical database analysis to be present in protein structures. In this review, weak interactions between a divalent sulfur atom and an oxygen or nitrogen atom in proteins are highlighted with several examples. S···O interactions in proteins showed obviously different structural features from those in organic molecules (i.e., πO → σS* versus nO → σS* directionality. The difference was ascribed to the HOMO of the amide group, which expands in the vertical direction (πO rather than in the plane (nO. S···X interactions in four model proteins, phospholipase A2 (PLA2, ribonuclease A (RNase A, insulin, and lysozyme, have also been analyzed. The results suggested that S···X interactions would be important factors that control not only the three-dimensional structure of proteins but also their functions to some extent. Thus, S···X interactions will be useful tools for protein engineering and the ligand design.

  6. Interactions Between Spatially Explicit Conservation and Management Measures: Implications for the Governance of Marine Protected Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, P. Francisco; Gaymer, Carlos F.

    2013-12-01

    Marine protected areas are not established in an institutional and governance vacuum and managers should pay attention to the wider social-ecological system in which they are immersed. This article examines Islas Choros-Damas Marine Reserve, a small marine protected area located in a highly productive and biologically diverse coastal marine ecosystem in northern Chile, and the interactions between human, institutional, and ecological dimensions beyond those existing within its boundaries. Through documents analysis, surveys, and interviews, we described marine reserve implementation (governing system) and the social and natural ecosystem-to-be-governed. We analyzed the interactions and the connections between the marine reserve and other spatially explicit conservation and/or management measures existing in the area and influencing management outcomes and governance. A top-down approach with poor stakeholder involvement characterized the implementation process. The marine reserve is highly connected with other spatially explicit measures and with a wider social-ecological system through various ecological processes and socio-economic interactions. Current institutional interactions with positive effects on the management and governance are scarce, although several potential interactions may be developed. For the study area, any management action must recognize interferences from outside conditions and consider some of them (e.g., ecotourism management) as cross-cutting actions for the entire social-ecological system. We consider that institutional interactions and the development of social networks are opportunities to any collective effort aiming to improve governance of Islas Choros-Damas marine reserve. Communication of connections and interactions between marine protected areas and the wider social-ecological system (as described in this study) is proposed as a strategy to improve stakeholder participation in Chilean marine protected areas.

  7. Interfacial interactions between Skeletonema costatum extracellular organic matter and metal oxides: Implications for ceramic membrane filtration

    KAUST Repository

    Zaouri, Noor

    2017-03-21

    In the current study, the interfacial interactions between the high molecular weight (HMW) compounds of Skeletonema costatum (SKC) extracellular organic matter (EOM) and ZrO2 or Al2O3, were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). HMW SKC-EOM was rigorously characterized and described as a hydrophilic organic compound mainly comprised of polysaccharide-like structures. Lipids and proteins were also observed, although in lower abundance. HMW SKC-EOM displayed attractive forces during approaching (i.e., leading to jump-to-contact events) and adhesion forces during retracting regime to both metal oxides at all solution conditions tested, where electrostatics and hydrogen bonding were suggested as dominant interacting mechanisms. However, the magnitude of these forces was significantly higher on ZrO2 surfaces, irrespective of cation type (Na+ or Ca2+) or concentration. Interestingly, while HMW SKC-EOM interacting forces to Al2O3 were practically insensitive to solution chemistry, the interactions between ZrO2 and HMW SKC-EOM increased with increasing cation concentration in solution. The structure, and lower charge, hydrophilicity, and density of hydroxyl groups on ZrO2 surface would play a key role on favoring zirconia associations with HMW SKC-EOM. The current results contribute to advance our fundamental understanding of Algogenic Organic Matter (AOM) interfacial interactions with metal oxides (i.e., AOM membrane fouling), and would highly assist in the proper selection of membrane material during episodic algal blooms.

  8. Physiological and molecular implications of plant polyamine metabolism during biotic interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Jiménez Bremont

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During ontogeny, plants interact with a wide variety of microorganisms. The association with mutualistic microbes results in benefits for the plant. By contrast, pathogens may cause a remarkable impairment of plant growth and development. Both types of plant-microbe interactions provoke notable changes in the polyamine (PA metabolism of the host and/or the microbe, being each interaction a complex and dynamic process. It has been well documented that the levels of free and conjugated PAs undergo profound changes in plant tissues during the interaction with microorganisms. In general, this is correlated with a precise and coordinated regulation of PA biosynthetic and catabolic enzymes. Interestingly, some evidence suggests that the relative importance of these metabolic pathways may depend on the nature of the microorganism, a concept that stems from the fact that these amines mediate the activation of plant defense mechanisms. This effect is mediated mostly through PA oxidation, even though part of the response is activated by non-oxidized PAs. In the last years, a great deal of effort has been devoted to profile plant gene expression following microorganism recognition. In addition, the phenotypes of transgenic and mutant plants in PA metabolism genes have been assessed. In this review, we integrated the current knowledge on this field and analyze the possible roles of these amines during the interaction of plants with microbes.

  9. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  10. An Introduction to Interactive Teaching Mode and Its Implication in Col-lege English Writing Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娇; 常世财

    2014-01-01

    Interactive teaching mode refers to a dynamic process of teaching in which teachers and students and teaching materi⁃als will affect each other. It offers language learners a chance to communicate and exchange information frequently. Group coop⁃erative leaning has long been considered to be one of the most important forms of the interactive teaching mode. English writing, one of the essential English language skills, is an integral part of college English teaching. The high or low level of English writing is a comprehensive reflection of various abilities. This paper aims to explore the application of the interactive teaching model in college English writing class in order to improve students’motivation and ability of English writing, thus can provide an effective way of learning to the current college English writing class.

  11. Blueprints of signaling interactions between pattern recognition receptors: implications for the design of vaccine adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Kim; Plantinga, Theo S; Kox, Matthijs; Vaneker, Michiel; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Adema, Gosse J; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G

    2013-03-01

    Innate immunity activation largely depends on recognition of microorganism structures by Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs). PRR downstream signaling results in production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators. Moreover, PRR engagement in antigen-presenting cells initiates the activation of adaptive immunity. Recent reports suggest that for the activation of innate immune responses and initiation of adaptive immunity, synergistic effects between two or more PRRs are necessary. No systematic analysis of the interaction between the major PRR pathways were performed to date. In this study, a systematical analysis of the interactions between PRR signaling pathways was performed. PBMCs derived from 10 healthy volunteers were stimulated with either a single PRR ligand or a combination of two PRR ligands. Known ligands for the major PRR families were used: Toll-like receptors (TLRs), C-type lectin receptors (CLRs), NOD-like receptors (NLRs), and RigI-helicases. After 24 h of incubation, production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-10 was measured in supernatants by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The consistency of the PRR interactions (both inhibitory and synergistic) between the various individuals was assessed. A number of PRR-dependent signaling interactions were found to be consistent, both between individuals and with regard to multiple cytokines. The combinations of TLR2 and NOD2, TLR5 and NOD2, TLR5 and TLR3, and TLR5 and TLR9 acted as synergistic combinations. Surprisingly, inhibitory interactions between TLR4 and TLR2, TLR4 and Dectin-1, and TLR2 and TLR9 as well as TLR3 and TLR2 were observed. These consistent signaling interactions between PRR combinations may represent promising targets for immunomodulation and vaccine adjuvant development.

  12. Interactive Closed Circuit Television: Educational Implications for the Severely Visually Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikson, Tora K.; Bikson, Thomas H.

    Interactive classroom television (ICTS) systems were installed in two special education classrooms to evaluate their impact on the learning experiences of severely visually impaired students. During a 3-year experimental period, data were collected from approximately 14 elementary students measuring achievement, visual-motor integration, visual…

  13. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood : implications for cocaine intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Rixt van der

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in drug-intak

  14. The social meanings behind male sex work: implications for sexual interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, J; Minichiello, V

    1995-12-01

    This qualitative study explores the meanings of the commercial sexual encounter between male sex workers and their clients. The study highlights the various social meanings male sex workers attribute to having sex, their typologies of clients, the psychic contexts of male commercial sex, safer sex interactions, and how these issues inform sexual behaviour. The data shows that the meaning attached to the act of having sex is an important aspect of the way in which participants perceive their partners, conduct themselves during sexual encounters, and engage in safe sex practices. Clients are categorized by sex workers according to their perceptions of 'them', which include 'marrieds', 'easy trade', 'undesirables', 'sugar daddies' and 'heaven trade'. Different types of clients pose alternate levels of risk to the safe sex practices of sex workers. The sex worker's definition of commercial sex as work enables him to separate work and personal sex and define work sex as 'not real sex', in which safe sex practices symbolize both the degree of self that is shared and protective work equipment. It was also found that this sample of sex workers do not negotiate safe sex. Rather they use 'modes of interaction' which direct the encounter either towards safe sex, or they refuse to continue with the transaction. The interactive modes identified are 'natural', 'educative', 'challenge', 'other options' and 'walk-out'. These modes of interaction are effective strategies for ensuring safe sex, and can be used by the broader community to gain partner compliance in safe sex practices.

  15. An analysis of the possibility for health implications of joint actions and interactions between food additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.; Butler, W.; Feron, V.J.; Kozianowski, G.; Renwick, A.G.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that structurally unrelated food additives could show either joint actions or interactions has been assessed based on their potential to share common sites and mechanisms of action or common pathways of elimination. All food additives approved in the European Union and allocated nume

  16. Evolutionary interactions between the invasive tallow tree and herbivores: implications for biological control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding interactions between insect agents and host plants is critical for forecasting their impact before the insects are introduced, and for improving our knowledge of the mechanisms driving success or failure in biological weed control. As invasive plants may undergo rapid adaptive evolutio...

  17. Interaction of C₆₀ with water: first-principles modeling and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Il; Snow, Samuel D; Kim, Jae-Hong; Jang, Seung Soon

    2015-02-03

    The nature of fullerene-water interactions has been the subject of much research and debate. Specifically, the presence of a stabilizing, negative surface potential on colloidal aggregates of C60 in water is unexpected, given the neutral nature of pure carbon, and is not well understood. Previous simulation efforts have focused on the C60-water interaction using molecular dynamics simulations that lacked the ability to account for charge transfer and distribution interactions. In this study, first-principles density functional theory was used to analyze the fundamental electronic interactions to elucidate the polarization and charge transfer between water and C60. Simulations show that charge is inductively transferred to the C60 from water molecules, with subsequent polarization of the C60 molecule. In a case with two neighboring C60 molecules, the charge polarization induces a charge onto the second C60. Simulation suggests that this charge transfer and polarization may contribute at least partly to the observed negative surface potential of fullerene aggregates and, combined with hydrogen bonding network formation around C60, provides a fundamental driving force for aggregate formation in water.

  18. Colliding Winds in Low-Mass Binary Star Systems: wind interactions and implications for habitable planets

    CERN Document Server

    Johnstone, C P; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Bisikalo, D; Güdel, M; Eggl, S

    2015-01-01

    Context. In binary star systems, the winds from the two components impact each other, leading to strong shocks and regions of enhanced density and temperature. Potentially habitable circumbinary planets must continually be exposed to these interactions regions. Aims. We study, for the first time, the interactions between winds from low-mass stars in a binary system, to show the wind conditions seen by potentially habitable circumbinary planets. Methods. We use the advanced 3D numerical hydrodynamic code Nurgush to model the wind interactions of two identical winds from two solar mass stars with circular orbits and a binary separation of 0.5 AU. As input into this model, we use a 1D hydrodynamic simulation of the solar wind, run using the Versatile Advection Code. We derive the locations of stable and habitable orbits in this system to explore what wind conditions potentially habitable planets will be exposed to during their orbits. Results. Our wind interaction simulations result in the formation of two stron...

  19. Aromatic interactions at the ligand-protein interface: Implications for the development of docking scoring functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brylinski, Michal

    2017-08-17

    The ability to design and fine-tune non-covalent interactions between organic ligands and proteins is indispensable to rational drug development. Aromatic stacking has long been recognized as one of the key constituents of ligand-protein interfaces. In this communication, we employ a two-parameter geometric model to conduct a large-scale statistical analysis of aromatic contacts in the experimental and computer-generated structures of ligand-protein complexes, considering various combinations of aromatic amino acid residues and ligand rings. The geometry of interfacial π-π stacking in crystal structures accords with experimental and theoretical data collected for simple systems, such as the benzene dimer. Many contemporary ligand docking programs implicitly treat aromatic stacking with van der Waals and Coulombic potentials. Although this approach generally provides a sufficient specificity to model aromatic interactions, the geometry of π-π contacts in high-scoring docking conformations could still be improved. The comprehensive analysis of aromatic geometries at ligand-protein interfaces lies the foundation for the development of type-specific statistical potentials to more accurately describe aromatic interactions in molecular docking. A Perl script to detect and calculate the geometric parameters of aromatic interactions in ligand-protein complexes is available at https://github.com/michal-brylinski/earomatic. The dataset comprising experimental complex structures and computer-generated models is available at https://osf.io/rztha/. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. An analysis of the possibility for health implications of joint actions and interactions between food additives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groten, J.P.; Butler, W.; Feron, V.J.; Kozianowski, G.; Renwick, A.G.; Walker, R.

    2000-01-01

    The possibility that structurally unrelated food additives could show either joint actions or interactions has been assessed based on their potential to share common sites and mechanisms of action or common pathways of elimination. All food additives approved in the European Union and allocated nume

  1. Strength of Drug–Polymer Interactions: Implications for Crystallization in Dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, Pinal; Suryanarayanan, Raj

    2016-09-07

    We investigated the influence of the strength of drug–polymer interactions on the crystallization behavior of a model drug in amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs). Ketoconazole ASDs were prepared with each poly(acrylic acid), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Over a wide temperature range in the supercooled region, the α-relaxation time was obtained, which provided a measure of molecular mobility. Isothermal crystallization studies were performed in the same temperature interval using either a synchrotron (for low levels of crystallinity) or a laboratory X-ray (for crystallization kinetics) source. The stronger the drug–polymer interaction, the longer was the delay in crystallization onset time, indicating an increase in physical stability. Stronger drug–polymer interactions also translated to a decrease in the magnitude of the crystallization rate constant. In amorphous ketoconazole as well as in the dispersions, the coupling coefficient, a measure of the extent of coupling between relaxation and crystallization times was ~0.5. This value was unaffected by the strength of drug–polymer interactions. On the basis of these results, the crystallization times in ASDs were predicted at temperatures very close to Tg, using the coupling coefficient experimentally determined for amorphous ketoconazole. The predicted and experimental crystallization times were in good agreement, indicating the usefulness of the model.

  2. Microbial interactions involving sulfur bacteria : implications for the ecology and evolution of bacterial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmann, J; van Gemerden, H

    2000-01-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is the identification and characterization of those microorganisms which govern transformations in natural ecosystems. This review summarizes our present knowledge of microbial interactions in the natural sulfur cycle. Central to the discussion is the recent progres

  3. Microbial interactions involving sulfur bacteria : implications for the ecology and evolution of bacterial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overmann, J; van Gemerden, H

    2000-01-01

    A major goal of microbial ecology is the identification and characterization of those microorganisms which govern transformations in natural ecosystems. This review summarizes our present knowledge of microbial interactions in the natural sulfur cycle. Central to the discussion is the recent

  4. Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) in Educational Environments: Implications of Understanding Computers as Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Gary A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews literature in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) as it applies to educational environments. Topics include the origin of HCI; human factors; usability; computer interface design; goals, operations, methods, and selection (GOMS) models; command language versus direct manipulation; hypertext; visual perception; interface…

  5. Mycotoxins and Antifungal Drug Interactions: Implications in the Treatment of Illnesses Due to Indoor Chronic Toxigenic Mold Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebere C. Anyanwu

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to toxigenic molds in water-damaged buildings is an indoor environmental health problem to which escalating health and property insurance costs are raising a statewide concern in recent times. This paper reviews the structural and functional properties of mycotoxins produced by toxigenic molds and their interactive health implications with antifungal drugs. Fundamental bases of pathophysiological, neurodevelopmental, and cellular mechanisms of mycotoxic effects are evaluated. It is most likely that the interactions of mycotoxins with antifungal drugs may, at least in part, contribute to the observable persistent illnesses, antifungal drug resistance, and allergic reactions in patients exposed to chronic toxigenic molds. Safe dose level of mycotoxin in humans is not clear. Hence, the safety regulations in place at the moment remain inconclusive, precautionary, and arbitrary. Since some of the antifungal drugs are derived from molds, and since they have structural and functional groups similar to those of mycotoxins, the knowledge of their interactions are important in enhancing preventive measures.

  6. Hemorheological implications of perfluorocarbon based oxygen carrier interaction with colloid plasma expanders and blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez, Diana M; Ortiz, Daniel; Alvarez, Oscar A; Briceño, Juan C; Cabrales, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsions used as artificial oxygen carriers lack colloid osmotic pressure (COP) and must be administered with colloid-based plasma expanders (PEs). Although PFC emulsions have been widely studied, there is limited information about PFC emulsion interaction with PEs and blood. Their interaction forms aggregates due to electrostatic and rheological phenomena, and change blood rheology and blood flow. This study analyzes the effects of the interaction between PFC emulsions with blood in the presence of clinically-used PEs. The rheological behavior of the mixtures was analyzed in vitro in parallel with in vivo analysis of blood flow in the microcirculation using intravital microscopy, when PEs were administered in a clinically relevant scenario. The interaction between the PFC emulsion and PE with blood produced PFC droplets and red blood cell (RBCs) aggregation and increased blood viscosity in a shear dependent fashion. The PFC droplets formed aggregates when mixed with PEs containing electrolytes, and the aggregation increased with the electrolyte concentration. Mixtures of PFC with PEs that produced PFC aggregates also induced RCBs aggregation when mixed with blood, increasing blood viscosity at low shear rates. The more viscous suspension at low shear rates produced a blunted blood flow velocity profile in vivo compared to nonaggregating mixtures of PFC and PEs. For the PEs evaluated, human serum albumin produced minimal to undetectable aggregation. PFC and PEs interaction with blood can affect sections of the microcirculation with low shear rates (e.g., arterioles, venules, and pulmonary circulation) when used in a clinical setting, because persistent aggregates could cause capillary occlusion, decreased perfusion, pulmonary emboli or focal ischemia.

  7. A novel interaction between lamin A and SREBP1: implications for partial lipodystrophy and other laminopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, David J; Trembath, Richard C; Shackleton, Sue

    2002-04-01

    The gene encoding nuclear lamins A and C is mutated in at least three inherited disorders. Two of these, Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD-AD) and a form of dilated cardiomyopathy (CMD1A), involve muscle defects, and the other, familial partial lipodystrophy (FPLD), involves loss of subcutaneous adipose tissue. Mutations causing FPLD, in contrast to those causing muscle disorders, are tightly clustered within the C-terminal domain of lamin A/C. We investigated the expression and subcellular localization of FPLD lamin A mutants and found no abnormalities. We therefore set out to identify proteins interacting with the C-terminal domain of lamin A by screening a mouse 3T3-L1 adipocyte library in a yeast two-hybrid interaction screen. Using this approach, the adipocyte differentiation factor, sterol response element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) was identified as a novel lamin A interactor. In vitro glutathione S-transferase pull-down and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation studies confirmed an interaction between lamin A and both SREBP1a and 1c. A binding site for lamin A was identified in the N-terminal transcription factor domain of SREBP1, between residues 227 and 487. The binding of lamin A to SREBP1 was noticeably reduced by FPLD mutations. Interestingly, one EDMD-AD mutation also interfered with the interaction between lamin A and SREBP1. Whilst the physiological relevance of this interaction has yet to be elucidated, these data raise the intriguing possibility that fat loss seen in laminopathies may be caused, at least in part, by reduced binding of the adipocyte differentiation factor SREBP1 to lamin A.

  8. Interactions of fines with base fractions of oil and its implication in smart water flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakravarty, Krishna Hara; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate reservo...... reservoirs. This study shows that addition of water and crude oil on calcite fines leads to formation of soluble oil emulsions in the water phase. Formation of these emulsions and its implication in EOR has been experimentally analyzed.......Migration of fines, and formation of oil emulsion have been independently observed during smart water flooding both have been suggested to play a vital role in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). But, the exact role of fines and the reason of emulsion formation are not well studied for carbonate...

  9. Implications of Shared Interactive Displays for Work at a Surgery Ward: Coordination, Articulation Work and Context-awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lis Witte Kjær

    2008-01-01

    context-awareness of collaborating physicians, nurses and surgery technicians. We focus on the implication of the systems for work and describe the changes in coordination, articulation work and context-awareness that occurred. This implied creating a fit between technology and work, attributing......We report on experiences gained from the use at a surgery ward of shared interactive displays to support coordination and communication.  The displays merge large displays, video feed, RFID tag, chat and mobile phones to facilitate better coordination and articulation of work tasks and enhance...... appropriate meaning to new clues by clinicians and learning new ways of cooperating. Trade-offs had to be made, since work and benefits were differentially redistributed. We propose that computer support for medical work should support flexible appropriation and learning....

  10. Making Sense of Experienced Teachers’ Interactive Decisions: Implications for Expertise in Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Gün

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers’ decision making has always been an area of curiosity in many studies related to teachers and teaching. One approach to understanding teachers’ decisions is through the analysis of their reflection-in-action behaviours. This study, based on the premise that one can gain understanding from examining experienced teachers’ classroom performances, focuses on the interactive decisions made by ten experienced language teachers. The study presents the findings of an analysis of similarities in the motivations behind teachers’ interactive decisions, as demonstrated in their verbal reports following the video recorded lesson observations. These findings show that there are both shared pedagogical and affective attributes among participant teachers. These results, and the insight they give into experienced teachers’ decision making are potentially beneficial for all pre-service and practising teachers.

  11. Interactions of engineered nanomaterials in physiological media and implications for in vitro dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Joel; Deloid, Glen; Pyrgiotakis, Georgios; Demokritou, Philip

    2013-06-01

    In vitro toxicity assays are efficient and inexpensive tools for screening the increasing number of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) entering the consumer market. However, the data produced by in vitro studies often vary substantially among different studies and from in vivo data. In part, these discrepancies may be attributable to lack of standardisation in dispersion protocols and inadequate characterisation of particle-media interactions which may affect the particle kinetics and the dose delivered to cells. In this study, a novel approach for preparation of monodisperse, stabilised liquid suspensions is presented and coupled with a numerical model which estimates delivered dose values. Empirically derived material- and media-specific functions are presented for each media-ENM system that can be used to convert administered doses to delivered doses. The interactions of ENMs with a variety of physiologic media were investigated and the importance of this approach was demonstrated by in vitro cytotoxicity assays using THP-1 macrophages.

  12. Foam-oil interaction in porous media: implications for foam assisted enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajzadeh, R; Andrianov, A; Krastev, R; Hirasaki, G J; Rossen, W R

    2012-11-15

    The efficiency of a foam displacement process in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) depends largely on the stability of foam films in the presence of oil. Experimental studies have demonstrated the detrimental impact of oil on foam stability. This paper reviews the mechanisms and theories (disjoining pressure, coalescence and drainage, entering and spreading of oil, oil emulsification, pinch-off, etc.) suggested in the literature to explain the impact of oil on foam stability in the bulk and porous media. Moreover, we describe the existing approaches to foam modeling in porous media and the ways these models describe the oil effect on foam propagation in porous media. Further, we present various ideas on an improvement of foam stability and longevity in the presence of oil. The outstanding questions regarding foam-oil interactions and modeling of these interactions are pointed out. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Immunoendocrine Interactions during HIV-TB Coinfection: Implications for the Design of New Adjuvant Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guadalupe Veronica Suarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, around 14 million individuals are coinfected with both tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. In coinfected individuals, both pathogens weaken immunological system synergistically through mechanisms that are not fully understood. During both HIV and TB infections, there is a chronic state of inflammation associated to dramatic changes in immune cytokine and endocrine hormone levels. Despite this, the relevance of immunoendocrine interaction on both the orchestration of an effective immune response against both pathogens and the control of the chronic inflammation induced during HIV, TB, or both infections is still controversial. The present study reviews immunoendocrine interactions occurring during HIV and TB infections. We also expose our own findings on immunoendocrine cross talk in HIV-TB coinfection. Finally, we evaluate the use of adrenal hormones and their derivatives in immune-therapy and discuss the use of some of these compounds like the adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of TB in HIV patients.

  14. Stereotype threat and interpersonal interactions: Implications for cross-gender selection interviews

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to expand research on stereotype threat into the domain of intergroup interactions by manipulating fear of appearing sexist for male participants interviewing female participants in a mock selection interview. Males were instructed to avoid sexist behaviour, or not. Following the interview, participants completed self- and partner-ratings of social skills and interview skills. Counter to a stereotype threat prediction, males under threat rated their social skills more positiv...

  15. Efficacy of synaptic inhibition depends on multiple, dynamically interacting mechanisms implicated in chloride homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Doyon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloride homeostasis is a critical determinant of the strength and robustness of inhibition mediated by GABA(A receptors (GABA(ARs. The impact of changes in steady state Cl(- gradient is relatively straightforward to understand, but how dynamic interplay between Cl(- influx, diffusion, extrusion and interaction with other ion species affects synaptic signaling remains uncertain. Here we used electrodiffusion modeling to investigate the nonlinear interactions between these processes. Results demonstrate that diffusion is crucial for redistributing intracellular Cl(- load on a fast time scale, whereas Cl(-extrusion controls steady state levels. Interaction between diffusion and extrusion can result in a somato-dendritic Cl(- gradient even when KCC2 is distributed uniformly across the cell. Reducing KCC2 activity led to decreased efficacy of GABA(AR-mediated inhibition, but increasing GABA(AR input failed to fully compensate for this form of disinhibition because of activity-dependent accumulation of Cl(-. Furthermore, if spiking persisted despite the presence of GABA(AR input, Cl(- accumulation became accelerated because of the large Cl(- driving force that occurs during spikes. The resulting positive feedback loop caused catastrophic failure of inhibition. Simulations also revealed other feedback loops, such as competition between Cl(- and pH regulation. Several model predictions were tested and confirmed by [Cl(-](i imaging experiments. Our study has thus uncovered how Cl(- regulation depends on a multiplicity of dynamically interacting mechanisms. Furthermore, the model revealed that enhancing KCC2 activity beyond normal levels did not negatively impact firing frequency or cause overt extracellular K(- accumulation, demonstrating that enhancing KCC2 activity is a valid strategy for therapeutic intervention.

  16. Implications for Utilizing YouTube based Community Interactions for Destination Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Sambhanthan, Arunasalam; Thelijjagoda, Samantha; Tan, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    In recent time, YouTube has evolved into a powerful medium for social interaction. Utilizing YouTube for enhancing marketing endeavors is a strategy practiced by marketing professionals across several industries. This paper rationalizes on the different ways and means of leveraging YouTube-based platforms for effective destination marketing by the hospitality industry (hotels). More specifically, the typology of virtual communities is adapted to evaluate the YouTube platform for effective des...

  17. Intramolecular interactions in aminoacyl nucleotides: Implications regarding the origin of genetic coding and protein synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Watkins, C. L.; Hall, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    Cellular organisms store information as sequences of nucleotides in double stranded DNA. This information is useless unless it can be converted into the active molecular species, protein. This is done in contemporary creatures first by transcription of one strand to give a complementary strand of mRNA. The sequence of nucleotides is then translated into a specific sequence of amino acids in a protein. Translation is made possible by a genetic coding system in which a sequence of three nucleotides codes for a specific amino acid. The origin and evolution of any chemical system can be understood through elucidation of the properties of the chemical entities which make up the system. There is an underlying logic to the coding system revealed by a correlation of the hydrophobicities of amino acids and their anticodonic nucleotides (i.e., the complement of the codon). Its importance lies in the fact that every amino acid going into protein synthesis must first be activated. This is universally accomplished with ATP. Past studies have concentrated on the chemistry of the adenylates, but more recently we have found, through the use of NMR, that we can observe intramolecular interactions even at low concentrations, between amino acid side chains and nucleotide base rings in these adenylates. The use of this type of compound thus affords a novel way of elucidating the manner in which amino acids and nucleotides interact with each other. In aqueous solution, when a hydrophobic amino acid is attached to the most hydrophobic nucleotide, AMP, a hydrophobic interaction takes place between the amino acid side chain and the adenine ring. The studies to be reported concern these hydrophobic interactions.

  18. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  19. The Tip-Sample Interaction in Atomic Force Microscopy and its Implications for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baselt, David Randall

    This thesis describes the construction of an atomic force microscope and its application to the study of tip -sample interactions, primarily through the use of friction and hardness (elasticity) imaging. Part one describes the atomic force microscope, which consists of a scanned-cantilever stage (chapter 2); a versatile digital signal processor-based control system with self-optimizing feedback, lock-in amplifier emulation (for hardness imaging), and macro programmability (chapter 3); and image processing software (chapter 4). Part two describes a number of results that have helped to characterize the tip-sample interaction and the contact imaging modes used for its study. Meniscus forces act laterally as well as normally, and that they vary with position (chapter 5). Friction measurements couple with scanner position and feedback, and the meniscus effects friction images (chapter 6). Sliding of the tip over the sample surface introduces slope-dependence into hardness measurements (chapter 7). Dull tips can create prominent topography artifacts even on very flat surfaces (chapter 8). In an investigation of collagen fibrils, AFM has revealed the characteristic 65 nm banding pattern, a second, minor banding pattern, and microfibrils that run along the fibril axis. The distribution of proteoglycans along the fibrils creates a characteristic pattern in friction images. Although imaging in water reduces interaction forces, water can also make biological samples more sensitive to force. However, for robust biological samples imaged in air, tip shape presents a greater obstacle than tip -sample interaction forces to obtaining high-resolution images. Tip contamination increases tip-sample friction and can occasionally improve resolution (chapter 9). For a separate project I have designed a general -purpose nearfield scanning optical microscope (chapter 10).

  20. Implications of lipid monolayer charge characteristics on their selective interactions with a short antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciumac, Daniela; Campbell, Richard A; Xu, Hai; Clifton, Luke A; Hughes, Arwel V; Webster, John R P; Lu, Jian R

    2017-02-01

    Many antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) target bacterial membranes and they kill bacteria by causing structural disruptions. One of the fundamental issues however lies in the selective responses of AMPs to different cell membranes as a lack of selectivity can elicit toxic side effects to mammalian host cells. A key difference between the outer surfaces of bacterial and mammalian cells is the charge characteristics. We report a careful study of the binding of one of the representative AMPs, with the general sequence G(IIKK)4I-NH2 (G4), to the spread lipid monolayers of DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and DPPG (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (sodium salt)) mimicking the charge difference between them, using the combined measurements from Langmuir trough, Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) and neutron reflection (NR). The difference in pressure rise upon peptide addition into the subphase clearly demonstrated the different interactions arising from different lipid charge features. Morphological changes from the BAM imaging confirmed the association of the peptide into the lipid monolayers, but there was little difference between them. However, NR studies revealed that the peptide bound 4 times more onto the DPPG monolayer than onto the DPPC monolayer. Importantly, whilst the peptide could only be associated with the head groups of DPPC it was well penetrated into the entire DPPG monolayer, showing that the electrostatic interaction strengthened the hydrophobic interaction and that the combined molecular interactive processes increased the power of G4 in disrupting the charged membranes. The results are discussed in the context of general antibacterial actions as observed from other AMPs and membrane lytic actions.

  1. Effect of blood storage on erythrocyte/wall interactions: implications for surface charge and rigidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, C; Caprani, A

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we study, under flow conditions, the interactions of stored erythrocytes with an artificial surface: a microelectrode whose charge density ranges from -15 to +27 microC/cm2. Interactions consist of red cells slowly circulating on the microelectrode and exerting a real contact with the electrode. Interaction is detected and measured by transient fluctuations of the electrolyte resistance obtained by impedance measurement of the microelectrode. Effects of aging induced by storage of whole blood at 4 degrees C show that the surface charge of erythrocytes rapidly decreases when blood is stored for more than 6 days under our experimental conditions. In comparison with trypsin-treated erythrocytes, an eight day storage induces a 60% decrease in the surface charge of red cells. After two weeks of storage, red cells are no longer negatively charged, presumably because of removal of sialic acid. Cells rigidity is significant after 6 days of storage and influences the electrical contact. Membrane rigidity increase could arise from the surface charge decrease. Finally the surface charge decrease could be importance in the use of stored blood.

  2. Implications of the observation of dark matter self-interactions for singlet scalar dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Robyn; Logan, Heather E; Peterson, Andrea D; Poulin, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for dark matter self-interactions has recently been reported based on the observation of a spatial offset between the dark matter halo and the stars in a galaxy in the cluster Abell 3827. Interpreting the offset as due to dark matter self-interactions leads to a cross section measurement of sigma_DM/m ~ (1-1.5) cm^2/g, where m is the mass of the dark matter particle. We use this observation to constrain singlet scalar dark matter coupled to the Standard Model and to two-Higgs-doublet models. We show that the most natural scenario in this class of models is very light dark matter, below about 0.1 GeV, whose relic abundance is set by freeze-in, i.e., by slow production of dark matter in the early universe via extremely tiny interactions with the Higgs boson, never reaching thermal equilibrium. We also show that the dark matter abundance can be established through the usual thermal freeze-out mechanism in the singlet scalar extension of the Yukawa-aligned two-Higgs-doublet model, but that it requires ra...

  3. Functional organization and its implication in evolution of the human protein-protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yiqiang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on the distinguishing properties of protein-protein interaction networks such as power-law degree distribution and modularity structure, several stochastic models for the evolution of these networks have been purposed, motivated by the idea that a validated model should reproduce similar topological properties of the empirical network. However, being able to capture topological properties does not necessarily mean it correctly reproduces how networks emerge and evolve. More importantly, there is already evidence suggesting functional organization and significance of these networks. The current stochastic models of evolution, however, grow the network without consideration for biological function and natural selection. Results To test whether protein interaction networks are functionally organized and their impacts on the evolution of these networks, we analyzed their evolution at both the topological and functional level. We find that the human network is shown to be functionally organized, and its function evolves with the topological properties of the network. Our analysis suggests that function most likely affects local modularity of the network. Consistently, we further found that the topological unit is also the functional unit of the network. Conclusion We have demonstrated functional organization of a protein interaction network. Given our observations, we suggest that its significance should not be overlooked when studying network evolution.

  4. Neighbor overlap is enriched in the yeast interaction network: analysis and implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Feiglin

    Full Text Available The yeast protein-protein interaction network has been shown to have distinct topological features such as a scale free degree distribution and a high level of clustering. Here we analyze an additional feature which is called Neighbor Overlap. This feature reflects the number of shared neighbors between a pair of proteins. We show that Neighbor Overlap is enriched in the yeast protein-protein interaction network compared with control networks carefully designed to match the characteristics of the yeast network in terms of degree distribution and clustering coefficient. Our analysis also reveals that pairs of proteins with high Neighbor Overlap have higher sequence similarity, more similar GO annotations and stronger genetic interactions than pairs with low ones. Finally, we demonstrate that pairs of proteins with redundant functions tend to have high Neighbor Overlap. We suggest that a combination of three mechanisms is the basis for this feature: The abundance of protein complexes, selection for backup of function, and the need to allow functional variation.

  5. Plant genotype shapes ant-aphid interactions: implications for community structure and indirect plant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Kailen A; Agrawal, Anurag A

    2008-06-01

    Little is known about the mechanisms by which plant genotype shapes arthropod community structure. In a field experiment, we measured the effects of milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) genotype and ants on milkweed arthropods. Populations of the ant-tended aphid Aphis asclepiadis and the untended aphid Myzocallis asclepiadis varied eight- to 18-fold among milkweed genotypes, depending on aphid species and whether ants were present. There was no milkweed effect on predatory arthropods. Ants increased Aphis abundance 59%, decreased Myzocallis abundance 52%, and decreased predator abundance 56%. Milkweed genotype indirectly influenced ants via direct effects on Aphis and Myzocallis abundance. Milkweed genotype also modified ant-aphid interactions, influencing the number of ants attracted per Aphis and Myzocallis. While ant effects on Myzocallis were consistently negative, effects on Aphis ranged from antagonistic to mutualistic among milkweed genotypes. As a consequence of milkweed effects on ant-aphid interactions, ant abundance varied 13-fold among milkweed genotypes, and monarch caterpillar survival was negatively correlated with genetic variation in ant abundance. We speculate that heritable variation in milkweed phloem sap drives these effects on aphids, ants, and caterpillars. In summary, milkweed exerts genetic control over the interactions between aphids and an ant that provides defense against foliage-feeding caterpillars.

  6. Interactions of laminin with the amyloid ß peptide: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive neuronal cell loss is observed in Alzheimer's disease. Laminin immunoreactivity colocalizes with senile plaques, the characteristic extracellular histopathological lesions of Alzheimer brain, which consist of the amyloid ß (Aß peptide polymerized into amyloid fibrils. These lesions have neurotoxic effects and have been proposed to be a main cause of neurodegeneration. In order to understand the pathological significance of the interaction between laminin and amyloid, we investigated the effect of laminin on amyloid structure and toxicity. We found that laminin interacts with the Aß1-40 peptide, blocking fibril formation and even inducing depolymerization of preformed fibrils. Protofilaments known to be intermediate species of Aß fibril formation were also detected as intermediate species of laminin-induced Aß fibril depolymerization. Moreover, laminin-amyloid interactions inhibited the toxic effects on rat primary hippocampal neurons. As a whole, our results indicate a putative anti-amyloidogenic role of laminin which may be of biological and therapeutic interest for controlling amyloidosis, such as those observed in cerebral angiopathy and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Proteoglycans in host-pathogen interactions: molecular mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Allison H; Park, Pyong Woo

    2010-02-01

    Many microbial pathogens subvert proteoglycans for their adhesion to host tissues, invasion of host cells, infection of neighbouring cells, dissemination into the systemic circulation, and evasion of host defence mechanisms. Where studied, specific virulence factors mediate these proteoglycan-pathogen interactions, which are thus thought to affect the onset, progression and outcome of infection. Proteoglycans are composites of glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains attached covalently to specific core proteins. Proteoglycans are expressed ubiquitously on the cell surface, in intracellular compartments, and in the extracellular matrix. GAGs mediate the majority of ligand-binding activities of proteoglycans, and many microbial pathogens elaborate cell-surface and secreted factors that interact with GAGs. Some pathogens also modulate the expression and function of proteoglycans through known virulence factors. Several GAG-binding pathogens can no longer attach to and invade host cells whose GAG expression has been reduced by mutagenesis or enzymatic treatment. Furthermore, GAG antagonists have been shown to inhibit microbial attachment and host cell entry in vitro and reduce virulence in vivo. Together, these observations underscore the biological significance of proteoglycan-pathogen interactions in infectious diseases.

  8. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stagljar Igor

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR. Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothesize that identifying and characterizing novel MOR interacting proteins (MORIPs may help to elucidate the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of opioid dependence. Results GPR177, the mammalian ortholog of Drosophila Wntless/Evi/Sprinter, was identified as a MORIP in a modified split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen. GPR177 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that plays a critical role in mediating Wnt protein secretion from Wnt producing cells. The MOR/GPR177 interaction was validated in pulldown, coimmunoprecipitation, and colocalization studies using mammalian tissue culture cells. The interaction was also observed in rodent brain, where MOR and GPR177 were coexpressed in close spatial proximity within striatal neurons. At the cellular level, morphine treatment caused a shift in the distribution of GPR177 from cytosol to the cell surface, leading to enhanced MOR/GPR177 complex formation at the cell periphery and the inhibition of Wnt protein secretion. Conclusions It is known that chronic morphine treatment decreases dendritic arborization and hippocampal neurogenesis, and Wnt proteins are essential for these processes. We therefore propose that the morphine-mediated MOR/GPR177 interaction may result in decreased Wnt secretion in the CNS, resulting in atrophy of dendritic arbors and decreased neurogenesis. Our results demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for GPR177 in regulating cellular response to opioid drugs.

  9. Cognition-emotion interactions: patterns of change and implications for math problem solving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trezise, Kelly; Reeve, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Surprisingly little is known about whether relationships between cognitive and emotional states remain stable or change over time, or how different patterns of stability and/or change in the relationships affect problem solving abilities. Nevertheless, cross-sectional studies show that anxiety/worry may reduce working memory (WM) resources, and the ability to minimize the effects anxiety/worry is higher in individuals with greater WM capacity. To investigate the patterns of stability and/or change in cognition-emotion relations over time and their implications for problem solving, 126 14-year-olds' algebraic WM and worry levels were assessed twice in a single day before completing an algebraic math problem solving test. We used latent transition analysis to identify stability/change in cognition-emotion relations, which yielded a six subgroup solution. Subgroups varied in WM capacity, worry, and stability/change relationships. Among the subgroups, we identified a high WM/low worry subgroup that remained stable over time and a high WM/high worry, and a moderate WM/low worry subgroup that changed to low WM subgroups over time. Patterns of stability/change in subgroup membership predicted algebraic test results. The stable high WM/low worry subgroup performed best and the low WM capacity-high worry "unstable across time" subgroup performed worst. The findings highlight the importance of assessing variations in cognition-emotion relationships over time (rather than assessing cognition or emotion states alone) to account for differences in problem solving abilities.

  10. Chemical interactions between the present-day Martian atmosphere and surface minerals: Implications for sample return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, Ronald; Fegley, Bruce

    1988-01-01

    Thermochemical and photochemical reactions between surface minerals and present-day atmospheric constituents are predicted to produce microscopic effects on the surface of mineral grains. Relevant reactions hypothesized in the literature include conversions of silicates and volcanic glasses to clay minerals, conversion of ferrous to ferric compounds, and formation of carbonates, nitrates, and sulfates. These types of surface-atmosphere weathering of minerals, biological potential of the surface environment, and atmospheric stability in both present and past Martian epochs. It is emphasized that the product of these reactions will be observable and interpretable on the microscopic surface layers of Martian surface rocks using modern techniques with obvious implications for sample return from Mars. Macroscopic products of chemical weathering reactions in past Martian epochs are also expected in Martian surface materials. These products are expected not only as a result of reactions similar to those proceeding today but also due to aqueous reactions in past epochs in which liquid water was putatively present. It may prove very difficult or impossible, however, to determine definitively from the relic macroscopic product alone either the exact weathering process which led to its formation of the identity of its weathering parent mineral. The enormous advantages of studying the Martian chemical weathering by investigating the microscopic products of present-day chemical reactions on sample surfaces are very apparent.

  11. Predicting cancer prognosis using interactive online tools: a systematic review and implications for cancer care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Borsika A; Gaglio, Bridget; Sanders, Tristan; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Dearing, James W; Bull, Sheana; Glasgow, Russell E; Marcus, Alfred

    2013-10-01

    Cancer prognosis is of keen interest for patients with cancer, their caregivers, and providers. Prognostic tools have been developed to guide patient-physician communication and decision-making. Given the proliferation of prognostic tools, it is timely to review existing online cancer prognostic tools and discuss implications for their use in clinical settings. Using a systematic approach, we searched the Internet, Medline, and consulted with experts to identify existing online prognostic tools. Each was reviewed for content and format. Twenty-two prognostic tools addressing 89 different cancers were identified. Tools primarily focused on prostate (n = 11), colorectal (n = 10), breast (n = 8), and melanoma (n = 6), although at least one tool was identified for most malignancies. The input variables for the tools included cancer characteristics (n = 22), patient characteristics (n = 18), and comorbidities (n = 9). Effect of therapy on prognosis was included in 15 tools. The most common predicted outcome was cancer-specific survival/mortality (n = 17). Only a few tools (n = 4) suggested patients as potential target users. A comprehensive repository of online prognostic tools was created to understand the state-of-the-art in prognostic tool availability and characteristics. Use of these tools may support communication and understanding about cancer prognosis. Dissemination, testing, refinement of existing, and development of new tools under different conditions are needed.

  12. Implication of Bemisia tabaci heat shock protein 70 in Begomovirus-whitefly interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, Monika; Popovski, Smadar; Kollenberg, Mario; Gorovits, Rena; Brown, Judith K; Cicero, Joseph M; Czosnek, Henryk; Winter, Stephan; Ghanim, Murad

    2012-12-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) is a major cosmopolitan pest capable of feeding on hundreds of plant species and transmits several major plant viruses. The most important and widespread viruses vectored by B. tabaci are in the genus Begomovirus, an unusual group of plant viruses owing to their small, single-stranded DNA genome and geminate particle morphology. B. tabaci transmits begomoviruses in a persistent circulative nonpropagative manner. Evidence suggests that the whitefly vector encounters deleterious effects following Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) ingestion and retention. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis underlying these coevolved begomovirus-whitefly interactions. To elucidate these interactions, we undertook a study using B. tabaci microarrays to specifically describe the responses of the transcriptomes of whole insects and dissected midguts following TYLCV acquisition and retention. Microarray, real-time PCR, and Western blot analyses indicated that B. tabaci heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) specifically responded to the presence of the monopartite TYLCV and the bipartite Squash leaf curl virus. Immunocapture PCR, protein coimmunoprecipitation, and virus overlay protein binding assays showed in vitro interaction between TYLCV and HSP70. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunolocalization showed colocalization of TYLCV and the bipartite Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus virions and HSP70 within midgut epithelial cells. Finally, membrane feeding of whiteflies with anti-HSP70 antibodies and TYLCV virions showed an increase in TYLCV transmission, suggesting an inhibitory role for HSP70 in virus transmission, a role that might be related to protection against begomoviruses while translocating in the whitefly.

  13. Interactive effects of temperature and drought on cassava growth and toxicity: implications for food security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alicia L; Cavagnaro, Timothy R; Gleadow, Ros; Miller, Rebecca E

    2016-10-01

    Cassava is an important dietary component for over 1 billion people, and its ability to yield under drought has led to it being promoted as an important crop for food security under climate change. Despite its known photosynthetic plasticity in response to temperature, little is known about how temperature affects plant toxicity or about interactions between temperature and drought, which is important because cassava tissues contain high levels of toxic cyanogenic glucosides, a major health and food safety concern. In a controlled glasshouse experiment, plants were grown at 2 daytime temperatures (23 °C and 34 °C), and either well-watered or subject to a 1 month drought prior to harvest at 6 months. The objective was to determine the separate and interactive effects of temperature and drought on growth and toxicity. Both temperature and drought affected cassava physiology and chemistry. While temperature alone drove differences in plant height and above-ground biomass, drought and temperature × drought interactions most affected tuber yield, as well as foliar and tuber chemistry, including C : N, nitrogen and cyanide potential (CNp; total cyanide released from cyanogenic glucosides). Conditions that most stimulated growth and yield (well-watered × high temperature) effected a reduction in tuber toxicity, whereas drought inhibited growth and yield, and was associated with increased foliar and tuber toxicity. The magnitude of drought effects on tuber yield and toxicity were greater at high temperature; thus, increases in tuber CNp were not merely a consequence of reduced tuber biomass. Findings confirm that cassava is adaptable to forecast temperature increases, particularly in areas of adequate or increasing rainfall; however, in regions forecast for increased incidence of drought, the effects of drought on both food quality (tuber toxicity) and yield are a greater threat to future food security and indicate an increasing necessity for processing of

  14. Gene-environment interactions in early life and adulthood: implications for cocaine intake

    OpenAIRE

    van der Veen, Rixt

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the research described in this thesis was to demonstrate the role of gene-environment interactions in the emergence of individual differences in cocaine use. For this purpose we used two inbred mouse strains, the C57Bl/6 (C57) and DBA/2 (DBA), which are known to differ in drug-intake and to be differentially sensitive to several stressors. We studied the impact of early life experiences (long-term influence) as well as a later life psychosocial stressor (short-term influence)...

  15. Apple FLOWERING LOCUS T proteins interact with transcription factors implicated in cell growth and organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimida, Naozumi; Kidou, Shin-Ichiro; Iwanami, Hiroshi; Moriya, Shigeki; Abe, Kazuyuki; Voogd, Charlotte; Varkonyi-Gasic, Erika; Kotoda, Nobuhiro

    2011-05-01

    Understanding the flowering process in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) is essential for developing methods to shorten the breeding period and regulate fruit yield. It is known that FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) acts as a transmissible floral inducer in the Arabidopsis flowering network system. To clarify the molecular network of two apple FT orthologues, MdFT1 and MdFT2, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen to identify proteins that interact with MdFT1. We identified several transcription factors, including two members of the TCP (TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTORs) family, designated MdTCP2 and MdTCP4, and an Arabidopsis thaliana VOZ1 (Vascular plant One Zinc finger protein1)-like protein, designated MdVOZ1. MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 also interacted with MdFT2 in yeast. The expression domain of MdTCP2 and MdVOZ1 partially overlapped with that of MdFT1 and MdFT2, most strikingly in apple fruit tissue, further suggesting a potential interaction in vivo. Constitutive expression of MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 in Arabidopsis affected plant size, leaf morphology and the formation of leaf primordia on the adaxial side of cotyledons. On the other hand, chimeric MdTCP2, MdTCP4 and MdVOZ1 repressors that included the ethylene-responsive transcription factors (ERF)-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) domain motif influenced reproduction and inflorescence architecture in transgenic Arabidopsis. These results suggest that MdFT1 and/or MdFT2 might be involved in the regulation of cellular proliferation and the formation of new tissues and that they might affect leaf and fruit development by interacting with TCP- and VOZ-family proteins. DDBJ accession nos. AB531019 (MdTCP2a mRNA), AB531020 (MdTCP2b mRNA), AB531021 (MdTCP4a mRNA), AB531022 (MdTCP4b mRNA) and AB531023 (MdVOZ1a mRNA). © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  16. Neuroendocrine-immune system interactions in amphibians: implications for understanding global amphibian declines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins-Smith, L A

    2001-01-01

    Amphibians are ancient creatures valued by biologists and naturalists around the world. They share with all other vertebrates a complex neuroendocrine system that enables them to flourish in a variety of aquatic and semiaquatic environments. Studies from a number of laboratories have demonstrated that the immune system of amphibian species is nearly as complex as that of mammals. Yet for reasons that are not well understood, amphibian species are facing greater survival challenges than in the recent past. This article will review our current understanding of the neuroendocrine immune system interactions in amphibians and address the question of whether environmental stressors may contribute to immunosuppression and amphibian declines.

  17. On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning On student engagement in whole-class oral interaction: from classroom discourse and sociocultural aspects to implications for language learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Altamiro Consolo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a study on classroom interaction in an EFL context in Brazil. The study, of an ethnographic nature, analyses recorded lessons, interviews and questionnaires answered by the students. The social rules governing classroom interaction usually determine an asymmetrical relationship between the teacher and the students, though it may be possible, according to the data obtained, to create an atmosphere of co-operation in which interaction may occur within less asymmetrical verbal patterns. This atmosphere, determined by linguistic, pedagogical, psychological and social factors, favours student language production. The data suggest connections between the students’ views of classroom language learning, their engagement in classroom discourse, and possible implications for (foreign language development. Este artigo relata um estudo sobre interação em sala de aula em um contexto de inglês como língua estrangeira, no Brasil. O estudo, de natureza etnográfica, analisa aulas gravadas, entrevistas e questionários respondidos pelos alunos. As regras sociais que permeiam a interação em sala de aula geralmente determinam uma relação assimétrica entre professor e alunos, embora seja possível, com base nos dados obtidos, criar-se uma atmosfera de cooperação, na qual uma interação caracterizada por padrões verbais menos assimétricos possa ocorrer. Tal atmosfera, determinada por fatores lingüísticos, pedagógicos, psicológicos e sociais, favorece a produção verbal dos alunos. Os dados sugerem relações entre as visões dos alunos sobre aprendizagem de línguas, seu engajamento no discurso de sala de aula e possíveis implicações para o desenvolvimento da competência em língua estrangeira.

  18. Subsurface interactions of actinide species and microorganisms : implications for the bioremediation of actinide-organic mixtures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaszak, J.E.; Reed, D.T.; Rittmann, B.E.

    1999-02-12

    By reviewing how microorganisms interact with actinides in subsurface environments, we assess how bioremediation controls the fate of actinides. Actinides often are co-contaminants with strong organic chelators, chlorinated solvents, and fuel hydrocarbons. Bioremediation can immobilize the actinides, biodegrade the co-contaminants, or both. Actinides at the IV oxidation state are the least soluble, and microorganisms accelerate precipitation by altering the actinide's oxidation state or its speciation. We describe how microorganisms directly oxidize or reduce actinides and how microbiological reactions that biodegrade strong organic chelators, alter the pH, and consume or produce precipitating anions strongly affect actinide speciation and, therefore, mobility. We explain why inhibition caused by chemical or radiolytic toxicities uniquely affects microbial reactions. Due to the complex interactions of the microbiological and chemical phenomena, mathematical modeling is an essential tool for research on and application of bioremediation involving co-contamination with actinides. We describe the development of mathematical models that link microbiological and geochemical reactions. Throughout, we identify the key research needs.

  19. Microbe-aliphatic hydrocarbon interactions in soil: implications for biodegradation and bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, J L; Paton, G I; Semple, K T

    2007-05-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons make up a substantial portion of organic contamination in the terrestrial environment. However, most studies have focussed on the fate and behaviour of aromatic contaminants in soil. Despite structural differences between aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, both classes of contaminants are subject to physicochemical processes, which can affect the degree of loss, sequestration and interaction with soil microflora. Given the nature of hydrocarbon contamination of soils and the importance of bioremediation strategies, understanding the fate and behaviour of aliphatic hydrocarbons is imperative, particularly microbe-contaminant interactions. Biodegradation by microbes is the key removal process of hydrocarbons in soils, which is controlled by hydrocarbon physicochemistry, environmental conditions, bioavailability and the presence of catabolically active microbes. Therefore, the aims of this review are (i) to consider the physicochemical properties of aliphatic hydrocarbons and highlight mechanisms controlling their fate and behaviour in soil; (ii) to discuss the bioavailability and bioaccessibility of aliphatic hydrocarbons in soil, with particular attention being paid to biodegradation, and (iii) to briefly consider bioremediation techniques that may be applied to remove aliphatic hydrocarbons from soil.

  20. Arsenic mobilization and attenuation by mineral-water interactions: implications for managed aquifer recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Chelsea W; Yang, Y Jeffrey; Jun, Young-Shin

    2012-07-01

    Managed aquifer recharge (MAR) has potential for addressing deficits in water supplies worldwide. It is also widely used for preventing saltwater intrusion, maintaining the groundwater table, and augmenting ecological stream flows, among many other beneficial environmental applications. However, field MAR sites have experienced arsenic mobilization from aquifer formation minerals due to induced changes in groundwater chemistry. To address this environmental concern, it is crucial to understand the potential sources and sinks impacting arsenic mobilization. This paper outlines important mineral-water interactions that can occur at MAR sites. Detailed information on minerals of concern, physiochemical processes for arsenic mobilization or attenuation, and the potential impact of microbial activity and hydrology on these processes is provided. Based on these mineral-water interactions, guidelines for predicting arsenic mobility are presented, and recommendations are made concerning MAR site monitoring. The review emphasizes important aspects in correlating interfacial reactions to reactive transport modeling and elucidating future challenges, a first step toward developing safer and more sustainable MAR operations.

  1. Chk2 oligomerization studied by phosphopeptide ligation: implications for regulation and phosphodependent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiejin; Taylor, Ian A; Lloyd, Janette; Clapperton, Julie A; Howell, Steven; MacMillan, Derek; Smerdon, Stephen J

    2008-12-19

    Chk2/CHEK2/hCds1 is a modular serine-threonine kinase involved in transducing DNA damage signals. Phosphorylation by ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase (ATM) promotes Chk2 self-association, autophosphorylation, and activation. Here we use expressed protein ligation to generate a Chk2 N-terminal regulatory region encompassing a fork-head-associated (FHA) domain, a stoichiometrically phosphorylated Thr-68 motif and intervening linker. Hydrodynamic analysis reveals that Thr-68 phosphorylation stabilizes weak FHA-FHA interactions that occur in the unphosphorylated species to form a high affinity dimer. Although clearly a prerequisite for Chk2 activation in vivo, we show that dimerization modulates potential phosphodependent interactions with effector proteins and substrates through either the pThr-68 site, or the canonical FHA phosphobinding surface with which it is tightly associated. We further show that the dimer-occluded pThr-68 motif is released by intra-dimer autophosphorylation of the FHA domain at the highly conserved Ser-140 position, a major pThr contact in all FHA-phosphopeptide complex structures, revealing a mechanism of Chk2 dimer dissociation following kinase domain activation.

  2. Mucin-Microbiota Interaction During Postnatal Maturation of the Intestinal Ecosystem: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokhsefat, Sana; Lin, Aifeng; Comelli, Elena M

    2016-06-01

    The mucus layer and gut microbiota interplay contributes to host homeostasis. The mucus layer serves as a scaffold and a carbon source for gut microorganisms; conversely, gut microorganisms, including mucin degraders, influence mucin gene expression, glycosylation, and secretion. Conjointly they shield the epithelium from luminal pathogens, antigens, and toxins. Importantly, the mucus layer and gut microbiota are established in parallel during early postnatal life. During this period, the development of gut microbiota and mucus layer is coupled with that of the immune system. Developmental changes of different mucin types can impact the age-dependent patterns of intestinal infection in terms of incidence and severity. Altered mucus layer, dysbiotic microbiota, and abnormal mucus-gut microbiota interaction have the potential for inducing systemic effects, and accompany several intestinal diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, and radiation-induced mucositis. Early life provides a pivotal window of opportunity to favorably modulate the mucus-microbiota interaction. The support of a health-compatible mucin-microbiota maturation in early life is paramount for long-term health and serves as an important opportunity for clinical intervention.

  3. Interactions of Circadian Rhythmicity, Stress and Orexigenic Neuropeptide Systems: Implications for Food Intake Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasiak, Anna; Gundlach, Andrew L.; Hess, Grzegorz; Lewandowski, Marian H.

    2017-01-01

    Many physiological processes fluctuate throughout the day/night and daily fluctuations are observed in brain and peripheral levels of several hormones, neuropeptides and transmitters. In turn, mediators under the “control” of the “master biological clock” reciprocally influence its function. Dysregulation in the rhythmicity of hormone release as well as hormone receptor sensitivity and availability in different tissues, is a common risk-factor for multiple clinical conditions, including psychiatric and metabolic disorders. At the same time circadian rhythms remain in a strong, reciprocal interaction with the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Recent findings point to a role of circadian disturbances and excessive stress in the development of obesity and related food consumption and metabolism abnormalities, which constitute a major health problem worldwide. Appetite, food intake and energy balance are under the influence of several brain neuropeptides, including the orexigenic agouti-related peptide, neuropeptide Y, orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone and relaxin-3. Importantly, orexigenic neuropeptide neurons remain under the control of the circadian timing system and are highly sensitive to various stressors, therefore the potential neuronal mechanisms through which disturbances in the daily rhythmicity and stress-related mediator levels contribute to food intake abnormalities rely on reciprocal interactions between these elements. PMID:28373831

  4. Interactions between opioids and anabolic androgenic steroids: implications for the development of addictive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Fred; Hallberg, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decades, research on doping agents, such as anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), has revealed that these compounds are often used in combination with other drugs of abuse. It seems that misuse of AAS probably involves more than a desire to enhance appearance or sports performance and studies have revealed that steroids are commonly connected with alcohol, opioids, tobacco, and psychotropic drugs. We have observed that AAS may interact with the endogenous opioids, excitatory amino acids, and dopaminergic pathways involved in the brain reward system. Furthermore, our studies provide evidence that AAS may induce an imbalance in these signal systems leading to an increased sensitivity toward opioid narcotics and central stimulants. In fact, studies performed in various clinics have shown that individuals taking AAS are likely to get addicted to opioids like heroin. This chapter reviews current knowledge on interactions between AAS and endogenous as well as exogenous opioids based not only on research in our laboratory but also on research carried out by several other clinical and preclinical investigators.

  5. Reciprocity in microbiome and immune system interactions and its implications in disease and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoopour, Enayat; Singh, Bhagirath

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation of the whole microbial normal flora residing in a host to its natural habitat over an evolutionary peroid has resulted in peaceful coexistence with mutual benefits for both microbiota and host in steady state. This symbiotic relationship between host and microbiota has a significant impact on shaping the immune response in the host to achieve an immune tolerance to microbiota but retaining the ability to respond to invading pathogens. Perturbation of this balance by manipulation of microbial communities in the host can lead to immune dysregulation and susceptibility to diseases. By studying the host in the absence of microbiota or with alteration of microbiota the complexity of microbial impact on the immune system can be resolved. Conversely, the study of microbiota in the absence of immune system factors can show how the immune system contributes to preservation of the host-microbiota balance. The absence of molecules involved in innate or adaptive immunity in knockout models can perturb the balance between host and microbiota further adding to more immune dysregulation. A better understanding of Microbiome-immune system interaction provides a new opportunity to identify biomarkers and drug targets. This will allow the development of new therapeutic agents for modulating the immune system to improve health with little or no toxicity. The study of interplay between host and microbiota has a promising role in the design of therapeutic interventions for immunopathological diseases arising from imbalanced host and microbiota interactions.

  6. Surface energetics and protein-protein interactions: analysis and mechanistic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri, Claudio; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions (PPI) at the molecular level is a fundamental task in the design of new drugs, the prediction of protein function and the clarification of the mechanisms of (dis)regulation of biochemical pathways. In this study, we use a novel computational approach to investigate the energetics of aminoacid networks located on the surface of proteins, isolated and in complex with their respective partners. Interestingly, the analysis of individual proteins identifies patches of surface residues that, when mapped on the structure of their respective complexes, reveal regions of residue-pair couplings that extend across the binding interfaces, forming continuous motifs. An enhanced effect is visible across the proteins of the dataset forming larger quaternary assemblies. The method indicates the presence of energetic signatures in the isolated proteins that are retained in the bound form, which we hypothesize to determine binding orientation upon complex formation. We propose our method, BLUEPRINT, as a complement to different approaches ranging from the ab-initio characterization of PPIs, to protein-protein docking algorithms, for the physico-chemical and functional investigation of protein-protein interactions.

  7. Cognition-emotion interactions: Patterns of change and implications for math problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly eTrezise

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Surprisingly little is known about whether relationships between cognitive and emotional states remain stable or change over time, or how different patterns of stability and/or change in the relationships affect problem solving abilities. Nevertheless, cross-sectional studies show that anxiety/worry may reduce working memory resources, and the ability to minimize the effects anxiety/worry is higher in individuals with greater WM capacity. To investigate the patterns of stability and/or change in cognition-emotion relations over time and their implications for problem solving, 126 14-year-olds’ algebraic WM and worry levels were assessed twice in a single day before completing an algebraic math problem solving test. We used latent transition analysis to identify stability/change in cognition-emotion relations, which yielded a six subgroup solution. Subgroups varied in WM capacity, worry, and stability/change relationships. Among the subgroups, we identified a high WM/low worry subgroup that remained stable over time and a high WM/high worry, and a moderate WM/low worry subgroup that changed to low WM subgroups over time. Patterns of stability/change in subgroup membership predicted algebraic test results. The stable high WM/low worry subgroup performed best and the low WM capacity-high worry unstable across time subgroup performed worst. The findings highlight the importance of assessing variations in cognition-emotion relationships over time (rather than assessing cognition or emotion states alone to account for differences in problem solving abilities.

  8. Glacial interglacial rain ratio changes: Implications for atmospheric CO2 and ocean sediment interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoven, Guy

    2007-03-01

    A reduction of the carbonate-carbon to organic-carbon export rain ratio during glacial times has been advanced to explain the glacial-interglacial atmospheric CO2 variations. This hypothesis is tested and implications for the dynamics of sedimentary carbonate preservation and dissolution are explored with a multi-box model ( MBM) of the ocean carbon cycle, fully coupled to a new transient early diagenesis model (called MEDUSA). A peak reduction of the rain ratio by 40% at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) was found to produce a net atmospheric pCO2 reduction of about 40 ppm. Changing shelf carbonate accumulation rates and continental weathering inputs produced a 55-60 ppm reduction. The combination of the two mechanisms generates a pCO2 change of 90-95 ppm, which compares well with the observed data. However, the resulting model sedimentary record does not conform to actual sedimentary records. The changes related to continental shelf processes and variable weathering flux depress the calcite saturation horizon (CSH) by about 1 km at the LGM; if rain ratio variations are also considered, that depression increases by another km. In addition to this large amplitude for the CSH, possibly due to the adopted box-model approach, the changing rain ratio also leads to transition zone changes in the model sedimentary record that are opposite in phase with data-based reconstructions. Realistic changes in the aragonite fraction of the carbonate rain were found to have only a minimal impact on atmospheric pCO2. Finally, chemical erosion of deep-sea sediment was shown to reduce the amplitude of variation of the sedimentary CCD by about 10-20%. It may provide a mechanism to improve the model-data agreement.

  9. Hepatitis B virus polymerase blocks pattern recognition receptor signaling via interaction with DDX3: implications for immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifeng; Ryu, Wang-Shick

    2010-07-15

    Viral infection leads to induction of pattern-recognition receptor signaling, which leads to interferon regulatory factor (IRF) activation and ultimately interferon (IFN) production. To establish infection, many viruses have strategies to evade the innate immunity. For the hepatitis B virus (HBV), which causes chronic infection in the liver, the evasion strategy remains uncertain. We now show that HBV polymerase (Pol) blocks IRF signaling, indicating that HBV Pol is the viral molecule that effectively counteracts host innate immune response. In particular, HBV Pol inhibits TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1)/IkappaB kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon), the effector kinases of IRF signaling. Intriguingly, HBV Pol inhibits TBK1/IKKepsilon activity by disrupting the interaction between IKKepsilon and DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase, which was recently shown to augment TBK1/IKKepsilon activity. This unexpected role of HBV Pol may explain how HBV evades innate immune response in the early phase of the infection. A therapeutic implication of this work is that a strategy to interfere with the HBV Pol-DDX3 interaction might lead to the resolution of life-long persistent infection.

  10. Three types of ambiguity in coding empathic interactions in primary care visits: implications for research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Ashley L; Tai-Seale, Ming; Stults, Cheryl D; Luiz, Jamie M; Frankel, Richard M

    2012-10-01

    To describe three methodological challenges experienced in studying patients' expressions of emotion in a sample of periodic health exams, and the research and practice implications of these challenges. Qualitative analysis of empathic cues in audio-taped and transcribed periodic health examinations of adult patients (n=322) in an integrated delivery system. The empathic and potential empathic opportunities methodology was used. Identifying emotional cues that constitute "empathic opportunities" is a complex task. Three types of ambiguity made this task particularly challenging: 1) presentations of emotional cues can be "fuzzy" and varied; 2) expressions of illness can be emotionally laden in the absence of explicit "emotion words"; and 3) empathic opportunities vary in length and intensity. Interactional ambiguities pose a challenge to researchers attempting to document emotional cues with a binary coding scheme that indicates only whether an empathic opportunity is present or absent. Additional efforts to refine the methodological approach for studying empathy in medical interactions are needed. The challenges discussed likely represent the same types of situations physicians find themselves in when talking with patients. Highlighting these ambiguities may aid physicians in better recognizing and meeting the emotional needs of their patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatitis B virus polymerase blocks pattern recognition receptor signaling via interaction with DDX3: implications for immune evasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Wang

    Full Text Available Viral infection leads to induction of pattern-recognition receptor signaling, which leads to interferon regulatory factor (IRF activation and ultimately interferon (IFN production. To establish infection, many viruses have strategies to evade the innate immunity. For the hepatitis B virus (HBV, which causes chronic infection in the liver, the evasion strategy remains uncertain. We now show that HBV polymerase (Pol blocks IRF signaling, indicating that HBV Pol is the viral molecule that effectively counteracts host innate immune response. In particular, HBV Pol inhibits TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1/IkappaB kinase-epsilon (IKKepsilon, the effector kinases of IRF signaling. Intriguingly, HBV Pol inhibits TBK1/IKKepsilon activity by disrupting the interaction between IKKepsilon and DDX3 DEAD box RNA helicase, which was recently shown to augment TBK1/IKKepsilon activity. This unexpected role of HBV Pol may explain how HBV evades innate immune response in the early phase of the infection. A therapeutic implication of this work is that a strategy to interfere with the HBV Pol-DDX3 interaction might lead to the resolution of life-long persistent infection.

  12. Interaction of tumor cells with the immune system: implications for dendritic cell therapy and cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Marianne; Karas, Irene; Gomez, Ivan; Eger, Andreas; Imhof, Martin

    2013-01-01

    There is a continuous demand for preclinical modeling of the interaction of dendritic cells with the immune system and cancer cells. Recent progress in gene expression profiling with nucleic acid microarrays, in silico modeling and in vivo cell and animal approaches for non-clinical proof of safety and efficacy of these immunotherapies is summarized. Immunoinformatic approaches look promising to unfold this potential, although still unstable and difficult to interpret. Animal models have progressed a great deal in recent years, finally narrowing the gap from bench to bedside. However, translation to the clinic should be done with precaution. The most significant results concerning clinical benefit might come from detailed immunologic investigations made during well designed clinical trials of dendritic-cell-based therapies, which in general prove safe.

  13. Implications of promiscuous Pim-1 kinase fragment inhibitor hydrophobic interactions for fragment-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Andrew C; Liu, Jinyu; Hirth, Bradford; Asmussen, Gary; Xiang, Yibin; Biemann, Hans-Peter; Bishop, Kimberly A; Fremgen, Trisha; Fitzgerald, Maria; Gladysheva, Tatiana; Jain, Annuradha; Jancsics, Katherine; Metz, Markus; Papoulis, Andrew; Skerlj, Renato; Stepp, J David; Wei, Ronnie R

    2012-03-22

    We have studied the subtleties of fragment docking and binding using data generated in a Pim-1 kinase inhibitor program. Crystallographic and docking data analyses have been undertaken using inhibitor complexes derived from an in-house surface plasmon resonance (SPR) fragment screen, a virtual needle screen, and a de novo designed fragment inhibitor hybrid. These investigations highlight that fragments that do not fill their binding pocket can exhibit promiscuous hydrophobic interactions due to the lack of steric constraints imposed on them by the boundaries of said pocket. As a result, docking modes that disagree with an observed crystal structure but maintain key crystallographically observed hydrogen bonds still have potential value in ligand design and optimization. This observation runs counter to the lore in fragment-based drug design that all fragment elaboration must be based on the parent crystal structure alone.

  14. Inflammatory Mediators and Angiogenic Factors in Choroidal Neovascularization: Pathogenetic Interactions and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Campa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Choroidal neovascularization (CNV is a common and severe complication in heterogeneous diseases affecting the posterior segment of the eye, the most frequent being represented by age-related macular degeneration. Although the term may suggest just a vascular pathological condition, CNV is more properly definable as an aberrant tissue invasion of endothelial and inflammatory cells, in which both angiogenesis and inflammation are involved. Experimental and clinical evidences show that vascular endothelial growth factor is a key signal in promoting angiogenesis. However, many other molecules, distinctive of the inflammatory response, act as neovascular activators in CNV. These include fibroblast growth factor, transforming growth factor, tumor necrosis factor, interleukins, and complement. This paper reviews the role of inflammatory mediators and angiogenic factors in the development of CNV, proposing pathogenetic assumptions of mutual interaction. As an extension of this concept, new therapeutic approaches geared to have an effect on both the vascular and the extravascular components of CNV are discussed.

  15. Ozone-vegetation interaction in the Earth system: implications for air quality, ecosystems and agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, A. P. K.; Lombardozzi, D.; Val Martin, M.; Heald, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Surface ozone is one of the most significant air pollutants due to its damaging effects not only on human health, but also on vegetation and crop productivity. Chronic ozone exposure has been shown to reduce photosynthesis and interfere with gas exchange in plants, which in turn affect the surface energy balance, carbon sink and other biogeochemical fluxes. Ozone damage on vegetation can thus have major ramifications on climate and atmospheric composition, including possible feedbacks onto ozone itself (see figure) that are not well understood. The damage of ozone on crops has been well documented, but a mechanistic understanding is not well established. Here we present several results pertaining to ozone-vegetation interaction. Using the Community Earth System Model, we find that inclusion of ozone damage on plants reduces the global land carbon sink by up to 5%, while simulated ozone is modified by -20 to +4 ppbv depending on the relative importance of competing mechanisms in different regions. We also perform a statistical analysis of multidecadal global datasets of crop yields, agroclimatic variables and ozone exposures to characterize the spatial variability of crop sensitivity to ozone and temperature extremes, specifically accounting for the confounding effect of ozone-temperature covariation. We find that several crops exhibit stronger sensitivity to ozone than found by previous field studies, with a strong anticorrelation between the sensitivity and average ozone levels that reflects biological adaptive ozone resistance. Our results show that a more complete understanding of ozone-vegetation interaction is necessary to derive more realistic future projections of climate, air quality and agricultural production, and thereby to formulate optimal strategies to safeguard public health and food security.

  16. Evolution of NMDA receptor cytoplasmic interaction domains: implications for organisation of synaptic signalling complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emes Richard D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate gated postsynaptic receptors in the central nervous system (CNS are essential for environmentally stimulated behaviours including learning and memory in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Though their genetics, biochemistry, physiology, and role in behaviour have been intensely studied in vitro and in vivo, their molecular evolution and structural aspects remain poorly understood. To understand how these receptors have evolved different physiological requirements we have investigated the molecular evolution of glutamate gated receptors and ion channels, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, which is essential for higher cognitive function. Studies of rodent NMDA receptors show that the C-terminal intracellular domain forms a signalling complex with enzymes and scaffold proteins, which is important for neuronal and behavioural plasticity Results The vertebrate NMDA receptor was found to have subunits with C-terminal domains up to 500 amino acids longer than invertebrates. This extension was specific to the NR2 subunit and occurred before the duplication and subsequent divergence of NR2 in the vertebrate lineage. The shorter invertebrate C-terminus lacked vertebrate protein interaction motifs involved with forming a signaling complex although the terminal PDZ interaction domain was conserved. The vertebrate NR2 C-terminal domain was predicted to be intrinsically disordered but with a conserved secondary structure. Conclusion We highlight an evolutionary adaptation specific to vertebrate NMDA receptor NR2 subunits. Using in silico methods we find that evolution has shaped the NMDA receptor C-terminus into an unstructured but modular intracellular domain that parallels the expansion in complexity of an NMDA receptor signalling complex in the vertebrate lineage. We propose the NR2 C-terminus has evolved to be a natively unstructured yet flexible hub organising postsynaptic signalling. The evolution of

  17. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse-Wicher, Marta; Li, An; Silveira, Rodrigo L; Pereira, Caroline S; Tryfona, Theodora; Gomes, Thiago C F; Skaf, Munir S; Dupree, Paul

    2016-08-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls.

  18. The effects of steam on the surface properties of palygorskite: Implications for palygorskite-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadakia, Abhy

    decreased by 40-50% after steam treatment. The reduced affinity for water and EGME may represent a reduced affinity for polar molecules in general. These results, particularly the XPS spectra and the observed large changes in rheological properties, suggest that steam altered the H + ion environment and/or concentration on palygorskite's surface. Exposing palygorskite to steam may have significant implications for its industrial applications, adversely affecting some applications and enhancing others.

  19. Molecular biology of human herpesvirus 8: novel functions and virus-host interactions implicated in viral pathogenesis and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Emily; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is the second identified human gammaherpesvirus. Like its relative Epstein-Barr virus, HHV-8 is linked to B-cell tumors, specifically primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease, in addition to endothelial-derived KS. HHV-8 is unusual in its possession of a plethora of "accessory" genes and encoded proteins in addition to the core, conserved herpesvirus and gammaherpesvirus genes that are necessary for basic biological functions of these viruses. The HHV-8 accessory proteins specify not only activities deducible from their cellular protein homologies but also novel, unsuspected activities that have revealed new mechanisms of virus-host interaction that serve virus replication or latency and may contribute to the development and progression of virus-associated neoplasia. These proteins include viral interleukin-6 (vIL-6), viral chemokines (vCCLs), viral G protein-coupled receptor (vGPCR), viral interferon regulatory factors (vIRFs), and viral antiapoptotic proteins homologous to FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein (FLIP) and survivin. Other HHV-8 proteins, such as signaling membrane receptors encoded by open reading frames K1 and K15, also interact with host mechanisms in unique ways and have been implicated in viral pathogenesis. Additionally, a set of micro-RNAs encoded by HHV-8 appear to modulate expression of multiple host proteins to provide conditions conducive to virus persistence within the host and could also contribute to HHV-8-induced neoplasia. Here, we review the molecular biology underlying these novel virus-host interactions and their potential roles in both virus biology and virus-associated disease.

  20. Models of magma-aquifer interactions and their implications for hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strehlow, Karen; Gottsmann, Jo; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús

    2014-05-01

    Interactions of magmatic and hydrological systems are manifold, complex and poorly understood. On the one side they bear a significant hazard potential in the form of phreatic explosions or by causing "dry" effusive eruptions to turn into explosive phreatomagmatic events. On the other side, they can equally serve to reduce volcanic risk, as resulting geophysical signals can help to forecast eruptions. It is therefore necessary to put efforts towards answering some outstanding questions regarding magma - aquifer interactions. Our research addresses these problems from two sides. Firstly, aquifers respond to magmatic activity and they can also become agents of unrest themselves. Therefore, monitoring the hydrology can provide a valuable window into subsurface processes in volcanic areas. Changes in temperature and strain conditions, seismic excitation or the injection of magmatic fluids into hydrothermal systems are just a few of the proposed processes induced by magmatic activity that affect the local hydrology. Interpretations of unrest signals as groundwater responses are described for many volcanoes and include changes in water table levels, changes in temperature or composition of hydrothermal waters and pore pressure-induced ground deformation. Volcano observatories can track these hydrological effects for example with potential field investigations or the monitoring of wells. To fully utilise these indicators as monitoring and forecasting tools, however, it is necessary to improve our understanding of the ongoing mechanisms. Our hydrogeophysical study uses finite element analysis to quantitatively test proposed mechanisms of aquifer excitation and the resultant geophysical signals. Secondly, volcanic activity is influenced by the presence of groundwater, including phreatomagmatic and phreatic eruptions. We focus here on phreatic explosions at hydrothermal systems. At least two of these impulsive events occurred in 2013: In August at the Icelandic volcano

  1. Interaction between the H II region and AFGL 333-Ridge: Implications for the star formation scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Makoto; Soejima, Takashi; Chibueze, James O.; Nagayama, Takumi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Sunada, Kazuyoshi; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Burns, Ross A.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the star formation activities in the AFGL 333 region, which is in the vicinity of the W 4 expanding bubble, by conducting NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) mapping observations with the 45 m Nobeyama Radio Telescope an angular resolution of 75″. The morphology of the NH3 (1,1) map shows a bow-shaped structure with the size of 2.0 × 0.6 pc as seen in the dust continuum. At the interface between the W 4 bubble and the dense NH3 cloud, the compact H II region G134.2+0.8, associated with IRAS 02245+6115, is located. Interestingly, just at the north and south of G134.2+0.8 we found NH3 emission exhibiting large velocity widths of ˜2.8 km s-1, compared to 1.8 km s-1 at the other positions. As the possibility of mechanical energy injection through the activity of young stellar objects (YSOs) is low, we considered the origin of the large turbulent gas motion as an indication of interaction between the compact H II region and the periphery of the dense molecular cloud. We also found expanding motion of the CO emission associated with G134.2+0.8. The overall structure of the AFGL 333-Ridge might have been formed by the expanding bubble of W 4. However, the small velocity widths observed to the west of IRAS 02245+6115, around the center of the dense molecular cloud, suggest that interaction with the compact H II region is limited. Therefore the YSOs (dominantly Class 0/I) in the core of the AFGL 333-Ridge dense molecular cloud most likely formed in quiescent mode. As previously suggested for the large-scale star formation in the W 3 giant molecular cloud, our results show an apparent coexistence of induced and quiescent star formations in this region. It appears that star formation in the AFGL 333 region has proceeded without significant external triggers, but accompanying stellar feedback environment.

  2. Interaction Between HII Region and AFGL333-Ridge: Implications to the Star Formation Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Makoto; Chibueze, James O; Nagayama, Takumi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Handa, Toshihiro; Sunada, Kazuyuki; Kamezaki, Tatsuya; Burns, Ross A

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the star formation activities in the AFGL333 region, which is in the vicinity of the W4 expanding bubble, by conducting NH3 (1,1), (2,2), and (3,3) mapping observations with the 45 m Nobeyama Radio Telescope at an angular resolution of 75". The morphology of the NH3 (1,1) map shows a bow-shape structure with the size of 2.0 x 0.6 pc as seen in the dust continuum. At the interface between the W4 bubble and the dense NH3 cloud, the compact HII region G134.2+0.8, associated with IRAS02245+6115, is located. Interestingly, just north and south of G134.2+0.8 we found NH3 emission exhibiting large velocity widths of ~ 2.8 km/s, compared to 1.8 km/s at the other positions. As the possibility of mechanical energy injection through the activity of YSO(s) is low, we considered the origin of the large turbulent gas motion as indication of interaction between the compact HII region and the periphery of the dense molecular cloud. We also found expanding motion of the CO emission associated with G134.2+0.8. ...

  3. Virus-host Interactions during Hepatitis C Virus Entry - Implications for Pathogenesis and Novel Treatment Approaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joachim Lupberger; Catherine Schuster; Franζoise Stoll-Keller; Hubert E. Blum; Thomas F. Baumert; Mirjam B. Zeisel; Anita Haberstroh; Eva K. Schnober; Sophie Krieger; Eric Soulier; Christine Thumann; Cathy Royer; Samira Fafi-Kremer

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family and causes acute and chronic hepatitis. Chronic HCV infection may result in severe liver damage including liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The liver is the primary target organ of HCV, and the hepatocyte is its primary target cell. Attachment of the virus to the cell surface followed by viral entry is the first step in a cascade of interactions between the virus and the target cell that is required for successful entry into the cell and initiation of infection. This step is an important determinant of tissue tropism and pathogenesis; it thus represents a major target for antiviral host cell responses, such as antibody-mediated virus neutralization. Following the development of novel cell culture models for HCV infection our understanding of the HCV entry process and mechanisms of virus neutralization has been markedly advanced. In this review we summarize recent developments in the molecular biology of viral entry and its impact on pathogenesis of HCV infection, development of novel preventive and therapeutic antiviral strategies.

  4. Multifunctionality – Interactions and Implications: The Case of the Podkylava Village (Western Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohátová Zuzana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctionality is one of the most important aspects of the sustainable development. There are essentially two approaches to the analysis of multifunctionality. One is to interpret multifunctionality as a characteristic of an economic activity. The second way of interpreting multifunctionality is in terms of multiple roles assigned to agriculture. In this view, agriculture as an activity is entrusted with fulfilling certain functions in society. Social functions are linked to employment and income generation in rural areas and hence sustaining the viability of rural communities and maintaining rural society. The study focuses on social aspect of multifunctional agriculture in Kopanice region located in western part of Slovakia near borders with Czech Republic. The region is according to OECD regional typology being considered as intermediate one approaching the category of predominantly rural region. In spite of the fact, that the share of the primary sector in economy of the region is decreasing, the agriculture still plays an important role from aspects of employment and building of social capital. The paper evaluates the influence of external and internal factors on the development of social capital in the selected region and authors will focus mainly on the impact of local stakeholders and policy measures. The interaction between relevant stakeholders as public sector, civil society, local business sector and primary sector is expected to be beneficial for development of social capital.

  5. Technological Implications of Modifying the Extent of Cell Wall-Proanthocyanidin Interactions Using Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Bautista-Ortín

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transference and reactivity of proanthocyanidins is an important issue that affects the technological processing of some fruits, such as grapes and apples. These processes are affected by proanthocyanidins bound to cell wall polysaccharides, which are present in high concentrations during the processing of the fruits. Therefore, the effective extraction of proanthocyanidins from fruits to their juices or derived products will depend on the ability to manage these associations, and, in this respect, enzymes that degrade these polysaccharides could play an important role. The main objective of this work was to test the role of pure hydrolytic enzymes (polygalacturonase and cellulose and a commercial enzyme containing these two activities on the extent of proanthocyanidin-cell wall interactions. The results showed that the modification promoted by enzymes reduced the amount of proanthocyanidins adsorbed to cell walls since they contributed to the degradation and release of the cell wall polysaccharides, which diffused into the model solution. Some of these released polysaccharides also presented some reactivity towards the proanthocyanidins present in a model solution.

  6. Hybrid Model of the Context Dependent Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex: Implications for Vergence-Version Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina eRanjbaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g. fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  7. Dark matter production from Goldstone boson interactions and implications for direct searches and dark radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Ibarra, Alejandro; Molinaro, Emiliano, E-mail: camilo.garcia@tum.de, E-mail: alejandro.ibarra@ph.tum.de, E-mail: emiliano.molinaro@tum.de [Physik-Department T30d, Technische Universität München, James-Franck-Straße, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The stability of the dark matter particle could be attributed to the remnant Z{sub 2} symmetry that arises from the spontaneous breaking of a global U(1) symmetry. This plausible scenario contains a Goldstone boson which, as recently shown by Weinberg, is a strong candidate for dark radiation. We show in this paper that this Goldstone boson, together with the CP-even scalar associated to the spontaneous breaking of the global U(1) symmetry, plays a central role in the dark matter production. Besides, the mixing of the CP-even scalar with the Standard Model Higgs boson leads to novel Higgs decay channels and to interactions with nucleons, thus opening the possibility of probing this scenario at the LHC and in direct dark matter search experiments. We carefully analyze the latter possibility and we show that there are good prospects to observe a signal at the future experiments LUX and XENON1T provided the dark matter particle was produced thermally and has a mass larger than ∼ 25 GeV.

  8. The contribution of parent-child interactions to smoking experimentation in adolescence: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James

    2012-02-01

    Because few prospective studies have examined the independent influence of mothers and fathers on smoking experimentation, we tested the association between a set of parent-specific, familial and peer interactions with smoking experimentation in early adolescence. Data come from two cohorts in the British Youth Panel Survey (N = 1736; mean age at baseline, 11.26; SD = 0.65), a study of children resident with members of the British Household Panel Survey. Baseline data showed 8.2% of participants had smoked which increased to 40.3% after a 3-year follow-up. Multivariate logistic regression models showed risk factors for the onset of experimentation included frequent time spent with peers (P smoking (P = 0.001), female gender and older participant age (P smoking increased the likelihood of girls but not boys experimentation (P = 0.01). This study suggests that familial risk and protective factors operate independently and that more attention should be paid to the role of fathers in smoking prevention.

  9. Ocean-ice interactions with possible implications for Arctic ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, R. B.

    2015-12-01

    Confined ice shelves restrain flow of non-floating ice, allowing ice sheets to grow larger than they otherwise would. Ice shelves lead a precarious existence, subject to fragmentation if sufficient meltwater fills crevasses, and very sensitive to even slight warming of water beneath. Ice shelves tend to exist in the coldest waters in the world ocean, often overlying warmer, more-saline waters. Changes in water temperature or circulation generally shrink existing ice shelves and raise sea level by unbuttressing the non-floating ice, and this is likely the most important control on marine-ending parts of land ice, exceeding the influence of sea-level or accumulation-rate changes. Advance of an ice-shelf grounding line into warmer, deeper water will increase melting rates, reduce buttressing, and tend to stabilize the grounding line near or above the upper limit of that warmer water. This physical understanding indicates that the oceanographic state, and its interaction with tributary ice streams, must have been central in the extent of Arctic ice shelves once sufficient cooling occurred to allow extensive advance of land ice into the ocean.

  10. Interaction of ozone and carbon dioxide with polycrystalline potassium bromide and its atmospheric implication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanov, Alexander V.; Isaikina, Oksana Ya.; Maksimov, Ivan B.; Lunin, Valerii V.

    2017-03-01

    It has been discovered for the first time that gaseous ozone in the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor interacts with crystalline potassium bromide giving gaseous Br2 and solid salts KHCO3 and KBrO3. Molecular bromine and hydrocarbonate ion are the products of one and the same reaction described by the stoichiometric equation 2KBr(cr.) + O3(gas) + 2CO2(gas) + H2O(gas) → 2KHCO3(cr.) + Br2(gas) + O2(gas). The dependencies of Br2, KHCO3 and KBrO3 formation rates on the concentrations of O3 and CO2, humidity of initial gas mixture, and temperature have been investigated. A kinetic scheme has been proposed that explains the experimental regularities found in this work on the quantitative level. According to the scheme, the formation of molecular bromine and hydrocarbonate is due to the reaction between hypobromite BrO-, the primary product of bromide oxidation by ozone, with carbon dioxide and water; bromate results from consecutive oxidation of bromide ion by ozone Br- → +O3 , -O2 BrO- → +O3 , -O2 BrO2- → +O3, -O2 BrO3- .

  11. Using Electronic Properties of Adamantane Derivatives to Analyze their Ion Channel Interactions: Implications for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacum, Jason

    2013-03-01

    The derivatives of adamantane, which is a cage-like diamondoid structure, can be used as pharmaceuticals for the treatment of various diseases and disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. These drugs interact with ion channels, and they act by electronically and physically hindering the ion transport. The electronic properties of each compound influence the location and level of ion channel hindrance, and the specific use of each compound depends on the functional groups that are attached to the adamantane base chain. Computational analysis and molecular simulations of these different derivatives and the ion channels can provide useful insight into the effect that the functional groups have on the properties of the compounds. Using this information, conclusions can be made about the pharmaceutical mechanisms, as well as how to improve them or create new beneficial compounds. Focusing on the electronic properties, such as the dipole moments of the derivatives and amino acids in the ion channels, can provide more efficient predictions of how these drugs work and how they can be enhanced. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER46304

  12. The Mind and the Machine. On the Conceptual and Moral Implications of Brain-Machine Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Maartje

    2009-12-01

    Brain-machine interfaces are a growing field of research and application. The increasing possibilities to connect the human brain to electronic devices and computer software can be put to use in medicine, the military, and entertainment. Concrete technologies include cochlear implants, Deep Brain Stimulation, neurofeedback and neuroprosthesis. The expectations for the near and further future are high, though it is difficult to separate hope from hype. The focus in this paper is on the effects that these new technologies may have on our 'symbolic order'-on the ways in which popular categories and concepts may change or be reinterpreted. First, the blurring distinction between man and machine and the idea of the cyborg are discussed. It is argued that the morally relevant difference is that between persons and non-persons, which does not necessarily coincide with the distinction between man and machine. The concept of the person remains useful. It may, however, become more difficult to assess the limits of the human body. Next, the distinction between body and mind is discussed. The mind is increasingly seen as a function of the brain, and thus understood in bodily and mechanical terms. This raises questions concerning concepts of free will and moral responsibility that may have far reaching consequences in the field of law, where some have argued for a revision of our criminal justice system, from retributivist to consequentialist. Even without such a (unlikely and unwarranted) revision occurring, brain-machine interactions raise many interesting questions regarding distribution and attribution of responsibility.

  13. Hybrid model of the context dependent vestibulo-ocular reflex: implications for vergence-version interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbaran, Mina; Galiana, Henrietta L

    2015-01-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is an involuntary eye movement evoked by head movements. It is also influenced by viewing distance. This paper presents a hybrid nonlinear bilateral model for the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) in the dark. The model is based on known interconnections between saccadic burst circuits in the brainstem and ocular premotor areas in the vestibular nuclei during fast and slow phase intervals of nystagmus. We implemented a viable switching strategy for the timing of nystagmus events to allow emulation of real nystagmus data. The performance of the hybrid model is evaluated with simulations, and results are consistent with experimental observations. The hybrid model replicates realistic AVOR nystagmus patterns during sinusoidal or step head rotations in the dark and during interactions with vergence, e.g., fixation distance. By simply assigning proper nonlinear neural computations at the premotor level, the model replicates all reported experimental observations. This work sheds light on potential underlying neural mechanisms driving the context dependent AVOR and explains contradictory results in the literature. Moreover, context-dependent behaviors in more complex motor systems could also rely on local nonlinear neural computations.

  14. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn Charles [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  15. Ozone-surface interactions: Investigations of mechanisms, kinetics, mass transport, and implications for indoor air quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Glenn C.

    1999-12-01

    In this dissertation, results are presented of laboratory investigations and mathematical modeling efforts designed to better understand the interactions of ozone with surfaces. In the laboratory, carpet and duct materials were exposed to ozone and measured ozone uptake kinetics and the ozone induced emissions of volatile organic compounds. To understand the results of the experiments, mathematical methods were developed to describe dynamic indoor aldehyde concentrations, mass transport of reactive species to smooth surfaces, the equivalent reaction probability of whole carpet due to the surface reactivity of fibers and carpet backing, and ozone aging of surfaces. Carpets, separated carpet fibers, and separated carpet backing all tended to release aldehydes when exposed to ozone. Secondary emissions were mostly n-nonanal and several other smaller aldehydes. The pattern of emissions suggested that vegetable oils may be precursors for these oxidized emissions. Several possible precursors and experiments in which linseed and tung oils were tested for their secondary emission potential were discussed. Dynamic emission rates of 2-nonenal from a residential carpet may indicate that intermediate species in the oxidation of conjugated olefins can significantly delay aldehyde emissions and act as reservoir for these compounds. The ozone induced emission rate of 2-nonenal, a very odorous compound, can result in odorous indoor concentrations for several years. Surface ozone reactivity is a key parameter in determining the flux of ozone to a surface, is parameterized by the reaction probability, which is simply the probability that an ozone molecule will be irreversibly consumed when it strikes a surface. In laboratory studies of two residential and two commercial carpets, the ozone reaction probability for carpet fibers, carpet backing and the equivalent reaction probability for whole carpet were determined. Typically reaction probability values for these materials were 10

  16. Interactions between amyloid-β and hemoglobin: implications for amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Ying Chuang

    Full Text Available Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides in the brain is one of the central pathogenic events in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, why and how Aβ aggregates within the brain of AD patients remains elusive. Previously, we demonstrated hemoglobin (Hb binds to Aβ and co-localizes with the plaque and vascular amyloid deposits in post-mortem AD brains. In this study, we further characterize the interactions between Hb and Aβ in vitro and in vivo and report the following observations: 1 the binding of Hb to Aβ required iron-containing heme; 2 other heme-containing proteins, such as myoglobin and cytochrome C, also bound to Aβ; 3 hemin-induced cytotoxicity was reduced in neuroblastoma cells by low levels of Aβ; 4 Hb was detected in neurons and glial cells of post-mortem AD brains and was up-regulated in aging and APP/PS1 transgenic mice; 5 microinjection of human Hb into the dorsal hippocampi of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice induced the formation of an envelope-like structure composed of Aβ surrounding the Hb droplets. Our results reveal an enhanced endogenous expression of Hb in aging brain cells, probably serving as a compensatory mechanism against hypoxia. In addition, Aβ binds to Hb and other hemoproteins via the iron-containing heme moiety, thereby reducing Hb/heme/iron-induced cytotoxicity. As some of the brain Hb could be derived from the peripheral circulation due to a compromised blood-brain barrier frequently observed in aged and AD brains, our work also suggests the genesis of some plaques may be a consequence of sustained amyloid accretion at sites of vascular injury.

  17. Patients' and carers' experiences of interacting with home haemodialysis technology: implications for quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkomar, Atish; Farrington, Ken; Mayer, Astrid; Walker, Diane; Blandford, Ann

    2014-12-11

    Little is known about patients' and carers' experiences of interacting with home haemodialysis (HHD) technology, in terms of user experience, how the design of the technology supports safety and fits with home use, and how the broader context of service provision impacts on patients' use of the technology. Data were gathered through ethnographic observations and interviews with 19 patients and their carers associated with four different hospitals in the UK, using five different HHD machines. All patients were managing their condition successfully on HHD. Data were analysed qualitatively, focusing on themes of how individuals used the machines and how they managed their own safety. Findings are organised by three themes: learning to use the technology, usability of the technology, and managing safety during dialysis. Home patients want to live their lives fully, and value the freedom and autonomy that HHD gives them; they adapt use of the technology to their lives and their home context. They also consider the machines to be safe; nevertheless, most participants reported feeling scared and having to learn through mistakes in the early months of dialysing at home. Home care nurses and technicians provide invaluable support. Although participants reported on strategies for anticipating problems and keeping safe, perceived limitations of the technology and of the broader system of care led some to trade off safety against immediate quality of life. Enhancing the quality and safety of the patient experience in HHD involves designing technology and the broader system of care to take account of how individuals manage their dialysis in the home. Possible design improvements to enhance the quality and safety of the patient experience include features to help patients manage their dialysis (e.g. providing timely reminders of next steps) and features to support communication between families and professionals (e.g. through remote monitoring).

  18. Implication of fault interaction to seismic hazard assessment in Sichuan-Yunnan provinces of Southeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkarlaouni, C.; Papadimitriou, E. E.; Karakostas, V. G.; Wen, Xue–Ze; Jin, Xue–Shen; Kilias, A.; Pan, Hua

    2009-04-01

    Strong seismicity in China and adjacent regions is distributed over specific zones that configure rigid lithospheric subplates often bounded by active faults. Sichuan and Yunnan provinces correspond to a so-called rhombic shaped subplate that experiences the strongest intraplate seismicity in the territory of China. The region exhibits a complicated tectonic regime that consists of various rupture zones and different faulting types with strike slip prevailing, consistent with the regional stress field and geological background. During the 20th century, 35 devastating earthquakes with magnitude Ms≥6.5 occurred nearby densely populated areas causing a majority of casualties and deaths. The fact that Sichuan and Yunnan provinces are densely populated and industrially developed urges the necessity for investigating the occurrence pattern of the region's stronger events through the stress evolutionary model and also identifying the structures that are apt to produce a potential strong seismic event in the future. The tectonic complexity reveals a real challenge for our investigation, since the interaction is sought among different faulting types. Stress transfer seems not to be restricted in a single however segmented fault but also expands over the adjacent faults or conjugate zones often bringing them toward rupture. The characteristic of the tectonic setting is that various long strike slip, normal and some thrust faults exist within the same area, interacting with each other. Such interaction of strong earthquakes has been proved by previous investigation concerning the Xianshuihe fault zone (Papadimitriou et al., 2004) and the stress evolution for the northeast Tibetan Plateau from 1920 till present for a viscoelastic model (Wan et al., 2007). A feature characterizing long fault zones is that they are found segmented and distinct parts of faults rupture each time until they complete a seismic cycle. Although fault surfaces are irregular and ruptures are more

  19. Sedimentation influx and volcanic interactions in the Fuji Five Lakes: implications for paleoseismological records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamair, Laura; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurélia; Yamamoto, Shinya; El Ouahabi, Meriam; Garrett, Ed; Shishikura, Masanobu; Schmidt, Sabine; Boes, Evelien; Obrochta, Stephen; Nakamura, Atsunori; Miyairi, Yosuke; Yokoyama, Yusuke; De Batist, Marc; Heyvaert, Vanessa M. A.

    2017-04-01

    The Fuji Fives Lakes are located at the foot of Mount Fuji volcano close to the triple junction, where the North American Plate, the Eurasian plate and the Philippine Sea Plate meet. These lakes are ideally situated to study Mount Fuji volcanism and the interaction between volcanism, changes in lake sedimentation rates and the ability of lakes to record paleoearthquakes. Here, we present newly acquired geological data of Lake Yamanaka and Lake Motosu, including seismic reflection profiles, gravity and piston cores. These two lakes and their respective watersheds were affected by several eruptions of Mount Fuji. Lake Yamanaka, a very shallow lake (max. depth 14 m), was heavily impacted by the scoria fall-out of the A.D. 1707 Hoei eruption of Mount Fuji. A detailed investigation of the effect of the Hoei eruption was conducted on short gravity cores, using high resolution XRD, C/N and 210Pb/137Cs analyses. The preliminary results suggest that the sedimentation rate of Lake Yamanaka drastically reduced after the Hoei eruption, followed by an increase until the present day. Similarly, lacustrine sedimentation in Lake Motosu (max. depth 122 m) was disturbed by Mount Fuji volcanism at a larger scale. The watershed of Lake Motosu was impacted by several lava flows and scoria cones. For example, the Omuro scoria cone reduced the catchment size of Lake Motosu and modified its physiography. The related scoria fall out covered an extensive part of the lake catchment and reduced terrigenous sedimentary influx to Lake Motosu. Within the deep basin of Lake Motosu, seismic reflection data shows two different periods that are distinguished by a major change in the dominant sedimentary processes. During the first period, sublacustrine landslides and turbidity currents were the dominant sedimentation processes. During the second one, the seismic stratigraphy evidences only deposition of numerous turbidites interrupting the hemipelagic sedimentation. Changes in sedimentary processes

  20. Studies of ice nuclei at the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator and their implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Heike

    2013-04-01

    Ice containing clouds permanently cover 40% of the earth's surface. Ice formation processes have a large impact on the formation of precipitation, cloud radiative properties, cloud electrification and hence influence both, weather and climate. Our understanding of the physical and chemical processes underlying ice formation is limited. However what we know is that the two main pathways of atmospheric ice formation are homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. The latter involves aerosol particles that act as ice nuclei inducing cloud droplet freezing at temperatures significantly above the homogeneous freezing threshold temperature. Particles acting as IN are e.g. dust particles, but also biological particles like bacteria, pollen and fungal spores. Different heterogeneous freezing mechanisms do exit, with their relative importance for atmospheric clouds still being debated. However, there are strong indications that immersion freezing is the most important mechanism when considering mixed phase clouds. What we are still lacking is a) the fundamental process understanding on how aerosol particles induce ice nucleation and b) means to quantify ice nucleation in atmospheric models. Concerning a) there most likely is not only one answer, considering the variety of IN found in the atmosphere. With respect to b) different approaches based on either the stochastic or singular hypotheses have been suggested. However it is still being debated which would be a suitable way to parameterize laboratory data for use in atmospheric modeling. In this presentation, both topics will be addressed. Using the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) (Hartmann et al., 2011), we examined different types of dust particles with and without coating, and biological particles such as bacteria and pollen, with respect to their immersion freezing behaviour. We will summarize our findings concerning the properties controlling the ice nucleation behaviour of these particles and

  1. pH-dependent drug-drug interactions for weak base drugs: potential implications for new drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Wu, F; Lee, S C; Zhao, H; Zhang, L

    2014-08-01

    Absorption of an orally administered drug with pH-dependent solubility may be altered when it is coadministered with a gastric acid-reducing agent (ARA). Assessing a drug's potential for pH-dependent drug-drug interactions (DDIs), considering study design elements for such DDI studies, and interpreting and communicating study results in the drug labeling to guide drug dosing are important for drug development. We collected pertinent information related to new molecular entities approved from January 2003 to May 2013 by the US Food and Drug Administration for which clinical DDI studies with ARAs were performed. On the basis of assessments of data on pH solubility and in vivo DDIs with ARAs, we proposed a conceptual framework for assessing the need for clinical pH-dependent DDI studies for weak base drugs (WBDs). Important study design considerations include selection of ARAs and timing of dosing of an ARA relative to the WBD in a DDI study. Labeling implications for drugs having DDIs with ARAs are also illustrated.

  2. From conditioning to learning communities: implications of fifty years of research in e-learning interaction design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ravenscroft

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will consider e-learning in terms of the underlying learning processes and interactions that are stimulated, supported or favoured by new media and the contexts or communities in which it is used. We will review and critique a selection of research and development from the past fifty years that has linked pedagogical and learning theory to the design of innovative e-learning systems and activities, and discuss their implications. It will include approaches that are, essentially, behaviourist (Skinner and Gagné, cognitivist (Pask, Piaget and Papert, situated (Lave, Wenger and Seely-Brown, socioconstructivist (Vygotsky, socio-cultural (Nardi and Engestrom and community-based (Wenger and Preece. Emerging from this review is the argument that effective elearning usually requires, or involves, high-quality educational discourse, that leads to, at the least, improved knowledge, and at the best, conceptual development and improved understanding. To achieve this I argue that we need to adopt a more holistic approach to design that synthesizes features of the included approaches, leading to a framework that emphasizes the relationships between cognitive changes, dialogue processes and the communities, or contexts for e-learning.

  3. Genetic gating of human fear learning and extinction: possible implications for gene-environment interaction in anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Weike, Almut I; Nikamo, Pernilla; Schalling, Martin; Hamm, Alfons O; Ohman, Arne

    2009-02-01

    Pavlovian fear conditioning is a widely used model of the acquisition and extinction of fear. Neural findings suggest that the amygdala is the core structure for fear acquisition, whereas prefrontal cortical areas are given pivotal roles in fear extinction. Forty-eight volunteers participated in a fear-conditioning experiment, which used fear potentiation of the startle reflex as the primary measure to investigate the effect of two genetic polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR and COMTval158met) on conditioning and extinction of fear. The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, located in the serotonin transporter gene, is associated with amygdala reactivity and neuroticism, whereas the COMTval158met polymorphism, which is located in the gene coding for catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), a dopamine-degrading enzyme, affects prefrontal executive functions. Our results show that only carriers of the 5-HTTLPR s allele exhibited conditioned startle potentiation, whereas carriers of the COMT met/met genotype failed to extinguish conditioned fear. These results may have interesting implications for understanding gene-environment interactions in the development and treatment of anxiety disorders.

  4. Implication of the Tpl2 kinase in inflammatory changes and insulin resistance induced by the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceppo, Franck; Berthou, Flavien; Jager, Jennifer; Dumas, Karine; Cormont, Mireille; Tanti, Jean-François

    2014-03-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation is associated with the development of insulin resistance. In obese adipose tissue, lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and saturated fatty acids trigger inflammatory factors that mediate a paracrine loop between adipocytes and macrophages. However, the inflammatory signaling proteins underlying this cross talk remain to be identified. The mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2) is activated by inflammatory stimuli, including LPS, and its expression is up-regulated in obese adipose tissue, but its role in the interaction between adipocytes and macrophages remains ill-defined. To assess the implication of Tpl2 in the cross talk between these 2 cell types, we used coculture system and conditioned medium (CM) from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of Tpl2 in the coculture markedly reduced lipolysis and cytokine production and prevented the decrease in adipocyte insulin signaling. Tpl2 knockdown in cocultured adipocytes reduced lipolysis but had a weak effect on cytokine production and did not prevent the alteration of insulin signaling. By contrast, Tpl2 silencing in cocultured macrophages resulted in a marked inhibition of cytokine production and prevented the alteration of adipocyte insulin signaling. Further, when Tpl2 was inhibited in LPS-activated macrophages, the produced CM did not alter adipocyte insulin signaling and did not induce an inflammatory response in adipocytes. By contrast, Tpl2 silencing in adipocytes did not prevent the deleterious effects of a CM from LPS-activated macrophages. Together, these data establish that Tpl2, mainly in macrophages, is involved in the cross talk between adipocytes and macrophages that promotes inflammatory changes and alteration of insulin signaling in adipocytes.

  5. Amino acid and carbohydrate tradeoffs by honey bee nectar foragers and their implications for plant-pollinator interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksma, Harmen P; Oxman, Karmi L; Shafir, Sharoni

    2014-10-01

    Honey bees are important pollinators, requiring floral pollen and nectar for nutrition. Nectar is rich in sugars, but contains additional nutrients, including amino acids (AAs). We tested the preferences of free-flying foragers between 20 AAs at 0.1% w/w in sucrose solutions in an artificial meadow. We found consistent preferences amongst AAs, with essential AAs preferred over nonessential AAs. The preference of foragers correlated negatively with AA induced deviations in pH values, as compared to the control. Next, we quantified tradeoffs between attractive and deterrent AAs at the expense of carbohydrates in nectar. Bees were attracted by phenylalanine, willing to give up 84units sucrose for 1unit AA. They were deterred by glycine, and adding 100 or more units of sucrose could resolve to offset 1unit AA. In addition, we tested physiological effects of AA nutrition on forager homing performance. In a no-choice context, caged bees showed indifference to 0.1% proline, leucine, glycine or phenylalanine in sucrose solutions. Furthermore, flight tests gave no indication that AA nutrition affected flight capacity directly. In contrast, low carbohydrate nutrition reduced the performance of bees, with important methodological implications for homing studies that evaluate the effect of substances that may affect imbibition of sugar solution. In conclusion, low AA concentrations in nectar relative to pollen suggest a limited role in bee nutrition. Most of the 20 AAs evoked a neutral to a mild deterrent response in bees, thus it seems unlikely that bees respond to AAs in nectar as a cue to assess nutritional quality. Nonetheless, free choice behavior of foraging bees is influenced, for instance by phenylalanine and glycine. Thus, AAs in nectar may affect plant-pollinator interactions and thereby exhibit a selective pressure on the flora in the honey bee habitat.

  6. Prognostic implications of carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein and lysyl-oxidase expression in human breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patani Neill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ubiquitin modification of proteins influences cellular processes relevant to carcinogenesis. CHIP (carboxyl-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein is a chaperone-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase, regulating the stability of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 interacting proteins. CHIP is implicated in the modulation of estrogen receptor (ESR1 and Her-2/neu (ERBB2 stability. LOX (lysyl-oxidase serves intracellular roles and catalyses the cross-linking of extracellular matrix (ECM collagens and elastin. LOX expression is altered in human malignancies and their peri-tumoral stroma. However, paradoxical roles are reported. In this study, the level of mRNA expression of CHIP and LOX were assessed in normal and malignant breast tissue and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters. Materials and Methods: Breast cancer (BC tissues (n = 127 and normal tissues (n = 33 underwent RNA extraction and reverse transcription; transcript levels were determined using real-time quantitative PCR and normalized against CK-19. Transcript levels were analyzed against TNM stage, nodal involvement, tumor grade and clinical outcome over a ten-year follow-up period. Results: CHIP expression decreased with increasing Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI: NPI-1 vs. NPI-3 (12.2 vs. 0.2, P = 0.0264, NPI-2 vs. NPI-3 (3 vs. 0.2, P = 0.0275. CHIP expression decreased with increasing TNM stage: TNM-1 vs. TNM-2 (12 vs. 0, P = 0.0639, TNM-1 vs. TNM-2-4 (12 vs. 0, P = 0.0434. Lower transcript levels were associated with increasing tumor grade: grade 1 vs. grade 3 (17.7 vs. 0.3, P = 0.0266, grade 2 vs. grade 3 (5 vs. 0.3, P = 0.0454. The overall survival (OS for tumors classified as ′low-level expression′, was poorer than those with ′high-level expression′ (118.1 vs. 152.3 months, P = 0.039. LOX expression decreased with increasing NPI: NPI-1 vs. NPI-2 (3 vs. 0, P = 0.0301 and TNM stage: TNM-1 = 3854639, TNM-2 = 908900, TNM-3 = 329, TNM-4 = 1.232 (P = NS. Conclusion: CHIP

  7. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions...... interaction between a human operator and an artificial actor or agent. We can apply insights from puppetry to develop culturally-aware robots. Here we describe the development of a robotic marionette theatre wherein robotic controllers assume the role of human puppeteers. The system has been built, tested...

  8. Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The main theme of this anthology is the unique interaction between mathematics, physics and philosophy during the beginning of the 20th century. Seminal theories of modern physics and new fundamental mathematical structures were discovered or formed in this period. Significant physicists...... such as Lorentz and Einstein as well as mathematicians such as Poincare, Minkowski, Hilbert and Weyl contributed to this development. They created the new physical theories and the mathematical disciplines that play such paramount roles in their mathematical formulations. These physicists and mathematicians were...

  9. Lithium enhances CRTC oligomer formation and the interaction between the CREB coactivators CRTC and CBP--implications for CREB-dependent gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Annette; von der Heyde, Anne Sophie; Böer, Ulrike; Phu, Do Thanh; Tzvetkov, Mladen; Oetjen, Elke

    2013-01-01

    Lithium salts are important drugs to treat bipolar disorder. Previous work showed that lithium by enforcing the interaction between the transcription factor CREB and its coactivator CRTC1 enhanced cAMP-stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription. Both CREB and CRTC have been implicated in neuronal adaptation, which might underlie lithium's therapeutic action. In the present study the mechanisms of lithium action on cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription were further elucidated. Transient transfection assays revealed that all three CRTC isoforms conferred lithium responsiveness to CREB whereas their intrinsic transcriptional activities remained unchanged by lithium, suggesting a conformational change of CREB or CRTC by lithium. In in vitro protein-protein interaction assays lithium enhanced the interaction between CREB and both coactivators CRTC and CBP. Furthermore, lithium enforced the oligomerization of CRTC, a prerequisite for CREB interaction. For further evaluation it was investigated whether lithium competes with magnesium, which coordinates the conformation of the CREB basic region leucine zipper (bZip). Mutational analysis of the magnesium coordinating lysine-290 within the bZip, in vitro and intracellular interaction assays and luciferase reporter-gene assays revealed that the effect of lithium on the CREB-CRTC interaction or on the transcriptional activity, respectively, was not affected by the mutation, thus excluding a magnesium-lithium competition. However, the CREB-CRTC interaction was strongly increased in lysine-290-mutants thereby extending the CRTC-CREB interaction domain. Taken together the results exclude a competition between lithium and magnesium at the bZip, but suggest that lithium by enforcing the CRTC-oligomer formation and the interaction of CREB-CBP-CRTC enhances cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions and its implications for membrane fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianrong; Shen, Liguo; Zhang, Meijia; Hong, Huachang; He, Yiming; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    Concept of hydrophobicity always fails to accurately assess the interfacial interaction and membrane fouling, which calls for reliable parameters for this purpose. In this study, effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions related to membrane fouling were investigated based on thermodynamic analysis. It was found that, total interaction energy between sludge foulants and membrane monotonically decreases and increases with water and glycerol contact angle, respectively, indicating that these two parameters can be reliable indicators predicting total interaction energy and membrane fouling. Membrane roughness decreases interaction strength for over 20 times, and effects of membrane roughness on membrane fouling should consider water and glycerol contact angle on membrane. It was revealed existence of a critical water and glycerol contact angle for a given membrane bioreactor. Meanwhile, diiodomethane contact angle has minor effect on the total interaction, and cannot be regarded as an effective indicator assessing interfacial interactions and membrane fouling.

  11. How does shape affect predator- prey interactions in fish? Implications for marine food web structure and dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Cachera, Marie; Villanueva, Ching-maria; Ernande, Bruno; Baheux, Mickael; Rouquette, Manuel; Chambord, Sophie; Lefebvre, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    Each species pertains to a given functional niche, depending on its relationships with others species and its interactions with the abiotic environment. Understanding inter-specific interactions is critical to know and predict ecosystems' structure, functioning and dynamics, but also their response to anthropogenic impacts. Predator-prey relationship is one of the main biotic interactions as it both determines the survival of the prey and the predator and is the keystone of food webs. Unra...

  12. Impact of UV radiation on activity of linear furanocoumarins and Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki against Spodoptera exigua: Implications for tritrophic interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trumble, J.T.; Moar, W.J.; Brewer, M.J.; Carson, W.G. (Univ. of California, Riverside (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Acidic fogs with a pH of 2.0 and duration of 2 hr did not reduce the efficacy of Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki. Therefore, the impact of UV radiation was investigated on the interactions between (1) levels of the antibacterial linear furanocoumarins psoralen, bergapten, and xanthotoxin in Apium graveolens (L.) occurring following a 2.0 pH acidic fog episode, (2) the noctuid Spodoptera exigua, and (3) a sublethal dosage of the microbial pathogen B. thuringiensis var. kurstaki. Mean time to pupation in the absence of UV radiation was significantly extended by the addition of either psoralens or B. thuringiensis. Larvae developing on diets containing B. thuringiensis plus psoralens required nearly 40% longer to pupate than controls, but their effects were additive as the interaction was not significant. Mean time to mortality, a weighted average time of death, was not significantly affected by any of the treatments. In a 2 {times} 2 {times} 2 factorial analysis, all main effects reduced survival significantly, as did the three-way interaction. Thus, antagonistic interactions with psoralens that would reduce the effectiveness of B. thuringiensis in the field were not observed. When pairs of main effects were nested within the two levels of the third factor, several two-way interactions were found. Interestingly, the activity of B. thuringiensis and the psoralens, individually or in combination, was enhanced by exposure to UV radiation. Implications of this research are discussed for both natural and agricultural ecosystems.

  13. Probing secondary glutaminyl cyclase (QC) inhibitor interactions applying an in silico-modeling/site-directed mutagenesis approach: implications for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Birgit; Buchholz, Mirko; Wermann, Michael; Heiser, Ulrich; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-12-01

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) catalyze the formation of pyroglutamate-modified amyloid peptides deposited in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Inhibitors of QC are currently in development as potential therapeutics. The crystal structures of the potent inhibitor PBD150 bound to human and murine QC (hQC, mQC) have been described recently. The binding modes of a dimethoxyphenyl moiety of the inhibitor are significantly different between the structures, which contrasts with a similar K(i) value. We show the conformation of PBD150 prone to disturbance by protein-protein interactions within the crystals. Semi-empirical calculations of the enzyme-inhibitor interaction within the crystal suggest significant differences in the dissociation constants between the binding modes. To probe for interactions in solution, a site-directed mutagenesis on hQC was performed. The replacement of F325 and I303 by alanine or asparagine resulted in a 800-fold lower activity of the inhibitor, whereas the exchange of S323 by alanine or valine led to a 20-fold higher activity of PBD150. The results provide an example of deciphering the interaction mode between a target enzyme and lead substance in solution, if co-crystallization does not mirror such interactions properly. Thus, the study might provide implications for rapid screening of binding modes also for other drug targets.

  14. Structure-based engineering of species selectivity in the interaction between urokinase and its receptor: implication for preclinical cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Huai, Qing

    2010-01-01

    and wound healing, several intervention studies have focused on targeting the uPA.uPAR interaction in vivo. Evaluations of such studies in xenotransplanted tumor models are, however, complicated by the pronounced species selectivity in this interaction. We now report the molecular basis underlying...

  15. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  16. A Qualitative Inquiry into the Complex Features of Strained Interactions: Analysis and Implications for Health Care Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunborg, Charlotta; Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Communication skills are vital for successful relationships between patients and health care professionals. Failure to communicate may lead to a lack of understanding and may result in strained interactions. Our theoretical point of departure was to make use of chaos and complexity theories. To examine the features of strained interactions and to discuss their relevance for health care settings. A netnography study design was applied. Data were purposefully sampled, and video clips (122 minutes from 30 video clips) from public online venues were used. The results are presented in four categories: 1) unpredictability, 2) sensitivity dependence, 3) resistibility, and 4) iteration. They are all features of strained interactions. Strained interactions are a complex phenomenon that exists in health care settings. The findings provide health care professionals guidance to understand the complexity and the features of strained interactions.

  17. Interaction of the mu-opioid receptor with GPR177 (Wntless) inhibits Wnt secretion: potential implications for opioid dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Stagljar Igor; Van Bockstaele Elisabeth J; Reyes Beverly AS; Wong Victoria; Kittanakom Saranya; Jin Jay; Berrettini Wade; Levenson Robert

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Opioid agonist drugs produce analgesia. However, long-term exposure to opioid agonists may lead to opioid dependence. The analgesic and addictive properties of opioid agonist drugs are mediated primarily via the mu-opioid receptor (MOR). Opioid agonists appear to alter neuronal morphology in key brain regions implicated in the development of opioid dependence. However, the precise role of the MOR in the development of these neuronal alterations remains elusive. We hypothes...

  18. The role of hydrophobicity and surface receptors at hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten in the interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 : Implications for interactions in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vila, Taissa; Nazir, Rashid; Rozental, Sonia; dos Santos, Giulia M. P.; Calixto, Renata O.R.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Wick, Lukas Y.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate th

  19. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies......, gene and protein level alterations have fatal consequences. We used genome-wide protein-protein interaction data to identify chromosome-specific patterns of protein interactions. We found that some chromosomes encode proteins that interact infrequently with each other, chromosome 21 in particular. We...

  20. Perillyl alcohol: Dynamic interactions with the lipid bilayer and implications for long‐term inhalational chemotherapy for gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando da Fonseca, Clovis; Khandelia, Himanshu; D’Alincourt Salazar, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gliomas display a high degree of intratumor heterogeneity, including changes in physiological parameters and lipid composition of the plasma membrane, which may contribute to the development of drug resistance. Biophysical interactions between therapeutic agents and the lipid componen...

  1. Polypharmacotherapy and drug-drug interactions in patients hospitalized in an Internal Medicine department: magnitude of the problem and clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Lusiani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The use of multiple drugs is a growing problem in elderly patients: it increases the risk of drug-drug interactions and reduces the compliance to cures. The magnitude and the clinical implications of this phenomenon in patients hospitalized in Internal Medicine departments (IM remain largely unknown. AIM OF THE STUDY To evaluate how frequently polypharmacotherapy occurs in IM patients, to what extent the hospitalization affects it, and to what extent potential drug-drug interactions have to do with the treated conditions. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this observational study, the clinical records of 232 consecutive patients (median age 80 years were reviewed, and the medical prescriptions on admission to and at discharge from the hospital were analysed, with special regard to potential drugdrug interactions, using the Micromedex® Healthcare Series system (www.thomsonhc.com; the interactions were classified in terms of severity and type (clinical relevance. RESULTS The total number of prescribed drugs per-patient on admission and at discharge were 4.73 ± 2.88 vs 5.69 ± 2.78 (p < 0.01; the number of potentially harmful interactions were 0.91 ± 1.17 vs 1.39 ± 1.59 (p < 0.01; the percentage of patients at risk for any interactions (mostly moderate or severe, as a matter of fact were 53% vs 66% (p < 0.01. As for clinical relevance, most interactions were of the pharmacodymanic type (67 vs 93, p n.s., and very few patients (5 vs 5 had interactions potentially interfering with their disease status. The risk of interactions progressively increased with the number of prescribed drugs, reaching a plateau of 60% with the combination of 4 drugs. CONCLUSIONS Our data confirm that drug-drug interactions due to polypharmacotherapy are a relevant problem in patients hospitalized in IM, and that hospitalization per se adds to its magnitude. Although few patients seem to be directly threatened in their disease status, most of them are exposed to the

  2. Neural systems supporting cognitive-affective interactions in adolescence: The role of puberty and implications for affective disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecile D. Ladouceur

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from longitudinal studies suggests that adolescence may represent a period of vulnerability that, in the context of adverse events, could contribute to developmental trajectories toward behavioral and emotional health problems, including affective disorders. Adolescence is also a sensitive period for the development of neural systems supporting cognitive-affective processes, which have been implicated in the pathophysiology of affective disorders such as anxiety and mood disorders. In particular, the onset of puberty brings about a cascade of physical, hormonal, psychological, and social changes that contribute in complex ways to the development of these systems. This article provides a brief overview of neuroimaging research pertaining to the development of cognitive-affective processes in adolescence. It also includes a brief review of evidence from animal and human neuroimaging studies suggesting that sex steroids influence the connectivity between prefrontal cortical and subcortical limbic regions in ways that contribute to increased reactivity to emotionally salient stimuli. We integrate these findings in the context of a developmental affective neuroscience framework suggesting that the impact of rising levels of sex steroids during puberty on fronto-limbic connectivity may be even greater in the context of protracted development of prefrontal cortical regions in adolescence. We conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for future research aimed at identifying neurodevelopmental markers of risk for future onset of affective disorders.

  3. The Role of Hydrophobicity and Surface Receptors at Hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. Strain Karsten in the Interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 – Implications for Interactions in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Taissa; Nazir, Rashid; Rozental, Sonia; dos Santos, Giulia M. P.; Calixto, Renata O. R.; Barreto-Bergter, Eliana; Wick, Lukas Y.; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate the intrinsic properties of the B. terrae BS001 interaction with the basidiomycetous soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. In some experiments, the ascomycetous Trichoderma asperellum 302 was also used. The hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten were largely hydrophilic on water-containing media versus hydrophobic when aerial, as evidenced by contact angle analyses (CA). Co-migration of B. terrae strain BS001 cells with the hyphae of the two fungi occurred preferentially along the - presumably hydrophilic - soil-dwelling hyphae, whereas aerial hyphae did not allow efficient migration, due to reduced thickness of their surrounding mucous films. Moreover, the cell numbers over the length of the hyphae in soil showed an uneven distribution, i.e., the CFU numbers increased from minima at the inoculation point to maximal numbers in the middle of the extended hyphae, then decreasing toward the terminal side. Microscopic analyses of the strain BS001 associations with the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphae in the microcosms confirmed the presence of B. terrae BS001 cells on the mucous matter that was present at the hyphal surfaces of the fungi used. Cell agglomerates were found to accumulate at defined sites on the hyphal surfaces, which were coined ‘fungal-interactive’ hot spots. Evidence was further obtained for the contention that receptors for a physical bacterium-fungus interaction occur at the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphal surface, in which the specific glycosphingolipid ceramide monohexoside (CMH) plays an important role. Thus, bacterial adherence may be mediated by heterogeneously distributed fungal-specific receptors, implying the CMH moieties. This

  4. The role of hydrophobicity and surface receptors at hyphae of Lyophyllum sp strain Karsten in the interaction with Burkholderia terrae BS001 – implications for interactions in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taissa Vieira Machado Vila

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The soil bacterium Burkholderia terrae strain BS001 can interact with varying soil fungi, using mechanisms that range from the utilization of carbon/energy sources such as glycerol to the ability to reach novel territories in soil via co-migration with growing fungal mycelia. Here, we investigate the intrinsic properties of the B. terrae BS001 interaction with the basidiomycetous soil fungus Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten. In some experiments, the ascomycetous Trichoderma asperellum 302 was also used. The hyphae of Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten were largely hydrophilic on water-containing media versus hydrophobic when aerial, as evidenced by contact angle analyses (CA. Co-migration of B. terrae strain BS001 cells with the hyphae of the two fungi occurred preferentially along the - presumably hydrophilic - soil-dwelling hyphae, whereas aerial hyphae did not allow efficient migration, due to reduced thickness of their surrounding mucous films. Moreover, the cell numbers over the length of the hyphae in soil showed an uneven distribution, i.e. the CFU numbers increased from minima at the inoculation point to maximal numbers in the middle of the extended hyphae, then decreasing towards the terminal side. Microscopic analyses of the strain BS001 associations with the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphae in the microcosms confirmed the presence of B. terrae BS001 cells on the mucous matter that was present at the hyphal surfaces of the fungi used. Cell agglomerates were found to accumulate at defined sites on the hyphal surfaces, which were coined ‘fungal-interactive’ hot spots. Evidence was further obtained for the contention that receptors for a physical bacterium-fungus interaction occur at the Lyophyllum sp. strain Karsten hyphal surface, in which the specific glycosphingolipid ceramide mono hexoside (CMH plays an important role. Thus, bacterial adherence may be mediated by heterogeneously-distributed fungal-specific receptors, implying the CMH

  5. Interaction of Actinide Species with Microorganisms & Microbial Chelators: Cellular Uptake, Toxicity, & Implications for Bioremediation of Soil & Ground Water.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim Boukhalfa

    2006-03-28

    Microorganisms influence the natural cycle of major elements, including C, N, P, S, and transition metals such as Mn and Fe. Bacterial processes can also influence the behavior of actinides in soil and ground water. While radionuclides have no known biological utility, they have the potential to interact with microorganisms and to interfere with processes involving other elements such as Fe and Mn. These interactions can transform radionuclides and affect their fate and transport. Organic acids, extruded by-products of cell metabolism, can solubilize radionuclides and facilitate their transport. The soluble complexes formed can be taken up by the cells and incorporated into biofilm structures. We have examined the interactions of Pu species with bacterial metabolites, studied Pu uptake by microorganisms and examined the toxicity of Pu and other toxic metals to environmentally relevant bacteria. We have also studied the speciation of Pu(IV) in the presence of natural and synthetic chelators.

  6. P-glycoprotein Inhibition by the Agricultural Pesticide Propiconazole and Its Hydroxylated Metabolites: Implications for Pesticide-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The human efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp; MDR1) functions an important cellular defense system against a variety of xenobiotics; however, little information exists on whether environmental chemicals interact with P-gp. Conazoles provide a unique challenge to exposure ass...

  7. Differential CLE peptide perception by plant receptors implicated from structural and functional analyses of TDIF-TDR interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zhijie; Chakraborty, Sayan; Xu, Guozhou; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-04-06

    Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor (TDIF) belongs to the family of post-translationally modified CLE (CLAVATA3/embryo surrounding region (ESR)-related) peptide hormones that control root growth and define the delicate balance between stem cell proliferation and differentiation in SAM (shoot apical meristem) or RAM (root apical meristem). In Arabidopsis, Tracheary Element Differentiation Inhibitory Factor Receptor (TDR) and its ligand TDIF signaling pathway is involved in the regulation of procambial cell proliferation and inhibiting its differentiation into xylem cells. Here we present the crystal structures of the extracellular domains (ECD) of TDR alone and in complex with its ligand TDIF resolved at 2.65 Åand 2.75 Å respectively. These structures provide insights about the ligand perception and specific interactions between the CLE peptides and their cognate receptors. Our in vitro biochemical studies indicate that the interactions between the ligands and the receptors at the C-terminal anchoring site provide conserved binding. While the binding interactions occurring at the N-terminal anchoring site dictate differential binding specificities between different ligands and receptors. Our studies will open different unknown avenues of TDR-TDIF signaling pathways that will enhance our knowledge in this field highlighting the receptor ligand interaction, receptor activation, signaling network, modes of action and will serve as a structure function relationship model between the ligand and the receptor for various similar leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs).

  8. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Myung-Haing [Laboratory of Toxicology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Joon, E-mail: joonkim@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Biochemistry, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kee-Ho, E-mail: khlee@kirams.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  9. Dysregulated neutrophil-endothelial interaction in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitides : Implications for pathogenesis and disease intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Nan; Westra, Johanna; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The interplay between neutrophils and endothelial cells allows ANCA to become pathogenic and results in uncontrolled inflammation in the vessel wall. This review presents an overall view on neutrophil-endothelial interaction during inflammation with a focus on ANCA-associated vasculitis, and summari

  10. Structure-based engineering of species selectivity in the interaction between urokinase and its receptor: implication for preclinical cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Lin; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Huai, Qing;

    2010-01-01

    this difference by solving the crystal structure for the murine uPA.uPAR complex and demonstrate by extensive surface plasmon resonance studies that the kinetic rate constants for this interaction can be swapped completely between these orthologs by exchanging only two residues. This study not only discloses...

  11. Positive Social Interactions in a Lifespan Perspective with a focus on Opioidergic and Oxytocinergic systems: Implications for Neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonnello, Valentina; Petrocchi, Nicola; Farinelli, Marina; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2016-08-16

    In recent years, a growing interest has emerged in the beneficial effects of positive social interactions on health. The present work aims to review animal and human studies linking social interactions and health throughout the lifespan, with a focus on current knowledge of the possible mediating role of opioids and oxytocin. During the prenatal period, a positive social environment contributes to regulating maternal stress response and protecting the fetus from exposure to maternal active glucocorticoids. Throughout development, positive social contact with the caregiver acts as a "hidden regulator" and promotes infant neuro affective development. Postnatal social neuro protection interventions involving caregiver-infant physical contact seem to be crucial important for rescuing preterm infants at risk for neurodevelopmental disorders. Attachment figures and friendships in adulthood continue to have a protective role for health and brain functioning, counteracting brain aging. In humans, implementation of meditative practices that promote compassionate motivation and prosocial behavior appears beneficial for health in adolescents and adults. Human and animal studies suggest the oxytocinergic and opioidergic systems are important mediators of the effects of positive social interactions. However, most of the studies focus on a specific phase of life (i.e., adulthood). Future studies should focus on the role of opioids and oxytocin in positive social interactions adopting a lifespan perspective.

  12. Examining Peer Acceptance in Verbal and Non-Verbal Interaction during Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Implications for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrou, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of peer acceptance in a study investigating the interactions of pairs of disabled and non-disabled pupils working together on computer-based tasks in mainstream primary schools in Cyprus. Twenty dyads of pupils were observed and videotaped while working together at the computer. Data analyses were based on the…

  13. Interaction between G Protein-Coupled Receptor 143 and Tyrosinase: Implications for Understanding Ocular Albinism Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippo, Elisabetta; Schiedel, Anke C; Manga, Prashiela

    2017-02-01

    Developmental eye defects in X-linked ocular albinism type 1 are caused by G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) mutations. Mutations result in dysfunctional melanosome biogenesis and macromelanosome formation in pigment cells, including melanocytes and retinal pigment epithelium. GPR143, primarily expressed in pigment cells, localizes exclusively to endolysosomal and melanosomal membranes unlike most G protein-coupled receptors, which localize to the plasma membrane. There is some debate regarding GPR143 function and elucidating the role of this receptor may be instrumental for understanding neurogenesis during eye development and for devising therapies for ocular albinism type I. Many G protein-coupled receptors require association with other proteins to function. These G protein-coupled receptor-interacting proteins also facilitate fine-tuning of receptor activity and tissue specificity. We therefore investigated potential GPR143 interaction partners, with a focus on the melanogenic enzyme tyrosinase. GPR143 coimmunoprecipitated with tyrosinase, while confocal microscopy demonstrated colocalization of the proteins. Furthermore, tyrosinase localized to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with a GPR143 trafficking mutant. The physical interaction between the proteins was confirmed using fluorescence resonance energy transfer. This interaction may be required in order for GPR143 to function as a monitor of melanosome maturation. Identifying tyrosinase as a potential GPR143 binding protein opens new avenues for investigating the mechanisms that regulate pigmentation and neurogenesis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. (Mis)Use of Email in Student-Faculty Interaction: Implications for University Instruction in Germany, Saudi Arabia, and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielewicz-Betz, Anna

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines student-faculty communication by email and the lack of clear guidelines that leads to misuse of email in student-faculty interaction, whereby status-incongruent pragmatic markers are employed, resulting in impoliteness and inappropriateness. The main objective is to bridge the gap in research on other than requestive speech…

  15. Effective Classroom Instruction: Implications of Child Characteristics by Reading Instruction Interactions on First Graders' Word Reading Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald; Morrison, Frederick J.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Toste, Jessica R.; Lundblom, Erin; Crowe, Elizabeth C.; Fishman, Barry

    2011-01-01

    Too many children fail to learn how to read proficiently with serious consequences for their overall well-being and long-term success in school. This may be because providing effective instruction is more complex than many of the current models of reading instruction portray; there are Child Characteristic x Instruction (CXI) interactions. Here we…

  16. The Integration of Epistasis Network and Functional Interactions in a GWAS Implicates RXR Pathway Genes in the Immune Response to Smallpox Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Brett A.; Lareau, Caleb; Oberg, Ann L.; Kennedy, Richard B.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2016-01-01

    Although many diseases and traits show large heritability, few genetic variants have been found to strongly separate phenotype groups by genotype. Complex regulatory networks of variants and expression of multiple genes lead to small individual-variant effects and difficulty replicating the effect of any single variant in an affected pathway. Interaction network modeling of GWAS identifies effects ignored by univariate models, but population differences may still cause specific genes to not replicate. Integrative network models may help detect indirect effects of variants in the underlying biological pathway. In this study, we used gene-level functional interaction information from the Integrative Multi-species Prediction (IMP) tool to reveal important genes associated with a complex phenotype through evidence from epistasis networks and pathway enrichment. We test this method for augmenting variant-based network analyses with functional interactions by applying it to a smallpox vaccine immune response GWAS. The integrative analysis spotlights the role of genes related to retinoid X receptor alpha (RXRA), which has been implicated in a previous epistasis network analysis of smallpox vaccine. PMID:27513748

  17. When renewable portfolio standards meet cap-and-trade regulations in the electricity sector: Market interactions, profits implications, and policy redundancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, C.-C., E-mail: cctsao3@ucmerced.edu [School of engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Campbell, J.E., E-mail: ecampbell3@ucmerced.edu [School of engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Chen, Yihsu, E-mail: yihsu.chen@ucmerced.edu [School of engineering, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); Sierra Nevada Research Institute, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States); School of social sciences, humanities, and art, University of California Merced, Merced, CA 95343 (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Emission trading programs (C and T) and renewable portfolio standards (RPS) are two common tools used by policymakers to control GHG emissions in the energy and other energy-intensive sectors. Little is known, however, as to the policy implications resulting from these concurrent regulations, especially given that their underlying policy goals and regulatory schemes are distinct. This paper applies both an analytical model and a computational model to examine the short-run implications of market interactions and policy redundancy. The analytical model is used to generate contestable hypotheses, while the numerical model is applied to consider more realistic market conditions. We have two central findings. First, lowering the CO{sub 2} C and T cap might penalize renewable units, and increasing the RPS level could sometimes benefit coal and oil and make natural gas units worse off. Second, making one policy more stringent would weaken the market incentive, which the other policy relies upon to attain its intended policy target. - Highlights: > Lowering the CO{sub 2} C and T cap might penalize renewable units, and increasing the RPS level could sometimes benefit coal and oil and make natural gas units worse off. > Making one policy more stringent would weaken the market incentive, which the other policy relies upon to attain its intended policy target. > The market-wise average emissions could increase when increasing RPS requirement.

  18. Measuring the strength of interaction between the Ebola fusion peptide and lipid rafts: implications for membrane fusion and virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica S Freitas

    Full Text Available The Ebola fusion peptide (EBO₁₆ is a hydrophobic domain that belongs to the GP2 membrane fusion protein of the Ebola virus. It adopts a helical structure in the presence of mimetic membranes that is stabilized by the presence of an aromatic-aromatic interaction established by Trp8 and Phe12. In spite of its infectious cycle becoming better understood recently, several steps still remain unclear, a lacuna that makes it difficult to develop strategies to block infection. In order to gain insight into the mechanism of membrane fusion, we probed the structure, function and energetics of EBO₁₆ and its mutant W8A, in the absence or presence of different lipid membranes, including isolated domain-resistant membranes (DRM, a good experimental model for lipid rafts. The depletion of cholesterol from living mammalian cells reduced the ability of EBO₁₆ to induce lipid mixing. On the other hand, EBO₁₆ was structurally sensitive to interaction with lipid rafts (DRMs, but the same was not observed for W8A mutant. In agreement with these data, W8A showed a poor ability to promote membrane aggregation in comparison to EBO₁₆. Single molecule AFM experiments showed a high affinity force pattern for the interaction of EBO₁₆ and DRM, which seems to be a complex energetic event as observed by the calorimetric profile. Our study is the first to show a strong correlation between the initial step of Ebola virus infection and cholesterol, thus providing a rationale for Ebola virus proteins being co-localized with lipid-raft domains. In all, the results show how small fusion peptide sequences have evolved to adopt highly specific and strong interactions with membrane domains. Such features suggest these processes are excellent targets for therapeutic and vaccine approaches to viral diseases.

  19. A Meta-Analysis of Factors Influencing the Development of Trust in Automation: Implications for Human-Robot Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    us in social relationships and systems, • our specific expectation that partners in an interaction will carry out their fiduciary obligations and...work, it is important to understand the relationship between the terms autonomy, automation, and robot. Literature and human perception have often...performance), the factors that make up these relationships are of critical importance to the development or degradation of trust in automation. However

  20. Molecular characterization reveals the complexity of previously overlooked coral-exosymbiont interactions and the implications for coral-guild ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, H.; Leray, M.; Magalon, H.; Penin, L.; Gélin, P.; Knowlton, N.; Fauvelot, C.

    2017-01-01

    Several obligate associate crabs and shrimps species may co-occur and interact within a single coral host, leading to patterns of associations that can provide essential ecological services. However, knowledge of the dynamics of interactions in this system is limited, partly because identifying species involved in the network remains challenging. In this study, we assessed the diversity of the decapods involved in exosymbiotic assemblages for juvenile and adult Pocillopora damicornis types α and β on reefs of New Caledonia and Reunion Island. This approach revealed complex patterns of association at regional and local scales with a prevalence of assemblages involving crab-shrimp partnerships. Furthermore, the distinction of two lineages in the snapping shrimp Alpheus lottini complex, rarely recognized in ecological studies, reveals a key role for cryptic diversity in structuring communities of mutualists. The existence of partnerships between species that occurred more commonly than expected by chance suggests an increased advantage for the host or a better adaptation of associated species to local environmental conditions. The consideration of cryptic diversity helps to accurately describe the complexity of interaction webs for diverse systems such as coral reefs, as well as the functional roles of dominant associated species for the persistence of coral populations. PMID:28358026

  1. Man-Machine Interaction Design and Analysis System (MIDAS): Memory Representation and Procedural Implications for Airborne Communication Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corker, Kevin M.; Pisanich, Gregory M.; Lebacqz, Victor (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The Man-Machine Interaction Design and Analysis System (MIDAS) has been under development for the past ten years through a joint US Army and NASA cooperative agreement. MIDAS represents multiple human operators and selected perceptual, cognitive, and physical functions of those operators as they interact with simulated systems. MIDAS has been used as an integrated predictive framework for the investigation of human/machine systems, particularly in situations with high demands on the operators. Specific examples include: nuclear power plant crew simulation, military helicopter flight crew response, and police force emergency dispatch. In recent applications to airborne systems development, MIDAS has demonstrated an ability to predict flight crew decision-making and procedural behavior when interacting with automated flight management systems and Air Traffic Control. In this paper we describe two enhancements to MIDAS. The first involves the addition of working memory in the form of an articulatory buffer for verbal communication protocols and a visuo-spatial buffer for communications via digital datalink. The second enhancement is a representation of multiple operators working as a team. This enhanced model was used to predict the performance of human flight crews and their level of compliance with commercial aviation communication procedures. We show how the data produced by MIDAS compares with flight crew performance data from full mission simulations. Finally, we discuss the use of these features to study communications issues connected with aircraft-based separation assurance.

  2. Cell-matrix mechanical interaction in electrospun polymeric scaffolds for tissue engineering: Implications for scaffold design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kelsey M; Bhaw-Luximon, Archana; Jhurry, Dhanjay

    2017-03-01

    Engineered scaffolds produced by electrospinning of biodegradable polymers offer a 3D, nanofibrous environment with controllable structural, chemical, and mechanical properties that mimic the extracellular matrix of native tissues and have shown promise for a number of tissue engineering applications. The microscale mechanical interactions between cells and electrospun matrices drive cell behaviors including migration and differentiation that are critical to promote tissue regeneration. Recent developments in understanding these mechanical interactions in electrospun environments are reviewed, with emphasis on how fiber geometry and polymer structure impact on the local mechanical properties of scaffolds, how altering the micromechanics cues cell behaviors, and how, in turn, cellular and extrinsic forces exerted on the matrix mechanically remodel an electrospun scaffold throughout tissue development. Techniques used to measure and visualize these mechanical interactions are described. We provide a critical outlook on technological gaps that must be overcome to advance the ability to design, assess, and manipulate the mechanical environment in electrospun scaffolds toward constructs that may be successfully applied in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  3. Regulation of drug-metabolizing enzymes in infectious and inflammatory disease: implications for biologics-small molecule drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Pankajini; Taneja, Guncha; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2017-06-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) are primarily down-regulated during infectious and inflammatory diseases, leading to disruption in the metabolism of small molecule drugs (smds), which are increasingly being prescribed therapeutically in combination with biologics for a number of chronic diseases. The biologics may exert pro- or anti-inflammatory effect, which may in turn affect the expression/activity of DMEs. Thus, patients with infectious/inflammatory diseases undergoing biologic/smd treatment can have complex changes in DMEs due to combined effects of the disease and treatment. Areas covered: We will discuss clinical biologics-SMD interaction and regulation of DMEs during infection and inflammatory diseases. Mechanistic studies will be discussed and consequences on biologic-small molecule combination therapy on disease outcome due to changes in drug metabolism will be highlighted. Expert opinion: The involvement of immunomodulatory mediators in biologic-SMDs is well known. Regulatory guidelines recommend appropriate in vitro or in vivo assessments for possible interactions. The role of cytokines in biologic-SMDs has been documented. However, the mechanisms of drug-drug interactions is much more complex, and is probably multi-factorial. Studies aimed at understanding the mechanism by which biologics effect the DMEs during inflammation/infection are clinically important.

  4. Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the South-East Atlantic: Knowledge Gaps, Planned Observations to Address Them, and Implications for Global Climate Change Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, Jens; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Haywood, J.; Luna, B.; Abel, S.

    2015-01-01

    Southern Africa produces almost a third of the Earth's biomass burning (BB) aerosol particles, yet the fate of these particles and their influence on regional and global climate is poorly understood. Particles lofted into the mid-troposphere are transported westward over the South-East (SE) Atlantic, home to one of the three permanent subtropical Stratocumulus (Sc) cloud decks in the world. The stratocumulus "climate radiators" are critical to the regional and global climate system. They interact with dense layers of BB aerosols that initially overlay the cloud deck, but later subside and are mixed into the clouds. These interactions include adjustments to aerosol-induced solar heating and microphysical effects. As emphasized in the latest IPCC report, the global representation of these aerosol-cloud interaction processes in climate models is one of the largest uncertainty in estimates of future climate. Hence, new observations over the SE Atlantic have significant implications for global climate change scenarios. We discuss the current knowledge of aerosol and cloud property distributions based on satellite observations and sparse suborbital sampling, and describe planned field campaigns in the region. Specifically, we describe the scientific objectives and implementation of the following four synergistic, international research activities aimed at providing a process-level understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions over the SE Atlantic: 1) ORACLES (Observations of Aerosols above Clouds and their interactions), a five-year investigation between 2015 and 2019 with three Intensive Observation Periods (IOP), recently funded by the NASA Earth-Venture Suborbital Program, 2) CLARIFY-2016 (Cloud-Aerosol-Radiation Interactions and Forcing: Year 2016), a comprehensive observational and modeling programme funded by the UK's Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), and supported by the UK Met Office. 3) LASIC (Layered Atlantic Smoke Interactions with Clouds), a funded

  5. Implication of scavenger receptors in the interactions between diesel exhaust particles and immature or mature dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassalle Philippe

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The exposure to pollutants such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP is associated with an increased incidence of respiratory diseases. However, the mechanisms by which DEP have an effect on human health are not completely understood. In addition to their action on macrophages and airway epithelial cells, DEP also modulate the functions of dendritic cells (DC. These professional antigen-presenting cells are able to discriminate unmodified self from non-self thanks to pattern recognition receptors such as the Toll like Receptors (TLR and Scavenger Receptors (SR. SR were originally identified by their ability to bind and internalize modified lipoproteins and microorganisms but also particles and TLR agonists. In this study, we assessed the implication of SR in the effects of DEP associated or not with TLR agonists on monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. For this, we studied the regulation of CD36, CXCL16, LOX-1, SR-A1 and SR-B1 expression on MDDC treated with DEP associated or not with TLR2, 3 and 4 ligands. Then, the capacity of SR ligands (dextran sulfate and maleylated-ovalbumin to block the effects of DEP on the function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-activated DC has been evaluated. Results Our data demonstrate that TLR2 agonists mainly augmented CXCL16, LOX-1 and SR-B1 expression whereas DEP alone had only a weak effect. Interestingly, DEP modulated the action of TLR2 and TLR4 ligands on the expression of LOX-1 and SR-B1. Pretreatment with the SR ligand maleylated-ovalbumin but not dextran sulfate inhibited the endocytosis of DEP by MDDC. Moreover, this SR ligand blocked the effect by DEP at low dose (1 μg/ml on MDDC phenotype (a decrease of CD86 and HLA-DR expression and on the secretion of CXCL10, IL-12 and TNF-α. In contrast, the decrease of IL-12 and CXCL10 secretion and the generation of oxygen metabolite induced by DEP at 10 μg/ml was not affected by SR ligands Conclusion Our results show for the first time that the modulation of

  6. Neuroimmunoendocrine interactions in post-traumatic stress disorder: focus on long-term implications of childhood maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieck, Andréa; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Hartmann do Prado, Carine; Teixeira, Antonio L; Bauer, Moisés E

    2014-01-01

    Childhood maltreatment has been linked to enhanced vulnerability to psychiatric pathologies in adult life, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous works have reported cogent neuroendocrine and immune changes related to adult traumatic events (war survivors, refugees, etc.), but little information is known regarding the impact of early-life stress (ELS) in adult physiology. Here, we review the neuroendocrine and immunological changes commonly observed in PTSD, focusing on the long-term implications of ELS. Childhood maltreatment may lead to altered glucocorticoid (GC) secretion, resulting in hypo- or hypercortisolemia, and reciprocal changes in peripheral leukocyte sensitivity to GC. It is believed that these neuroendocrine changes are correlated with the immune imbalance phenomenon (low-grade inflammation), characterized by increased plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and C-reactive protein. Changes in peripheral lymphocyte subsets are also documented, such as a reduction in regulatory T cells and an expansion of activated T cells. The excess of circulating cytokines may thus interfere with key brain neurotransmitter pathways involved in depression and enhanced risk to cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Recent gene-environment and epigenetic findings have indicated potential molecular mechanisms linking ELS, neuroendocrine and immunity in PTSD. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Molecular interactions of ‘high risk’ human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins: implications for tumour progression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Oishee Chakrabarti; Sudhir Krishna

    2003-04-01

    The aetiology of cervical cancer has been primarily attributed to human papillomaviruses (HPVs). These are characterized by the persistent expression of the two oncogenes, E6 and E7. Experimental studies show that E6 and E7 genes of the high risk HPVs deregulate key cell cycle controls. Recent work has uncovered new cellular partners for these proteins that throw light on many of the pathways and processes in which these viral proteins intervene. This review focuses on the regulation of host proteins by the viral oncoproteins and consequence of such interactions on cell survival, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis.

  8. Implications of Shared Interactive Displays for Work at a Surgery Ward: Coordination, Articulation Work and Context-awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bossen, Claus; Jensen, Lis Witte Kjær

    2008-01-01

    We report on experiences gained from the use at a surgery ward of shared interactive displays to support coordination and communication.  The displays merge large displays, video feed, RFID tag, chat and mobile phones to facilitate better coordination and articulation of work tasks and enhance co...... appropriate meaning to new clues by clinicians and learning new ways of cooperating. Trade-offs had to be made, since work and benefits were differentially redistributed. We propose that computer support for medical work should support flexible appropriation and learning....

  9. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. PMID:26193078

  10. Temperature Dependence of the Stability of Ion Pair Interactions, and its Implications on the Thermostability of Proteins from Thermophiles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SWETHA BIKKINA; AGASTYA P BHATI; SILADITYA PADHI; U DEVA PRIYAKUMAR

    2017-03-01

    An understanding of the determinants of the thermal stability of thermostable proteins is expected to enable design of enzymes that can be employed in industrial biocatalytic processes carried out at high temperatures. A major factor that has been proposed to stabilize thermostable proteins is the high occurrenceof salt bridges. The current study employs free energy calculations to elucidate the thermodynamics of the formation of salt bridge interactions and the temperature dependence, using acetate and methylguanidium ionsas model systems. Three different orientations of the methylguanidinium approaching the carboxylate grouphave been considered for obtaining the free energy profiles. The association of the two ions becomes more favorable with an increase in temperature. The desolvation penalty corresponding to the association of the ionpair is the lowest at high temperatures. The occurrence of bridging water molecules between the ions ensures that the ions are not fully desolvated, and this could provide an explanation for the existence of internal watermolecules in thermostable proteins reported recently. The findings provide a detailed picture of the interactions that make ion pair association at high temperatures a favorable process, and reaffirm the importance of saltbridges in the design of thermostable proteins.

  11. Kinematic classifications of local interacting galaxies: implications for the merger/disk classifications at high-z

    CERN Document Server

    Hung, Chao-Ling; Yuan, Tiantian; Larson, Kirsten L; Casey, Caitlin M; Smith, Howard A; Sanders, D B; Kewley, Lisa J; Hayward, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    The classification of galaxy mergers and isolated disks is key for understanding the relative importance of galaxy interactions and secular evolution during the assembly of galaxies. The kinematic properties of galaxies as traced by emission lines have been used to suggest the existence of a significant population of high-z star-forming galaxies consistent with isolated rotating disks. However, recent studies have cautioned that post-coalescence mergers may also display disk-like kinematics. To further investigate the robustness of merger/disk classifications based on kinematic properties, we carry out a systematic classification of 24 local (U)LIRGs spanning a range of galaxy morphologies: from isolated spiral galaxies, ongoing interacting systems, to fully merged remnants. We artificially redshift the WiFeS observations of these local (U)LIRGs to z=1.5 to make a realistic comparison with observations at high-z, and also to ensure that all galaxies have the same spatial sampling of ~900 pc. Using both kineme...

  12. Atmospheric implication of the hydrogen bonding interaction in hydrated clusters of HONO and dimethylamine in the nighttime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailiang; Du, Lin

    2017-01-25

    In this study, the stability of clusters formed by the trans- and cis-isomers of nitrous acid (HONO) with dimethylamine (DMA) and water has been characterized by density functional theory. The large red shifts of the OH-stretching transitions of both HONO isomers in the clusters indicate the formation of strong hydrogen bonds. At standard temperature and pressure, H2O (acceptor) binds to HONO (donor) with binding energies of -25.0 to -24.6 kJ mol(-1), less stable than those of DMA (acceptor) with HONO (donor) (-50.5 to -45.3 kJ mol(-1)). Our findings indicate that hydration enhances proton transfer from HONO to DMA, and consequently increases the interaction strength (binding energies = -67.8 to -78.6 kJ mol(-1)). The topological and generalized Kohn-Sham energy decomposition confirms strong hydrogen bond interactions. The clustering of HONO with DMA in the atmosphere is negligible as compared to the important H2SO4-DMA clusters.

  13. Microenvironment interactions and B-cell receptor signaling in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Implications for disease pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Hacken, Elisa; Burger, Jan A

    2016-03-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a malignancy of mature B lymphocytes which are highly dependent on interactions with the tissue microenvironment for their survival and proliferation. Critical components of the microenvironment are monocyte-derived nurselike cells (NLCs), mesenchymal stromal cells, T cells and NK cells, which communicate with CLL cells through a complex network of adhesion molecules, chemokine receptors, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family members, and soluble factors. (Auto-) antigens and/or autonomous mechanisms activate the B-cell receptor (BCR) and its downstream signaling cascade in secondary lymphatic tissues, playing a central pathogenetic role in CLL. Novel small molecule inhibitors, including the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase delta (PI3Kδ) inhibitor idelalisib, target BCR signaling and have become the most successful new therapeutics in this disease. We here review the cellular and molecular characteristics of CLL cells, and discuss the cellular components and key pathways involved in the cross-talk with their microenvironment. We also highlight the relevant novel treatment strategies, focusing on immunomodulatory agents and BCR signaling inhibitors and how these treatments disrupt CLL-microenvironment interactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tumor Microenvironment Regulation of Cancer Cell Survival, Metastasis, Inflammation, and Immune Surveillance edited by Peter Ruvolo and Gregg L. Semenza. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. AM-251 and rimonabant act as direct antagonists at mu-opioid receptors: implications for opioid/cannabinoid interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seely, Kathryn A; Brents, Lisa K; Franks, Lirit N; Rajasekaran, Maheswari; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Fantegrossi, William E; Prather, Paul L

    2012-10-01

    Mu-opioid and CB1-cannabinoid agonists produce analgesia; however, adverse effects limit use of drugs in both classes. Additive or synergistic effects resulting from concurrent administration of low doses of mu- and CB1-agonists may produce analgesia with fewer side effects. Synergism potentially results from interaction between mu-opioid receptors (MORs) and CB1 receptors (CB1Rs). AM-251 and rimonabant are CB1R antagonist/inverse agonists employed to validate opioid-cannabinoid interactions, presumed to act selectively at CB1Rs. Therefore, the potential for direct action of these antagonists at MORs is rarely considered. This study determined if AM-251 and/or rimonabant directly bind and modulate the function of MORs. Surprisingly, AM-251 and rimonabant, but not a third CB1R inverse agonist AM-281, bind with mid-nanomolar affinity to human MORs with a rank order of affinity (K(i)) of AM-251 (251 nM) > rimonabant (652 nM) > AM281 (2135 nM). AM-251 and rimonabant, but not AM-281, also competitively antagonize morphine induced G-protein activation in CHO-hMOR cell homogenates (K(b) = 719 or 1310 nM, respectively). AM-251 and rimonabant block morphine inhibition of cAMP production, while only AM-251 elicits cAMP rebound in CHO-hMOR cells chronically exposed to morphine. AM-251 and rimonabant (10 mg/kg) attenuate morphine analgesia, whereas the same dose of AM-281 produces little effect. Therefore, in addition to high CB1R affinity, AM-251 and rimonabant bind to MORs with mid-nanomolar affinity and at higher doses may affect morphine analgesia via direct antagonism at MORs. Such CB1-independent of these antagonists effects may contribute to reported inconsistencies when CB1/MOR interactions are examined via pharmacological methods in CB1-knockout versus wild-type mice.

  15. Long-lived interaction between hydrothermal and magmatic fluids in the Soultz-sous-Forêts granitic system (Rhine Graben, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardien, Véronique; Rabinowicz, Michel; Vigneresse, Jean-Louis; Dubois, Michel; Boulvais, Philippe; Martini, Rossana

    2016-03-01

    thus concentrated in these vertical channels. Eventually, when the channels intersected the top of the crack network, water boiling caused the formation of primary inclusions. At the same temperature, the saline magmatic waters, which were denser than the meteoric waters, initiated thermohaline convection with the buoyant "cold" hydrothermal water layer. This mechanism can explain the mixing of surface and deep-seated fluids in the same primary inclusions trapped during the crystallization of magmatic minerals. This study, which separately considers fluid-rock interactions at the level of successive mineral facies, brings new insights into how fluids may be different, their origin and composition, and depending on tectono-thermal conditions, bears implications for eventual ore forming processes.

  16. Chandra Observations of the Lensing Cluster EMSS 1358+6245: Implications for Self-interacting Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabadjis, J. S.; Bautz, M. W.; Garmire, G. P.

    2002-06-01

    We present Chandra observations of EMSS 1358+6245, a relaxed cooling flow cluster of galaxies at z=0.328. We employ a new deprojection technique to construct temperature, gas, and dark matter profiles. We confirm the presence of cool gas in the cluster core, and our deprojected temperature profile for the hot component is isothermal over 30kpcconfidence limit) on the size of any constant-density core. We compare this result to recent simulations and place a conservative upper limit on the dark matter particle-scattering cross section of 0.1 cm2 g-1. This limit implies that the cross section must be velocity-dependent if the relatively shallow core mass profiles of dwarf galaxies are a direct result of dark matter self-interaction.

  17. Terrace-width distributions of touching steps: Modification of the fermion analogy with implications for measuring step-step interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our results show that the generalized Wigner distribution with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter (ϱ) indicates an effective attraction between steps. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  18. Interactions of mussel-inspired polymeric nanoparticles with gastric mucin: Implications for gastro-retentive drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoqrot, Suhair; Hasan, Lina; Alsadi, Aya; Hamed, Rania; Tarawneh, Ola

    2017-08-01

    Mussel-inspired polydopamine (pD) coatings have several unique characteristics such as durability, versatility, and robustness. In this study, we have designed pD-coated nanoparticles (NPs) of methoxy polyethylene glycol-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL@pD) as prospective nanoscale mucoadhesive platforms for gastro-retentive drug delivery. Successful pD coating on the NPs was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Mucoadhesion of pD-coated NPs was investigated in vitro using commercially available mucin under stomach lumen-mimetic conditions. Mucin-NP interactions were monitored by dynamic light scattering, which showed a significant change in particle size distribution of pD-coated NPs at mucin/NP ratios of 1:1, 1:2, and 1:4w/w. Turbidity measurements indicated the formation of large mucin-NP aggregates causing a significant increase in turbidity at mucin/NP ratios of 2:1 and 4:1w/w. pD-coated NPs exhibited a significantly higher mucin adsorption ability compared to uncoated NPs at mucin/NP ratios of 1:4, 1:2, and 1:1w/w. Zeta potential measurements demonstrated that mucin-pD-coated NP interactions were not electrostatic in nature. An ex vivo wash-off test conducted using excised sheep stomach revealed that 78% of pD-coated NPs remained attached to the mucosa after 8h of incubation, compared to only 33% of uncoated NPs. In vitro release of rifampicin, used as a model drug, showed a similar controlled release profile from both pD-coated and uncoated NPs. Our results serve to expand the versatility of mussel-inspired coatings to the design of mucoadhesive nanoscale vehicles for oral drug delivery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Perillyl alcohol: Dynamic interactions with the lipid bilayer and implications for long-term inhalational chemotherapy for gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Orlando da Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gliomas display a high degree of intratumor heterogeneity, including changes in physiological parameters and lipid composition of the plasma membrane, which may contribute to the development of drug resistance. Biophysical interactions between therapeutic agents and the lipid components at the outer plasma membrane interface are critical for effective drug uptake. Amphipathic molecules such as perillyl alcohol (POH have a high partition coefficient and generally lead to altered lipid acyl tail dynamics near the lipid-water interface, impacting the lipid bilayer structure and transport dynamics. We therefore hypothesized that glioma cells may display enhanced sensitivity to POH-induced apoptosis due to plasma membrane alterations, while in non-transformed cells, POH may be expelled through thermal agitation. Methods: Interactions between POH and the plasma membrane was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. In this phase I/II trial, we set up to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of long-term (up to 5 years daily intranasal administration of POH in a cohort of 19 patients with low-grade glioma (LGG. Importantly, in a series of clinical studies previously published by our group, we have successfully established that intranasal delivery of POH to patients with malignant gliomas is a viable and effective therapeutic strategy. Results: POH altered the plasma membrane potential of the lipid bilayer of gliomas and prolonged intranasal administration of POH in a cohort of patients with LGG halted disease progression with virtually no toxicity. Conclusion: Altogether, the results suggest that POH-induced alterations of the plasma membrane might be contributing to its therapeutic efficacy in preventing LGG progression.

  20. Insect-plant-pathogen interactions as shaped by future climate: effects on biology, distribution and implications for agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Dáder, Beatriz; Vassiliadis, Simone; Fereres, Alberto

    2017-08-26

    Carbon dioxide (CO2 ) is the main anthropogenic gas which has drastically increased since the industrial revolution, and current concentrations are projected to double by the end of this century. As a consequence, elevated CO2 is expected to alter the earths' climate, increase global temperatures and change weather patterns. This is likely to have both direct and indirect impacts on plants, insect pests, plant pathogens and their distribution, and is therefore problematic for the security of future food production. This review summarises the latest findings and highlights current knowledge gaps regarding the influence of climate change on insect, plant and pathogen interactions with an emphasis on agriculture and food production. Direct effects of climate change, including increased CO2 concentration, temperature, patterns of rainfall and severe weather events that impact insects (namely vectors of plant pathogens) are discussed. Elevated CO2 and temperature, together with plant pathogen infection, can considerably change plant biochemistry and therefore plant defence responses. This can have substantial consequences on insect fecundity, feeding rates, survival, population size, and dispersal. Generally, changes in host plant quality due to elevated CO2 (e.g., carbon to nitrogen ratios in C3 plants) negatively affect insect pests. However, compensatory feeding, increased population size and distribution have also been reported for some agricultural insect pests. This underlines the importance of additional research on more targeted, individual insect-plant scenarios at specific locations to fully understand the impact of a changing climate on insect-plant-pathogen interactions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. An Epidemiological Study of Concomitant Use of Chinese Medicine and Antipsychotics in Schizophrenic Patients: Implication for Herb-Drug Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Tan, Qing-Rong; Tong, Yao; Wang, Xue-Yi; Wang, Huai-Hai; Ho, Lai-Ming; Wong, Hei Kiu; Feng, Yi-Bin; Wang, Di; Ng, Roger; McAlonan, Grainne M.; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Wong, Vivian Taam

    2011-01-01

    Background Herb-drug interactions are an important issue in drug safety and clinical practice. The aim of this epidemiological study was to characterize associations of clinical outcomes with concomitant herbal and antipsychotic use in patients with schizophrenia. Methods and Findings In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, 1795 patients with schizophrenia who were randomly selected from 17 psychiatric hospitals in China were interviewed face-to-face using a structured questionnaire. Association analyses were conducted to examine correlates between Chinese medicine (CM) use and demographic, clinical variables, antipsychotic medication mode, and clinical outcomes. The prevalence of concomitant CM and antipsychotic treatment was 36.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 34.2%–38.6%]. Patients using concomitant CM had a significantly greater chance of improved outcomes than non-CM use (61.1% vs. 34.3%, OR = 3.44, 95% CI 2.80–4.24). However, a small but significant number of patients treated concomitantly with CM had a greater risk of developing worse outcomes (7.2% vs. 4.4%, OR = 2.06, 95% CI 2.06–4.83). Significant predictors for concomitant CM treatment-associated outcomes were residence in urban areas, paranoid psychosis, and exceeding 3 months of CM use. Herbal medicine regimens containing Radix Bupleuri, Fructus Gardenia, Fructus Schisandrae, Radix Rehmanniae, Akebia Caulis, and Semen Plantaginis in concomitant use with quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzepine were associated with nearly 60% of the risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusions Concomitant herbal and antipsychotic treatment could produce either beneficial or adverse clinical effects in schizophrenic population. Potential herb-drug pharmacokinetic interactions need to be further evaluated. PMID:21359185

  2. An epidemiological study of concomitant use of Chinese medicine and antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients: implication for herb-drug interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Jin Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herb-drug interactions are an important issue in drug safety and clinical practice. The aim of this epidemiological study was to characterize associations of clinical outcomes with concomitant herbal and antipsychotic use in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In this retrospective, cross-sectional study, 1795 patients with schizophrenia who were randomly selected from 17 psychiatric hospitals in China were interviewed face-to-face using a structured questionnaire. Association analyses were conducted to examine correlates between Chinese medicine (CM use and demographic, clinical variables, antipsychotic medication mode, and clinical outcomes. The prevalence of concomitant CM and antipsychotic treatment was 36.4% [95% confidence interval (95% CI 34.2%-38.6%]. Patients using concomitant CM had a significantly greater chance of improved outcomes than non-CM use (61.1% vs. 34.3%, OR = 3.44, 95% CI 2.80-4.24. However, a small but significant number of patients treated concomitantly with CM had a greater risk of developing worse outcomes (7.2% vs. 4.4%, OR = 2.06, 95% CI 2.06-4.83. Significant predictors for concomitant CM treatment-associated outcomes were residence in urban areas, paranoid psychosis, and exceeding 3 months of CM use. Herbal medicine regimens containing Radix Bupleuri, Fructus Gardenia, Fructus Schisandrae, Radix Rehmanniae, Akebia Caulis, and Semen Plantaginis in concomitant use with quetiapine, clozapine, and olanzepine were associated with nearly 60% of the risk of adverse outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant herbal and antipsychotic treatment could produce either beneficial or adverse clinical effects in schizophrenic population. Potential herb-drug pharmacokinetic interactions need to be further evaluated.

  3. A systematic review of interactive multimedia interventions to promote children's communication with health professionals: implications for communicating with overweight children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaff, Carol; Glazebrook, Cris; Wharrad, Heather

    2014-01-22

    Interactive multimedia is an emerging technology that is being used to facilitate interactions between patients and health professionals. The purpose of this review was to identify and evaluate the impact of multimedia interventions (MIs), delivered in the context of paediatric healthcare, in order to inform the development of a MI to promote the communication of dietetic messages with overweight preadolescent children. Of particular interest were the effects of these MIs on child engagement and participation in treatment, and the subsequent effect on health-related treatment outcomes. An extensive search of 12 bibliographic databases was conducted in April 2012. Studies were included if: one or more child-participant was 7 to 11-years-of-age; a MI was used to improve health-related behaviour; child-participants were diagnosed with a health condition and were receiving treatment for that condition at the time of the study. Data describing study characteristics and intervention effects on communication, satisfaction, knowledge acquisition, changes in self-efficacy, healthcare utilisation, and health outcomes were extracted and summarised using qualitative and quantitative methods. A total of 14 controlled trials, published between 1997 and 2006 met the selection criteria. Several MIs had the capacity to facilitate engagement between the child and a clinician, but only one sought to utilise the MI to improve communication between the child and health professional. In spite of concerns over the quality of some studies and small study populations, MIs were found useful in educating children about their health, and they demonstrated potential to improve children's health-related self-efficacy, which could make them more able partners in face-to-face communications with health professionals. The findings of this review suggest that MIs have the capacity to support preadolescent child-clinician communication, but further research in this field is needed. Particular

  4. Evolution of Xylan Substitution Patterns in Gymnosperms and Angiosperms: Implications for Xylan Interaction with Cellulose1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An; Gomes, Thiago C.F.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between cellulose and xylan is important for the load-bearing secondary cell wall of flowering plants. Based on the precise, evenly spaced pattern of acetyl and glucuronosyl (MeGlcA) xylan substitutions in eudicots, we recently proposed that an unsubstituted face of xylan in a 2-fold helical screw can hydrogen bond to the hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose microfibrils. In gymnosperm cell walls, any role for xylan is unclear, and glucomannan is thought to be the important cellulose-binding polysaccharide. Here, we analyzed xylan from the secondary cell walls of the four gymnosperm lineages (Conifer, Gingko, Cycad, and Gnetophyta). Conifer, Gingko, and Cycad xylan lacks acetylation but is modified by arabinose and MeGlcA. Interestingly, the arabinosyl substitutions are located two xylosyl residues from MeGlcA, which is itself placed precisely on every sixth xylosyl residue. Notably, the Gnetophyta xylan is more akin to early-branching angiosperms and eudicot xylan, lacking arabinose but possessing acetylation on alternate xylosyl residues. All these precise substitution patterns are compatible with gymnosperm xylan binding to hydrophilic surfaces of cellulose. Molecular dynamics simulations support the stable binding of 2-fold screw conifer xylan to the hydrophilic face of cellulose microfibrils. Moreover, the binding of multiple xylan chains to adjacent planes of the cellulose fibril stabilizes the interaction further. Our results show that the type of xylan substitution varies, but an even pattern of xylan substitution is maintained among vascular plants. This suggests that 2-fold screw xylan binds hydrophilic faces of cellulose in eudicots, early-branching angiosperm, and gymnosperm cell walls. PMID:27325663

  5. Zooplanktivory and nutrient regeneration by invertebrate (Mysis relicta) and vertebrate (Oncorhynchus nerka) planktivores: Implications for trophic interactions in oligotrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipps, S.R.; Bennett, D.H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated zooplanktivory and nutrient regeneration by the opossum shrimp Mysis relicta and kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to assess the relative roles of these planktivores in oligotrophic food webs. Using bioenergetic models and clearance rate estimates, we quantified phosphorus (P) excretion rates and consumption of cladoceran prey by Mysis and kokanees in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho, from 1995 to 1996. Consumption of cladoceran prey by Mysis was 186 kg ?? ha-1 ?? year-1, whereas consumption by kokanees was less than one quarter as much, at 45 kg ?? ha-1 ?? year-1. Similarly, Mysis excreted approximately 0.250 kg P ?? ha-1 ?? year-1 during nighttime migrations into the upper water column, whereas P excretion by kokanees was less than one third as much, at approximately 0.070 kg P ?? ha-1 ?? year-1. On a volumetric basis, nocturnal excretion by Mysis ranged from 0.002 to 0.007 ??g P ?? L-1 ?? d-1 and accounted for less than 1% of the soluble reactive P typically measured in the upper water column of the lake. Hence, nutrient recycling by Mysis may be limited in the upper water column because of the nocturnal feeding habitats that constrain Mysis to deeper strata for much of the day. In spring and autumn months, low abundance of cladoceran prey coincided with high seasonal energy requirements of the Mysis population that were linked to timing of annual Mysis brood release and abundance of age-0 Mysis. Predation by Mysis accounted for 5-70% of daily cladoceran standing stock, supporting the notion that seasonal availability of cladocerans may be regulated by Mysis predation. In lakes where Mysis experience little predation mortality, they likely play a dominant role in food web interactions (e.g., trophic cascades) relative to planktivorous fishes. Biotic mechanisms, such as successful predator-avoidance behavior, omnivorous feeding habits, and seasonal variation in Mysisbiomass, enhance the ability of Mysis to influence food web interactions from an intermediate

  6. Isolated CyaA-RTX subdomain from Bordetella pertussis: Structural and functional implications for its interaction with target erythrocyte membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Riyaz Ahmad; Meetum, Kanungsuk; Suvarnapunya, Kittipong; Katzenmeier, Gerd; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-10-01

    The 126-kDa Bordetella pertussis CyaA-hemolysin (CyaA-Hly) was previously expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble precursor that can be acylated to retain hemolytic activity. Here, we investigated structural and functional characteristics of a ∼100-kDa isolated RTX (Repeat-in-ToXin) subdomain (CyaA-RTX) of CyaA-Hly. Initially, we succeeded in producing a large amount with high purity of the His-tagged CyaA-RTX fragment and in establishing the interaction of acylated CyaA-Hly with sheep red blood cell (sRBC) membranes by immuno-localization. Following pre-incubation of sRBCs with non-acylated CyaA-Hly or with the CyaA-RTX fragment that itself produces no hemolytic activity, there was a dramatic decrease in CyaA-Hly-induced hemolysis. When CyaA-RTX was pre-incubated with anti-CyaA-RTX antisera, the capability of CyaA-RTX to neutralize the hemolytic activity of CyaA-Hly was greatly decreased. A homology-based model of the 100-kDa CyaA-RTX subdomain revealed a loop structure in Linker II sharing sequence similarity to human WW domains. Sequence alignment of Linker II with the human WW-domain family revealed highly conserved aromatic residues important for protein-protein interactions. Altogether, our present study demonstrates that the recombinant CyaA-RTX subdomain retains its functionality with respect to binding to target erythrocyte membranes and the WW-homologous region in Linker II conceivably serves as a functional segment required for receptor-binding activity.

  7. Interactions and potential implications of Plasmodium falciparum-hookworm coinfection in different age groups in south-central Cote d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie A Righetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given the widespread distribution of Plasmodium and helminth infections, and similarities of ecological requirements for disease transmission, coinfection is a common phenomenon in sub-Saharan Africa and elsewhere in the tropics. Interactions of Plasmodium falciparum and soil-transmitted helminths, including immunological responses and clinical outcomes of the host, need further scientific inquiry. Understanding the complex interactions between these parasitic infections is of public health relevance considering that control measures targeting malaria and helminthiases are going to scale. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional survey was carried out in April 2010 in infants, young school-aged children, and young non-pregnant women in south-central Côte d'Ivoire. Stool, urine, and blood samples were collected and subjected to standardized, quality-controlled methods. Soil-transmitted helminth infections were identified and quantified in stool. Finger-prick blood samples were used to determine Plasmodium spp. infection, parasitemia, and hemoglobin concentrations. Iron, vitamin A, riboflavin, and inflammation status were measured in venous blood samples. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Multivariate regression analysis revealed specific association between infection and demographic, socioeconomic, host inflammatory and nutritional factors. Non-pregnant women infected with P. falciparum had significantly lower odds of hookworm infection, whilst a significant positive association was found between both parasitic infections in 6- to 8-year-old children. Coinfected children had lower odds of anemia and iron deficiency than their counterparts infected with P. falciparum alone. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that interaction between P. falciparum and light-intensity hookworm infections vary with age and, in school-aged children, may benefit the host through preventing iron deficiency anemia. This observation warrants additional investigation to

  8. Basalt-Limestone and Andesite-Limestone Interaction in the Arc Crust - Implications for Volcanic Degassing of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, L. B.; Dasgupta, R.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanically emitted CO2 is generally mantle-derived, but high degassing rates at some arcs (e.g. Merapi [1] and Colli Albani Volcanic District [2]) are thought to be affected by magma-carbonate interaction in the upper plate. However, the effects of depth, temperature, and composition on this process are poorly known. We experimentally simulated magma (50%)-limestone (50%) wallrock interactions at 0.5-1.0 GPa, 1100-1200 °C using pure calcite and a hydrous (~3-5 wt.% H2O) melt (basalt, andesite, or dacite). At 1.0 GPa, 1200 °C starting melts are superliquidus, whereas in the presence of calcite, Ca-rich cpx ± Ca-scapolite are produced. With increasing T, basalt-calcite interaction causes the melt, on a volatile-free basis, to become silica-poor and Ca-rich with alumina decreasing as cpx becomes more CaTs-rich. The same trend is seen with all starting melt compositions as P decreases at a constant T (1200 °C), producing melts similar to ultracalcic (CaO/Al2O3>>1) melt inclusions found in arc settings. Shifting from basalt to andesite has little effect on SiO2 and CaO of the reacted melt (e.g. 37 wt.% SiO2, 42 wt.% CaO at 0.5 GPa, 1200 °C), whereas Al2O3 of andesite-derived reacted melt is lower, likely a result of lower alumina in the starting andesite. Wall-rock calcite consumption is observed to increase with increasing T, decreasing P, and increasing melt XSiO2. At 0.5 GPa between 1100 and 1200 °C, our basalt experiments yield carbonate assimilation from 22 to 48 wt.%. This decreases to 20 wt.% at 1.0 GPa, 1200 °C, whereas an andesitic composition assimilates 59 to 52 wt.% from 0.5 to 1.0 GPa at 1200 °C. The higher assimilation in andesite-added runs at high-T is because of lower silicate liquidus as evidenced by lower modal proportion or absence of cpx ± scapolite. Using a magma flux rate estimated for Mt. Vesuvius [3], we obtain a CO2 outflux for a single such volcano experiencing arc magma-calcite reaction [4] of at least 2-4% of the present

  9. Implication of the bacterial endosymbiont Rickettsia spp. in interactions of the whitefly Bemisia tabaci with tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliot, Adi; Cilia, Michelle; Czosnek, Henryk; Ghanim, Murad

    2014-05-01

    Numerous animal and plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors in a persistent, circulative manner. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly Bemisia tabaci. We report here that infection with Rickettsia spp., a facultative endosymbiont of whiteflies, altered TYLCV-B. tabaci interactions. A B. tabaci strain infected with Rickettsia acquired more TYLCV from infected plants, retained the virus longer, and exhibited nearly double the transmission efficiency compared to an uninfected B. tabaci strain with the same genetic background. Temporal and spatial antagonistic relationships were discovered between Rickettsia and TYLCV within the whitefly. In different time course experiments, the levels of virus and Rickettsia within the insect were inversely correlated. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of Rickettsia-infected midguts provided evidence for niche exclusion between Rickettsia and TYLCV. In particular, high levels of the bacterium in the midgut resulted in higher virus concentrations in the filter chamber, a favored site for virus translocation along the transmission pathway, whereas low levels of Rickettsia in the midgut resulted in an even distribution of the virus. Taken together, these results indicate that Rickettsia, by infecting the midgut, increases TYLCV transmission efficacy, adding further insights into the complex association between persistent plant viruses, their insect vectors, and microorganism tenants that reside within these insects. Interest in bacterial endosymbionts in arthropods and many aspects of their host biology in agricultural and human health systems has been increasing. A recent and relevant studied example is the influence of Wolbachia on dengue virus transmission by mosquitoes. In parallel with our recently studied whitefly-Rickettsia-TYLCV system, other studies have shown that dengue virus levels in the mosquito vector are inversely correlated with bacterial load. Our work

  10. Genetic variation in Staphylococcus aureus surface and immune evasion genes is lineage associated: implications for vaccine design and host-pathogen interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Jodi A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background S. aureus is a coloniser and pathogen of humans and mammals. Whole genome sequences of 58 strains of S. aureus in the public domain and data from multi-strain microarrays were compared to assess variation in the sequence of proteins known or putatively interacting with host. Results These included 24 surface proteins implicated in adhesion (ClfA, ClfB, Cna, Eap, Ebh, EbpS, FnBPA, FnBPB, IsaB, IsdA, IsdB, IsdH, SasB, SasC, SasD, SasF, SasG, SasH, SasK, SdrC, SdrD, SdrE, Spa and SraP and 13 secreted proteins implicated in immune response evasion (Coa, Ecb, Efb, Emp, EsaC, EsxA, EssC, FLIPr, FLIPr like, Sbi, SCIN-B, SCIN-C, VWbp located on the stable core genome. Many surface protein genes were missing or truncated, unlike immune evasion genes, and several distinct variants were identified. Domain variants were lineage specific. Unrelated lineages often possess the same sequence variant domains proving that horizontal transfer and recombination has contributed to their evolution. Surprisingly, sequenced strains from four animal S. aureus strains had surface and immune evasion proteins remarkably similar to those found in human strains, yet putative targets of these proteins vary substantially between different hosts. This suggests these proteins are not essential for virulence. However, the most variant protein domains were the putative functional regions and there is biological evidence that variants can be functional, arguing they do play a role. Conclusion Surface and immune evasion genes are candidates for S. aureus vaccines, and their distribution and functionality is key. Vaccines should contain cocktails of antigens representing all variants or they will not protect against naturally occurring S. aureus populations.

  11. Interaction between the 5-HT system and the basal ganglia: Functional implication and therapeutic perspective in Parkinson’s disease

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    Cristina eMiguelez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT has a multifaceted function in the modulation of information processing through the activation of multiple receptor families, including G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes (5-HT1, 5-HT2, 5-HT4-7 and ligand-gated ion channels (5-HT3. The largest population of serotonergic neurons is located in the midbrain, specifically in the raphe nuclei. Although the medial and dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN share common projecting areas, in the basal ganglia (BG nuclei serotonergic innervations come mainly from the DRN. The BG are a highly organized network of subcortical nuclei composed of the striatum (caudate and putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN, internal and external globus pallidus (or entopeduncular nucleus in rodents, GPi/EP and GPe and substantia nigra (pars compacta, SNc, and pars reticulata, SNr. The BG are part of the cortico-BG-thalamic circuits, which play a role in many functions like motor control, emotion, and cognition and are critically involved in diseases such as Parkinson’s disease. This review provides an overview of serotonergic modulation of the BG at the functional level and a discussion of how this interaction may be relevant to treating Parkinson’s disease and the motor complications induced by chronic treatment with L-DOPA.

  12. Post-glacial landform evolution in the middle Satluj River valley, India: Implications towards understanding the climate tectonic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shubhra; Bartarya, S. K.; Marh, B. S.

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary landform evolution in monsoon-dominated middle Satluj valley is reconstructed using the fragmentary records of fluvial terraces, alluvial fans, debris flows, paleo-flood deposits, and epigenetic gorges. Based on detailed field mapping, alluvial stratigraphy, sedimentology and optical chronology, two phases of fluvial aggradations are identified. The older aggradation event dated between ˜13 and 11 ka (early-Holocene), occurred in the pre-existing topography carved by multiple events of erosion and incision. Climatically, the event corresponds to the post-glacial strengthened Indian summer monsoon (ISM). The younger aggradation event dated between ˜5 and 0.4 ka (mid- to late-Holocene), was during the declining phase of ISM. The terrain witnessed high magnitude floods during transitional climate (˜6.5-7 ka). The fluvial sedimentation was punctuated by short-lived debris flows and alluvial fans during the LGM (weak ISM), early to mid-Holocene transition climate and mid- to late-Holocene declining ISM. Based on the terrace morphology, an event of relatively enhanced surface uplift is inferred after late Holocene. The present study suggests that post-glacial landforms in the middle Satluj valley owe their genesis to the interplay between the climate variability and local/regional tectonic interactions.

  13. Comparative internal kinematics of the HII regions in interacting and isolated galaxies: implications for massive star formation modes

    CERN Document Server

    Zaragoza-Cardiel, Javier; Font, Joan; García-Lorenzo, Begoña; Camps-Fariña, Artemi; Fathi, Kambiz; James, Philip A; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Barrera-Ballesteros, Jorge; Cisternas, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    We have observed 10 interacting galaxy pairs using the Fabry-Perot interferometer GH$\\alpha$FaS (Galaxy H$\\alpha$ Fabry-Perot system) on the $4.2\\rm{m}$ William Herschel Telescope (WHT) at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma. We present here the H$\\alpha$ surface brightness, velocity and velocity dispersion maps for the 10 systems we have not previously observed using this technique, as well as the physical properties (sizes, H$\\alpha$ luminosities and velocity dispersion) of 1259 HII regions from the full sample. We also derive the physical properties of 1054 HII regions in a sample of 28 isolated galaxies observed with the same instrument in order to compare the two populations of HII regions. We find a population of the brightest HII regions for which the scaling relations, for example the relation between the H$\\alpha$ luminosity and the radius, are clearly distinct from the relations for the regions of lower luminosity. The regions in this bright population are more frequent in the inte...

  14. QCD prediction of jet structure in 2D trigger-associated momentum correlations and implications for multiple parton interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Trainor, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    The expression "multiple parton interactions" (MPI) denotes a conjectured QCD mechanism representing contributions from secondary (semi)hard parton scattering to the transverse azimuth region (TR) of jet-triggered p-p collisions. MPI is an object of underlying-event (UE) studies that consider variation of TR $n_{ch}$ or $p_t$ yields relative to a trigger condition (leading hadron or jet $p_t$). An alternative approach is 2D trigger-associated (TA) correlations on hadron transverse momentum $p_t$ or rapidity $y_t$ in which all hadrons from all p-p events are included. Based on a two-component (soft+hard) model (TCM) of TA correlations a jet-related TA hard component is isolated. Contributions to the hard component from the triggered dijet and from secondary dijets (MPI) can be distinguished, including their azimuth dependence relative to the trigger direction. Measured $e^+$-$e^-$ and p-\\=p fragmentation functions and a minimum-bias jet spectrum from 200 GeV p-\\=p collisions are convoluted to predict the 2D ha...

  15. Interacting effects of latitude, mass, age, and sex on winter survival of Surf Scoters (Melanitta perspicillata): Implications for differential migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Esler, Daniel N.; Iverson, Samuel A.; Ward, David; Boyd, Sean; Kirk, Molly; Lewis, Tyler L.; VanStratt, Corey S.; Brodhead, Katherine M.; Hupp, Jerry; Schmutz, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    We quantified variation in winter survival of Surf Scoters (Melanitta perspicillata (L., 1758)) across nearly 30° of latitude on the Pacific coast of North America to evaluate potential effects on winter distributions, including observed differential distributions of age and sex classes. We monitored fates of 297 radio-marked Surf Scoters at three study sites: (1) near the northern periphery of their wintering range in southeast Alaska, USA, (2) the range core in British Columbia, Canada, and (3) the southern periphery in Baja California, Mexico. We detected 34 mortalities and determined that survival averaged lower at the range peripheries than in the range core, was lower during mid-winter than during late winter at all sites, and was positively correlated with body mass within locations. Although neither age nor sex class had direct effects, mass effects led to differential survival patterns among classes. When simultaneously incorporating these interacting influences, adult males of mean mass for their location had highest survival at the northern range periphery in Alaska, whereas adult females and juveniles had higher survival at the range core and the southern periphery. Our observations help to explain patterns of differential migration and distribution reported for this species and highlight seasonal periods (mid-winter) and locations (range peripheries) of elevated levels of mortality for demographically important age–sex classes (adult females).

  16. Unique somatic and malignant expression patterns implicate PIWI-interacting RNAs in cancer-type specific biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Victor D.; Vucic, Emily A.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Hubaux, Roland; Enfield, Katey S.S.; Pikor, Larissa A.; Becker-Santos, Daiana D.; Brown, Carolyn J.; Lam, Stephen; Lam, Wan L.

    2015-01-01

    Human PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are known to be expressed in germline cells, functionally silencing LINEs and SINEs. Their expression patterns in somatic tissues are largely uncharted. We analyzed 6,260 human piRNA transcriptomes derived from non-malignant and tumour tissues from 11 organs. We discovered that only 273 of the 20,831 known piRNAs are expressed in somatic non-malignant tissues. However, expression patterns of these piRNAs were able to distinguish tissue-of-origin. A total of 522 piRNAs are expressed in corresponding tumour tissues, largely distinguishing tumour from non-malignant tissues in a cancer-type specific manner. Most expressed piRNAs mapped to known transcripts, contrary to “piRNA clusters” reported in germline cells. We showed that piRNA expression can delineate clinical features, such as histological subgroups, disease stages, and survival. PiRNAs common to many cancer types might represent a core gene-set that facilitates cancer growth, while piRNAs unique to individual cancer types likely contribute to cancer-specific biology. PMID:26013764

  17. Interaction of Branch Migration Translocases with the Holliday Junction-resolving Enzyme and Their Implications in Holliday Junction Resolution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Cristina; Suzuki, Yuki; Marchisone, Chiara; Carrasco, Begoña; Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Takeyasu, Kunio; Alonso, Juan C.; Ayora, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Double-strand break repair involves the formation of Holliday junction (HJ) structures that need to be resolved to promote correct replication and chromosomal segregation. The molecular mechanisms of HJ branch migration and/or resolution are poorly characterized in Firmicutes. Genetic evidence suggested that the absence of the RuvAB branch migration translocase and the RecU HJ resolvase is synthetically lethal in Bacillus subtilis, whereas a recU recG mutant was viable. In vitro RecU, which is restricted to bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, binds HJs with high affinity. In this work we found that RecU does not bind simultaneously with RecG to a HJ. RuvB by interacting with RecU bound to the central region of HJ DNA, loses its nonspecific association with DNA, and re-localizes with RecU to form a ternary complex. RecU cannot stimulate the ATPase or branch migration activity of RuvB. The presence of RuvB·ATPγS greatly stimulates RecU-mediated HJ resolution, but the addition of ATP or RuvA abolishes this stimulatory effect. A RecU·HJ·RuvAB complex might be formed. RecU does not increase the RuvAB activities but slightly inhibits them. PMID:24770420

  18. Interaction of branch migration translocases with the Holliday junction-resolving enzyme and their implications in Holliday junction resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañas, Cristina; Suzuki, Yuki; Marchisone, Chiara; Carrasco, Begoña; Freire-Benéitez, Verónica; Takeyasu, Kunio; Alonso, Juan C; Ayora, Silvia

    2014-06-20

    Double-strand break repair involves the formation of Holliday junction (HJ) structures that need to be resolved to promote correct replication and chromosomal segregation. The molecular mechanisms of HJ branch migration and/or resolution are poorly characterized in Firmicutes. Genetic evidence suggested that the absence of the RuvAB branch migration translocase and the RecU HJ resolvase is synthetically lethal in Bacillus subtilis, whereas a recU recG mutant was viable. In vitro RecU, which is restricted to bacteria of the Firmicutes phylum, binds HJs with high affinity. In this work we found that RecU does not bind simultaneously with RecG to a HJ. RuvB by interacting with RecU bound to the central region of HJ DNA, loses its nonspecific association with DNA, and re-localizes with RecU to form a ternary complex. RecU cannot stimulate the ATPase or branch migration activity of RuvB. The presence of RuvB·ATPγS greatly stimulates RecU-mediated HJ resolution, but the addition of ATP or RuvA abolishes this stimulatory effect. A RecU·HJ·RuvAB complex might be formed. RecU does not increase the RuvAB activities but slightly inhibits them. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Chandra Observations of the Lensing Cluster EMSS 1358+6245 Implications for Self-Interacting Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Arabadjis, J S; Garmire, G P

    2001-01-01

    We present Chandra observations of EMSS 1358+6245, a relaxed cooling flow cluster of galaxies at z = 0.328. We employ a new deprojection technique to construct temperature, gas, and dark matter profiles. We confirm the presence of cool gas in the cluster core, and our deprojected temperature profile for the hot component is isothermal over 30 kpc < r < 0.8 Mpc. Fitting the mass profile to an NFW model yields r_s = 153 [+161,-83] kpc and c = 8.4 [+3.4,-2.3]. We find good agreement between our dark matter profile and weak gravitational lensing measurements. We place an upper limit of 42 kpc (90% confidence limit) on the size of any constant density core. We compare this result to recent simulations and place a conservative upper limit on the dark matter particle scattering cross section of 0.1 cm^2/g. This limit implies that the cross-section must be velocity dependent if the relatively shallow core mass profiles of dwarf galaxies are a direct result of dark matter self-interaction.

  20. Nrf2 regulates gene-environment interactions in an animal model of intrauterine inflammation: Implications for preterm birth and prematurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussan, Thomas E.; Sudini, Kuladeep; Talbot, C. Conover; Wang, Xiaobin; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Burd, Irina; Biswal, Shyam

    2017-01-01

    Preterm birth (PTB) is the leading cause of neonatal mortality, and surviving infants are at increased risk for lifelong disabilities. Intrauterine inflammation is an etiological factor that drives PTB, and oxidative stress is associated with PTB. Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a redox-sensitive transcription factor that is the key regulator of the response to oxidative and inflammatory stress. Here, we used the established mouse model of intrauterine inflammation-induced PTB to determine whether Nrf2 is a modifier of susceptibility to PTB and prematurity-related morbidity and mortality in the offspring. We determined that Nr2-deficient (Nrf2−/−) mice exhibited a greater sensitivity to intrauterine inflammation, as indicated by decreased time to delivery, reduced birthweight, and 100% mortality. Placentas from preterm Nrf2−/− mice showed elevated levels of markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and cell death, and transcriptomic analysis identified numerous key signaling pathways that were differentially expressed between wild-type (WT) and Nrf2−/− mice in both preterm and control samples. Thus, Nrf2 could be a critical factor for gene-environment interactions that may determine susceptibility to PTB. Further studies are needed to determine if Nrf2 is a viable therapeutic target in women who are at risk for PTB and associated complications in the affected offspring. PMID:28071748

  1. Post-glacial landform evolution in the middle Satluj River valley, India: Implications towards understanding the climate tectonic interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shubhra Sharma; S K Bartarya; B S Marh

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary landform evolution in monsoon-dominated middle Satluj valley is reconstructed using the fragmentary records of fluvial terraces, alluvial fans, debris flows, paleo-flood deposits, and epigenetic gorges. Based on detailed field mapping, alluvial stratigraphy, sedimentology and optical chronology, two phases of fluvial aggradations are identified. The older aggradation event dated between ∼13 and 11 ka (early-Holocene), occurred in the pre-existing topography carved by multiple events of erosion and incision. Climatically, the event corresponds to the post-glacial strengthened Indian summer monsoon (ISM). The younger aggradation event dated between ∼5 and 0.4 ka (mid- to late-Holocene), was duringthe declining phase of ISM. The terrain witnessed high magnitude floods during transitional climate (∼6.5–7 ka). The fluvial sedimentation was punctuated by short-lived debris flows and alluvial fans during the LGM (weak ISM), early to mid-Holocene transition climate and mid- to late-Holocene decliningISM. Based on the terrace morphology, an event of relatively enhanced surface uplift is inferred after late Holocene. The present study suggests that post-glacial landforms in the middle Satluj valley owe their genesis to the interplay between the climate variability and local/regional tectonic interactions.

  2. Substituent effects and supramolecular interactions of titanocene(III) chloride: implications for catalysis in single electron steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Kube, Christian; Daasbjerg, Kim; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan; Fianu, Godfred D; Sadasivam, Dhandapani V; Flowers, Robert A

    2014-01-29

    The electrochemical properties of titanocene(III) complexes and their stability in THF in the presence and absence of chloride additives were studied by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and computational methods. The anodic peak potentials of the titanocenes can be decreased by as much as 0.47 V through the addition of an electron-withdrawing substituent (CO2Me or CN) to the cyclopentadienyl ring when compared with Cp2TiCl. For the first time, it is demonstrated that under the conditions of catalytic applications low-valent titanocenes can decompose by loss of the substituted ligand. The recently discovered effect of stabilizing titanocene(III) catalysts by chloride additives was analyzed by CV, kinetic, and computational studies. An unprecedented supramolecular interaction between [(C5H4R)2TiCl2](-) and hydrochloride cations through reversible hydrogen bonding is proposed as a mechanism for the action of the additives. This study provides the critical information required for the rational design of titanocene-catalyzed reactions in single electron steps.

  3. Interaction of Tryptophane and Phenylalanine with Cadmium and Molybdenum Ferrocyanides and Its Implications in Chemical Evolution and Origins of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Brij

    2016-07-01

    Insoluble metal hexacyanoferrate(II) complexes could have concentrated biomonomers from dilute prebiotic soup during course of chemical evolution and origin of life or primitive earth. In the light of above hypothesis, adsorption of tryptophane and phenylalanine was studied on cadmium and molybdenum ferrocyanides at neutral pH (7.0 ± 0.01) and at a temperature of 30 ± 1º C. Interaction of amino acids with metal ferrocyanides are found to be maximum at neutral pH. Neutral pH is chosen for the adsorption studies because most of the reactions in biological systems taken place at neutral pH range. Adsorption trend follow Langmuir isotherm model. The Langmuir constants b and Qo were calculated at neutral pH, tryptophane was found to more adsorbed than phenylalanine on both metal ferrocyanides studied. Molybdenum ferrocyanides studied. Molybdenum ferrocyanides was found to have more uptake capacity for both adsorbates than cadmium ferrocyanides. The present study suggests that metal ferrocyanides might have played a role in the stabilization of biomolecules through their surface activity during course of chemical solution and origins of life on primitive earth.

  4. Geochemical characterization of surface water and spring water in SE Kashmir Valley, western Himalaya: Implications to water–rock interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gh Jeelani; Nadeem A Bhat; K Shivanna; M Y Bhat

    2011-10-01

    Water samples from precipitation, glacier melt, snow melt, glacial lake, streams and karst springs were collected across SE of Kashmir Valley, to understand the hydrogeochemical processes governing the evolution of the water in a natural and non-industrial area of western Himalayas. The time series data on solute chemistry suggest that the hydrochemical processes controlling the chemistry of spring waters is more complex than the surface water. This is attributed to more time available for infiltrating water to interact with the diverse host lithology. Total dissolved solids (TDS), in general, increases with decrease in altitude. However, high TDS of some streams at higher altitudes and low TDS of some springs at lower altitudes indicated contribution of high TDS waters from glacial lakes and low TDS waters from streams, respectively. The results show that some karst springs are recharged by surface water; Achabalnag by the Bringi stream and Andernag and Martandnag by the Liddar stream. Calcite dissolution, dedolomitization and silicate weathering were found to be the main processes controlling the chemistry of the spring waters and calcite dissolution as the dominant process in controlling the chemistry of the surface waters. The spring waters were undersaturated with respect to calcite and dolomite in most of the seasons except in November, which is attributed to the replenishment of the CO2 by recharging waters during most of the seasons.

  5. Spectrin interactions with globin chains in the presence of phosphate metabolites and hydrogen peroxide: implications for thalassaemia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poppy Datta; Sudipa Chakrabarty; Amit Chakrabarty; Abhijit Chakrabarti

    2007-09-01

    We have shown the differential interactions of the erythroid skeletal protein spectrin with the globin subunits of adult haemoglobin (HbA); these indicate a preference for -globin over that for -globin and intact HbA in an adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent manner. The presence of Mg/ATP led to an appreciable decrease in the binding affinity of the -globin chain to spectrin and the overall yield of globin–spectrin cross-linked complexes formed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Similar effects were also seen in the presence of 2-,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG), the other important phosphate metabolite of erythrocytes. The binding affinity and yield of cross-linked high molecular weight complexes (HMWCs) formed under oxidative conditions were significantly higher in -globin compared with intact haemoglobin, HbA and the -globin chain. The results of this study indicate a possible correlation of the preferential spectrin binding of the -globin chain over that of the -globin in the haemoglobin disorder -thalassaemia.

  6. Differences in Oral Structure and Tissue Interactions during Mouse vs. Human Palatogenesis: Implications for the Translation of Findings from Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Deng, Mei; Naluai-Cecchini, Theresa; Glass, Ian A.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2017-01-01

    Clefting of the secondary palate is one of the most common human birth defects and results from failure of the palatal shelves to fuse during embryonic development. Palatogenesis is traditionally considered to be a highly conserved developmental process among mammalian species. However, cleft palate phenotypes in humans are considerably more variable than those seen in mice, the most common animal model for studying palatal development and pathogenesis of cleft palate. In this investigation, we utilized macroscopic observations, histology and 3D imaging techniques to directly compare palate morphology and the oral-nasal cavity during palate closure in mouse embryos and human conceptuses. We showed that mouse and human palates display distinct morphologies attributable to the structural differences of the oral-nasal cavity. We further showed that the palatal shelves interact differently with the primary palate and nasal septum in the hard palate region and with pharyngeal walls in the soft palate region during palate closure in mice and humans. Knowledge of these morphological differences is important for improved translation of findings in mouse models of human cleft lip/palate and, as such, should ultimately enhance our understanding of human palatal morphogenesis and the pathogenesis of cleft lip/palate in humans. PMID:28360863

  7. Raman-IR vibrational and XRD characterization of ancient and modern mineralogy from volcanic eruption in Tenerife Island: Implication for Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Lalla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A detailed vibrational Raman-IR spectroscopic and diffractional analyses have been performed on basalts from two locations from Tenerife Island: (1 the Arenas Negras volcano which belongs to the historical eruption not showing visible alteration and (2 Pillow Lavas zone from Anaga Massif which shows a clearly fluid-rock interaction caused by submarine alteration. These places have been extensively studied due to its similarity with the surface of Mars. The analysis is based on the mineral detection of selected samples by a Micro-Raman study of the materials. The complementary techniques have confirmed the mineralogy detected by the Raman measurement. The results show a volcanic environment behavior with primary phases like olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar/plagioclase. Moreover, the presence of accessory minerals or secondary mineralization like phosphate, iron oxides, zeolite or carbonates shows the alteration processes on each outcrop. The variation in the crystallinity and amorphous phases is related to fluid-rock interaction caused by hydrothermal episodes and external weathering processes, which shows several analogies with the ancient volcanic activity from Mars.

  8. Dietary Lipid and Carbohydrate Interactions: Implications on Lipid and Glucose Absorption, Transport in Gilthead Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) Juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carolina; Corraze, Geneviève; Basto, Ana; Larroquet, Laurence; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2016-06-01

    A digestibility trial was performed with gilthead sea bream juveniles (IBW = 72 g) fed four diets differing in lipid source (fish oil, FO; or a blend of vegetable oil, VO) and starch content (0 %, CH-; or 20 %, CH+) to evaluate the potential interactive effects between carbohydrates and VO on the processes involved in digestion, absorption and transport of lipids and glucose. In fish fed VO diets a decrease in lipid digestibility and in cholesterol (C), High Density Lipoprotein(HDL)-C and Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL)-C (only in CH+ group) were recorded. Contrarily, dietary starch induced postprandial hyperglycemia and time related alterations on serum triacylglycerol (TAG), phospholipid (PL) and C concentrations. Fish fed a CH+ diet presented lower serum TAG than CH- group at 6 h post-feeding, and the reverse was observed at 12 h post-feeding for TAG and PL. Lower serum C and PL at 6 h post-feeding were recorded only in VOCH+ group. No differences between groups were observed in hepatic and intestinal transcript levels of proteins involved in lipid transport and hydrolysis (FABP, DGAT, GPAT, MTP, LPL, LCAT). Lower transcript levels of proteins related to lipid transport (ApoB, ApoA1, FABP2) were observed in the intestine of fish fed the CH+ diet, but remained unchanged in the liver. Overall, transcriptional mechanisms involved in lipid transport and absorption were not linked to changes in lipid serum and digestibility. Dietary starch affected lipid absorption and transport, probably due to a delay in lipid absorption. This study suggests that a combination of dietary VO and starch may negatively affect cholesterol absorption and transport.

  9. Interaction between O-GlcNAc modification and tyrosine phosphorylation of prohibitin: implication for a novel binary switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudharsana R Ande

    Full Text Available Prohibitin (PHB or PHB1 is an evolutionarily conserved, multifunctional protein which is present in various cellular compartments including the plasma membrane. However, mechanisms involved in various functions of PHB are not fully explored yet. Here we report for the first time that PHB interacts with O-linked beta-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (O-GlcNAc transferase, OGT and is O-GlcNAc modified; and also undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation in response to insulin. Tyrosine 114 (Tyr114 and tyrosine 259 (Tyr259 in PHB are in the close proximity of potential O-GlcNAc sites serine 121 (Ser121 and threonine 258 (Thr258 respectively. Substitution of Tyr114 and Tyr259 residues in PHB with phenylalanine by site-directed mutagenesis results in reduced tyrosine phosphorylation as well as reduced O-GlcNAc modification of PHB. Surprisingly, this also resulted in enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation and activity of OGT. This is attributed to the presence of similar tyrosine motifs in PHB and OGT. Substitution of Ser121 and Thr258 with alanine and isoleucine respectively resulted in attenuation of O-GlcNAc modification and increased tyrosine phosphorylation of PHB suggesting an association between these two dynamic modifications. Sequence analysis of O-GlcNAc modified proteins having known O-GlcNAc modification site(s or known tyrosine phosphorylation site(s revealed a strong potential association between these two posttranslational modifications in various proteins. We speculate that O-GlcNAc modification and tyrosine phosphorylation of PHB play an important role in tyrosine kinase signaling pathways including insulin, growth factors and immune receptors signaling. In addition, we propose that O-GlcNAc modification and tyrosine phosphorylation is a novel previously unidentified binary switch which may provide new mechanistic insights into cell signaling pathways and is open for direct experimental examination.

  10. Inhibition of CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 by podophyllotoxin: Implication for clinical drug–drug interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jin-Hui Song; Dong-Xue Sun; Bin Chen; Dai-Hong Ji; Jie Pu; Jie Xu; Feng-De Tian; Lin Guo

    2011-12-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PPT) and its derivatives exert significant anti-cancer activities, and one derivative etoposide is often utilized to treat various cancers in the clinic. The aim of the present study is to investigate the inhibitory effects of PPT on major cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoforms in human livers. Inhibition of CYP3A4, CYP2C9, CYP2C8, CYP2D6, CYP2E1 and CYP2A6 by PPT was investigated in the human liver microsomal system. Time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4 by PPT was also evaluated. The results showed that PPT strongly exhibited inhibitory effects on CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 in a concentration-dependent manner. Half inhibition concentration (IC50) was 1.1±0.3 and 4.6±0.3 M for CYP3A4 and CYP2C9, respectively. Inhibition kinetic analysis showed that PPT exhibited competitive inhibition towards CYP3A4 and CYP2C9 with Ki of 1.6 and 2.0 M, respectively. Additionally, PPT exerted time-dependent inhibition towards CYP3A4 and the kinetic parameters were 4.4±2.1 M and 0.06±0.01 min–1 for KI and kinact, respectively. Our experimental data indicate that potential drug–drug interaction (DDI) might exist when PPT is co-administered with the substrates which mainly undergo CYP3A4- or CYP2C9-mediated metabolism.

  11. Specific interaction between EF-G and RRF and its implication for GTP-dependent ribosome splitting into subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ning; Zavialov, Andrey V.; Ehrenberg, Måns; Frank, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Summary After termination of protein synthesis, the bacterial ribosome is split into its 30S and 50S subunits by the action of ribosome recycling factor (RRF) and elongation factor G (EF-G) in a GTP-hydrolysis dependent manner. Based on a previous cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) study of ribosomal complexes, we have proposed that the binding of EF-G to an RRF containing post-termination ribosome triggers an inter-domain rotation of RRF, which destabilizes two strong intersubunit bridges (B2a and B3) and, ultimately, separates the two subunits. Here, we present a 9 Å (FSC at 0.5 cutoff) cryo-EM map of a 50S EFG GDPNP RRF complex and a quasi-atomic model derived from it, showing the interaction between EF-G and RRF on the 50S subunit in the presence of the non-cleavable GTP analogue GDPNP. The detailed information in this model and a comparative analysis of EF-G structures in various nucleotide- and ribosome-bound states show how rotation of the RRF head domain may be triggered by various domains of EF-G. For validation of our structural model, all known mutations in EF-G and RRF that relate to ribosome recycling have been taken into account. More importantly, our results indicate a substantial conformational change in the Switch I region of EF-G, suggesting that a conformational signal transduction mechanism, similar to that employed in tRNA translocation on the ribosome by EF-G, translates a large-scale movement of EF-G’s domain IV, induced by GTP hydrolysis, into the domain rotation of RRF that eventually splits the ribosome into subunits. PMID:17996252

  12. Modulation of γ-secretase activity by multiple enzyme-substrate interactions: implications in pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeljko M Svedružić

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We describe molecular processes that can facilitate pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD by analyzing the catalytic cycle of a membrane-imbedded protease γ-secretase, from the initial interaction with its C99 substrate to the final release of toxic Aβ peptides. RESULTS: The C-terminal AICD fragment is cleaved first in a pre-steady-state burst. The lowest Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio is observed in pre-steady-state when Aβ40 is the dominant product. Aβ42 is produced after Aβ40, and therefore Aβ42 is not a precursor for Aβ40. The longer more hydrophobic Aβ products gradually accumulate with multiple catalytic turnovers as a result of interrupted catalytic cycles. Saturation of γ-secretase with its C99 substrate leads to 30% decrease in Aβ40 with concomitant increase in the longer Aβ products and Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio. To different degree the same changes in Aβ products can be observed with two mutations that lead to an early onset of AD, ΔE9 and G384A. Four different lines of evidence show that γ-secretase can bind and cleave multiple substrate molecules in one catalytic turnover. Consequently depending on its concentration, NotchΔE substrate can activate or inhibit γ-secretase activity on C99 substrate. Multiple C99 molecules bound to γ-secretase can affect processive cleavages of the nascent Aβ catalytic intermediates and facilitate their premature release as the toxic membrane-imbedded Aβ-bundles. CONCLUSIONS: Gradual saturation of γ-secretase with its substrate can be the pathogenic process in different alleged causes of AD. Thus, competitive inhibitors of γ-secretase offer the best chance for a successful therapy, while the noncompetitive inhibitors could even facilitate development of the disease by inducing enzyme saturation at otherwise sub-saturating substrate. Membrane-imbedded Aβ-bundles generated by γ-secretase could be neurotoxic and thus crucial for our understanding of the amyloid hypothesis and AD

  13. ADAM2 interactions with mouse eggs and cell lines expressing α4/α9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 integrins: implications for integrin-based adhesion and fertilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulyana V Desiderio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrins are heterodimeric cell adhesion molecules, with 18 α (ITGA and eight β (ITGB subunits forming 24 heterodimers classified into five families. Certain integrins, especially the α(4/α(9 (ITGA4/ITGA9 family, interact with members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease family. ADAM2 is among the better characterized and also of interest because of its role in sperm function. Having shown that ITGA9 on mouse eggs participates in mouse sperm-egg interactions, we sought to characterize ITGA4/ITGA9-ADAM2 interactions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An anti-β(1/ITGB1 function-blocking antibody that reduces sperm-egg binding significantly inhibited ADAM2 binding to mouse eggs. Analysis of integrin subunit expression indicates that mouse eggs could express at least ten different integrins, five in the RGD-binding family, two in the laminin-binding family, two in the collagen-binding family, and ITGA9-ITGB1. Adhesion assays to characterize ADAM2 interactions with ITGA4/ITGA9 family members produced the surprising result that RPMI 8866 cell adhesion to ADAM2 was inhibited by an anti-ITGA9 antibody, noteworthy because ITGA9 has only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1, and RPMI 8866 cells lack detectable ITGB1. Antibody and siRNA studies demonstrate that ITGB7 is the β subunit contributing to RPMI 8866 adhesion to ADAM2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that a novel integrin α-β combination, ITGA9-ITGB7 (α(9β(7, in RPMI 8866 cells functions as a binding partner for ADAM2. ITGA9 had previously only been reported to dimerize with ITGB1. Although ITGA9-ITGB7 is unlikely to be a widely expressed integrin and appears to be the result of "compensatory dimerization" occurring in the context of little/no ITGB1 expression, the data indicate that ITGA9-ITGB7 functions as an ADAM binding partner in certain cellular contexts, with implications for mammalian fertilization and integrin function.

  14. Interactions Between Diffuse Groundwater Recharge and Hyporheic Zone Chemistry in Spring-Fed River: Implications for Metal, Nutrient & Carbonate Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, M. J.; Martin, J. B.; Cohen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Diffuse groundwater flow through stream-bed sediments can represent water with a chemically distinct composition, influencing elemental cycling and ecosystem dynamics. Diffuse flow may be particularly important in systems where hyporheic exchange is small. The entirely spring-sourced Ichetucknee River (north-central Florida) is a model system for distinguishing the processes controlling solute sources and cycling due to its stable discharge (6-9 m3/s), constant but distinct spring chemistry through time, and minimal hyporheic exchange. Most stream solute concentrations exhibit large diel cycles, but these changes do not explain all observed longitudinal changes in river chemistry. Ca, Fe, and PO4 concentrations are all elevated in river water over the flow-weighted average of the source springs (Ca = 1.37 vs 1.31 mM; Fe = 8 vs. 0.4 μg/L; PO4 = 54 vs. 49 μg/L) despite evidence of in-stream removal of these solutes by biotic and abiotic processes. Cl concentrations are also elevated in the river over the spring sources and previous calculations estimated an additional 0.75 m3/s of water was needed to close the Cl budget of the river. Diffuse groundwater flow could be the source of these additional solutes and flow. To estimate the impact of diffuse flow interacting with hyporheic zone chemistry on the metal, nutrient, and carbonate chemistry of the Ichetucknee River we compared the chemistry of the springs and river with measurements of pore-water chemistry and hydraulic gradients within the unconsolidated channel sediments. A cross-river transect of four pore-water chemical profiles indicate that pore-water chemistry is dominated by the mineralization of organic carbon, resulting in pore-waters undersaturated with respect to calcite and elevated in Ca, Fe, and PO4 concentrations (ca. 1.44 mM, 2000 μg/L, and 150-300 μg/L, respectively) relative to the river. A diffuse flow rate through the river sediments of 0.2-0.7 m3/s, would account for the addition of both PO

  15. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  16. How secondary school students conceptualize infrared radiation-matter interaction? Findings from a research study and implications for an instructional design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabel Hernández, Marıa; Rıos, Raquel; Pintó, Roser

    2016-05-01

    This study has been carried out within the REVIR scenario, which is a project promoting that secondary school students have access to a computerized laboratory at the Faculty of Education of our university and work in small groups during four hours with specific instructional material. One of the laboratory sessions included in the REVIR project deals with IR radiation-matter interaction, and is addressed to post-compulsory secondary students (16-18 year-old students). Within this framework, we have conducted a research study to analyse students' conceptualizations of the processes or mechanisms that take place in IR radiation-matter interaction (energy transfer, selective absorption), and its effects at a macroscopic level (temperature increase) and at a molecular level (vibration). For data collection, a question was posed to all students at the end of each REVIR session, asking students to relate what was described in an article about the application of an IR laser for acne treatment to what they had learnt throughout the session. The analysis of the 67 students' answers to that question revealed that many students explained the effects of the IR laser in vague terms, often repeating information included in the article, without explaining absorption of IR radiation in terms of energy. In consecutive versions of the instructional material, more oriented application questions were added after the article and explicit discussion around synthesis and exploratory (of students' previous ideas) questions was carried out during the session. From the analysis of 49 and 119 students' answers in consecutive later versions, we found that the introduction of these changes resulted in a greater number of students' descriptions in macroscopic and microscopic terms, and a lower number of answers simply repeating information extracted from the reading. Furthermore, more students explicitly explained absorption in terms of energy associated to IR light. Implications for the

  17. Transcriptomic profile induced in bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells after interaction with multiple myeloma cells: implications in myeloma progression and myeloma bone disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Gomez, Antonio; Las Rivas, Javier De; Ocio, Enrique M.; Díaz-Rodríguez, Elena; Montero, Juan C.; Martín, Montserrat; Blanco, Juan F.; Sanchez-Guijo, Fermín M.; Pandiella, Atanasio; San Miguel, Jesús F.; Garayoa, Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Despite evidence about the implication of the bone marrow (BM) stromal microenvironment in multiple myeloma (MM) cell growth and survival, little is known about the effects of myelomatous cells on BM stromal cells. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from healthy donors (dMSCs) or myeloma patients (pMSCs) were co-cultured with the myeloma cell line MM.1S, and the transcriptomic profile of MSCs induced by this interaction was analyzed. Deregulated genes after co-culture common to both d/pMSCs revealed functional involvement in tumor microenvironment cross-talk, myeloma growth induction and drug resistance, angiogenesis and signals for osteoclast activation and osteoblast inhibition. Additional genes induced by co-culture were exclusively deregulated in pMSCs and predominantly associated to RNA processing, the ubiquitine-proteasome pathway, cell cycle regulation, cellular stress and non-canonical Wnt signaling. The upregulated expression of five genes after co-culture (CXCL1, CXCL5 and CXCL6 in d/pMSCs, and Neuregulin 3 and Norrie disease protein exclusively in pMSCs) was confirmed, and functional in vitro assays revealed putative roles in MM pathophysiology. The transcriptomic profile of pMSCs co-cultured with myeloma cells may better reflect that of MSCs in the BM of myeloma patients, and provides new molecular insights to the contribution of these cells to MM pathophysiology and to myeloma bone disease. PMID:25268740

  18. Discrimination Study on Fluid—Rock Interaction Between Metallogenic and Non—Metallogenic Sections in a Shear Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏俊浩; 李建威; 等

    1999-01-01

    Discriminations in a local chemical,fluidal,mechanical and thermal processes in a shear zone will lead to metallogenic differentiation in a local section.This paper,based on the general geological setting of the Shibangou gold deposit in Xixia,Henan,deals with petrological and petrochemical samples of altered rocks in the metallogenic section and of mylonites in the non-metallogenic section of a selected shear zone.The discriminations in fluid-rock interaction and petrological mass balance between altered rocks near the orebody and mylonites in the shear zone are discussed as well.The results show that the petrological volume of altered rocks in the metallogenic section of the shear zone is almost always dilatant and the mylonite volume in the non-metallogenic section is almost always lost.Major elements in altered rocks from the metallogenic section and in mylonites from the non-metallogenic section always show a tendency of being enriched and depleted,respectively.Fluid-rock ratios in the mylonites(Nu=93.68-468.40)are larger than those of the altered rocks(NC(Ⅳ)s=36.11-216.67).The gain and loss of major and trace elements from the altered rocks and mylonites in the shear zone are a composite process to be imported and exported by percolating fluids as well as of the loss and dilatancy of rock volume.

  19. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortorella, Silvia; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L; Núñez, Angel; Garzón, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH) has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins), mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC) nucleus (contributing to wakefulness) and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) nucleus (contributing to REM sleep). Anatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC, and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  20. Synaptic interactions between perifornical lateral hypothalamic area, locus coeruleus nucleus and the oral pontine reticular nucleus are implicated in the stage succession during sleep-wakefulness cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel eNunez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The perifornical area in the posterior lateral hypothalamus (PeFLH has been implicated in several physiological functions including the sleep-wakefulness regulation. The PeFLH area contains several cell types including those expressing orexins (Orx; also known as hypocretins, mainly located in the PeF nucleus. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the synaptic interactions between Orx neurons located in the PeFLH area and different brainstem neurons involved in the generation of wakefulness and sleep stages such as the locus coeruleus (LC nucleus (contributing to wakefulness and the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO nucleus (contributing to REM sleepAnatomical data demonstrated the existence of a neuronal network involving the PeFLH area, LC and the PnO nuclei that would control the sleep-wake cycle. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that PeFLH area had an excitatory effect on LC neurons. PeFLH stimulation increased the firing rate of LC neurons and induced an activation of the EEG. The excitatory effect evoked by PeFLH stimulation in LC neurons was blocked by the injection of the Orx-1 receptor antagonist SB-334867 into the LC. Similar electrical stimulation of the PeFLH area evoked an inhibition of PnO neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors because the effect was blocked by bicuculline application into the PnO. Our data also revealed that the LC and PnO nuclei exerted a feedback control on neuronal activity of PeFLH area. Electrical stimulation of LC facilitated firing activity of PeFLH neurons by activation of catecholaminergic receptors whereas PnO stimulation inhibited PeFLH neurons by activation of GABAergic receptors. In conclusion, Orx neurons of the PeFLH area seem to be an important organizer of the wakefulness and sleep stages in order to maintain a normal succession of stages during the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  1. Nutritional implications of patient-provider interactions in hospital settings: evidence from a within-subject assessment of mealtime exchanges and food intake in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, L; Paquet, C; Ma, Z; McKenzie, D St-Arnaud; Kergoat, M-J; Ferland, G

    2007-05-01

    To examine the nutritional implications of the interactions taking place between patients and care providers during mealtimes in hospital settings. Specifically, we tested research propositions that the amount and nature of interpersonal behaviours exchanged between patients and providers impact patients' food intake. These propositions were derived from prior evidence of social influences on eating behaviour and a well-established framework that identifies two fundamental modalities of human interaction: striving for mastery and power (agency) and efforts to promote union with others (communion). In a within-subject naturalistic study, participants were observed on multiple meals (n=1477, 46.2 meals/participant on average), during which participants' and providers' agency- and communion-related behaviours and patients' protein and energy intake were recorded. Meal-level frequency and complementarity of patients' and providers' behaviours were computed to test research propositions. Dining room of a geriatric rehabilitation unit. Thirty-two elderly patients (21 females, mean age:78.8, 95% CI: 76.4, 81.1). Meal-level frequency of patient-provider exchanges (P=0.016) and patients' agency-related behaviours (P=0.029), as well as mutual reciprocation of patients' and providers' communion-related behaviours (P=0.015) on a given meal were positively linked to protein intake. Higher energy intake was found during meals where patients expressed more agency-related behaviours (P=0.029). Results present evidence that the amount and nature of patient-provider interpersonal exchanges on a given meal influence the nutritional quality of food intake in hospitalized elderly. They provide insights into how to improve the design and delivery of routine care to this malnutrition-prone population. This study was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Operating grant to Laurette Dubé, Doctoral Fellowship to Catherine Paquet) the Fonds de la Recherche en santé du Qu

  2. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    interacts with risk allele count, such that PTSD is increased in those with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures. Since the single nucleotide polymorphisms studied encompass stress circuitry and addiction biology, these findings may have implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment.Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder, genetic association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk alleles, trauma exposure, neuroticism, childhood adversity

  3. The non-specific lipid transfer protein N5 of Medicago truncatula is implicated in epidermal stages of rhizobium-host interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pii Youry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The symbiotic interaction between leguminous plants and rhizobia involves two processes: bacterial infection, resulting in the penetration of bacteria in epidermal and cortical cells, and root nodule organogenesis. Root nodule symbiosis is activated by rhizobial signalling molecules, called Nodulation factors (NFs. NF perception induces the expression of several genes called early nodulins. The early nodulin N5 of Medicago truncatula is a lipid transfer protein that has been shown to positively regulate nodulation although it displays in vitro inhibitory activity against Sinorhizobium meliloti. The purpose of this work was to investigate the role of MtN5 by studying its spatial and temporal pattern of expression during the symbiotic interaction, also in relation to known components of the symbiotic signalling pathway, and by analysing the phenotypic alterations displayed by rhizobia-inoculated MtN5-silenced roots. Results We show here that MtN5 is a NF-responsive gene expressed at a very early phase of symbiosis in epidermal cells and root hairs. MtN5 expression is induced in vitro by rhizobial effector molecules and by auxin and cytokinin, phytohormones involved in nodule organogenesis. Furthermore, lipid signaling is implicated in the response of MtN5 to rhizobia, since the activity of phospholipase D is required for MtN5 induction in S. meliloti-inoculated roots. MtN5-silenced roots inoculated with rhizobia display an increased root hair curling and a reduced number of invaded primordia compared to that in wild type roots, but with no impairment to nodule primordia formation. This phenotype is associated with the stimulation of ENOD11 expression, an early marker of infection, and with the down-regulation of Flotillin 4 (FLOT4, a protein involved in rhizobial entry. Conclusions These data indicate that MtN5 acts downstream of NF perception and upstream of FLOT4 in regulating pre-infection events. The positive effect of MtN5

  4. Using micro-scale evidence to understand regional-scale hydrothermal alteration of plutonic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plümper, O.; King, H. E.; Putnis, A.

    2009-01-01

    Subsolidus re-equilibration of plutonic feldspars induced by hydrothermal fluids provides a valuable record of fluid-rock interactions that affect large volumes of the Earth's continental crust (Taylor, 1977). The effect of hydrothermal fluids has important implications for the interpretation of the

  5. Using micro-scale evidence to understand regional-scale hydrothermal alteration of plutonic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plümper, O.; King, H. E.; Putnis, A.

    2009-01-01

    Subsolidus re-equilibration of plutonic feldspars induced by hydrothermal fluids provides a valuable record of fluid-rock interactions that affect large volumes of the Earth's continental crust (Taylor, 1977). The effect of hydrothermal fluids has important implications for the interpretation of the

  6. Rôle central de l’Ocytocine dans la neurophysiologie de la personnalité sociale : interaction avec la sérotonine et implication dans la pathologie de l’autisme

    OpenAIRE

    Mottolese, Raphaëlle

    2013-01-01

    Interacting with others is crucial for human fitness. In the past decade, there has been a growing interest for oxytocin (OXT) and its implication in social behavior. In the first section of this work we show that peripheral and central concentrations of OXT are correlated. Peripheral and central OXT are also correlated with subjects’ extraversion and with the volume of amygdala and hippocampus, two brain regions important for the regulation of social behavior. Interestingly, we show that OXT...

  7. 2-Deoxyglucose induces the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP) by increasing O-GlcNAcylation – Implications for targeting the Warburg effect in cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Shin Yee; Hagen, Thilo, E-mail: bchth@nus.edu.sg

    2015-10-02

    The high proliferation rate of cancer cells and the microenvironment in the tumor tissue require the reprogramming of tumor cell metabolism. The major mechanism of metabolic reprogramming in cancer cells is the Warburg effect, defined as the preferential utilization of glucose via glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. Targeting the Warburg effect is considered as a promising therapeutic strategy in cancer therapy. In this regard, the glycolytic inhibitor 2-deoxyglucose (2DG) has been evaluated clinically. 2DG exerts its effect by directly inhibiting glycolysis at the level of hexokinase and phosphoglucoisomerase. In addition, 2DG is also known to induce the expression of thioredoxin interacting protein (TXNIP), a tumor suppressor protein and an important negative regulator of cellular glucose uptake. Hence, characterization of the mechanism through which 2DG regulates TXNIP expression may reveal novel approaches to target the Warburg effect in cancer cells. Therefore, in this study we sought to test various hypotheses for the mechanistic basis of the 2DG dependent TXNIP regulation. We have shown that 2DG induced TXNIP expression is independent of carbohydrate response element mediated transcription. Furthermore, the induction of TXNIP is neither dependent on the ability of 2DG to deplete cellular ATP nor to cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. We found that the 2DG induced TXNIP expression is at least in part dependent on the inhibition of the O-GlcNAcase enzyme and the accumulation of O-GlcNAc modified proteins. These results have implications for the identification of therapeutic targets to increase TXNIP expression in cancer. - Highlights: • 2DG increases TXNIP expression at the mRNA and protein level. • The effect of 2DG on TXNIP is independent of ChoRE mediated transcription. • 2DG induces TXNIP independent of ER stress induction and ATP depletion. • 2DG inhibits OGA and leads to accumulation of O-GlcNAcylated proteins. • The upregulation of

  8. A New Arabia-Africa-Eurasia GPS Velocity Field (1994-2014) and E Mediterranean Block Model: Implications for Continental Deformation in a Zone of Active Plate Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernant, P.; Floyd, M.; Ozener, H.; Ergintav, S.; Karakhanian, A.; Kadirov, F. A.; Sokhadze, G.; ArRajehi, A.; Nankali, H. R.; Georgiev, I.; Ganas, A.; Paradissis, D.; McClusky, S.; Gomez, F. G.; Reilinger, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    We present new GPS velocities for the Arabia-Africa-Eurasia region determined with GAMIT/GLOBK (>830 velocities) spanning the period 1994-2014. Here we consider the E Mediterranean region of plate interaction. We use DEFNODE software to develop block models and estimate slip rates on major faults and strain of some blocks. The wrms of residual velocities from our new model is 1.3 mm/yr. We identify small E-W extension within the newly defined Anatolian block confined to a 100-200 km wide zone south of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) reaching 2-3 mm/yr with rates increasing towards the west. Possible causes we consider include, un-modeled postseismic effects of the 1999 Izmit/Duzce earthquake sequence, continuing post-seismic effects of the 20th Century sequence of M>7 earthquakes, and/or toroidal sub-lithospheric flow towards the subducting Hellenic slab. The overall strain rate of the Marmara Sea block is dominantly N-S extension, and the Van block, N-S compression. Present slip rates along the NAF increase from E to W, 22-24 mm/yr along the E to E-central segment and 27-28 mm/yr along the W segment. We quantify extension in the G. of Corinth, central Greece, and G. of Evia; the W, central and E sections of the Hellenic Trench are shortening with extension in the back-arc. The W Hellenic Trench and W Peloponnese have right-lateral strike-slip and the E Hellenic Trench, left-lateral ss. N-S extension (2-4 mm/yr) in N Greece and the N Aegean Sea extends at least to 42°N. Arabia-Sinai left-lateral motion across the Dead Sea Fault is ~5 mm/yr along the S segment; significant residual velocities along the N and S segments indicate lower slip rates in the N and require fault segmentation to account for slip rate variations along strike. We identify E-W contraction of the Arabian (Persian) Gulf (~3-5 mm/yr) that extends into the E part of the Arabian Plate. We will quantify and present these and other observed deformation patterns and discuss their tectonic implications.

  9. Live cell imaging of interactions between replicase and capsid protein of Brome mosaic virus using Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation: Implications for replication and genome packaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaturvedi, Sonali; Rao, A.L.N., E-mail: arao@ucr.edu

    2014-09-15

    In Brome mosaic virus, it was hypothesized that a physical interaction between viral replicase and capsid protein (CP) is obligatory to confer genome packaging specificity. Here we tested this hypothesis by employing Bimolecular Fluorescent Complementation (BiFC) as a tool for evaluating protein–protein interactions in living cells. The efficacy of BiFC was validated by a known interaction between replicase protein 1a (p1a) and protein 2a (p2a) at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) site of viral replication. Additionally, co-expression in planta of a bona fide pair of interacting protein partners of p1a and p2a had resulted in the assembly of a functional replicase. Subsequent BiFC assays in conjunction with mCherry labeled ER as a fluorescent cellular marker revealed that CP physically interacts with p2a, but not p1a, and this CP:p2a interaction occurs at the cytoplasmic phase of the ER. The significance of the CP:p2a interaction in BMV replication and genome packaging is discussed. - Highlights: • YFP fusion proteins of BMV p1a and p2a are biologically active. • Self-interaction was observed for p1a, p2a and CP. • CP interacts with p2a but not p1a. • Majority of reconstituted YFP resulting from bona fide fusion protein partners localized on ER.

  10. Lithium control on experimental serpentinization processes: implications for natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafay, Romain; Janots, Emilie; Montes-Hernandez, German

    2014-05-01

    Fluid mobile elements such as As, B, Li or Sb are of prime importance to trace fluid-rock interactions in the oceanic lithosphere from its hydrothermal alteration at the ocean ridge up to its dehydration in deep subduction. Although the cycle of fluid mobile elements is increasingly studied, their partitioning between fluid and mineral are still poorly know and their role on mechanism and kinetic of serpentinization reaction have been neglected. In the present experimental study supported by two kinds of experiments, we focussed on Li study and highlighted that this element play a substantial role on serpentinization reaction kinetic/mechanism and on serpentine textural properties. Indeed, in presence of 200 µg g-1 of dissolved Li alteration rate is 2-4 time faster with respect to olivine alteration reactions in undoped system (1) at same experimental conditions (alkaline solution, T = 200°C, Psat ~16 bar, olivine grains Chemistry - A European Journal 19, 5417-5424. (3) Lafay et al. (2014) Microporous et Mesoporous Materials 183; 81-90.

  11. Experimental study on interaction between simulated sandstone and acidic fluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yongwang; Zeng Jianhu; Yu Bingsong

    2009-01-01

    In order to investigate the controlling mechanism of temperature, fluid and other factors on water-rock interaction in the diagenetic process, we performed a series of simulated experiments on the interaction between two kinds of fluids with different salinity and a composite mineral system (simulated sandstone), which contains albite, K-feldspar and other minerals. The experimental results showed that acidity was the most important factor that affected the dissolution of minerals in the composite mineral system. The lower the pH value, the more easily the minerals dissolved. At the same pH value, the dissolution abilities of different acids for various mineral components were also different. Compared to hydrochloric acid (inorganic acid), oxalic acid (organic acid) was more able to dissolve aluminosilicate minerals. However, the dissolution ability of oxalic acid for carbonate minerals was lower than that of hydrochloric acid. In the process of fluid-rock interaction,dissolution of feldspar was relatively complicated. Increase of temperature would accelerate the dissolution of feldspar. Under acidic conditions, albite had a higher dissolution rate than K-feldspar. K-feldspar could dissolve and convert into montmorillonite and kaolinite, while albite could dissolve and convert into kaolinite both at 40℃ and 80℃. Presence of organic acid, and decrease of pH value and water salinity were all favorable for the dissolution of feldspar, but weakened the ability to form clay minerals.

  12. A new implication for strong interactions if large, direct CP violation in bar B0(B 0)rightarrowpi+pi- is confirmed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshay, Saul; Kreyerhoff, Georg

    2003-09-01

    We show that the large, direct CP-violation parameter A pipi = -C pipi , reported by the BELLE collaboration in the decays bar B0(B 0)rightarrowpi+pi- , implies an unusual situation in which the presence of a very large difference between two strong-interaction phases ( ~ -110-degree) plays an essential role. We make the demonstration within a model of strong, two-body quasi-elastic interactions between physical hadrons. The model can accommodate a large difference between two strong-interaction phases, for which it provides a natural enhancement.

  13. Some implications for the study of the doctor-patient interaction: power, structure, and agency in the works of Howard Waitzkin and Arthur Kleinman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, G

    1990-01-01

    This article critiques two major theoretical perspectives concerning the doctor-patient interaction in medical anthropology represented by the work of Howard Waitzkin and Arthur Kleinman. In his work on the doctor-patient interaction Waitzkin has tended to draw on structural explanations which subordinate the role of agency. Kleinman's work emphasizes agency without satisfactorily integrating structural or social causality in his work on the doctor-patient interaction. The work of Anthony Giddens and others has clarified the structure/agency dichotomy in social science to which the nature of power is central.

  14. The Implications of the 4 C's of Supply Chain Network Interaction Strategies for Cost Information Visibility and Network Profitability - An Integrative Model

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The globalization of supply and demand has resulted in increasingly complex supply chain interaction strategies across different industries. Since the different interaction strategies are associated with different types of interdependence between partners, the impact of these strategies on cost information visibility across a supply chain network merits further investigation. The importance of cost information visibility lies in the fact that a firm's internal costs ca...

  15. Challenges for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders: Implications of the Ca(2+)/cAMP intracellular signalling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantin, Leandro Bueno; Caricati-Neto, Afonso

    2016-10-01

    In 2013, we discovered that the entitled "calcium paradox" phenomenon, which means a paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by l-type Ca(2+) channel blockers (CCBs), used in antihypertensive therapy, is due to interaction between the intracellular signalling pathways mediated by Ca(2+) and cAMP (Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction). In 2015, we proposed that the pharmacological manipulation of this interaction could be a new therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Besides the paradoxical sympathetic hyperactivity produced by CCBs, several clinical studies have been demonstrating pleiotropic effects of CCBs, including neuroprotective effects. CCBs genuinely exhibit cognitive-enhancing abilities and reduce the risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson´s disease and others. The molecular mechanisms involved in these pleiotropic effects remain under debate. Our recent discovery that the "calcium paradox" phenomenon is due to Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction may provide new insights for the pharmacological treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including enhancement of current therapies mainly by reducing adverse effects, and improving effectiveness of modern medicines. Whether Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction is involved in CCBs pleiotropic effects also deserves special attention. Then, the pharmacological manipulation of the Ca(2+)/cAMP interaction could be a more efficient therapeutic strategy for increasing neurotransmission in psychiatric disorders, and producing neuroprotection in the neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, in this review we summarize the current knowledge of this field, making new directions and future perspectives.

  16. Percolation experiments to determine fluid-matrix interaction (with particular regard to pretreatment of the drill core); Kerndurchstroemungsversuche zur Ermittlung von Fluid-Matrix-Wechselwirkungen (unter besonderer Beruecksichtigung der Kernvorbehandlung)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, M.; Seibt, A. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Bohrtechnik und Fluidbergbau; Hoth, P. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    1997-12-01

    The injection of fluids into sandstone reservoirs leads to interactions between these waters, the reservoir rocks, and the formation fluids. Estimations about possible permeability reducing processes caused by these interactions are therefore of great importance for the exploitation of sandstone aquifers as geothermal reservoirs. Percolation experiments under in situ conditions with core samples from North German geothermal boreholes were done in order to investigate these fluid-rock interactions. (orig./AKF) [Deutsch] Die Injektion von Fluiden in Aquiferspeicher fuehrt zu Wechselwirkungen zwischen dem Speichergestein, den Formationsfluiden und den injizierten Loesungen. Fuer die Bewirtschaftung der Speicher sind insbesondere Kenntnisse ueber moegliche Permeabilitaetsreduzierungen durch diese Wechselwirkungen von Bedeutung. Mit Hilfe von Kern-Durchstroemungsexperimenten, durchgefuehrt unter lagerstaettenaehnlichen Bedingungen mit Original- bzw. modifizierten Fluiden, wurde daher das Durchstroemungsverhalten von unterschiedlich ausgebildeten Reservoirsandsteinen aus norddeutschen Geothermiebohrungen untersucht. (orig./AKF)

  17. Halogen bonding interactions between brominated ion pairs and CO2 molecules: implications for design of new and efficient ionic liquids for CO2 absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang; Lu, Yunxiang; Peng, Changjun; Hu, Jun; Liu, Honglai; Hu, Ying

    2011-04-14

    In recent years, several novel halogenated liquids with characteristics of ionic liquids (ILs) were reported. To explore their performance in the absorption of CO(2), in this work, quantum chemical calculations at DFT level have been carried out to investigate halogen bonding interactions between experimentally available brominated ion pairs and CO(2) molecules. It is shown that, as compared to B3LYP, the functional PBE yields geometrical and energetic data more close to those of MP2 for cation-CO(2) systems. The cation of brominated ILs under study can interact with CO(2) molecules through Br···O interactions, possibly making an important impact on the physical solubility of CO(2) in brominated ILs. The optimized geometries of the complexes of the ion pair with CO(2) molecules are quite similar to those of the corresponding complexes of the cation, especially for the essentially linear C-Br···O contacts. However, much weaker halogen bonds are predicted in the former systems, as indicated by the longer intermolecular distances and the smaller interaction energies. Charges derived from NBO analysis reveal the origin of the different optimized conformations and halogen bonding interactions for the CO(2) molecule. Based on the electrostatic potential results, the substitution of hydrogen atoms with fluorine atoms constituting the cation is then applied to enhance halogen bond strength. The QTAIM analysis further validates the existence of halogen bonding interaction in all complexes. The topological properties at the halogen bond critical points indicate that the Br···O interactions in the complexes are basically electrostatic in nature and belong to conventional weak halogen bonds. This study would be helpful for designing new and effective ILs for CO(2) physical absorption.

  18. Conformational mapping and energetics of saccharide-aromatic residue interactions: implications for the discrimination of anomers and epimers and in protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Manju; Sunoj, Raghavan B; Balaji, Petety V

    2012-06-07

    Aromatic residues play a key role in saccharide-binding sites. Experimental studies have given an estimate of the energetics of saccharide-aromatic residue interactions. In this study, dependence of the energetics on the mutual position-orientation (PO) of saccharide and aromatic residue has been investigated by geometry optimization of a very large number (164) of complexes at MP2/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The complexes are of Tyr and Phe analogs with α/β-D-Glc, β-D-Gal, α-D-Man and α/β-L-Fuc. A number of iso-energy POs are found for the complexes of all six saccharides. Stacking and non-stacking modes of binding are found to be of comparable strengths. In general, complexes of p-OHTol are stronger than those of Tol, and those dominated by OH···O interactions are more stable than ones dominated by CH···π interactions. The strengths of OH···O/π interactions, but not those of CH···π, show large variations. Even though an aromatic residue has a large variety of POs to interact with a saccharide, distinct preferences are found due to anomeric and epimeric differences. An aromatic residue can interact from either the a- or b-face of Glc, but only through the b-face with Gal, its C4-epimer. In contrast, stacking interaction with Man (C2-epimer of Glc) requires the participation of the -CH(2)OH group and free rotation of this group, as is observed in solution, precludes all modes of stacking interactions. It is also found that an aromatic residue can be strategically placed either to discriminate or to accommodate (i) anomers of Glc and of Fuc and (ii) Gal/Fuc. Thus, analysis of the optimized geometries of by far the largest number of complexes, and with six different saccharides, at this level of theory has given insights into how Nature cleverly uses aromatic residues to fine tune saccharide specificities of proteins. These are of immense utility for protein engineering and protein design studies.

  19. Current insights into the molecular systems pharmacology of lncRNA-miRNA regulatory interactions and implications in cancer translational medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Nair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the role(s of microRNAs (miRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of various cancers has received great attention. Indeed, there is also a growing recognition of regulatory RNA cross-talk, i.e., lncRNA-miRNA interactions, that may modulate various events in carcinogenesis and progression to metastasis. This review summarizes current evidence in the literature of lncRNA-miRNA interactions in various cancers such as breast, liver, stomach, lung, prostate, bladder, colorectal, blood, brain, skin, kidney, cervical, laryngeal, gall bladder, and bone. Further, the potential prognostic and theragnostic clinical applications of lncRNA-miRNA interactions in cancer are discussed along with an overview of noncoding RNA (ncRNA-based studies that were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO 2015. Interestingly, the last decade has seen tremendous innovation, as well as increase in complexity, of the cancer biological network(s from mRNA- to miRNA- and lncRNA-based networks. Thus, biological networks devoted to understanding regulatory interactions between these ncRNAs would be the next frontier in better elucidating the contributions of lncRNA-miRNA interactions in cancer. Herein, a cancer biological network of lncRNA-miRNA interactions is presented wherein “edges” connect interacting lncRNA-miRNA pairs, with each ncRNA serving as a discrete “node” of the network. In conclusion, the untapped potential of lncRNA-miRNA interactions in terms of its diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic potential as targets for clinically actionable intervention as well as biomarker validation in discovery pipelines remains to be explored. Future research will likely harness this potential so as to take us closer to the goal of “precision” and “personalized medicine” which is tailor-made to the unique needs of each cancer patient, and is clearly the way forward going into the future.

  20. Interactive 3D Hybrid PET/CT Imaging in the Identification of Myocardial Viability in Patients After Myocardial Infarction: Feasibility Study and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Wen Wu

    2008-06-01

    Conclusion: We present a protocol to acquire CT coronary angiography and PET data and to visualize 3D fused images with an interactive visualization interface. This image coregistration is potentially useful to facilitate the process of image interpretation and decision-making.

  1. The interaction of a histidine-rich protein hpn with the membrane mimics: implications for pathologic roles of Hpn in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinglu; Qi, Shuang; Sun, Xuesong; Ge, Ruiguang

    2014-04-01

    Hpn is a small histidine-rich protein in Helicobacter pylori. This protein has been shown to play roles in nickel storage and detoxification and to exhibit cytotoxicity to gastric epithelial cells. Hpn can be secreted outside of the bacterium and forms amyloid-like structures. To study the interactions between Hpn and membrane mimics, which may further our understanding of the pathologic roles of this bacterium. Various biochemical and biophysical methods, such as secondary structure determination be CD, calcein release assay with fluorescence spectrometry, and Laurdan and Prodan generalized polarization determination have been used to characterize the interaction between Hpn and membrane mimics. Membrane mimics induced the formation of α-helix in Hpn. The interaction disrupts the integrity of the membrane mimics and leads to the release of inner calcein probe. The experiments involving the Laurdan and Prodan fluorescence indicated that increasing the total protein/lipid ratio leads to a less ordered and more hydrated lipid membrane structure close to the water/lipid interface of lipid bilayers modeling the mitochondrial inner membrane. The present data indicated that Hpn may take part in the pathological roles of Helicobacter pylori through membrane interactions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Phylogenetic divergence of CD47 interactions with human signal regulatory protein alpha reveals locus of species specificity. Implications for the binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2007-01-19

    Cell-cell interactions between ubiquitously expressed integrin-associated protein (CD47) and its counterreceptor signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha) on phagocytes regulate a wide range of adhesive signaling processes, including the inhibition of phagocytosis as documented in mice. We show that CD47-SIRPalpha binding interactions are different between mice and humans, and we exploit phylogenetic divergence to identify the species-specific binding locus on the immunoglobulin domain of human CD47. All of the studies are conducted in the physiological context of membrane protein display on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Novel quantitative flow cytometry analyses with CD47-green fluorescent protein and soluble human SIRPalpha as a probe show that neither human CD47 nor SIRPalpha requires glycosylation for interaction. Human CD47-expressing CHO cells spread rapidly on SIRPalpha-coated glass surfaces, correlating well with the spreading of primary human T cells. In contrast, CHO cells expressing mouse CD47 spread minimally and show equally weak binding to soluble human SIRPalpha. Further phylogenetic analyses and multisite substitutions of the CD47 Ig domain show that human to cow mutation of a cluster of seven residues on adjacent strands near the middle of the domain decreases the association constant for human SIRPalpha to about one-third that of human CD47. Direct tests of cell-cell adhesion between human monocytes and CD47-displaying CHO cells affirm the species specificity as well as the importance of the newly identified binding locus in cell-cell interactions.

  3. Treatment of Plasmodium chabaudi Parasites with Curcumin in Combination with Antimalarial Drugs: Drug Interactions and Implications on the Ubiquitin/Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoraima Neto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimalarial drug resistance remains a major obstacle in malaria control. Evidence from Southeast Asia shows that resistance to artemisinin combination therapy (ACT is inevitable. Ethnopharmacological studies have confirmed the efficacy of curcumin against Plasmodium spp. Drug interaction assays between curcumin/piperine/chloroquine and curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combinations and the potential of drug treatment to interfere with the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS were analyzed. In vivo efficacy of curcumin was studied in BALB/c mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi clones resistant to chloroquine and artemisinin, and drug interactions were analyzed by isobolograms. Subtherapeutic doses of curcumin, chloroquine, and artemisinin were administered to mice, and mRNA was collected following treatment for RT-PCR analysis of genes encoding deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs. Curcumin was found be nontoxic in BALB/c mice. The combination of curcumin/chloroquine/piperine reduced parasitemia to 37% seven days after treatment versus the control group’s 65%, and an additive interaction was revealed. Curcumin/piperine/artemisinin combination did not show a favorable drug interaction in this murine model of malaria. Treatment of mice with subtherapeutic doses of the drugs resulted in a transient increase in genes encoding DUBs indicating UPS interference. If curcumin is to join the arsenal of available antimalarial drugs, future studies exploring suitable drug partners would be of interest.

  4. Pseudomorphic replacement of diopside during interaction with (Ni,Mg)Cl2 aqueous solutions : Implications for the Ni-enrichment mechanism in talc- and serpentine-type phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majumdar, Alik S.; King, Helen E.; John, Timm; Kusebauch, Christof; Putnis, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    A hydrothermal experimental study of diopside interaction with (Ni,Mg)Cl2 aqueous solutions has been carried out to clarify the replacement mechanism and pattern of element mobilization and its relevance to peridotite alteration. Three different solution compositions were used with Ni/Mg ratios of 0

  5. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex damage does not impair the development and use of common ground in social interaction: implications for cognitive theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rupa; Tranel, Daniel; Duff, Melissa C

    2012-01-01

    During conversation, interactants draw on their shared communicative context and history ("common ground") to help decide what to say next, tailoring utterances based on their knowledge of what the listener knows. The use of common ground draws on an understanding of the thoughts and feelings of others to create and update a model of what is known by the other person, employing cognitive processes such as theory of mind. We tested the hypothesis that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), a neural region involved in processing and interpreting social and emotional information, would be critical for the development and use of common ground. We studied seven patients with bilateral vmPFC damage and seven age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy comparison participants, each interacting with a familiar partner. Across 24 trials, participants verbally directed their partners how to arrange a set of 12 abstract tangram cards. Our hypothesis was not supported: the vmPFC and healthy comparison groups showed similar development and use of common ground, evident in reduction in time and words used to describe the cards, similar increases in the use of definite references (e.g., the horse), and comparable use of verbal play (playful language) in their interactions. These results argue against the idea that the vmPFC is critical for the development and use of common ground in social interaction. We propose that a cognitive and neuroanatomical bifurcation in theory of mind processes may explain this outcome. The vmPFC may be important for affective theory of mind (the ability to understand another's feelings); however, the development and use of common ground in social interaction may place higher demands on the ability to understand another's knowledge, or cognitive theory of mind, which may not require the vmPFC.

  6. Insights into the Interaction Mechanism of Ligands with Aβ42 Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Mechanics: Implications of Role of Common Binding Site in Drug Design for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundaikar, Harish S; Degani, Mariam S

    2015-10-01

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) into oligomers and further into fibrils is hypothesized to be a key factor in pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, mapping and docking were used to study the binding of ligands to protofibrils. It was followed by molecular simulations to understand the differences in interactions of known therapeutic agents such as curcumin, fluorescence-based amyloid staining agents such as thioflavin T, and diagnostic agents such as florbetapir (AV45), with Aβ protofibrils. We show that therapeutic agents bind to and distort the protofibrils, thus causing destabilization or prevention of oligomerization, in contrast to diagnostic agents which bind to but do not distort such structures. This has implications in the rational design of ligands, both for diagnostics and therapeutics of AD.

  7. A model for the interaction of frog population dynamics with Batrachochytrium dendrobaties, Janthinobacterium lividium and temperature and its implication for chytridiomycosis management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackleh, Azmy S.; Carter, Jacoby; Chellamuthu, Vinodh K.; Ma, Baoling

    2016-01-01

    Chytridiomycosis is an emerging disease caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) that poses a serious threat to frog populations worldwide. Several studies have shown that inoculation of bacterial species Janthinobacterium lividum (Jl) can mitigate the impact of the disease. However, there are many questions regarding this interaction. A mathematical model of a frog population infected with chytridiomycosis is developed to investigate how the inoculation of Jl could reduce the impact of Bd disease on frogs. The model also illustrates the important role of temperature in disease dynamics. The model simulation results suggest possible control strategies for Jl to limit the impact of Bd in various scenarios. However, a better knowledge of Jl life cycle is needed to fully understand the interaction of Jl, Bd, temperature and frogs.

  8. Computer simulations of the interaction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartic protease with spherical gold nanoparticles: implications in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Chris G.; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with human immune-deficiency virus aspartic protease (HIVPR) is modelled using a regime of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations of the ‘docking’, first as a rigid-body complex, and eventually through flexible-fit analysis, creates 36 different complexes from four initial orientations of the nanoparticle strategically positioned around the surface of the enzyme. The structural deviations of the enzymes from the initial x-ray crystal structure during each docking simulation are assessed by comparative analysis of secondary structural elements, root mean square deviations, B-factors, interactive bonding energies, dihedral angles, radius of gyration (R g), circular dichroism (CD), volume occupied by C α , electrostatic potentials, solvation energies and hydrophobicities. Normalisation of the data narrows the selection from the initial 36 to one ‘final’ probable structure. It is concluded that, after computer simulations on each of the 36 initial complexes incorporating the 12 different biophysical techniques, the top five complexes are the same no matter which technique is explored. The significance of the present work is an expansion of an earlier study on the molecular dynamic simulation for the interaction of HIVPR with silver nanoparticles. This work is supported by experimental evidence since the initial ‘orientation’ of the AgNP with the enzyme is the same as the ‘final’ AuNP-HIVPR complex generated in the present study. The findings will provide insight into the forces of the binding of the HIVPR to AuNP. It is anticipated that the protocol developed in this study will act as a standard process for the interaction of any nanoparticle with any biomedical target.

  9. A first-principles model of copper-boron interactions in Si: implications for the light-induced degradation of solar Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E.; Coutinho, J.; Öberg, S.; Torres, V. J. B.

    2017-02-01

    The recent discovery that Cu contamination of Si combined with light exposure has a significant detrimental impact on carrier life-time has drawn much concern within the solar-Si community. The effect, known as the copper-related light-induced degradation (Cu-LID) of Si solar cells, has been connected to the release of Cu interstitials within the bulk (2016 Sol. Energy Mater. Sol. Cells 147 115-26). In this paper, we describe a comprehensive analysis of the formation/dissociation process of the CuB pair in Si by means of first-principles modelling, as well as the interaction of CuB defects with photo-excited minority carriers. We confirm that the long-range interaction between the \\text{Cu}\\text{i}+ cation and the \\text{B}\\text{s}- anion has a Coulomb-like behaviour, in line with the trapping-limited diffusivity of Cu observed by transient ion drift measurements. On the other hand, the short-range interaction between the d-electrons of Cu and the excess of negative charge on \\text{B}\\text{s}- produces a repulsive effect, thereby decreasing the binding energy of the pair when compared to the ideal point-charge Coulomb model. We also find that metastable CuB pairs produce acceptor states just below the conduction band minimum, which arise from the Cu level emptied by the B acceptor. Based on these results, we argue that photo-generated minority carriers trapped by the metastable pairs can switch off the Coulomb interaction that holds the pairs together, enhancing the release of Cu interstitials, and acting as a catalyst for Cu-LID.

  10. A review of scientifc linkages and interactions between climate change and air quality, with implications for air quality management in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Tirusha Thambiran; Roseanne D. Diab

    2010-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable advancement in our scientifc understanding of the linkages and interactions between climate change and air quality. A warmer, evolving climate is likely to have severe consequences for air quality due to impacts on pollution sources and meteorology. Climate-induced changes to sources of tropospheric ozone precursor gases and to atmospheric circulation are likely to lead to changes in both the concentration and dispersion of near-surface ozone that c...

  11. The interaction of HAb18G/CD147 with integrin α6β1 and its implications for the invasion potential of human hepatoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Juan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HAb18G/CD147 plays pivotal roles in invasion by hepatoma cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Our previous study demonstrated that overexpression of HAb18G/CD147 promotes invasion by interacting with integrin α3β1. However, it has never been investigated whether α3β1 is solely responsible for this process or if other integrin family members also interact with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. Methods Human SMMC-7721 and FHCC98 cells were cultured and transfected with siRNA fragments against HAb18G/CD147. The expression levels of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1 were determined by immunofluorescent double-staining and confocal imaging analysis. Co-immunoprecipitation and Western blot analyses were performed to examine the native conformations of HAb18G/CD147 and integrin α6β1. Invasion potential was evaluated with an invasion assay and gelatin zymography. Results We found that integrin α6β1 co-localizes and interacts with HAb18G/CD147 in human hepatoma cells. The enhancing effects of HAb18G/CD147 on invasion capacity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs were partially blocked by integrin α6β1 antibodies (P 2+ mobilization, significantly reduced cell invasion potential and secretion of MMPs in human hepatoma cells (P Conclusion These results suggest that α6β1 interacts with HAb18G/CD147 to mediate tumor invasion and metastatic processes through the PI3K pathway.

  12. Computer simulations of the interaction of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartic protease with spherical gold nanoparticles: implications in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Chris G; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) with human immune-deficiency virus aspartic protease (HIVPR) is modelled using a regime of molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations of the 'docking', first as a rigid-body complex, and eventually through flexible-fit analysis, creates 36 different complexes from four initial orientations of the nanoparticle strategically positioned around the surface of the enzyme. The structural deviations of the enzymes from the initial x-ray crystal structure during each docking simulation are assessed by comparative analysis of secondary structural elements, root mean square deviations, B-factors, interactive bonding energies, dihedral angles, radius of gyration (R g), circular dichroism (CD), volume occupied by C α , electrostatic potentials, solvation energies and hydrophobicities. Normalisation of the data narrows the selection from the initial 36 to one 'final' probable structure. It is concluded that, after computer simulations on each of the 36 initial complexes incorporating the 12 different biophysical techniques, the top five complexes are the same no matter which technique is explored. The significance of the present work is an expansion of an earlier study on the molecular dynamic simulation for the interaction of HIVPR with silver nanoparticles. This work is supported by experimental evidence since the initial 'orientation' of the AgNP with the enzyme is the same as the 'final' AuNP-HIVPR complex generated in the present study. The findings will provide insight into the forces of the binding of the HIVPR to AuNP. It is anticipated that the protocol developed in this study will act as a standard process for the interaction of any nanoparticle with any biomedical target.

  13. The moderating role of an oxytocin receptor gene polymorphism in the relation between unsupportive social interactions and coping profiles: Implications for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opal Arilla Mcinnis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin is a hormone that is thought to influence prosocial behaviors and may be important in modulating responses to both positive and negative social interactions. Indeed, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR has been associated with decreased trust, empathy, optimism and social support seeking, which are important components of coping with stressors. In the current study, conducted among undergraduate students (N=225, it was shown that parental and peer social support was related to fewer depressive symptoms through elevated problem-focused coping and lower emotion-focused coping, and these effects were independent of the OXTR polymorphism. Unsupportive social interactions from parents were associated with more severe depressive symptoms through the greater use of emotion-focused coping, and this relation was moderated by the OXTR genotype. Specifically, individuals who carried the polymorphism on one or both of their alleles demonstrated increased emotion-focused coping following unsupportive responses compared to those without the polymorphism. Likewise, lower problem-focused coping mediated the relation between parental and peer unsupportive responses to depressive symptoms, but this mediated relation was only evident among carriers of the polymorphism. These findings suggest that carrying this OXTR polymorphism might favor disadvantageous coping styles in the face of negative social interactions, which in turn are linked to poor mood. Regardless of genotype, parental and peer social support are fundamental in determining stress-related coping and well-being.

  14. Genetic Association and Gene-gene interaction of HAS2, HABP1 and HYAL3 Implicate Hyaluronan Metabolic Genes in Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustuv Basu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan (HA plays a significant role in maintaining aqueous humor outflow in trabecular meshwork, the primary ocular tissue involved in glaucoma. We examined potential association of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the HA synthesizing gene – hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2, hyaluronan binding protein 1 (HABP1 and HA catabolic gene hyaluronidase 3 (HYAL3 in the primary open angle glaucoma (POAG patients in the Indian population. Thirteen tagged SNPs (6 for HAS2, 3 for HABP1 and 4 for HYAL3 were genotyped in 116 high tension (HTG, 321 non-high tension glaucoma (NHTG samples and 96 unrelated, age-matched, glaucoma-negative, control samples. Allelic and genotypic association were analyzed by PLINK v1.04; haplotypes were identified using PHASE v2.1 and gene-gene interaction was analyzed using multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR v2.0. An allelic association (rs6651224; p = 0.03; OR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.25–0.94 was observed at the second intron (C>G of HAS2 both for NHTG and HTG. rs1057308 revealed a genotypic association (p = 0.03 at the 5’ UTR of HAS2 with only HTG. TCT haplotype (rs1805429 – rs2472614 – rs8072363 in HABP1 and TTAG and TTGA (rs2285044 – rs3774753 – rs1310073 – rs1076872 in HYAL3 were found to be significantly high (p < 0.05 both for HTG and NHTG compared to controls. Gene-gene interaction revealed HABP1 predominantly interacts with HAS2 in HTG while it associates with both HYAL3 and HAS2 in NHTG. This is the first genetic evidence, albeit from a smaller study, that the natural polymorphisms in the genes involved in hyaluronan metabolism are potentially involved in glaucomatous neurodegeneration.

  15. Sex-specific genotype-by-environment interactions for cuticular hydrocarbon expression in decorated crickets, Gryllodes sigillatus: implications for the evolution of signal reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weddle, C B; Mitchell, C; Bay, S K; Sakaluk, S K; Hunt, J

    2012-10-01

    Phenotypic traits that convey information about individual identity or quality are important in animal social interactions, and the degree to which such traits are influenced by environmental variation can have profound effects on the reliability of these cues. Using inbred genetic lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, we manipulated diet quality to test how the cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles of males and females respond across two different nutritional rearing environments. There were significant differences between lines in the CHC profiles of females, but the effect of diet was not quite statistically significant. There was no significant genotype-by-environment interaction (GEI), suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic variation in female CHCs are independent of genotype. There was, however, a significant effect of GEI for males, with changes in both signal quantity and content, suggesting that environmental effects on phenotypic expression of male CHCs are dependent on genotype. The differential response of male and female CHC expression to variation in the nutritional environment suggests that these chemical cues may be under sex-specific selection for signal reliability. Female CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of identity: high genetic variability, low condition dependence and a high degree of genetic determination. This supports earlier work showing that female CHCs are used in self-recognition to identify previous mates and facilitate polyandry. In contrast, male CHCs show the characteristics of reliable cues of quality: condition dependence and a relatively higher degree of environmental determination. This suggests that male CHCs are likely to function as cues of underlying quality during mate choice and/or male dominance interactions.

  16. Interactive effects of supplemental UV-B and temperature in European aspen seedlings: Implications for growth, leaf traits, phenolic defense and associated organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamanana, Tendry R; Lavola, Anu; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2015-08-01

    Past studies reveal opposite effects of elevated UV-B and temperature on plant growth and concentrations of UV-B absorbing compounds, yet few studies have dealt with the combined and interactive effects of these two climate change factors on woody dioecious plants. We investigated the interactive effects of UV-B and temperature treatments on growth, leaf traits and phenolic concentrations in Populus tremula L. (European aspen) seedlings. We also considered the consequences of these effects on their associated organisms: herbivorous insects, rust pathogens, the presence of endophytic fungi and whether or not the responses differ between genders and genotypes. Supplemental temperature and UV-B were modulated to +2 °C and +30.77% above ambient conditions, respectively. Warming increased growth, photosynthesis and foliar nitrogen concentration but reduced leaf thickness and phenolic concentrations. On the other hand, supplemental UV-B increased total phenolic glycosides, mainly flavonols and phenolic acids, and partially counteracted the positive effects of warming on growth. Fast growing genotypes were less susceptible to the growth-reducing effect of combined UVB + T, less infected with rust disease and less prone to insect damage probably due to their higher salicylate and lower nitrogen concentrations. Under ambient temperature, the males of European aspen were taller and had bigger leaves than the females, while under elevated temperature, females grew bigger and, under UV-B, had more tremulacin than males. The multiple interactive effects of UV-B and temperature on growth, leaf traits and phenolic compounds, highlight the importance of multifactor experiments as a realistic predictor of plant responses to climate change.

  17. Novel interactions between the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 and the NFAR protein family: Implications for the HTLV lifecycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, Jane; Hall, William W. [Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Ratner, Lee [Department of Medicine, Division of Molecular Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri, United States of America (United States); Sheehy, Noreen [Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine and Medical Science, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2016-07-15

    The human T-cell leukaemia virus type 1 and type 2 (HTLV-1/HTLV-2) antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2 play key roles in the HTLV lifecycles and persistence in the host. Nuclear Factors Associated with double-stranded RNA (NFAR) proteins NF90/110 function in the lifecycles of several viruses and participate in host innate immunity against infection and oncogenesis. Using GST pulldown and co-immunoprecipitation assays we demonstrate specific novel interactions between HBZ/APH-2 and NF90/110 and characterised the protein domains involved. Moreover we show that NF90/110 significantly enhance Tax mediated LTR activation, an effect that was abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. Additionally we found that HBZ and APH-2 modulate the promoter activity of survivin and are capable of antagonising NF110-mediated survivin activation. Thus interactions between HTLV antisense proteins and the NFAR protein family have an overall positive impact on HTLV infection. Hence NFARs may represent potential therapeutic targets in HTLV infected cells. - Highlights: • This study demonstrates for the first time interactions between NF90/110 and the HTLV antisense proteins HBZ and APH-2. • We show that NF90/110 significantly enhance LTR activation by the HTLV Tax protein, an effect that is abolished by HBZ but enhanced by APH-2. • The study shows that even though the HTLV antisense proteins activate survivin expression they antagonize the ability of NF90/110 to do so. • Overall we found that NF90/110 positively regulate HTLV infection and as such might represent a therapeutic target in infected cells.

  18. Complex interactions between dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like compounds for in vitro cellular responses: implications for the identification of dioxin exposure biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kane, Anthony A; Elliott, Chris T; Mooney, Mark H

    2014-02-17

    Despite considerable advances in reducing the production of dioxin-like toxicants in recent years, contamination of the food chain still occasionally occurs resulting in huge losses to the agri-food sector and risk to human health through exposure. Dioxin-like toxicity is exhibited by a range of stable and bioaccumulative compounds including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs), produced by certain types of combustion, and man-made coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as found in electrical transformer oils. While dioxinergic compounds act by a common mode of action making exposure detection biomarker based techniques a potentially useful tool, the influence of co-contaminating toxicants on such approaches needs to be considered. To assess the impact of possible interactions, the biological responses of H4IIE cells to challenge by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) in combination with PCB-52 and benzo-a-pyrene (BaP) were evaluated by a number of methods in this study. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) induction in TCDD exposed cells was suppressed by increasing concentrations of PCB-52, PCB-153, or BaP up to 10 μM. BaP levels below 1 μM suppressed TCDD stimulated EROD induction, but at higher concentrations, EROD induction was greater than the maximum observed when cells were treated with TCDD alone. A similar biphasic interaction of BaP with TCDD co-exposure was noted in the AlamarBlue assay and to a lesser extent with PCB-52. Surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF) profiling of peptidomic responses of cells exposed to compound combinations was compared. Cells co-exposed to TCDD in the presence of BaP or PCB-52 produced the most differentiated spectra with a substantial number of non-additive interactions observed. These findings suggest that interactions between dioxin and other toxicants create novel, additive, and non-additive effects, which may be more indicative

  19. Analysis of an ankyrin-like region in Epstein Barr Virus encoded (EBV BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein: implications for interactions with NF-κB and p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoda Lucy Y

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The carboxyl terminal of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV ZEBRA protein (also termed BZLF-1 encoded replication protein Zta or ZEBRA binds to both NF-κB and p53. The authors have previously suggested that this interaction results from an ankyrin-like region of the ZEBRA protein since ankyrin proteins such as IκB interact with NF-κB and p53 proteins. These interactions may play a role in immunopathology and viral carcinogenesis in B lymphocytes as well as other cell types transiently infected by EBV such as T lymphocytes, macrophages and epithelial cells. Methods Randomization of the ZEBRA terminal amino acid sequence followed by statistical analysis suggest that the ZEBRA carboxyl terminus is most closely related to ankyrins of the invertebrate cactus IκB-like protein. This observation is consistent with an ancient origin of ZEBRA resulting from a recombination event between an ankyrin regulatory protein and a fos/jun DNA binding factor. In silico modeling of the partially solved ZEBRA carboxyl terminus structure using PyMOL software demonstrate that the carboxyl terminus region of ZEBRA can form a polymorphic structure termed ZANK (ZEBRA ANKyrin-like region similar to two adjacent IκB ankyrin domains. Conclusions Viral capture of an ankyrin-like domain provides a mechanism for ZEBRA binding to proteins in the NF-κB and p53 transcription factor families, and also provides support for a process termed "Ping-Pong Evolution" in which DNA viruses such as EBV are formed by exchange of information with the host genome. An amino acid polymorphism in the ZANK region is identified in ZEBRA from tumor cell lines including Akata that could alter binding of Akata ZEBRA to the p53 tumor suppressor and other ankyrin binding protein, and a novel model of antagonistic binding interactions between ZANK and the DNA binding regions of ZEBRA is suggested that may be explored in further biochemical and molecular biological models of viral

  20. Identification of the first inhibitor of the GBP1:PIM1 interaction. Implications for the development of a new class of anticancer agents against paclitaxel resistant cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Mirko; Persico, Marco; Kumar, Ajay; Orteca, Nausicaa; Kumar, Vineet; Pepe, Antonella; Mahalingam, Sakkarapalayam; Alegria, Antonio E; Petrella, Lella; Sevciunaite, Laima; Camperchioli, Alessia; Mariani, Marisa; Di Dato, Antonio; Novellino, Ettore; Scambia, Giovanni; Malhotra, Sanjay V; Ferlini, Cristiano; Fattorusso, Caterina

    2014-10-09

    Class III β-tubulin plays a prominent role in the development of drug resistance to paclitaxel by allowing the incorporation of the GBP1 GTPase into microtubules. Once in the cytoskeleton, GBP1 binds to prosurvival kinases such as PIM1 and initiates a signaling pathway that induces resistance to paclitaxel. Therefore, the inhibition of the GBP1:PIM1 interaction could potentially revert resistance to paclitaxel. A panel of 44 4-azapodophyllotoxin derivatives was screened in the NCI-60 cell panel. The result is that 31 are active and the comparative analysis demonstrated specific activity in paclitaxel-resistant cells. Using surface plasmon resonance, we were able to prove that NSC756093 is a potent in vitro inhibitor of the GBP1:PIM1 interaction and that this property is maintained in vivo in ovarian cancer cells resistant to paclitaxel. Through bioinformatics, molecular modeling, and mutagenesis studies, we identified the putative NSC756093 binding site at the interface between the helical and the LG domain of GBP1. According to our results by binding to this site, the NSC756093 compound is able to stabilize a conformation of GBP1 not suitable for binding to PIM1.

  1. BmP02 Atypically Delays Kv4.2 Inactivation: Implication for a Unique Interaction between Scorpion Toxin and Potassium Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BmP02, a short-chain peptide with 28 residues from the venom of Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, has been reported to inhibit the transient outward potassium currents (Ito in rat ventricular muscle cells. However, it remains unclear whether BmP02 modulates the Kv4.2 channel, one of the main contributors to Ito. The present study investigated the effects of BmP02 on Kv4.2 kinetics and its underlying molecular mechanism. The electrophysiological recordings showed that the inactivation of Kv4.2 expressed in HEK293T cells was significantly delayed by BmP02 in a dose-response manner with EC50 of ~850 nM while the peak current, activation and voltage-dependent inactivation of Kv4.2 were not affected. Meanwhile, the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 was accelerated and the deactivation was slowed after the application of BmP02. The site-directed mutagenesis combined with computational modelling identified that K347 and K353, located in the turret motif of the Kv4.2, and E4/E5, D20/D21 in BmP02 are key residues to interact with BmP02 through electrostatic force. These findings not only reveal a novel interaction between Kv4.2 channel and its peptidyl modulator, but also provide valuable information for design of highly-selective Kv4.2 modulators.

  2. Implications of saline concentrations for the performance and competitive interactions of the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) and Aedes albopictus (Stegomyia albopictus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, D A; Himel, E; Reiskind, M H; Vamosi, S M

    2014-03-01

    Aedes albopictus (Stegomyia albopictus) (Diptera: Culicidae) has probably supplanted Aedes aegypti (Stegomyia aegypti) throughout most of its historical range in the U.S.A., although Ae. aegypti still exists in large coastal cities in southern Florida. We measured salt concentrations in field containers along an axis perpendicular to the coast and examined intraspecific outcomes in these species under different salt concentrations in a factorial study using varying intra- and interspecific densities in different conditions of salinity to order to determine if salt could mitigate the documented competitive superiority of Ae. albopictus. Salt in field containers declined away from the coast, with maximal values similar to our lower salt concentrations. Egg hatching and short-term survival of pupae and late instars were not affected by salt concentrations; survival of early instars of both species decreased at higher concentrations. In high salt conditions, Ae. aegypti achieved higher survival. In the longterm experiment, both species displayed longer development times. Salt did not affect interactions for either species; Ae. aegypti survived in the highest salt conditions, regardless of density. The tolerance of Ae. aegypti to high salt concentrations may allow it to use coastal containers, although because salt did not mediate interspecific interactions between Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, the ultimate effects of salt on the coexistence of these species or exclusion of either species remain unknown.

  3. BmP02 Atypically Delays Kv4.2 Inactivation: Implication for a Unique Interaction between Scorpion Toxin and Potassium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Zhu, Yan; Shi, Jian; Tao, Jie; Ji, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    BmP02, a short-chain peptide with 28 residues from the venom of Chinese scorpion Buthus martensi Karsch, has been reported to inhibit the transient outward potassium currents (Ito) in rat ventricular muscle cells. However, it remains unclear whether BmP02 modulates the Kv4.2 channel, one of the main contributors to Ito. The present study investigated the effects of BmP02 on Kv4.2 kinetics and its underlying molecular mechanism. The electrophysiological recordings showed that the inactivation of Kv4.2 expressed in HEK293T cells was significantly delayed by BmP02 in a dose-response manner with EC50 of ~850 nM while the peak current, activation and voltage-dependent inactivation of Kv4.2 were not affected. Meanwhile, the recovery from inactivation of Kv4.2 was accelerated and the deactivation was slowed after the application of BmP02. The site-directed mutagenesis combined with computational modelling identified that K347 and K353, located in the turret motif of the Kv4.2, and E4/E5, D20/D21 in BmP02 are key residues to interact with BmP02 through electrostatic force. These findings not only reveal a novel interaction between Kv4.2 channel and its peptidyl modulator, but also provide valuable information for design of highly-selective Kv4.2 modulators. PMID:27690098

  4. Molecular Interaction and Cellular Location of RecA and CheW Proteins in Salmonella enterica during SOS Response and Their Implication in Swarming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irazoki, Oihane; Aranda, Jesús; Zimmermann, Timo; Campoy, Susana; Barbé, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its role in DNA damage repair and recombination, the RecA protein, through its interaction with CheW, is involved in swarming motility, a form of flagella-dependent movement across surfaces. In order to better understand how SOS response modulates swarming, in this work the location of RecA and CheW proteins within the swarming cells has been studied by using super-resolution microscopy. Further, and after in silico docking studies, the specific RecA and CheW regions associated with the RecA-CheW interaction have also been confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation techniques. Our results point out that the CheW distribution changes, from the cell poles to foci distributed in a helical pattern along the cell axis when SOS response is activated or RecA protein is overexpressed. In this situation, the CheW presents the same subcellular location as that of RecA, pointing out that the previously described RecA storage structures may be modulators of swarming motility. Data reported herein not only confirmed that the RecA-CheW pair is essential for swarming motility but it is directly involved in the CheW distribution change associated to SOS response activation. A model explaining not only the mechanism by which DNA damage modulates swarming but also how both the lack and the excess of RecA protein impair this motility is proposed. PMID:27766091

  5. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    for regulation of SNAP23 were also investigated in the skeletal muscle cell line L6. RESULTS: We showed increased SNAP23 levels in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes compared with that from lean control subjects. Moreover, SNAP23 was redistributed from the plasma membrane to the microsomal....../cytosolic compartment in the patients with the type 2 diabetes. Expression of the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c was higher in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes. Studies in L6 cells showed that Munc18c promoted the expression of SNAP23. CONCLUSIONS: We have translated our previous in vitro results...... into humans by showing that there is a change in the distribution of SNAP23 to the interior of the cell in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes. We also showed that Munc18c is a potential regulator of SNAP23....

  6. A review of scientifc linkages and interactions between climate change and air quality, with implications for air quality management in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirusha Thambiran

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been considerable advancement in our scientifc understanding of the linkages and interactions between climate change and air quality. A warmer, evolving climate is likely to have severe consequences for air quality due to impacts on pollution sources and meteorology. Climate-induced changes to sources of tropospheric ozone precursor gases and to atmospheric circulation are likely to lead to changes in both the concentration and dispersion of near-surface ozone that could act to offset improvements in air quality. The control of air pollutants through air quality management is also likely to impact on climate change, with reductions in ozone, particulate matter and sulphur dioxide being of particular interest. The improved understanding of the relationship between air quality and climate change provides a scientific basis for policy interventions. After a review of the scientific linkages, the potential to include climate change considerations in air quality management planning processes in South Africa was examined.

  7. Quantitative analysis of epithelial cells in urine from men with and without urethritis: implications for studying epithelial: pathogen interactions in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittington Kate

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epithelial cells in first catch urine (FCU specimens from 87 men with and without urethritis were quantified. Epithelial cells were broadly categorised into transitional and squamous populations using morphological characteristics and immunostaining with anti-pan leukocyte and anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibodies. Findings The majority (77/87 = 89% of samples contained both transitional (76/87 = 87%; range 1 × 104 – 6 × 105, median 6 × 104 and squamous (57/87 = 66%; range 1 × 104 – 8 × 105, median 2 × 104 epithelial cells. The number of transitional cells correlated with the number of squamous cells (Spearman's rho = 0.697 p Conclusion Further studies are required to explore the complexity of epithelial cell populations in urine. These would provide novel opportunities for studying cellular interactions of C. trachomatis in male urethral infections, about which little is currently known.

  8. Molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition and epithelial-stromal interaction in phyllodes tumors: implications for histologic grade and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ji Eun; Jung, Woo-Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of molecules associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and epithelial-stromal interactions (ESI) and to evaluate their roles in phyllodes tumors (PTs). Tissue microarrays (TMAs) were constructed from 207 PT specimens (157 benign, 34 borderline and 16 malignant). The presence of EMT-related markers including N-cadherin, Twist, TGF-beta, HMGA2, S100A4 and Ezrin as well as ESI-related molecules such as SDF1 and CXCR4 among the TMAs was assessed immunohistochemically. Immunohistochemical results were analyzed in terms of clinicopathologic parameters. For higher grade PTs, expressions of Twist (p EMT-associated molecules, and CXCR4, an ESI-associated molecule, were increased in the stromal component of advanced grade PTs. Further, high expression of Twist in the stromal component was correlated with poorer prognoses.

  9. Ero1-PDI interactions, the response to redox flux and the implications for disulfide bond formation in the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham, Adam M; van Lith, Marcel; Sitia, Roberto; Braakman, Ineke

    2013-05-05

    The protein folding machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) ensures that proteins entering the eukaryotic secretory pathway acquire appropriate post-translational modifications and reach a stably folded state. An important component of this protein folding process is the supply of disulfide bonds. These are introduced into client proteins by ER resident oxidoreductases, including ER oxidoreductin 1 (Ero1). Ero1 is usually considered to function in a linear pathway, by 'donating' a disulfide bond to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and receiving electrons that are passed on to the terminal electron acceptor molecular oxygen. PDI engages with a range of clients as the direct catalyst of disulfide bond formation, isomerization or reduction. In this paper, we will consider the interactions of Ero1 with PDI family proteins and chaperones, highlighting the effect that redox flux has on Ero1 partnerships. In addition, we will discuss whether higher order protein complexes play a role in Ero1 function.

  10. Terrace-Width Distributions (TWDs) of Touching Steps: Modification of the Fermion Analogy, with Implications for Measuring Step-Step Interactions on Vicinals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, T. L.; Sathiyanarayanan, Rajesh; Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Kim, Kwangmoo

    2010-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we computefootnotetextRS, ABH, and TLE, Phys. Rev. B 80 (2009) 153415. the TWDs of surfaces in which steps can touch each other, forming multiple-atomic height steps, but cannot cross (no overhangs), and so inconsistent with the standard mapping to spinless fermions. Our numerical results show that the generalized Wigner distribution, with minor modifications at small step separations, gives a very good fit for TWDs of touching steps. (We also generate analytic results by generalizing results for extended fermions.footnotetextSiew-Ann Cheong and C.L. Henley, arXiv:0907.4228v1.) The interaction strength derived from the fit parameter indicates an effective attraction between steps, weakening the overall repulsion. The strength of this effective attraction decreases for larger mean-step separations and decreasing step-touching energies; describable via finite-size scaling. Hence, accurate extraction of the true repulsion strength requires multiple vicinalities.

  11. Development of the anti-gravitational system in land plants and its implication for the interaction between plants and other organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki

    2003-06-01

    After they first went ashore during the Silurian epoch, plants have developed the anti-gravitational system to survive under terrestrial environment with the strong gravitational force. The cell wall acts as a principal component of the anti-gravitational system in plants, probably with the aid of links to the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. The cell wall has well developed in land plants and often represents more than 90% of the dry weight of the plant. The development of the cell wall has greatly influenced the interaction between plants and other organisms, such as feeding, sheltering, invasion, and symbiosis, and has been involved in the regulation of the global environment throughout the evolution.

  12. Zinc thiolate reactivity toward nitrogen oxides: insights into the interaction of Zn2+ with S-nitrosothiols and implications for nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhukh, Julia; Lippard, Stephen J

    2012-07-02

    Zinc thiolate complexes containing N(2)S tridentate ligands were prepared to investigate their reactivity toward reactive nitrogen species, chemistry proposed to occur at the zinc tetracysteine thiolate site of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The complexes are unreactive toward nitric oxide (NO) in the absence of dioxygen, strongly indicating that NO cannot be the species directly responsible for S-nitrosothiol formation and loss of Zn(2+) at the NOS dimer interface in vivo. S-Nitrosothiol formation does occur upon exposure of zinc thiolate solutions to NO in the presence of air, however, or to NO(2) or NOBF(4), indicating that these reactive nitrogen/oxygen species are capable of liberating zinc from the enzyme, possibly through generation of the S-nitrosothiol. Interaction between simple Zn(2+) salts and preformed S-nitrosothiols leads to decomposition of the -SNO moiety, resulting in release of gaseous NO and N(2)O. The potential biological relevance of this chemistry is discussed.

  13. Interactions of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes with the immune system of the skin and the possible implications related to cutaneous nanotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Castro Fernandes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the interaction of carbon nanotubes and fullerenes with the constituents of the skin, especially the skin immune unit, is relevant to the determina-tion of toxicological endpoints. A systematic review was done focused on such aspects. Considerable part of the found references concentrated in cytotoxicity and skin per-meation. On a smaller scale, there are articles on immunomodulation and activation of immune cells and other elements. Few of the found studies deal specifically with cutaneous immune response, limiting the related knowledge. The findings suggest that nanomaterials studied may be involved in skin problems such irritant contact dermatitis, anaphylactoid reactions, urticaria, angioedema, and raised the need for performing additional studies to confirm the findings. The standardization of the description and testing of nanomaterials characteristics used in experiments can facilitate comparison of results.

  14. Dynamics of bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cell/mesenchymal stem cell interaction in co-culture and its implications in angiogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguirre, A.; Planell, J.A. [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Maria de Luna 11, Ed. CEEI, 50118 Zaragoza (Spain); Engel, E., E-mail: elisabeth.engel@upc.edu [Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), Baldiri Reixac 15-21, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Dept. of Material Science and Metallurgical Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia (UPC), ETSEIB, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); CIBER-BBN, Maria de Luna 11, Ed. CEEI, 50118 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} BM-EPCs and MSCs establish complex, self-organizing structures in co-culture. {yields} Co-culture decreases proliferation by cellular self-regulatory mechanisms. {yields} Co-cultured cells present an activated proangiogenic phenotype. {yields} qRT-PCR and cluster analysis identify new target genes playing important roles. -- Abstract: Tissue engineering aims to regenerate tissues and organs by using cell and biomaterial-based approaches. One of the current challenges in the field is to promote proper vascularization in the implant to prevent cell death and promote host integration. Bone marrow endothelial progenitor cells (BM-EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are bone marrow resident stem cells widely employed for proangiogenic applications. In vivo, they are likely to interact frequently both in the bone marrow and at sites of injury. In this study, the physical and biochemical interactions between BM-EPCs and MSCs in an in vitro co-culture system were investigated to further clarify their roles in vascularization. BM-EPC/MSC co-cultures established close cell-cell contacts soon after seeding and self-assembled to form elongated structures at 3 days. Besides direct contact, cells also exhibited vesicle transport phenomena. When co-cultured in Matrigel, tube formation was greatly enhanced even in serum-starved, growth factor free medium. Both MSCs and BM-EPCs contributed to these tubes. However, cell proliferation was greatly reduced in co-culture and morphological differences were observed. Gene expression and cluster analysis for wide panel of angiogenesis-related transcripts demonstrated up-regulation of angiogenic markers but down-regulation of many other cytokines. These data suggest that cross-talk occurs in between BM-EPCs and MSCs through paracrine and direct cell contact mechanisms leading to modulation of the angiogenic response.

  15. Interactions Between Snow-Adapted Organisms, Minerals and Snow in a Mars-Analog Environment, and Implications for the Possible Formation of Mineral Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausrath, E.; Bartlett, C. L.; Garcia, A. H.; Tschauner, O. D.; Murray, A. E.; Raymond, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that icy environments on bodies such as Mars, Europa, and Enceladus may be important potential habitats in our solar system. Life in icy environments faces many challenges, including water limitation, temperature extremes, and nutrient limitation. Understanding how life has adapted to withstand these challenges on Earth may help understand potential life on other icy worlds, and understanding the interactions of such life with minerals may help shed light on the detection of possible mineral biosignatures. Snow environments, being particularly nutrient limited, may require specific adaptations by the microbiota living there. Previous observations have suggested that associated minerals and microorganisms play an important role in snow algae micronutrient acquisition. Here, in order to interpret micronutrient uptake by snow algae, and potential formation of mineral biosignatures, we present observations of interactions between snow algae and associated microorganisms and minerals in both natural, Mars-analog environments, and laboratory experiments. Samples of snow, dust, snow algae, and microorganisms were collected from Mount Anderson Ridge, CA. Some samples were DAPI-stained and analyzed by epifluorescent microscopy, and others were freeze-dried and examined by scanning electron microscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Xenic cultures of the snow alga Chloromonas brevispina were also grown under Fe-limiting conditions with and without the Fe-containing mineral nontronite to determine impacts of the mineral on algal growth. Observations from epifluorescent microscopy show bacteria closely associated with the snow algae, consistent with a potential role in micronutrient acquisition. Particles are also present on the algal cell walls, and synchrotron-XRD and XRF observations indicate that they are Fe-rich, and may therefore be a micronutrient source. Laboratory experiments indicated

  16. Role of Electrostatic Interactions on the Transport of Druglike Molecules in Hydrogel-Based Articular Cartilage Mimics: Implications for Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fengbin; Baldursdottir, Stefania; Hvidt, Søren; Jensen, Henrik; Larsen, Susan W; Yaghmur, Anan; Larsen, Claus; Østergaard, Jesper

    2016-03-07

    In the field of drug delivery to the articular cartilage, it is advantageous to apply artificial tissue models as surrogates of cartilage for investigating drug transport and release properties. In this study, artificial cartilage models consisting of 0.5% (w/v) agarose gel containing 0.5% (w/v) chondroitin sulfate or 0.5% (w/v) hyaluronic acid were developed, and their rheological and morphological properties were characterized. UV imaging was utilized to quantify the transport properties of the following four model compounds in the agarose gel and in the developed artificial cartilage models: H-Ala-β-naphthylamide, H-Lys-Lys-β-naphthylamide, lysozyme, and α-lactalbumin. The obtained results showed that the incorporation of the polyelectrolytes chondroitin sulfate or hyaluronic acid into agarose gel induced a significant reduction in the apparent diffusivities of the cationic model compounds as compared to the pure agarose gel. The decrease in apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds was not caused by a change in the gel structure since a similar reduction in apparent diffusivity was not observed for the net negatively charged protein α-lactalbumin. The apparent diffusivity of the cationic compounds in the negatively charged hydrogels was highly dependent on the ionic strength, pointing out the importance of electrostatic interactions between the diffusant and the polyelectrolytes. Solution based affinity studies between the model compounds and the two investigated polyelectrolytes further confirmed the electrostatic nature of their interactions. The results obtained from the UV imaging diffusion studies are important for understanding the effect of drug physicochemical properties on the transport in articular cartilage. The extracted information may be useful in the development of hydrogels for in vitro release testing having features resembling the articular cartilage.

  17. Groundwater–surface water interactions, vegetation dependencies and implications for water resources management in the semi-arid Hailiutu River catchment, China – a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, large-scale land use changes took place in the Hailiutu River catchment, a semi-arid area in northwest China. These changes had significant impacts on the water resources in the area. Insights into groundwater and surface water interactions and vegetation-water dependencies help to understand these impacts and formulate sustainable water resources management policies. In this study, groundwater and surface water interactions were identified using the baseflow index at the catchment scale, and hydraulic and water temperature methods as well as event hydrograph separation techniques at the sub-catchment scale. The results show that almost 90% of the river discharge consists of groundwater. Vegetation dependencies on groundwater were analysed from the relationship between the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and groundwater depth at the catchment scale and along an ecohydrogeological cross-section, and by measuring the sap flow of different plants, soil water contents and groundwater levels at different research sites. The results show that all vegetation types, i.e. trees (willow (Salix matsudana and poplar (Populus simonii, bushes (salix – Salix psammophila, and agricultural crops (maize – Zea mays, depend largely on groundwater as the source for transpiration. The comparative analysis indicates that maize crops use the largest amount of water, followed by poplar trees, salix bushes, and willow trees. For sustainable water use with the objective of satisfying the water demand for socio-economical development and to prevent desertification and ecological impacts on streams, more water-use-efficient crops such as sorghum, barley or millet should be promoted to reduce the consumptive water use. Willow trees should be used as wind-breaks in croplands and along roads, and drought-resistant and less water-use intensive plants (for instance native bushes should be used to vegetate sand dunes.

  18. Structure-based computational study of two disease resistance gene homologues (Hm1 and Hm2) in maize (Zea mays L.) with implications in plant-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehury, Budheswar; Patra, Mahesh Chandra; Maharana, Jitendra; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta; Barooah, Madhumita

    2014-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent HC-toxin reductases (HCTR1 and 2) encoded by enzymatic class of disease resistance homologous genes (Hm1 and Hm2) protect maize by detoxifying a cyclic tetrapeptide, HC-toxin, secreted by the fungus Cochliobolus carbonum race 1(CCR1). Unlike the other classes' resistance (R) genes, HCTR-mediated disease resistance is an inimitable mechanism where the avirulence (Avr) component from CCR1 is not involved in toxin degradation. In this study, we attempted to decipher cofactor (NADPH) recognition and mode of HC-toxin binding to HCTRs through molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and binding free energy calculation methods. The rationality and the stability of docked complexes were validated by 30-ns MD simulation. The binding free energy decomposition of enzyme-cofactor complex was calculated to find the driving force behind cofactor recognition. The overall binding free energies of HCTR1-NADPH and HCTR2-NADPH were found to be -616.989 and -16.9749 kJ mol-1 respectively. The binding free energy decomposition revealed that the binding of NADPH to the HCTR1 is mainly governed by van der Waals and nonpolar interactions, whereas electrostatic terms play dominant role in stabilizing the binding mode between HCTR2 and NADPH. Further, docking analysis of HC-toxin with HCTR-NADPH complexes showed a distinct mode of binding and the complexes were stabilized by a strong network of hydrogen bond and hydrophobic interactions. This study is the first in silico attempt to unravel the biophysical and biochemical basis of cofactor recognition in enzymatic class of R genes in cereal crop maize.

  19. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  20. Interaction between forest biodiversity and people’s use of forest resources in Roviana, Solomon Islands: implications for biocultural conservation under socioeconomic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In Solomon Islands, forests have provided people with ecological services while being affected by human use and protection. This study used a quantitative ethnobotanical analysis to explore the society–forest interaction and its transformation in Roviana, Solomon Islands. We compared local plant and land uses between a rural village and urbanized village. Special attention was paid to how local people depend on biodiversity and how traditional human modifications of forest contribute to biodiversity conservation. Methods After defining locally recognized land-use classes, vegetation surveys were conducted in seven forest classes. For detailed observations of daily plant uses, 15 and 17 households were randomly selected in the rural and urban villages, respectively. We quantitatively documented the plant species that were used as food, medicine, building materials, and tools. Results The vegetation survey revealed that each local forest class represented a different vegetative community with relatively low similarity between communities. Although commercial logging operations and agriculture were both prohibited in the customary nature reserve, local people were allowed to cut down trees for their personal use and to take several types of non-timber forest products. Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island’s primary forest (68.4%) and the main island’s reserve (68.3%). Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village. In the rural village, customary governance and control over the use of forest resources by the local people still functioned. Conclusions Human modifications of the forest created unique vegetation communities, thus increasing biodiversity overall. Each type of forest had different species that varied in their levels of importance to the local subsistence lifestyle, and the villagers’ behaviors, such as respect for forest reserves and the

  1. Interaction between forest biodiversity and people's use of forest resources in Roviana, Solomon Islands: implications for biocultural conservation under socioeconomic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Takuro; Sirikolo, Myknee Qusa; Sasaoka, Masatoshi; Ohtsuka, Ryutaro

    2014-01-27

    In Solomon Islands, forests have provided people with ecological services while being affected by human use and protection. This study used a quantitative ethnobotanical analysis to explore the society-forest interaction and its transformation in Roviana, Solomon Islands. We compared local plant and land uses between a rural village and urbanized village. Special attention was paid to how local people depend on biodiversity and how traditional human modifications of forest contribute to biodiversity conservation. After defining locally recognized land-use classes, vegetation surveys were conducted in seven forest classes. For detailed observations of daily plant uses, 15 and 17 households were randomly selected in the rural and urban villages, respectively. We quantitatively documented the plant species that were used as food, medicine, building materials, and tools. The vegetation survey revealed that each local forest class represented a different vegetative community with relatively low similarity between communities. Although commercial logging operations and agriculture were both prohibited in the customary nature reserve, local people were allowed to cut down trees for their personal use and to take several types of non-timber forest products. Useful trees were found at high frequencies in the barrier island's primary forest (68.4%) and the main island's reserve (68.3%). Various useful tree species were found only in the reserve forest and seldom available in the urban village. In the rural village, customary governance and control over the use of forest resources by the local people still functioned. Human modifications of the forest created unique vegetation communities, thus increasing biodiversity overall. Each type of forest had different species that varied in their levels of importance to the local subsistence lifestyle, and the villagers' behaviors, such as respect for forest reserves and the semidomestication of some species, contributed to

  2. Conformational states of Ras complexed with the GTP analogue GppNHp or GppCH2p: implications for the interaction with effector proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerner, Michael; Nuehs, Andrea; Ganser, Petra; Herrmann, Christian; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2005-02-15

    The guanine nucleotide-binding protein Ras occurs in solution in two different states, state 1 and state 2, when the GTP analogue GppNHp is bound to the active center as detected by (31)P NMR spectroscopy. Here we show that Ras(wt).Mg(2+).GppCH(2)p also exists in two conformational states in dynamic equilibrium. The activation enthalpy DeltaH(++)(12) and the activation entropy DeltaS(++)(12) for the transition from state 1 to state 2 are 70 kJ mol(-1) and 102 J mol(-1) K(-1), within the limits of error identical to those determined for the Ras(wt).Mg(2+).GppNHp complex. The same is true for the equilibrium constants K(12) = [2]/[1] of 2.0 and the corresponding DeltaG(12) of -1.7 kJ mol(-1) at 278 K. This excludes a suggested specific effect of the NH group of GppNHp on the equilibrium. The assignment of the phosphorus resonance lines of the bound analogues has been done by two-dimensional (31)P-(31)P NOESY experiments which lead to a correction of the already reported assignments of bound GppNHp. Mutation of Thr35 in Ras.Mg(2+).GppCH(2)p to serine leads to a shift of the conformational equilibrium toward state 1. Interaction of the Ras binding domain (RBD) of Raf kinase or RalGDS with Ras(wt) or Ras(T35S) shifts the equilibrium completely to state 2. The (31)P NMR experiments suggest that, besides the type of the side chain of residue 35, a main contribution to the conformational equilibrium in Ras complexes with GTP and GTP analogues is the effective acidity of the gamma-phosphate group of the bound nucleotide. A reaction scheme for the Ras-effector interaction is presented which includes the existence of two conformations of the effector loop and a weak binding state.

  3. Interaction of FAM5C with UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1): Implication of N-glycosylation in FAM5C secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terao, Yuya; Fujita, Hidenobu; Horibe, Sayo; Sato, Junya; Minami, Satomi; Kobayashi, Miwako; Matsuoka, Ichiro; Sasaki, Naoto; Satomi-Kobayashi, Seimi; Hirata, Ken-Ichi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki

    2017-03-27

    N-glycosylation of proteins is important for protein folding and function. We have recently reported that FAM5C/BRINP3 contributes to the tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of leukocyte adhesion molecules in vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, regulatory mechanism of the FAM5C biosynthesis is poorly understood. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed the interaction of FAM5C with UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1), a glycoprotein folding-sensor enzyme. FAM5C ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and co-localized with endogenously expressed UGGT1. Molecular size of FAM5C was reduced by treatment with N-glycosidase F and in FAM5C-expressing cells cultured in the presence of the N-glycosylation inhibitor tunicamycin. FAM5C was secreted by the cells and the secretion of FAM5C was blocked by tunicamycin. Among six potential N-glycosylation sites, the potential site at Asn(168) was not N-glycosylated, and Asn(337), Asn(456), Asn(562), Asn(609), and Asn(641) mutants were poorly secreted by the cells. These results demonstrated that FAM5C is an N-glycosylated protein and N-glycosylation is necessary for the secretion of FAM5C.

  4. What is the value of embedding artificial emotional prosody in human computer interactions? Implications for theory and design in psychological science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. C. Mitchell

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In computerised technology, artificial speech is becoming increasingly important, and is already used in ATMs, online gaming and healthcare contexts. However, today’s artificial speech typically sounds monotonous, a main reason for this being the lack of meaningful prosody. One particularly important function of prosody is to convey different emotions. This is because successful encoding and decoding of emotions is vital for effective social cognition, which is increasingly recognised in human-computer interaction contexts. Current attempts to artificially synthesise emotional prosody are much improved relative to early attempts, but there remains much work to be done due to methodological problems, lack of agreed acoustic correlates, and lack of theoretical grounding. If the addition of synthetic emotional prosody is not of sufficient quality, it may risk alienating users instead of enhancing their experience. So the value of embedding emotion cues in artificial speech may ultimately depend on the quality of the synthetic emotional prosody. However, early evidence on reactions to synthesised nonverbal cues in the facial modality bodes well. Attempts to implement the recognition of emotional prosody into artificial applications and interfaces have perhaps been met with greater success, but the ultimate test of synthetic emotional prosody will be to critically compare how people react to synthetic emotional prosody vs. natural emotional prosody, at the behavioural, socio-cognitive and neural levels.

  5. Attachment and biofilm formation by foodborne bacteria in meat processing environments: causes, implications, role of bacterial interactions and control by alternative novel methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Heir, Even; Hébraud, Michel; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Langsrud, Solveig; Møretrø, Trond; Habimana, Olivier; Desvaux, Mickaël; Renier, Sandra; Nychas, George-John

    2014-07-01

    Attachment of potential spoilage and pathogenic bacteria to food contact surfaces and the subsequent biofilm formation represent serious challenges to the meat industry, since these may lead to cross-contamination of the products, resulting in lowered-shelf life and transmission of diseases. In meat processing environments, microorganisms are sometimes associated to surfaces in complex multispecies communities, while bacterial interactions have been shown to play a key role in cell attachment and detachment from biofilms, as well as in the resistance of biofilm community members against antimicrobial treatments. Disinfection of food contact surfaces in such environments is a challenging task, aggravated by the great antimicrobial resistance of biofilm associated bacteria. In recent years, several alternative novel methods, such as essential oils and bacteriophages, have been successfully tested as an alternative means for the disinfection of microbial-contaminated food contact surfaces. In this review, all these aspects of biofilm formation in meat processing environments are discussed from a microbial meat-quality and safety perspective. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. X-rays associated with the jet-cloud interacting radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A): implications for energy deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Worrall, D M; Young, A J

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery with Chandra of X-ray-emitting gas associated with the jet-cloud interaction in the radio galaxy 3C 277.3 (Coma A), a source that falls in the most important power range for radio-mode feedback in the Universe. This hot gas, heated by the jet, dominates the mass of the cloud which is responsible for an extreme projected deflection of the kpc-scale radio jet. Highly absorbed X-ray emission from the nucleus of 3C 277.3 confirms that the jet lies close to the plane of the sky and so has a large intrinsic deflection. We detect group gas on the scale of the radio lobes, and see X-ray cavities coincident with the brightest radio emission, with the lobes embraced by X-ray enhancements that we argue are the result of shocks. The anti-correlation between the locations of X-ray arms and H$\\alpha$-emitting filaments that are believed to have originated from a merger with one or more gas-rich galaxies suggests that shocks advancing around the lobe are inhibited by the dense colder material. Synchr...

  7. Strong ionic interactions in noncovalent complexes between poly(ethylene imine), a cationic electrolyte, and Cibacron Blue, a nucleotide mimic--implications for oligonucleotide vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelikbıçak, Ömür; Salih, Bekir; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2014-07-01

    Cationic polymers can bind DNA to form polyplexes, which are noncovalent complexes used for gene delivery into the targeted cells. For more insight on such biologically relevant systems, the noncovalent complexes between the cationic polymer poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) and the nucleotide mimicking dye Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB) were investigated using mass spectrometry methods. Two PEIs of low molecular weight were utilized (Mn  ≈ 423 and 600 Da). The different types of CB anions produced by Na(+)/H(+) exchanges on the three sulfonic acid groups of CB and their dehydrated counterparts were responsible for complex formation with PEI. The CB anions underwent noncovalent complex formation with protonated, but not with sodiated PEI. A higher proportion of cyclic oligomers were detected in PEI423 than PEI600, but both architectures formed association products with CB. Tandem mass spectrometry studies revealed a significantly stronger noncovalent interaction between PEI and dehydrated CB than between PEI and intact CB. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Satellite-based 3D structure of cloud and aerosols over the Indian Monsoon region: implications for aerosol-cloud interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sagnik; Sengupta, Kamalaika; Basil, George; Das, Sushant; Nidhi, Nidhi; Dash, S. K.; Sarkar, Arjya; Srivastava, Parul; Singh, Ajit; Agarwal, P.

    2012-11-01

    Accurate knowledge of vertical distributions of aerosol and cloud fields and their space-time variations are required to reduce the uncertainty in estimated climate forcing. Here, multi-sensor (both passive and active) data were used to construct the climatology of 3-D cloud and aerosol fields over the Indian monsoon region. Multilayer clouds are found to persist throughout the year, among which cumulus and stratocumulus dominate the low clouds and cirrus dominates the high clouds. A combination of passive stereo-technique (MISR) and radiometric technique (ISCPP) captures the multilayer cloud structure as revealed by active sensor CALIOP. Coexistence of low clouds throughout the year with high aerosol concentration beneath and above leads to a transition from increasing to decreasing cloud fraction with an increase in aerosol optical depth. Such transition is rapid in the monsoon season due to convergence of low clouds to form high clouds facilitated by high aerosol loading. Further, the regional climate model RegCM 4.1 has been used to examine aerosol-cloud interaction. The aerosol-induced changes of low cloud amount are under-estimated by the model. The observation-based seasonal climatology of aerosol and cloud fields presented here may help in improving the model simulations of cloud variability and associated rainfall.

  9. Gut microbial adaptation to dietary consumption of fructose, artificial sweeteners and sugar alcohols: implications for host-microbe interactions contributing to obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, A N; Chassard, C; Lacroix, C

    2012-09-01

    The Western diet, comprised of highly refined carbohydrates and fat but reduced complex plant polysaccharides, has been attributed to the prevalence of obesity. A concomitant rise in the consumption of fructose and sugar substitutes such as sugar alcohols, artificial sweeteners, even rare sugars, has mirrored this trend, as both probable contributor and solution to the epidemic. Acknowledgement of the gut microbiota as a factor involved in obesity has sparked much controversy as to the cause and consequence of this relationship. Dietary intakes are a known modulator of gut microbial phylogeny and metabolic activity, frequently exploited to stimulate beneficial bacteria, promoting health benefits. Comparably little research exists on the impact of 'unconscious' dietary modulation on the resident commensal community mediated by increased fructose and sugar substitute consumption. This review highlights mechanisms of potential host and gut microbial fructose and sugar substitute metabolism. Evidence is presented suggesting these sugar compounds, particularly fructose, condition the microbiota, resulting in acquisition of a westernized microbiome with altered metabolic capacity. Disturbances in host-microbe interactions resulting from fructose consumption are also explored.

  10. What is the Value of Embedding Artificial Emotional Prosody in Human-Computer Interactions? Implications for Theory and Design in Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachel L C; Xu, Yi

    2015-01-01

    In computerized technology, artificial speech is becoming increasingly important, and is already used in ATMs, online gaming and healthcare contexts. However, today's artificial speech typically sounds monotonous, a main reason for this being the lack of meaningful prosody. One particularly important function of prosody is to convey different emotions. This is because successful encoding and decoding of emotions is vital for effective social cognition, which is increasingly recognized in human-computer interaction contexts. Current attempts to artificially synthesize emotional prosody are much improved relative to early attempts, but there remains much work to be done due to methodological problems, lack of agreed acoustic correlates, and lack of theoretical grounding. If the addition of synthetic emotional prosody is not of sufficient quality, it may risk alienating users instead of enhancing their experience. So the value of embedding emotion cues in artificial speech may ultimately depend on the quality of the synthetic emotional prosody. However, early evidence on reactions to synthesized non-verbal cues in the facial modality bodes well. Attempts to implement the recognition of emotional prosody into artificial applications and interfaces have perhaps been met with greater success, but the ultimate test of synthetic emotional prosody will be to critically compare how people react to synthetic emotional prosody vs. natural emotional prosody, at the behavioral, socio-cognitive and neural levels.

  11. Hydrous basalt-limestone interaction at crustal conditions: Implications for generation of ultracalcic melts and outflux of CO2 at volcanic arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Laura B.; Dasgupta, Rajdeep

    2015-10-01

    High degassing rates for some volcanoes, typically in continental arcs, (e.g., Colli Albani Volcanic District, Etna, Vesuvius, Italy; Merapi, Indonesia; Popocatepetl, Mexico) are thought to be influenced by magma-carbonate interaction in the crust. In order to constrain the nature of reaction and extent of carbonate breakdown, we simulated basalt-limestone wall-rock interactions at 0.5-1.0 GPa, 1100-1200 °C using a piston cylinder and equal mass fractions of calcite (CaCO3) and a hydrous (∼4 wt.% H2O) basalt in a layered geometry contained in AuPd capsules. All experiments produce melt + fluid + calcite ± clinopyroxene ± plagioclase ± calcic-scapolite ± spinel. With increasing T, plagioclase is progressively replaced by scapolite, clinopyroxene becomes CaTs-rich, and fluid proportion, as inferred from vesicle population, increases. At 1.0 GPa, 1200 °C our hydrous basalt is superliquidus, whereas in the presence of calcite, the experiment produces calcite + clinopyroxene + scapolite + melt. With the consumption of calcite with increasing T and decreasing P, melt, on a volatile-free basis, becomes silica-poor (58.1 wt.% at 1.0 GPa, 1100 °C to 34.9 wt.% at 0.5 GPa, 1200 °C) and CaO-rich (6.7 wt.% at 1.0 GPa, 1100 °C to 43.7 wt.% at 0.5 GPa, 1200 °C), whereas Al2O3 drops (e.g., 19.7 at 1100 °C to 12.8 wt.% at 1200 °C at 1.0 GPa) as clinopyroxene becomes more CaTs-rich. High T or low P melt compositions are 'ultracalcic,' potentially presenting a new hypothesis for the origin of ultracalcic melt inclusions in arc lava olivines. Wall-rock calcite consumption is observed to increase with increasing T and decreasing P. At 0.5 GPa, our experiments yield carbonate assimilation from 21.6 to 47.6% between 1100 and 1200 °C. Using measured CO2 outflux rates for Mts. Vesuvius, Merapi, Etna and Popocatepetl over a T variation of 1100 to 1200 °C at 0.5 GPa, we calculate 6-92% of magmatic input estimates undergo this extent of assimilation, suggesting that up to ∼3

  12. An experimental study of basaltic glass-H2O-CO2 interaction at 22 and 50 °C: Implications for subsurface storage of CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeczka, Iwona; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Oelkers, Eric H.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.

    2014-02-01

    A novel high pressure column flow reactor was used to investigate the evolution of solute chemistry along a 2.3 m flow path during pure water- and CO2-charged water-basaltic glass interaction experiments at 22 and 50 °C and 10-5.7 to 22 bars partial pressure of CO2. Experimental results and geochemical modelling showed the pH of injected pure water evolved rapidly from 6.7 to 9-9.5 and most of the iron released to the fluid phase was subsequently consumed by secondary minerals, similar to natural meteoric water-basalt systems. In contrast to natural systems, however, the aqueous aluminium concentration remained relatively high along the entire flow path. The aqueous fluid was undersaturated with respect to basaltic glass and carbonate minerals, but supersaturated with respect to zeolites, clays, and Fe hydroxides. As CO2-charged water replaced the alkaline fluid within the column, the fluid briefly became supersaturated with respect to siderite. Basaltic glass dissolution in the column reactor, however, was insufficient to overcome the pH buffer capacity of CO2-charged water. The pH of this CO2-charged water rose from an initial 3.4 to only 4.5 in the column reactor. This acidic reactive fluid was undersaturated with respect to carbonate minerals but supersaturated with respect to clays and Fe hydroxides at 22 °C, and with respect to clays and Al hydroxides at 50 °C. Basaltic glass dissolution in the CO2-charged water was closer to stoichiometry than in pure water. The mobility and aqueous concentration of several metals increased significantly with the addition of CO2 to the inlet fluid, and some metals, including Mn, Cr, Al, and As exceeded the allowable drinking water limits. Iron became mobile and the aqueous Fe2+/Fe3+ ratio increased along the flow path. Although carbonate minerals did not precipitate in the column reactor in response to CO2-charged water-basaltic glass interaction, once this fluid exited the reactor, carbonates precipitated as the fluid

  13. Variability in P-Glycoprotein Inhibitory Potency (IC50) Using Various in Vitro Experimental Systems: Implications for Universal Digoxin Drug-Drug Interaction Risk Assessment Decision Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Joe; O’Connor, Michael P.; Bednarczyk, Dallas; Coleman, JoAnn; Lee, Caroline; Palm, Johan; Pak, Y. Anne; Perloff, Elke S.; Reyner, Eric; Balimane, Praveen; Brännström, Marie; Chu, Xiaoyan; Funk, Christoph; Guo, Ailan; Hanna, Imad; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Hillgren, Kate; Li, Libin; Hollnack-Pusch, Evelyn; Jamei, Masoud; Lin, Xuena; Mason, Andrew K.; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Patel, Aarti; Podila, Lalitha; Plise, Emile; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Salphati, Laurent; Sands, Eric; Taub, Mitchell E.; Taur, Jan-Shiang; Weitz, Dietmar; Wortelboer, Heleen M.; Xia, Cindy Q.; Xiao, Guangqing; Yabut, Jocelyn; Yamagata, Tetsuo; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    A P-glycoprotein (P-gp) IC50 working group was established with 23 participating pharmaceutical and contract research laboratories and one academic institution to assess interlaboratory variability in P-gp IC50 determinations. Each laboratory followed its in-house protocol to determine in vitro IC50 values for 16 inhibitors using four different test systems: human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2; eleven laboratories), Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (MDCKII-MDR1; six laboratories), and Lilly Laboratories Cells—Porcine Kidney Nr. 1 cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (LLC-PK1-MDR1; four laboratories), and membrane vesicles containing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp; five laboratories). For cell models, various equations to calculate remaining transport activity (e.g., efflux ratio, unidirectional flux, net-secretory-flux) were also evaluated. The difference in IC50 values for each of the inhibitors across all test systems and equations ranged from a minimum of 20- and 24-fold between lowest and highest IC50 values for sertraline and isradipine, to a maximum of 407- and 796-fold for telmisartan and verapamil, respectively. For telmisartan and verapamil, variability was greatly influenced by data from one laboratory in each case. Excluding these two data sets brings the range in IC50 values for telmisartan and verapamil down to 69- and 159-fold. The efflux ratio-based equation generally resulted in severalfold lower IC50 values compared with unidirectional or net-secretory-flux equations. Statistical analysis indicated that variability in IC50 values was mainly due to interlaboratory variability, rather than an implicit systematic difference between test systems. Potential reasons for variability are discussed and the simplest, most robust experimental design for P-gp IC50 determination proposed. The impact of these findings on drug-drug interaction risk assessment is discussed in the companion article (Ellens et al., 2013) and recommendations

  14. The interaction between sea ice and salinity-dominated ocean circulation: implications for halocline stability and rapid changes of sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mari F.; Nilsson, Johan; Nisancioglu, Kerim H.

    2016-11-01

    Changes in the sea ice cover of the Nordic Seas have been proposed to play a key role for the dramatic temperature excursions associated with the Dansgaard-Oeschger events during the last glacial. In this study, we develop a simple conceptual model to examine how interactions between sea ice and oceanic heat and freshwater transports affect the stability of an upper-ocean halocline in a semi-enclosed basin. The model represents a sea ice covered and salinity stratified Nordic Seas, and consists of a sea ice component and a two-layer ocean. The sea ice thickness depends on the atmospheric energy fluxes as well as the ocean heat flux. We introduce a thickness-dependent sea ice export. Whether sea ice stabilizes or destabilizes against a freshwater perturbation is shown to depend on the representation of the diapycnal flow. In a system where the diapycnal flow increases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a positive feedback on a freshwater perturbation. If the diapycnal flow decreases with density differences, the sea ice acts as a negative feedback. However, both representations lead to a circulation that breaks down when the freshwater input at the surface is small. As a consequence, we get rapid changes in sea ice. In addition to low freshwater forcing, increasing deep-ocean temperatures promote instability and the disappearance of sea ice. Generally, the unstable state is reached before the vertical density difference disappears, and the temperature of the deep ocean do not need to increase as much as previously thought to provoke abrupt changes in sea ice.

  15. Interaction between pre-landing activities and stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system in the drop jump: implications to performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, T; Komi, P V; Nicol, C; Kyröläinen, H

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the pre-landing activities and the stiffness regulation of the knee joint musculoskeletal system and the takeoff speed during a drop jump (DJ). Nine healthy male subjects performed a DJ test from the height of 50 cm. The surface electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus lateralis (VL) muscle was recorded to evaluate both the pre-landing and post-landing muscle activation levels. Simultaneous recording of the jumping motion and ground reaction force was performed by a high-speed video camera (100 frames x s(-1)), and a force platform was employed to allow joint moment analysis. Joint stiffness was calculated by a linear regression of the knee joint moment/angle relationship. Elasticity of the knee extensor muscle during DJ was estimated by means of a four-element muscle model consisting of a parallel elastic component, a series elastic component (SEC), a viscous damper, and a contractile element. DJ performance correlated positively with the positive peak power of the knee joint (P knee joint at the end of stretch (P power of the ankle joint. The knee joint moment at the end of stretch correlated with the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase from the end of the initial impact to the onset of the concentric action (P knee extensors (P analysis showed that the SEC stiffness during the transmission phase of the knee joint can be explained by a combination of the pre-activity of the VL muscle and the knee joint angular velocity at touchdown (F = 5.76, P knee extensor muscle in conjunction with the muscle contractile property play a major role in regulating the performance in DJ.

  16. Glucose restriction induces cell death in parental but not in homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-depleted RKO colon cancer cells: molecular mechanisms and implications for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, A; Ricci, A; Trisciuoglio, D; Iorio, E; Carpinelli, G; Pistritto, G; Cirone, M; D'Orazi, G

    2013-05-23

    Tumor cell tolerance to nutrient deprivation can be an important factor for tumor progression, and may depend on deregulation of both oncogenes and oncosuppressor proteins. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an oncosuppressor that, following its activation by several cellular stress, induces cancer cell death via p53-dependent or -independent pathways. Here, we used genetically matched human RKO colon cancer cells harboring wt-HIPK2 (HIPK2(+/+)) or stable HIPK2 siRNA interference (siHIPK2) to investigate in vitro whether HIPK2 influenced cell death in glucose restriction. We found that glucose starvation induced cell death, mainly due to c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation, in HIPK2(+/+)cells compared with siHIPK2 cells that did not die. (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance quantitative metabolic analyses showed a marked glycolytic activation in siHIPK2 cells. However, treatment with glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose induced cell death only in HIPK2(+/+) cells but not in siHIPK2 cells. Similarly, siGlut-1 interference did not re-establish siHIPK2 cell death under glucose restriction, whereas marked cell death was reached only after zinc supplementation, a condition known to reactivate misfolded p53 and inhibit the pseudohypoxic phenotype in this setting. Further siHIPK2 cell death was reached with zinc in combination with autophagy inhibitor. We propose that the metabolic changes acquired by cells after HIPK2 silencing may contribute to induce resistance to cell death in glucose restriction condition, and therefore be directly relevant for tumor progression. Moreover, elimination of such a tolerance might serve as a new strategy for cancer therapy.

  17. An investigation of the interactions of Eu³⁺ and Am³⁺ with uranyl minerals: implications for the storage of spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Steudtner, Robin; Schmidt, Moritz; McKenna, Cora; León Vintró, Luis; Twamley, Brendan; Baker, Robert J

    2016-04-21

    The reaction of a number of uranyl minerals of the (oxy)hydroxide, phosphate and carbonate types with Eu(iii), as a surrogate for Am(iii), have been investigated. A photoluminescence study shows that Eu(iii) can interact with the uranyl minerals Ca[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·8H2O (becquerelite) and A[UO2(CO3)3]·xH2O (A/x = K3Na/1, grimselite; CaNa2/6, andersonite; and Ca2/11, liebigite). For the minerals [(UO2)8(O)2(OH)12]·12H2O (schoepite), K2[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·7H2O (compreignacite), A[(UO2)2(PO4)2]·8H2O (A = Ca, meta-autunite; Cu, meta-torbernite) and Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2]·6H2O (cuprosklodowskite) no Eu(iii) emission was observed, indicating no incorporation into, or sorption onto the structure. In the examples with Eu(3+) incorporation, sensitized emission is seen and the lifetimes, hydration numbers and quantum yields have been determined. Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluroescence Spectroscpoy (TRLFS) at 10 K have also been measured and the resolution enhancements at these temperatures allow further information to be derived on the sites of Eu(iii) incorporation. Infrared and Raman spectra are recorded, and SEM analysis show significant morphology changes and the substitution of particularly Ca(2+) by Eu(3+) ions. Therefore, Eu(3+) can substitute Ca(2+) in the interlayers of becquerelite and liebigite and in the structure of andersonite, whilst in grimselite only sodium is exchanged. These results have guided an investigation into the reactions with (241)Am on a tracer scale and results from gamma-spectrometry show that becquerelite, andersonite, grimselite, liebigite and compreignacite can include americium in the structure. Shifts in the U[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O Raman active bands are similar to that observed in the Eu(iii) analogues and Am(iii) photoluminescence measurements are also reported on these phases; the Am(3+) ion quenches the emission from the uranyl ion.

  18. Variability in P-glycoprotein inhibitory potency (IC₅₀) using various in vitro experimental systems: implications for universal digoxin drug-drug interaction risk assessment decision criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Joe; O'Connor, Michael P; Bednarczyk, Dallas; Coleman, Joann; Lee, Caroline; Palm, Johan; Pak, Y Anne; Perloff, Elke S; Reyner, Eric; Balimane, Praveen; Brännström, Marie; Chu, Xiaoyan; Funk, Christoph; Guo, Ailan; Hanna, Imad; Herédi-Szabó, Krisztina; Hillgren, Kate; Li, Libin; Hollnack-Pusch, Evelyn; Jamei, Masoud; Lin, Xuena; Mason, Andrew K; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Patel, Aarti; Podila, Lalitha; Plise, Emile; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Salphati, Laurent; Sands, Eric; Taub, Mitchell E; Taur, Jan-Shiang; Weitz, Dietmar; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Xia, Cindy Q; Xiao, Guangqing; Yabut, Jocelyn; Yamagata, Tetsuo; Zhang, Lei; Ellens, Harma

    2013-07-01

    A P-glycoprotein (P-gp) IC₅₀ working group was established with 23 participating pharmaceutical and contract research laboratories and one academic institution to assess interlaboratory variability in P-gp IC₅₀ determinations. Each laboratory followed its in-house protocol to determine in vitro IC₅₀ values for 16 inhibitors using four different test systems: human colon adenocarcinoma cells (Caco-2; eleven laboratories), Madin-Darby canine kidney cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (MDCKII-MDR1; six laboratories), and Lilly Laboratories Cells--Porcine Kidney Nr. 1 cells transfected with MDR1 cDNA (LLC-PK1-MDR1; four laboratories), and membrane vesicles containing human P-glycoprotein (P-gp; five laboratories). For cell models, various equations to calculate remaining transport activity (e.g., efflux ratio, unidirectional flux, net-secretory-flux) were also evaluated. The difference in IC₅₀ values for each of the inhibitors across all test systems and equations ranged from a minimum of 20- and 24-fold between lowest and highest IC₅₀ values for sertraline and isradipine, to a maximum of 407- and 796-fold for telmisartan and verapamil, respectively. For telmisartan and verapamil, variability was greatly influenced by data from one laboratory in each case. Excluding these two data sets brings the range in IC₅₀ values for telmisartan and verapamil down to 69- and 159-fold. The efflux ratio-based equation generally resulted in severalfold lower IC₅₀ values compared with unidirectional or net-secretory-flux equations. Statistical analysis indicated that variability in IC₅₀ values was mainly due to interlaboratory variability, rather than an implicit systematic difference between test systems. Potential reasons for variability are discussed and the simplest, most robust experimental design for P-gp IC₅₀ determination proposed. The impact of these findings on drug-drug interaction risk assessment is discussed in the companion article (Ellens

  19. 认知语境与语用能力的交互性及其教学启示%On the Interactivity of Cognitive Context and Pragmatic Competence and Its Pedagogical Implication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵庆龄

    2014-01-01

    Upon analysis of the definition and components of cognitive context and pragmatic competence, the paper intends to reveal the connection between cognitive context and pragmatic competence in terms of their ontological definitions.It is found that cognitive context and pragmatic competence share close inter-activity in terms of their definition and components,while they restrict each other to a large extent.Based on the above findings,some pedagogical implications are suggested on the development of students’prag-matic competence.%从分析认知语境和语用能力的定义和构成成分入手,旨在揭示二者之间在概念本体上的联系。研究发现语用能力的各个组成部分都与认知语境存在着紧密的联系,二者除了在概念上存在着众多交叉点之外,还在构建机制上存在着相互制约的关系。在理清认知语境和语用能力之间的交互关系基础上,对语用能力的教学提出了一些建议。

  20. Critical Thinking: Implications for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    1989-01-01

    Synthesizes critical thinking research in four areas--reading, writing, group interactions, and speaking--and discusses the implications of those studies for library information science research. The potential for employing critical thinking strategies in bibliographic instruction and the need for library science educators to initiate their own…

  1. Physical interaction and functional coupling between ACDP4 and the intracellular ion chaperone COX11, an implication of the role of ACDP4 in essential metal ion transport and homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jianguo

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Divalent metal ions such as copper, manganese, and cobalt are essential for cell development, differentiation, function and survival. These essential metal ions are delivered into intracellular domains as cofactors for enzymes involved in neuropeptide and neurotransmitter synthesis, superoxide metabolism, and other biological functions in a target specific fashion. Altering the homeostasis of these essential metal ions is known to connect to a number of human diseases including Alzheimer disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and pain. It remains unclear how these essential metal ions are delivered to intracellular targets in mammalian cells. Here we report that rat spinal cord dorsal horn neurons express ACDP4, a member of Ancient Conserved Domain Protein family. By screening a pretransformed human fetal brain cDNA library in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified that ACDP4 specifically interacts with COX11, an intracellular metal ion chaperone. Ectopic expression of ACDP4 in HEK293 cells resulted in enhanced toxicity to metal ions including copper, manganese, and cobalt. The metal ion toxicity became more pronounced when ACDP4 and COX11 were co-expressed ectopically in HEK293 cells, suggesting a functional coupling between them. Our results indicate a role of ACDP4 in metal ion homeostasis and toxicity. This is the first report revealing a functional aspect of this ancient conserved domain protein family. We propose that ACDP is a family of transporter protein or chaperone proteins for delivering essential metal ions in different mammalian tissues. The expression of ACDP4 on spinal cord dorsal horn neurons may have implications in sensory neuron functions under physiological and pathological conditions.

  2. Interactions between interactions: predator-prey, parasite-host, and mutualistic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape

    2008-01-01

    Ecological interactions such as those between predators and prey, parasites and hosts, and pollinators and plants are usually studied on their own while neglecting that one category of interactions can have dramatic effects on another. Such interactions between interactions will have both ecological and evolutionary effects because the actions of one party will influence interactions among other parties, thereby eventually causing feedback on the first party. Examples of such interactions include the effects of predators and parasites on the evolution of host sexual selection, the effects of parasites and predators on the evolution of virulence, and the effects of parasites and predators on the evolution of pollinator mutualisms. Such interactions among interactions will generally prevent simple cases of coevolution, because any single case of interaction between two parties may be affected by an entire range of additional interacting factors. These phenomena will have implications not only for how ecologists and evolutionary biologists empirically study interactions but also on how such interactions are modeled.

  3. Highly interactive distributed visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpa, M.; Belleman, R.G.; Sloot, P.M.A.; de Laat, C.T.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our iGrid2005 demonstration, called the "Dead Cat Demo"; an example of a highly interactive augmented reality application consisting of software services distributed over a wide-area, high-speed network. We describe our design decisions, analyse the implications of the design on applica

  4. Sibling interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsam, Rosemary H

    2013-01-01

    Sibling interactions traditionally were conceived psychoanalytically in "vertical" and parentified oedipal terms and overlooked in their own right, for complicated reasons (Colonna and Newman 1983). Important work has been done to right this, from the 1980s and onward, with conferences and writings. Juliet Mitchell's 2000 and, in particular, her 2003 books, for example, have brought "lateral" sibling relations forcefully to the forefront of insights, especially about sex and violence, with the added interdisciplinary impact of illuminating upheaval in global community interactions as well as having implications for clinicians. A clinical example from the analysis of an adult woman with a ten-years-younger sister will show here how we need both concepts to help us understand complex individual psychic life. The newer "lateral" sibling emphasis, including Mitchell's "Law of the Mother" and "seriality," can be used to inform the older "vertical" take, to enrich the full dimensions of intersubjective oedipal and preoedipal reciprocities that have been foundational in shaping that particular analysand's inner landscape. Some technical recommendations for heightening sensitivity to the import of these dynamics will be offered along the way here, by invoking Hans Loewald's useful metaphor of the analytic situation as theater.

  5. A Critique of Interactional Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Fang

    2011-01-01

    Interactional approach is a very important theory in second language acquisition, including the input hypothesis and interaction hypothesis. This article first presents an exposition of these two hypotheses, and continues with a critical evaluation of them. Finally, the article concludes with the pedagogical implications of the approach.

  6. Fast fluid-flow events within a subduction-related vein system in oceanic eclogite: implications for pore fluid pressure at the plate interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taetz, Stephan; John, Timm; Bröcker, Michael; Spandler, Carl; Stracke, Andreas

    2017-04-01

    A better understanding of the subduction zone fluid cycle and its mechanical feedback requires in-depth knowledge of how fluids flow within and out of the descending slabs. In order to develop reliable quantitative models of fluid flow, the general relationship between dehydration reactions, fluid pathway formation, and the dimensions and timescales of distinct fluid flow events have to be explored. The high-pressure/low-temperature metamorphic rocks of the Pouébo Eclogite Mélange in New Caledonia provide an excellent opportunity to study the fluid flux in a subduction zone setting. Fluid dynamics are recorded by high-pressure veins that cross-cut eclogite facies mélange blocks from this occurrence. Two types of garnet-quartz-phengite veins can be distinguished. These veins record both synmetamorphic internal fluid release by mineral breakdown reactions (type I veins) as well as infiltration of an external fluid (type II veins) and the associated formation of a reaction halo. The overall dehydration, fluid accumulation and fluid migration documented by the type I veins occurred on a timescale of 10^5-106 years that is mainly given by the geometry and convergence rate of the subduction system. In order to quantify the timeframe of fluid-rock interaction between the external fluid and the wall-rock, we have applied Li-isotope chronology. A continuous profile was sampled perpendicular to a type II vein including material from the vein, the reaction selvage and the immediate host rock. Additional drill cores were taken from parts of the outcrop that most likely remained completely unaffected by fluid infiltration-induced alteration. Different Li concentrations in the internal and external fluid reservoirs produced a distinct diffusion profile of decreasing Li concentration and increasing δ7Li as the reaction front propagated into the host-rock. Li-chronometric constraints indicate that fluid-rock interaction related to the formation of the type II veins and had

  7. Water-rock interactions, orthopyroxene growth, and Si-enrichment in the mantle: evidence in xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau, southwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas; Alexis Riter, J. C.; Mertzman, Stanley A.

    1999-01-01

    Water-rock interactions and consequent orthopyroxene growth are documented by mantle xenoliths from opposite margins of the Colorado Plateau province. The interactions are inferred from a distinctive texture plus composition of orthopyroxene in spinel peridotite, in which porphyroblasts of orthopyroxene with inclusions of resorbed olivine are zoned to interiors exceptionally low in Al 2O 3 (Bandera Crater, New Mexico, in the southeastern margin of the Colorado Plateau, extending the known distribution from the northwestern margin (Grand Canyon field). Evidence that Si-enrichment locally accompanied movement of aqueous fluid is provided by an orthopyroxenite xenolith that is about 95% enstatite. The enstatite occurs in curved laths to 25 mm long, and the texture and composition (Al 2O 3 1 to 2 wt%, Mg/(Mg + Fe) 0.92) are attributed to growth during subsolidus interaction between peridotite and hydrous fluid. Modal orthopyroxene calculated from 4 bulk rock analyses of peridotite xenoliths from the Grand Canyon field ranges from 26 to 29%, more than in comparably depleted oceanic mantle. The mantle root of the Colorado Plateau may have formed from accreted ocean lithosphere and subsequently been enriched in Si by aqueous metasomatism at widely distributed sites. Similar fluid-rock interaction may have contributed to the orthopyroxene-enrichment characteristic of some mantle xenoliths from roots of Archaean cratons.

  8. Implications of recent MINER$\

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Among the most important tasks of neutrino oscillation experiments is correctly estimating the parent neutrino energy from the by-products of their interactions. Large uncertainties in our current understanding of such processes can significantly hamper this effort. We explore several recent measurements made using the \\mnv{} detector in the few-GeV NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab: the differential cross-section vs. $Q^2$ for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and pion kinetic energy for resonant single charged pion production, and the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and kinetic energy for coherent pion production. We furthermore discuss their implications for energy reconstruction in oscillation measurements.

  9. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression......, we investigate empirically the role of the social environment of individuals for their communication patterns. Our study species is a song bird, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). The results suggest that individual communication in this species is influenced by features of the local...... social environment of the individual. In the last two studies, we investigate the role of social structure for cooperation in a classic natural system for behavioural research, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), by means of computer simulations. Cooperation contradicts evolutionary theory...

  10. Interaction as Negotiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jannie Friis; Nielsen, Christina

    In this paper we discuss recent developments in interaction design principles for ubiquitous computing environments, specifically implications related to situated and mobile aspects of work. We present 'Interaction through Negotiation' as a general Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) paradigm, aimed...... at ubiquitous/pervasive technology and environments, with focus on facilitating negotiation in and between webs of different artifacts, humans and places. This approach is concerned with the way technology presents itself to us, both as physical entities and as conceptual entities, as well as the relations...... on several extensive empirical case studies, as well as co-operative design-sessions, we present a reflective analysis providing insights into results of the "Interaction through Negotiation" design approach in action. A very promising area of application is exception handling in pervasive computing...

  11. Interactive Communication Technologies in Business Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Allbritton, Marcel M.

    1995-01-01

    Explores the distinctive aspects of the new interactive communication technologies (electronic mail over the Internet) in business communication and their implications. Discusses the growth of interactive communication, the concept of interactivity, physical distance and social presence, getting to critical mass, and flexibility and control of…

  12. Fluid-Solid Interaction and Multiscale Dynamic Processes: Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Spina, Laura; Mendo-Pérez, Gerardo M.; Guzmán-Vázquez, Enrique; Scheu, Bettina; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    . Analysis of time series, both experimental and synthetics, synchronized with high-speed imaging enables the explanation and interpretation of distinct phases of the dynamics of these fluids and the extraction of time and frequency characteristics of the individual processes. We observed that the effects of both, pressure drop triggering function and viscosity, control the characteristics of the micro-signals in time and frequency. This suggests the great potential that experimental and numerical approaches provide to untangle from field volcanic seismograms the multiscale processes of the stress field, driving forces and fluid-rock interaction that determine the volcanic conduit dynamics.

  13. A coupled geochemical-transport-geomechanical model to address caprock integrity during long-term CO2 storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, E.F. van der; Waldmann, S.; Fokker, P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Underground storage of CO2 will lead to chemical fluid-rock interactions which may potentially alter the porosity and the flow patterns in faults. In this study, we present a coupled numerical model combining chemical fluid-rock interactions, aqueous diffusion, fluid flow, and mechanical processes,

  14. High-pressure subduction-related serpentinites and metarodingites from East Thessaly (Greece): Implications for their metamorphic, geochemical and geodynamic evolution in the Hellenic-Dinaric ophiolite context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsovitis, Petros

    2017-04-01

    Metaophiolites that consist mainly of serpentinites or metabasites outcrop in the East Thessaly region, Central Greece. These formations, along with some ophiolite outcrops, have been variably emplaced onto the Pelagonian tectonostratigraphic zone as dispersed and deformed thrust sheets. Based upon their estimated metamorphic degree, serpentinites from the metaophiolites and ophiolitic units of East Thessaly have been divided into three groups: Group-1 serpentinites from East Othris, include lizardite and antigorite in balanced amounts, defining greenschist facies metamorphic conditions ( 320-340 °C, P ≈ 6-7 kbar). Group-2 serpentinites are marked by further prevalence of antigorite over lizardite, suggesting upper-greenschist to lower-blueschist facies metamorphism ( 340-370 °C, P ≈ 8-10 kbar). Group-3 serpentinites are mainly characterized by the predominance of antigorite corresponding to blueschist facies metamorphism ( 360-400 °C, P ≈ 11-12 kbar). The chemical composition and mineral chemistry of the East Thessaly serpentinites suggest that their protoliths were highly depleted harzburgites. Group-1 serpentinites exhibit higher Mg/Si ratio values and LOI compared to serpentinite Groups-2 and -3, due to increasing metamorphic conditions of the latter groups. The prominent Cs, U, Pb, As and Sb enrichments point to subduction-related serpentinites that were subjected to fluid/rock interactions. The East Thessaly serpentinites also seem to have undergone deserpentinization retrograde metamorphism (estimated at P processes.

  15. Interaction of Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) with the p10 domain of polyprotein 2a and its implications in SeMV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govind, Kunduri; Bakshi, Arindam; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2014-01-01

    Identification of viral encoded proteins that interact with RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) is an important step towards unraveling the mechanism of replication. Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) RdRp was shown to interact strongly with p10 domain of polyprotein 2a and moderately with the protease domain. Mutational analysis suggested that the C-terminal disordered domain of RdRp is involved in the interaction with p10. Coexpression of full length RdRp and p10 resulted in formation of RdRp-p10 complex which showed significantly higher polymerase activity than RdRp alone. Interestingly, CΔ43 RdRp also showed a similar increase in activity. Thus, p10 acts as a positive regulator of RdRp by interacting with the C-terminal disordered domain of RdRp.

  16. Some Implications of Career Theory for Adult Development and Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, John L.

    Structural-interactive vocational theory shows that both aspirational and work histories have continuity over the life span and provide useful explanations of stability and change. This paper suggests some implications of structural-interactive theory for the study of adult development. Common principles of structural-interactive theories are…

  17. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK), a protein implicated in mental retardation and autism-spectrum disorders, interacts with T-Brain-1 (TBR1) to control extinction of associative memory in male mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tzyy-Nan; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Background Human genetic studies have indicated that mutations in calcium/calmodulin-dependent serine protein kinase (CASK) result in X-linked mental retardation and autism-spectrum disorders. We aimed to establish a mouse model to study how Cask regulates mental ability. Methods Because Cask encodes a multidomain scaffold protein, a possible strategy to dissect how CASK regulates mental ability and cognition is to disrupt specific protein–protein interactions of CASK in vivo and then investigate the impact of individual specific protein interactions. Previous in vitro analyses indicated that a rat CASK T724A mutation reduces the interaction between CASK and T-brain-1 (TBR1) in transfected COS cells. Because TBR1 is critical for glutamate receptor, ionotropic, N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunit 2B (Grin2b) expression and is a causative gene for autism and intellectual disability, we then generated CASK T740A (corresponding to rat CASK T724A) mutant mice using a gene-targeting approach. Immunoblotting, coimmunoprecipitation, histological methods and behavioural assays (including home cage, open field, auditory and contextual fear conditioning and conditioned taste aversion) were applied to investigate expression of CASK and its related proteins, the protein–protein interactions of CASK, and anatomic and behavioural features of CASK T740A mice. Results The CASK T740A mutation attenuated the interaction between CASK and TBR1 in the brain. However, CASK T740A mice were generally healthy, without obvious defects in brain morphology. The most dramatic defect among the mutant mice was in extinction of associative memory, though acquisition was normal. Limitations The functions of other CASK protein interactions cannot be addressed using CASK T740A mice. Conclusion Disruption of the CASK and TBR1 interaction impairs extinction, suggesting the involvement of CASK in cognitive flexibility. PMID:28234597

  18. Submarine water-rock interactions and microbial life: a theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, W.; Hentscher, M.

    2009-04-01

    Mass and energy balances coupled with thermodynamic calculations indicate that a large amount of energy in the form of chemical work (about 100 Petajoule/yr) is transported to the seafloor by hydrothermal vent fluids. A similar amount of energy is tied to the affinity of reduced components in seafloor rocks and minerals for oxidation. Chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms harness an unknown fraction of that energy to produce primary biomass in the deep sea. The specific magmatic and fluid-rock interaction processes taking place within the geological system control what metabolic reactions can support chemolithoautotrophy-based microbial ecosystems at the seafloor. It turns out that basement composition, magmatic degassing, and subseafloor mineralization impose a first-order control on vent fluid chemistry. We used thermodynamic calculations to assess how much energy hot rocks can provide in different geotectonic setting to support biomass production by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms. The dominant energy source varies greatly between vents in different submarine settings, from hydrogen sulfide in basalt-hosted systems to dihydrogen and methane in peridotite-hosted systems to Fe and S in felsic rock systesm in island arcs. The dihydrogen fluxes related to serpentinization are at least one order of magnitude greater than those related to global magmatism, and hydrogen consumption could be one of the most important catabolic reactions in deep-sea chemolithoautotrophy. In one example we show that peridotite-water interactions release quantities of hydrogen that are sufficient for methanogens and sulfate reducers to thrive under a range of temperature and fluid flux conditions. In contrast, hydrogen production within basaltic aquifers is barely enough under the best of circumstances to allow for growth of methanogens and sulfate reducers. This prediction appears to be corroborated by sulfur isotope compositions of hydrothermally altered peridotites and basalts

  19. 灵活互动智能用电的技术内涵及发展方向%Technical Implications and Development Trends of Flexible and Interactive Utilization of Intelligent Power

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李同智

    2012-01-01

    智能用电是智能电网研究的热点、难点,灵活互动的供用电模式已成为智能用电的发展趋势。文中介绍了构成灵活互动智能用电的高级量测体系标准、系统及终端技术,智能用电双向互动运行模式支撑技术,以及用户用电环境与用电模式相互影响的内涵和国内外发展现状。明确了灵活互动智能用电的发展目标,阐述了灵活互动智能用电的发展方向和研究技术路线。%Intelligent power utilization is a topical and difficult subject in the study of smart grid. The flexible and interactive mode of power supply and consumption has become the trend of intelligent power utilization. A description mcludes tne standards, system and terminal technology of advanced metering infrastructure, the bi-directional interactive operation mode and supporting technology of intelligent power utilization, and the interaction between users' power utilization environment and patterns, which constituting the flexible and interactive utilization Of intelligent power. The current situation and development problems of these techniques at home and abroad are discussed. The development goals of flexible and interactive utilization of intelligent power are clarified. The development trends and technical study route of flexible and interactive utilization of intelligent power are elaborated.

  20. Exploring the strength, mode, dynamics, and kinetics of binding interaction of a cationic biological photosensitizer with DNA: implication on dissociation of the drug-DNA complex via detergent sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Bijan Kumar; Guchhait, Nikhil

    2011-10-20

    The present study aims at exploring a detailed characterization of the binding interaction of a promising cancer cell photosensitizer, harmane (HM), with DNA extracted from herring sperm. The polarity-sensitive prototropic transformation of HM, a naturally occurring, fluorescent, drug-binding alkaloid, β-carboline, is remarkably modified upon interaction with DNA and is manifested through significant modulations on the absorption and emission profiles of HM. From the series of studies undertaken in the present program, for example, absorption; steady-state emission; the effect of chaotrope (urea); iodide ion-induced steady-state fluorescence quenching; circular dichroism (CD); and helix melting from absorption spectroscopy; the mode of binding of HM into the DNA helix has been substantiated to be principally intercalative. Concomitantly, a discernible dependence of the photophysics of the DNA-bound drug on the medium ionic strength indicates that electrostatic attraction should not be ignored in the interaction. Efforts have also been delivered to delineate the dynamical aspects of the interaction, such as modulation in time-resolved fluorescence decay and rotational relaxation dynamics of the drug within the DNA environment. In view of the prospective biological applications of HM, the issue of facile dissociation of intercalated HM from the DNA helix also comprises a crucial prerequisite for the functioning as an effective therapeutic agent. In this context, our results imply that the concept of detergent-sequestered dissociation of the drug from the drug-DNA complex can be a prospective strategy through an appropriate choice of the detergent molecule. The utility of the present work resides in exploring the potential applicability of the fluorescence property of HM for studying its interactions with a relevant biological target, for example, DNA. In addition, the methods and techniques used in the present work can also be exploited to study the interaction of

  1. New T=1 effective interactions for the f5/2 p3/2 p1/2 g9/2 model space; Implications for valence-mirror symmetry and seniority isomers

    CERN Document Server

    Lisetskiy, A F; Horoi, M; Grawe, H

    2004-01-01

    New shell model Hamiltonians are derived for the T=1 part of the residual interaction in the f5/2 p3/2 p1/2 g9/2 model space based on the analysis and fit of the available experimental data for 57Ni-78Ni isotopes and 77Cu-100Sn isotones. The fit procedure, properties of the determined effective interaction as well as new results for valence-mirror symmetry and seniority isomers for nuclei near 78Ni and 100Sn are discussed.

  2. Comprehension, Metacomprehension, and Instructional Implications for College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberry, K. Sue

    1984-01-01

    Notes that by examining the interactive processes involved in comprehending, researchers are concluding that readers use their prior knowledge to actively construct meaning from printed material. Reviews research in metacomprehension and discusses its implications for college reading instruction. (FL)

  3. Influence of social media on Ghanaian youths: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of social media on Ghanaian youths: Implications for counselling. ... Social media platforms have become essential tools for the promotion of social interactions among youths. Platforms such as facebook, Whatsapp, ... Article Metrics.

  4. Sperm-egg interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janice P

    2012-01-01

    A crucial step of fertilization is the sperm-egg interaction that allows the two gametes to fuse and create the zygote. In the mouse, CD9 on the egg and IZUMO1 on the sperm stand out as critical players, as Cd9(-/-) and Izumo1(-/-) mice are healthy but infertile or severely subfertile due to defective sperm-egg interaction. Moreover, work on several nonmammalian organisms has identified some of the most intriguing candidates implicated in sperm-egg interaction. Understanding of gamete membrane interactions is advancing through characterization of in vivo and in vitro fertilization phenotypes, including insights from less robust phenotypes that highlight potential supporting (albeit not absolutely essential) players. An emerging theme is that there are varied roles for gamete molecules that participate in sperm-egg interactions. Such roles include not only functioning as fusogens, or as adhesion molecules for the opposite gamete, but also functioning through interactions in cis with other proteins to regulate membrane order and functionality.

  5. Control On Fluid Flow Properties In Sandstone: Interactions Between Diagenesis Processes And Fracture Corridors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossennec, Claire; Géraud, Yves; Moretti, Isabelle; Mattioni, Luca

    2016-04-01

    During the development of a fault zone, processes occur at different scales: secondary faults and fractures development in the damage zone while "diagenetic" processes, i.e: fluid rock interaction at the grains size scale, contribute to modify the matrix features. Spatial distribution of these processes is clearly controlled by microstructural transformations induced by fractured corridors and their location. Understanding flowing properties in the associated damage zone contributes to the better modeling of the fluid flow in faulted and fractured reservoirs which could be oil, gas or water bearing. The Lower Triassic Buntsandstein sandstones outcrop of Cleebourg is located in the Hochwald Horst affected by a major NNE-SSW striking fault, and the structure globally dips with 30° toward Rhenish Fault (Upper Rhine Graben main western border fault). The study of the outcrop aims to decipher the fluid-flow scheme and interactions between fracture network and diagenetic features distribution in the damage zone of a fault, located close to major faulted areas, through field and laboratories petrophysical measurements (permeability, thermic conductivity), and samples microstructural and diagenetical descriptions. The outcrop is structurally divided into a 14 meters thick fault core, surrounded by 5 meters thick transition zones, and damage zone of minimum thickness of 40 meters (total thickness unknown, due to the limits of the outcrop). Damage zone includes three fractured corridors, perpendicular to bedding and from 2 to 5 meters thick. Results presented here were acquired in 2 different layers with similar lithology but only on damage zone samples. In entire damage zone, porosity results and thin section description allow to distinguish two different facies: • Fa1 Intermediate porous (porosity of 12%) sandstone with major illite cement and clay content up to 20% (detrital and diagenetic); • Fa2 High porous (porosity >15%) sandstone with quartz feeding

  6. Examining the Effects of Field Dependence-Independence on Learners' Problem-Solving Performance and Interaction with a Computer Modeling Tool: Implications for the Design of Joint Cognitive Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeli, Charoula

    2013-01-01

    An investigation was carried out to examine the effects of cognitive style on learners' performance and interaction during complex problem solving with a computer modeling tool. One hundred and nineteen undergraduates volunteered to participate in the study. Participants were first administered a test, and based on their test scores they were…

  7. Sequence-dependent upstream DNA-RNA polymerase interactions in the open complex with λPR λPRM promoters and implications for the mechanism of promoter interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Cellai, Sara; Ross, Wilma; Bustamante, Carlos; Rivetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    The upstream interactions of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase in open complex (RPo) formed at the PR and PRM promoters of bacteriophage lambda, have been studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM). We demonstrate that the previously described 30 nm DNA compaction observed upon RPo formation at PR1 is a consequence of the specific interaction of the RNAP with two AT-rich sequence determinants positioned from −36 to −59 and from −80 to −100. Likewise, RPos formed at PRM showed a specific contact between the RNAP and the DNA sequence from −36 to −60. We further demonstrate that this interaction, which results in DNA wrapping against the polymerase surface, is mediated by the C-terminal domains of the alpha subunits (αCTD). Substitution of these AT-rich sequences with heterologous DNA reduces DNA wrapping but has little effect on the activity of the PR promoter. We find, however, that the frequency of DNA templates with both PR and PRM occupied by an RNAP significantly increases upon loss of DNA wrapping. These results suggest that αCTD interactions with upstream DNA can also play a role in regulating the expression of closely spaced promoters. Finally, a model for a possible mechanism of promoter interference between PR and PRM is proposed. PMID:19061900

  8. Do nonbonded H--H interactions in phenanthrene stabilize it relative to anthracene? A possible resolution to this question and its implications for ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Robert D; Nikolayenko, Igor V

    2012-08-23

    The problem of whether interactions between the hydrogen atoms at the 1,10-positions in the "cleft" of the "bent" phenanthrene stabilize the latter molecule thermodynamically relative to "linear" anthracene, or whether the higher stability of phenanthrene is due to a more energetically favorable π-system, is considered. DFT calculations at the X3LYP/cc-pVTZ(-f)++ level of the ground state energies (E) of anthracene, phenanthrene, and the set of five benzoquinolines are reported. In the gas phase, "bent" phenanthrene was computed to be thermodynamically more stable than "linear" anthracene by -28.5 kJ mol(-1). This fact was attributed predominantly to the phenomenon of higher aromatic stabilization of the π-system of phenanthrene relative to anthracene, and not to the stabilizing influence of the nonbonding H--H interactions in its cleft. In fact, these interactions in phenanthrene were shown to be destabilizing. Similar calculations for five benzoquinolines (bzq) indicate that ΔE values vary as: 6,7-bzq (linear) ≤ 2,3-bzq (linear) < 5,6-bzq (bent) ≤ 3,4-bzq (bent) < 7,8-bzq (bent, no H--H nonbonding interactions in cleft), supporting the idea that it is a more stable π-system that favors 7,8-bzq over 2,3-bzq and 6,7-bzq, and that the H--H interactions in the clefts of 3,4-bzq and 5,6-bzq are destabilizing. Intramolecular hydrogen bonding in the cleft of 7,8-bzq plays a secondary role in its stabilization relative 6,7-bzq. The question of whether H--H nonbonded interactions between H atoms at the 3 and 3' positions of 2,2'-bipyridyl (bpy) coordinated to metal ions are stabilizing or destabilizing is then considered. The energy of bpy is scanned as a function of N-C-C-N torsion angle (χ) in the gas-phase, and it is found that the trans form is 32.8 kJ mol(-1) more stable than the cis conformer. A relaxed coordinate scan of energy of bpy in aqueous solution as a function of χ is modeled using the PBF approach, and it is found that the trans conformer is

  9. The antecedents and implications of interracial anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, E Ashby; Devine, Patricia G

    2003-06-01

    Drawing on previous theorizing from both the prejudice and social anxiety literatures, a model of the antecedents and implications of intergroup anxiety is offered. It is argued that a lack of positive previous experiences with outgroup members creates negative expectancies about interracial interactions, which result in intergroup anxiety. This anxiety is posited to result in heightened hostility toward outgroup members and a desire to avoid interacting with outgroup members. Study 1 examined White participants' responses to interacting with Black people using a range of self-report measures; the associations between these responses supported the relationships outlined in the model. Study 2 explored White participants' responses to an anticipated interaction with a Black person or a White person. The findings revealed that high levels of anxiety about an interaction with a Black person, but not a White person, were associated with a lower likelihood of returning for the interaction.

  10. THE FOREIGN FACTOR WITHIN THE TRIPLE HELIX MODEL: INTERACTIONS OF NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL INNOVATION SYSTEMS, TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE REGION: THE CASE OF THE ELECTRONICS CLUSTER IN GUADALAJARA, JALISCO, MÉXICO.

    OpenAIRE

    María Isabel Rivera Vargas

    2006-01-01

    Within the context of global production the interactions among endogenous and foreign firms and their respective innovation systems, as well as strategic governmental policies favouring the exchange, may give rise to either virtuous or vicious circles of development through technological spillovers (Cantwell 1989, 1995a; Perez 1998), therefore, the foreign factor should be considered an important component within the triple helix paradigm in developing countries. This paper argues that in dev...

  11. Sequence-dependent upstream DNA-RNA polymerase interactions in the open complex with lambdaPR and lambdaPRM promoters and implications for the mechanism of promoter interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, Laura; Cellai, Sara; Ross, Wilma; Bustamante, Carlos; Rivetti, Claudio

    2009-01-23

    Upstream interactions of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase (RNAP) in an open promoter complex (RPo) formed at the P(R) and P(RM) promoters of bacteriophage lambda have been studied by atomic force microscopy. We demonstrate that the previously described 30-nm DNA compaction observed upon RPo formation at P(R) [Rivetti, C., Guthold, M. & Bustamante, C. (1999). Wrapping of DNA around the E. coli RNA polymerase open promoter complex. EMBO J., 18, 4464-4475.] is a consequence of the specific interaction of the RNAP with two AT-rich sequence determinants positioned from -36 to -59 and from -80 to -100. Likewise, RPos formed at P(RM) showed a specific contact between RNAP and the upstream DNA sequence. We further demonstrate that this interaction, which results in DNA wrapping against the polymerase surface, is mediated by the C-terminal domains of alpha-subunits (carboxy-terminal domain). Substitution of these AT-rich sequences with heterologous DNA reduces DNA wrapping but has only a small effect on the activity of the P(R) promoter. We find, however, that the frequency of DNA templates with both P(R) and P(RM) occupied by an RNAP significantly increases upon loss of DNA wrapping. These results suggest that alpha carboxy-terminal domain interactions with upstream DNA can also play a role in regulating the expression of closely spaced promoters. Finally, a model for a possible mechanism of promoter interference between P(R) and P(RM) is proposed.

  12. Investigating Variations in Gameplay: Cognitive Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Sedig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in creating computer games for learning, problem solving, and other high-level cognitive activities. When investigating whether gameplay is conducive to such activities, gameplay is often studied as a whole. As a result, cognitive implications can be linked to the game but not to its structural elements. Given that gameplay arises from interaction between the player and the game, it is the structural components of interaction that should be investigated to better understand the design of gameplay. Furthermore, minor variations in the components of interaction can have significant cognitive implications. However, such variation has not been studied yet. Thus, to gain a better understanding of how we can study the effect of interaction on the cognitive aspect of gameplay, we conducted an exploratory investigation of two computer games. These games were isomorphic at a deep level and only had one minor difference in the structure of their interaction. Volunteers played these games and discussed the cognitive processes that emerged. In one game, they primarily engaged in planning, but in the other game they primarily engaged in visualizing. This paper discusses the results of our investigation as well as its implications for the design of computer games.

  13. Use of fracture filling mineral assemblages for characterizing water-rock interactions during exhumation of an accretionary complex: An example from the Shimanto Belt, southern Kyushu Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Takuya; Yoshida, Hidekazu; Metcalfe, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Various fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals in fracture walls were formed by fluid-rock interaction during the exhumation of the Palaeogene Shimanto Belt of Kyushu, Japan, which is located in an accretionary complex. Each mineral formed under favourable geological conditions and can be used to estimate the conditions of accretion and formation of the related rock sequences. Petrographic observations, mineralogical and geochemical analyses were made on fracture filling minerals and secondary minerals from boreholes of ca. 140 m depth, drilled in the Shimanto Belt. Results reveal that the secondary minerals were formed in three major stages distinguished by the sequential textural relationships of the minerals and the interpreted environment of mineral formation. Filling mineral assemblages show that the studied rock formation has been subducted to a depth of several km and the temperature reached was ca. 200-300 °C. After the subduction, the rock formation was uplifted and surface acidic water penetrated up to 80 m beneath the present ground surface. The acid water dissolved calcite fracture filling minerals to form the present groundwater flow-paths, which allowed recent wall rock alteration to occur. The results shown here imply that filling mineral assemblages can be an effective tool to evaluate the environmental changes during exhumation of an accretionary complex.

  14. Dependence of mu-conotoxin block of sodium channels on ionic strength but not on the permeating [Na+]: implications for the distinctive mechanistic interactions between Na+ and K+ channel pore-blocking toxins and their molecular targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ronald A; Hui, Kwokyin; French, Robert J; Sato, Kazuki; Henrikson, Charles A; Tomaselli, Gordon F; Marbán, Eduardo

    2003-08-15

    Mu-conotoxins (mu-CTXs) are Na+ channel-blocking, 22-amino acid peptides produced by the sea snail Conus geographus. Although K+ channel pore-blocking toxins show specific interactions with permeant ions and strong dependence on the ionic strength (mu), no such dependence has been reported for mu-CTX and Na+ channels. Such properties would offer insight into the binding and blocking mechanism of mu-CTX as well as functional and structural properties of the Na+ channel pore. Here we studied the effects of mu and permeant ion concentration ([Na+]) on mu-CTX block of rat skeletal muscle (mu1, Nav1.4) Na+ channels. Mu-CTX sensitivity of wild-type and E758Q channels increased significantly (by approximately 20-fold) when mu was lowered by substituting external Na+ with equimolar sucrose (from 140 to 35 mm Na+); however, toxin block was unaltered (p > 0.05) when mu was maintained by replacement of [Na+] with N-methyl-d-glucamine (NMG+), suggesting that the enhanced sensitivity at low mu was not due to reduction in [Na+]. Single-channel recordings identified the association rate constant, k(on), as the primary determinant of the changes in affinity (k(on) increased 40- and 333-fold for mu-CTX D2N/R13Q and D12N/R13Q, respectively, when symmetric 200 mm Na+ was reduced to 50 mm). In contrast, dissociation rates changed channels depends critically on mu but not specifically on [Na+], contrasting with the known behavior of pore-blocking K+ channel toxins. These findings suggest that different degrees of ion interaction, underlying the fundamental conduction mechanisms of Na+ and K+ channels, are mirrored in ion interactions with pore-blocking toxins.

  15. Distinct Chlorine Isotopic Reservoirs on Mars: Implications for Character, Extent and Relative Timing of Crustal Interaction with Mantle-Derived Magmas, Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere, and the Building Blocks of an Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, C. K.; Messenger, S.; Sharp, Z. D.; Burger, P. V.; Nguyen, N.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The style, magnitude, timing, and mixing components involved in the interaction between mantle derived Martian magmas and Martian crust have long been a point of debate. Understanding this process is fundamental to deciphering the composition of the Martian crust and its interaction with the atmosphere, the compositional diversity and oxygen fugacity variations in the Martian mantle, the bulk composition of Mars and the materials from which it accreted, and the noble gas composition of Mars and the Sun. Recent studies of the chlorine isotopic composition of Martian meteorites imply that although the variation in delta (sup 37) Cl is limited (total range of approximately14 per mille), there appears to be distinct signatures for the Martian crust and mantle. However, there are potential issues with this interpretation. New Cl isotope data from the SAM (Sample Analysis at Mars) instrument on the Mars Science Lab indicate a very wide range of Cl isotopic compositions on the Martian surface. Recent measurements by [10] duplicated the results of [7,8], but placed them within the context of SAM surface data. In addition, Martian meteorite Chassigny contains trapped noble gases with isotopic ratios similar to solar abundance, and has long been considered a pristine, mantle derived sample. However, previous studies of apatite in Chassigny indicate that crustal fluids have interacted with regions interstitial to the cumulus olivine. The initial Cl isotope measurements of apatite in Chassigny suggest an addition of crustal component to this lithology, apparently contradicting the rare gas data. Here, we examine the Cl isotopic composition of multiple generations and textures of apatite in Chassigny to extricate the crustal and mantle components in this meteorite and to reveal the style and timing of the addition of crustal components to mantle-derived magmas. These data reveal distinct Martian Cl sources whose signatures have their origins linked to both the early Solar

  16. Melt-rock interactions and fabric development of peridotites from North Pond in the Kane area, Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Implications of microstructural and petrological analyses of peridotite samples from IODP Hole U1382A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harigane, Yumiko; Abe, Natsue; Michibayashi, Katsuyoshi; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Chang, Qing

    2016-06-01

    North Pond is an isolated sedimentary pond on the western flank of the Kane area along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Drill-hole U1382A of IODP Expedition 336 recovered peridotite and gabbro samples from a sedimentary breccia layer in the pond, from which we collected six fresh peridotite samples. The peridotite samples came from the southern slope of the North Pond where an oceanic core complex is currently exposed. The samples were classified as spinel harzburgite, plagioclase-bearing harzburgite, and a vein-bearing peridotite that contains tiny gabbroic veins. No obvious macroscopic shear deformation related to the formation of a detachment fault was observed. The spinel harzburgite with a protogranular texture was classified as refractory peridotite. The degree of partial melting of the spinel harzburgite is estimated to be ˜17%, and melt depletion would have occurred at high temperatures in the uppermost mantle beneath the spreading axis. The progressive melt-rock interactions between the depleted spinel harzburgite and the percolating melts of Normal-Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (N-MORB) produced the plagioclase-bearing harzburgite and the vein-bearing peridotite at relatively low temperatures. This implies that the subsequent refertilization occurred in an extinct spreading segment of the North Pond after spreading at the axis. Olivine fabrics in the spinel and plagioclase-bearing harzburgites are of types AG, A, and D, suggesting the remnants of a mantle flow regime beneath the spreading axis. The initial olivine fabrics appear to have been preserved despite the later melt-rock interactions. The peridotite samples noted above preserve evidence of mantle flow and melt-rock interactions beneath a spreading ridge that formed at ˜8 Ma.

  17. Brain-gut interactions and inflammatory bowel disease:Implications for acupuncture and moxibustion treatment%炎症性肠病的脑肠互动及针灸干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包春辉; 窦传字; 徐斌; 刘慧荣; 吴焕淦

    2013-01-01

    炎症性肠病(inflammatory bowel disease,IBD)是一组病因尚不十分清楚的慢性、复发性肠道炎症性疾病.近年来脑肠互动在IBD发病中的作用越来越受到重视.大量研究表明,IBD患者中枢神经系统、下丘脑-垂体-肾上腺轴(HPA轴)、下丘脑-自主神经系统轴(HANS轴)与肠道应答功能均存在不同程度的失调,并且与疾病活动度密切相关.业已证实,针灸是治疗IBD的有效手段,通过对脑肠互动功能的整体调节可能是针灸治疗IBD的关键效应机制.因此,本文旨在阐释IBD脑肠互动机制以及中医理论对脑肠互动的认识,并在此基础上对针灸的干预机制作初步探讨.%Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic recurrent intestinal inflammatory disorder.The role of dysfunction of brain-gut interactions in the pathogenesis of IBD has recently been intensively investigated.Numerous studies have shown that the central nervous system,the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA axis),the hypothalamus-the autonomic nervous system axis (HANS axis),and intestinal response functions develop varying degrees of dysfunction in IBD patients and are closely related to disease activity.It has been proven that acupuncture and moxibustion therapy is an effective means for the treatment of IBD,and the hollstic regulation of the function of brain-gut interactions may be the key effect mechanism of acupuncture and moxibustion treatment in IBD.In this paper,we aim to explain the mechanism of brain-gut interactions in IBD as well as traditional Chinese medicine theory on brain-gut interactions,and on this basis,we explore the possible mechanism of acupuncture and moxibution treatment.

  18. Preliminary results from the experimental study of CO{sub 2}-brine-rock interactions at elevated T and P: implications for the pilot plant for CO{sub 2} storage in Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galarza, C.; Buil, B.; Pena, J.; Martin, P.L.; Gomez, P.; Garralon, A. [CIEMAT, Unidad de Geologia Ambiental Aplicada, Departamento de Medio Ambiente, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    A new experimental program has been carried out in order to study CO{sub 2}-brine-rock interactions susceptible to take place in conditions close to those expected in the pilot plant that is being developed in Spain (a carbonate reservoir located at more than 800 m depth, with 15% porosity, and a salinity of the native brine between 20 - 90 g/L). The combination of preliminary experimental and numerical modeling (PHREEQC) results suggests that the main geochemical processes are calcite dissolution and anhydrite precipitation. (authors)

  19. Interactional Expertise and Embodiment

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Harry

    2016-01-01

    In Part 1 of this paper, I introduce the idea of interactional expertise while in Part 2, I focus on its implications for philosophical theories of the importance of the body in forming our conceptual world. I argue that the way philosophers have dealt with the body turns attention away from the most important questions and that we cannot answer these questions without making the notion of socialisation, and therefore interactional expertise, a central concept in our thinking. This makes language at least as important, and often more important than bodily practice in our understanding of the world. The notion of a disembodied socialised agent leads in the direction of interesting questions while the notion of an embodied but unsocialised human actor is unimaginable.

  20. Fluid–rock interaction across the South Tibetan Detachment, Garhwal Himalaya (India): Mineralogical and geochemical evidences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anubhooti Saxena; Himanshu K Sachan; Pulok K Mukherjee; Dilip K Mukhopadhya

    2012-02-01

    The Malari Leucogranite in the Garhwal Himalaya is cut across by a continental-scale normal fault system called the South Tibetan Detachment (STD). A mineralogical, geochemical and fluid inclusion study of samples from the fault zone of the Malari Granite was performed to reveal the imprints of fluid–rock interaction. Fluid inclusion assemblages observed in the alteration zone indicate the presence of NaCl-dominated aqueous fluids with varied salinity of 6 –16 wt.% of NaCl equivalent. Mineralogical changes include the alteration of feldspar to muscovite and muscovite to chlorite. This alteration took place at temperatures of 275°–335°C and pressures between 1.9 and 4.2 kbars as revealed by the application of chlorite thermometry, fluid isochores, and presence of K-feldspar+muscovite+chlorite+quartz mineral assemblage. Geochemical mass-balance estimates predict 32% volume loss during alteration. An estimated fluid/rock ratio of 82 is based on loss of silica during alteration, and reveals presence of a moderately low amount of fluid at the time of faulting. Results of fluid inclusion and alteration mineralogy indicate that the Malari Leucogranites were exhumed due to normal faulting along the STD and erosion from mid-crustal levels. Most of the leucogranites in the Himalayas occur along the STD and possibly a regional-scale fluid flow all along the STD might have caused similar alteration of leucogranites along this tectonic break. Regional fluid flow was probably concentrated along the STD and channelized through mesoscopic fractures, microcracks and grain boundaries.

  1. Activated Glucocorticoid Receptor Interacts with the INHAT Component Set/TAF-Iβ and Releases it from a Glucocorticoid-responsive Gene Promoter, Relieving Repression: Implications for the Pathogenesis of Glucocorticoid Resistance in Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia with Set-Can Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichijo, Takamasa; Chrousos, George P.; Kino, Tomoshige

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Set/template-activating factor (TAF)-Iβ, part of the Set-Can oncogene product found in acute undifferentiated leukemia, is a component of the inhibitor of acetyltransferases (INHAT) complex. Set/TAF-Iβ interacted with the DNA-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in yeast two-hybrid screening, and repressed GR-induced transcriptional activity of a chromatin-integrated glucocorticoid-responsive and a natural promoter. Set/TAF-Iβ was co-precipitated with glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) of these promoters in the absence of dexamethasone, while addition of the hormone caused dissociation of Set/TAF-Iβ from and attraction of the p160-type coactivator GRIP1 to the promoter GREs. Set-Can fusion protein, on the other hand, did not interact with GR, was constitutively co-precipitated with GREs and suppressed GRIP1-induced enhancement of GR transcriptional activity and histone acetylation. Thus, Set/TAF-Iβ acts as a ligand-activated GR-responsive transcriptional repressor, while Set-Can does not retain physiologic responsiveness to ligand-bound GR, possibly contributing to the poor responsiveness of Set-Can-harboring leukemic cells to glucocorticoids. PMID:18096310

  2. Explicit Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löwgren, Jonas; Eriksen, Mette Agger; Linde, Per

    2006-01-01

    as an interpretation of palpability, comprising usability as well as patient empowerment and socially performative issues. We present a prototype environment for video recording during physiotherapeutical consultation which illustrates our current thoughts on explicit interaction and serves as material for further......We report an ongoing study of palpable computing to support surgical rehabilitation, in the general field of interaction design for ubiquitous computing. Through explorative design, fieldwork and participatory design techniques, we explore the design principle of explicit interaction...

  3. Floor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Ludvigsen, Martin;

    2005-01-01

    Within architecture, there is a long tradition of careful design of floors. The design has been concerned with both decorating floors and designing floors to carry information. Ubiquitous computing technology offers new opportunities for designing interactive floors. This paper presents three...... different interactive floor concepts. Through an urban perspective it draws upon the experiences of floors in architecture, and provides a set of design issues for designing interactive floors....

  4. Evidences for a leaky scanning mechanism for the synthesis of the shorter M23 protein isoform of aquaporin-4: implication in orthogonal array formation and neuromyelitis optica antibody interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Pisani, Francesco; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Frigeri, Antonio

    2010-02-12

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) exists as two major isoforms that differ in the length of the N terminus, the shorter AQP4-M23 and the longer AQP4-M1. Both isoforms form tetramers, which can further aggregate in the plasma membrane to form typical orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) whose dimension depends on the ratio of the M1 and M23. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the M23 isoform can be produced directly by the M1 mRNA. In cells transiently transfected with AQP4-M1 coding sequence we observed besides AQP4-M1 the additional presence of the AQP4-M23 isoform associated with the formation of typical OAPs observable by two-dimensional blue native/SDS-PAGE and total internal reflection microscopy. The mutation of the second in-frame methionine M23 in AQP4-M1 (AQP4-M1(M23I)) prevented the expression of the M23 isoform and the formation of OAPs. We propose "leaky scanning" as a translational mechanism for the expression of AQP4-M23 protein isoform and that the formation of OAPs may occur even in the absence of AQP4-M23 mRNA. This mechanism can have important pathophysiological implications for the cell regulation of the M1/M23 ratio and thus OAP size. In this study we also provide evidence that AQP4-M1 is mobile in the plasma membrane, that it is inserted and not excluded into immobile OAPs, and that it is an important determinant of OAP structure and size.

  5. Playful Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    The video Playful Interaction describes a future architectural office, and envisions ideas and concepts for playful interactions between people, materials and appliances in a pervasive and augmented working environment. The video both describes existing developments, technologies and designs...... as well as ideas not yet implemented such as playful modes of interaction with an augmented ball. Playful Interaction has been used as a hybrid of a vision video and a video prototype (1). Externally the video has been used to visualising our new ideas, and internally the video has also worked to inspire...

  6. Self-interacting Dark Matter Benchmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplinghat, M.; Tulin, S.; Yu, H-B

    2017-01-01

    Dark matter self-interactions have important implications for the distributions of dark matter in the Universe, from dwarf galaxies to galaxy clusters. We present benchmark models that illustrate characteristic features of dark matter that is self-interacting through a new light mediator. These models have self-interactions large enough to change dark matter densities in the centers of galaxies in accord with observations, while remaining compatible with large-scale structur...

  7. Gene-environment interaction affects substance P and neurokinin A in the entorhinal cortex and periaqueductal grey in a genetic animal model of depression: implications for the pathophysiology of depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husum, Henriette; Wörtwein, Gitta; Andersson, Weronika

    2008-01-01

    of the congenitally 'depressed' Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) compared to the Flinders Resistant Line (FRL) control rats. It is also known that environmental stress may affect brain levels of tachykinins. In view of these results we decided to superimpose maternal deprivation, an early life environmental stressor......, onto the genetically predisposed 'depressed' FSL rats and the FRL control rats and use this paradigm as a model of gene-environment interaction. The adult animals were sacrificed, adrenal glands and brains dissected out and SP-, NKA- and CRH-LI levels were determined in ten discrete brain regions....... Maternal deprivation led to a marked increase in SP-LI and NKA-LI levels in the periaqueductal grey (PAG) and entorhinal cortex of the 'depressed' FSL strain while it had no significant effect in the FRL controls. Furthermore, specific strain differences in peptide-LI content were confirmed. No difference...

  8. The Effect of Water on Crack Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaede, O.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2009-04-01

    While the mechanical coupling between pore fluid and solid phase is relatively well understood, quantitative studies dealing with chemical-mechanical weakening in geological materials are rare. Many classical poroelastic problems can be addressed with the simple law of effective stress. Experimental studies show that the presence of a chemically active fluid can have effects that exceed the predictions of the law of effective stress. These chemical fluid-rock interactions alter the mechanical properties of the solid phase. Especially chemical-mechanical weakening has important ramifications for many areas of applied geosciences ranging from nuclear waste disposal over reservoir enhancement to fault stability. In this study, we model chemically induced changes of the size of the process zone around a crack tip. The knowledge of the process zone size is used to extend existing effective medium approximations of cracked solids. The stress distribution around a crack leads to a chemical potential gradient. This gradient will be a driver for mass diffusion through the solid phase. As an example, mass diffusion is towards the crack tip for a mode I crack. In this case a chemical reaction, that weakens the solid phase, will increase the size of the process zone around the crack tip. We apply our model to the prominent hydrolytic weakening effect observed in the quartz-water system (Griggs and Blacic, 1965). Hydrolytic weakening is generally attributed to water hydrolyzing the strong Si-O bonds of the quartz crystal. The hydrolysis replaces a Si-O-Si bridge with a relatively weak hydrogen bridge between two silanol groups. This enhances dislocation mobility and hence the yield stress is reduced. The plastic process zone around a crack tip is therefore larger in a wet crystal than in a dry crystal. We calculate the size of the process zone by solving this coupled mechanical-chemical problem with the Finite Element code ABAQUS. We consider single crack, collinear crack and

  9. Aesthetic interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Iversen, Ole Sejer; Krogh, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    There is a growing interest in considering aesthetic aspects in the design of interactive systems. A set of approaches are emerging each representing different applications of the terminology as well as different inherent assumptions on the role of the user, designer and interaction ideals....... In this paper, we use the concept of Pragmatist Aesthetics to provide a framework for distinguishing between different approaches to aesthetics. Moreover, we use our own design cases to illustrate how pragmatist aesthetics is a promising path to follow in the context of designing interactive systems......, as it promotes aesthetics of use, rather than aesthetics of appearance. We coin this approach in the perspective of aesthetic interaction. Finally we make the point that aesthetics is not re-defining everything known about interactive systems. We provide a framework placing this perspective among other...

  10. Application and Implication of Diversified Interactive Assessment In English Writing%英语作文多元互动评阅模式的运用及启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱娥

    2014-01-01

    作文评改是写作教学的一个重要环节。基于合作学习理论和过程写作理论进行的英语作文多元互动评阅教学实验表明:多元互动评阅模式可以减少词汇错误、书写错误和语法错误,增强学生合作学习意识和自主学习意识,培养学生自我纠错能力和鉴赏能力,巩固英语写作知识,从而提高写作水平。%Composition assessment is an important part in teaching writing .Based on the theories of cooperative learn-ing and process writing ,the teaching research in English writing shows that the mode of diversified interactive assessment can reduce the errors in vocabulary ,spelling ,and grammar ;It can also strengthen the awareness of cooperative learning and self-learning of the students ,develop the ability of self-correction and appreciation ,and consolidate the knowledge of English writing in order to improve the level of writing .

  11. Zircon U-Pb dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic characteristics of the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks in western Fujian Province, South China: Implication for Cretaceous crust-mantle interactions and lithospheric extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Lu, An-Huai; Zhao, Hai-Xiang; Yang, Tang-Li; Hou, Ming-Lan

    2016-09-01

    Comprehensive petrological, in situ zircon U-Pb dating, Ti-in-zircon temperature and Hf isotopic compositions, whole rock geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic data are reported for the Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions in the western Fujian Province (Interior Cathaysia Block), South China. The Jintonghu monzonitic intrusions were intruded at 95-96 Ma. Their Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions are similar to the coeval and nearby enriched lithospheric mantle-derived mafic and syenitic rocks, indicating that the Jintonghu monzonitic rocks were likely derived from partial melting of the enriched mantle sources. Their high Nb/Ta ratios (average 21.6) suggest that the metasomatically enriched mantle components were involved, which was attributed to the modification of slab-derived fluid and melt by the subduction of the paleo-Pacific Plate. The presence of mafic xenoliths, together with geochemical and isotopic features indicates a mafic-felsic magma mixing. Furthermore, the Jintonghu intrusions may have experienced orthopyroxene-, biotite- and plagioclase-dominated crystallization. Crust-mantle interaction can be identified as two stages, including that the Early Cretaceous mantle metasomatism and lithospheric extension resulted from the paleo-Pacific slab subduction coupled with slab rollback, and the Late Cretaceous crustal activation and enhanced extension induced by dip-angle subduction and the underplating of mantle-derived mafic magma.

  12. Two HAP2-GCS1 homologs responsible for gamete interactions in the cellular slime mold with multiple mating types: Implication for common mechanisms of sexual reproduction shared by plants and protozoa and for male-female differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Marina; Yamada, Lixy; Fujisaki, Yukie; Bloomfield, Gareth; Yoshida, Kentaro; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Sawada, Hitoshi; Mori, Toshiyuki; Urushihara, Hideko

    2016-07-01

    Fertilization is a central event in sexual reproduction, and understanding its molecular mechanisms has both basic and applicative biological importance. Recent studies have uncovered the molecules that mediate this process in a variety of organisms, making it intriguing to consider conservation and evolution of the mechanisms of sexual reproduction across phyla. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum undergoes sexual maturation and forms gametes under dark and humid conditions. It exhibits three mating types, type-I, -II, and -III, for the heterothallic mating system. Based on proteome analyses of the gamete membranes, we detected expression of two homologs of the plant fertilization protein HAP2-GCS1. When their coding genes were disrupted in type-I and type-II strains, sexual potency was completely lost, whereas disruption in the type-III strain did not affect mating behavior, suggesting that the latter acts as female in complex organisms. Our results demonstrate the highly conserved function of HAP2-GCS1 in gamete interactions and suggest the presence of additional allo-recognition mechanisms in D. discoideum gametes.

  13. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  14. Embarrassing Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deterding, Sebastian; Lucero, Andrés; Holopainen, Jussi;

    2015-01-01

    Wherever the rapid evolution of interactive technologies disrupts standing situational norms, creates new, often unclear situational audiences, or crosses cultural boundaries, embarrassment is likely. This makes embarrassment a fundamental adoption and engagement hurdle, but also a creative design...

  15. Interaction graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seiller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Interaction graphs were introduced as a general, uniform, construction of dynamic models of linear logic, encompassing all Geometry of Interaction (GoI) constructions introduced so far. This series of work was inspired from Girard's hyperfinite GoI, and develops a quantitative approach that should...... be understood as a dynamic version of weighted relational models. Until now, the interaction graphs framework has been shown to deal with exponentials for the constrained system ELL (Elementary Linear Logic) while keeping its quantitative aspect. Adapting older constructions by Girard, one can clearly define...... "full" exponentials, but at the cost of these quantitative features. We show here that allowing interpretations of proofs to use continuous (yet finite in a measure-theoretic sense) sets of states, as opposed to earlier Interaction Graphs constructions were these sets of states were discrete (and finite...

  16. Neutrino Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    McFarland, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    This manuscript summarizes a series of three lectures on interactions of neutrinos . The lectures begin with a pedagogical foundation and then explore topics of interest to current and future neutrino oscillation and cross-section experiments.

  17. Interactive Workspaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Preben Holst

    augmented reality, interactive building elements, and mobile devices to support new ways of working in a diversity of application domains with work situations ranging from individual work, through local collaboration, to distributed collaboration. The work situations may take place in offices/project rooms...... or in the field. The types of tasks may range from adhoc to more planned forms of interaction. We involve users from specific application domains and use settings continuously in our research following a participatory design approach....

  18. Geochemistry, zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopes of an Early Cretaceous intrusive suite in northeastern Jiangxi Province, South China Block: Implications