WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluid sealing technology

  1. Magnetic fluid seals for DWDM filter manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhixin

    2002-01-01

    Performance requirements of rotary magnetic fluid seals for thin film dense wavelength division multiplexing filter manufacturing are discussed. High speed, large diameter, tight tolerance for rotating accuracy and motion control are some of the technical challenges in this application. Analytical methods for studying these technical issues and experimental data are presented. Innovative design approaches are also discussed. It is shown that using the most advanced magnetic fluid technology and seal design technology, magnetic fluid seals can provide satisfactory performance in this challenging new application

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MAGNETIC FLUID SEAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bashtovoi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Dependences of critical pressure drop, being held by magnetic fluid seal, on time in a static state and shaft rotation velocity in dynamics have been experimentally determined. The significant influence of particles’ redistribution in magnetic fluid on static parameters of magnetic fluid seal has been established.

  3. TECHNOLOGY ROADMAPPING FOR IAEA SEALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFFHEINS,B.; ANNESE,C.; GOODMAN,M.; OCONNOR,W.; GUSHUE,S.; PEPPER,S.

    2003-07-13

    In the fall of 2002, the U.S. Support Program (USSP) initiated an effort to define a strategy or ''roadmap'' for future seals technologies and to develop a generalized process for planning safeguards equipment development, which includes seals and other safeguards equipment. The underlying objectives of the USSP include becoming more proactive than reactive in addressing safeguards equipment needs, helping the IAEA to maintain an inventory of cost-effective, reliable, and effective safeguards equipment, establishing a long-term planning horizon, and securing IAEA ownership in the process of effective requirements definition and timely transitioning of new or improved systems for IAEA use. At an initial workshop, seals, their functions, performance issues, and future embodiments were discussed in the following order: adhesive seals, metal seals, passive and active loop seals, ultrasonic seals, tamper indicating enclosures (including sample containers, equipment enclosures, and conduits). Suggested improvements to these technologies focused largely on a few themes: (1) The seals must be applied quickly, easily, and correctly; (2) Seals and their associated equipment should not unduly add bulk or weight to the inspectors load; (3) Rapid, in-situ verifiability of seals is desirable; and (4) Seal systems for high risk or high value applications should have two-way, remote communications. Based upon these observations and other insights, the participants constructed a skeletal approach for seals technology planning. The process begins with a top-level review of the fundamental safeguards requirements and extraction of required system features, which is followed by analysis of suitable technologies and identification of technology gaps, and finally by development of a planning schedule for system improvements and new technology integration. Development of a comprehensive procedure will require the partnership and participation of the IAEA. The

  4. Performances of Magnetic Fluid Seal and Application to Turbopumps

    OpenAIRE

    北洞, 貴也; 黒川, 淳一; 宮副, 雄貴; 林, 正悦

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic fluid shaft seal can achieve zero-leakage and operate stably against shaft vibration, but the sealing pressure is very low. In order to improve the pressure performance of a magnetic fluid seal and apply it to a turbopump, the seal pressure characteristics are studied theoretically and experimentally. The Poisson equation for magnetic vector potential is solved by FEM, and the seal performances are determined by use of the Bernoulli equation. The validity of the theory is confirmed...

  5. Application study of magnetic fluid seal in hydraulic turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Z Y; Zhang, W

    2012-01-01

    The waterpower resources of our country are abundant, and the hydroelectric power is developed, but at present the main shaft sealing device of hydraulic turbine is easy to wear and tear and the leakage is great. The magnetic fluid seal has the advantages of no contact, no wear, self-healing, long life and so on. In this paper, the magnetic fluid seal would be used in the main shaft of hydraulic turbine, the sealing structure was built the model, meshed the geometry, applied loads and solved by using MULTIPHYSICS in ANSYS software, the influence of the various sealing structural parameters such as tooth width, height, slot width, sealing gap on the sealing property were analyzed, the magnetic fluid sealing device suitable for large-diameter shaft and sealing water was designed, the sealing problem of the hydraulic turbine main shaft was solved effectively which will bring huge economic benefits.

  6. Design optimization of seal structure for sealing liquid by magnetic fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Tonggang; Cheng Yusheng; Yang Zhiyi

    2005-01-01

    The durability of the magnetic fluid seal clearly decreases when sealing another liquid because of the interface instability caused by the applied magnetic field and the velocity difference of the two liquids. With an intention to establish a stable interface during sealing liquid, a new magnetic fluid seal was developed in this paper. The parameters of the structure were optimized by a simulation apparatus. And the magnetic fluid seal designed based on the optimum parameters shows good performance and long life for sealing lubricating oil

  7. Application of a magnetic fluid seal to rotary blood pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitamura, Y; Arioka, S; Azegami, M; Sakota, D; Sekine, K

    2008-01-01

    A magnetic fluid seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of a shaft without frictional heat and material wear and hence has excellent durability. However, the durability of a magnetic fluid seal decreases in liquid. The life of a seal applied to a rotary blood pump is not known. We have developed a magnetic fluid seal that has a shield mechanism minimizing the influence of the rotary pump on the magnetic fluid. The developed magnetic fluid seal worked for over 286 days in a continuous flow condition, for 24 days (on-going) in a pulsatile flow condition and for 24 h (electively terminated) in blood flow. The magnetic fluid seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps

  8. Magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids in rotating seal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borbath, T; Borbath, I; Boros, T; Bica, D; Vekas, L; Potencz, I

    2010-01-01

    Recent results are presented concerning the development of magnetofluidic leakage-free rotating seals for vacuum and high pressure gases, evidencing significant advantages compared to mechanical seals. The micro-pilot scale production of various types of magnetizable sealing fluids is shortly reviewed, in particular the main steps of the chemical synthesis of magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids with light hydrocarbon, mineral oil and synthetic oil carrier liquids. The behavior of different types of magnetizable fluids in the rotating sealing systems is analyzed. Design concepts, some constructive details and testing procedures of magnetofluidic rotating seals are presented such as the testing equipment. The main characteristics of several magnetofluidic sealing systems and their applications will be presented: vacuum deposition systems and liquefied gas pumps applications, mechanical and magnetic nanofluid combined seals, gas valves up to 40 bar equipped by rotating seal with magnetic nanofluids and magnetic composite fluids.

  9. Sealing performance of a magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Kano, Kentaro; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya; Higuchi, Taka-Aki

    2009-09-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) for a rotary blood pump seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and, hence, has excellent durability. The performance of a MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We have developed a MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Under the condition of continuous flow, the MF seal remained in perfect condition against a pressure of 298 mm Hg (pump flow rate: 3.96 L/min). The seal was also perfect against a pressure of 170 mm Hg in a continuous flow of 3.9 L/min for 275 days. We have developed a MF seal that works in liquid against clinically used pressures. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  10. Miniature magnetic fluid seal working in liquid environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori, E-mail: ymitamura@par.odn.ne.jp [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0814 (Japan); Durst, Christopher A., E-mail: chris@procyrion.com [Procyrion, Inc., Houston, TX 77027 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This study was carried out to develop a miniature magnetic fluid (MF) seal working in a liquid environment. The miniature MF seal is intended for use in a catheter blood pump. The requirements for the MF seal included a size of less than Ø4×4.5 mm, shaft diameter of 1 mm, sealing pressure of 200 mmHg, shaft speed of up to 40000 rpm, and life of one month. The miniature MF seal was composed of an NdFeB magnet (Ø4×Ø2×1) sandwiched between two pole pieces (Ø4×Ø1.1×0.5). A shield (Ø4×Ø1.2×1.5) was placed on the pole piece facing the liquid to minimize the influence of pump flow on the MF. The seal was installed on a Ø1 shaft. A seal was formed by injecting MF (Ms: 47.8 kA/m and η: 0.5 Pa·sec) into the gap between the pole pieces and the shaft. Total volume of the MF seal was 44 μL. A sealing pressure of 370 mmHg was obtained at motor speeds of 0-40,000 rpm. The seal remained perfect for 10 days in saline under the condition of a pump flow of 1.5 L/min (The test was terminated in accordance with plans). The seal remained intact after ethylene oxide sterilization during which the seal was exposed to high pressures. In conclusion, the newly developed MF seal will be useful for a catheter pump. - Highlights: • A miniature magnetic fluid seal working in a liquid environment was developed. • The seal can be installed on Ø1 mm shaft and can seal against 370 mmHg at 40000 rpm. • The magnetic fluid seal will be useful for a catheter blood pump.

  11. Failure of Magnetic Fluid Seals Operating in Water: Preliminary Conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuszewski Leszek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses properties of magnetic fluid seals installed in rotary sealing nodes which operate in the utility water environment. Seals of this type have been examined as a possible solution to the problem with ship manoeuvring propulsion sealing. The present analysis bases on laboratory durability tests of magnetic fluid seals exposed to longterm utility water loads, at different water pressures and shaft revolutions. The basic seal durability criterion was the number of revolutions made by the sealing node shaft until the appearance of water tightness loss (leakage. It was found that the main factor leading to the wear of the seal is the relative speed of the magnetic fluid with respect to that of the utility water, and this process is heavily affected by the pressure acting on the seal. The reported test results are presented in the form of diagrams showing the seal durability (time until water tightness loss as a function of rotational speed. The curves shown in the diagrams are regular, with two different rotational speed ranges: the highspeed range, when the tightness loss is relatively fast, and the low-speed range, with a clear tendency to prolong the seal lifetime. These diagrams were given the name of durability curves of the MF seal operating in water. The results of the performed tests suggest formal similarity between the experimental data distribution concerning tightness loss processes occurring in magnetic fluid seals operating in water environment and metal fatigue processes. The article proposes a preliminary simplified durability model to describe the examined phenomenon.

  12. Analysis on the Viscous Pumping in a Magnetic Fluid Seal Under a Rotating Load and the Seal Design

    OpenAIRE

    長屋, 幸助; 大沼, 浩身; 佐藤, 淳

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses effects of viscous pumping in a magnetic fluid seal under a rotating load. The Reynolds equation was presented for the seal based on magnetic fluid mechanics, and the expressions for obtaining pressures in the seal, eccentricities of the rotating shaft due to the viscous pumping and seal pressures were given. Numerical Calculations were carried out for some sample problems, and the effect of magnetic flux densities on the pressure in the seal and the seal pressures were c...

  13. Seal analysis technology for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Liangang; Zhang Liping; Yang Yu; Zang Fenggang

    2009-01-01

    There is the coolant with radiation, high temperature and high pressure in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is closely correlated to RPV sealing capability whether the whole nuclear system work well or not. The aim of this paper is to study the seal analysis method and technology, such as the pre-tensioning of the bolt, elastoplastic contact and coupled technology of thermal and structure. The 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method really and generally consider the loads and model the contact problem with friction between the contact plates. This method is easier than the specialized seal program and used widely. And it is more really than the 2 D seal analysis method. This 3 D elastoplastic seal analysis method has been successfully used in the design and analysis of RPV. (authors)

  14. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: effects of seal structure on long-term performance in liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    2011-03-01

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of an MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We developed an MF seal that has a "shield" mechanism, and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. Three types of MF seals were used. Seal A was a conventional seal without a shield. Seal B had the same structure as that of Seal A, but the seal was installed at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal C was a seal with a shield and the MF was set at 1 mm below liquid level. Seal A failed after 6 and 11 days. Seal B showed better results (20 and 73 days). Seal C showed long-term durability (217 and 275 days). The reason for different results in different seal structures was considered to be different flow conditions near the magnetic fluid. Fluid dynamics near the MF in the pump were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. We have developed an MF seal with a shield that works in liquid for >275 days. The MF seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  15. Application of hydrophilic magnetic fluid to oil seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y. S.; Nakatsuka, K.; Fujita, T.; Atarashi, T.

    1999-07-01

    Bearing and gear are important components in machines. Lubricant for bearing or gear is usually confined in working space by rubber retainer or mechanical seal, and its lifetime which is determined by the friction wear of sealing material is important. In this report, the basic characteristics of magnetic fluid seal applied to lubricant retainer is studied. The fluid used for this purpose is ethyleneglycol-based magnetic fluid in which silica-coated iron particles are dispersed. The lubricant oil seal set consisting of six stages of pole piece and Nd-permanent magnets (4.0 Wb/m 2) in seal housing showed an excellent pressure resistance of 618 kPa under a rotating speed of 1800 rpm.

  16. Supercritical fluid chromatography of fish, shark and seal oils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch-Jensen, Christina; Mollerup, Jørgen

    1996-01-01

    Various natural and treated fish, shark liver and seal oils have been analyzed by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) using a non-polar capillary column. The lipids are separated according to molecular mass. The lipid groups found included free fatty acids, cholesterol, squalene, vitamins, wax...... applications of SFC on fish, seal and shark liver oils are presented....

  17. Thermal fluid-solid interaction model and experimental validation for hydrostatic mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weifeng; Liao, Chuanjun; Liu, Xiangfeng; Suo, Shuangfu; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuming

    2014-09-01

    Hydrostatic mechanical face seals for reactor coolant pumps are very important for the safety and reliability of pressurized-water reactor power plants. More accurate models on the operating mechanism of the seals are needed to help improve their performance. The thermal fluid-solid interaction (TFSI) mechanism of the hydrostatic seal is investigated in this study. Numerical models of the flow field and seal assembly are developed. Based on the mechanism for the continuity condition of the physical quantities at the fluid-solid interface, an on-line numerical TFSI model for the hydrostatic mechanical seal is proposed using an iterative coupling method. Dynamic mesh technology is adopted to adapt to the changing boundary shape. Experiments were performed on a test rig using a full-size test seal to obtain the leakage rate as a function of the differential pressure. The effectiveness and accuracy of the TFSI model were verified by comparing the simulation results and experimental data. Using the TFSI model, the behavior of the seal is presented, including mechanical and thermal deformation, and the temperature field. The influences of the rotating speed and differential pressure of the sealing device on the temperature field, which occur widely in the actual use of the seal, are studied. This research proposes an on-line and assembly-based TFSI model for hydrostatic mechanical face seals, and the model is validated by full-sized experiments.

  18. Miniature magnetic fluid seal working in liquid environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Durst, Christopher A.

    2017-06-01

    This study was carried out to develop a miniature magnetic fluid (MF) seal working in a liquid environment. The miniature MF seal is intended for use in a catheter blood pump. The requirements for the MF seal included a size of less than Ø4×4.5 mm, shaft diameter of 1 mm, sealing pressure of 200 mmHg, shaft speed of up to 40000 rpm, and life of one month. The miniature MF seal was composed of an NdFeB magnet (Ø4×Ø2×1) sandwiched between two pole pieces (Ø4×Ø1.1×0.5). A shield (Ø4×Ø1.2×1.5) was placed on the pole piece facing the liquid to minimize the influence of pump flow on the MF. The seal was installed on a Ø1 shaft. A seal was formed by injecting MF (Ms: 47.8 kA/m and η: 0.5 Pa·sec) into the gap between the pole pieces and the shaft. Total volume of the MF seal was 44 μL. A sealing pressure of 370 mmHg was obtained at motor speeds of 0-40,000 rpm. The seal remained perfect for 10 days in saline under the condition of a pump flow of 1.5 L/min (The test was terminated in accordance with plans). The seal remained intact after ethylene oxide sterilization during which the seal was exposed to high pressures. In conclusion, the newly developed MF seal will be useful for a catheter pump.

  19. A 3D-CFD code for accurate prediction of fluid flows and fluid forces in seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, M. M.; Przekwas, A. J.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Current and future turbomachinery requires advanced seal configurations to control leakage, inhibit mixing of incompatible fluids and to control the rotodynamic response. In recognition of a deficiency in the existing predictive methodology for seals, a seven year effort was established in 1990 by NASA's Office of Aeronautics Exploration and Technology, under the Earth-to-Orbit Propulsion program, to develop validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) concepts, codes and analyses for seals. The effort will provide NASA and the U.S. Aerospace Industry with advanced CFD scientific codes and industrial codes for analyzing and designing turbomachinery seals. An advanced 3D CFD cylindrical seal code has been developed, incorporating state-of-the-art computational methodology for flow analysis in straight, tapered and stepped seals. Relevant computational features of the code include: stationary/rotating coordinates, cylindrical and general Body Fitted Coordinates (BFC) systems, high order differencing schemes, colocated variable arrangement, advanced turbulence models, incompressible/compressible flows, and moving grids. This paper presents the current status of code development, code demonstration for predicting rotordynamic coefficients, numerical parametric study of entrance loss coefficients for generic annular seals, and plans for code extensions to labyrinth, damping, and other seal configurations.

  20. A sealed turbo-alternator using any working-fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chollet, Maurice.

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to a sealed turbo-alternator operating with a working fluid other than water. The turbo-alternator and the feed and lubricating pumps thereof are housed in a sealed casing. The latter constitutes, with the heat pump and the heat sink, a sealed enclosure containing the working and lubricating fluid. The alternator, which comprises neither collector nor brushes, is dipped in the working fluid vapor. Electric energy leaves the sealed enclosure through insulating sealed passager. In view of the absence of leakage it is possible to select (e.g. among freons) a working fluid well suited to the temperature differential between the heat source and the heat sink, and, accordingly to use temperature drops which could be too small in the case of steam. The various applications are as follows: recovery of calories at the exhaust of diesels and of gas turbines or in the cooling water of diesels; equipment of isotopic generators; recovery of calories from factory waste thrown into rivers (anti-pollution effect in view of the lowering of water temperature); non-polluting engine for special electrical vehicles [fr

  1. Numerical analysis on the action of centrifuge force in magnetic fluid rotating shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jibin; Li, Xuehui; Lu, Yongping; Hu, Jianhui

    2002-11-01

    The magnetic fluid seal is suitable for high-speed rotating shaft seal applications. Centrifuge force will have evident influence on magnetic fluid rotating shaft seals. The seal capacity of the rotating shaft seal can be improved or increased by some measures. Through hydrodynamic analysis the moving status of the magnetic fluid is worked out. By numerical method, the magnetic field and the isobars in the magnetic fluid of a seal device are computed. Then the influence of the centrifuge force on the magnetic fluid seal is calculated quantitatively.

  2. Numerical analysis on the action of centrifuge force in magnetic fluid rotating shaft seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jibin; Li Xuehui; Lu Yongping; Hu Jianhui

    2002-01-01

    The magnetic fluid seal is suitable for high-speed rotating shaft seal applications. Centrifuge force will have evident influence on magnetic fluid rotating shaft seals. The seal capacity of the rotating shaft seal can be improved or increased by some measures. Through hydrodynamic analysis the moving status of the magnetic fluid is worked out. By numerical method, the magnetic field and the isobars in the magnetic fluid of a seal device are computed. Then the influence of the centrifuge force on the magnetic fluid seal is calculated quantitatively

  3. CFD Activity at Aerojet Related to Seals and Fluid Film Bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, George E.

    1991-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) activities related to seals and fluid film bearings are presented. Among the topics addressed are the following: Aerovisc Numeric and its capabilities; Recent Seal Applications; and Future Code Developments.

  4. Coaxial twin-shaft magnetic fluid seals applied in vacuum wafer-handling robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Ming; Wen, Haiying; Du, Yu; Dai, Penglei

    2012-07-01

    Compared with traditional mechanical seals, magnetic fluid seals have unique characters of high airtightness, minimal friction torque requirements, pollution-free and long life-span, widely used in vacuum robots. With the rapid development of Integrate Circuit (IC), there is a stringent requirement for sealing wafer-handling robots when working in a vacuum environment. The parameters of magnetic fluid seals structure is very important in the vacuum robot design. This paper gives a magnetic fluid seal device for the robot. Firstly, the seal differential pressure formulas of magnetic fluid seal are deduced according to the theory of ferrohydrodynamics, which indicate that the magnetic field gradient in the sealing gap determines the seal capacity of magnetic fluid seal. Secondly, the magnetic analysis model of twin-shaft magnetic fluid seals structure is established. By analyzing the magnetic field distribution of dual magnetic fluid seal, the optimal value ranges of important parameters, including parameters of the permanent magnetic ring, the magnetic pole tooth, the outer shaft, the outer shaft sleeve and the axial relative position of two permanent magnetic rings, which affect the seal differential pressure, are obtained. A wafer-handling robot equipped with coaxial twin-shaft magnetic fluid rotary seals and bellows seal is devised and an optimized twin-shaft magnetic fluid seals experimental platform is built. Test result shows that when the speed of the two rotational shafts ranges from 0-500 r/min, the maximum burst pressure is about 0.24 MPa. Magnetic fluid rotary seals can provide satisfactory performance in the application of wafer-handling robot. The proposed coaxial twin-shaft magnetic fluid rotary seal provides the instruction to design high-speed vacuum robot.

  5. Theoretical and experimental study on the magnetic fluid seal of reciprocating shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Decai; Xu, Haiping; He, Xinzhi; Lan, Huiqing

    2005-03-01

    The authors obtain anti-pressure formula of reciprocating shaft magnetic fluid seal from general Navier-Stokes equation. In order to verify the correctness of the anti-pressure formula, the authors set up a magnetic fluid anti-pressure experiment rig for a reciprocating seal. Finally, the authors have verified influence of speed and stroke on the seal anti-pressure.

  6. Spray sealing: A breakthrough in integral fuel tank sealing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Martin D.; Zadarnowski, J. H.

    1989-11-01

    In a continuing effort to increase readiness, a new approach to sealing integral fuel tanks is being developed. The technique seals potential leak sources by spraying elastomeric materials inside the tank cavity. Laboratory evaluations project an increase in aircraft supportability and reliability, an improved maintainability, decreasing acquisition and life cycle costs. Increased usable fuel volume and lower weight than conventional bladders improve performance. Concept feasibility was demonstrated on sub-scale aircraft fuel tanks. Materials were selected by testing sprayable elastomers in a fuel tank environment. Chemical stability, mechanical properties, and dynamic durability of the elastomer are being evaluated at the laboratory level and in sub-scale and full scale aircraft component fatigue tests. The self sealing capability of sprayable materials is also under development. Ballistic tests show an improved aircraft survivability, due in part to the elastomer's mechanical properties and its ability to damp vibrations. New application equipment, system removal, and repair methods are being investigated.

  7. ESDRED Temporary Sealing Technology Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, J.; Garcia-Sineriz, J. L.; Barcena, I.; Alonso, M. C.; Fernandez Luco, L.; Garcia, J. L.; Fries, T.; Pettersson, S.; Boden, A.; Salo, J. P.

    2009-07-01

    The work in the ESDRED In te grated Project Module 4, Temporary Sealing (using low pH cement) Technology, consisted first of designing a low pH cement formulation and then of preparing several concrete designs suitable for the construction of sealing plugs and for rock support using shot crete techniques. Regarding sealing plugs, a short plug was constructed at Aspo in Sweden and it was very quickly loaded to failure i.e. slippage by applying water pressure to one face. A second, full scale plug was subsequently constructed at Grimsel test site in Switzerland. It was loaded using the swelling pressure created by bentonite blocks which were artificially hydrated. At time of writing the targeted pressure on the plug was not reached. As the saturation of the bentonite is taking longer than expected the partners involved agreed to continue with the saturation of the bentonite blocks and the related data monitoring beyond the ESDRED Project. The studies on low-pH shot crete for rock sup port were based on available recipes of low-pH concrete mixtures for use in a repository. Pilot and full scale tests were carried out in Sweden and in Switzerland. (Author) 5 refs.

  8. A magnetic fluid seal for rotary blood pumps: Long-term performance in liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Sayaka; Amari, Shuichi; Okamoto, Eiji; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya

    A magnetic fluid (MF) seal enables mechanical contact-free rotation of the shaft and hence has excellent durability. The performance of a MF seal, however, has been reported to decrease in liquids. We have developed a MF seal that has a 'shield' mechanism and a new MF with a higher magnetization of 47.9 kA/m. The sealing performance of the MF seal installed in a rotary blood pump was studied. The seal was perfect against a pressure of 150 mmHg in a continuous flow of 4.0 L/min for 275 days and against a pressure of 175 mmHg in a continuous flow of 3.9 L/min for 217 days. We have developed a MF seal that works in liquid against pressure mostly used clinically. The magnetic fluid seal is promising as a shaft seal for rotary blood pumps.

  9. Development of a magnetic fluid shaft seal for an axial-flow blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Kazumitsu; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Murabayashi, Shun; Nishimura, Ikuya; Yozu, Ryouhei; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2003-10-01

    A rotating impeller in a rotary blood pump requires a supporting system in blood, such as a pivot bearing or magnetic suspension. To solve potential problems such as abrasive wear and complexity of a supporting system, a magnetic fluid seal was developed for use in an axial-flow blood pump. Sealing pressures at motor speeds of up to 8,000 rpm were measured with the seal immersed in water or bovine blood. The sealing pressure was about 200 mm Hg in water and blood. The calculated theoretical sealing pressure was about 230 mm Hg. The seal remained perfect for 743 days in a static condition and for 180+ days (ongoing test) at a motor speed of 7,000 rpm. Results of measurement of cell growth activity indicated that the magnetic fluid has no negative cytological effects. The specially designed magnetic fluid shaft seal is useful for an axial-flow blood pump.

  10. Study on tamper-indicating technology in electronic seals system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiong; Han Feng; Zuo Guangxia; Zhao Xin; Zhang Quanhu; Di Yuming

    2009-01-01

    To strengthen our national arms control verification technical storage and deepen electronic seals' research, this paper mainly introduces seals' characteristics, functions and work principle, studies on tamper-indicating technology which is a key technology in electronic seals, designs some hardware circuit such as optical transceiver, temperature detection circuit, move detection circuit, re-prized circuit and so on, also designs a software program which is used for recording the destroying or tampering events' information. Experimental results show that electronic seals system can record the destroying or tampering events' information accurately and quickly, and give corresponding tamper-indication. (authors)

  11. Regarding the influence of heating and the Soret effect on a magnetic fluid seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krakov, M.S., E-mail: mkrakov@gmail.com [Belarusian National Technical University, 65 Independence Ave., 220013 Minsk (Belarus); Nikiforov, I.V. [Belarusian State University, 4 Independence Sq., 220050 Minsk (Belarus)

    2017-06-01

    The influence of a temperature gradient and the Soret effect on the distribution of particles in a magnetic fluid seal (MFS) is studied. The heating of the MFS is found to be an effective method of homogenizing the magnetic fluid in the seal; in addition, the influence of the Soret effect on this process is found to be essential.

  12. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  13. Influence of the shaft rotation on the stability of magnetic fluid shaft seal characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2008-12-01

    Distribution of the magnetic particles concentration in a magnetic fluid shaft seal is studied numerically for a rotating shaft. It is revealed that the shaft rotation causes not only an azimuthal flow of the magnetic fluid, but a meridional flow as well. This meridional flow prevents the growth of magnetic particle concentration in the gap of the magnetic fluid shaft seal. As a result, the burst pressure of the magnetic fluid shaft seal for the rotating shaft is stable and does not change with time. Figs 6, Refs 7.

  14. Cask systems development program seal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1991-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (10 CFR 71). Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. Experiments were performed to characterize the performance of several seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Results show that the seal materials tested, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings

  15. Laboratory studies of fluid flow through borehole seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    South, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    Boreholes in the vicinity of a nuclear waste repository must be reliably sealed to prevent rapid migration of radionuclide contaminated water from the vicinity of the repository to the accessible environment. Few data currently exist regarding the effectiveness of borehole sealing. The objective of this research was to assess the performance of borehole seals under laboratory conditions, particularly with regard to varying stress fields. The approach used to evaluate borehole seals was to compare flow through a sealed borehole with flow through intact rock. Granite, basalt, and tuff were tested, using either cement or bentonite as the seal material. The main conclusions reached as a result of the experiments is that currently existing materials are capable of forming high quality seals when placed under laboratory conditions. Variation of triaxial stress state about a borehole does not significantly affect seal performance if the rock is stiffer than the seal material. Temperature/moisture variations (drying) degraded the quality of cement seals significantly. Performance partially recovered upon resaturation. Significant remaining questions include field emplacement techniques; field vertification of plug quality; plug performance over long time periods, particularly with respect to temperature/moisture variations and chemical stability; and radionuclide sorption capabilities. Scale effects are also important, as shafts and drifts must be sealed as well as larger diameter boreholes

  16. Improving tag/seal technologies: the vulnerability assessment component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), specifically the Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, has sponsored the development of numerous tag and seal technologies for high-security/high-valued applications. One important component in this technology development effort has been the continuous integration of vulnerability assessments. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been the lead laboratory for vulnerability assessments of fiber-optic-based tag/seal technologies. This paper presents a brief historical overview and the current status of the DOE high-security tag/seal development program and discusses INEL's adversarial role and assessment philosophy. Verification testing criteria used to define ''successful'' tampering attempts/attacks are discussed. Finally, the advantages of integrating a vulnerability assessment into the development of commercial security tag/seals are presented

  17. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  18. Fluid moderator control system fuel assembly seal connector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, L.; Tower, S.N.; Klassen, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fuel assemblies having one or more flow channels therethrough, a core support plate having one or more flow channels therethrough, and seal connectors for sealingly connecting the one or more flow channels in the core support plate with the one or more flow channels in the fuel assemblies. The seal connectors each comprises a first portion and second portion each comprising an elongated member having a flow channel therethrough and being in substantial axial alignment with each other and being separated by a space therebetween, means for sealingly connecting the first portion o one or the one or more flow channels in the fuel assemblies, means for sealingly connecting the second portion to the first portion and for allowing relative motion between the portions, means for limiting the relative motion of the first and second portion in directions toward and away from each other, means for reconnectingly connecting and resealingly sealing the second portion to one of the one or more flow channels in the core support plate. It comprises a slip fit connection whereby the remote end of the second portion fits within whereby the remote end of the second portion fits within an opening in the core support plate which is in flow communication with the one or more flow channels in the core support plate and further comprises a ball and cones seal in series with axially spaced ring seals

  19. Fluid flow measurements of Test Series A and B for the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.

    1987-12-01

    The degree of waste isolation achieved by a repository seal system is dependent upon the fluid flow characteristics, or permeability, of the seals. In order to obtain meaningful, site-specific data on the performance of various possible seal system components, a series of in situ experiments called the Small Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT) are being conducted at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This report contains the results of gas flow, tracer penetration, and brine flow tests conducted on concrete seals in vertical (Test Series A) and horizontal (Test Series B) configurations. The test objectives were to evaluate the seal performance and to determine if there existed scaling effects which could influence future SSSPT designs. 3 refs., 77 figs

  20. Technological progress in sealed lead/acid batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, J.; Nakashima, H.; Kasai, Y.

    A brief review is given of the history of the research and development of sealed lead/acid batteries during the 30 years since, in 1959, the Yuasa Battery Co. introduced a small-sized sealed battery as the power supply for portable television sets. In 1965, Yuasa began the full-scale mass production and sale of a small-sized sealed lead/acid battery under the NOYPER brand. In 1970, the use of a PbCa alloy grid was adopted, and there followed the successful development of a sealed battery with an oxygen-recombination facility. In 1976, Yuasa more or less established the basic technology for the valve-regulated sealed lead/acid battery — the NP battery — which is now the type in general use. Throughout the 1980s, Yuasa, has continued development in order to expand the sphere of application for the production technology of valve-regulated batteries for motorcycles, as well as for stationary duties with large capacities of 100 to 3000 A h. Recently, in order to improve the reliability and boost the output of sealed lead/acid batteries for employment in UPS power sources, Yuasa has been working intently on the design of a valve-regulated lead/acid battery with outstanding characteristics for high-rate discharge and resistance to high temperatures.

  1. Field Test and Evaluation of Engineered Biomineralization Technology for Sealing Existing Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Alfred [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Storage Program (CSP) aimed at developing Advanced Wellbore Integrity Technologies to Ensure Permanent Geologic Carbon Storage. The technology field-tested in this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP), which utilizes a biologically-based process to precipitate calcium carbonate. If properly controlled MICP can successfully seal fractures, high permeability zones, and compromised wellbore cement in the vicinity of wellbores and in nearby caprock, thereby improving the storage security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide. This report describes an MICP sealing field test performed on a 24.4 cm (9.625 inch) diameter well located on the Gorgas Steam Generation facility near Jasper, Alabama. The research was aimed at (1) developing methods for delivering MICP promoting fluids downhole using conventional oil field technologies and (2) assessing the ability of MICP to seal cement and formation fractures in the near wellbore region in a sandstone formation. Both objectives were accomplished successfully during a field test performed during the period April 1-11, 2014. The test resulted in complete biomineralization sealing of a horizontal fracture located 340.7 m (1118 feet) below ground surface. A total of 24 calcium injections and six microbial inoculation injections were required over a three day period in order to achieve complete sealing. The fractured region was considered completely sealed when it was no longer possible to inject fluids into the formation without exceeding the initial formation fracture pressure. The test was accomplished using conventional oil field technology including an 11.4 L (3.0 gallon) wireline dump bailer for injecting the biomineralization materials downhole. Metrics indicating successful MICP sealing included reduced injectivity during seal formation, reduction in pressure falloff, and

  2. Application of a hydrophilic Fe-Co magnetic fluid to the oil seal of a rotary shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Ryu, B. O.; Song, W. S.; Hong, G. P.; Zoo, Y. S.

    2003-01-01

    Existing oil seals of rotary shafts are made of rubber or ceramic goods (rubber retainer or mechanical seal). Thus if they are used for a long time, lubricant's leakage is induced from the gap between the shaft and bearings because of stiffening and abrading on the quality of seals due to the friction between rotating shaft and oil seal. Therefore the oil seals is restricted to durability limits and caused to require a quick change of the seal parts and to require significant man - powers for the complicated fabrication of seals. This study is established from the idea for working out these problems. This seal is composed of magnetic fluid to stop up oil in seals. As magnetic fluid between shaft and oil seal stops up oil in seals during rotating shaft, there is a friction but isn't an abrasion between shaft and oil seal so that there is no problem of the durability limits. In this study, with Fe- Co magnetic fluid is produced by hydrophilic ethylene glycol medium, Fe- Co(30 % : Co) powder, ring structure's Nd- permanent magnet of magnetic field strength 3300 Gauss and pole-piece(thickness : 1 mm, mild steel plate). With this arrangement the performance is such that the maximum resisting pressure of the oil seal apparatus was measured to be 25 kg/ cm 2 at the shaft speed 1800 rpm. It is believed that this magnetic fluid of Fe-Co powder used at the oil seal apparatus is the highest value among magnetic fluids in use until now. In an innovation this can give the advantages of lower noise, longer durability, and airtight of sealing as the contact of shaft (solid) to be friction and magnetic fluid(liquid) to seal. For that reason, this magnetic fluid of Fe-Co powder not only has enough specificity about the oil seal of rotary shaft but also shows enough quality as resisting pressure seal apparatus. Applications of this seal include all kinds of pump like high damping seal. This seal apparatus is economical and has an excellent sealing efficiency which can not be

  3. Brush seal leakage performance with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, Julie A.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Yoder, Dennis A.

    1992-01-01

    The leakage performance of a brush seal with gaseous working fluids at static and low rotor speed conditions was studied. The leakage results included for air, helium, and carbon dioxide at several bristle/rotor interferences. Also, the effects of packing a lubricant into the bristles and also of reversing the pressure drop across the seal were studied. Results were compared to that of an annular seal at similar operating conditions. In order to generalize the results, they were correlated using corresponding state theory. The brush seal tested had a bore diameter of 3.792 cm (1.4930 in.), a fence height of 0.0635 cm (0.025 in.), and 1800 bristles/cm circumference (4500 bristles/in. circumference). Various bristle/rotor radial interferences were achieved by using a tapered rotor. The brush seal reduced the leakage in comparison to the annular seal, up to 9.5 times. Reversing the pressure drop across the brush seal produced leakage rates approximately the same as that of the annular seal. Addition of a lubricant reduced the leakage by 2.5 times. The air and carbon dioxide data were successfully correlated using corresponding state theory. However, the helium data followed a different curve than the air and carbon dioxide data.

  4. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Seals and Sealing Handbook, 6th Edition provides comprehensive coverage of sealing technology, bringing together information on all aspects of this area to enable you to make the right sealing choice. This includes detailed coverage on the seals applicable to static, rotary and reciprocating applications, the best materials to use in your sealing systems, and the legislature and regulations that may impact your sealing choices. Updated in line with current trends this updated reference provides the theory necessary for you to select the most appropriate seals for the job and with its 'Failur

  5. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2012-01-01

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  6. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of pressurizer safety valve loop seal purge phenomena in nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Woon [Dongguk Univ., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of). Nuclear and Energy Engineering Dept.

    2012-11-15

    In Korean 3 Loop plants a water loop seal pipe is installed containing condensed water upstream of a pressurizer safety valve to protect the valve disk from the hot steam environment. The loop seal water purge time is a key parameter in safety analyses for overpressure transients, because it delays valve opening. The loop seal purge time is uncertain to measure by test and thus 3-dimensional realistic computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed in this paper to predict the seal water purge time before full opening of the valve which is driven by steam after water purge. The CFD model for a typical pressurizer safety valve with a loop seal pipe is developed using the computer code of ANSYS CFX 11. Steady-state simulations are performed for full discharge of steam at the valve full opening. Transient simulations are performed for the loop seal dynamics and to estimate the loop seal purge time. A sudden pressure drop higher than 2,000 psia at the tip of the upper nozzle ring is expected from the steady-state calculation. Through the transient simulation, almost loop seal water is discharged within 1.2 second through the narrow opening between the disk and the nozzle of the valve. It can be expected that the valve fully opens at least before 1.2 second because constant valve opening is assumed in this CFX simulation, which is conservative because the valve opens fully before the loop seal water is completely discharged. The predicted loop seal purge time is compared with previous correlation. (orig.)

  7. Fluid-structure interaction analysis of annular seals and rotor systems in multi-stage pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Qinglei; Zhai, Lulu; Wang, Leqin; Wu, Dazhuan

    2013-01-01

    Annular seals play an important role in determining the vibrational behavior of rotors in multi-stage pumps. To determine the critical speeds and unbalanced responses of rotor systems which consider annular seals, a fluid-structure interaction (FSI) method was developed, and the numerical method was verified by experiments conducted on a model rotor. In a typical FSI process, rotor systems are modeled based on a node-element method, and the motion equations are expressed in a type of matrix. To consider the influence of annular seals, dynamic coefficients of annular seals were introduced into the motion equations through matrix transformation. The test results of the model rotor showed good agreement with the calculated results. Based on the FSI method proposed here, the governing equations of annular seals were solved in two different ways. The results showed that the Childs method is more accurate in predicting a rotor's critical speed. The critical speeds of the model rotor were calculated at different clearance sizes and length/diameter ratios. Tilting coefficients of long seals were added to the dynamic coefficients to consider the influence of tilting. The critical speeds reached their maximum value when the L/D ratio was around 1.25, and tilting enhanced the rotor's stability when long annular seals were located in either end of the shaft.

  8. Seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsher, R.A.G.

    1982-01-01

    An aperture through a biological shield is sealed by a flexible sheath having a beading at one end located on an annular member slidable in the aperture such that the beading bears in sealing engagement against the sides of the aperture. The annular member is retained by a retractable latch and can be rejected by pushing it out of the aperture using a replacement annular member with a replacement sheath thereon to butt against the annular member to be rejected. The replacement annular member may be mounted on a tubular device having an outer co-axial member for operating the latch when the replacement annular member butts against the annular member to be rejected. Applications include effecting a seal between a remote handling equipment and a wall through which the equipment extends. (author)

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  10. Development of a CFD Code for Analysis of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, Mahesh M.; Przekwas, Andrzej J.; Singhal, Ashok K.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to develop a 3-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the analysis of fluid flow in cylindrical seals and evaluation of the dynamic forces on the seals. This code is expected to serve as a scientific tool for detailed flow analysis as well as a check for the accuracy of the 2D industrial codes. The features necessary in the CFD code are outlined. The initial focus was to develop or modify and implement new techniques and physical models. These include collocated grid formulation, rotating coordinate frames and moving grid formulation. Other advanced numerical techniques include higher order spatial and temporal differencing and an efficient linear equation solver. These techniques were implemented in a 2D flow solver for initial testing. Several benchmark test cases were computed using the 2D code, and the results of these were compared to analytical solutions or experimental data to check the accuracy. Tests presented here include planar wedge flow, flow due to an enclosed rotor, and flow in a 2D seal with a whirling rotor. Comparisons between numerical and experimental results for an annular seal and a 7-cavity labyrinth seal are also included.

  11. Coupling analysis of frictional heat of fluid film and thermal deformation of mechanical seal end faces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jianfeng; Gu Boqin

    2007-01-01

    The heat transfer model of the rotating ring and the stationary ring of mechanical seal was built. The method to calculate the frictional heat that transferred by the rings was given. the coupling analysis of the frictional heat of fluid film and thermal deformation of end faces was carried out by using FEA and BP ANN, and the relationship among the rotational speed ω, the fluid film thickness h i on the inner diameter of sealing face and the radial separation angle β of deformed end faces was obtained. Corresponding to a given ω, h i and β can be obtained by the equilibrium condition between the closing force and the bearing force of fluid film. The relationship between the leakage rate and the closing force was analyzed, and the fundamental of controlling the leakage rate by regulating the closing force was also discussed. (authors)

  12. Innovative technology summary report: Sealed-seam sack suits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    Sealed-seam sack suits are an improved/innovative safety and industrial hygiene technology designed to protect workers from dermal exposure to contamination. Most of these disposable, synthetic-fabric suits are more protective than cotton suits, and are also water-resistant and gas permeable. Some fabrics provide a filter to aerosols, which is important to protection against contamination, while allowing air to pass, increasing comfort level of workers. It is easier to detect body-moisture breakthrough with the disposable suits than with cotton, which is also important to protecting workers from contamination. These suits present a safe and cost-effective (6% to 17% less expensive than the baseline) alternative to traditional protective clothing. This report covers the period from October 1996 to August 1997. During that time, sealed-seam sack suits were demonstrated during daily activities under normal working conditions at the C Reactor and under environmentally controlled conditions at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

  13. Task 4 supporting technology. Part 2: Detailed test plan for thermal seals. Thermal seals evaluation, improvement and test. CAN8-1, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), advanced technology demonstrator: X-33. Leading edge and seals thermal protection system technology demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogenson, P. A.; Lu, Tina

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to develop the advanced thermal seals to a technology readiness level (TRL) of 6 to support the rapid turnaround time and low maintenance requirements of the X-33 and the future reusable launch vehicle (RLV). This program is divided into three subtasks: (1) orbiter thermal seals operation history review; (2) material, process, and design improvement; and (3) fabrication and evaluation of the advanced thermal seals.

  14. Mapping of Technological Opportunities-Labyrinth Seal Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Dana W., Sr.

    2006-01-01

    All technological systems evolve based on evolutionary sequences that have repeated throughout history and can be abstracted from the history of technology and patents. These evolutionary sequences represent objective patterns and provide considerable insights that can be used to proactively model future seal concepts. This presentation provides an overview of how to map seal technology into the future using a labyrinth seal example. The mapping process delivers functional descriptions of sequential changes in market/consumer demand, from today s current paradigm to the next major paradigm shift. The future paradigm is developed according to a simple formula: the future paradigm is free of all flaws associated with the current paradigm; it is as far into the future as we can see. Although revolutionary, the vision of the future paradigm is typically not immediately or completely realizable nor is it normally seen as practical. There are several reasons that prevent immediate and complete practical application, such as: 1) Some of the required technological or business resources and knowledge not being available; 2) Availability of other technological or business resources are limited; and/or 3) Some necessary knowledge has not been completely developed. These factors tend to drive the Total Cost of Ownership or Utilization out of an acceptable range and revealing the reasons for the high Total Cost of Ownership or Utilization which provides a clear understanding of research opportunities essential for future developments and defines the current limits of the immediately achievable improvements. The typical roots of high Total Cost of Ownership or Utilization lie in the limited availability or even the absence of essential resources and knowledge necessary for its realization. In order to overcome this obstacle, step-by-step modification of the current paradigm is pursued to evolve from the current situation toward the ideal future, i.e., evolution rather than

  15. Episodic tremor and slip explained by fluid-enhanced microfracturing and sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudin, M.; Gueydan, F.

    2017-12-01

    A combination of non-volcanic tremor and transient slow slip events behaviors is commonly observed at plate interface, between locked/seismogenic zone at low depths and stable/ductile creep zone at larger depths. This association defines Episodic Tremor and Slip, systematically highlighted by over-pressurized fluids and near failure shear stress conditions. Here we propose a new mechanical approach that provides for the first time a mechanical and field-based explanation of the observed association between non-volcanic tremor and slow slip events. In contrast with more classical rate-and-state models, this physical model uses a ductile rheology with grain size sensitivity, fluid-driven microfracturing and sealing (e.g. grain size reduction and grain growth) and related pore fluid pressure fluctuations. We reproduce slow slip events by transient ductile strain localization as a result of fluid-enhanced microfracturing and sealing. Moreover, occurrence of macrofracturing during transient strain localization and local increase in pore fluid pressure well simulate non-volcanic tremor. Our model provides therefore a field-based explanation of episodic tremor and slip and moreover predicts the depth and temperature ranges of their occurrence in subduction zones. It implies furthermore that non-volcanic tremor and slow slip events are physically related.

  16. Dynamic Behavior Analysis of Non-Contacting Hydrodynamic Finger Seal Based on Fluid-Solid-Interaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Hua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Finger seal is an advanced compliant seal and can be utilized to separate high (HP and low pressure (LP zones in high speed rotating shaft environment. The work to be presented concerns the dynamic behavior of a repetitive section of a two-layer finger seal with high-and padded low-pressure laminates. The dynamic performance of the finger seal are analyzed by the coupled fluid-solid-interaction (FSI simulations. By using the commercial software ANSYS-CFX, the numerical simulation results of interactions between the gas flow and fingers structural deformation are described when the radial periodic excitation from the shaft applies to the finger seal. And the gas film loading capacity, gas film stiffness and leakage varied with time are put forward in different working conditions. Compared with the dynamic performance analysis results based on equivalent dynamic method, the FSI dynamic analysis shows some different characteristics which are more accordance with actual circumstance. Moreover, it is shown that under low pressure differential and high rotation speed the non-contacting finger seal with advance features both in sealing effectiveness and potential unlimited life span can be obtained by rational structure design. But for the non-contacting finger seal with circumferential convergent pad working in high pressure and low rotating speed conditions, it is difficult to improve the sealing performance by the way of changing the structure parameters of finger seal. It is because the high pressure plays a major role on this sealing situation.

  17. Episodic Tremor and Slip Explained by Fluid-Enhanced Microfracturing and Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaudin, M.; Gueydan, F.

    2018-04-01

    Episodic tremor and slow-slip events at the deep extension of plate boundary faults illuminate seismic to aseismic processes around the brittle-ductile transition. These events occur in volumes characterized by overpressurized fluids and by near failure shear stress conditions. We present a new modeling approach based on a ductile grain size-sensitive rheology with microfracturing and sealing, which provides a mechanical and field-based explanation of such phenomena. We also model pore fluid pressure variation as a function of changes in porosity/permeability and strain rate-dependent fluid pumping. The fluid-enhanced dynamic evolution of microstructures defines cycles of ductile strain localization and implies increase in pore fluid pressure. We propose that slow-slip events are ductile processes related to transient strain localization, while nonvolcanic tremor corresponds to fracturing of the whole rock at the peak of pore fluid pressure. Our model shows that the availability of fluids and the efficiency of fluid pumping control the occurrence and the P-T conditions of episodic tremor and slip.

  18. Investigation of SSME alternate high pressure fuel turbopump lift-off seal fluid and structural dynamic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrod, David A.

    1989-01-01

    The Space Shuttle main engine (SSME) alternate turbopump development program (ATD) high pressure fuel turbopump (HPFTP) design utilizes an innovative lift-off seal (LOS) design that is located in close proximity to the turbine end bearing. Cooling flow exiting the bearing passes through the lift-off seal during steady state operation. The potential for fluid excitation of lift-off seal structural resonances is investigated. No fluid excitation of LOS resonances is predicted. However, if predicted LOS natural frequencies are significantly lowered by the presence of the coolant, pressure oscillations caused by synchronous whirl of the HPFTP rotor may excite a resonance.

  19. Seals and sealing handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Flitney, Robert K

    2007-01-01

    Wherever machinery operates there will be seals of some kind ensuring that the machine remains lubricated, the fluid being pumped does not leak, or the gas does not enter the atmosphere. Seals are ubiquitous, in industry, the home, transport and many other places. This 5th edition of a long-established title covers all types of seal by application: static, rotary, reciprocating etc. The book bears little resemblance to its predecessors, and Robert Flitney has re-planned and re-written every aspect of the subject. No engineer, designer or manufacturer of seals can afford to be without this uniq

  20. Apical sealing of root canal fillings performed with five different endodontic sealers: analysis by fluid filtration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Carvalho de Vasconcelos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the sealing ability of five root canal sealers, including two experimental cements (MBP and MTA-Obtura using the fluid filtration method. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Teeth were divided into 5 study groups: G1-AH Plus; G2-Acroseal; G3Sealapex; G4-MBP; G5-MTA-Obtura; and two controls. Chemical-mechanical preparation was performed with ProFile rotary nickel-titanium instruments 1 mm short of the apical foramen. The sealing ability was evaluated by fluid filtration at 15, 30, and 60 days. RESULTS: The statistical analysis showed significant difference between the materials at different periods (p<0.05. AH Plus and MBP had similar leakage values at 15 and 60 days, alternating with significant reduction at 30 days, while the other materials showed progressive increase in leakage values. Acroseal and Sealapex presented the best results at 15 days and the worst at 60 days. CONCLUSIONS: All sealers evaluated presented fluid leakage, with AH Plus and MBP showing the best results at the end of the experimental period. Acroseal, Sealapex, and MTA-Obtura presented increase in leakage values at longer observation periods.

  1. Supercritical fluids technology. Pt. 1 General topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    Supercritical fluids technology is among the emerging 'clean' technologies, that allows the minimization in the use of chemical and thermic treatments and products irradiation, diminishing the quantity of liquid wastes to be treated. In this first article phase equilibria thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of transport phenomena are reviewed [it

  2. Magnelok technology: a complement to magnetorheological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J. David

    2004-07-01

    Magnetorheological or MR fluids have been successfully used to enable highly effective semi-active control systems in automobile primary suspensions to control unwanted motions in civil engineering structures and to provide force-feedback in steer-by-wire systems. A key to the successful use of MR fluids is an appreciation and understanding of the balance and trade-off between the magnetically controlled on-state force and the ever-present off-state viscous force. In all MR fluid applications, one must deal with the fact that MR fluids never fully decouple or go to zero force in their off-state. Magnelok devices are a magnetically controlled compliment to traditional MR fluid devices that have been developed to enable a true force decoupling in the off-state. Magnelok devices may be embodied as linear or rotary dampers, brakes, lockable struts or position holding devices. They are particularly suitable for lock/un-lock applications. Unlike MR fluid devices they contain no fluid yet they do provide a variable level of friction damping that is controlled by the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. Magnelok devices are low cost as they easily accommodate relatively loose mechanical tolerances and require no seals or accumulator. A variety of controllable Magnelok devices and applications are described.

  3. Glass sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, R.K.; Kovacic, L.; Chambers, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Hernetic glass sealing technologies developed for weapons component applications can be utilized for the design and manufacture of fuel cells. Design and processing of of a seal are optimized through an integrated approach based on glass composition research, finite element analysis, and sealing process definition. Glass sealing procedures are selected to accommodate the limits imposed by glass composition and predicted calculations.

  4. Mechanical Seal Opening Condition Monitoring Based on Acoustic Emission Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erqing Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the measurement of mechanical sealing film thickness and just-lift-off time is very difficult, the sealing film condition monitoring method based on acoustic emission signal is proposed. The mechanical seal acoustic emission signal present obvious characteristics of time-varying nonlinear and pulsating. In this paper, the acoustic emission signal is used to monitor the seal end faces just-lift-off time and friction condition. The acoustic emission signal is decomposed by empirical mode decomposition into a series of intrinsic mode function with independent characteristics of different time scales and different frequency band. The acoustic emission signal only generated by end faces friction is obtained by eliminating the false intrinsic mode function components. The correlation coefficient of acoustic emission signal and Multi-scale Laplace Wavelet is calculated. It is proved that the maximum frequency (8000 Hz of the correlation coefficient is appeared at the spindle speed of 300 rpm. And at this time (300 rpm the end faces have just lifted off. By a set of mechanical oil seal running test, it is demonstrated that this method could accurately identify mechanical seal end faces just-lift-off time and friction condition.

  5. Standard Test Method for Testing Nonmetallic Seal Materials by Immersion in a Simulated Geothermal Test Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a procedure for a laboratory test for performing an initial evaluation (screening) of nonmetallic seal materials by immersion in a simulated geothermal test fluid. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific precautionary statements, see Section 6 and 11.7.

  6. A review of the available technologies for sealing a potential underground nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Richardson, A.M.

    1994-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the availability of technologies to seal underground openings. The technologies are needed to seal the potential high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Technologies are evaluated for three basic categories of seal components: backfill (general fill and graded fill), bulkheads, and grout curtains. Not only is placement of seal components assessed, but also preconditioning of the placement area and seal component durability. The approach taken was: First, review selected sealing case histories (literature searches and site visits) from the mining, civil, and defense industries; second, determine whether reasonably available technologies to seal the potential repository exist; and finally, identify deficiencies in existing technologies. It is concluded that reasonably available technologies do exist to place backfill, bulkheads, and grout curtains. Technologies also exist to precondition areas where seal components are to be placed. However, if final performance requirements are stringent for these engineered structures, some existing technologies may need to be developed. Deficiencies currently do exist in technologies that demonstrate the long-term durability and performance of seal components. Case histories do not currently exist that demonstrate the placement of seal components in greatly elevated thermal and high-radiation environments and in areas where ground support (rock bolts and concrete liners) has been removed. The as-placed, in situ material properties for sealing materials appropriate to Yucca Mountain are not available

  7. SCISEAL: A CFD Code for Analysis of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althavale, Mahesh M.; Ho, Yin-Hsing; Przekwas, Andre J.

    1996-01-01

    A 3D CFD code, SCISEAL, has been developed and validated. Its capabilities include cylindrical seals, and it is employed on labyrinth seals, rim seals, and disc cavities. State-of-the-art numerical methods include colocated grids, high-order differencing, and turbulence models which account for wall roughness. SCISEAL computes efficient solutions for complicated flow geometries and seal-specific capabilities (rotor loads, torques, etc.).

  8. Industrial applications of radiotracer and sealed source technology promoted by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joon-Ha Jin; Thereska, J.

    2004-01-01

    Great technical and economical benefits can be obtained by applying radioisotope technologies to various industries. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has contributed to the development of radiotracer and sealed source technology as applied to industry and environment through coordinated research projects (CRPs). The mature and competitive techniques have been transferred and implemented to developing countries through the Agency's technical co-operation (TC) projects. The paper presents the main achievements in radiotracer and sealed source technology promoted by IAEA as well as the perspective of the technology transfer to developing countries. (author)

  9. Investigation of positive shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfouts, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    Welded metal bellows secondary seals prevent secondary seal leakage with a minimum number of potential leak paths. High performance seal is obtained by controlling the potentially unstable seal-face movements induced by mechanical vibrations and fluid pressure pulsations.

  10. Problems and criteria of quality improvement in end face mechanical seal rings through technological methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarelnik, V.; Belous, A.; Antoszewski, B.; Zukov, A.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper are presented the recommendations for material’s selections of the mechanical seals rings and basic productive and operating requirements. The system of a directional selection of technology that ensures the required quality of working surfaces of the mechanical seals rings covers their entire life cycle. The mathematical frictional model is proposed as an instrument for calculating a linear and weighing abrasion of the mechanical seals rings and helps to improve selection’s criteria and the most rational method of strengthening.

  11. Supercritical fluid technology: concepts and pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Praful Balavant; Kumar, G Aravind; Kumar, Averineni Ranjith; Shavi, Gopal Venkatesh; Karthik, Arumugam; Reddy, Meka Sreenivasa; Udupa, Nayanabhirama

    2011-01-01

    In light of environmental apprehension, supercritical fluid technology (SFT) exhibits excellent opportunities to accomplish key objectives in the drug delivery sector. Supercritical fluid extraction using carbon dioxide (CO(2)) has been recognized as a green technology. It is a clean and versatile solvent with gas-like diffusivity and liquid-like density in the supercritical phase, which has provided an excellent alternative to the use of chemical solvents. The present commentary provides an overview of different techniques using supercritical fluids and their future opportunity for the drug delivery industry. Some of the emerging applications of SFT in pharmaceuticals, such as particle design, drug solubilization, inclusion complex, polymer impregnation, polymorphism, drug extraction process, and analysis, are also covered in this review. The data collection methods are based on the recent literature related to drug delivery systems using SFT platforms. SFT has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This cutting-edge technology is growing predominantly to surrogate conventional unit operations in relevance to the pharmaceutical production process. Supercritical fluid technology has recently drawn attention in the field of pharmaceuticals. It is a distinct conception that utilizes the solvent properties of supercritical fluids above their critical temperature and pressure, where they exhibit both liquid-like and gas-like properties, which can enable many pharmaceutical applications. For example, the liquid-like properties provide benefits in extraction processes of organic solvents or impurities, drug solubilization, and polymer plasticization, and the gas-like features facilitate mass transfer processes. It has become a much more versatile and environmentally attractive technology that can handle a variety of complicated problems in pharmaceuticals. This review is

  12. Combat Ration Network for Technology Implementation (CORANET II) Knurled Seal Heat Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Canavan Mr. Henderikus B. Bruins Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey The Center for Advanced Food Technology School of Enviromental and...Analysis Literature Search Results • No published findings on knurled or patterned seal bars effect on seal strength in engineering , trade, or...Ade Engineers to review knurl pattern geometries and machining processes • 5 Final design revisions were approved for manufacturing on May 7th. » Flat

  13. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  14. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference large irradiator and reference sealed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haffner, D.R.; Villelgas, A.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to examine the decommissioning of large radioactive irradiators and their respective facilities, and a broad spectrum of sealed radioactive sources and their respective devices. Conceptual decommissioning activities are identified, and the technology, safety, and costs (in early 1993 dollars) associated with decommissioning the reference large irradiator and sealed source facilities are evaluated. The study provides bases and background data for possible future NRC rulemaking regarding decommissioning, for evaluation of the reasonableness of planned decommissioning actions, and for determining if adequate funds are reserved by the licensees for decommissioning of their large irradiator or sealed source facilities. Another purpose of this study is to provide background and information to assist licensees in planning and carrying out the decommissioning of their sealed radioactive sources and respective facilities.

  15. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning a reference large irradiator and reference sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haffner, D.R.; Villelgas, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report contains the results of a study sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to examine the decommissioning of large radioactive irradiators and their respective facilities, and a broad spectrum of sealed radioactive sources and their respective devices. Conceptual decommissioning activities are identified, and the technology, safety, and costs (in early 1993 dollars) associated with decommissioning the reference large irradiator and sealed source facilities are evaluated. The study provides bases and background data for possible future NRC rulemaking regarding decommissioning, for evaluation of the reasonableness of planned decommissioning actions, and for determining if adequate funds are reserved by the licensees for decommissioning of their large irradiator or sealed source facilities. Another purpose of this study is to provide background and information to assist licensees in planning and carrying out the decommissioning of their sealed radioactive sources and respective facilities

  16. Hydraulic fracturing chemicals and fluids technology

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    When classifying fracturing fluids and their additives, it is important that production, operation, and completion engineers understand which chemical should be utilized in different well environments. A user's guide to the many chemicals and chemical additives used in hydraulic fracturing operations, Hydraulic Fracturing Chemicals and Fluids Technology provides an easy-to-use manual to create fluid formulations that will meet project-specific needs while protecting the environment and the life of the well. Fink creates a concise and comprehensive reference that enables the engineer to logically select and use the appropriate chemicals on any hydraulic fracturing job. The first book devoted entirely to hydraulic fracturing chemicals, Fink eliminates the guesswork so the engineer can select the best chemicals needed on the job while providing the best protection for the well, workers and environment. Pinpoints the specific compounds used in any given fracturing operation Provides a systematic approach to class...

  17. Numerical, Analytical, Experimental Study of Fluid Dynamic Forces in Seals Volume 6: Description of Scientific CFD Code SCISEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athavale, Mahesh; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The objectives of the program were to develop computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes and simpler industrial codes for analyzing and designing advanced seals for air-breathing and space propulsion engines. The CFD code SCISEAL is capable of producing full three-dimensional flow field information for a variety of cylindrical configurations. An implicit multidomain capability allow the division of complex flow domains to allow optimum use of computational cells. SCISEAL also has the unique capability to produce cross-coupled stiffness and damping coefficients for rotordynamic computations. The industrial codes consist of a series of separate stand-alone modules designed for expeditious parametric analyses and optimization of a wide variety of cylindrical and face seals. Coupled through a Knowledge-Based System (KBS) that provides a user-friendly Graphical User Interface (GUI), the industrial codes are PC based using an OS/2 operating system. These codes were designed to treat film seals where a clearance exists between the rotating and stationary components. Leakage is inhibited by surface roughness, small but stiff clearance films, and viscous pumping devices. The codes have demonstrated to be a valuable resource for seal development of future air-breathing and space propulsion engines.

  18. Modern supercritical fluid technology for food applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    This review provides an update on the use of supercritical fluid (SCF) technology as applied to food-based materials. It advocates the use of the solubility parameter theory (SPT) for rationalizing the results obtained when employing sub- and supercritical media to food and nutrient-bearing materials and for optimizing processing conditions. Total extraction and fractionation of foodstuffs employing SCFs are compared and are illustrated by using multiple fluids and unit processes to obtain the desired food product. Some of the additional prophylactic benefits of using carbon dioxide as the processing fluid are explained and illustrated with multiple examples of commercial products produced using SCF media. I emphasize the role of SCF technology in the context of environmentally benign and sustainable processing, as well as its integration into an overall biorefinery concept. Conclusions are drawn in terms of current trends in the field and future research that is needed to secure new applications of the SCF platform as applied in food science and technology.

  19. A review on the welding technology for the sealing of irradiation test fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. W.; Kang, Y. H.; Kim, B. G.; Joo, K. N.; Oh, J. M.; Park, S. J.; Shin, Y. T

    2000-02-01

    For the irradiation test of nuclear fuel in a research reactor, the fuel manufacturing technology should be developed in advance. Highly radioactive fission products are produced and can be released from the fuel materials during irradiation. Therefore, The sealing of the test is one of the most important procedure among the test fuel manufacturing processes, considering its impacts on the safety of a reactor operation.many welding techniques such as TIG, EBW, LBW, upset butt welding and flash welding are applied in sealing the end of fuel elements. These welding techniques are adopted in conjunction with the weld material, weldability, weld joint design and cost effectiveness. For fuel irradiation test, the centerline temperature of fuel pellets is one of the important item to be measured. For this, a thermocouple is installed into the center of the fuel pellet. The sealing of the penetration hole of the thermocouple sheath should be conducted and the hole should be perfectly sealed using the dissimilar metal joining technique. For this purpose, the dissimilar metal welding between zircaloy-4 and Inconel or stainless steel is needed to be developed. This report describes the techniques sealing the end cap and the penetration of a thermocouple sheath by welding. (author)

  20. Design review and analysis for a Pratt and Whitney fluid-film bearing and seal testing rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Dara W.

    1994-01-01

    A design review has been completed for a Pratt and Whitney (P&W)-designed fluid-film bearing and annular-seal test rig to be manufactured and installed at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Issues covered in this study include: (1) the capacity requirements of the drive unit; (2) the capacity and configuration of the static loading system; (3) the capacity and configuration of the dynamic excitation system; (4) the capacity, configuration, and rotordynamic stability of a test bearing, support bearings, and shaft; and (5) the characteristics and configuration of the measurement transducers and data channels.

  1. The force on an object passing through a magnetic fluid seal

    CERN Document Server

    Morton, G

    2002-01-01

    Forces on solid objects passed through a magnetic liquid plug in a tube are measured. A simple one-dimensional model is developed based on hydrostatic and magnetic pressures. The results demonstrate its potential to be used to separate two fluids while allowing solids to pass from one fluid to the other.

  2. Computerized X-ray Microtomography Observations and Fluid Flow Measurements of the Effect of Effective Stress on Fractured Reservoir Seal Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, N.; Crawshaw, J.; Boek, E.

    2014-12-01

    The successful storage of carbon dioxide in geologic formations requires an in-depth understanding of all reservoir characteristics and morphologies. An intact and substantial seal formation above a storage reservoir is required for a significant portion of the initial sealing mechanisms believed to occur during carbon dioxide storage operations. Shales are a common seal formation rock types found above numerous hydrocarbon reservoirs, as well as potential saline aquifer storage locations. Shales commonly have very low permeability, however they also have the tendency to be quite fissile, and the formation of fractures within these seals can have a significant detrimental effect on the sealing potential of a reservoir and amount to large areas of high permeability and low capillary pressures compared to the surrounding intact rock. Fractured shales also have an increased current interest due to the increasing development of shale gas reservoirs using hydraulic fracturing techniques. This work shows the observed changes that occur within fractured pieces of reservoir seal shale samples, along with quarry analogues, using an in-situ micro-CT fluid flow imaging apparatus with a Hassler type core holder. Changes within the preferential flow path under different stress regimes as well as physical changes to the fracture geometry are reported. Lattice Boltzmann flow simulations were then performed on the extracted flow paths and compared to experiment permeability measurements. The preferential flow path of carbon dioxide through the fracture network is also observed and compared to the results two-phase Lattice Boltzmann fluid flow simulations.

  3. Ceramic Seal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Juan A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Custer, Joyce Olsen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hymel, Ross W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krementz, Dan [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Gobin, Derek [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Harpring, Larry [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Varble, Don [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiMaio, Jeff [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States); Hudson, Stephen [Tetramer Technologies, Pendleton, SC (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  4. Ceramic Seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smartt, Heidi A.; Romero, Juan A.; Custer, Joyce Olsen; Hymel, Ross W.; Krementz, Dan; Gobin, Derek; Harpring, Larry; Martinez-Rodriguez, Michael; Varble, Don; DiMaio, Jeff; Hudson, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Containment/Surveillance (C/S) measures are critical to any verification regime in order to maintain Continuity of Knowledge (CoK). The Ceramic Seal project is research into the next generation technologies to advance C/S, in particular improving security and efficiency. The Ceramic Seal is a small form factor loop seal with improved tamper-indication including a frangible seal body, tamper planes, external coatings, and electronic monitoring of the seal body integrity. It improves efficiency through a self-securing wire and in-situ verification with a handheld reader. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under sponsorship from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D), have previously designed and have now fabricated and tested Ceramic Seals. Tests have occurred at both SNL and SRNL, with different types of tests occurring at each facility. This interim report will describe the Ceramic Seal prototype, the design and development of a handheld standalone reader and an interface to a data acquisition system, fabrication of the seals, and results of initial testing.

  5. Seal design alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Sambeek, L.L.; Luo, D.D.; Lin, M.S.; Ostrowski, W.; Oyenuga, D.

    1993-06-01

    This report presents the results from a study of various sealing alternatives for the WIPP sealing system. Overall, the sealing system has the purpose of reducing to the extent possible the potential for fluids (either gas or liquid) from entering or leaving the repository. The sealing system is divided into three subsystems: drift and panel seals within the repository horizon, shaft seals in each of the four shafts, and borehole seals. Alternatives to the baseline configuration for the WIPP seal system design included evaluating different geometries and schedules for seal component installations and the use of different materials for seal components. Order-of-magnitude costs for the various alternatives were prepared as part of the study. Firm recommendations are not presented, but the advantages and disadvantages of the alternatives are discussed. Technical information deficiencies are identified and studies are outlined which can provide required information

  6. Upgrading inflatable door seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, T.M.; Metcalfe, R.; Welch, L.A.; Josefowich, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Inflatable door seals are used for airlocks in CANDU stations. They have been a significant source of unreliability and maintenance cost. A program is underway to improve their performance and reliability, backed by environmental qualification testing. Only commercial products and suppliers existed in 1993. For historical reasons, these 'existing products' did not use the most durable material then available. In hindsight, neither had they been adapted nor optimized to combat conditions often experienced in the plants-sagging doors, damaged sealing surfaces, and many thousands of openings and closings per year. Initial attempts to involve the two existing suppliers in efforts to upgrade these seals were unsuccessful. Another suitable supplier had therefore to be found, and a 'new,' COG-owned seal developed; this was completed in 1997. This paper summarizes its testing, along with that of the two existing products. Resistance to aging has been improved significantly. Testing has shown that an accident can be safely withstood after 10 years of service or 40,000 openings-closings, whichever comes first. AECL's Fluid Sealing Technology Unit (FSTU) has invested in the special moulds, test fixtures and other necessary tooling and documentation required to begin commercial manufacture of this new quality product. Accordingly, as with FSTU's other nuclear products such as pump seals, the long-term supply of door seals to CANDU plants is now protected from many external uncertainties-e.g., commercial products being discontinued, materials being changed, companies going out of business. Manufacturing to AECL's detailed specifications is being subcontracted to the new supplier. FSTU is performing the quality surveillance, inspection, testing, and customer service activities concomitant with direct responsibility for supply to the plants. (author)

  7. Hermetically Sealed Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzapple, Mark T.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hermetically sealed pump compresses fluid to pressure up to 4,000 atm (400 MPa). Pump employs linear electric motor instead of rotary motor to avoid need for leakage-prone rotary seals. In addition, linear-motor-powered pump would not require packings to seal its piston. Concept thus eliminates major cause of friction and wear. Pump is double-ended diaphragm-type compressor. All moving parts sealed within compressor housing.

  8. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system

  9. Development of Mechanical Sealing and Laser Welding Technology to Instrument Thermocouple for Nuclear Fuel Test Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joung, Chang-Young; Ahn, Sung-Ho; Hong, Jin-Tae; Kim, Ka-Hye; Huh, Sung-Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Zircaloy-4 of the nuclear fuel test rod, AISI 316L of the mechanical sealing parts, and the MI (mineral insulated) cable at a thermocouple instrumentation are hetero-metals, and are difficult to weld to dissimilar materials. Therefore, a mechanical sealing method to instrument the thermocouple should be conducted using two kinds of sealing process as follows: One is a mechanical sealing process using Swagelok, which is composed of sealing components that consists of an end-cap, a seal tube, a compression ring and a Swagelok nut. The other is a laser welding process used to join a seal tube, and an MI cable, which are made of the same material. The mechanical sealing process should be sealed up with the mechanical contact compressed by the strength forced between a seal tube and an end-cap, and the laser welding process should be conducted to have no defects on the sealing area between a seal tube and an MI cable. Therefore, the mechanical sealing and laser welding techniques need to be developed to accurately measure the centerline temperature of the nuclear fuel test rod in an experimental reactor. The mechanical sealing and laser welding tests were conducted to develop the thermocouple instrumentation techniques for the nuclear fuel test rod. The optimum torque value of a Swagelok nut to seal the mechanical sealing part between the end-cap and seal tube was established through various torque tests using a torque wrench. The optimum laser welding conditions to seal the welding part between a seal tube and an MI cable were obtained through various welding tests using a laser welding system.

  10. Egyptian diatomite as high fluid loss squeeze slurry in sealing fractures and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Lost circulation is the most costly mud related drilling problem, and induced fracture. Water slurry of diatomite is used as the high fluid loss squeeze slurry in the treatment of lost circulation and in decreasing fluid loss. Egypt has diatomite deposits, especially in El-Fayuom Depression. Fourteen samples were collected from Qasr El-Sagha at the northern shore of Birket Qarun. Samples were examined to identify the diatom species then subjected to X-ray fluorescence, XRD and grain size distribution tests. A total of 38 species related to 13 diatom genera were identified. Cocconeis, Epithemia and Rhopalodia were the predominant genera. The diatomaceous earth which acts as a filter aid material was tested with different additives; bentonite, lime, finely divided paper, polymer, barite and different concentrations with different types of lost circulation materials (LCM to form a high fluid loss squeeze slurry. As a result the required time for collecting the filtrate was decreased to be in the range of 50 s to 1 min and 49 s comparing with the international standard which recommended the filtrate should be collected maximum within 2–3 min.

  11. Steam Turbine Flow Path Seals (a Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuimin, V. M.

    2018-03-01

    Various types of shroud, diaphragm, and end seals preventing idle leak of working steam are installed in the flow paths of steam turbine cylinders for improving their efficiency. Widely known labyrinth seals are most extensively used in the Russian turbine construction industry. The category of labyrinth seals also includes seals with honeycomb inserts. The developers of seals with honeycomb inserts state that the use of such seals makes it possible to achieve certain gain due to smaller leaks of working fluid and more reliable operation of the system under the conditions in which the rotor rotating parts may rub against the stator elements. However, a positive effect can only be achieved if the optimal design parameters of the honeycomb structure are fulfilled with due regard to the specific features of its manufacturing technology and provided that this structure is applied in a goal-seeking manner in the seals of steam and gas turbines and compressors without degrading their vibration stability. Calculated and preliminary assessments made by experts testify that the replacement of conventional labyrinth seals by seals with honeycomb inserts alone, due to which the radial gaps in the shroud seal can be decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 mm, allows the turbine cylinder efficiency to be increased at the initial stage by approximately 1% with the corresponding gain in the turbine set power output. The use of rectangular-cellular seals may result, according to estimates made by their developers, in a further improvement of turbine efficiency by 0.5-1.0%. The labor input required to fabricate such seals is six to eight times smaller than that to fabricate labyrinth seals with honeycomb inserts. Recent years have seen the turbine construction companies of the United States and Germany advertising the use of abradable (sealing) coatings (borrowed from the gas turbine construction technology) in the turbine designs instead of labyrinth seals. The most efficient performance of

  12. A durable, non power consumptive, simple seal for rotary blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitamura, Y; Sekine, K; Asakawa, M; Yozu, R; Kawada, S; Okamoto, E

    2001-01-01

    One of the key technologic requirements for rotary blood pumps is the sealing of the motor shaft. A mechanical seal, a journal bearing, magnetic coupling, and magnetic suspension have been developed, but they have drawbacks such as wear, thrombus formation, and power consumption. A magnetic fluid seal was developed for an axial flow pump. A magnetic fluid seal is durable, simple, and non power consumptive. Long-term experiments and finite element modeling (FEM) analyses confirmed these advantages. The seal body was composed of a Ned-Fe magnet and two pole pieces; the seal was formed by injecting ferrofluid into the gap (50 microm) between the pole pieces and the motor shaft. To contain the ferrofluid in the seal and to minimize the possibility of ferrofluid making contact with blood, a shield with a small cavity was attached to the pole piece. While submerged in blood, the sealing pressure of the seal was measured and found to be 188 mm Hg with ferrofluid LS-40 (saturated magnetization, 24.3 kA/m) at a motor speed of 10,000 rpm and 225 mm Hg under static conditions. The magnetic fluid seals performed perfectly at a pressure of 100 mm Hg for 594 + days in a static condition, and 51, 39+, and 34+ days at a motor speed of 8,000 rpm. FEM analyses indicated a theoretical sealing pressure of 260 mm Hg. The state of the magnetic fluid in the seal in water was observed with a microscope. Neither splashing of magnetic fluid nor mixing of the magnetic fluid and water was observed. The specially designed magnetic fluid seal for keeping liquids out is useful for axial flow blood pumps. The magnetic fluid seal was incorporated into an intracardiac axial flow pump.

  13. Nuclear reactor sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEdwards, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor sealing system is disclosed. The nuclear reactor includes a vessel sealed at its upper end by a closure head. The closure head comprises at least two components, one of which is rotatable; and the two components define an annulus therebetween. The sealing system includes at least a first and second inflatable seal disposed in series in an upper portion of the annulus. The system further includes a dip seal extending into a body of insulation located adjacent a bottom portion of the closure head. The dip seal comprises a trough formed by a lower portion of one of the components, and a seal blade pendently supported from the other component and extending downwardly into the trough. A body of liquid metal is contained in the trough which submerges a portion of the seal blade. The seal blade is provided with at least one aperture located above the body of liquid metal for providing fluid communication between the annulus intermediate the dip seal and the inflatable seals, and a body of cover gas located inside the vessel. There also is provided means for introducing a purge gas into the annulus intermediate the inflatable seals and the seal blade. The purge gas is introduced in an amount sufficient to substantially reduce diffusion of radioactive cover gas or sodium vapor up to the inflatable seals. The purge gas mixes with the cover gas in the reactor vessel where it can be withdrawn from the vessel for treatment and recycle to the vessel

  14. Review of fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Maolin; Wang, Yixuan; Jiao, Zongxia; Shi, Yan

    2017-09-01

    This study examines the development of the fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines. The current state of hydraulic wind turbines as a new technology is described, and its basic fluid model and typical control method are expounded by comparing various study results. Finally, the advantages of hydraulic wind turbines are enumerated. Hydraulic wind turbines are expected to become the main development direction of wind turbines.

  15. Review of fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maolin CAI; Yixuan WANG; Zongxia JIAO; Yan SHI

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the development of the fluid and control technology of hydraulic wind turbines.The current state of hydraulic wind turbines as a new technology is described,and its basic fluid model and typical control method are expounded by comparing various study results.Finally,the advantages of hydraulic wind turbines are enumerated.Hydraulic wind turbines are expected to become the main development direction of wind turbines.

  16. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  17. Technology with Supercritical Fluid. Part 2. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    The present article is based on a bibliographical analysis of the main applications of the supercritical fluid in various fields, as: extraction from solid matrices, division of liquid charges, chromatography HPLC with supercritical eluent, chemical and biochemical reactions in supercritical solvents etc [it

  18. Shaft seal assembly and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A pressure-actuated shaft seal assembly and associated method for controlling the flow of fluid adjacent a rotatable shaft are provided. The seal assembly includes one or more seal members that can be adjusted between open and closed positions, for example, according to the rotational speed of the shaft. For example, the seal member can be configured to be adjusted according to a radial pressure differential in a fluid that varies with the rotational speed of the shaft. In addition, in the closed position, each seal member can contact a rotatable member connected to the shaft to form a seal with the rotatable member and prevent fluid from flowing through the assembly. Thus, the seal can be closed at low speeds of operation and opened at high speeds of operation, thereby reducing the heat and wear in the seal assembly while maintaining a sufficient seal during all speeds of operation.

  19. Development of fluid and I and C systems design technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Park, C. K.; Kim, S. O.

    2000-05-01

    LMR is the reactor type that makes utilization of uranium resource very efficiently and the necessity of construction of a LMR in 2020's has been raised. However, the design technology required for construction has not been secured domestically. To fulfill the necessity, study has been made for the LMR system design technology and conceptual design of KALIMER systems for fluid, instrumentation, control, and protection have been developed. Also the computer code systems for the design and analysis of the KALIMER fluid systems have been developed. These study results are to used as the starting point of the next phase LMR design technology development research

  20. Development of fluid and I and C systems design technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Park, C. K.; Kim, S. O. [and others

    2000-05-01

    LMR is the reactor type that makes utilization of uranium resource very efficiently and the necessity of construction of a LMR in 2020's has been raised. However, the design technology required for construction has not been secured domestically. To fulfill the necessity, study has been made for the LMR system design technology and conceptual design of KALIMER systems for fluid, instrumentation, control, and protection have been developed. Also the computer code systems for the design and analysis of the KALIMER fluid systems have been developed. These study results are to used as the starting point of the next phase LMR design technology development research.

  1. Development of fluid and I and C systems design technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Park, C K; Kim, S O [and others

    2000-05-01

    LMR is the reactor type that makes utilization of uranium resource very efficiently and the necessity of construction of a LMR in 2020's has been raised. However, the design technology required for construction has not been secured domestically. To fulfill the necessity, study has been made for the LMR system design technology and conceptual design of KALIMER systems for fluid, instrumentation, control, and protection have been developed. Also the computer code systems for the design and analysis of the KALIMER fluid systems have been developed. These study results are to used as the starting point of the next phase LMR design technology development research.

  2. Numerical modelling of the mechanical and fluid flow properties of fault zones - Implications for fault seal analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heege, J.H. ter; Wassing, B.B.T.; Giger, S.B.; Clennell, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Existing fault seal algorithms are based on fault zone composition and fault slip (e.g., shale gouge ratio), or on fault orientations within the contemporary stress field (e.g., slip tendency). In this study, we aim to develop improved fault seal algorithms that account for differences in fault zone

  3. Supercritical fluid technology for energy and environmental applications

    CERN Document Server

    Anikeev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical Fluid Technology for Energy and Environmental Applications covers the fundamental principles involved in the preparation and characterization of supercritical fluids (SCFs) used in the energy production and other environmental applications. Energy production from diversified resources - including renewable materials - using clean processes can be accomplished using technologies like SCFs. This book is focused on critical issues scientists and engineers face in applying SCFs to energy production and environmental protection, the innovative solutions they have found, and the challenges they need to overcome. The book also covers the basics of sub- and supercritical fluids, like the thermodynamics of phase and chemical equilibria, mathematical modeling, and process calculations. A supercritical fluid is any substance at a temperature and pressure above its critical point where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist. At this state the compound demonstrates unique properties, which can be "fine...

  4. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing the annulus defined within a substantially cylindrical rotatable riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor closure head is described. The apparatus comprises an inflatable sealing mechanism disposed in one portion of the riser assembly near the annulus such that upon inflation the sealing mechanism is radially actuated against the other portion of the riser assembly thereby sealing the annulus. The apparatus further comprises a connecting mechanism which places one end of the sealing mechanism in fluid communication with the reactor cover gas so that overpressurization of the reactor cover gas will increase the radial actuation of the sealing mechanism thus enhancing sealing of the annulus

  5. Liposomal preparation by supercritical fluids technology | Zhong ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Biotechnology ... technology (SCF) has been utilized in liposomal preparation because of its friendliness, nontoxicity to the environment and its possibility to achieve solvent-free liposomes and industrial-scale of liposome production under the conditions of current good manufacturing practice (cGMP).

  6. Hydraulic Characterization Activities in Support of the Shaft-Seals Fluid-Flow Modeling Integration into the WIPP EPA Compliance Certification Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowles, M.K.; Hurtado, L.D.; Dale, Tim

    1997-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a planned geologic repository for permanent disposal of transuranic waste generated by the U.S. Department of Energy. Disposal regions consist of panels and drifts mined from the bedded salt of the Salado Formation at a depth of approximately 650 m below the surface. This lithology is part of the 225 million year old Delaware Basin, and is geographically located in southeastern New Mexico. Four shafts service the facility needs for air intake, exhaust, waste handling, and salt handling. As the science advisor for the project, Sandia National Laboratories developed the WIPP shaft sealing system design. This design is a fundamental component of the application process for facility licensing, and has been found acceptable by stakeholders and regulatory agencies. The seal system design is founded on results obtained from laboratory and field experiments, numerical modeling, and engineering judgment. This paper describes a field test program to characterize the fluid flow properties in the WIPP shafts at representative seal locations. This work was conducted by Duke Engineering and Services under contract to Sandia National Laboratories in support of the seal system design

  7. Fluid Flow Technology that Measures Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    From 1994 to 1996, NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a Center Director's Discretionary Fund research effort to apply artificial intelligence technologies to the health management of plant equipment and space propulsion systems. Through this effort, NASA established a business relationship with Quality Monitoring and Control (QMC), of Kingwood, Texas, to provide hardware modeling and artificial intelligence tools. Very detailed and accurate Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) analysis and algorithms were jointly created, which identified several missing, critical instrumentation needs for adequately evaluating the engine health status. One of the missing instruments was a liquid oxygen (LOX) flow measurement. This instrument was missing since the original SSME included a LOX turbine flow meter that failed during a ground test, resulting in considerable damage for NASA. New balanced flow meter technology addresses this need with robust, safe, and accurate flow metering hardware.

  8. Upgrading oil sands bitumen with FLUID COKING and FLEXICOKING technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamienski, P.; Phillips, G. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Co., Fairfax, VA (United States); McKnight, C.; Rumball, B. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation described EMRE's Fluid Coking and Flexicoking technologies that are well suited for upgrading Alberta's heavy crudes and oil sands bitumen into pipelineable crudes or synthetic crudes, which can be further processed into transportation fuels. The Fluid Coking technology uses a fluidized bed reactor that thermally converts the heavy oils into light gases, liquids and coke. The metals and much of the sulphur are concentrated in the coke. Combustion of the coke provides process heat and the remaining coke is sold or stored on site for later recovery. Syncrude Canada currently operates 3 Fluid Coking units in northern Alberta. Flexicoking extends fluid coking by integrating air gasification to produce a carbon monoxide/hydrogen rich fuel gas that helps meet fuel and energy requirements of bitumen recovery and upgrading. The yields of light gas and liquids are similar to those of the Fluid Coking process. The partial combustion of coke provides the process heat for the thermal conversion and gasification steps. The remaining coke is gasified and desulphurized using Flexsorb technology. At present, there are 5 Flexicoking units in operation around the world. Interest in the technology is growing, particularly in locations with large demand for clean fuel or electricity. It is also suitable for steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) operations in Alberta. This presentation outlined the operating principles of the Flexicoking integrated gasification system and compared it with more expensive oxygen gasification processes. tabs., figs.

  9. Nuclear waste vault sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gyenge, M.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear waste vault must be designed and built to ensure adequate isolation of the nuclear wastes from human contact. Consequently, after a vault has been fully loaded, it must be adequately sealed off to prevent radionuclide migration which may be provided by circulating groundwater. Vault sealing entails four major aspects, i.e.: (a) vault grouting; (b) borehole sealing; (c) buffer packing; and (d) backfilling. Of particular concern in vault sealing are the physical and chemical properties of the sealing material, its long-term durability and stability, and the techniques used for its emplacement. Present sealing technology and sealing materials are reviewed in terms of the particular needs of vault sealing. Areas requiring research and development are indicated

  10. Cryogenic Fluid Management Technology for Moon and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Michael P.; Gaby, Joseph D.; Salerno, Louis J.; Sutherlin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy, focused cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are underway within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Under the auspices of the Exploration Technology Development Program, cryogenic fluid management technology efforts are being conducted by the Cryogenic Fluid Management Project. Cryogenic Fluid Management Project objectives are to develop storage, transfer, and handling technologies for cryogens to support high performance demands of lunar, and ultimately, Mars missions in the application areas of propulsion, surface systems, and Earth-based ground operations. The targeted use of cryogens and cryogenic technologies for these application areas is anticipated to significantly reduce propellant launch mass and required on-orbit margins, to reduce and even eliminate storage tank boil-off losses for long term missions, to economize ground pad storage and transfer operations, and to expand operational and architectural operations at destination. This paper organizes Cryogenic Fluid Management Project technology efforts according to Exploration Architecture target areas, and discusses the scope of trade studies, analytical modeling, and test efforts presently underway, as well as future plans, to address those target areas. The target areas are: liquid methane/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Ascent Stage, liquid hydrogen/liquid oxygen for propelling the Altair Lander Descent Stage and Ares V Earth Departure Stage, liquefaction, zero boil-off, and propellant scavenging for Lunar Surface Systems, cold helium and zero boil-off technologies for Earth-Based Ground Operations, and architecture definition studies for long term storage and on-orbit transfer and pressurization of LH2, cryogenic Mars landing and ascent vehicles, and cryogenic production via in situ resource utilization on Mars.

  11. Sealing arrangement for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Sievwright, R.W.T.; Elliott, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    A sealing arrangement for hermetically sealing two mating surfaces comprises two seals arranged to lie between the surfaces. Each seal provides hermetic sealing over a respective different temperature range and lie serially along the surfaces between the regions to be isolated. A main seal integrity test arrangement is provided in the form of a port and passage. This allows for the introduction of a fluid into or the evacuation of a region between the two seals to detect a leak. The port is also provided with at least two test port seals which seal with a plug. The plug is also provided with a test port to allow the integrity of the test port seal to be tested. (UK)

  12. Supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic-processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, D.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on the applications of supercritical fluid technologies for ceramic processing. The physical and chemical properties of these densified gases are summarized and related to their use as solvents and processing media. Several areas are identified in which specific ceramic processes benefit from the unique properties of supercritical fluids. The rapid expansion of supercritical fluid solutions provides a technique for producing fine uniform powders and thin films of widely varying materials. Supercritical drying technologies allow the formation of highly porous aerogel products with potentially wide application. Hydrothermal processes leading to the formation of large single crystals and microcrystalline powders can also be extended into the supercritical regime of water. Additional applications and potential applications are identified in the areas of extraction of binders and other additives from ceramic compacts, densification of porous ceramics, the formation of powders in supercritical micro-emulsions, and in preceramic polymer processing

  13. Spent sealed radioactive sources conditioning technology for the disposal at the national repository Baita-Bihor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujoreanu, D.; Popescu, I.V.

    2006-01-01

    A spent sealed radioactive source(SRS) is a high integrity capsule which contains a small amount of concentrated radionuclide with an activity which ranges from a few MBq up to levels of hundreds TBq. Presently, there are now many spent and unusable SRS in Romania, which have been used a long time in various industrial applications (smoke detectors, weld testing etc.). Considering the activity of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR) at the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti regarding radioactive source collecting from various economic agents, several radioactive sources are held in the intermediate storage deposit facility on the institute platform awaiting conditioning for the final disposal. This paper presents the conditioning technology for this sources, which has as ultimate purpose to completion of a product which matches the waste acceptance requirements imposed by the National Authority Control of Nuclear Activities, CNCAN, for the disposal site DNDR Baita - Bihor. The technology used for obtaining the final product allows two options for the immobilization of the sources in the 218 L steel drum and these are: Sources placed in the original packages and which can not be dismantled will be isolated by encapsulation in 10 litters metal capsules and then conditioned in 218 l steel drum, with a concrete biological shielding; Sources removed from the initial package are isolated in stainless steel capsules, which are to be conditioned in the same 218 L steel drum. The final product obtained as a result of the concrete conditioning operations of the spent SRS in 218 L steel drum is the steel drum - concrete - low radioactive waste assembly which presents itself as a concrete block which includes one or more capsules containing SRS. (author)

  14. Fluid-based radon mitigation technology development for industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, K.V.; Gabor, J.D.; Holtz, R.E.; Gross, K.C.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the radon mitigation technology development effort is to develop an efficient and economical radon gas removal technology based on a fluid absorption process. The technology must be capable of cleaning up a wide range of radon gas stream concentrations to a level that meets EPA gas emission standards for residential and industrial applications. Argonne has recently identified a phenomenon that offers the possibility of radon recovery from the atmosphere with high efficiency at room temperature, and radon release at slightly elevated temperatures (50-60 degrees C.) such a device would offer numerous substantial advantages over conventional cryogenic charcoal systems for the removal of radon. Controlled sources of radon in Argonne's radon research facility are being used to quantitatively assess the performance of a selected class of absorbing fluids over a range of radon concentrations. This paper will discuss the design of laboratory- and engineering-scale radon absorption units and present some preliminary experimental test results

  15. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The seals described are for use in a nuclear reactor where there are fuel assemblies in a vessel, an inlet and an outlet for circulating a coolant in heat transfer relationship with the fuel assemblies and a closure head on the vessel in a tight fluid relationship. The closure head comprises rotatable plugs which have mechanical seals disposed in the annulus around each plug while allowing free rotation of the plug when the seal is not actuated. The seal is usually an elastomer or copper. A means of actuating the seal is attached for drawing it vertically into the annulus for sealing. When the reactor coolant is liquid sodium, contact with oxygen must be avoided and argon cover gas fills the space between the bottom of the closure head and the coolant liquid level and the annuli in the closure head. (U.K.)

  16. Symposium on computational fluid dynamics: technology and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    A symposium on the technology and applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was held in Pretoria from 21-23 Nov 1988. The following aspects were covered: multilevel adaptive methods and multigrid solvers in CFD, a symbolic processing approach to CFD, interplay between CFD and analytical approximations, CFD on a transfer array, the application of CFD in high speed aerodynamics, numerical simulation of laminar blood flow, two-phase flow modelling in nuclear accident analysis, and the finite difference scheme for the numerical solution of fluid flow

  17. Strengthening of the nuclear valve sealing surface by laser cladding technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Huang Guodong

    1998-07-01

    A 5 kW laser with CO 2 flow transverse for cladding Co-base alloy or Ni-base alloy coat on the austenite matrix of the nuclear valve sealing surface is introduced. The results show that, after the sealing surface of valve is processed by the laser cladding, the coat of 3.0 mm thick can be made with smooth surface. The test and comparison analysis indicate that the structure and all performance have obvious advantages over that of the plasma spurt welding, bead welding and flame welding processing

  18. Design considerations for mechanical face seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    Two companion reports deal with design considerations for improving performance of mechanical face seals, one of family of devices used in general area of fluid sealing of rotating shafts. One report deals with basic seal configuration and other with lubrication of seal.

  19. Industrial applications and current trends in supercritical fluid technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamse Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluids have a great potential for wide fields of processes Although CO2 is still one of the most used supercritical gases, for special purposes propane or even fluorinated-chlorinated fluids have also been tested. The specific characteristics of supercritical fluids behaviour were analyzed such as for example the solubilities of different components and the phase equilibria between the solute and solvent. The application at industrial scale (decaffeinating of tea and coffee, hop extraction or removal of pesticides from rice, activity in supercritical extraction producing total extract from the raw material or different fractions by using the fractionated separation of beverages (rum, cognac, whisky, wine, beer cider, of citrus oils and of lipids (fish oils, tall oil were also discussed. The main interest is still for the extraction of natural raw materials producing food ingredients, nutraceuticals and phytopharmaceuticals but also cleaning purposes were tested such as the decontamination of soils the removal of residual solvents from pharmaceutical products, the extraction of flame retardants from electronic waste or precision degreasing and cleaning of mechanical and electronic parts. An increasing interest obviously exists for impregnation purposes based on supercritical fluids behaviour, as well as for the dying of fibres and textiles. The production of fine particles in the micron and submicron range, mainly for pharmaceutical products is another important application of supercritical fluids. Completely new products can be produced which is not possible under normal conditions. Supercritical fluid technology has always had to compete with the widespread opinion that these processes are very expensive due to very high investment costs in comparison with classical low-pressure equipment. Thus the opinion is that these processes should be restricted to high-added value products. A cost estimation for different plant sizes and

  20. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 10: Retrofit Techniques and Technologies: Air Sealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Gilbride, Theresa L.; Hefty, Marye G.; Cole, Pamala C.; Williamson, Jennifer L.; Love, Pat M.

    2010-04-12

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the U.S. Department of Energy Building America Program. The report provides information to home owners who want to make their existing homes more energy efficient by sealing leaks in the building envelope (ceiling, walls, and floors) that let in drafts and let conditioned air escape. The report provides descriptions of 19 key areas of the home where air sealing can improve home performance and energy efficiency. The report includes suggestions on how to find a qualified weatherization or home performance contractor, what to expect in a home energy audit, opportune times for performing air sealing, and what safety and health concerns to be aware of. The report describes some basic building science concepts and topics related to air sealing including ventilation, diagnostic tools, and code requirements. The report will be available for free download from the DOE Building America website. It is a suitable consumer education tool for home performance and weatherization contractors to share with customers to describe the process and value of home energy retrofits.

  1. The hip fluid seal--Part II: The effect of an acetabular labral tear, repair, resection, and reconstruction on hip stability to distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Philippon, Marc J; Campbell, Kevin J; Dornan, Grant J; Jansson, Kyle S; LaPrade, Robert F; Wijdicks, Coen A

    2014-04-01

    The acetabular labrum is theorized to be important to normal hip function by providing stability to distraction forces through the suction effect of the hip fluid seal. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of the hip capsule and labrum to the distractive stability of the hip, and to characterize hip stability to distraction forces in six labral conditions: intact labrum, labral tear, labral repair (looped vs. through sutures), partial resection, labral reconstruction with iliotibial band, and complete resection. Eight cadaveric hips with a mean age of 47.8 years (SD 4.3, range 41-51 years) were included. For each condition, the hip seal was broken by distracting the hip at a rate of 0.33 mm/s while the required force, energy, and negative intra-articular pressure were measured. For comparisons between labral conditions, measurements were normalized to the intact labral state (percent of intact). The relative contribution of the labrum to distractive stability was greatest at 1 and 2 mm of displacement, where it was significantly greater than the role of the capsule and accounted for 77 % (SD 27 %, p = 0.006) and 70 % (SD 7 %, p = 0.009) of total distractive stability, respectively. The relative contribution of the capsule to distractive stability increased with progressive displacement, providing 41 % (SD 49 %) and 52 % (SD 53 %) of distractive stability at 3 and 5 mm of distraction, respectively. The maximal distraction force required to break the hip seal in the intact labral state (capsule removed) varied from 124 to 150 N. Labral tear, partial resection, and complete resection resulted in average maximal distraction forces of 76 % (SD 34 %), 29 % (SD 26 %), and 27 % (SD 22 %), respectively, compared to the intact state. Through type labral repairs resulted in significantly greater improvements (from the labral tear state) in maximal negative pressure generated, compared to looped type repairs (median increase; +32 vs. -9 %, p

  2. [Research on soil bacteria under the impact of sealed CO2 leakage by high-throughput sequencing technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Di; Ma, Xin; Li, Yu-E; Zha, Liang-Song; Wu, Yang; Zou, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Shuang

    2013-10-01

    Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage has provided a new option for mitigating global anthropogenic CO2 emission with its unique advantages. However, there is a risk of the sealed CO2 leakage, bringing a serious threat to the ecology system. It is widely known that soil microorganisms are closely related to soil health, while the study on the impact of sequestered CO2 leakage on soil microorganisms is quite deficient. In this study, the leakage scenarios of sealed CO2 were constructed and the 16S rRNA genes of soil bacteria were sequenced by Illumina high-throughput sequencing technology on Miseq platform, and related biological analysis was conducted to explore the changes of soil bacterial abundance, diversity and structure. There were 486,645 reads for 43,017 OTUs of 15 soil samples and the results of biological analysis showed that there were differences in the abundance, diversity and community structure of soil bacterial community under different CO, leakage scenarios while the abundance and diversity of the bacterial community declined with the amplification of CO2 leakage quantity and leakage time, and some bacteria species became the dominant bacteria species in the bacteria community, therefore the increase of Acidobacteria species would be a biological indicator for the impact of sealed CO2 leakage on soil ecology system.

  3. Compliant seal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1993-10-01

    The compliant metallic seal combines the noncontact feature of the labyrinth seal, the low leakage of a mechanical seal, and the compliant nature of the brush seal. It consists of several thin metallic elements or leaves mounted within a ring which is press fit into the housing, and in form, sort of resembles a lip seal sections wiping the shaft. A second set of overlapping cover leaves are placed on top of the shaft riding leaves which reduces leakage and provides stiffness. The leaves can be straight or angle cut. The shaft riding fingers are designed with mismatched curvature to provide lift off similar to the Rayleigh lift pads in mechanical seals with leading edge clearances nearly twice those of the trailing edge as as shown by Fleming to be optimal for gas flows in convergent seal passages. Leading edge clearances range from 300 to 500 microinches. Balance pockets beneath the leaves provide fluid film feed to the 'Rayleigh lift' surface and the proper balance ratio (mechanical seal) when combined with the static pressure and film pressure. The leaves flex in the radial direction and accommodate thermomechanical behavior as well as axial motion and angular misalignment. In the static mode, there is a net closing force on the leaves. The seals were tested to 70 psi at speeds to 16,000 rpm or surface speeds to 330 fps and temperatures from ambient to 440 F. A slow cycle through the rig critical at 10,000 rpm induced a radial vibration response of 0.004 to 0.005 inch were accommodated by the seal. Preliminary performance data are encouraging demonstrating hydrodynamic liftoff and noncontacting operation at pressure and speeds typical of gas turbine engines. The leakage performance data are significantly better than commercial labyrinth and brush seals which should be expected as this design incorporates the features of the low leakage face or mechanical seal along with the flexibility of the brush configuration.

  4. Contributions to thermal and fluid dynamic problems in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Krebs, L.; Rust, K.

    1984-02-01

    The majority of contributions compiled in this report deals with thermal and fluid dynamic problems in nuclear engineering. Especially problems of heat transfer and cooling are represented which may arise during and afer a loss-of-coolant accident both in light water reactors and in liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors. Papers on the mass transfer in pressurized water, tribological problems in sodium cooled reactors, the fluid dynamics of pulsed column, and fundamental investigations of convective flows supplement these contributions on problems connected with accidents. Furthermore, a keynote paper presents the individual activities relating to the reliability of reactor components, a field recently included in our research program. Technical solutions to special problems are closely connected to the investigations based on experiments. Therefore, several contributions deal with new developments in technology and measuring techniques. (orig.) [de

  5. Sealing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2013-12-10

    A sealing device for sealing a gap between a dovetail of a bucket assembly and a rotor wheel is disclosed. The sealing device includes a cover plate configured to cover the gap and a retention member protruding from the cover plate and configured to engage the dovetail. The sealing device provides a seal against the gap when the bucket assemply is subjected to a centrifugal force.

  6. Refrigeration system with clearance seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, N. J.

    1985-01-01

    In a refrigeration system such as a split Stirling system, fluid seals associated with the reciprocating displacer are virtually dragless clearance seals. Movement of the displacer relative to the pressure variations in the working volume of gas is retarded by a discrete braking element. Because it is not necessary that the brake providing any sealing action, the brake can be designed for greater durability and less dependence on ambient and operating temperatures. Similarly, the clearance seal can be formed of elements having low thermal expansion such that the seal is not temperature dependent. In the primary embodiments the braking element is a split friction brake

  7. Comments on Frequency Swept Rotating Input Perturbation Techniques and Identification of the Fluid Force Models in Rotor/bearing/seal Systems and Fluid Handling Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszynska, Agnes; Bently, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    Perturbation techniques used for identification of rotating system dynamic characteristics are described. A comparison between two periodic frequency-swept perturbation methods applied in identification of fluid forces of rotating machines is presented. The description of the fluid force model identified by inputting circular periodic frequency-swept force is given. This model is based on the existence and strength of the circumferential flow, most often generated by the shaft rotation. The application of the fluid force model in rotor dynamic analysis is presented. It is shown that the rotor stability is an entire rotating system property. Some areas for further research are discussed.

  8. Micro/Nanospheres Generation by Fluid-Fluid Interaction Technology: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Bergstrom, Don; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Hongbo; Yin, Ruixue; Song, Ki-Young; Zhang, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on the fundamental fluid mechanics which governs the generation of micro/nanospheres. The micro/nanosphere generation process has gathered significant attention in the past two decades, since micro/nanospheres are widely used in drug delivery, food science, cosmetics, and other application areas. Many methods have been developed based on different operating principles, such as microfluidic methods, electrospray methods, chemical methods, and so forth. This paper focuses on microfluidic methods. Although the structure of the microfluidic devices may be different, the operating principles behind them are often very similar. Following an initial discussion of the fluid mechanics related to the generation of microspheres, various design approaches are discussed, including T-junction, flow focusing, membrane emulsification, modified T-junction, and double emulsification methods. The advantages and problems associated with each method are also discussed. Next, the most commonly used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are reviewed at three different levels: microscopic, mesoscopic, and macroscopic. Finally, the issues identified in the current literature are discussed, and some suggestions are offered regarding the future direction of technology development related to micro/nanosphere generation. Few relevant patents to the topic have been reviewed and cited. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Pressure Actuated Leaf Seals for Improved Turbine Shaft Sealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondahl, Clayton

    2006-01-01

    This presentation introduces a shaft seal in which leaf seal elements are constructed from slotted shim material formed and layered into a frusto-conical assembly. Limited elastic deflection of seal leaves with increasing system pressure close large startup clearance to a small, non-contacting, steady state running clearance. At shutdown seal elements resiliently retract as differential seal pressure diminishes. Large seal clearance during startup and shutdown provides a mechanism for rub avoidance. Minimum operating clearance improves performance and non-contacting operation promises long seal life. Design features of this seal, sample calculations at differential pressures up to 2400 psid and benefit comparison with brush and labyrinth seals is documented in paper, AIAA 2005 3985, presented at the Advanced Seal Technology session of the Joint Propulsion Conference in Tucson this past July. In this presentation use of bimetallic leaf material will be discussed. Frictional heating of bimetallic leaf seals during a seal rub can relieve the rub condition to some extent with a change in seal shape. Improved leaf seal rub tolerance is expected with bimetallic material.

  10. Mechanical seals

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, E

    1977-01-01

    Mechanical Seals, Third Edition is a source of practical information on the design and use of mechanical seals. Topics range from design fundamentals and test rigs to leakage, wear, friction and power, reliability, and special designs. This text is comprised of nine chapters; the first of which gives a general overview of seals, including various types of seals and their applications. Attention then turns to the fundamentals of seal design, with emphasis on six requirements that must be considered: sealing effectiveness, length of life, reliability, power consumption, space requirements, and c

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  12. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Kretzschmar, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies

  13. Mass transport of heavy metal ions and radon in gels used as sealing agents in containment technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos, I.; Bauer, K.; Lakatos-Szabo, J. [Research Lab. for Mining Chemistry, Miskolc-Egyetemvaros (Hungary); Kretzschmar, H.J. [DBI Gas- und Umwelttechnik GmbH, Feiberg (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The diffusion and hydrodynamic mass transport of multivalent cations, mostly Cr(III) and Cr(VI) ions and radon in polymer/silicate gels and Montanwax emulsions were studied. It was concluded that the self-conforming gels may decrease the hydrodynamic mass transport in porous and fractured media by 4-6 orders of magnitude. In water saturated systems, however, the diffusion transport can be restricted by hydrogels only to a moderate extent. On the other hand, the high and selective retention capacity of gels towards different diffusing species may open new vistas in the sealing technologies. Similar results were obtained for transport phenomena of radon. The almost perfect quenching process of radon and its nuclides in gels and emulsions further enhances the positive effects of the encapsulation methods. The laboratory experiments provided valuable new information to design the different containment technologies.

  14. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics for propulsion technology: Geometric grid visualization in CFD-based propulsion technology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, John P.; Meyer, Doug

    1992-01-01

    The coordination is examined of necessary resources, facilities, and special personnel to provide technical integration activities in the area of computational fluid dynamics applied to propulsion technology. Involved is the coordination of CFD activities between government, industry, and universities. Current geometry modeling, grid generation, and graphical methods are established to use in the analysis of CFD design methodologies.

  16. Security seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobeli, Garth W.

    1985-01-01

    Security for a package or verifying seal in plastic material is provided by a print seal with unique thermally produced imprints in the plastic. If tampering is attempted, the material is irreparably damaged and thus detectable. The pattern of the imprints, similar to "fingerprints" are recorded as a positive identification for the seal, and corresponding recordings made to allow comparison. The integrity of the seal is proved by the comparison of imprint identification records made by laser beam projection.

  17. Seal arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dempsey, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    A hydraulically balanced face type shaft seal is provided in which the opening and closing seal face areas retain concentricity with each other in the event of lateral shaft displacement. The seal arrangement is for a vertical high pressure pump, indented for use in the cooling system of a nuclear reactor. (Auth.)

  18. Sealing properties of mechanical seals for an axial flow blood pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, J; Mori, T; Yamazaki, K; Koyanagi, H

    1999-08-01

    A miniature intraventricular axial flow blood pump for left ventricular support is under development. One of the key technologies required for such pumps is sealing of the motor shaft. In this study, to prevent blood backflow into the motor side, mechanical seals were developed and their sealing properties investigated. In the experimental apparatus, the mechanical seal separated the bovine blood on the chamber side from the cooling water on the motor side. A leakage of the blood was measured by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) light emission analysis. The rate of hemolysis was measured by the cyanmethemoglobin method. Frictional torque acting on the shaft was measured by a torque transducer. In the experiments, the rotational speed of the shaft was changed from 1,000 to 10,000 rpm, and the contact force of the seal faces was changed from 1.96 to 4.31 N. To estimate lubrication regimes, the Stribeck curve, a diagram of the coefficient of friction against the bearing characteristic G number, was drawn. The results of the experiments showed that both the leakage of blood and the rate of hemolysis were very small. The friction loss was also very small. The mechanical seal was operated in various lubrication regimes, from a fluid lubrication regime to a mixed lubrication regime.

  19. Cover gas seals: FFTF-LMFBR seal test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, T.S.; Shimazaki, T.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor-inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configurations provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the CRBRP to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  20. SEALING SIMULATED LEAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-09-01

    This report details the testing equipment, procedures and results performed under Task 7.2 Sealing Simulated Leaks. In terms of our ability to seal leaks identified in the technical topical report, Analysis of Current Field Data, we were 100% successful. In regards to maintaining seal integrity after pigging operations we achieved varying degrees of success. Internal Corrosion defects proved to be the most resistant to the effects of pigging while External Corrosion proved to be the least resistant. Overall, with limitations, pressure activated sealant technology would be a viable option under the right circumstances.

  1. Advanced CO2 Leakage Mitigation using Engineered Biomineralization Sealing Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Cunningham, Alfred [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Phillips, Adrienne [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This research project addresses one of the goals of the DOE Carbon Sequestration Program (CSP). The CSP core R&D effort is driven by technology and is accomplished through laboratory and pilot scale research aimed at new technologies for greenhouse gas mitigation. Accordingly, this project was directed at developing novel technologies for mitigating unwanted upward leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) injected into the subsurface as part of carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. The technology developed by way of this research project is referred to as microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP).

  2. The impact of environmental regulations on drilling fluid technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    A multitude of new drilling fluid products, systems, and treatment processes have been developed in recent years in response to increasingly stringent environmental regulations. Many fluid additives and systems that once played a major role in the drilling industry are little used today or are no longer available. New water-base mud systems are approaching the performance levels typical of conventional oil-base muds, levels largely achieved by the new synthetic-base fluids. However, these new drilling fluids do not have the adverse environmental impact associated with oil-base systems when waste fluids and cuttings are discarded. 65 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, R.F.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing members operatively disposed between the outlet nozzle and the hoop. The sealing members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop and are connected by a leak restraining member establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel

  4. Nozzle seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walling, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    In an illustrative embodiment of the invention, a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, having an internal hoop from which the heated coolant emerges from the reactor core and passes through to the reactor outlet nozzles, is provided with sealing rings operatively disposed between the outlet nozzles and the hoop. The sealing rings connected by flexible members are biased against the pressure vessel and the hoop, establishing a leak-proof condition between the inlet and outlet coolants in the region about the outlet nozzle. Furthermore, the flexible responsiveness of the seal assures that the seal will not structurally couple the hoop to the pressure vessel. 4 claims, 2 figures

  5. Integrated intelligent instruments using supercritical fluid technology for soil analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liebman, S.A.; Phillips, C.; Fitzgerald, W.; Levy, E.J.

    1994-01-01

    Contaminated soils pose a significant challenge for characterization and remediation programs that require rapid, accurate and comprehensive data in the field or laboratory. Environmental analyzers based on supercritical fluid (SF) technology have been designed and developed for meeting these global needs. The analyzers are designated the CHAMP Systems (Chemical Hazards Automated Multimedia Processors). The prototype instrumentation features SF extraction (SFE) and on-line capillary gas chromatographic (GC) analysis with chromatographic and/or spectral identification detectors, such as ultra-violet, Fourier transform infrared and mass spectrometers. Illustrations are given for a highly automated SFE-capillary GC/flame ionization (FID) configuration to provide validated screening analysis for total extractable hydrocarbons within ca. 5--10 min, as well as a full qualitative/quantitative analysis in 25--30 min. Data analysis using optional expert system and neural networks software is demonstrated for test gasoline and diesel oil mixtures in this integrated intelligent instrument approach to trace organic analysis of soils and sediments

  6. Sealing Failure Analysis on V-Shaped Sealing Rings of an Inserted Sealing Tool Used for Multistage Fracturing Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Hu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The inserted sealing tool is a critical downhole implement that is used to balance the downhole pressure in multistage fracturing operations and prevent fracturing fluid from overflow and/or backward flow. The sealing ring of an inserted sealing tool plays an important role in downhole sealing since a sealing failure would ail the fracturing operation. In order to improve the sealing performance and reduce the potential fracturing failures, this research aims to investigate the influence of V-shaped sealing ring geometries on sealing performance. Constitutive experiments of rubber materials were carried out and the parameters of the constitutive relationship of rubber materials were obtained. A two-dimensional axisymmetric model considering the sealing ring has been established and influences are investigated with considerations of various system parameters and operating conditions. It is found that the stresses concentrated at the shoulder and inner vertex of the sealing ring have direct impact on the damage of the sealing rings under operational conditions. Moreover, the sealing interference, among several other factors, greatly affects the life of the sealing ring. A new design of the sealing ring is suggested with optimized geometric parameters. Its geometric parameters are the edge height of 5 mm, the vertex angle of 90°–100°, and the interference of 0.1 mm, which show a better performance and prolonged operation life of the sealing ring.

  7. Industrial applications and current trends in supercritical fluid technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Gamse Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Supercritical fluids have a great potential for wide fields of processes Although CO2 is still one of the most used supercritical gases, for special purposes propane or even fluorinated-chlorinated fluids have also been tested. The specific characteristics of supercritical fluids behaviour were analyzed such as for example the solubilities of different components and the phase equilibria between the solute and solvent. The application at industrial scale (decaffeinating of tea and coffee, hop...

  8. Electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musyck, E.

    1981-01-01

    An electronic seal is presented for a volume such as container for fissile materials. The seal encloses a lock for barring the space as well as a device for the detection and the recording of the intervention of the lock. (AF)

  9. Ferrules seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1984-07-10

    A device is provided for sealing an inner tube and an outer tube without excessively deforming the tubes. The device includes two ferrules which cooperate to form a vacuum-tight seal between the inner tube and outer tube and having mating surfaces such that overtightening is not possible. 3 figs.

  10. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  11. Shaft and tunnel sealing considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsall, P.C.; Shukla, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    Much of the emphasis of previous repository sealing research has been placed on plugging small diameter boreholes. It is increasingly evident that equal emphasis should now be given to shafts and tunnels which constitute more significant pathways between a repository and the biosphere. The paper discusses differences in requirements for sealing shafts and tunnels as compared with boreholes and the implications for seal design. Consideration is given to a design approach for shaft and tunnel seals based on a multiple component design concept, taking into account the requirements for retrievability of the waste. A work plan is developed for the future studies required to advance shaft and tunnel sealing technology to a level comparable with the existing technology for borehole sealing

  12. Self lubricating fluid bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns self lubricating fluid bearings, which are used in a shaft sealed system extending two regions. These regions contain fluids, which have to be isolated. A first seal is fluid tight for the first region between the carter shaft and the shaft. The second seal is fluid tight between the carter and the shaft, it communicates with the second region. The first fluid region is the environment surrounding the shaft carter. The second fluid region is a part of a nuclear reactor which contains the cooling fluid. The shaft is conceived to drive a reactor circulating and cooling fluid [fr

  13. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee

    2014-01-01

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO 2 , which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO 2 , a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO 2 was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO 2 decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO 2 requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO 2 is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO 2 . Supercritical CO 2 's advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative decontamination methods, as demonstrated

  14. Spatial Overlap of Grey Seals and Fisheries in Irish Waters, Some New Insights Using Telemetry Technology and VMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Cronin

    Full Text Available Seals and humans often target the same food resource, leading to competition. This is of mounting concern with fish stocks in global decline. Grey seals were tracked from southeast Ireland, an area of mixed demersal and pelagic fisheries, and overlap with fisheries on the Celtic Shelf and Irish Sea was assessed. Overall, there was low overlap between the tagged seals and fisheries. However, when we separate active (e.g. trawls and passive gear (e.g. nets, lines fisheries, a different picture emerged. Overlap with active fisheries was no different from that expected under a random distribution, but overlap with passive fisheries was significantly higher. This suggests that grey seals may be targeting the same areas as passive fisheries and/or specifically targeting passive gear. There was variation in foraging areas between individual seals suggesting habitat partitioning to reduce intra-specific competition or potential individual specialisation in foraging behaviour. Our findings support other recent assertions that seal/fisheries interactions in Irish waters are an issue in inshore passive fisheries, most likely at the operational and individual level. This suggests that seal population management measures would be unjustifiable, and mitigation is best focused on minimizing interactions at nets.

  15. Sealing device and method for sealing fractures or leaks in wall or formation surrounding tube-shaped channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The sealing device (1) includes an elongated body (5) adapted to be introduced into a tube-shaped channel (2) and including a sealing fluid placement section (6) arranged between a first and a second annular flow barrier (7, 8). The elongated body further includes a sealing fluid activation secti...

  16. Development of Nuclear Decontamination Technology Using Supercritical Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Wonyoung; Park, Kwangheon; Park, Jihye; Lee, Donghee [Kyunghee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Soil cleaning technologies that have been developed thus far increase treatment costs in contaminated soil recovery processes because they generate large amounts of secondary wastes. In this respect, this study is intended to develop soil decontamination methods using CO{sub 2}, which is a nontoxic, environmentally friendly substance, in order to fundamentally suppress the generation of secondary wastes from the decontamination process and to create high added values. In this study, to develop decontamination methods for uranium-contaminated soil using supercritical CO{sub 2}, a soil decontamination system using supercritical CO{sub 2} was constructed. In addition, the basic principle of supercritical CO{sub 2} decontamination using a TBP-HNO3 complex was explained. According to the results of the study, sea-sand samples having the same degree of contamination showed different results of decontamination according to the quantities of the TBP-HNO3 complex used as an extraction agent, which resulted in high extraction rates. Thus far, a most widely used method of extracting uranium has been the dissolving of uranium in acids. However, this method has the large adverse effect of generating strong acidic wastes that cannot be easily treated. On the other hand, supercritical CO{sub 2} requires critical conditions that are no more difficult to meet than those of other supercritical fluids, since its density can be changed from a very low state close to that of an ideal gas to a high state close to that of liquids. The critical gas conditions are a pressure of 71 bar and a temperature of 31 .deg. C, both of which are inexpensive to achieve. Moreover, CO{sub 2} is a solvent that is not harmful to the human body and few effects on environmental pollution. Therefore, nontoxic and environment friendly processes can be developed using supercritical CO{sub 2}. Supercritical CO{sub 2}'s advantages over prevailing methods suggest its potential for developing innovative

  17. Recent advances in magnetic liquid sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raj, K.; Stahl, P.; Bottenberg, W.; True, D.; Martis, G.; Zook, C.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper recent work in design and testing of two special magnetic liquid seals extending the state-of-the-art of ferrofluidic sealing is discussed. These custom seals are a moving belt edge seal and an exclusion seal. The first seal provides a hermetic barrier to solid particulates expected to be present in enclosed nuclear environments. The second seal is used on a magnetic disk drive spindle and reduces the particulate contaminants in the memory disk pack area by up to three orders of magnitude. In addition, bearing life in the spindle is found to be doubled due to reduction of operating temperature. The fundamentals of magnetic fluid sealing are presented in terms of magnetic circuit design and physical properties of ferrofluids

  18. A shaft seal system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Ahrens, E.H.; Dennis, A.W.; Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Tillerson, J.R.; Thompson, T.W.; Galbraith, D.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the demonstration of compliance with federal regulations, a shaft seal system has been designed for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The system completely fills the 650 m shafts with components consisting of the common engineering materials, each of which possesses low permeability, longevity, and can be constructed using available technology. Design investigations couple rock mechanics and fluid flow analysis and tests of these materials within the natural geological setting, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the design

  19. Non-intuitive fluid dynamics from reactor and containment technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    One exciting aspect of fluid dynamics is that the subject has many surprises. The surprises can be good, but if not anticipated, they sometimes can be costly and embarrassing. Several non-intuitive fluid responses have emerged from studies in nuclear reactor and containment design. These responses include bubble behavior, blowdown, and waterhammer phenomena. Apologies are extended to those who are not surprised by the results. However, many will find the examples interesting; some have been amazed; a few have declared a personal crisis in their engineering perception

  20. Technology for Space Station Evolution. Volume 3: EVA/Manned Systems/Fluid Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (OAST) conducted a workshop on technology for space station evolution 16-19 Jan. 1990 in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this workshop was to collect and clarify Space Station Freedom technology requirements for evolution and to describe technologies that can potentially fill those requirements. These proceedings are organized into an Executive Summary and Overview and five volumes containing the Technology Discipline Presentations. Volume 3 consists of the technology discipline sections for Extravehicular Activity/Manned Systems and the Fluid Management System. For each technology discipline, there is a Level 3 subsystem description, along with the papers.

  1. Critical fluid technology for the processing of lipid-related natural products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, J.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., Supercritical Fluid Facility, Chemistry Div. NM (United States)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, the technology envelope that embraces critical fluids can involve a wide range of conditions, different types of pure and modified fluids, as well as processing options involving extractions, fractionations or reactions. Technological development drivers continue to be environmentally and consumer-benign processing and/or products, however in recent years expansion of the use of sub- and supercritical fluids has been catalyzed by applications in such opportune fields as nutraceuticals, conversion of biomass (bio-refining), and the ability to modify natural products by reactions. The use of critical fluid technology is an important facet of any sustainable development program, particularly when utilized over a broad, interconnected application platform. In this overview presentation, concepts and applications of critical fluids from the author's research as well as the literature will be cited to support the above trends. A totally 'green' processing platform appears to be viable using carbon dioxide in the appropriate form, ethanol and water as intermediate co-solvents/reactants, and water from above its boiling point to supercritical conditions. These fluids can be combined in overall coupled unit processes, such as combining trans-esterification with hydrogenation, or glycero-lysis of lipid moieties with supercritical fluid fractionation. Such fluids also can exploited sequentially for bio-refining processes or the segregation of value-added products, but may require using coupled fluid or unit operations to obtain the targeted product composition or purity. Changing the reduced temperatures and/or pressures of critical fluids offers a plethora of opportunity, an excellent example being the relative critical fluid state of water. For example, sub-critical water slightly above its boiling point provides a unique medium that mimics polar organic solvents, and has been used even for the extraction of thermally labile solutes or

  2. A fluid biopsy as investigating technology for the fluid phase of solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Peter; Bethel, Kelly

    2012-02-01

    Reliable measurement of internal bodily substances and structures is one of the cornerstones of modern medicine. Progress in cancer medicine, like that in many medical fields, must encompass and take advantage of progress in the physical sciences. Historically, the development and refinement of physical sciences-based detection of biological entities precedes periods of great advancements in therapies. To treat broken limbs and arthritis, we are indebted to Conrad Roentgen's discovery of x-rays by which we can evaluate the bones; to apply gamma knife therapy for cancer, we are indebted to Marie Curie's discoveries about radioactivity by which we can eradicate tumors; to manage the complications of diabetes, we are indebted to Tom Clemens, Ames Pharmaceuticals and Dick Bernstein's refinement of direct blood glucose measurement technology by which we can count, hour-to-hour, the waxing and waning of blood sugar levels; to understand anything at all on the cellular level, we are indebted to Antonie van Leeuwenhoek's microscope, by which we can see our cells. The application of physical sciences perspectives to biological and medical problems has a long and productive history. As of late, however, the increasing compartmentalization of science and exponential increases of knowledge in both arenas has resulted in a rift between the two. The NCI has initiated a research network establishing multiple centers of investigation, the Physical Sciences in Oncology Centers (http://physics.cancer.gov), which seek to mend the rift. Each headed by a pair of investigators, one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences, the centers seek to bring the advances and breakthroughs of the physical sciences world to bear on the question of cancer. This issue of physical biology contains a series of articles exploring the utility and applicability of a new method for measuring cancer as it spreads, developed at the Scripps Physical Oncology Center. Although some progress

  3. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Metcalfe, R.

    1986-06-01

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  4. Electromagnetic shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kenji.

    1994-01-01

    As an electromagnetic shaft seal, there are disposed outwarding electromagnetic induction devices having generating power directing to an electroconductive fluid as an object of sealing, and inwarding electromagnetic induction device added coaxially. There are disposed elongate rectangular looped first coils having a predetermined inner diameter, second coils having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the first coil and third coil having the same shape and shifted by a predetermined pitch relative to the second coil respectively each at a predetermined inner diameter of clearance to the outwarding electromagnetic induction devices and the inwarding electromagnetic induction device. If the inwarding electromagnetic induction device and the outwarding electromagnetic induction device are operated, they are stopped at a point that the generating power of the former is equal with the sum of the generating power of the latter and a differential pressure. When three-phase AC is charged to the first coil, the second coil and the third coil successively, a force is generated in the advancing direction of the magnetic field in the electroconductive fluid by the similar effect to that of a linear motor, and the seal is maintained at high reliability. Moreover, the limit for the rotational angle of the shaft is not caused. (N.H.)

  5. Review of results from SKB R and D on grouting technology for sealing the rock, years 1996-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boden, A.; Eklund, D.; Eriksson, Magnus; Lagerblad, B.; Lindblom, U.

    2001-05-01

    In order identify the current state of the art and developments needs, SKB assembled a group of experts from universities and other research organisations. Internal plans were written for the subprojects 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', 'Mechanisms that control the spreading of grout in jointed rock' and 'Cement based grouting material'. Later internal plans for the subprojects 'Demands on grouting' and 'Stabilising and sealing effect of pre-grouting' were written. The aims, which were set for the different subprojects, were in short, to summarise the technological advances, establish a method for rock characterisation from a grouting point of view, develop conceptual and numerical models for simulation of the grouting course, characterise grout in a relevant way, develop understanding and theoretical know-how of durability and chemical influence, identify and develop a number of grouting materials for different situations, develop a specification of requirements for grouting and to verify the theories in laboratory. In the subproject 'Demands on grouting' a literature review was carried out. One important conclusion from the study is that the concept is not very well dealt with in the literature. SKB are currently investigating the prerequisites for the construction of the deep repository. One part of that work is to further specify demands on maximum allowed volume of leakage water for the repository as a whole and also for each part of the deep repository. In the subproject 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', the possibilities of using hydraulic tests for predictions and design have been studied. The idea of this study was to investigate correspondences and deviations to increase the understanding of what is measured in a water-loss measurement. One can draw the conclusion that hydraulic tests are useful when describing the fracture geometry. Numerical modelling and experiments indicate that the specific capacity, Q/Δh, (flow

  6. The Bulgarian coal and the fluid bed technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, M.; Georgiev, J.; Lebedov, K.; Petrov, N.

    2000-01-01

    Because of low-quality of the most of Bulgarian coal and more rigorous ecological restrictions for decreasing of greenhouse gases the fluidized bed technology is the most appropriate combustion technology. A study with a pilot plant aiming to establish the values of technological parameters in view to maintain stable process of fluidized bed combustion at the specific burning characteristics of the Bulgarian coal was carried out. Coal of different quality and particle size production of 'Marbas' LTD mines were used. Series of experiments with batches of strictly determined content were carried out at minimal, average and maximal load. The technological factors as: layer's aerodynamics, layer's height, fuel's quantity and quantity of inert material were changed at each batch. The ecological factors were optimized considering coal's quality, plant's parameters, limestone's dosing and layer's aerodynamics. A regressive model for optimization of technological and ecological factors was created. An average coefficient of performance was achieved, resp. 82.27 % at combustion of coal from mines 'Maritsa-West' and 90 % from mine 'Lev'. A coefficient of sulfur oxides' capture 70 % was obtained at coal with sulfur content 3.1-3.9 %. In conclusion the fluidized bed technology is very suitable for combustion's characteristics of the Bulgarian coal

  7. Electron beam selectively seals porous metal filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, J. A.; Tulisiak, G.

    1968-01-01

    Electron beam welding selectively seals the outer surfaces of porous metal filters and impedances used in fluid flow systems. The outer surface can be sealed by melting a thin outer layer of the porous material with an electron beam so that the melted material fills all surface pores.

  8. Research on RCP400-TB50 type reactor coolant pump shaft seal failure analysis and monitoring method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Chaolian; Shen Yuxian; Wang Chuan; Du Pengcheng

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical seal is widely applied in mechanical devices of nuclear power plant. 3-stages mechanical seal applied in reactor coolant pump (abbreviate to RCP) is a kind of product with top technology and manufacture difficulty. As the only running machine in primary loop of nuclear power plant, RCP is designed with high security, reliability and perform ability. So performance of its key component, 3-stages mechanical seal, could directly decide whether units can operate safely and reliably. In this paper mechanical seal used in RCP400-TB50 type RCP which in designed and manufactured by Andritz AG is selected as a typical example of dynamic pressure type mechanical seal applied in second generation NPP. Its structure and working principle is expounded. Engineering fluid mechanics theory is used to establish the mathematical model using for analyzing status of mechanical seal and deducing the theoretical formula. Its correctness is verified by compare with the test data. So that research result can be used as the theoretical basis for analysis of RCP400-TB50 RCP shaft seal's working condition. According to the shaft seal operation characteristic we can establish a suitable RCP shaft seal monitoring method and interlock protection setting for NPP operation. (authors)

  9. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  10. Hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVault, Robert C.; McConnell, Benjamin W.; Phillips, Benjamin A.

    1996-01-01

    A hermetically sealed superconducting magnet motor includes a rotor separated from a stator by either a radial gap, an axial gap, or a combined axial and radial gap. Dual conically shaped stators are used in one embodiment to levitate a disc-shaped rotor made of superconducting material within a conduit for moving cryogenic fluid. As the rotor is caused to rotate when the field stator is energized, the fluid is pumped through the conduit.

  11. Optimum fluid design for drilling and cementing a well drilled with coil tubing technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swendsen, O.; Saasen, A.; Vassoy, B. [Statoil (Norway); Skogen, E.; Mackin, F.; Normann, S. H.

    1998-12-31

    The strategy, design and drilling fluid and cementing operations in the first two wells drilled with coil tubing technology in the Gullfaks field in the Tampen Spur Area of the Norwegian sector of the North Sea are discussed. The drilling fluid use was a solids-free potassium formate/polymer brine-based fluid with a density of 1,50-1.56 g/cc, with flow properties characterized by very low fluid loss due to high extensional viscosity, a low viscosity at all shear rates, and a low degree of shear-thinning. The low viscous drilling fluid is considered to have been the major contributing factor in achieving excellent hole cleaning, no differential sticking, successful setting of cement kick-off plugs, problem-free running of the liner, and excellent zonal isolation when cementing the liner. These experiences led the authors to conclude that it is possible to formulate a brine-based solids-free drilling fluid with low viscosity and fluid loss properties for most formation pressure regimes, and that such a drilling fluid is well suited to drilling highly deviated slim hole wells where hole cleaning and differential sticking present special challenges. 12 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. Development of fluid system design technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D. J.; Chang, M. H.; Kang, D. J. and others

    1999-03-01

    This study presents the technology development of the system design concepts of SMART, a multi-purposed integral reactor with enhanced safety and operability, for use in diverse usages and applications of the nuclear energy. This report contains the following; - Design characteristics - Performance and safety related design criteria - System description: Primary system, Secondary system, Residual heat removal system, Make-up system, Component cooling system, Safety system - Development of design computer code: Steam generator performance(ONCESG), Pressurizer performance(COLDPZR), Steam generator flow instability(SGINS) - Development of component module and modeling using MMS computer code - Design calculation: Steam generator thermal sizing, Analysis of feed-water temperature increase at a low flow rate, Evaluation of thermal efficiency in the secondary system, Inlet orifice throttling coefficient for the prevention of steam generator flow instability, Analysis of Nitrogen gas temperature in the pressurizer during heat-up process, evaluation of water chemistry and erosion etc. The results of this study can be utilized not only for the foundation technology of the next phase basic system design of the SMART but also for the basic model in optimizing the system concepts for future advanced reactors. (author)

  13. Potential of organic Rankine cycle technology in India: Working fluid selection and feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, Jahar; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2015-01-01

    India has great potential to employ the ORC (organic Rankine cycle) technology for conversion of low temperature waste heat and renewable energy. In this study, available waste heat and relevant renewable heat sources in India are reviewed and suitable working fluids for ORC have been selected based on operational, environmental and safety criteria. A feasibility study and comparison of selected fluids for ORC is also presented for Indian climates along with discussions on component, operation and cost related aspects. A comprehensive review on available heat sources and sinks shows that India has plenty of waste heat and renewable energy sources for electricity generation by means of ORC; however, condenser operation may be challenging due to wide ambient temperature variation. Appropriate performance comparison among selected working fluids shows that ammonia is the best fluid in terms of net power generation and compactness of turbo-machineries, whereas n-Pentane is the best fluid in terms of thermal efficiency and heat exchanger compactness. Both are recommended as working fluids for ORC installations in India. The study reveals that there is a great opportunity to employ this technology in India provided we have to overcome some challenges related to component selection, finance and maintenance. - Highlights: • Available waste heat and renewable heat energies, and sinks in India are reviewed. • Suitable working fluids are selected by operational, environmental and safety criteria. • A feasibility study and comparison of selected fluids are presented for Indian climates. • Ammonia and n-Pentane are recommended for ORC installation in India. • Challenges related to plant component, operation and cost are discussed.

  14. Technological study of organic fluids; Etudes technologiques des fluides caloporteurs organique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveque, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    Under contract to EURATOM (MM. VAN der VENNE and HANNAERT), the C.E.A. and the Progil Society have collaborated on a technological study of the terphenyls. The results obtained from the radiolysis and pyrolysis of the product OM2 (70 p. 100 m-terphenyl, 25 p. 100 o-terphenyl, 5 p. 100 p-terphenyl) are reported. Using two pile loops at temperatures up to 450 deg. C, a phenomena of accelerated pyrolysis on the radiolized material has been demonstrated. Some by-products of the petroleum industry have also been studied, with a view to finding substitutes for terphenyl. (author) [French] Le C.E.A. et la Societe PROGIL ont entrepris en commun sous contrat EURATOM (MM. VAN der VENNE et HANNAERT) une etude technologique des terphenyles. Les resultats de radiolyse et de pyrolyse obtenus sur le produit OM2 (70 p. 100 m-terphenyle, 25 p. 100 o-terphenyle. 5 p. 100 de p-terphenyle) sont exposes. L'exploitation de deux boucles en pile jusqu'a des temperatures de 450 deg. C a mis en evidence un phenomene de pyrolyse acceleree sur le produit radiolyse. On a etudie egalement quelques sous-produits de l'industrie petroliere dans le but de trouver des substituts au terphenyle. (auteur)

  15. 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP on technological specialties. Topic 3: thermal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The document includes 10 papers presented at the 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP (Mexico) on technological specialties in the field of thermal fluids. (Topic 3). From these, 4 papers were in INIS subject scope and a separate abstract was prepared for each of them

  16. Carbon capture from coal fired power plant using pressurized fluid bed technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dennis; Christensen, Tor

    2010-09-15

    This presentation will discuss the use of a pressurized fluid bed boiler system and specialized carbon capture system to burn coal and generagte clean electricity. The paper will present the existing boiler and carbon capture technology and present economics, thermal performance and emissions reduction for a 100Mw module.

  17. Detection of Neisseria meningitidis in cerebrospinal fluid using a multiplex PCR and the Luminex detection technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2012-01-01

    pathogens most frequently found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients. The Luminex suspension array system uniquely combines flow cytometry, microspheres, laser technology, digital signal processing, and traditional chemistry. In this method, the reaction is carried out in one vessel, in which distinctly...

  18. The CANDU irradiated fuel safeguards sealing system at the threshold of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stirling, A.J.; Kupca, S.; Martin, R.E.; West, R.J.; Aikens, A.E.; Cox, C.A.; White, B.F.; Smith, M.T.; Payne, W.E.

    1985-07-01

    The development of a safeguards containment and surveillance system for the irradiated fuel discharged from CANDU nuclear generating stations has inspired the development of three different sealing technologies. Each seal type utilizes a random seal identity of different design. The AECL Random Coil (ARC) Seal combines the identity and integrity elements in the ultrasonic signature of a wire coil. Two variants of an optical seal have been developed which features identity elements of crystalline zirconium and aluminum. The sealed cap-seal uses a conventional IAEA 'Type X Seal' (wire seal). The essential features and relative merits of each seal design are described

  19. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1993-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories was asked to evaluate the seals used as tamper-indicating devices (TIDs) at DOE facilities. Initially, a survey determined what seal manufacturers were being used and what similar seal types were available. Once the required specifications for TIDs were defined, a test plan measured the currently available seals against the requirements. Environmental and physical type tests stressed the seals under two broad categories: (1) handling durability and (2) tamper resistance. Results of the testing provide comparative ratings for the various seals, recommendations for using currently available seals, and a new tamper-indicating technology

  20. Endotracheal tubes and fluid aspiration: an in vitro evaluation of new cuff technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyaselvam, Maryanne Z; Marsh, Lucy L; Bamford, Sarah; Smith, Ann; Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W

    2017-03-04

    Aspiration of subglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is a prerequisite for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) ETTs reduce aspiration of subglottic secretions and have demonstrated lower VAP rates. We compared the performance of seven SSD ETTs against a non-SSD ETT in preventing aspiration below inflated cuffs. ETTs were positioned vertically in 2 cm diameter cylinders. Four ml of a standard microbial suspension was added above inflated cuffs. After 1 h, aspiration was measured and ETTs demonstrating no leakage were subjected to rotational movement and evaluation over 24 h. Collected aspirated fluid was used to inoculate agar media and incubated aerobically at 37 °C for 24 h. The aspiration rate, volume and number of microorganisms that leaked past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT, with new ETTs used for each repeat. Best performing ETTs were then tested in five different cylinder diameters (1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 cm). Experiments were repeated as above using sterile water. Volume and time taken for aspiration past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT. Results were analysed using non-parametric tests for repeated measures. The PneuX ETT prevented aspiration past the cuff in all experiments. All other ETTs allowed aspiration, with considerable variability in performance. The PneuX ETT was statistically superior in reducing aspiration compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration across the range of diameters compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration, relating to cuff material and design. Variability in performance was likely due to the random manner in which involutional folds form in the inflated ETT cuff. The PneuX ETT was the only ETT able to consistently prevent aspiration past the cuff in all experiments.

  1. Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen [SIMBOL Materials

    2014-04-30

    Materials is evaluating other products with greater commercial value. Potassium Silicotitanates, zeolites and other sorbents were evaluated as potential reagents for the extraction of potassium from geothermal brines and production of potassium chloride (potash). It was found that zeolites were effective at removing potassium but the capacity of the zeolites and the form that the potassium is in does not have economic potential. Iron-silica by-product The conversion of iron-silica by-product produced during silica management operations into more valuable materials was studied at the laboratory scale. Results indicate that it is technically feasible to convert the iron-silica by-product into ferric chloride and ferric sulfate solutions which are precursors to a ferric phosphate product. However, additional work to purify the solutions is required to determine the commercial viability of this process. Conclusion Simbol Materials is in the process of designing its first commercial plant based on the technology developed to the pilot scale during this project. The investment in the commercial plant is hundreds of millions of dollars, and construction of the commercial plant will generate hundreds of jobs. Plant construction will be completed in 2016 and the first lithium products will be shipped in 2017. The plant will have a lithium carbonate equivalent production capacity of 15,000 tonnes per year. The gross revenues from the project are expected to be approximately $ 80 to 100 million annually. During this development program Simbol grew from a company of about 10 people to over 60 people today. Simbol is expected to employ more than 100 people once the plant is constructed. Simbol Materials’ business is scalable in the Imperial Valley region because there are eleven geothermal power plants already in operation, which allows Simbol to expand its business from one plant to multiple plants. Additionally, the scope of the resource is vast in terms of potential products such

  2. Improved circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1974-01-01

    Comparative tests of modified and unmodified carbon ring seals showed that addition of helical grooves to conventional segmented carbon ring seals reduced leakage significantly. Modified seal was insensitive to shaft runout and to flooding by lubricant.

  3. Refurbishing the seals of the H2S compressors in the isotopic exchange installations at the Heavy Water Reprocessing Plant. Technical solutions for replacing liquid seals by dry seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait; Adrian; Serban, Viorel; Androne, Marian; Florea, Ioana; Ciocan, George; State, Elena

    2004-01-01

    pressure required by the dynamic stage is self-supplied by mounting inside a toroidal housing around the driving shaft a mini-rotor fastened to the shaft. The dynamic sub-stage is a micro-compressor or a micro-pump operating in a free-motion regime what supplies re-circulation of only a few percents of the maximal cooling capacity of the micro-installation. The working fluid for the dynamical sub-stage could be either the working gas (H 2 S, for the present case) or a neutral gas (nitrogen, for instance) or else a liquid (water or oil). The static sub-stage is made of elastic elements of siphon type, mounted co-axially with the driving shaft, which in case of a pressure difference between interior and exterior ensures self-sealing by the axial motion of a diaphragm fastened to an end of the siphon. On the opposite side of the diaphragm a gasket is provided which ensures the sealing on a disk fastened on the driving shaft. Two elastic enclosures between the two siphons form by means of which one can control when necessary the enclosure/opening of the sealing. Hence in the new system the oil for sealing is totally eliminated and the adjacent installations for pumping, cooling and cleaning as well. Instead the technological water is used which after ensuring the sealing is directed towards the isotopic exchange column. Hence, it ensures the pressure self-regulation on the dynamical stage thus avoiding automation systems which could lower the reliability of this new system of total sealing

  4. Application of FTA technology to extraction of sperm DNA from mixed body fluids containing semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yoshihiko; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2006-01-01

    FTA technology is a novel method designed to simplify the collection, shipment, archiving and purification of nucleic acids from a wide variety of biological sources. In this study, we report a rapid and simple method of extracting DNA from sperm when body fluids mixed with semen were collected using FTA cards. After proteinase K digestion of the sperm and body fluid mixture, the washed pellet suspension as the sperm fraction and the concentrated supernatant as the epithelial cell fraction were respectively applied to FTA cards containing DTT. The FTA cards were dried, then directly added to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mix and processed by PCR. The time required from separation of the mixed fluid into sperm and epithelial origin DNA extractions was only about 2.5-3h. Furthermore, the procedure was extremely simple. It is considered that our designed DNA extraction procedure using an FTA card is available for application to routine work.

  5. Cover gas seals. 11 - FFTF-LMFBR seal-test program, January-March 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurzeka, W.; Oliva, R.; Welch, F.

    1974-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to: (1) conduct static and dynamic tests to demonstrate or determine the mechanical performance of full-size (cross section) FFTF fuel transfer machine and reactor vessel head seals intended for use in a sodium vapor - inert gas environment, (2) demonstrate that these FFTF seals or new seal configuration provide acceptable fission product and cover gas retention capabilities at LMFBR Clinch River Plant operating environmental conditions other than radiation, and (3) develop improved seals and seal technology for the LMFBR Clinch River Plant to support the national objective to reduce all atmospheric contaminations to low levels

  6. NASA Fluid Lensing & MiDAR: Next-Generation Remote Sensing Technologies for Aquatic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirayath, Ved

    2018-01-01

    We present two recent instrument technology developments at NASA, Fluid Lensing and MiDAR, and their application to remote sensing of Earth's aquatic systems. Fluid Lensing is the first remote sensing technology capable of imaging through ocean waves in 3D at sub-cm resolutions. MiDAR is a next-generation active hyperspectral remote sensing and optical communications instrument capable of active fluid lensing. Fluid Lensing has been used to provide 3D multispectral imagery of shallow marine systems from unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, or drones), including coral reefs in American Samoa and stromatolite reefs in Hamelin Pool, Western Australia. MiDAR is being deployed on aircraft and underwater remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) to enable a new method for remote sensing of living and nonliving structures in extreme environments. MiDAR images targets with high-intensity narrowband structured optical radiation to measure an objectâ€"TM"s non-linear spectral reflectance, image through fluid interfaces such as ocean waves with active fluid lensing, and simultaneously transmit high-bandwidth data. As an active instrument, MiDAR is capable of remotely sensing reflectance at the centimeter (cm) spatial scale with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) multiple orders of magnitude higher than passive airborne and spaceborne remote sensing systems with significantly reduced integration time. This allows for rapid video-frame-rate hyperspectral sensing into the far ultraviolet and VNIR wavelengths. Previously, MiDAR was developed into a TRL 2 laboratory instrument capable of imaging in thirty-two narrowband channels across the VNIR spectrum (400-950nm). Recently, MiDAR UV was raised to TRL4 and expanded to include five ultraviolet bands from 280-400nm, permitting UV remote sensing capabilities in UV A, B, and C bands and enabling mineral identification and stimulated fluorescence measurements of organic proteins and compounds, such as green fluorescent proteins in terrestrial and

  7. Study on Nonlinear Vibration and Crack Fault of Rotor-bearing-seal Coupling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuegang LUO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear dynamic model of rotor-bearing-seal system with crack in shaft is set up based on the coupling model of nonlinear oil-film force and Muszyska’s nonlinear seal fluid force. The dynamic vibration characteristics of the rotor-bearing-seal system and the effects of physical and structural parameters of labyrinth seal and crack fault on movement character of the rotor were analyzed. The increases of seal length, seal pressure differential, seal radius and axial velocity are in favor of the stability of the system, and it of seal gap and crack depth are not in favor of the stability of the system.

  8. Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology Flight Volume Measurements Under Zero G Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Anthony A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the project is to perform analysis of data using the Systems Engineering Educational Discovery (SEED) program data from 2011 and 2012 Fluid Vessel Quantity using Non-Invasive PZT Technology flight volume measurements under Zero G conditions (parabolic Plane flight data). Also experimental planning and lab work for future sub-orbital experiments to use the NASA PZT technology for fluid volume measurement. Along with conducting data analysis of flight data, I also did a variety of other tasks. I provided the lab with detailed technical drawings, experimented with 3d printers, made changes to the liquid nitrogen skid schematics, and learned how to weld. I also programmed microcontrollers to interact with various sensors and helped with other things going on around the lab.

  9. Workshop on Critical Issues in Microgravity Fluids, Transport, and Reaction Processes in Advanced Human Support Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Joshi, Jitendra A.

    2004-01-01

    This workshop was designed to bring the experts from the Advanced Human Support Technologies communities together to identify the most pressing and fruitful areas of research where success hinges on collaborative research between the two communities. Thus an effort was made to bring together experts in both advanced human support technologies and microgravity fluids, transport and reaction processes. Expertise was drawn from academia, national laboratories, and the federal government. The intent was to bring about a thorough exchange of ideas and develop recommendations to address the significant open design and operation issues for human support systems that are affected by fluid physics, transport and reaction processes. This report provides a summary of key discussions, findings, and recommendations.

  10. Numerical simulation on reasonable hole-sealing depth of boreholes for gas extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dan; Pan, Jingtao

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the low efficiency of extracting gas in coal reservoirs with a low gas permeability, some boreholes were drilled for gas extraction in No. 2 coal reservoir of Wangjialing Coalmine in Shanxi Province, China and reasonably sealed. Aiming at shortfalls such as rapid attenuation of volume for extracted gas as well as low gas permeability when using boreholes in the No. 2 coal reservoir, the traditional COMSOL MultiphysicsMT Earth Science Module was used to couple the three governing equations (Darcy-Brinkman-Navier-Stokes) for fluids. On this basis, numerical simulation on the seepage law along the directions of roadways and boreholes was carried out. The simulation results indicated that when the hole-sealing length was within the width range of fractures in roadways, the negative pressure not only led the gas in surrounding rock masses to flow to the boreholes, but also made the air flow in roadways to permeate into coal walls. As a result, gas and air flows both entered into the boreholes through the loosening zone containing fractures, resulting in seepage of air in roadway to the boreholes. The seepage velocity along the roadway direction under condition with a hole-sealing length of 12 m was obviously slower than that when the hole-sealing length was 8 m. While, the method by simply increasing the length of the hole-sealing section for boreholes failed to effectively stop the air flow in roadways from permeating into the coal wall and then entering the boreholes. Moreover, the increase in the hole-sealing length brought about much more difficulties to the hole-sealing construction. So, the method is not operable in practical condition of the coal mine. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the traditional hole-sealing technology based on foamed macromolecular materials which are mainly made of polyurethane (PU) and use the fluid wall-type hole-sealing technology based on solid-liquid coupling. Then, the effects of gas extraction before and after using

  11. Numerical simulation on reasonable hole-sealing depth of boreholes for gas extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available To overcome the low efficiency of extracting gas in coal reservoirs with a low gas permeability, some boreholes were drilled for gas extraction in No. 2 coal reservoir of Wangjialing Coalmine in Shanxi Province, China and reasonably sealed. Aiming at shortfalls such as rapid attenuation of volume for extracted gas as well as low gas permeability when using boreholes in the No. 2 coal reservoir, the traditional COMSOL MultiphysicsMT Earth Science Module was used to couple the three governing equations (Darcy-Brinkman–Navier-Stokes for fluids. On this basis, numerical simulation on the seepage law along the directions of roadways and boreholes was carried out. The simulation results indicated that when the hole-sealing length was within the width range of fractures in roadways, the negative pressure not only led the gas in surrounding rock masses to flow to the boreholes, but also made the air flow in roadways to permeate into coal walls. As a result, gas and air flows both entered into the boreholes through the loosening zone containing fractures, resulting in seepage of air in roadway to the boreholes. The seepage velocity along the roadway direction under condition with a hole-sealing length of 12 m was obviously slower than that when the hole-sealing length was 8 m. While, the method by simply increasing the length of the hole-sealing section for boreholes failed to effectively stop the air flow in roadways from permeating into the coal wall and then entering the boreholes. Moreover, the increase in the hole-sealing length brought about much more difficulties to the hole-sealing construction. So, the method is not operable in practical condition of the coal mine. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the traditional hole-sealing technology based on foamed macromolecular materials which are mainly made of polyurethane (PU and use the fluid wall-type hole-sealing technology based on solid-liquid coupling. Then, the effects of gas extraction

  12. Experimental study on a magnetofluid sealing liquid for propeller shaft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chang-Fa; Sun, Rong-Hua; Zheng, Jin-Xing

    2003-06-01

    The selecting and preparing method of the basic material of magnetic fluid was introduced. By using a chemical method, the magnetic micropowder Fe3O4 was successfully yielded, and an oil-base as a working carrier and dispersing agent was determined. The preparation process of the magnetic fluid and prescription of the oil-base magnetic fluid were discussed. The simulation experimental rig of magnetic fluid sealing for propeller shaft was designed. The sealing ability experiment was conducted and results were analyzed. The pressure of sealing is up to 2 MPa.

  13. Sealing of rock fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Erlstroem, M.; Boergesson, L.

    1985-12-01

    The major water-bearing fractures in granite usually from fairly regular sets but the extension and degree of connectivity is varying. This means that only a few fractures that are interconnected with the deposition holes and larger water-bearing structures in a HLW repository are expected and if they can be identified and cut off through sealing it would be possible to improve the isolation of waste packages very effectively. Nature's own fracture sealing mechanisms may be simulated and a survey of the involved processes actually suggests a number of possible filling methods and substances. Most of them require high temperature and pressure and correspondingly sophisticated techniques, but some are of potential interest for immediate application with rather moderate effort. Such a technique is to fill the fractures with clayey substances which stay flexible and low-permeable provided that they remain physically and chemically intact. It is demonstrated in the report that effective grouting requires a very low viscosity and shear strength of the substance and this can be achieved by mechanical agitation as demonstrated in this report. Thus, by superimposing static pressure and shear waves induced by percussion hammering at a suitable frequency, clays and fine-grained silts as well as cement can be driven into fractures with an average aperture as small as 0.1 mm. Experiments were made in the laboratory using concrete and steel plates, and a field pilot test was also conducted under realistic conditions on site in Stripa. They all demonstrated the practicality of the 'dynamic injection technique' and that the fluid condition of the grouts yielded complete filling of the injected space to a considerable distance from the injection point. The field test indicated a good sealing ability as well as a surprisingly high resistance to erosion and piping. (author)

  14. Development of Fluid and I and C Systems Design Technology for LMR - Development of mechanical structure design technology for LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Han; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Hueong Yeon and others

    2005-03-01

    The key research items during the fiscal years of Phase 3 of the mechanical design technology development for liquid metal reactor are described. The objective of this project is to develop the design technology for the mechanical system of 600MWe, pool type liquid metal reactor with sodium coolant, and the structural integrity evaluation technology for mechanical system of the reactor system, structures and equipments. In the design technology development for mechanical structures, the reactor internal structures, reactor head and piping system, reactor containment structures have been studied, and new structural concepts compatible with the new reactor have been proposed. The thermal protection devices of reactor vessel and the refueling system have been conceptually established and the feasibility study for 3-D seismic isolation of reactor building was performed. The structural damage detection technology for reactor internal structures has been studied and its application has been confirmed. In the structural integrity evaluation technology development, the sensitivities of material constants for inelastic analysis codes have been studied and the applicabilities of the developed codes are enhanced. The high temperature creep-fatigue structural behavior test has been conducted so that high temperature structural damage test and evaluation technology were ensured at first in domestic. The high temperature seismic buckling analysis method to evaluate the buckling of thin reactor shell structure under the transient thermal load was established. In addition, the core seismic response analysis code reflected the fluid effect of core was developed and its accuracy was confirmed with a scale-down model test

  15. Production of sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandi, L.N.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotope production has been an ongoing activity in India since the sixties. Radioisotopes find wide-ranging applications in various fields, including industry, research, agriculture and medicine. Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, an industrial unit of Department of Atomic Energy is involved in fabrication and supply of wide variety of sealed sources. The main radioisotopes fabricated and supplied by BRIT are Cobalt-60, Iridium-192. These isotopes are employed in industrial and laboratory irradiators, teletherapy machines, radiography exposure devices, nucleonic gauges. The source fabrication facilities of BRIT are located at Rajasthan Atomic Power Project Cobalt-60 Facility (RAPPCOF), Kota, Radiological Laboratories Group (RLG) and High Intensity Radiation Utilization Project (HIRUP) at Trombay

  16. A hybrid floating brush seal (HFBS) for improved sealing and wear performance in turbomachinery applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott Byran

    A conceptually new type of seal has been developed for gas turbine applications which dramatically reduces wear and leakage associated with current labyrinth and brush seal technologies. The Hybrid Floating Brush Seal (HFBS) combines brush seal and film riding face seal technologies to create a hybrid seal that allows both axial and radial excursions of the sealed shaft, while simultaneously eliminating interface surface speeds (friction and heat) between the rotor and the brush material that characterize standard brush seal technology. A simple test rig was designed to evaluate feasibility of the HFBS under relatively low pressures and rotational speeds (50psig, 5krpm). A second test stand was created to study the effects of centrifugal force on bristle deflection. A third test facility was constructed for prototype development and extensive room temperature testing at moderate pressures and fairly high rotational speeds (100psig, 40krpm). This test rig also allowed the evaluation of the HFBS during axial movement of a rotating shaft. An analytical model to predict the effects of centrifugal force on the bristles of a rotating brush seal was developed. Room temperature analysis of the HFBS proved successful for relatively high operating rotational velocities at moderate pressures with very acceptable leakage rates for gas turbine engines. Brush seals were able to track rotor speeds up to 24krpm while maintaining sealing integrity. The HFBS's ability to function under axial shaft displacement and synchronous dynamic radial loading was also proven successful. Hydrodynamic performance of the face seal was proven to provide adequate stiffness and load carrying capacity to keep the brush seal from contacting the face seal at pressure drops across the brush of up to 100psi. Leakage performance over standard brush seal and labyrinth technology was quite dramatic. The HFBS showed its sealing advantage using much higher radial interference between the rotor and the bristle

  17. Rotary plug seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Koji; Abiko, Yoshihiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable fuel exchange even upon failure of regular seals and also to enable safety seal exchange by the detection of the reduction in the contact pressure of a rotary plug seal. Constitution: If one of a pair of regular tube seals for the rotary plug is failed during ordinary operation of a FBR type reactor, the reduction in the contact pressure of the seal to the plug gibbousness is detected by a pressure gauge and a solenoid valve is thereby closed. Thus, a back-up-tube seal provided above or below the tube seal is press-contacted by way of argon gas to the gibbousness to enter into operation state and lubricants are supplied from an oil tank. In such a structure, the back-up-tube seal is operated before the failure of the tube seal to enable to continue the fuel exchange work, as well as safety exchange for the tube seal. (Moriyama, K.)

  18. Mechanical seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    2001-01-01

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  19. Mechanical Seal Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotlyar, Oleg M.

    1999-06-18

    An improved mechanical seal assembly is provided for sealing rotating shafts with respect to their shaft housings, wherein the rotating shafts are subject to substantial axial vibrations. The mechanical seal assembly generally includes a rotating sealing ring fixed to the shaft, a non-rotating sealing ring adjacent to and in close contact with the rotating sealing ring for forming an annular seal about the shaft, and a mechanical diode element that applies a biasing force to the non-rotating sealing ring by means of hemispherical joint. The alignment of the mechanical diode with respect to the sealing rings is maintained by a series of linear bearings positioned axially along a desired length of the mechanical diode. Alternative embodiments include mechanical or hydraulic amplification components for amplifying axial displacement of the non-rotating sealing ring and transferring it to the mechanical diode.

  20. Shaft seal assembly for high speed and high pressure applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadt, W. F.; Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A seal assembly is provided for reducing the escape of fluids from between a housing and a shaft rotably mounted in the housing. The seal assembly comprises a pair of seal rings resiliently connected to each other and disposed in side-by-side relationship. In each seal ring, both the internal bore surface and the radial face which faces away from the other seal ring are provided with a plurality of equi-spaced recesses. The seal faces referred to are located adjacent a seating surface of the housing. Under normal operating conditions, the seal assembly is stationary with respect to the housing, and the recesses generate life, keep the assembly spaced from the rotating shaft and allow slip therebetween. The seal assembly can seize on the shaft, and slip will then occur between the radial faces and the housing.

  1. Mechanical seal program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, G.B.

    1983-01-01

    The experimental plans and timing for completion of the mechanical seal program for both the slurry and transfer pumps are given. The slurry pump seal program will be completed by April 1984 with turnover of two seals in pumps to SRP Tank 15H. Transfer pump seal design will be released for plant use by May 1984. Also included are various other pump and seal related tests

  2. High pressure mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Henry W. (Inventor); Anderson, Raymond H. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A relatively impervious mechanical seal is formed between the outer surface of a tube and the inside surface of a mechanical fitting of a high pressure fluid or hydraulic system by applying a very thin soft metal layer onto the outer surface of the hard metal tube and/or inner surface of the hard metal fitting. The thickness of such thin metal layer is independent of the size of the tube and/or fittings. Many metals and alloys of those metals exhibit the requisite softness, including silver, gold, tin, platinum, indium, rhodium and cadmium. Suitably, the coating is about 0.0025 millimeters (0.10 mils) in thickness. After compression, the tube and fitting combination exhibits very low leak rates on the order or 10.sup.-8 cubic centimeters per second or less as measured using the Helium leak test.

  3. Petrophysical Characterization of Arroyal Antiform Geological Formations (Aguilar de Campoo, Palencia) as a Storage and Seal Rocks in the Technology Development Plant for Geological CO2 Storage (Hontomin, Burgos)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, R.; Barrios, I.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Pelayo, M.; Saldana, R.

    2011-01-01

    The geological storage program of Energy City Foundation is focusing its research effort in the Technological Development and Research Plant in Hontomin (Burgos) start off. The present report shows the petrophysical characterization of of the Arroyal antiform geological formations since they are representatives, surface like, of the storage and seal formations that will be found in the CO 2 injection plant in Hontomin. In this petrophysics characterization has taken place the study of matrix porosity, specific surface and density of the storage and seal formations. Mercury intrusion porosimetry, N 2 adsorption and He pycnometry techniques have been used for the characterization. Furthermore, it has carried out a mineralogical analysis of the seal materials by RX diffraction. (Author) 26 refs.

  4. Transient thermal-mechanical coupling behavior analysis of mechanical seals during start-up operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B. C.; Meng, X. K.; Shen, M. X.; Peng, X. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transient thermal-mechanical coupling model for a contacting mechanical seal during start-up has been developed. It takes into consideration the coupling relationship among thermal-mechanical deformation, film thickness, temperature and heat generation. The finite element method and multi-iteration technology are applied to solve the temperature distribution and thermal-mechanical deformation as well as their evolution behavior. Results show that the seal gap transforms from negative coning to positive coning and the contact area of the mechanical seal gradually decreases during start-up. The location of the maximum temperature and maximum contact pressure move from the outer diameter to inside diameter. The heat generation and the friction torque increase sharply at first and then decrease. Meanwhile, the contact force decreases and the fluid film force and leakage rate increase.

  5. Inboard seal mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A regenerator assembly for a gas turbine engine has a hot side seal assembly formed in part by a cast metal engine block having a seal recess formed therein that is configured to supportingly receive ceramic support blocks including an inboard face thereon having a regenerator seal face bonded thereto. A pressurized leaf seal is interposed between the ceramic support block and the cast metal engine block to bias the seal wear face into sealing engagement with a hot side surface of a rotary regenerator matrix.

  6. Radioactive material package seal tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 x 10 -7 std cm 3 /s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  7. Development of Fluid and I and C System Design Technology for LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. O.; Sim, Y. S.; Choi, S. K.

    2007-06-01

    The basic concept of fluid and I and C systems of KALIMER-600 was developed and the computer codes required to materialize system concept were also implemented through the R and D program. Based on the analysis results of the design characteristics for the similar reactor types developed in the foreign countries, the system design technologies with adoption of the innovative ideas were developed. With the development, expansion and reinforcement of the methodologies required according to the progress of development and design of the system and the experimental verification of the developed computer code, the excellent and innovative outcomes were produced

  8. Performance Characteristics and Temperature Compensation Method of Fluid Property Sensor Based on Tuning-Fork Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluid property sensor (FPS based on tuning-fork technology is applied to the measurement of the contaminant level of lubricant oil. The measuring principle of FPS sensor is derived and proved together with its resolution. The performance characteristics of the FPS sensor, such as sensitivity coefficient, resolution, and quality factor, are analyzed. A temperature compensation method is proposed to eliminate the temperature-dependence of the measuring parameters, and its validity is investigated by numerical simulation of sensitivity, oscillating frequency, and dielectric constant. The values of purification efficiency obtained using microwave and without microwave are compared experimentally.

  9. Development of Fluid and I and C Systems Design Technology for LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong O; Sim, Y. S.; Choi, S. K.; Kim, E. K.; Wi, M. H.; Eho, J. H.; Hur, S.; Seong, S. H.; Kim, S. Y.; Jeon, W. D.

    2005-03-01

    The basic concept of fluid and I and C system of KALIMER-600 was developed and the computer codes required to materialize system concept were also implemented through the R and D program. Based on the analysis results of the design characteristics for the similar reactor types developed in a foreign country, the system design technologies with adoption of the innovative ideas were developed. With the development, expansion and reinforcement of the methodologies required according to the progress of development and design of the system and the experimental verification of the developed computer code, the excellent and innovative outcomes were produced

  10. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  11. Fog seal guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-10-01

    Fog seals are a method of adding asphalt to an existing pavement surface to improve sealing or waterproofing, prevent further stone loss by holding aggregate in place, or simply improve the surface appearance. However, inappropriate use can result in...

  12. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for rotary seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2015-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  13. Development of fluid I and C systems design technology for LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, S. O.; Kim, Y. S.

    2002-04-01

    LMR can make the utilization of the uranium resources much more efficiently and reduce the storage load of high level nuclear waste but the technology for designing the systems of LMR was not secured domestically. Based on this technical requirement, research was made for the LMR system technology and a conceptual design for the fluid and IC systems for the LMR was developed and established. Also required computer code systems for the analysis and design of the systems were developed. Design requirements for each system were revised, analysis was made for various system design features, performance, sodium-water reaction, and operation stability. The developed codes were verified against experimental data produced locally and acquired through international cooperation

  14. Circumferential shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A circumferential shaft seal comprising two sealing rings held to a rotating shaft by means of a surrounding elastomeric band is disclosed. The rings are segmented and are of a rigid sealing material such as carbon or a polyimide and graphite fiber composite.

  15. Seals in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasseur, Sophie Marie Jacqueline Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The harbour seal Phoca vitulina and the grey seal Halichoerus grypus have been inhabitants of the Wadden Sea since millennia. Prehistoric findings indicate the presence of both species around 5000 BC. This changed dramatically in the mid Middle-Ages as around 1500 AC, the grey seal disappeared from

  16. Organochlorine pesticides in follicular fluid of women undergoing assisted reproductive technologies from central China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Yindi; Huang, Bo; Li, Qing X.; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Female infertility rates have increased by approximately 4% since the 1980s. There is evidence of adverse effects on female fertility in relation to exposure of chemical pollution in recent years. Follicular fluid samples were collected from 127 woman patients (aged 20–35) who underwent assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and had no records indicating occupational exposure to OCPs. Seventeen OCPs were analyzed in this study. The results showed that methoxychlor was dominant, accounted for 13.4% of total OCPs with a mean concentration of 167.9 ± 33.9 ng/g lipid weight (lw), followed by heptachlor-epoxide, hexachlorocyclohexanes, endrin and DDT. The concentrations of OCPs in the follicular fluid samples in the present study were moderate in comparison with those reported from developed or industrialized countries. All these pollutants can accumulate in different tissues of human body through diet, drinking water and respiration. No correlation between patient age and OCP concentrations was observed in this study. - Highlights: • 17 OCPs in follicular fluid samples from 127 woman patients were analyzed. • Methoxychlor was the most dominant, constituting 13.4% of total OCPs with a mean concentration of 168 ng/g lw. • The concentrations of DDT and HCHs were lower than those in human breast milk from Russia and Iran and blood from India. • DDTs and HCHs in the samples would be mainly from historical usage. • The correlation between patient ages and concentrations of OCPs was weak. - OCPs at median concentrations of 460.0–2927.2 ng/g lipid weight in follicular fluids of central China have physiological effects.

  17. Electronic self-monitoring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Electronic Self-Monitoring Seal is a new type of security seal which allows continuous verification of the seal's identity and status. The identity information is a function of the individual seal, time, and seal integrity. A description of this seal and its characteristics are presented. Also described are the use cycle for the seal and the support equipment for programming and verifying the seal

  18. Numerical Investigation of the Effect of Radial Lip Seal Geometry on Sealing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tok, G.; Parlar, Z.; Temiz, V.

    2018-01-01

    Sealing elements are often needed in industry and especially in machine design. With the change and development of machine technology from day to day, sealing elements show continuous development and change in parallel with these developments. Many factors influence the performance of the sealing elements such as shaft surface roughness, radial force, lip geometry etc. In addition, the radial lip seals must have a certain pre-load and interference in order to provide a good sealing. This also affects the friction torque. Researchers are developing new seal designs to reduce friction losses in mechanical systems. In the presented study, the effect of the lip seal geometry on sealing performance will be examined numerically. The numerical model created for this purpose will be verified with experimental data firstly. In the numerical model, shaft and seal will be modeled as hyper-elastic in 2D and 3D. NBR (Nitrile Butadiene Rubber) as seal material will be analyzed for the rotating shaft state at constant speed by applying a uniform radial force.

  19. Cryogenic Fluid Storage Technology Development: Recent and Planned Efforts at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2009-01-01

    Recent technology development work conducted at NASA in the area of Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) storage is highlighted, including summary results, key impacts, and ongoing efforts. Thermodynamic vent system (TVS) ground test results are shown for hydrogen, methane, and oxygen. Joule-Thomson (J-T) device tests related to clogging in hydrogen are summarized, along with the absence of clogging in oxygen and methane tests. Confirmation of analytical relations and bonding techniques for broad area cooling (BAC) concepts based on tube-to-tank tests are presented. Results of two-phase lumped-parameter computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models are highlighted, including validation of the model with hydrogen self pressurization test data. These models were used to simulate Altair representative methane and oxygen tanks subjected to 210 days of lunar surface storage. Engineering analysis tools being developed to support system level trades and vehicle propulsion system designs are also cited. Finally, prioritized technology development risks identified for Constellation cryogenic propulsion systems are presented, and future efforts to address those risks are discussed.

  20. Thermoconvective flow velocity in a high-speed magnetofluid seal after it has stopped

    OpenAIRE

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2012-01-01

    Convective flow is investigated in the high-speed (linear velocity of the shaft seal is more than 1 m/s) magnetofluid shaft seal after it has been stopped. Magnetic fluid is preliminarily heated due to viscous friction in the moving seal. After the shaft has been stopped, nonuniform heated fluid remains under the action of a high-gradient magnetic field. Numerical analysis has revealed that in this situation, intense thermomagnetic convection is initiated. The velocity of magnetic fluid depen...

  1. Processing of novel bioactive polymeric matrixes for tissue engineering using supercritical fluid technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, Ana Rita C., E-mail: aduarte@dep.uminho.pt [3B' s Research Group, Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4806-909 Taipas, Guimaraes (Portugal); IBB, Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, PT Government Associated Laboratory, Guimaraes (Portugal); Caridade, Sofia G.; Mano, Joao F.; Reis, Rui L. [3B' s Research Group, Biomaterials, Biodegradables and Biomimetics, University of Minho, Headquarters of the European Institute of Excellence on Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, AvePark, 4806-909 Taipas, Guimaraes (Portugal); IBB, Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, PT Government Associated Laboratory, Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2009-08-31

    The aim of this study was to develop a new process for the production of bioactive 3D scaffolds using a clean and environmentally friendly technology. The possibility of preparing composite scaffolds of Bioglass and a polymeric blend of starch and poly(L-lactic acid) (SPLA50) was evaluated. Supercritical phase-inversion technique was used to prepare inorganic particles loaded starch-based porous composite matrixes in a one-step process for bone tissue engineering purposes. Due to their osteoconductive properties some glasses and ceramics are interesting materials to be used for bone tissue engineering purposes; however their poor mechanical properties create the need of a polymeric support where the inorganic fraction can be dispersed. Samples impregnated with different concentrations of Bioglass (10 and 15% wt/wt polymer) were prepared at 200 bar and 55 deg. C. The presence of Bioglass did not affect the porosity or interconnectivity of the polymeric matrixes. Dynamic mechanical analysis has proven that the modulus of the SPLA50 scaffolds increases when glass particles are impregnated within the matrix. In vitro bioactivity studies were carried out using simulated body fluid and the results show that a calcium-phosphate layer started to be formed after only 1 day of immersion. Chemical analysis of the apatite layer formed on the surface of the scaffold was performed by different techniques, namely EDS and FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The ion concentration in the simulated body fluid was also carried out by ICP analysis. Results suggest that a bone-like apatite layer was formed. This study reports the feasibility of using supercritical fluid technology to process, in one step, a porous matrix loaded with a bioactive material for tissue engineering purposes.

  2. Epoxy resins used to seal brachytherapy seed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Natalia Carolina Camargos; Ferraz, Wilmar Barbosa; Reis, Sergio Carneiro dos; Santos, Ana Maria Matildes dos

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer treatment with brachytherapy is recommended for patients with cancer at an early stage. In this treatment, small radioactive seeds are implanted directly in the prostate gland. These seeds are composed at least of one radionuclide carrier and an X-ray marker enclosed within a metallic tube usually sealed by laser process. This process is expensive and, furthermore, it can provoke a partial volatilization of the radionuclide and change the isotropy in dose distribution around the seed. In this paper, we present a new sealing process using epoxy resin. Three kinds of resins were utilized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X ray (EDS) and by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) and in sodium iodine solution (NaI). The sealing process showed excellent potential to replace the sealing laser usually employed. (author)

  3. VAK III. Seals and sealing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Agraives, B.C.; Dal Cero, G.; Debeir, R.; Mascetti, E.; Toornvliet, J.; Volcan, A.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the VAK III seals and sealing system, which have been used over a period of two years at the Kahl nuclear facility (Federal Republic of Germany), where field tests and feasibility studies were conducted in order to offer a possible solution for the sealing of LWR fuel assemblies. It has been prepared with the aim of an assessment study to be done at the IAEA. It gives all characteristics and technical descriptions for: the sealing principle, the seal construction, the operating tools, the data processing, the drawings, the publications related to that seal. The main points of progress are: the Strong Random Internal Defects (STRID) incorporated in the seals, allowing the obtention of a good signature stability; the Integrity Check on the Seal Status (broken or not) obtained through a decisive mechanical improvement: the Double Breakage Integrity Check (DOBRIC) and with a better ultrasonic evidence of that status; the provision of new function tools, allowing the performance of Identity Measurements in dry conditions (which means also at the manufacturer plant) or in deeper water (wet storage); the study and development of a new JRC VAK 45 Compact Instrument Box, in which all the measuring functions can be grouped and incorporating an autonomous Minicomputer offering to the Inspection the possibility of performing, on the spot, Correlation and Decision processes. The general benefit of such a feasibility study should be to convince the potential users that such a Safeguards Sealing System can be studied for slightly - or largely - different other applications, provided that the Basic and Operating Functions required to the system be clearly defined, possibly after a common agreement would be stated

  4. Reinforced seal component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeanson, G.M.; Odent, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention concerns a seal component of the kind comprising a soft sheath and a flexible reinforcement housed throughout the entire length of the sheath. The invention enables O ring seals to be made capable of providing a radial seal, that is to say between two sides or flat collars of two cylindrical mechanical parts, or an axial seal, that is to say between two co-axial axisymmetrical areas. The seal so ensured is relative, but it remains adequately sufficient for many uses, for instance, to ensure the separation of two successive fixed blading compartments of axial compressors used in gas diffusion isotope concentration facilities [fr

  5. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites

  6. Bentonite as a waste isolation pilot plant shaft sealing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daemen, J.; Ran, Chongwei [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Current designs of the shaft sealing system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) propose using bentonite as a primary sealing component. The shaft sealing designs anticipate that compacted bentonite sealing components can perform through the 10,000-year regulatory period and beyond. To evaluate the acceptability of bentonite as a sealing material for the WIPP, this report identifies references that deal with the properties and characteristics of bentonite that may affect its behavior in the WIPP environment. This report reviews published studies that discuss using bentonite as sealing material for nuclear waste disposal, environmental restoration, toxic and chemical waste disposal, landfill liners, and applications in the petroleum industry. This report identifies the physical and chemical properties, stability and seal construction technologies of bentonite seals in shafts, especially in a saline brine environment. This report focuses on permeability, swelling pressure, strength, stiffness, longevity, and densification properties of bentonites.

  7. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autrusson, B.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate). The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database. To perform this development, IPSN relies on industrial partners: SAPHYMO for the general architecture of the seal and the electronics, THALES for the authentication of data and the security of transmission. The main features of the IRES seal are the following: Interrogation by different inspectorate, allowing independent conclusions; Recording of events, including tampering, in a non-volatile memory; Authentication of data and enhanced security of the communication between the seal and the seal reader; Remote interrogation by an inspector or/and automatic for unattended systems or remote monitoring; Reusable after erasing the seal memory and replacement of the batteries

  8. Severe service sealing solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalfe, R.; Wensel, R.

    1994-09-01

    Successful sealing usually requires much more than initial leak-tightness. Friction and wear must also be acceptable, requiring a good understanding of tribology at the sealing interface. This paper describes various sealing solutions for severe service conditions. The CAN2A and CAN8 rotary face seals use tungsten carbide against carbon-graphite to achieve low leakage and long lifetime in nuclear main coolant pumps. The smaller CAN6 seal successfully uses tungsten carbide against silicon carbide in reactor water cleanup pump service. Where friction in CANDU fuelling machine rams must be essentially zero, a hydrostatic seal using two silicon carbide faces is the solution. In the NRU reactor moderator pumps, where pressure is much lower, eccentric seals that prevent boiling at the seal faces are giving excellent service. All these rotary face seals rely on supplementary elastomer seals between their parts. An integrated engineering approach to high performance sealing with O-rings is described. This is epitomized in critical Space Shuttle applications, but is increasingly being applied in CANDU plants. It includes gland design, selection and qualification of material, quality assurance, detection of defects and the effects of lubrication, surface finish, squeeze, stretch and volume constraints. In conclusion, for the severe service applications described, customized solutions have more than paid for themselves by higher reliability, lower maintenance requirements and reduced outage time. (author)

  9. The IRES electronic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourlez, P.; Funk, P.; Brochard, D.; Moreau, J.F.; Martin, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of the French Support Program for the IAEA Safeguards, the 'Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire' (IPSN), developed an electronic seal called Integrated and Reusable Electronic Seal (IRES) that enables independent verification by different inspectorates (IAEA, Euratom, and National Inspectorate) Furthermore, a bilateral co-ordination between Euratom and French domestic safeguards takes place in some French facilities regarding a common approach concerning the seals especially in case of crisis situation. The seal can be remotely interrogated by radio frequency and integrated to other Containment/surveillance systems by serial line RS 485. Data are authenticated and the IRESMAG software manages in the seal reader all functionalities of the seal and records inspection data compatible with the IAEA's Seal Database

  10. High pressure shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinson, A.R.; Rogers, V.D.

    1980-01-01

    In relation to reactor primary coolant pumps, mechanical seal assembly for a pump shaft is disclosed which features a rotating seal ring mounting system which utilizes a rigid support ring loaded through narrow annular projections in combination with centering non-sealing O-rings which effectively isolate the rotating seal ring from temperature and pressure transients while securely positioning the ring to adjacent parts. A stationary seal ring mounting configuration allows the stationary seal ring freedom of motion to follow shaft axial movement up to 3/4 of an inch and shaft tilt about the pump axis without any change in the hydraulic or pressure loading on the stationary seal ring or its carrier. (author)

  11. Flexible ring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbes, Claude; Gournier, Andre; Rouaud, Christian; Villepoix, Raymond de.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a flexible metal ring seal, able to ensure a perfect seal between two bearings due to the crushing and elastic deformation properties akin to similar properties in elastomers. Various designs of seal of this kind are already known, particularly a seal made of a core formed by a helical wire spring with close-wound turns and with high axial compression ratio, closed on itself and having the shape of an annulus. This wire ring is surrounded by at least one envelope having at rest the shape of a toroidal surface of which the generating circle does not close on itself. In a particular design mode, the seal in question can include, around the internal spring, two envelopes of which one in contact with the spring is composed of a low ductility elastic metal, such as mild steel or stainless steel and the other is, on the contrary, made of a malleable metal, such as copper or nickel. The first envelope evenly distributes the partial crushing of the spring, when the seal is tightened, on the second envelope which closely fits the two surfaces between which the seal operates. The stress-crushing curve characteristic of the seal comprises two separate parts, the first with a relatively sharp slope corresponds to the start of the seal compression phase, enabling at least some of these curves to reach the requisite seal threshold very quickly, then, beyond this, a second part, practically flat, where the stress is appreciably constant for a wide operating bracket [fr

  12. Bones and oil reservoirs : bioengineers use oilpatch technology to study fluid flow in bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsters, S.

    2003-06-01

    The fact that porosity and the presence of channels are qualities that are common to oil reservoirs and bones, led to the use of reservoir modelling technology in investigating bone disorders and to the discovery of dramatic changes in the structure and blood supply of osteoarthritic bones that lie under degenerating cartilage. CMG (Computer Modelling Group) Ltd., developers of reservoir simulation software claim that their software packages can help with the modelling of cellular responses to strains and deformations that occur as fluid flows through bone after a traumatic event such as a tear in the anterior cruciate ligament, a common sports-related injury. Researchers at the University of Calgary expect that by looking at the changes in blood and fluid flow within the bone, they can attain a better understanding of the chain of events that leads to osteoarthritis. Better understanding of the progression of the disease could eventually lead to more precise administration of drugs to deal with osteoarthritic pain, and even to the prevention of painful arthritic joints.

  13. Compliant Glass Seals for SOFC Stacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Yeong -Shyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Jung-Pyung [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Wei [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stephens, Elizabeth V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Koeppel, Brian J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lara-Curzio, Edgar [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-04-30

    This report summarizes results from experimental and modeling studies performed by participants in the Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program, which indicate that compliant glass-based seals offer a number of potential advantages over conventional seals based on de-vitrifying glasses, including reduced stresses during stack operation and thermal cycling, and the ability to heal micro-damage induced during thermal cycling. The properties and composition of glasses developed and/or investigated in these studies are reported, along with results from long-term (up to 5,800h) evaluations of seals based on a compliant glass containing ceramic particles or ceramic fibers.

  14. A warning system based on the RFID technology for running-out of injection fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Fang; Lin, Jen-Hung

    2011-01-01

    For providing an automatic warning system of running-out of injection fluid, RFID technology is applied in this work to propose an infrastructure with low cost to help nurses and patient's company. Specially, a RFID tag is designed and attached on a bag of intravenous drip to demonstrate the benefits in the present system. The main idea of this system is that, tag is disabled when the bag is not empty because of the EM loading due to the liquid contained. The bag can be any kind in the current market and be without any electronic attachment or modification. LAN (Local Area Network) is also applied as a part of this infrastructure for data transmission.

  15. 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop, Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Editor); Hendricks, Robert C. (Editor)

    2006-01-01

    The 2005 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA s new Exploration Initiative program aimed at exploring the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of the NASA-sponsored Propulsion 21 Project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA s turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts including tip clearance control, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Several organizations presented development efforts aimed at developing faster clearance control systems and associated technology to meet future engine needs. The workshop also covered several programs NASA is funding to develop technologies for the Exploration Initiative and advanced reusable space vehicle technologies. NASA plans on developing an advanced docking and berthing system that would permit any vehicle to dock to any on-orbit station or vehicle. Seal technical challenges (including space environments, temperature variation, and seal-on-seal operation) as well as plans to develop the necessary "androgynous" seal technologies were reviewed. Researchers also reviewed tests completed for the shuttle main landing gear door seals.

  16. Long-term brine migration through an engineered shaft seal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryar, D.G.; Beach, J.A.; Kelley, V.A.; Knowles, M.K.

    1997-01-01

    The shaft seal system for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) must provide a barrier to the migration of fluids within the shafts to prevent the release of contaminants to the accessible environment. To investigate the performance of the shaft seal system, a set of fluid flow performance models was developed based upon the physical characteristics of the WIPP shaft seal system and the surrounding geologic media. This paper describes the results of a numerical model used to investigate the long-term potential for brine migration through the shaft seal system. Modeling results demonstrate that the WIPP shaft seal system will effectively limit brine migration within the repository shafts

  17. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  18. Seal containment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugler, R.W.; Gerkey, K.S.; Kasner, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    An automated system for transporting nuclear fuel elements between fuel element assembly stations without contaminating the area outside the sealed assembly stations is described. The system comprises a plurality of assembly stations connected together by an elongated horizontal sealing mechanism and an automatic transport mechanism for transporting a nuclear fuel element in a horizontal attitude between the assembly stations while the open end of the fuel element extends through the sealing mechanism into the assembly station enclosure. The sealing mechanism allows the fuel element to be advanced by the transport mechanism while limiting the escape of radioactive particles from within the assembly station enclosure. 4 claims, 6 figures

  19. HFCVD Diamond-Coated Mechanical Seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Simões

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A mechanical seal promotes the connection between systems or mechanisms, preventing the escape of fluids to the exterior. Nonetheless, due to extreme working conditions, premature failure can occur. Diamond, due to its excellent properties, is heralded as an excellent choice to cover the surface of these devices and extend their lifetime. Therefore, the main objective of this work was to deposit diamond films over mechanical seals and test the coated seals on a water pump, under real working conditions. The coatings were created by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD and two consecutive layers of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond were deposited. One of the main difficulties is the attainment of a good adhesion between the diamond films and the mechanical seal material (WC-Co. Nucleation, deposition conditions, and pre-treatments were studied to enhance the coating. Superficial wear or delamination of the film was investigated using SEM and Raman characterization techniques, in order to draw conclusions about the feasibility of these coatings in the WC-Co mechanical seals with the purpose of increasing their performance and life time. The results obtained gave a good indication about the feasibility of this process and the deposition conditions used, with the mechanical seals showing no wear and no film delamination after a real work environment test.

  20. Apparatus for sealing a rotatable shield plug in a liquid metal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1980-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing a rotatable shield plug in a nuclear reactor having liquid metal coolant is described. The apparatus includes a dip -ring seal adapted to provide a fluid barrier between the liquid metal and the atmosphere and to permit rotation of the shield plug. The apparatus also includes a static seal for the rotatable shield plug located between the dip-ring seal and the liquid metal. The static seal isolates the dip-ring seal from the liquid metal vapor during operation at power and can be disengaged for rotation of the shield plug

  1. Improved cryogenic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.; Tellier, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Seals are designed for use with liquid propellant ball valves at temperatures ranging from -400 F to 130 F and 8,000 psig. Seals are capable of sustaining 90 degree rotation, with substantial amount of lateral and axial play, caused by large pressure loads and differential thermal contraction.

  2. Sealed radioactive sources toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mac Kenzie, C.

    2005-09-01

    The IAEA has developed a Sealed Radioactive Sources Toolkit to provide information to key groups about the safety and security of sealed radioactive sources. The key groups addressed are officials in government agencies, medical users, industrial users and the scrap metal industry. The general public may also benefit from an understanding of the fundamentals of radiation safety

  3. Rotary shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transducer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing

  4. Sealing a conduit end

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentz, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for sealing or blocking conduits, such as the primary nozzles of a nuclear steam generator is described. It includes an annular bracket sealingly attached to the open end of the nozzle, the bracket having a plurality of threaded holes therein. Mounted atop the bracket is a generally circular nozzle dam for covering the opening. Interposed between the nozzle dam and the bracket is an extrusion-resistant seal member having a plurality of apertures therethrough for receiving each bolt. The seal member is configured to resist extrusion by having laminated layers of differing hardnesses, so that the seal member will not laterally extrude away from each bolt in a manner that enlarges the aperture surrounding each bolt as the nozzle dam is bolted to the bracket. (author)

  5. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  6. Tamper-indicating quantum optical seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humble, Travis S [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Confidence in the means for identifying when tampering occurs is critical for containment and surveillance technologies. Fiber-optic seals have proven especially useful for actively surveying large areas or inventories due to the extended transmission range and flexible layout of fiber. However, it is reasonable to suspect that an intruder could tamper with a fiber-optic sensor by accurately replicating the light transmitted through the fiber. In this contribution, we demonstrate a novel approach to using fiber-optic seals for safeguarding large-scale inventories with increased confidence in the state of the seal. Our approach is based on the use of quantum mechanical phenomena to offer unprecedented surety in the authentication of the seal state. In particular, we show how quantum entangled photons can be used to monitor the integrity of a fiber-optic cable - the entangled photons serve as active sensing elements whose non-local correlations indicate normal seal operation. Moreover, we prove using the quantum no-cloning theorem that attacks against the quantum seal necessarily disturb its state and that these disturbances are immediately detected. Our quantum approach to seal authentication is based on physical principles alone and does not require the use of secret or proprietary information to ensure proper operation. We demonstrate an implementation of the quantum seal using a pair of entangled photons and we summarize our experimental results including the probability of detecting intrusions and the overall stability of the system design. We conclude by discussing the use of both free-space and fiber-based quantum seals for surveying large areas and inventories.

  7. Brush seal performance measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoy, Serdar; Akşit, Mahmut Faruk; Aksit, Mahmut Faruk; Duran, Ertuğrul Tolga; Duran, Ertugrul Tolga

    2009-01-01

    Brush seals are rapidly replacing conventional labyrinth seals in turbomachinery applications. Upon pressure application, seal stiffness increases drastically due to frictional bristle interlocking. Operating stiffness is critical to determine seal wear life. Typically, seal stiffness is measured by pressing a curved shoe to brush bore. The static-unpressurized measurement is extrapolated to pressurized and high speed operating conditions. This work presents a seal stiffness measurement syste...

  8. Comparison of Heat Transfer Fluid and Direct Steam Generation technologies for Integrated Solar Combined Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Antonio; Montes, María José; Varela, Fernando; Gil, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    At present time and in the medium term, Solar Thermal Power Plants are going to share scenario with conventional energy generation technologies, like fossil and nuclear. In such a context, Integrated Solar Combined Cycles (ISCCs) may be an interesting choice since integrated designs may lead to a very efficient use of the solar and fossil resources. In this work, different ISCC configurations including a solar field based on parabolic trough collectors and working with the so-called Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and Direct Steam Generation (DSG) technologies are compared. For each technology, four layouts have been studied: one in which solar heat is used to evaporate part of the high pressure steam of a bottoming Rankine cycle with two pressure levels, another that incorporates a preheating section to the previous layout, the third one that includes superheating instead of preheating and the last one including both preheating and superheating in addition to the evaporation. The analysis is made with the aim of finding out which of the different layouts reaches the best performance. For that purpose, three types of comparisons have been performed. The first one assesses the benefits of including a solar steam production fixed at 50 MW th . The second one compares the configurations with a standardised solar field size instead of a fixed solar steam production. Finally, the last one consists on an even more homogeneous comparison considering the same steam generator size for all the configurations as well as standardised solar fields. The configurations are studied by mean of exergy analyses. Several figures of merit are used to correctly assess the configurations. Results reveal that the only-evaporative DSG configuration becomes the best choice, since it benefits of both low irreversibility at the heat recovery steam generator and high thermal efficiency in the solar field. Highlights: ► ISCC configurations with DSG and HTF technologies are compared. ► Four

  9. Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J

    2014-04-01

    A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

  10. The cool seal system: a practical solution to the shaft seal problem and heat related complications with implantable rotary blood pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K; Mori, T; Tomioka, J; Litwak, P; Antaki, J F; Tagusari, O; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P; Kormos, R L

    1997-01-01

    A critical issue facing the development of an implantable, rotary blood pump is the maintenance of an effective seal at the rotating shaft. Mechanical seals are the most versatile type of seal in wide industrial applications. However, in a rotary blood pump, typical seal life is much shorter than required for chronic support. Seal failure is related to adhesion and aggregation of heat denatured blood proteins that diffuse into the lubricating film between seal faces. Among the blood proteins, fibrinogen plays an important role due to its strong propensity for adhesion and low transition temperature (approximately 50 degrees C). Once exposed to temperature exceeding 50 degrees C, fibrinogen molecules fuse together by multi-attachment between heat denatured D-domains. This quasi-polymerized fibrin increases the frictional heat, which proliferates the process into seal failure. If the temperature of the seal faces is maintained well below 50 degrees C, a mechanical seal would not fail in blood. Based on this "Cool-Seal" concept, we developed a miniature mechanical seal made of highly thermally conductive material (SiC), combined with a recirculating purge system. A large supply of purge fluid is recirculated behind the seal face to augment convective heat transfer to maintain the seal temperature below 40 degrees C. It also cools all heat generating pump parts (motor coil, bearing, seal). The purge consumption has been optimized to virtually nil (seal system has now been incorporated into our intraventricular axial flow blood pump (IVAP) and newly designed centrifugal pump. Ongoing in vivo evaluation of these systems has demonstrated good seal integrity for more than 160 days. The Cool-Seal system can be applied to any type of rotary blood pump (axial, diagonal, centrifugal, etc.) and offers a practical solution to the shaft seal problem and heat related complications, which currently limit the use of implantable rotary blood pumps.

  11. Upstream pumping of radial lip seals by tangentially deforming, rough seal surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bavel, van P.G.M.; Ruijl, T.A.M.; Leeuwen, van H.J.; Muijderman, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper aims at a theoretical explanation of the following two experimental observations of radial lip seals: fluid film formation and upstream pumping action. The origins of these observations are still poorly understood. A hydrodynamic analysis is presented for the fully flooded contact zone of

  12. Assessment of fluid distribution and flow properties in two phase fluid flow using X-ray CT technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lanlan; Wu, Bohao; Li, Xingbo; Wang, Sijia; Wang, Dayong; Zhou, Xinhuan; Zhang, Yi

    2018-04-01

    To study on microscale distribution of CO2 and brine during two-phase flow is crucial for understanding the trapping mechanisms of CO2 storage. In this study, CO2-brine flow experiments in porous media were conducted using X-ray computed tomography. The porous media were packed with glass beads. The pore structure (porosity/tortuosity) and flow properties at different flow rates and flow fractions were investigated. The results showed that porosity of the packed beads differed at different position as a result of heterogeneity. The CO2 saturation is higher at low injection flow rates and high CO2 fractions. CO2 distribution at the pore scale was also visualized. ∅ Porosity of porous media CT brine_ sat grey value of sample saturated with brine CT dry grey value of sample saturated with air CT brine grey value of pure brine CT air grey value of pure air CT flow grey values of sample with two fluids occupying the pore space {CT}_{CO_2_ sat} grey value of sample saturated with CO2 {f}_{CO_2}({S}_{CO_2}) CO2 fraction {q}_{CO_2} the volume flow rate for CO2 q brine the volume flow rate for brine L Thickness of the porous media, mm L e a bundle of capillaries of equal length, mm τ Tortuosity, calculated from L e / L.

  13. Releasable, high-pressure seal and method of forming same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holman, R.R.; Turkail, D.N.

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive releaseable, high-pressure seal was developed, which can withstand pressures over 70 atm, and is particularly useful for nuclear reactors where remote-handling equipment must be used to access the flanged connections. It is smaller than existing high-pressure seals and does not require as many bolts. The fail-safe quality of the seal does not depend on close tolerances or high-quality surface finishes. The seal comprises two conduits through which the high-pressure fluid flows, each fitted with flanges. The second flange has a periphery attached to the second conduit. Each flange has a central opening for the fluid to flow through. The second flange is frustoconical in shape and is resilient so that a portion of it near its central opening can be resiliently biased towards the first flange. A seal ring between the end flanges seals the interior of the conduits from the exterior. A force is applied to the seal ring which acts nearly parallel to the axis of the conduits and varies as a function of the fluid pressure inside of the conduits. The flanges are attached to each other with peripheral collars via a circumferential clamp. (DN)

  14. Home - Defense Technology Security Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    by @dtsamil Defense Technology Security Administration Mission, Culture, and History Executive Official seal of Defense Technology Security Administration Official seal of Defense Technology Security Administration OFFICE of the SECRETARY of DEFENSE Defense Technology Security Administration

  15. Computational fluid dynamics research at the United Technologies Research Center requiring supercomputers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgrebe, Anton J.

    1987-01-01

    An overview of research activities at the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is presented. The requirement and use of various levels of computers, including supercomputers, for the CFD activities is described. Examples of CFD directed toward applications to helicopters, turbomachinery, heat exchangers, and the National Aerospace Plane are included. Helicopter rotor codes for the prediction of rotor and fuselage flow fields and airloads were developed with emphasis on rotor wake modeling. Airflow and airload predictions and comparisons with experimental data are presented. Examples are presented of recent parabolized Navier-Stokes and full Navier-Stokes solutions for hypersonic shock-wave/boundary layer interaction, and hydrogen/air supersonic combustion. In addition, other examples of CFD efforts in turbomachinery Navier-Stokes methodology and separated flow modeling are presented. A brief discussion of the 3-tier scientific computing environment is also presented, in which the researcher has access to workstations, mid-size computers, and supercomputers.

  16. Reactor cavity seal ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1986-01-01

    A hydrostatic seal is described for sealing an annular gap between two flat substantially horizontal coplanar surfaces comprising, in combination: a generally flat annular plate of a width sufficient to span a gap between two surfaces: compressible annular sealing means disposed on the bottom surface of the flat annular plate for sealingly engaging the two flat surfaces in response to a downward force exerted on the plate; and fastening means, distributed along the center line of the plate, for releasably fastening the plate in a position to span the gap to be sealed and exert a downward force on the plate, each fastening means including a pair of elongated members of a size to fit into the gap to be sealed, means for mounting the members on the bottom surface of the plate so that at least a portion of each member is radially moveable in a direction toward a respective one of the vertical side surfaces defining the gap to be sealed to engage same and so that the plate is moveable relative to the members in a downward direction in response to hydrostatic pressure applied to the upper surface of the plate when the members are engaging the vertical side surfaces of an annular gap, and an actuating means, mounted on the plate for movement therewith in response to hydrostatic pressure, for radially moving the members, the actuating means extending through a bore in the plate to the upper surface of the plate

  17. Guidelines for meeting emission regulations for rotating machinery with mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechanical seals have played a major role during many years in minimizing emissions to atmosphere in rotating machinery. A review is presented of the continuing innovations and new technologies to improve mechanical seal performance in terms of emissions.

  18. Cutting fluids and clean technologies; Los fluidos de corte y las tecnologias limpias (III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terradillos, J.; Arnaiz, A.

    2003-07-01

    Metalworking fluids are an essential constituent of manufacturing and represent an important part of machining cost and disposal charges. Practically all cutting fluids currently in use fall into four categories: straight oils, soluble oils, semi-synthetic fluids and synthetic oils. The composition of these fluids depends on the machining requirements and primary functions include improving tool life, reducing thermal deformation of parts and improving surface finish and flushing away chips from the cutting zone. To maintain cutting fluid quality in the long term and, at the same time, reduce its environmental impact, three strategies could be followed: Prevention, Minimization and Evaluation, Related to prevention, different approaches exist for reducing the impact of cutting fluids. They include dry cutting, machining using a minimum quantity of lubricant (MQL) and developing environmental friendly acceptable formulations or refrigerant gases. (Author)

  19. Hermetizing ability of the new obturating material for root canals «Real Seal» with «Resilon» technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makedonova Y.A.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Simple, reliable and predictable obturation of root canals side by side with their cleaning and forming is an essential part of the endodontic treatment. The aim of this research is investigation of obturation density of root canals. Canals filled by means of lateral condensation of the new obturative system «Real Seal/Resilon» and by means of traditional method of canals obturation with the help of gutta-percha and sealer АН-plus. The results of the research proved a ligher hermetizing ability of the new experimental material «Real Seal» in comparison with obturation by means of gutta-percha pins. The obtained data reflects an objective picture and can be applied as a unique quality monitoring obturation of root canals.

  20. A coupled mechanical/hydrologic model for WIPP shaft seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehgartner, B.

    1991-06-01

    Effective sealing of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) shafts will be required to isolate defense-generated transuranic wastes from the accessible environment. Shafts penetrate water-bearing hard rock formations before entering a massive creeping-salt formation (Salado) where the WIPP is located. Short and long-term seals are planned for the shafts. Short-term seals, a composite of concrete and bentonite, will primarily be located in the hard rock formations separating the water-bearing zones from the Salado Formation. These seals will limit water flow to the underlying long-term seals in the Salado. The long-term seals will consist of lengthly segments of initially unsaturated crushed salt. Creep closure of the shaft will consolidate unsaturated crushed salt, thereby reducing its permeability. However, water passing through the upper short-term seals and brine inherent to the salt host rock itself will eventually saturate the crushed salt and consolidation could be inhibited. Before saturating, portions of the crushed salt in the shafts are expected to consolidate to a permeability equivalent to the salt host rock, thereby effectively isolating the waste from the overlying water-bearing formations. A phenomenological model is developed for the coupled mechanical/hydrologic behavior of sealed WIPP shafts. The model couples creep closure of the shaft, crushed salt consolidation, and the associated reduction in permeability with Darcy's law for saturated fluid flow to predict the overall permeability of the shaft seal system with time. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Design and Analysis of a Shaft Seal System for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.; Knowles, M.K.

    1999-01-01

    This special issue of Reliability Engineering and System Safety presents a wide range of analyses pertaining to performance of the first EPA-certified nuclear waste repository, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Licensing of the first such repository has involved unprecedented analysis accompanied by an equivalent peer review and public scmtiny. As a deep geologic repository, isolation of the repository from the biosphere requires implementation of unique seal systems. This paper describes the shall sealing system, which is designed to'mit fluid transport through the four existing shafts. The design approach applies redundancy to fictional elements and specifies multiple, common, low-permeability materials to ensure reliable performance. The system comprises 13 elements that completely fill the shafts with engineered materials possessing high density and low permeability. Laboratory and field measurements of component properties and performance provide the basis for the design and related evaluations. Hydrologic, mechanical, thermal, and physical features of the system are evaluated in a series of calculations. These sophisticated calculations indicate that the design effectively limits transport of fluids within the shafts, thereby limiting transport of waste material to regulatory boundaries. Additionally, the use or adaptation of existing technologies for seal construction combined with the use of available common materials assures that the design can be constructed

  2. Cover-gas seals: 11-LMFBR seal-test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, O.P. III; Horton, P.H.

    1977-01-01

    The objective of the Cover Gas Seal Material Development Program is to perform the engineering development required to provide reliable seals for LMFBR application. Specific objectives are to verify the performance of commercial solid cross-section and inflatable seals under reactor environments including radiation, to develop advanced materials and configurations capable of achieving significant improvement in radioactive gas containment and seal temperature capabilities, and to optimize seal geometry for maximum reliability and minimal gas permeation

  3. Rotatable seal assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibaldi, J.L.; Logan, C.M.

    1982-01-01

    An assembly is provided for rotatably supporting a rotor on a stator so that vacuum chambers in the rotor and stator remain in communication while the chambers are sealed from ambient air, which enables the use of a ball bearing or the like to support most of the weight of the rotor. The apparatus includes a seal device mounted on the rotor to rotate therewith, but shiftable in position on the rotor while being sealed to the rotor as by an oring. The seal device has a flat face that is biased towards a flat face on the stator, and pressurized air is pumped between the faces to prevent contact between them while spacing them a small distance apart to avoid the inflow of large amounts of air between the faces and into the vacuum chambers

  4. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  5. The Sealed Tube Neutron Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnell, L.N.; Beyerle, A.; Durkee, R.; Headley, G.; Hurley, P.

    1992-01-01

    A Sealed Tube Neutron Generator (STNG) has been designed and tested at Special Technologies Laboratories (STL) in Santa Barbara, California. Unlike similar tubes that have been used for years in other applications, e.g., by the oil well logging industry, the present device was designed primarily to be part of the Associated Particle Imaging (API) system. Consequently, the size and quality of the neutron spot produced by the STNG is of primary importance. Results from initial measurements indicate that performance goals are satisfied

  6. Revolutionizing Therapeutic Drug Monitoring with the Use of Interstitial Fluid and Microneedles Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, Tony K.L.; Ranamukhaarachchi, Sahan A.; Ensom, Mary H.H.

    2017-01-01

    While therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) that uses blood as the biological matrix is the traditional gold standard, this practice may be impossible, impractical, or unethical for some patient populations (e.g., elderly, pediatric, anemic) and those with fragile veins. In the context of finding an alternative biological matrix for TDM, this manuscript will provide a qualitative review on: (1) the principles of TDM; (2) alternative matrices for TDM; (3) current evidence supporting the use of interstitial fluid (ISF) for TDM in clinical models; (4) the use of microneedle technologies, which is potentially minimally invasive and pain-free, for the collection of ISF; and (5) future directions. The current state of knowledge on the use of ISF for TDM in humans is still limited. A thorough literature review indicates that only a few drug classes have been investigated (i.e., anti-infectives, anticonvulsants, and miscellaneous other agents). Studies have successfully demonstrated techniques for ISF extraction from the skin but have failed to demonstrate commercial feasibility of ISF extraction followed by analysis of its content outside the ISF-collecting microneedle device. In contrast, microneedle-integrated biosensors built to extract ISF and perform the biomolecule analysis on-device, with a key feature of not needing to transfer ISF to a separate instrument, have yielded promising results that need to be validated in pre-clinical and clinical studies. The most promising applications for microneedle-integrated biosensors is continuous monitoring of biomolecules from the skin’s ISF. Conducting TDM using ISF is at the stage where its clinical utility should be investigated. Based on the advancements described in the current review, the immediate future direction for this area of research is to establish the suitability of using ISF for TDM in human models for drugs that have been found suitable in pre-clinical experiments. PMID:29019915

  7. Revolutionizing Therapeutic Drug Monitoring with the Use of Interstitial Fluid and Microneedles Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony K.L. Kiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available While therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM that uses blood as the biological matrix is the traditional gold standard, this practice may be impossible, impractical, or unethical for some patient populations (e.g., elderly, pediatric, anemic and those with fragile veins. In the context of finding an alternative biological matrix for TDM, this manuscript will provide a qualitative review on: (1 the principles of TDM; (2 alternative matrices for TDM; (3 current evidence supporting the use of interstitial fluid (ISF for TDM in clinical models; (4 the use of microneedle technologies, which is potentially minimally invasive and pain-free, for the collection of ISF; and (5 future directions. The current state of knowledge on the use of ISF for TDM in humans is still limited. A thorough literature review indicates that only a few drug classes have been investigated (i.e., anti-infectives, anticonvulsants, and miscellaneous other agents. Studies have successfully demonstrated techniques for ISF extraction from the skin but have failed to demonstrate commercial feasibility of ISF extraction followed by analysis of its content outside the ISF-collecting microneedle device. In contrast, microneedle-integrated biosensors built to extract ISF and perform the biomolecule analysis on-device, with a key feature of not needing to transfer ISF to a separate instrument, have yielded promising results that need to be validated in pre-clinical and clinical studies. The most promising applications for microneedle-integrated biosensors is continuous monitoring of biomolecules from the skin’s ISF. Conducting TDM using ISF is at the stage where its clinical utility should be investigated. Based on the advancements described in the current review, the immediate future direction for this area of research is to establish the suitability of using ISF for TDM in human models for drugs that have been found suitable in pre-clinical experiments.

  8. Self-acting shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  9. Fluids engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Fluids engineering has played an important role in many applications, from ancient flood control to the design of high-speed compact turbomachinery. New applications of fluids engineering, such as in high-technology materials processing, biotechnology, and advanced combustion systems, have kept up unwaining interest in the subject. More accurate and sophisticated computational and measurement techniques are also constantly being developed and refined. On a more fundamental level, nonlinear dynamics and chaotic behavior of fluid flow are no longer an intellectual curiosity and fluid engineers are increasingly interested in finding practical applications for these emerging sciences. Applications of fluid technology to new areas, as well as the need to improve the design and to enhance the flexibility and reliability of flow-related machines and devices will continue to spur interest in fluids engineering. The objectives of the present seminar were: to exchange current information on arts, science, and technology of fluids engineering; to promote scientific cooperation between the fluids engineering communities of both nations, and to provide an opportunity for the participants and their colleagues to explore possible joint research programs in topics of high priority and mutual interest to both countries. The Seminar provided an excellent forum for reviewing the current state and future needs of fluids engineering for the two nations. With the Seminar ear-marking the first formal scientific exchange between Korea and the United States in the area of fluids engineering, the scope was deliberately left broad and general

  10. Innovative Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raj

    2008-06-30

    A functioning SOFC requires different type of seals such as metal-metal, metal-ceramic, and ceramic-ceramic. These seals must function at high temperatures between 600--900{sup o}C and in oxidizing and reducing environments of the fuels and air. Among the different type of seals, the metal-metal seals can be readily fabricated using metal joining, soldering, and brazing techniques. However, the metal-ceramic and ceramic-ceramic seals require significant research and development because the brittle nature of ceramics/glasses can lead to fracture and loss of seal integrity and functionality. Consequently, any seals involving ceramics/glasses require a significant attention and technology development for reliable SOFC operation. This final report is prepared to describe the progress made in the program on the needs, approaches, and performance of high temperature seals for SOFC. In particular, a new concept of self-healing glass seals is pursued for making seals between metal-ceramic material combinations, including some with a significant expansion mismatch.

  11. 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System Workshop. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Delgado, Irebert

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 NASA Seal/Secondary Air System workshop covered the following topics: (i) Overview of NASA's new Orion project aimed at developing a new spacecraft that will fare astronauts to the International Space Station, the Moon, Mars, and beyond; (ii) Overview of NASA's fundamental aeronautics technology project; (iii) Overview of NASA Glenn s seal project aimed at developing advanced seals for NASA's turbomachinery, space, and reentry vehicle needs; (iv) Reviews of NASA prime contractor, vendor, and university advanced sealing concepts, test results, experimental facilities, and numerical predictions; and (v) Reviews of material development programs relevant to advanced seals development. Turbine engine studies have shown that reducing seal leakage as well as high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip clearances will reduce fuel burn, lower emissions, retain exhaust gas temperature margin, and increase range. Turbine seal development topics covered include a method for fast-acting HPT blade tip clearance control, noncontacting low-leakage seals, intershaft seals, and a review of engine seal performance requirements for current and future Army engine platforms.

  12. Salt brickwork as long-term sealing in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.; Yaramanci, U.

    1993-01-01

    Radioactive wastes can be disposed of in deep salt formations. Rock salt is a suitable geologic medium because of its unique characteristics. Open boreholes, shafts and drifts are created to provide physical access to the repository. Long-term seals must be emplaced in these potential pathways to prevent radioactive release into the biosphere. The sealing materials must be mechanically and, most important, geochemically stable within the host rock. Salt bricks made from compressed salt-powder are understood to be the first choice long-term sealing material. Seals built of salt bricks will be ductile. Large sealing systems are built by combining the individual bricks with mortar. Raw materials for mortar are fine-grained halite powder and ground saliferous clay. This provides for the good adhesive strength of the mortar to the bricks and the high shear-strength of the mortar itself. To test the interaction of rock salt with an emplaced long-term seal, experiments will be carried out in situ, in the Asse salt mine in Germany. Simple borehole sealing experiments will be performed in horizontal holes and a complicated drift sealing experiment is planned, to demonstrate the technology of sealing a standard size drift or shaft inside a disturbed rock mass. Especially, the mechanical stability of the sealing system has to be demonstrated

  13. Design and construction issues associated with sealing of a repository in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, R.

    1991-01-01

    The isolation of radioactive wastes in geologic repositories requires that man-made penetrations such as shafts, tunnels and boreholes are adequately sealed. This paper presents the current design and construction issues for sealing a repository in salt and outlines some proposed solutions. The sealing components include shaft seals, tunnel seals, panel seals, and disposal room backfill. The performance requirements and construction constraints determine the types of materials selected and their necessary properties. The current issues of interest include: (1) selection of materials for rigid bulkheads used to promote recovery of the disturbed zone permeability; (2) the selection of bulkhead geometry to cutoff flow through more permeable zones, or zones where recovery of the backfill properties occurs more slowly or not at all; and (3) the interaction of fluids with hazardous wastes with brine and, subsequently, with seal materials that might affect seal material longevity. 19 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Nuclear instrumentation cable end seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.; Brown, D.P.

    1979-01-01

    An improved coaxial end seal for hermetically sealed nuclear instrumentation cable exhibiting an improved breakdown pulse noise characteristic under high voltage, high temperature conditions is described. A tubular insulator body has metallized interior and exterior surface portions which are braze sealed to a center conductor and an outer conductive sheath. The end surface of the insulator body which is directed toward the coaxial cable to which it is sealed has a recessed surface portion within which the braze seal material terminates

  15. Novel approaches in andrology examination and follicular fluid biochemical characterization in the optimization of reproductive technologies in farm animals

    OpenAIRE

    Vencato, Juri

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the studies reported in this Thesis was to increase our understanding of two aspects of the reproductive system in farm animals: the andrological evaluation and the follicular fluid composition. The final aim was to give some tools that can be helpful in optimizing the application of assisted reproductive technologies. Studies were conducted in bulls, rams, alpacas, lamas and dairy buffalo cows. The first study was designed to investigate the efficacy of scrotal thermograp...

  16. Electricity and fluid fuels from biomass and coal using advanced technologies: a cost comparison for developing country applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartha, S; Larson, E D; Williams, R H [Center for Energy and Environment Studies School of Engineering and Applied Science, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ (United States); Katofsky, R E [Arthur D. Little Co., Cambridge, MA (United States); Chen, J [Thermo Fibertek, Inc., Auburn, MA (United States); Marrison, C I [Oliver, Wyman and Co., New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    Recent analyses of alternative global energy supply strategies, such as the forthcoming report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to be published in 1996, have drawn attention to the possibility that biomass modernized with advanced technologies could play an important role in meeting global energy needs in the next century. This paper discusses two promising classes of advanced technologies that offer the potential for providing modem energy carriers (electricity and fluid fuels) from biomass at competitive costs within one or two decades. These technologies offer significantly more efficient use of land than currently commercial technologies for producing electricity and fluid fuels from biomass, as well as substantially improved energy balances. Electricity is Rely to be the first large market for modernized biomass, but the potential market for fluid fuel production is likely to be much larger. As coal is likely to present a more serious competitive challenge to biomass in the long run, we present an economic comparison with coal-based electricity and fluid fuels. A meaningful economic comparison between coal and biomass is possible because these feedstocks are sufficiently alike in their physical characteristics that similar conversion technologies may well be used for producing electricity and fluid fuels from them. When similar conversion technologies are used for both feedstocks, the relative costs of electricity or fluid fuels will be determined by the distinguishing technical characteristics of the feedstocks (sulphur content, moisture content and reactivity) and by the relative feedstock prices. Electric power generation from biomass and coal are compared here using an advanced integrated gasifier/gas turbine cycle that offers the potential for achieving high efficiency, low unit capital cost and low local pollutant emissions: the steam-injected gas turbine coupled to an air-blown gasifier. For both feedstocks, generation costs are

  17. Electricity and fluid fuels from biomass and coal using advanced technologies: a cost comparison for developing country applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartha, S.; Larson, E.D.; Williams, R.H.; Katofsky, R.E.; Chen, J.; Marrison, C.I.

    1995-01-01

    Recent analyses of alternative global energy supply strategies, such as the forthcoming report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), to be published in 1996, have drawn attention to the possibility that biomass modernized with advanced technologies could play an important role in meeting global energy needs in the next century. This paper discusses two promising classes of advanced technologies that offer the potential for providing modem energy carriers (electricity and fluid fuels) from biomass at competitive costs within one or two decades. These technologies offer significantly more efficient use of land than currently commercial technologies for producing electricity and fluid fuels from biomass, as well as substantially improved energy balances. Electricity is Rely to be the first large market for modernized biomass, but the potential market for fluid fuel production is likely to be much larger. As coal is likely to present a more serious competitive challenge to biomass in the long run, we present an economic comparison with coal-based electricity and fluid fuels. A meaningful economic comparison between coal and biomass is possible because these feedstocks are sufficiently alike in their physical characteristics that similar conversion technologies may well be used for producing electricity and fluid fuels from them. When similar conversion technologies are used for both feedstocks, the relative costs of electricity or fluid fuels will be determined by the distinguishing technical characteristics of the feedstocks (sulphur content, moisture content and reactivity) and by the relative feedstock prices. Electric power generation from biomass and coal are compared here using an advanced integrated gasifier/gas turbine cycle that offers the potential for achieving high efficiency, low unit capital cost and low local pollutant emissions: the steam-injected gas turbine coupled to an air-blown gasifier. For both feedstocks, generation costs are

  18. An in vitro evaluation of the apical sealing ability of new polymeric endodontic filling systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onay, Emel Olga; Ungor, Mete; Unver, Saadet; Ari, Hale; Belli, Sema

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the short-term sealing abilities of recently introduced polymeric endodontic filling systems. Root canals of 120 extracted and decoronated human single-rooted teeth were instrumented using crown-down technique with HERO Shaper rotary instruments. The roots were divided randomly into 8 groups (6 experimental and 2 control groups of 15 roots each) and filled with different combinations of core and sealer as follows: group 1, RealSeal/Resilon; group 2, RealSeal/Herofill; group 3, Hybrid Root Seal/Resilon; group 4, Hybrid Root Seal/Herofill; group 5, MM-Seal/Resilon; group 6, MM-Seal/Herofill; group 7, positive controls (Herofill only); group 8, negative controls. Apical leakage quantity was evaluated after 1 week by using a fluid filtration model. For each sample, measurements of fluid movement were recorded at 2-minute intervals for a total of 8 minutes, and then averaged. The data were calculated and analyzed using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the Tukey test. Significance was set at P less than .05. Multiple paired comparisons (Tukey test) showed that, of all the groups, MM-Seal/Herofill combination exhibited the least microleakage, and RealSeal/Herofill combination ranked second in this regard. The mean leakage values for the RealSeal/Resilon and MM-Seal/Resilon combinations were both significantly higher than the means for the other 4 experimental groups (P < .01). Hybrid Root Seal combined with Resilon resulted in significantly less microleakage than Hybrid Root Seal combined with Herofill (P = .001). The results suggest that the sealing properties of epoxy-resin-based sealer (MM-Seal) combined with gutta-percha (Herofill) are superior to those of methacrylate-based sealers (Hybrid Root Seal and Realseal) combined with Resilon.

  19. Innovation to reality for improved pump seal performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.; Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    'Full-Text:' The nuclear industry requires reliable pump seals. Extended operating conditions for aging plants (i.e., low pressure starts, pressure and temperature transients) and increasing demands from new plants (larger sizes, higher speeds) are pushing the operating envelope for seals. This means that many seals that were previously considered adequate are now requiring increased attention and care. Operating utilities have taken different approaches to addressing their existing, or emerging, seal problems. Primary concerns include maintenance practices, seal design, and monitoring capabilities, as well as operating conditions, transients, pump and motor design. Success in this area requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. Regardless of the design, the basic requirement in CANDU is a reliable seal lifetime exceeding 5 years. This paper describes AECL's efforts to meet this requirement through an ongoing program of research and development in seal technology. Current work includes rigorous testing and evaluation of new seal materials and coatings to maximize seal stability and minimize friction and wear (i.e., pressure/temperature transients produce unpredictable shaft movement that can significantly alter face deflections affecting leak rates and seal stability, and sometimes cause the seal to hang-up and de-stage). Also required is a practical method for on-line monitoring of the condition of the seal, whether it is newly installed or after several years of reliable performance. This provides crucial information for inventory, maintenance and outage planning. While new concepts may look good on paper, it is only after they have been demonstrated under fully representative station operating conditions that they can truly be considered ready for field use. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person

  20. Fluid sampling tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.R.; Johnston, R.G.; Martinez, R.K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool is described for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall. 6 figs.

  1. Fluid sampling tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    1999-05-25

    A fluid sampling tool for sampling fluid from a container. The tool has a fluid collecting portion which is drilled into the container wall, thereby affixing it to the wall. The tool may have a fluid extracting section which withdraws fluid collected by the fluid collecting section. The fluid collecting section has a fluted shank with an end configured to drill a hole into a container wall. The shank has a threaded portion for tapping the borehole. The shank is threadably engaged to a cylindrical housing having an inner axial passageway sealed at one end by a septum. A flexible member having a cylindrical portion and a bulbous portion is provided. The housing can be slid into an inner axial passageway in the cylindrical portion and sealed to the flexible member. The bulbous portion has an outer lip defining an opening. The housing is clamped into the chuck of a drill, the lip of the bulbous section is pressed against a container wall until the shank touches the wall, and the user operates the drill. Wall shavings (kerf) are confined in a chamber formed in the bulbous section as it folds when the shank advances inside the container. After sufficient advancement of the shank, an o-ring makes a seal with the container wall.

  2. Space Shuttle Orbiter AFT heat shield seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkover, L. J.

    1979-01-01

    The evolution of the orbiter aft heat shield seal (AHSS) design, which involved advancing mechanical seal technology in severe thermal environment is discussed. The baseline design, various improvements for engine access, and technical problem solution are presented. It is a structure and mechanism at the three main propulsion system (MPS) engine interfaces to the aft compartment structure. Access to each MPS engine requires disassembly and removal of the AHSS. Each AHSS accommodates the engine movement, is exposed to an extremely high temperature environment, and is part of the venting control of the aft compartment.

  3. Process engineering of fluids. Vol. 1. Fundamentals, methodology, technology, practice; Fluidverfahrenstechnik. Bd. 1. Grundlagen, Methodik, Technik, Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedecke, Ralf (ed.) [Degussa AG, Hanau (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The book was written by practicians for practicians; it explains the process engineering of liquid and gas mixtures for purification, separation and concentration of the fluid components by means of selective separating techniques, i.e. absorption, rectification, evaporation, condensation, extraction, adsorption, chromatography, membrane techique, melt crystallisation, and separation with supercritical fluids. All the necessary fundamentals of thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics and boundary layer processes are considered. There is a new and comprehensive chapter on the synthesis of fluid process engineering, from the first conception to its practical application. In this context, also aspects like miniplant technology, process synthesis and simulation are discussed as well as important problems concerning internals, scale-up and fouling. In order to provide accurate in-depth knowledge, renowned experts of industry and science cooperated to write this book. With its wide range of subjects, it addresses projecting and operating engineers, newcomers and university students who intend to put their knowledge into practice after their exams. (orig.)

  4. Process engineering of fluids. Vol. 2. Fundamentals, methodology, technology, practice; Fluidverfahrenstechnik. Bd. 2. Grundlagen, Methodik, Technik, Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goedecke, Ralf [Degussa AG, Hanau (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The book was written by practicians for practicians; it explains the process engineering of liquid and gas mixtures for purification, separation and concentration of the fluid components by means of selective separating techniques, i.e. absorption, rectification, evaporation, condensation, extraction, adsorption, chromatography, membrane techique, melt crystallisation, and separation with supercritical fluids. All the necessary fundamentals of thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, fluid mechanics and boundary layer processes are considered. There is a new and comprehensive chapter on the synthesis of fluid process engineering, from the first conception to its practical application. In this context, also aspects like miniplant technology, process synthesis and simulation are discussed as well as important problems concerning internals, scale-up and fouling. In order to provide accurate in-depth knowledge, renowned experts of industry and science cooperated to write this book. With its wide range of subjects, it addresses projecting and operating engineers, newcomers and university students who intend to put their knowledge into practice after their exams. (orig.)

  5. A study on the dynamic characteristics of pump seal, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Bosuk; Iwatsubo, Takuzo; Kawai, Ryoji

    1984-01-01

    From the viewpoint of the rate of plant operation, the vibration problems of pumps have been resolved. Owing to the trend toward high speed and large capacity, the flow of liquid films in the bearings and seals of pumps changed from laminar to turbulent flow, and also the effect of the inertia force of liquid films arose, the dynamic characteristics of high pressure non-contact seals due to fluid force have become to exert important effect on the vibration of pump shafts. In this research, the authors analyzed the dynamic characteristics of a seal due to fluid force when the parallel grooves with rectangular sectional form are made on the circumference of a journal. The equations of motion and the method of analysis, and the example of numerical calculation are reported. For determining the fluid force in a seal when parallel grooves exist, the method of dividing the seal into rands and grooves, determining the fluid force on a rand and in a groove successively for each stage, and summing all up is shown. The compound damping coefficient, added mass coefficient, compound spring coefficient, spring coefficient and damping coefficient were affected by the length of groove part and the Reynolds number in circumferential and axial directions. (Kako, I.)

  6. High speed cryogenic self-acting, shaft seals for liquid rocket turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burcham, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    Three self acting lift pad liquid oxygen face seals and two self acting gaseous helium circumferential seals for high speed liquid oxygen turbopump were evaluated. The development of a technology for reliable, 10 hour life, multiple start seals for use in high speed liquid oxygen turbopumps is discussed.

  7. Pool gateway seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starr, J.A.; Steinert, L.A.

    1983-01-01

    A device for sealing a gateway between interconnectable pools in a nuclear facility comprising a frame supporting a liquid impermeable sheet positioned in a u-shaped gateway between the pools. An inflatable tube carried in a channel in the periphery of the frame and adjoining the gateway provides a seal therebetween when inflated. A restraining arrangement on the bottom edge of the frame is releasably engagable with an adjacent portion of the gateway to restrict the movement of the frame in the u-shaped gateway upon inflation of the tube, thereby enhancing the seal. The impermeable sheet is formed of an elastomer and thus is conformable to a liquid permeable supportive wall upon application of liquid pressure to the side of the sheet opposite the wall

  8. New raw materials improve packing sealing efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igel, B.; McKeague, L.

    2012-01-01

    End-users and OEM's using or manufacturing on/off and control valves expect a permanent and effective increase in service life together with an increased sealing capability while at the same time minimizing maintenance concerns. Developing materials which provide consistency and repeatability are essential characteristics to optimizing valve performance. “New Generation” materials and yarn allow us to meet this growing demand while complying with the requirements related to chemical purity and an increased level of safety to both plant workers and equipment in the nuclear environment. Through R&D initiatives and developments in new and improved raw materials; a new mechanical packing generation which optimizes friction coefficients and extended life cycle has been introduced to the industry. Lower friction values drastically optimize actuator effort and size improving efficiency for stem operation with significant improvements in flow control of fluids. Combined with new and improved procedures (installation, torque levels and consolidation recommendations), this new packing generation has provided significant improvement in the mechanical behavior of packing materials (independent tests carried out in collaboration with AECL and CETIM) this has provided the opportunity to develop successful Valve Enhancement Programs which offer improved efficiency, valve operation and repeatability. These NEW generation yarns are available with or without wire reinforcement depending on specific operating parameters and conditions. The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate that new generation material(s). Which are available to the industry for AOV, MOV and Manual valves? - To highlight the steps taken in R&D and manufacturing contributing to the much improved yarns and finished packing products. - Comply and are designed to meet the stringent requirements in the nuclear industry - Simplify valve maintenance without risk to safety or performance - Increase service

  9. Formulating food protein-stabilized indomethacin nanosuspensions into pellets by fluid-bed coating technology: physical characterization, redispersibility, and dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Chen, Lingyun; Yin, Lifang; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Drug nanosuspensions are very promising for enhancing the dissolution and bioavailability of drugs that are poorly soluble in water. However, the poor stability of nanosuspensions, reflected in particle growth, aggregation/agglomeration, and change in crystallinity state greatly limits their applications. Solidification of nanosuspensions is an ideal strategy for addressing this problem. Hence, the present work aimed to convert drug nanosuspensions into pellets using fluid-bed coating technology. Indomethacin nanosuspensions were prepared by the precipitation-ultrasonication method using food proteins (soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, β-lactoglobulin) as stabilizers. Dried nanosuspensions were prepared by coating the nanosuspensions onto pellets. The redispersibility, drug dissolution, solid-state forms, and morphology of the dried nanosuspensions were evaluated. The mean particle size for the nanosuspensions stabilized using soybean protein isolate, whey protein isolate, and β-lactoglobulin was 588 nm, 320 nm, and 243 nm, respectively. The nanosuspensions could be successfully layered onto pellets with high coating efficiency. Both the dried nanosuspensions and nanosuspensions in their original amorphous state and not influenced by the fluid-bed coating drying process could be redispersed in water, maintaining their original particle size and size distribution. Both the dried nanosuspensions and the original drug nanosuspensions showed similar dissolution profiles, which were both much faster than that of the raw crystals. Fluid-bed coating technology has potential for use in the solidification of drug nanosuspensions.

  10. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Master Identification Records (seal)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records of all individually identified Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. These seals were identified by PSD personnel and cooperating scientists...

  11. Comparative Analysis of Technologies for Quantifying Extracellular Vesicles (EVs in Clinical Cerebrospinal Fluids (CSF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny C Akers

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs have emerged as a promising biomarker platform for glioblastoma patients. However, the optimal method for quantitative assessment of EVs in clinical bio-fluid remains a point of contention. Multiple high-resolution platforms for quantitative EV analysis have emerged, including methods grounded in diffraction measurement of Brownian motion (NTA, tunable resistive pulse sensing (TRPS, vesicle flow cytometry (VFC, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Here we compared quantitative EV assessment using cerebrospinal fluids derived from glioblastoma patients using these methods. For EVs 150 nm in diameter, NTA consistently detected lower number of EVs relative to TRPS. These results unveil the strength and pitfalls of each quantitative method alone for assessing EVs derived from clinical cerebrospinal fluids and suggest that thoughtful synthesis of multi-platform quantitation will be required to guide meaningful clinical investigations.

  12. Dye filled security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    A security seal for providing an indication of unauthorized access to a sealed object includes an elongate member to be entwined in the object such that access is denied unless the member is removed. The elongate member has a hollow, pressurizable chamber extending throughout its length that is filled with a permanent dye under greater than atmospheric pressure. Attempts to cut the member and weld it together are revealed when dye flows through a rupture in the chamber wall and stains the outside surface of the member

  13. Dynamic Characteristics of Flow Induced Vibration in a Rotor-Seal System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Flow induced vibration is an important factor affecting the performance of the rotor-seal system. From the point of view of flow induced vibration, the nonlinear models of the rotor-seal system are presented for the analysis of the fluid force, which is induced by the interaction between the unstable fluid flow in the seal and the vibrating rotor. The nonlinear characteristics of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system are analyzed, and the nonlinear phenomena in the unbalanced rotor-seal system are investigated using the nonlinear models. Various nonlinear phenomena of flow induced vibration in the rotor-seal system, such as synchronization phenomenon and amplitude mutation, are reproduced.

  14. Environmental assessment of alternative pasteurization technologies for fluid milk production using process simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluid milk processing (FMP) has significant environmental impact because of its high energy use. High temperature short time (HTST) pasteurization is the third most energy intensive operation comprising about 16% of total energy use, after clean-in-place operations and packaging. Nonthermal processe...

  15. Cost saving synergistic shaft seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Strom, T. N.

    1976-01-01

    Segmented carbon rings, used to replace elastomeric seal lip, provide resistance to high temperatures generated in lubricating film. Machining and close manufacturing tolerances of conventional segmented seal are avoided by mounting segmented rings in elastomeric flex section.

  16. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  17. Magnetically Actuated Seal, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT proposes development of a magnetically actuated dynamic seal. Dynamic seals are used throughout the turbopump in high-performance, pump-fed, liquid rocket...

  18. Continuous improvement of pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, W.; Eyvindson, A.; Rhodes, D.B.

    2003-01-01

    Pump seal reliability continues to be an area needing improvement and ongoing vigilance. Methods have been developed for identifying and assessing factors relating to seal performance, selecting the most relevant ones for a specific station, and then focusing on the most significant aspects and how to improve. Discussion invariably addresses maintenance practices, seal design, monitoring capabilities, operating conditions, transients, and pump and motor design. Success in reliability improvement requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person-rem. This paper describes some of the significant developments in AECL's ongoing program in seal R and D, as well as recent new installations following the most demanding seal qualification programs to date. (author)

  19. Intratracheal Seal Disc

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karen J; Moeslund, Niels; Lauridsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    . The device consisted of an intratracheal silicone seal disc fixated by a cord through the stoma to an external part. At day 14, computed tomography (CT) was performed before the device was extracted. With the pulling of a cord, the disc unraveled into a thin thread and was extracted through the stoma. At day...

  20. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  1. Shaft Seal Compensates for Cold Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, W. N.; Hein, L. A.

    1985-01-01

    Seal components easy to install. Ring seal for rotating or reciprocating shafts spring-loaded to compensate for slow yielding (cold flow) of sealing material. New seal relatively easy to install because components preassembled, then installed in one piece.

  2. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for bi-directional rotation seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietle, Lannie L [Houston, TX; Schroeder, John E [Richmond, TX

    2009-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  3. Fiber Optic Safeguards Sealing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    8217 or trade names does not constitute an official indorsement or approval of the use thereof. Destroy this report when it is no longer needed. Do not...an intergrity check of a seal than to photograph the seal’s fingerprints and to match positive/negative overlays. The seal identification time and

  4. Ultrasonic dip seal maintenance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poindexter, A.M.; Ricks, H.E.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a system for removing impurities from the surfaces of liquid dip seals and for wetting the metal surfaces of liquid dip seals in nuclear components. The system comprises an ultrasonic transducer that transmits ultrasonic vibrations along an ultrasonic probe to the metal and liquid surfaces of the dip seal thereby loosening and removing those impurities

  5. Radial lip seals, thermal aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stakenborg, M.J.L.; van Ostaijen, R.A.J.; Dowson, D.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper the influence of temperature on tne seal-snarc contact is studied, using coupled temperature-stress FEH analysis. A thermal network model is used to calculate the seal-shaft contact temperature for steady-state and transient conditions. Contact temperatures were measured under the seal

  6. Failure analysis and seal life prediction for contacting mechanical seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J. J.; He, X. Y.; Wei, L.; Feng, X.

    2008-11-01

    Fault tree analysis method was applied to quantitatively investigate the causes of the leakage failure of mechanical seals. It is pointed out that the change of the surface topography is the main reasons causing the leakage of mechanical seals under the condition of constant preloads. Based on the fractal geometry theory, the relationship between the surface topography and working time were investigated by experiments, and the effects of unit load acting on seal face on leakage path in a mechanical seal were analyzed. The model of predicting seal life of mechanical seals was established on the basis of the relationship between the surface topography and working time and allowable leakage. The seal life of 108 mechanical seal operating at the system of diesel fuel storage and transportation was predicted and the problem of the condition monitoring for the long-period operation of mechanical seal was discussed by this method. The research results indicate that the method of predicting seal life of mechanical seals is feasible, and also is foundation to make scheduled maintenance time and to achieve safe-reliability and low-cost operation for industrial devices.

  7. The NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) program - Building technology to solve future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Pamela F.; Dwoyer, Douglas L.; Kutler, Paul; Povinelli, Louis A.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics program in terms of a strategic vision and goals as well as NASA's financial commitment and personnel levels. The paper also identifies the CFD program customers and the support to those customers. In addition, the paper discusses technical emphasis and direction of the program and some recent achievements. NASA's Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers are the research hubs of the CFD program while the NASA Headquarters Office of Aeronautics represents and advocates the program.

  8. Utility of Cytospin and Cell block Technology in Evaluation of Body Fluids and Urine Samples: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qamar, Irmeen; Rehman, Suhailur; Mehdi, Ghazala; Maheshwari, Veena; Ansari, Hena A; Chauhan, Sunanda

    2018-01-01

    Cytologic examination of body fluids commonly involves the use of direct or sediment smears, cytocentrifuge preparations, membrane filter preparations, or cell block sections. Cytospin and cell block techniques are extremely useful in improving cell yield of thin serous effusions and urine samples, and ensure high diagnostic efficacy. We studied cytospin preparations and cell block sections prepared from 180 samples of body fluids and urine samples to compare the relative efficiency of cell retrieval, preservation of cell morphology, ease of application of special stains, and diagnostic efficacy. Samples were collected and processed to prepare cytospin smears and cell block sections. We observed that overall, cell yield and preservation of individual cell morphology were better in cytospin preparations as compared to cell blocks, while preservation of architectural pattern was better in cell block sections. The number of suspicious cases also decreased on cell block sections, with increased detection of malignancy. It was difficult to prepare cell blocks from urine samples due to low cellularity. Cytospin technology is a quick, efficient, and cost-effective method of increasing cell yield in hypocellular samples, with better preservation of cell morphology. Cell blocks are better prepared from high cellularity fluids; however, tissue architecture is better studied, with improved rate of diagnosis and decrease in ambiguous results. Numerous sections can be prepared from a small amount of material. Special stains and immunochemical stains can be easily applied to cell blocks. It also provides a source of archival material.

  9. Birch Bark Dry Extract by Supercritical Fluid Technology: Extract Characterisation and Use for Stabilisation of Semisolid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Armbruster

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Triterpene compounds like betulin, betulinic acid, erythrodiol, oleanolic acid and lupeol are known for many pharmacological effects. All these substances are found in the outer bark of birch. Apart from its pharmacological effects, birch bark extract can be used to stabilise semisolid systems. Normally, birch bark extract is produced for this purpose by extraction with organic solvents. Employing supercritical fluid technology, our aim was to develop a birch bark dry extract suitable for stabilisation of lipophilic gels with improved properties while avoiding the use of toxic solvents. With supercritical carbon dioxide, three different particle formation methods from supercritical solutions have been tested. First, particle deposition was performed from a supercritical solution in an expansion chamber. Second, the Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS method was used for particle generation. Third, a modified RESS-procedure, forming the particles directly into the thereby gelated liquid, was developed. All three methods gave yields from 1% to 5.8%, depending on the techniques employed. The triterpene composition of the three extracts was comparable: all three gave more stable oleogels compared to the use of an extract obtained by organic solvent extraction. Characterizing the rheological behaviour of these gels, a faster gelling effect was seen together with a lower concentration of the extract required for the gel formation with the supercritical fluid (SCF-extracts. This confirms the superiority of the supercritical fluid produced extracts with regard to the oleogel forming properties.

  10. NASA Fluid Lensing & MiDAR - Next-Generation Remote Sensing Technologies for Aquatic Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirayath, Ved

    2018-01-01

    Piti's Tepungan Bay and Tumon Bay, two of five marine preserves in Guam, have not been mapped to a level of detail sufficient to support proposed management strategies. This project addresses this gap by providing high resolution maps to promote sustainable, responsible use of the area while protecting natural resources. Dr. Chirayath, a research scientist at the NASA Ames Laboratory, developed a theoretical model and algorithm called 'Fluid Lensing'. Fluid lensing removes optical distortions caused by moving water, improving the clarity of the images taken of the corals below the surface. We will also be using MiDAR, a next-generation remote sensing instrument that provides real-time multispectral video using an array of LED emitters coupled with NASA's FluidCam Imaging System, which may assist Guam's coral reef response team in understanding the severity and magnitude of coral bleaching events. This project will produce a 3D orthorectified model of the shallow water coral reef ecosystems in Tumon Bay and Piti marine preserves. These 3D models may be printed, creating a tactile diorama and increasing understanding of coral reefs among various audiences, including key decision makers. More importantly, the final data products can enable accurate and quantitative health assessment capabilities for coral reef ecosystems.

  11. Basis of property limits for inflatable seal fluoroelastomers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2012-01-01

    Identification of a set of governing physico-mechanical properties for inflatable seals of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) and specification of their limits is described based on operating requirements, design practices and results from seal development. The limits of tensile strength, elongation at break, hardness, tear strength, fluid compatibility, compression set and specific gravity defined for the Viton GBL 200S/600S based inflatable seal formulation provide a standardized framework for regular production of reactor seals and a streamlined approach for compounding, design, manufacture and quality control. This assures significant reduction of efforts during the envisaged unification of Fast Breeder Reactor sealing based on four variations of inflatable seal compound which could result in a universal design code apart from significant gains in safety, reliability and life. The property set has potential use in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor and Advanced Heavy Water Reactor. Inclusion of factors such as batch-to-batch variations of compound properties and their reproducibility during laboratory measurements, hot tensile behavior of fluoroelastomer, long term ageing effects and the margin of safety at the end of seal design life ensures the utility of property set in attaining its intended objective.

  12. A new concept in rotary shaft seal lubrication : viscoelastohydrodynamic (VEHD) lubrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van H.J.; Stakenborg, M.J.L.; Dowson, D.; Taylor, C.M.; Godet, M.

    1991-01-01

    In practice rotary shaft seals will experience a small-amplitude dynamic excitation. It is shown that under periodic excitation circumferentially nonuniform clearances develop due to viscous seal material behaviour. The nearby fluid will fill these gaps, so entrainment and squeeze effects can

  13. Design considerations in mechanical face seals for improved performance. 2: Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of sealing technology in our industrial, chemical-oriented society in regard to maintenance and environmental contamination is pointed out. It is stated that seal performance (leakage, life) is directly related to seal lubrication. Current thinking in regard to seal lubrication is reviewed; the effect of energy dissipation in the thin lubricating film separating the sealing faces is pointed out, and the results of vaporization due to heating are illustrated. Also, hydrodynamic lubrication is reviewed, and an inherent tendency for the seal to operate with angular misalignment is shown. Recent work on hydrostatic effects is summarized and the conditions for seal instability are discussed. Four different modes of seal lubrication are postulated with the mode type being a strong function of speed and pressure.

  14. Design considerations in mechanical face seals for improved performance. II - Lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.; Greiner, H. F.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of sealing technology in the U.S. industrial chemical-orientated society in regard to maintenance and environmental contamination is pointed out. It is stated that seal performance (leakage, life) is directly related to seal lubrication, which is a mechanism not well understood. Current thinking in regard to seal lubrication is reviewed, the effect of energy dissipation in the thin lubricating film separating the sealing faces is pointed out, and the results of vaporization due to heating are illustrated. Also, hydrodynamic lubrication is reviewed, and an inherent tendency for the seal to operate with angular misalignment is pointed out. Recent work on hydrostatic effects is summarized and the conditions for seal instability are discussed. Four different modes of seal lubrication are postulated with the mode type being a strong function of speed and pressure.

  15. Hermetic Seal Leak Detection Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention is a hermetic seal leak detection apparatus, which can be used to test for hermetic seal leaks in instruments and containers. A vacuum tight chamber is created around the unit being tested to minimize gas space outside of the hermetic seal. A vacuum inducing device is then used to increase the gas chamber volume inside the device, so that a slight vacuum is pulled on the unit being tested. The pressure in the unit being tested will stabilize. If the stabilized pressure reads close to a known good seal calibration, there is not a leak in the seal. If the stabilized pressure reads closer to a known bad seal calibration value, there is a leak in the seal. The speed of the plunger can be varied and by evaluating the resulting pressure change rates and final values, the leak rate/size can be accurately calculated.

  16. Regenerator cross arm seal assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Anthony V.

    1988-01-01

    A seal assembly for disposition between a cross arm on a gas turbine engine block and a regenerator disc, the seal assembly including a platform coextensive with the cross arm, a seal and wear layer sealingly and slidingly engaging the regenerator disc, a porous and compliant support layer between the platform and the seal and wear layer porous enough to permit flow of cooling air therethrough and compliant to accommodate relative thermal growth and distortion, a dike between the seal and wear layer and the platform for preventing cross flow through the support layer between engine exhaust and pressurized air passages, and air diversion passages for directing unregenerated pressurized air through the support layer to cool the seal and wear layer and then back into the flow of regenerated pressurized air.

  17. Sealing wells with gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, E C

    1967-10-01

    A new system is being used in Mexico to temporarily plug producing wells. The temporary seal is a gel with a catalyst. The use of this temporary plug allows gas-lift wells to be taken off production in order to carry out emergency repairs. The gel solidifies by the action of the catalyst to a high temperature (70 - 150/sup 0/C). By locating the bottom of the tubing at the top of the production interval, the gel material will go into the permeable formation, and immediately set. When the gel has solidified, it seals off the horizon that must not be stimulated, and leaves the others exposed to the acid action. When the treatment is finished, the gel, by action of the catalyst, is liquefied and removed from the formation, being produced with the oil.

  18. Radioactive waste sealing container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tozawa, S.; Kitamura, T.; Sugimoto, S.

    1984-01-01

    A low- to medium-level radioactive waste sealing container is constructed by depositing a foundation coating consisting essentially of zinc, cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base, then coating an organic synthetic resin paint containing a metal phosphate over the foundation coating, and thereafter coating an acryl resin, epoxy resin, and/or polyurethane paint. The sealing container can consist of a main container body, a lid placed over the main body, and fixing members for clamping and fixing the lid to the main body. Each fixing member may consist of a material obtained by depositing a coating consisting essentially of cadmium or a zinc-aluminum alloy over a steel base

  19. Self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapich, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A sealed self-lubricating fluid bearing assembly is described for circulating fluid in the form of a gas coolant in a nuclear reactor, the power for the circulator being provided by a shaft located within the primary containment vessel. In such a system the reactor coolant is isolated from the fluid region at the far end of the drive shaft. (U.K.)

  20. α-sealed transfer device and portable plastic film sealers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhujun; Shan Ruixia

    1990-04-01

    An α transfer device which can be operated remotely is presented. The device is able to perform sealed transfer of radioactive articles from a hot cell or shielded glove box to the outside and non-radioactive articles from the outside to a hot cell or shielded glove box by using bag sealing technology. The structure of the transfer device is simple. Its operation is safe and reliable. The sealing performance of the device is very good (for alpha). The use of this transfer device will greatly reduce α contamination of the building and creates a favourable condition for operating radioactive materials in an undivided area. The portable heat sealing device is also a necessary tool in bag sealing technology and α-sealed transfer. Two types of portable plastic film sealers have been developed. Their structure is simple. The operation of the portable plastic film sealers is easy. Their performance is also excellent. Both the α-sealed transfer device and portable plastic film sealers are very useful to the reprocessing plant of nuclear fuel

  1. Closure and Sealing Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    T. Lahnalampi; J. Case

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the ''Closure and Sealing Design Calculation'' is to illustrate closure and sealing methods for sealing shafts, ramps, and identify boreholes that require sealing in order to limit the potential of water infiltration. In addition, this calculation will provide a description of the magma that can reduce the consequences of an igneous event intersecting the repository. This calculation will also include a listing of the project requirements related to closure and sealing. The scope of this calculation is to: summarize applicable project requirements and codes relating to backfilling nonemplacement openings, removal of uncommitted materials from the subsurface, installation of drip shields, and erecting monuments; compile an inventory of boreholes that are found in the area of the subsurface repository; describe the magma bulkhead feature and location; and include figures for the proposed shaft and ramp seals. The objective of this calculation is to: categorize the boreholes for sealing by depth and proximity to the subsurface repository; develop drawing figures which show the location and geometry for the magma bulkhead; include the shaft seal figures and a proposed construction sequence; and include the ramp seal figure and a proposed construction sequence. The intent of this closure and sealing calculation is to support the License Application by providing a description of the closure and sealing methods for the Safety Analysis Report. The closure and sealing calculation will also provide input for Post Closure Activities by describing the location of the magma bulkhead. This calculation is limited to describing the final configuration of the sealing and backfill systems for the underground area. The methods and procedures used to place the backfill and remove uncommitted materials (such as concrete) from the repository and detailed design of the magma bulkhead will be the subject of separate analyses or calculations. Post-closure monitoring will not

  2. An Investigation of the Integrity of Cemented Casing Seals with Application to Salt Cavern Sealing and Abandonment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifle, T.W.; Mellegard, K.D.; Skaug, N.T.; Bruno, M.S.

    2001-04-19

    This research project was pursued in three key areas. (1) Salt permeability testing under complex stress states; (2) Hydraulic and mechanical integrity investigations of the well casing shoe through benchscale testing; and (3) Geomechanical modeling of the fluid/salt hydraulic and mechanical interaction of a sealed cavern.

  3. BOSS: Borehole Disposal of Disused Sealed Sources. A Technical Manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The management of disused radioactive sources is the responsibility of individual Member States. Accordingly, interest in technologies to allow the safe, secure and sustainable management of disused sealed radioactive sources is growing. This publication is a technical summary on preparing and planning predisposal and disposal activities with regard to the BOSS (borehole disposal of disused sealed sources) system, a safe, simple and cost effective solution for the management of disused sealed radioactive sources. It advises potential implementers and decision makers on the implementation of BOSS, which is expected to provide Member States with a successful tool to contribute to the safety and security of current and future generations.

  4. A guide to the suitability of elastomeric seal materials for use in radioactive material transport packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vince, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Elastomeric seals are a frequently favoured method of sealing Radioactive Material Transport (RMT) packages. The sealing technology has been proven for many years in a wide range of industrial applications. The requirements of the RMT package applications, however, are significantly different from those commonly found in other industries. This guide outlines the Regulatory performance requirements placed on an RMT package sealing system by TS-R-1, and then summarises the material, environment and geometry characteristics of elastomeric seals relevant to RMT applications. Tables in the guide list typical material properties for a range of elastomeric materials commonly used in RMT packages

  5. Advanced Seal Sessions I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Dunlap, Patrick H.; Sarawate, Neelesh

    2013-01-01

    As aircraft operators continue to seek higher fuel efficiency, lower emissions, and longer on-wing performance, turbine engine designers are scrutinizing all components for areas of improvement. To achieve overall goals, turbine pressure ratios and by-pass ratios continue to climb. Also, designers are seeking to minimize parasitic and cooling flows to extract the most useful work out of the flow stream, placing a renewed interest on seal technology and secondary flow path management. In the area of future manned spacecraft, advancements are being examined for both habitat seals and re-entry thermal protection system thermal barrierseals. For long duration space craft, designers are continuing to look for savings in parasitic losses to reduce the amount of cabin re-supply air that needs to be brought along. This is placing greater demands on seal designs and materials to exhibit low leakage and be resistant to space environments. For future missions to and from distant planets, the re-entry heating will be higher than for low-earth orbit or lunar return motivating advanced thermal barrier development. This presentation will provide an overview of the seal challenges and opportunities in these diverse areas.

  6. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Uemura, Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC) monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting h...

  7. Comparison of Glucose Area Under the Curve Measured Using Minimally Invasive Interstitial Fluid Extraction Technology with Continuous Glucose Monitoring System in Diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Uemura; Yutaka Yano; Toshinari Suzuki; Taro Yasuma; Toshiyuki Sato; Aya Morimoto; Samiko Hosoya; Chihiro Suminaka; Hiromu Nakajima; Esteban C. Gabazza; Yoshiyuki Takei

    2017-01-01

    Background Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is reported to be a useful technique, but difficult or inconvenient for some patients and institutions. We are developing a glucose area under the curve (AUC) monitoring system without blood sampling using a minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology (MIET). Here we evaluated the accuracy of interstitial fluid glucose (IG) AUC measured by MIET in patients with diabetes for an extended time interval and the potency of detecting hy...

  8. Hazards of organic working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, S.

    1977-08-01

    We present several brief reviews on working fluids proposed for use in organic Rankine and bi-phase bottoming cycles. There are several general problems with many organic working fluids: flammability, toxicity, and a tendency to leak through seals. Besides, two of the proposed working fluids are to be used at temperatures above the manufacturer's maximum recommended temperature, and one is to be used in a way different from its customary usage. It may, in some cases, be more profitable to first seek alternative working fluids before committing large amounts of time and money to research projects on unsafe working fluids

  9. Supercritical fluid technology in materials science and engineering: syntheses, properties, and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Ya-Ping

    2002-01-01

    ... and polymer preparations and as alternative solvent systems for materials processing. In fact, materials-related applications have emerged as a new frontier in the development of supercritical fluid technology. I hope that this book will be a timely contribution to this emerging research field by serving at least two purposes. One is to provide intere...

  10. Can symmetry transitions of complex fields enable 3-d control of fluid vorticity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, James E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Solis, Kyle Jameson [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Methods of inducing vigorous noncontact fluid flow are important to technologies involving heat and mass transfer and fluid mixing, since they eliminate the need for moving parts, pipes and seals, all of which compromise system reliability. Unfortunately, traditional noncontact flow methods are few, and have limitations of their own. We have discovered two classes of fields that can induce fluid vorticity without requiring either gravity or a thermal gradient. The first class we call Symmetry-Breaking Rational Fields. These are triaxial fields comprised of three orthogonal components, two ac and one dc. The second class is Rational Triad Fields, which differ in that all three components are alternating. In this report we quantify the induced vorticity for a wide variety of fields and consider symmetry transitions between these field types. These transitions give rise to orbiting vorticity vectors, a technology for non-contact, non-stationary fluid mixing.

  11. Real-time imaging as an emerging process analytical technology tool for monitoring of fluid bed coating process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Venkata Ramana; Deshpande, Rucha S; Syed, Moinuddin R; Wakte, Pravin S

    2018-07-01

    A direct imaging system (Eyecon TM ) was used as a Process Analytical Technology (PAT) tool to monitor fluid bed coating process. Eyecon TM generated real-time onscreen images, particle size and shape information of two identically manufactured laboratory-scale batches. Eyecon TM has accuracy of measuring the particle size increase of ±1 μm on particles in the size range of 50-3000 μm. Eyecon TM captured data every 2 s during the entire process. The moving average of D90 particle size values recorded by Eyecon TM were calculated for every 30 min to calculate the radial coating thickness of coated particles. After the completion of coating process, the radial coating thickness was found to be 11.3 and 9.11 μm, with a standard deviation of ±0.68 and 1.8 μm for Batch 1 and Batch 2, respectively. The coating thickness was also correlated with percent weight build-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and dissolution. GPC indicated weight build-up of 10.6% and 9.27% for Batch 1 and Batch 2, respectively. In conclusion, weight build-up of 10% can also be correlated with 10 ± 2 μm increase in the coating thickness of pellets, indicating the potential applicability of real-time imaging as an endpoint determination tool for fluid bed coating process.

  12. Fracture Sealing in Shales: Geological and Geochemical Factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathelineau, Michel

    2001-01-01

    The so-called self-sealing processes can be re-examined at the light of geological and geochemical consideration about the past history of the rocks. The concept of 'self sealing' needs to consider the formation and the sealing of fractures, especially three main stages: (i) the initiation of the fracture (development of micro-cracks initiated from previous heterogeneities up to fracturing), ii) the fracturing processes which occur generally at depth in presence of a fluid phase, iii) the healing or sealing of the fractures which corresponds basically to two main processes: a restoration of the initial permeability of the rock block by reducing the transmissivity of the discontinuity down to values equivalent to that of the homogeneous medium before fracturing, or the sealing of the open discontinuity by precipitation of newly formed minerals. In the latter case, the evolution of the open fracture is driven by re-arrangement of particles or precipitation of newly formed material, either by dissolution/crystallisation processes or by crystallisation from the percolating fluids (advective processes). Such processes are governed by chemical processes, especially the rate of precipitation of minerals which depends of the degree of saturation with respect to the mineral, and the kinetics of precipitation. (author)

  13. Straight cylindrical seal for high-performance turbomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    A straight cylindrical seal configuration representing the seal for a high-performance turbopump (e.g., the space shuttle main engine fuel pump) was tested under static (nonrotating) conditions. The test data included critical mass flux and pressure profiles over a wide range of inlet temperatures and pressures for fluid nitrogen and fluid hydrogen with the seal in concentric and fully eccentric positions. The critical mass fluxes (or leakage rates) for the concentric and fully eccentric configurations were nearly the same when based on stagnation conditions upstream of the seal. The fully eccentric configuration pressure profiles of the gas and liquid were different. Further, the pressure differences between the maximum and the minimum clearance positions were highly dependent on the geometric conditions, the temperature, and the absolute pressure at both the inlet and the exit. The pressure differences were greatest in the inlet region. The results, although complex, tend to follow the corresponding-states principles for critical flows. Gaseous injection near the seal exit plane significantly altered the pressure profiles and could be used to control turbomachine instabilities.

  14. Sealed radioactive source management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Sealed radioactive sources have been used in a wide range of application in medicine, agriculture, geology, industry and other fields. Since its utilization many sources have become out of use and became waste but no proper management. This has lead to many accidents causing deaths and serious radiation injuries worldwide. Spent sources application is expanding but their management has seen little improvements. Sealed radioactive sources have become a security risk calling for prompt action. Source management helps to maintain sources in a good physical status and provide means of source tracking and control. It also provides a well documented process of the sources making any future management options safe, secure and cost effective. Last but not least good source management substantially reduces the risk of accidents and eliminates the risk of malicious use. The International Atomic Energy Agency assists Member States to build the infrastructure to properly manage sealed radioactive sources. The assistance includes training of national experts to handle, condition and properly store the sources. For Member States that do not have proper facilities, we provide the technical assistance to design a proper facility to properly manage the radioactive sources and provide for their proper storage. For Member States that need to condition their sources properly but don't have the required infrastructure we provide direct assistance to physically help them with source recovery and provide an international expert team to properly condition their sources and render them safe and secure. We offer software (Radioactive Waste Management Registry) to properly keep a complete record on the sources and provide for efficient tracking. This also helps with proper planning and decision making for long term management

  15. Low-Torque Seal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Borowski, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The EcoTurn Class K production prototypes have passed all AAR qualification tests and received conditional approval. The accelerated life test on the second set of seals is in progress. Due to the performance of the first set, no problems are expected.The seal has demonstrated superior performance over the HDL seal in the test lab with virtually zero torque and excellent contamination exclusion and grease retention.

  16. SEAL FOR HIGH SPEED CENTRIFUGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarstrom, C.W.

    1957-12-17

    A seal is described for a high speed centrifuge wherein the centrifugal force of rotation acts on the gasket to form a tight seal. The cylindrical rotating bowl of the centrifuge contains a closure member resting on a shoulder in the bowl wall having a lower surface containing bands of gasket material, parallel and adjacent to the cylinder wall. As the centrifuge speed increases, centrifugal force acts on the bands of gasket material forcing them in to a sealing contact against the cylinder wall. This arrangememt forms a simple and effective seal for high speed centrifuges, replacing more costly methods such as welding a closure in place.

  17. Advanced High Temperature Structural Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newquist, Charles W.; Verzemnieks, Juris; Keller, Peter C.; Rorabaugh, Michael; Shorey, Mark

    2002-10-01

    This program addresses the development of high temperature structural seals for control surfaces for a new generation of small reusable launch vehicles. Successful development will contribute significantly to the mission goal of reducing launch cost for small, 200 to 300 pound payloads. Development of high temperature seals is mission enabling. For instance, ineffective control surface seals can result in high temperature (3100 F) flows in the elevon area exceeding structural material limits. Longer sealing life will allow use for many missions before replacement, contributing to the reduction of hardware, operation and launch costs.

  18. Borehole sealing method and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, J.N.; Jansen, G. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for sealing boreholes in the earth. The borehole is blocked at the sealing level, and a sealing apparatus capable of melting rock and earth is positioned in the borehole just above seal level. The apparatus is heated to rock-melting temperature and powdered rock or other sealing material is transported down the borehole to the apparatus where it is melted, pooling on the mechanical block and allowed to cool and solidify, sealing the hole. Any length of the borehole can be sealed by slowly raising the apparatus in the borehole while continuously supplying powdered rock to the apparatus to be melted and added to the top of the column of molten and cooling rock, forming a continuous borehole seal. The sealing apparatus consists of a heater capable of melting rock, including means for supplying power to the heater, means for transporting powdered rock down the borehole to the heater, means for cooling the apparatus and means for positioning the apparatus in the borehole. 5 claims, 1 figure

  19. Study of the static airtightness mechanisms of metal seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tlili, A.

    2013-01-01

    The thesis aims to better understand the sealing mechanisms in contact at the interface between a metal gasket and clamps. The proposed approach is based on the development of a numerical model of the clamping seal by incorporating the laws' behavior of materials that will be determined by micro instrumented indentation testing. This model is particularly interested in identifying ways of providing the fluid leak to be sealed and to determine leakage rates resulting from the identified paths, as well as the evolution of the conductance of the interface over time. Particular attention will be paid to the roughness of the surfaces, changing leak paths at different levels depending on the tightening of the seal and gas flow rates in the different types of defects. The study was conducted in Pierrelatte's Sealing laboratory that develops metal seals for the aerospace, nuclear and scientific research. The thesis focuses on real surfaces and was supplemented by measurements of helium leaks using a press which applies different loads at different gas pressures and different roughness. (author) [fr

  20. Modelling technological process of ion-exchange filtration of fluids in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravshanov, N.; Saidov, U. M.

    2018-05-01

    Solution of an actual problem related to the process of filtration and dehydration of liquid and ionic solutions from gel particles and heavy ionic compounds is considered in the paper. This technological process is realized during the preparation and cleaning of chemical solutions, drinking water, pharmaceuticals, liquid fuels, products for public use, etc. For the analysis, research, determination of the main parameters of the technological process and operating modes of filter units and for support in managerial decision-making, a mathematical model is developed. Using the developed model, a series of computational experiments on a computer is carried out. The results of numerical calculations are illustrated in the form of graphs. Based on the analysis of numerical experiments, the conclusions are formulated that serve as the basis for making appropriate managerial decisions.

  1. Comparative evaluation of three shaft seals proposed for high performance turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental pressure profiles and leak rate characteristics for three shaft seal prototype model configurations proposed for the space shuttle turbopump were assessed in the concentric and fully eccentric, to point of rub, positions without the effects of rotation. The parallel-cylindrical configuration has moderate to good stiffness with a higher leak rate. It represents a simple concept, but for practical reasons and possible increases in stability, all such seals should be conical-convergent. The three-stepdown-sequential, parallel-cylindrical seal is converging and represents good to possible high stiffness when fluid separation occurs, with a significant decrease in leak rate. Such seals can be very effective. The three-stepdown-sequential labyrinth seal of 33-teeth (i.e., 12-11-10 teeth from inlet to exit) provides excellent leak control but usually has very poor stiffness, depending on cavity design. The seal is complex and not recommended for dynamic control.

  2. Design of Active Magnetic Bearing Controllers for Rotors Subjected to Gas Seal Forces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Jonas Skjødt; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2018-01-01

    Proper design of feedback controllers is crucial for ensuring high performance of Active Magnetic Bearing (AMB) supported rotor dynamic systems. Annular seals in those systems can contribute with significant forces, which, in many cases, are hard to model in advance due to complex geometries...... of the seal and multiphase fluids. Hence, it can be challenging to design AMB controllers that will guarantee robust performance for these kinds of systems. This paper demonstrates the design, simulation and experimental results of model based controllers for AMB systems, subjected to dynamic seal forces....... The controllers are found using H-infinity - and µ synthesis and are based on a global rotor dynamic model in-which the seal coefficients are identified in-situ. The controllers are implemented in a rotor-dynamic test facility with two radial AMBs and one annular seal with an adjustable inlet pressure. The seal...

  3. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfu Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide “anti-TAG” sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 101–102 copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%. For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections.

  4. Thermoconvective flow velocity in a high-speed magnetofluid seal after it has stopped

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakov, M. S.; Nikiforov, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    Convective flow is investigated in the high-speed (linear velocity of the shaft seal is more than 1 m/s) magnetofluid shaft seal after it has been stopped. Magnetic fluid is preliminarily heated due to viscous friction in the moving seal. After the shaft has been stopped, nonuniform heated fluid remains under the action of a high-gradient magnetic field. Numerical analysis has revealed that in this situation, intense thermomagnetic convection is initiated. The velocity of magnetic fluid depends on its viscosity. For the fluid with viscosity of 2 × 10-4 m2/s the maximum flow velocity within the volume of magnetic fluid with a characteristic size of 1 mm can attain a value of 10 m/s.

  5. Joint seal in tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, J.; White, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    A seal for a joint or gap between edges of adjacent wall sections (e.g. of concrete) of a liquid-containing vessel, such as a nuclear reactor cooling pond, comprises a sheet metal strip having longitudinally-extending edge parts, secured to the respective vessel-section edges, and a central part which is longitudinally corrugated to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate slight relative movements between the vessel-section edges (e.g. due to thermal expansions). The edges of the sheet metal of the strip are turned in so that the edge parts of the strip are formed as generally U-section channels. These accommodate longitudinally extending securing bars which are bolted to the vessel wall sections by bolts which pass through the bars, through the free-edged wall of the channel section and through a longitudinally extending resilient seal pad compressed between that wall of the channel section and the vessel wall section to which it is secured. The other wall of the channel section (integral with the corrugated central part of the strip) has access windows through which the bolts are inserted and tightened, the windows being then closed off in liquid-tight manner by welding closure caps over them. (author)

  6. Green biodiesel production: a review on feedstock, catalyst, monolithic reactor, and supercritical fluid technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizo Edwin Gumba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The advancement of alternative energy is primarily catalyzed by the negative environmental impacts and energy depletion caused by the excessive usage of fossil fuels. Biodiesel has emerged as a promising substitute to petrodiesel because it is biodegradable, less toxic, and reduces greenhouse gas emission. Apart from that, biodiesel can be used as blending component or direct replacements for diesel fuel in automotive engines. A diverse range of methods have been reported for the conversion of renewable feedstocks (vegetable oil or animal fat into biodiesel with transesterification being the most preferred method. Nevertheless, the cost of producing biodiesel is higher compared to fossil fuel, thus impeding its commercialization potentials. The limited source of reliable feedstock and the underdeveloped biodiesel production route have prevented the full-scale commercialization of biodiesel in many parts of the world. In a recent development, a new technology that incorporates monoliths as support matrices for enzyme immobilization in supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 for continuous biodiesel production has been proposed to solve the problem. The potential of SC-CO2 system to be applied in enzymatic reactors is not well documented and hence the purpose of this review is to highlight the previous studies conducted as well as the future direction of this technology.

  7. Management of spent sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicente, Roberto; Sordei, Gian-Maria; Hiromoto, Goro

    2002-01-01

    The number of sealed radiation sources used in industrial, medical, and research applications in Brazil amounts to hundreds of thousands. Spent or disused sources are being collected and stored as radioactive waste in nuclear research centers, awaiting for a decision on their final disposal. However, a safe and economically feasible disposal technology is unavailable. The aim of this paper is to report the development of the concept of a repository and a treatment process that will allow the final disposal of all the spent sealed sources in a safe, dedicated, and exclusive repository. The concept of the disposal system is a deep borehole in stable geologic media, meeting the radiological performance standards and safety requirements set by international organizations. (author)

  8. Repository Closure and Sealing Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A.T. Watkins

    2000-01-01

    The scope of this analysis will be to develop the conceptual design of the closure seals and their locations in the Subsurface Facilities. The design will be based on the recently established program requirements for transitioning to the Site Recommendation (SR) design as outlined by ''Approach to Implementing the Site Recommendation Baseline'' (Stroupe 2000) and the ''Monitored Geologic Repository Project Description Document'' (CRWMS M andO 1999b). The objective of this analysis will be to assist in providing a description for the Subsurface Facilities System Description Document, Section 2 and finally to document any conclusions reached in order to contribute and provide support to the SR. This analysis is at a conceptual level and is considered adequate to support the SR design. The final closure barriers and seals for the ventilation shafts, and the north and south ramps will require these openings to be permanently sealed to limit excessive air and water inflows and prevent human intrusion. The major tasks identified with closure in this analysis are: (1) Developing the overall subsurface seal layout and identifying design and operational interfaces for the Subsurface Facilities. (2) Summarizing the general site conditions and general rock characteristic with respect to seal location and describing the seal selected. (3) Identify seal construction materials, methodology of construction and strategic locations including design of the seal and plugs. (4) Discussing methods to prevent human intrusion

  9. Face-Sealing Butterfly Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, John N.

    1992-01-01

    Valve plate made to translate as well as rotate. Valve opened and closed by turning shaft and lever. Interactions among lever, spring, valve plate, and face seal cause plate to undergo combination of translation and rotation so valve plate clears seal during parts of opening and closing motions.

  10. Seals, Concrete Anchors, and Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    caulking compounds, nonhardening extruded tapes, nonhardening mastics, strippable spray coatings, pressure sensitive tapes, gaskets, adhesives, fabrics...films, etc. Although all of these materials may provide a seal, care must be taken when selecting a sealing material as to its chemical and...gaskets have performed satisfactorily. Another factor to be considered in the selection of gasketing material is its compatibility with both the

  11. Development of fluid and I and C system design technology for LMR('03)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong O; Sim, Yoon Sub; Choi, Seok Ki; Wi, Myung Hwan; Eoh, Jae Hyuk; Kim, Eui Kwang; Hur, Seop; Kim, Dong Hoon; Seong, Sung Hwan

    2004-02-01

    Based on the system design capability developed so far, our new unique reactor design concept was developed. The features are solving of a problem which existing sodium cooled reactor had, and improvement of economy and safety. Through the work, Some results were achieved, simplicity of KALIMER-600 structures, development of passive safety concept which is applicable to large sized plant, development of unique IHTS/SG combined design concept which can remove the possibility of SWR event, and optimization method of major components. Along with these results, analysis methods and computer codes, which are necessary for new design concept reactor, were developed for the self-reliance of domestic LMR technology by developing them without foreign assistance

  12. Research on seal control systems for international nuclear safeguard and the vulnerability assessment on the seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongjian; Liu Tianshu; Cao Fangfang; Xu Chunyan

    2014-01-01

    Safeguard seals, also called Tamper-indicating devices (TIDs), are widely used to detect tampering or unauthorized entry in the international safeguard and security systems, Seal control systems consist of seal implementing plan, seal development and the vulnerability assessment on tbe seals, effective implementing procedures and methods of the seals. The vulnerability assessment contents of safeguard seals, thermo-shrinked film seals being as an example, and seals control systems in the implementation program are researched. The seal control systems discuss task assignment, seals management flow and seals program data flow to promote applying effectively seals. The vulnerability assessment program of seals studies assurance level to some different tampering techniques and measures. The researches must promote utilizing seals effectively for nuclear security, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, radioactive waste management, and the nuclear material accounting and control. (authors)

  13. A strategy to seal exploratory boreholes in unsaturated tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, J.A.; Case, J.B.; Givens, C.A.; Carney, B.C.

    1994-04-01

    This report presents a strategy for sealing exploratory boreholes associated with the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. Over 500 existing and proposed boreholes have been considered in the development of this strategy, ranging from shallow (penetrating into alluvium only) to deep (penetrating into the groundwater table). Among the comprehensive list of recommendations are the following: Those boreholes within the potential repository boundary and penetrating through the potential repository horizon are the most significant boreholes from a performance standpoint and should be sealed. Shallow boreholes are comparatively insignificant and require only nominal sealing. The primary areas in which to place seals are away from high-temperature zones at a distance from the potential repository horizon in the Paintbrush nonwelded tuff and the upper portion of the Topopah Spring Member and in the tuffaceous beds of the Calico Hills Unit. Seals should be placed prior to waste emplacement. Performance goals for borehole seals both above and below the potential repository are proposed. Detailed construction information on the boreholes that could be used for future design specifications is provided along with a description of the environmental setting, i.e., the geology, hydrology, and the in situ and thermal stress states. A borehole classification scheme based on the condition of the borehole wall in different tuffaceous units is also proposed. In addition, calculations are presented to assess the significance of the boreholes acting as preferential pathways for the release of radionuclides. Design calculations are presented to answer the concerns of when, where, and how to seal. As part of the strategy development, available technologies to seal exploratory boreholes (including casing removal, borehole wall reconditioning, and seal emplacement) are reviewed

  14. Borehole sealing literature review of performance requirements and materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piccinin, D.; Hooton, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    To ensure the safe disposal of nuclear wastes, all potential pathways for radionuclide release to the biosphere must be effectively sealed. This report presents a summary of the literature up to August 1982 and outlines the placement, mechanical property and durability-stability requirements for borehole sealing. An outline of the materials that have been considered for possible use in borehole sealing is also included. Cement grouts are recommended for further study since it is indicated in the literature that cement grouts offer the best opportunity of effectively sealing boreholes employing present technology. However, new and less well known materials should also be researched to ensure that the best possible borehole plugging system is developed. 78 refs

  15. Airfoil seal system for gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    None, None

    2013-06-25

    A turbine airfoil seal system of a turbine engine having a seal base with a plurality of seal strips extending therefrom for sealing gaps between rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components. The seal strips may overlap each other and may be generally aligned with each other. The seal strips may flex during operation to further reduce the gap between the rotational airfoils and adjacent stationary components.

  16. Tamper tape seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, B.W.; Undem, H.A.

    1994-07-01

    Tamper tapes are appealing for many applications due to their ease of use and relative robustness. Applications include seals for temporary area denial, protection of sensitive equipment, chain-of-custody audit trails, and inventory control practices. A next generation of adhesive tamper tapes is being developed that combines the best features of commercially available devices with additional state-of-the-art features in tamper indication, tamper-resistance, and counterfeit-resistance. The additional features are based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research and development (R ampersand D) activities that were originally associated with preparations for the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty (START). New features include rapid-set, chemical-cure adhesive systems that allow user-friendly application and layered levels of counterfeit-resistance based on unique open-quotes fingerprintclose quotes characteristics that can be accessed as desired

  17. Cutting and drill fluids destruction by electro-coagulation: a new technological option. Eliminacion de fluidos de corte y taladrinas por electrocoagulacion: una nueva alternativa tecnologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alava, J.I.; Ipinaza, E.; Ortiz de Urbina, G.; Mugica, J.C.; Yurramendi, L.; Labarta, C.; Solazabal, R. (Centro Tecnologico de Materiales, San Sebastian (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    With the aim of comparison between incoming technologies, that use electro coagulation as a method for cutting fluids elimination, some restricted conditions have been selected that, equalized the feature of different electro technologies. It has been also specifically selected, those treatments, that are starting-up in the industrial environment. The comparison shows the efficiency of the destruction of organic compounds (until 98%) and equalized his environmental advantages and disadvantages. (Author) 10 refs. (Author)

  18. Labyrinth Seal Flutter Analysis and Test Validation in Support of Robust Rocket Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Park, John; Frady, Greg; Nesman, Tom

    2010-01-01

    High energy-density turbomachines, like the SSME turbopumps, utilize labyrinth seals, also referred to as knife-edge seals, to control leakage flow. The pressure drop for such seals is order of magnitude higher than comparable jet engine seals. This is aggravated by the requirement of tight clearances resulting in possible unfavorable fluid-structure interaction of the seal system (seal flutter). To demonstrate these characteristics, a benchmark case of a High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump (HPOTP) outlet Labyrinth seal was studied in detail. First, an analytical assessment of the seal stability was conducted using a Pratt & Whitney legacy seal flutter code. Sensitivity parameters including pressure drop, rotor-to-stator running clearances and cavity volumes were examined and modeling strategies established. Second, a concurrent experimental investigation was undertaken to validate the stability of the seal at the equivalent operating conditions of the pump. Actual pump hardware was used to construct the test rig, also referred to as the (Flutter Rig). The flutter rig did not include rotational effects or temperature. However, the use of Hydrogen gas at high inlet pressure provided good representation of the critical parameters affecting flutter especially the speed of sound. The flutter code predictions showed consistent trends in good agreement with the experimental data. The rig test program produced a stability threshold empirical parameter that separated operation with and without flutter. This empirical parameter was used to establish the seal build clearances to avoid flutter while providing the required cooling flow metering. The calibrated flutter code along with the empirical flutter parameter was used to redesign the baseline seal resulting in a flutter-free robust configuration. Provisions for incorporation of mechanical damping devices were introduced in the redesigned seal to ensure added robustness

  19. Fluid technologies: The Bush Pump, the LifeStraw and microworlds of humanitarian design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decade, many ingenious, small-scale gadgets have appeared in response to problems of disaster and extreme poverty. Focusing on the LifeStraw, a water filtration device invented by the company Vestergaard Frandsen, I situate this wave of humanitarian design relative to Marianne de Laet and Annemarie Mol's classic article on the Zimbabwe Bush Pump. The LifeStraw shares the Bush Pump's principle of technical minimalism, as well as its ethical desire to improve the lives of communities. Unlike the pump, however, the straw defines itself through rather than against market logic, accepting the premise that one can 'do well while doing good'. Moreover, it does not share the assumed framework of de Laet and Mol's Zimbabwean socio-technical landscape: a postcolonial state happily en route to national self-definition. Nonetheless, it clearly embodies moral affect, if in the idiom of humanitarian concern rather than development. My aim is to open up three interrelated lines of inquiry for discussion. First, I consider aspects of a postcolonial condition at the micro-level of immediate needs, including assumptions about nation-state politics and markets. Second, I emphasize science and technology in the form of infrastructure, the material frontline of norms. Third, I return reflexively to love, and the complicated allure of engagement in academic work.

  20. Turbine and Structural Seals Team Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Seals Team Facilities conceive, develop, and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. Current projects include...

  1. Fractal modeling of fluidic leakage through metal sealing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Xiaoqian; Huang, Yiyong; Chen, Yong

    2018-04-01

    This paper investigates the fluidic leak rate through metal sealing surfaces by developing fractal models for the contact process and leakage process. An improved model is established to describe the seal-contact interface of two metal rough surface. The contact model divides the deformed regions by classifying the asperities of different characteristic lengths into the elastic, elastic-plastic and plastic regimes. Using the improved contact model, the leakage channel under the contact surface is mathematically modeled based on the fractal theory. The leakage model obtains the leak rate using the fluid transport theory in porous media, considering that the pores-forming percolation channels can be treated as a combination of filled tortuous capillaries. The effects of fractal structure, surface material and gasket size on the contact process and leakage process are analyzed through numerical simulations for sealed ring gaskets.

  2. Group program procedure for machining seal rings of steam turbines on digital computer controlled machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glukhikh, V.K.; Skvortsov, S.B.; Sidorov, V.A.

    1982-01-01

    Developed is a group program procedure for turning machining of seal rings, including the use of new progressive high-accuracy equipment, universal device for securing of all nomenclature of treated seal rings, necessary cutting tools and program control of the process of treatment. Introduction of a new technological process permitted to improve the quality of treated seal rings; to reduce the labour consumption in 30...40% [ru

  3. Leak detection of KNI seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranyai, G.; Peter, A.; Windberg, P.

    1990-03-01

    In Unit 3 and 4 of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, KNI type seals are used as lead-throughs with conical nickel sealing rings. Their failure can be critical for the operation of the reactor. An Acoustical Leak Detection System (ALDS) was constructed and tested for the operational testing of the seals. Some individual papers are presented in this collection on the calibration and testing of the ALDS intended to be placed on the top of the reactor vessels. The papers include simulation measurements of Unit 3 of NPP, laboratory experiments, evaluation of measurements, and further development needs with the ALDS. (R.P.) 50 figs.; 19 tabs

  4. Silicone foam for penetration seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Yoshikazu

    1986-01-01

    In nuclear power plants or general buildings, it is very important to form a fire-resistant seal around cables, cable trays and conduits passing through a wall or a floor. Rockwool, asbestos, glasswool and flame-retarded urethane foam have so far been used for these purposes. However, they were not satisfactory in sealing property, workability and safety. The silicone foam newly developed, ''TOSSEAL'' 300, has cleared these defects. It has now come to be used for fire resistant seal in nuclear power plants. (author)

  5. Testing of molded high temperature plastic actuator road seals for use in advanced aircraft hydraulic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, A. W.; Huxford, R. L.; Nelson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Molded high temperature plastic first and second stage rod seal elements were evaluated in seal assemblies to determine performance characteristics. These characteristics were compared with the performance of machined seal elements. The 6.35 cm second stage Chevron seal assembly was tested using molded Chevrons fabricated from five molding materials. Impulse screening tests conducted over a range of 311 K to 478 K revealed thermal setting deficiencies in the aromatic polyimide molding materials. Seal elements fabricated from aromatic copolyester materials structurally failed during impulse cycle calibration. Endurance testing of 3.85 million cycles at 450 K using MIL-H-83283 fluid showed poorer seal performance with the unfilled aromatic polyimide material than had been attained with seals machined from Vespel SP-21 material. The 6.35 cm first stage step-cut compression loaded seal ring fabricated from copolyester injection molding material failed structurally during impulse cycle calibration. Molding of complex shape rod seals was shown to be a potentially controllable technique, but additional molding material property testing is recommended.

  6. DNA methylation and gene expression changes derived from assisted reproductive technologies can be decreased by reproductive fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Sebastian; Ivanova, Elena; Romar, Raquel; García-Martínez, Soledad; Soriano-Úbeda, Cristina; García-Vázquez, Francisco A; Saadeh, Heba; Andrews, Simon; Kelsey, Gavin; Coy, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    The number of children born since the origin of Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) exceeds 5 million. The majority seem healthy, but a higher frequency of defects has been reported among ART-conceived infants, suggesting an epigenetic cost. We report the first whole-genome DNA methylation datasets from single pig blastocysts showing differences between in vivo and in vitro produced embryos. Blastocysts were produced in vitro either without (C-IVF) or in the presence of natural reproductive fluids (Natur-IVF). Natur-IVF embryos were of higher quality than C-IVF in terms of cell number and hatching ability. RNA-Seq and DNA methylation analyses showed that Natur-IVF embryos have expression and methylation patterns closer to in vivo blastocysts. Genes involved in reprogramming, imprinting and development were affected by culture, with fewer aberrations in Natur-IVF embryos. Methylation analysis detected methylated changes in C-IVF, but not in Natur-IVF, at genes whose methylation could be critical, such as IGF2R and NNAT. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23670.001 PMID:28134613

  7. New dimension of slow food movement using supercritical fluid technology and methods to influence society by effective marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzel, Ruhan Aşkın

    2016-07-01

    Although slow food movement is a well-known movement nowadays, in order to make it more widespread to the society, necessity to develop and to adapt new techniques has become inevitable for healthier consumption age. For this purpose, possibility of increased usage of healthy foods with addition of natural extracts using new techniques came out from relevant questionaries applied to people of different age groups. In this study, specific properties of supercritical carbon dioxide at distinct temperatures and water in subcritical conditions were used to obtain extracts rich in water-soluble organic compounds. Experiments were carried out at pressures of 10, 20, 30, and 40 MPa and temperatures ranging from 40 to 200 ℃ with and without modifier for 2 h of extraction time. The flow rate was kept at 4 and 1 ml/min for CO2 and water, respectively. The highest water-soluble organic compound recovery yield was 78.10%. Results were supported by marketing strategies to announce this new application and products to the society. Group of sample questions was prepared to investigate (a) frequency of staple food usage, (b) the brand names and relevant reasons that bring up consumers to buy specifically same branded products, (c) knowledge about the ingredients and how advertising effects purchasing decision, etc. Finally, efficiency increase in slow food consumption was proved with supercritical fluid technology to draw attention to the health of consumers with newer and functional healthy foods. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Seal coat binder performance specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Need to improve seal coat binder specs: replace empirical tests (penetration, ductility) with : performance-related tests applicable to both : unmodified and modified binders; consider temperatures that cover entire in service : range that are tied t...

  9. Alaska Harbor Seal Glacial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Floating glacial ice serves as a haul-out substrate for a significant number (10-15%) of Alaskan harbor seals, and thus surveying tidewater glacial fjords is an...

  10. Coupled processes in repository sealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Case, J.B.; Kelsall, P.C.

    1985-01-01

    The significance of coupled processes in repository sealing is evaluated. In most repository designs, shaft seals will be located in areas of relatively low temperature perturbation, in which case the coupling of temperature with stress and permeability may be less significant than the coupling between stress and permeability that occurs during excavation. Constitutive relationships between stress and permeability are reviewed for crystalline rock and rocksalt. These provide a basis for predicting the development of disturbed zones near excavations. Field case histories of the degree of disturbance are presented for two contrasting rock types - Stripa granite and Southeastern New Mexico rocksalt. The results of field investigations in both rock types confirm that hydraulic conductivity or permeability is stress dependent, and that shaft seal performance may be related to the degree that stresses are perturbed and restored near the seal

  11. Northern Fur Seal Food Habits

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on northern fur seal rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1987 to present....

  12. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel O.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  13. [Effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Xia, F; Xing, D M; Ren, D; Feng, W; Chen, Y; Xiao, Z H; Zhao, Z M

    2017-05-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of vacuum sealing drainage technique in acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis of hand. Methods: A total of 9 cases acute and chronic suppurative tenosynovitis patients from January 2013 to April 2015 in Puai Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology were retrospectively reviewed. There were 6 males and 3 females, aging from 27 to 65 years, the average age was 55 years. There were 3 cases of index finger, 3 cases of middle finger, 2 cases of ring finger, 1 case include three fingers. The infection causes included stabbing with fishbone in 3 cases, stabbing with animal bone fragments in 3 cases, wound by sawdust in 3 cases, meat grinder injury in 1 case, multiple fingers crush injury postoperative infection of garbage truck in 1 case. Bacterial infection included 2 cases with Staphylococcus aureus, 2 cases with Staphylococcus epidermidis, 1 case with normal Escherichia coli, 1 case with mixed infection of Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca and Staphylococcus, 1 case with Bauman Acinetobacter bacillus, 1 case with Proteus mirabilis and 1 case of no growth of pathogenic bacteria culture. After thorough debridement, vacuum sealing drainage was used to observe the characteristics of irrigation fluid, the formation of cavity inflammation, the prognosis of infection and the recovery of finger function. Results: Seven patients with suppurative tenosynovitis were treated for 7 to 14 days, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing once; 1 patient was an illustration of the finger tip defect flap infected patients after 21 days of treatment, replaced the vacuum sealing drainage dressing twice, 1 patient was an illustration of the central refers to trauma, postoperative infection patients 28 d, replaced three times in the VSD. The follow-up time was 3 to 12 months (mean 8.2 months), 7 patients without tendon necrosis, secondary suture with no infection, 2 cases of

  14. Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants - Public Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grogan, Dylan C. P.

    2013-08-15

    Executive Summary This Final Report for the "Development of Molten-Salt Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) Technology for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants” describes the overall project accomplishments, results and conclusions. Phase 1 analyzed the feasibility, cost and performance of a parabolic trough solar power plant with a molten salt heat transfer fluid (HTF); researched and/or developed feasible component options, detailed cost estimates and workable operating procedures; and developed hourly performance models. As a result, a molten salt plant with 6 hours of storage was shown to reduce Thermal Energy Storage (TES) cost by 43.2%, solar field cost by 14.8%, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) by 9.8% - 14.5% relative to a similar state-of-the-art baseline plant. The LCOE savings range met the project’s Go/No Go criteria of 10% LCOE reduction. Another primary focus of Phase 1 and 2 was risk mitigation. The large risk areas associated with a molten salt parabolic trough plant were addressed in both Phases, such as; HTF freeze prevention and recovery, collector components and piping connections, and complex component interactions. Phase 2 analyzed in more detail the technical and economic feasibility of a 140 MWe,gross molten-salt CSP plant with 6 hours of TES. Phase 2 accomplishments included developing technical solutions to the above mentioned risk areas, such as freeze protection/recovery, corrosion effects of applicable molten salts, collector design improvements for molten salt, and developing plant operating strategies for maximized plant performance and freeze risk mitigation. Phase 2 accomplishments also included developing and thoroughly analyzing a molten salt, Parabolic Trough power plant performance model, in order to achieve the project cost and performance targets. The plant performance model and an extensive basic Engineering, Procurement, and Construction (EPC) quote were used to calculate a real levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of 11.50

  15. Sure confinement of spent sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.

    2013-10-01

    The industrial and technological development of the last decades produced and increment in the radiations application in different human activities. One of the main effects has been the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, several stages of the waste management of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work the confinement of spent sealed sources is described, maintaining as main objective the security of these sources and the protection to the workers and the people. (author)

  16. Results from the large scale in situ drift sealing experiment in the salt mine Sondershausen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitz, P.; Koch, G. [Freiberg Univ. of Mining an Technology, Institute of Mining Engineering (Germany); Gruner, M. [Wilsnack and Partners Freiberg / Saxony (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    The aim of the research, which is supported by the Federal Ministry for Education and Research (Bundesministerium fur Bildung und Forschung) and the state of Thuringia from 1997 to 2003, are long term stable drift sealing systems for underground waste disposals. As a result of the material selection for the sealing element bricks from a mixture of bentonite and quartz-sand were produced. The static abutment was built with natural salt bricks. A real drift sealing system was built in the former potash mine Sondershausen in a depth of 700 m and then tested under a fluid pressure up to 80 bar with saturated salt-brine. The functionality of the bentonite sealing element was proved successfully. Since 1998 some 500 t of such bentonite blocks with sand have been produced and built-in in underground sealing elements in salt mines. (authors)

  17. Seals Research at AlliedSignal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M. Rifat

    1996-01-01

    A consortium has been formed to address seal problems in the Aerospace sector of Allied Signal, Inc. The consortium is represented by makers of Propulsion Engines, Auxiliary Power Units, Gas Turbine Starters, etc. The goal is to improve Face Seal reliability, since Face Seals have become reliability drivers in many of our product lines. Several research programs are being implemented simultaneously this year. They include: Face Seal Modeling and Analysis Methodology; Oil Cooling of Seals; Seal Tracking Dynamics; Coking Formation & Prevention; and Seal Reliability Methods.

  18. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials used in the rock sealing project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onofrei, M.; Gray, M.N.; Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Karnland, O.; Shenton, B.; Walker, B.

    1993-12-01

    The Task Force on Sealing Materials and Techniques of the Stripa Project recommended that work be undertaken to study the sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. A new class of cement-based grouts (high-performance grouts) with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures in granite was investigated. The materials were selected for their small mean particle size and the ability to be made fluid by a superplasticizer at low water/cementitious-materials ratios. The fundamental physical and chemical properties (such as the particle size and chemical composition) of the materials were evaluated. The rheological properties of freshly mixed grouts, which control the workability of the grouts, were determined together with the properties of hardened materials, which largely control the long-term performance (longevity) of the materials in repository settings. The materials selected were shown to remain gel-like during the setting period, and so the grouts may be expected to remain largely homogenous during and after injection into the rock without separating into solid and liquid phases. The hydraulic conductivity and strength of hardened grouts were determined. The microstructure of the bulk grouts was characterized by a high degree of homogeneity with extremely fine porosity. The low hydraulic conductivity and good mechanical properties are consistent with the extremely fine porosity. The ability of the fractured grouts to self-seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted granulated grouts was determined. The laboratory tests were carried out in parallel with investigations of the in situ performance of the materials and with the development of geochemical and theoretical models for cement-based grout longevity. (author). 56 refs., 15 tabs., 98 figs

  19. Sealing properties of cement-based grout materials used in the rock sealing project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onofrei, M; Gray, M N; Pusch, R; Boergesson, L; Karnland, O; Shenton, B; Walker, B

    1993-12-01

    The Task Force on Sealing Materials and Techniques of the Stripa Project recommended that work be undertaken to study the sealing properties of cement-based grout materials. A new class of cement-based grouts (high-performance grouts) with the ability to penetrate and seal fine fractures in granite was investigated. The materials were selected for their small mean particle size and the ability to be made fluid by a superplasticizer at low water/cementitious-materials ratios. The fundamental physical and chemical properties (such as the particle size and chemical composition) of the materials were evaluated. The rheological properties of freshly mixed grouts, which control the workability of the grouts, were determined together with the properties of hardened materials, which largely control the long-term performance (longevity) of the materials in repository settings. The materials selected were shown to remain gel-like during the setting period, and so the grouts may be expected to remain largely homogenous during and after injection into the rock without separating into solid and liquid phases. The hydraulic conductivity and strength of hardened grouts were determined. The microstructure of the bulk grouts was characterized by a high degree of homogeneity with extremely fine porosity. The low hydraulic conductivity and good mechanical properties are consistent with the extremely fine porosity. The ability of the fractured grouts to self-seal was also observed in tests in which the hydraulic conductivity of recompacted granulated grouts was determined. The laboratory tests were carried out in parallel with investigations of the in situ performance of the materials and with the development of geochemical and theoretical models for cement-based grout longevity. (author). 56 refs., 15 tabs., 98 figs.

  20. Sealed can of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a seal plug cover with a gripping portion fitted to a canning machine and a gripping portion fitted to a gripper of the same configuration as a fuel body for handling the fuel body so as to facilitate the handling work. Structure: A sealed can comprises a vessel and a seal plug cover, said cover being substantially in the form of a bottomed cylinder, which is slipped on the vessel and air-tightly secured by a fastening bolt between it and a flange. The spent fuel body is received into the vessel together with coolant during the step of canning operation. Said seal plug cover has two gripping portions, one for opening and closing the plug cover of the canning machine as an exclusive use member, the other being in the form of a hook-shaped peripheral groove, whereby the gripping portions may be effectively used using the same gripper when the spent fuel body is transported while being received in the sealed can or when the fuel body is removed from the sealed can. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. Reusable, tamper-indicating seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A reusable, tamper-indicating seal is comprised of a drum confined within a fixed body and rotatable in one direction therewithin, the top of the drum constituting a tray carrying a large number of small balls of several different colors. The fixed body contains parallel holes for looping a seal wire therethrough. The base of the drums carries cams adapted to coact with cam followers to lock the wire within the seal at one angular position of the drum. A channel in the fixed body, visible from outside the seal, adjacent the tray constitutes a segregated location for a small plurality of the colored balls. A spring in the tray forces colored balls into the segregated location at one angular position of the drum, further rotation securing the balls in position and the wires in the seal. A wedge-shaped plough removes the balls from the segregated location, at a different angular position of the drum, the wire being unlocked at the same postion. A new pattern of colored balls will appear in the segregated location when the seal is relocked

  2. A model for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump shaft seal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.

    1990-01-01

    A model of the High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP) shaft seal system on the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is described. The model predicts the fluid properties and flow rates throughout this system for a number of conditions simulating failed seals. The results agree well with qualitative expectations and redline values but cannot be verified with actual data due to the lack thereof. The results indicate that each failure mode results in a unique distribution of properties throughout the seal system and can therefore be individually identified given the proper instrumentation. Furthermore, the detection process can be built on the principle of qualitative reasoning without the use of exact fluid property values. A simplified implementation of the model which does not include the slinger/labyrinth seal combination has been developed and will be useful for inclusion in a real-time diagnostic system.

  3. Hydrodynamic perception in true seals (Phocidae) and eared seals (Otariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, Wolf; Wieskotten, Sven; Marshall, Christopher; Dehnhardt, Guido

    2013-06-01

    Pinnipeds, that is true seals (Phocidae), eared seals (Otariidae), and walruses (Odobenidae), possess highly developed vibrissal systems for mechanoreception. They can use their vibrissae to detect and discriminate objects by direct touch. At least in Phocidae and Otariidae, the vibrissae can also be used to detect and analyse water movements. Here, we review what is known about this ability, known as hydrodynamic perception, in pinnipeds. Hydrodynamic perception in pinnipeds developed convergently to the hydrodynamic perception with the lateral line system in fish and the sensory hairs in crustaceans. So far two species of pinnipeds, the harbour seal (Phoca vitulina) representing the Phocidae and the California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) representing the Otariidae, have been studied for their ability to detect local water movements (dipole stimuli) and to follow hydrodynamic trails, that is the water movements left behind by objects that have passed by at an earlier point in time. Both species are highly sensitive to dipole stimuli and can follow hydrodynamic trails accurately. In the individuals tested, California sea lions were clearly more sensitive to dipole stimuli than harbour seals, and harbour seals showed a superior trail following ability as compared to California sea lions. Harbour seals have also been shown to derive additional information from hydrodynamic trails, such as motion direction, size and shape of the object that caused the trail (California sea lions have not yet been tested). The peculiar undulated shape of the harbour seals' vibrissae appears to play a crucial role in trail following, as it suppresses self-generated noise while the animal is swimming.

  4. Rock sealing - interim report on the rock seealing project (stage 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Boergesson, L.; Fredrikson, A.; Markstroem, I.; Erlstroem, M.; Ramqvist, G.; Gray, M.; Coons, B.

    1988-09-01

    The objective of the Sealing Project is to find ways of sealing finely fractured rock by grouting. This requires development of new injection technique as well as to identify materials which are sufficiently fluid to be groutable and acceptably low-previous and physically and chemically stable. The present report describes the results of the first two years of investigation (stage 1), which gave very positive results as concluded from a large field-scale test. (orig.)

  5. An ideal sealed source life-cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tompkins, Joseph Andrew

    2009-01-01

    In the last 40 years, barriers to compliant and timely disposition of radioactive sealed sources have become apparent. The story starts with the explosive growth of nuclear gauging technologies in the 1960s. Dozens of companies in the US manufactured sources and many more created nuclear solutions to industrial gauging problems. Today they do not yet know how many Cat 1, 2, or 3 sources there are in the US. There are, at minimum, tens of thousands of sources, perhaps hundreds of thousands of sources. Affordable transportation solutions to consolidate all of these sources and disposition pathways for these sources do not exist. The root problem seems to be a lack of necessary regulatory framework that has allowed all of these problems to accumulate with no national plan for solving the problem. In the 1960s, Pu-238 displaced Pu-239 for most neutron and alpha source applications. In the 1970s, the availability of inexpensive Am-241 resulted in a proliferation of low energy gamma sources used in nuclear gauging, well logging, pacemakers, and X-ray fluorescence applications for example. In the 1980s, rapid expansion of worldwide petroleum exploration resulted in the expansion of Am-241 sources into international locations. Improvements of technology and regulation resulted in a change in isotopic distribution as Am-241 made Pu-239 and Pu-238 obsolete. Many early nuclear gauge technologies have been made obsolete as they were replaced by non-nuclear technoogies. With uncertainties in source end of life disposition and increased requirements for sealed source security, nuclear gauging technology is the last choice for modern process engineering gauging solutions. Over the same period, much was learned about licensing LLW disposition facilities as evident by the closure of early disposition facilities like Maxey Flats. The current difficulties in sealed source disposition start with adoption of the NLLW policy act of 1985, which created the state LLW compact system they

  6. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques

  7. Effects of cavity on leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W; Nielsen, T K; Billdal, J T

    2010-01-01

    Labyrinth seals are widely used in rotating fluid machinery, due to its low-cost, simplicity and reliability. A straight-through labyrinth seal consists of a clearance between the stator and rotor, and sometimes cavities which are included on the stator or the rotator side. In this type of seals, making cavities are an effective way to convert turbulence kinetic energy into thermal energy by forming turbulence vortices, thereby reducing pressure difference and leakage flow. In this paper, the effect of cavities on leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals are studied by changing cavity dimensions such as depth and length, cavity number and cavity location. The influences of unilateral cavities and bilateral cavities on the leakage loss in straight-through labyrinth seals are also compared. The fluid flow characteristics through straight-through labyrinth seals were obtained by using viscous flow analysis along with a standard k-ωturbulence model. The cavity dimensions and cavity numbers have significant effects on the leakage as well as on the flow pattern in the seal. The bilateral cavity has better leakage performance than the unilateral cavity when cavity dimensions are identical. However, the cavity location shows no significant influences on the leakage flow.

  8. Fiscal 1996 investigational research on the chemical process technology using supercritical fluids; 1996 nendo chorinkai ryutai wo riyoshita kagaku process gijutsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Importance was studied of making a research on the chemical process technology using the supercritical fluid. As for its effect on global warming, the amount of CO2 emission was compared during the operation between the conventional process and the process using the supercritical fluid, the CO2 reduction rate and amount were trially calculated, and a CO2 reduction of a several ten thousand ton scale in carbon conversion was predicted. As to hazardous materials and the reaction of waste retrieval, it was made clear that the process using the supercritical fluid was valid also for objects for which the chemical process used to be impossible, which indicates a possibility of the widening field of application. Concerning its effect on the energy conservation, energy reduction of several ten thousand tons in heavy oil conversion was predicted by replacing all the existing processes with supercritical fluids. Relating to the recycling, with the use of supercritical fluids, the process is possible which produces higher quality and yield and fewer unnecessary products such as char than the conventional process. 197 refs., 102 figs., 71 tabs.

  9. Seal Technology in Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    the case inner wall (Fig.. 6 (a) and 7 (a)) und for shrouded rotors between blade shroud and the came (Figs. 6() snd 7(b)) (b) Blade roots and platforms ...work is required to fully validate these rig tests. Abradable coatings and linings used in turbines, produce wear of the fins on the root platforms ...Division of Rolls-Royce Limited for their permission to publish. ILI w% C - IL I L 2-10 1’t 00z It. ’K 0 0 ý - -C u -4% uj % z. 9 0 < m m wz I- 10 wIx u 2

  10. Adhesive sealing of dentin surfaces in vitro: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nawareg, Manar M; Zidan, Ahmed Z; Zhou, Jianfeng; Agee, Kelli; Chiba, Ayaka; Tagami, Jungi; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of the use of dental adhesives to form a tight seal of freshly prepared dentin to protect the pulp from bacterial products, during the time between crown preparation and final cementum of full crowns. The evolution of these “immediate dentin sealants” follows the evolution of dental adhesives, in general. That is, they began with multiple-step, etch-and-rinse adhesives, and then switched to the use of simplified adhesives. Methods Literature was reviewed for evidence that bacteria or bacterial products diffusing across dentin can irritate pulpal tissues before and after smear layer removal. Smear layers can be solubilized by plaque organisms within 7–10 days if they are directly exposed to oral fluids. It is likely that smear layers covered by temporary restorations may last more than one month. As long as smear layers remain in place, they can partially seal dentin. Thus, many in vitro studies evaluating the sealing ability of adhesive resins use smear layer-covered dentin as a reference condition. Surprisingly, many adhesives do not seal dentin as well as do smear layers. Results Both in vitro and in vivo studies show that resin-covered dentin allows dentinal fluid to cross polymerized resins. The use of simplified single bottle adhesives to seal dentin was a step backwards. Currently, most authorities use either 3-step adhesives such as Scotchbond Multi-Purposea or OptiBond FLb or two-step self-etching primer adhesives, such as Clearfil SEc, Unifil Bondd or AdheSEe, respectfully. PMID:26846037

  11. FOREWORD Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power (FMFP)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This section of the Special Issue carries selected articles from the Fluid Mechanics and Fluid. Power Conference held during 12–14 December 2013 at the National Institute of Technology,. Hamirpur (HP). The section includes three review articles and nine original research articles. These were selected on the basis of their ...

  12. Seal Related Development Activities at EG/G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Harold F.

    1991-01-01

    Seal related development activities including modeling, analysis, and performance testing are described for several current seal related projects. Among the current seal related projects are the following: high pressure gas sealing systems for turbomachinery; brush seals for gas path sealing in gas turbines; and tribological material evaluation for wear surfaces in sealing systems.

  13. Review of results from SKB R and D on grouting technology for sealing the rock, years 1996-2000; Oeversikt av resuItat fraan SKB:s FoU inom injekteringsteknik foer bergtaetning aaren 1996-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boden, A. (ed.) [Swedpower AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Eklund, D. [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Eriksson, Magnus [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. Soil and Rock Mechanics; Fransson, Aasa [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Inst. of Geology; Hansson, Paer [Vattenfall Utveckling AB, Aelvkarleby (Sweden); Lagerblad, B. [Swedish Cement and Concrete Research Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Lindblom, U. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Geotechnical Engineering; Wilen, P. [Swedpower AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2001-05-01

    In order identify the current state of the art and developments needs, SKB assembled a group of experts from universities and other research organisations. Internal plans were written for the subprojects 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', 'Mechanisms that control the spreading of grout in jointed rock' and 'Cement based grouting material'. Later internal plans for the subprojects 'Demands on grouting' and 'Stabilising and sealing effect of pre-grouting' were written. The aims, which were set for the different subprojects, were in short, to summarise the technological advances, establish a method for rock characterisation from a grouting point of view, develop conceptual and numerical models for simulation of the grouting course, characterise grout in a relevant way, develop understanding and theoretical know-how of durability and chemical influence, identify and develop a number of grouting materials for different situations, develop a specification of requirements for grouting and to verify the theories in laboratory. In the subproject 'Demands on grouting' a literature review was carried out. One important conclusion from the study is that the concept is not very well dealt with in the literature. SKB are currently investigating the prerequisites for the construction of the deep repository. One part of that work is to further specify demands on maximum allowed volume of leakage water for the repository as a whole and also for each part of the deep repository. In the subproject 'Characterisation of rock for grouting purposes', the possibilities of using hydraulic tests for predictions and design have been studied. The idea of this study was to investigate correspondences and deviations to increase the understanding of what is measured in a water-loss measurement. One can draw the conclusion that hydraulic tests are useful when describing the fracture geometry. Numerical modelling

  14. On-site Identification of Dynamic Annular Seal Forces in Turbo Machinery Using Active Magnetic Bearings - An Experimental Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Jonas S.; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2017-01-01

    Significant dynamic forces can be generated by annular seals in rotordynamics and can under certain conditions destabilize the system leading to machine failure. Mathematical modelling of dynamic seal forces are still challenging, especially for multiphase fluids and for seals with complex...... geometries. This results in much uncertainty in the estimation of the dynamic seal forces which often leads to unexpected system behaviour. This paper presents the results of a method suitable for on-site identification of uncertain dynamic annular seal forces in rotordynamic systems supported by Active...... Magnetic Bearings (AMB). An excitation current is applied through the AMBs to obtain perturbation forces and a system response, from which, the seal coefficients are extracted by utilizing optimization and a-priori information about the mathematical model structure and its known system dynamics. As a study...

  15. Mechanical seal with textured sidewall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Xiao, Nian

    2017-02-14

    The present invention discloses a mating ring, a primary ring, and associated mechanical seal having superior heat transfer and wear characteristics. According to an exemplary embodiment of the present invention, one or more dimples are formed onto the cylindrical outer surface of a mating ring sidewall and/or a primary ring sidewall. A stationary mating ring for a mechanical seal assembly is disclosed. Such a mating ring comprises an annular body having a central axis and a sealing face, wherein a plurality of dimples are formed into the outer circumferential surface of the annular body such that the exposed circumferential surface area of the annular body is increased. The texture added to the sidewall of the mating ring yields superior heat transfer and wear characteristics.

  16. Turbine interstage seal with self-balancing capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jacob A; Jones, Russell B; Sexton, Thomas D

    2017-09-26

    An interstage seal for a turbine of a gas turbine engine, the interstage seal having a seal carrier with an axial extending seal tooth movable with a stator of the engine, and a rotor with a seal surface that forms the interstage seal with the seal tooth, where a magnetic force produced by two magnets and a gas force produced by a gas pressure acting on the seal carrier forms a balancing force to maintain a close clearance of the seal without the seal tooth contacting the rotor seal surfaces during engine operation. In other embodiments, two pairs of magnets produce first and second magnetic forces that balance the seal in the engine.

  17. EBR-II rotating plug seal maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The EBR-II rotating plug seals require frequent cleaning and maintenance to keep the plugs from sticking during fuel handling. Time consuming cleaning on the cover gas and air sides of the dip ring seal is required to remove oxidation and sodium reaction products that accumulate and stop plug rotation. Despite severely limited access, effective seal cleaning techniques have removed 11 800 lb (5 352 kg) of deposits from the seals since 1964. Temperature control modifications and repairs have also required major maintenance work. Suggested seal design recommendations could significantly reduce maintenance on future similar seals

  18. Self-acting and hydrodynamic shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1973-01-01

    Self-acting and hydrodynamic seals are described. The analytical procedures are outlined for obtaining a seal force balance and the operating film thickness. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis revealed three different vibration modes. Proposed applications of self-acting seals in gas turbine engines and in rocket vehicle turbopumps are described. Also experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given; these data show the feasibility of operating the seal at conditions of 345 newtons per square centimeter (500 psi) and 152 meters per second (500 ft/sec) sliding speed.

  19. Sealed source peer review plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, Alexander; Leonard, Lee; Burns, Ron

    2009-01-01

    Sealed sources are known quantities of radioactive materials that have been encapsulated in quantities that produce known radiation fields. Sealed sources have multiple uses ranging from instrument calibration sources to sources that produce radiation fields for experimental applications. The Off-Site Source Recovery (OSR) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), created in 1999, under the direction of the Waste Management Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque has been assigned the responsibility to recover and manage excess and unwanted radioactive sealed sources from the public and private sector. LANL intends to ship drums containing qualified sealed sources to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal. Prior to shipping, these drums must be characterized with respect to radiological content and other parameters. The U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that ten radionulcides be quantified and reported for every container of waste to be disposed in the WIPP. The methods traditionally approved by the EPA include non-destructive assay (NDA) in accordance with Appendix A of the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOE, 2002) (CH WAC). However, because of the nature and pedigree of historical records for sealed sources and the technical infeasibility of performing NDA on these sources, LANL proposes to characterize the content of these waste drums using qualified existing radiological data in lieu of direct measurement. This plan describes the process and documentation requirements for the use of the peer review process to qualify existing data for sealed radiological sources in lieu of perfonning radioassay. The peer review process will be performed in accordance with criteria provided in 40 CFR (section) 194.22 which specifies the use of the NUREG 1297 guidelines. The plan defines the management approach, resources, schedule, and technical requirements

  20. Secondary seal effects in hydrostatic non-contact seals for reactor coolant pump shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, T.; Koga, T.; Tanoue, H.; Hirabayashi, H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a seal flow analysis in a hydrostatic non-contact seal for a PWR coolant pump shaft. A description is given of the non-contact seal for the reactor coolant pump. Results are presented for a distortion analysis of the seal ring, along with the seal flow characteristics and the contact pressure profiles of the secondary seals. The results of the work confirm previously reported findings that the seal ring distortion is sensitive to the o-ring location (which was placed between the ceramic seal face and the seal ring retainer). The paper concludes that the seal flow characteristics and the tracking performance depend upon the dynamic properties of the secondary seal. (U.K.)

  1. Development on application of ultrasonic sealing techniques to plutonium transportation cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Tsuyoshi; Akiba, Mitsunori; D'Agraives, B.C.

    1994-01-01

    In a cooperation research between Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and Commission of the European Communities, Joint Research Centre, Ispra establishment, application of ultrasonic sealing techniques to a plutonium container is developed in Ispra. The seal is derived from the sealing-bolt technology currently in use at the BNFL site of sellafield (UK) for the safeguarding of underwater spent fuel storage containers called MEBs. In this technique, one of the normal bolts closing the lid of the container is replaced by a special ultrasonically verifiable sealing-bolt. In the application to the plutonium container, it is proposed to attach a clamping seal which has the same internal configuration as a MEB sealing-bolt but is fastened with a 'one-way' mechanism to one of the protruding pins of the container. Similarly the seal is provided with an identity and integrity features. The uniqueness of the identity, as well as the integrity can be checked on the spot by an inspector carrying a reading equipment. Thus, in a few minutes, one identifies the seal and knows whether its integrity is intact, which tells that the container has not been opened or attempted to open illeagally. By application of the seal to the plutonium container, the containment/surveillance during the transportation will be upgraded. (author)

  2. WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Pfeifle, T.W. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system.

  3. WIPP shaft seal system parameters recommended to support compliance calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado, L.D.; Knowles, M.K.; Kelley, V.A.; Jones, T.L.; Ogintz, J.B.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1997-12-01

    The US Department of Energy plans to dispose of transuranic waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is sited in southeastern New Mexico. The WIPP disposal facility is located approximately 2,150 feet (650 m) below surface in the bedded halite of the Salado Formation. Prior to initiation of disposal activities, the Department of Energy must demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with all regulatory requirements. Applicable regulations require that contaminant releases from the WIPP remain below specified levels for a period of 10,000 years. To demonstrate that the WIPP will comply with these regulations, the Department of Energy has requested that Sandia National Laboratories develop and implement a comprehensive performance assessment of the WIPP repository for the regulatory period. This document presents the conceptual model of the shaft sealing system to be implemented in performance assessment calculations conducted in support of the Compliance Certification Application for the WIPP. The model was developed for use in repository-scale calculations and includes the seal system geometry and materials to be used in grid development as well as all parameters needed to describe the seal materials. These calculations predict the hydrologic behavior of the system. Hence conceptual model development is limited to those processes that could impact the fluid flow through the seal system

  4. Borehole sealing. Final report, March 1, 1973--October 31, 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eilers, L.H.

    1977-01-01

    A program to evaluate existing materials and techniques to permanently plug boreholes penetrating salt strata near prospective radioactive waste depository sites is described. A new subcontract No. 78X-33542C has been issued to seal a borehole near Lyons, Kansas, using the materials and techniques recommended in this report. It is recommended that the well be thoroughly cleaned including removing any casing penetrating the critical salt strata. Following this, any fluid-bearing zones should be grouted using the best grout available. Silica gel was recommended for porous zones backed up by Portland cement to seal fractures and vugs. Recommendations were made to use sulfate resistant Chem Comp or sulfate resistant regular Portland (Type V) as the primary sealing material in the areas where anhydrite strata are present such as the existing wells at Lyons, Kansas, or the prospective wells near Carlsbad, New Mexico. This would be modified to meet existing conditions such as salt saturated slurry through the salt strata or added powdered silica in the zones which might exceed 230/sup 0/F at any time. A short epoxy plug was recommended at the top and bottom of the salt strata and a short Seal Ring plug at the base of any extensive water zones. Extensive water zones are not expected in the New Mexico area, however.

  5. Petrophysical Characterization of Arroyal Antiform Geological Formations (Aguilar de Campoo, Palencia) as a Storage and Seal Rocks in the Technology Development Plant for Geological CO{sub 2} Storage (Hontomin, Burgos); Caracterizacin Petrofisica de las Formaciones Geologicas de la Antiforma de Arroyal (Aguilar de Campoo, Palencia) como Posibles Rocas Almacen y Sello en la Planta de Desarrollo Tecnologico de Almacenamiento Geologico de CO{sub 2} (Hontomin, Burgos)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, R.; Barrios, I.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Pelayo, M.; Saldana, R.

    2011-05-13

    The geological storage program of Energy City Foundation is focusing its research effort in the Technological Development and Research Plant in Hontomin (Burgos) start off. The present report shows the petrophysical characterization of of the Arroyal antiform geological formations since they are representatives, surface like, of the storage and seal formations that will be found in the CO{sub 2} injection plant in Hontomin. In this petrophysics characterization has taken place the study of matrix porosity, specific surface and density of the storage and seal formations. Mercury intrusion porosimetry, N{sub 2} adsorption and He pycnometry techniques have been used for the characterization. Furthermore, it has carried out a mineralogical analysis of the seal materials by RX diffraction. (Author) 26 refs.

  6. An Integrated Passive (Battery-Free) Seals-and-Tag for International Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nekoogar, F.; Dowla, F.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to reliably and securely automate the monitoring of SNM is an important goal in Safeguards. Although item level monitoring of SNM requires both seal and tag technologies, the two technologies thus far have been developed more or less independently, and had been a lack of an integrated compact system. An integrated seal-and-tag approach not only aids inspectors to perform their tasks effectively, this approach also allows real-time inspection in large scale facilities. A typical facility could be the size of a large warehouse with hundreds or thousands of items that need to be sealed and monitored in real-time. Previously we reported on advanced secure RF passive (battery-less) tags with special features including, long-range interrogation of passive tags, communicating with passive tags with strong encryption and dynamic authentication features, and the ability to place the tags directly on metal objects. In this paper, we report on a novel secure passive tag integrated with fibre optics seal that allows real-time monitoring of items through secure wireless communications that employs AES encryption and dynamic authentication. Furthermore, the devices can be networked for large scale operations. The proposed passive seal has the same capabilities as active seals in that it allows realtime monitoring. However, the battery lifetimes of conventional active seals are limited or unpredictable. As the long-term storage of SNM might last for several years, these passive seals having been integrated with passive RF tags, extends the lifetime of the physical seals and tags indefinitely, while getting the same performance of active seals and tags. The integrated seal-and-tag is transformational in addressing a critical need in Safeguards area for long-term real-time monitoring. (author)

  7. study on trace contaminants control assembly for sealed environment chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, L. P.; Wang, J.; Liu, L. K.; Liu, H.

    The biological and Physicochemical P C life support technologies are all important parts to establish a human Closed Ecological Life Support System CELSS for long-duration mission The latter has the advantages of lower power consumption lower mass and higher efficiency therefore researchers often incorporate the use of biological systems with P C life support technologies to continuously recycle air water and part of the solid waste stream generated such as the Russian BLSS and the NASA-sponsored Lunar-Mars Life Support Test Project LMLSTP In short these tests were very successful in integrating biological and P C life support technologies for long-duration life support Therefore we should use a combination of integrated biological with P C life support technologies in a human CELSS Human construction materials plants animals and soils release much trace toxic gases in a CELSS and they will inhibit plant growth and badly affect human health when their concentrations rise over their threshold levels The effect of biological trace contaminant control technologies is slower especially for a human sealed chamber because human produce much more methane and other contaminants A regenerative Trace Contaminant Control Subsystem TCCS with P C technology is a more important part in this case to control quickly the airborne contaminants levels and assure human in good condition in a sealed chamber This paper describes a trace contaminant control test facility incorporated a 8 m3 sealed environment chamber a regenerative TCCS with P C

  8. Knife-edge seal for vacuum bagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauschl, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Cam actuated clamps pinch bagging material between long knife edge (mounted to clamps) and high temperature rubber cushion bonded to baseplate. No adhesive, tape, or sealing groove is needed to seal edge of bagging sheet against base plate.

  9. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Crittercam video

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  10. Film riding seals for rotary machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidkar, Rahul Anil; Sarawate, Neelesh Nandkumar; Wolfe, Christopher Edward; Ruggiero, Eric John; Raj Mohan, Vivek Raja

    2017-03-07

    A seal assembly for a rotary machine is provided. The seal assembly includes multiple sealing device segments disposed circumferentially intermediate to a stationary housing and a rotor. Each of the segments includes a shoe plate with a forward-shoe section and an aft-shoe section having one or more labyrinth teeth therebetween facing the rotor. The sealing device includes a stator interface element having a groove or slot for allowing disposal of a spline seal for preventing segment leakages. The sealing device segment also includes multiple bellow springs or flexures connected to the shoe plate and to the stator interface element. Further, the sealing device segments include a secondary seal integrated with the stator interface element at one end and positioned about the multiple bellow springs or flexures and the shoe plate at the other end.

  11. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Ultrasound Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ultrasound images for measuring the condition of juvenile seals at Laysan Island during 2009-2010, collected when seals were handled as part of the De-Worming Project

  12. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Telemetry Tag Deployments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with dive...

  13. Legacy HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seals Observers

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set documents observers that have collected monk seal data as part of the ongoing monk seal population assessment efforts by PSD personnel and cooperating...

  14. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Handling Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains records for all handling and measurement of Hawaiian monk seals since 1981. Live seals are handled and measured during a variety of events...

  15. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Argos Location Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This project investigates foraging behavior of Hawaiian monk seals by conducting telemetry studies. During these studies, live seals are instrumented with satellite...

  16. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Entanglement data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains records of all entanglements of Hawaiian monk seals in marine debris. The data set comprises records of seals entangled by derelict fishing...

  17. Seal Apparatus and Methods to Manufacture Thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    In some implementations, apparatus and methods are provided through which a dynamic cryogenic seal is manufactured. In some implementations, the seal includes a retainer and a spring-seal assembly, the assembly being comprised of a main spring housing and fluorine-containing polymer seals. In some implementations, either a radial seal, or an axial (or "piston seal") is provided. In some implementations, methods of manufacturing the dynamic cryogenic seal are also provided. In some implementations, the methods include assembling the components while either heated or cooled, taking advantage of thermal expansion and contraction, such that there is a strong interference fit between the components at room temperature. In some implementations, this process ensures that the weaker fluorine-containing polymer seal is forced to expand and contract with the stronger retainer and spring and is under constant preload. In some implementations, the fluorine-containing polymer is therefore fluidized and retained, and can not lift off.

  18. Acoustic resonance spectroscopy intrinsic seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olinger, C.T.; Burr, T.; Vnuk, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    We have begun to quantify the ability of acoustic resonance spectroscopy (ARS) to detect the removal and replacement of the lid of a simulated special nuclear materials drum. Conceptually, the acoustic spectrum of a container establishcs a baseline fingerprint, which we refer to as an intrinsic seal, for the container. Simply removing and replacing the lid changes some of the resonant frequencies because it is impossible to exactly duplicate all of the stress patterns between the lid and container. Preliminary qualitative results suggested that the ARS intrinsic seal could discriminate between cases where a lid has or has not been removed. The present work is directed at quantifying the utility of the ARS intrinsic seal technique, including the technique's sensitivity to ''nuisance'' effects, such as temperature swings, movement of the container, and placement of the transducers. These early quantitative tests support the potential of the ARS intrinsic seal application, but also reveal a possible sensitivity to nuisance effects that could limit environments or conditions under which the technique is effective

  19. Pre-sealing risk analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensminger, D.A.; Hough, M.E.; Oston, S.G.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes studies of accidents involving high-level radioactive waste before sealing the waste into a repository. The report summarizes work done in this area during Fiscal Year 1978 and supplements previous work. Models of accident probability, severity, and consequences are refined and extended

  20. Dampers for Stationary Labyrinth Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aini, Yehia; Mitchell, William; Roberts, Lawrence; Montgomery, Stuart; Davis, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Vibration dampers have been invented that are incorporated as components within the stationary labyrinth seal assembly. These dampers are intended to supplement other vibration-suppressing features of labyrinth seals in order to reduce the incidence of high-cycle-fatigue failures, which have been known to occur in the severe vibratory environments of jet engines and turbopumps in which labyrinth seals are typically used. A vibration damper of this type includes several leaf springs and/or a number of metallic particles (shot) all held in an annular seal cavity by a retaining ring. The leaf springs are made of a spring steel alloy chosen, in conjunction with design parameters, to maintain sufficient preload to ensure effectiveness of damping at desired operating temperatures. The cavity is vented via a small radial gap between the retaining ring and seal housing. The damping mechanism is complex. In the case of leaf springs, the mechanism is mainly friction in the slippage between the seal housing and individual dampers. In the case of a damper that contains shot, the damping mechanism includes contributions from friction between individual particles, friction between particles and cavity walls, and dissipation of kinetic energy of impact. The basic concept of particle/shot vibration dampers has been published previously; what is new here is the use of such dampers to suppress traveling-wave vibrations in labyrinth seals. Damping effectiveness depends on many parameters, including, but not limited to, coefficient of friction, mode shape, and frequency and amplitude of vibrational modes. In tests, preloads of the order of 6 to 15 lb (2.72 to 6.8 kilograms) per spring damper were demonstrated to provide adequate damping levels. Effectiveness of shot damping of vibrations having amplitudes from 20 to 200 times normal terrestrial gravitational acceleration (196 to 1,960 meters per square second) and frequencies up to 12 kHz was demonstrated for shot sizes from 0.032 to

  1. Development of simplified rotating plug seal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueta, M.; Ichimiya, M.; Kanaoka, T.; Sekiya, H.; Ueda, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1991-01-01

    We studied a compact and simplified rotating plug seal structure and conducted experiments for key elements of the concept such us the mechanical seal structure and sodium deposit prevention system. Good characteristics were confirmed for the mechanical seal structure, which utilizes an elastomer seal and thin lathe bearing. Applicability of the density barrier concept was also confirmed as the sodium deposit prevention system. This concept can be applied to actual plants. (author)

  2. Piston rod seal for a Stirling engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Wilbur

    1984-01-01

    In a piston rod seal for a Stirling engine, a hydrostatic bearing and differential pressure regulating valve are utilized to provide for a low pressure differential across a rubbing seal between the hydrogen and oil so as to reduce wear on the seal.

  3. 19 CFR 113.25 - Seals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... signatures of principal and surety, if individuals, and the corporate seal shall be affixed close to the... law of the state in which executed. However, when the charter or governing statute of a corporation requires its acts to be evidenced by its corporate seal, such seal is required. ...

  4. Ergonomics and safety of manual bag sealing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.D. de; Bosch, T.; Eikhout, S.M.; Vink, P.

    2005-01-01

    A variety of seals is used to close bags. Each seal has advantages and disadvantages. For shop assistants sealing bags could be a repetitive physically demanding action. Opening and closing the bags again can cause some discomfort or annoyance for consumers. Besides, it is an activity which can

  5. Improved sealing for in-core systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunford, S.

    1989-01-01

    The in-core instrumentation sealing nozzles designed by Framatome have three mechanical seals in series instead of the one traditional seal, and are pressurized by simply tightening up the nozzle covers. They have been installed from the start on all Framatome PWRs, as well as having been backfitted on Belgium and Yugoslavian units and chosen for the Chinese Qinshan plant. (author)

  6. Comparative study on two different seal surface structure for reactor pressure vessel sealing behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jun; Xiong Guangming; Deng Xiaoyun

    2014-01-01

    The seal surface structure is very important to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) sealing behavior. In this paper, two 3-D RPV sealing analysis finite models have been established with different seal surface structures, in order to study the influence of two structures. The separation of RPV upper and lower flanges, bolt loads and etc. are obtained, which are used to evaluate the sealing behavior of the RPV. Meanwhile, the comparative analysis of safety margin of two seal surface structural had been done, which provides the theoretical basis for RPV seal structure design optimization. (authors)

  7. Sealing of polymer micro-structures by over-moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingaard, Mathias; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2012-01-01

    A concept for sealing of polymer micro-structures by over-moulding with polystyrene was devised and investigated by both experiments and simulations. The depth to which the melt filled the structure, i.e. a groove in the surface of the insert, before solidification was compared with results from...... simulations by computational fluid dynamics software. In both experiments and simulations, there was clearly an increase of filling depth with groove width and, especially for wide grooves, with injection temperature. In the simulations, changes in prescribed heat transfer coefficient had the largest effect...... on filling depth in the narrowest grooves. Around the experimental groove widths, there was good agreement between experiments and simulations. It was concluded that sealing by over-moulding is feasible if the depth/width ratio of the structure is large enough which in this paper is larger than six, i.e. up...

  8. Theoretical modelling of hot gas ingestion through turbine rim seals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Owen

    2012-12-01

    The nozzle guide vanes create three-dimensional (3D variations in the distribution of pressure in the mainstream annulus and the turbine blades create unsteady effects. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD is both time-consuming and expensive for these 3D unsteady flows, and engine designers tend to use correlations or simple models to predict ingress. This paper describes the application of simple ‘orifice models’, the analytical solutions of which can be used to calculate the sealing effectiveness of turbine rim seals. The solutions agree well with available data for externally-induced ingress, where the effects of rotation are negligible, for rotationally-induced ingress, where the effects of the external flow are small, and for combined ingress, where the effects of both external flow and rotation are significant.

  9. Interaction between clay-based sealing components and crystalline host rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanto, D. G.; Dixon, D. A.; Man, A. G.

    The results of hydraulic-mechanical (H-M) numerical simulation of a shaft seal installed at a fracture zone (FZ) in a crystalline host rock using the finite element method are presented. The primary function of a shaft seal is to limit short-circuiting of the groundwater flow regime via the shaft in a deep geological repository. Two different stages of system evolution were considered in this numerical modelling. Stage 1 simulates the groundwater flow into an open shaft, prior to seal installation. Stage 2 simulates the groundwater flow into the shaft seal after seal installation. Four different cases were completed to: (i) evaluate H-M response due to the interaction between clay-based sealing material and crystalline host rock in the shaft seal structure; (ii) quantify the effect of the different times between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation on the H-M response; and (iii) define the potential effects of different sealing material configurations. Shaft sealing materials include the bentonite-sand mixture (BSM), dense backfill (DBF), and concrete plug (CP). The BSM has greater swelling capacity and lower hydraulic conductivity ( K) than the DBF. The results of these analyses show that the decrease of the pore water pressure is concentrated along the fracture zone (FZ), which has the greatest K. As the time increases, the greatest decrease in pore water pressure is found around the FZ. Following FZ isolation and the subsequent filling of the shaft with water as it floods, the pore water pressure profile tends to recover back to the initial conditions prior to shaft excavation. The majority of the fluids that ultimately saturate the centre of the shaft seal flow radially inwards from the FZ. The time between the completion of the shaft excavation and the completion of shaft seal installation has a significant effect on the saturation time. A shorter time can reduce the saturation time. Since most of the inflow

  10. Development of radioactive sealed sources in epoxy matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benega, Marcos A.G.; Nagatomi, Helio R.; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Karan Junior, Dib; Souza, Carla D.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study and develop commercial resins for manufacturing solid sealed sources. The sources are produced with radionuclides of barium-133, cesium-137 and cobalt-57. They are used in radiation detectors verification. For the immobilization of the radionuclides in the epoxy matrix, it is made use of emulsifying agents that ensure the miscibility between resin and aqueous radioactive solution, as well as curing agents for controlling, curing and sealing the standard radioactive solution completely. As a result, it is expected to obtain standard sealed sources and equivalent to water. The equivalence to water is an important and necessary characteristic. The radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine are supplied in an aqueous form and the resin applied must have a very similar density comparing to the water. The sources must also be comparable in quality to sources produced internationally, but with low cost and wide available materials in the market. It is intended to create a national technology able to meet the demand of this product in the domestic market and achieve excellence in quality through accreditation and certification of the product by the appropriate agencies. The study of the necessary parameters used in the production of these sources, will bring technology for the manufacture of other categories of standard sealed sources, those used for nuclear medicine, image, laboratories and industry. (author)

  11. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H L; Xu, C; Zuo, M Z; Wu, Q B

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation

  12. The thermal and mechanical deformation study of up-stream pumping mechanical seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H. L.; Xu, C.; Zuo, M. Z.; Wu, Q. B.

    2015-01-01

    Taking the viscosity-temperature relationship of the fluid film into consideration, a 3-D numerical model was established by ANSYS software which can simulate the heat transfer between the upstream pumping mechanical seal stationary and rotational rings and the fluid film between them as well as simulate the thermal deformation, structure deformation and the coupling deformation of them. According to the calculation result, thermal deformation causes the seal face expansion and the maximum thermal deformation appears at the inside of the seal ring. Pressure results in a mechanical deformation, the maximum deformation occurs at the top of the spiral groove and the overall trend is inward the mating face, opposite to the thermal deformation. The coupling deformation indicate that the thermal deformation can be partly counteracted by pressure deformation. Using this model, the relationship between deformation and shaft speed and the sealing liquid pressure was studied. It's found that the shaft speed will both enhance the thermal and structure deformation and the fluid pressure will enhance the structure deformation but has little to do with the thermal deformation. By changing the sealing material, it's found that material with low thermal expansion coefficient and low elastic modulus will suffer less thermal-pressure deformation.

  13. Addendum to ''Test Plan: Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT)''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finley, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document describes activities that are intended to update the data base of fluid flow measurements made on expansive salt concrete (ESC) seals as part of the Small-Scale Seal Performance Tests (SSSPT). The original plans for the SSSPT experiments are described by Stormont (1985a and 1985b). These seals have previously been tested with brine and gas during the early stages (less than 450 days) after emplacement. The purpose of this Test Plan Addendum is to detail the activities necessary to, update the gas and brine measurements previously performed on the SSSPT Series A and Series B seals and to identify the key personnel responsible for implementing these activities. This addendum describes a limited undertaking and does NOT change the scope of the original test plan

  14. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-08-01

    Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology.

  15. Tamper-indicating devices and safeguards seals evaluation test report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-08-01

    Volume I was based on a survey and an evaluation of seals that are used as tamper-indicating devices at DOE facilities. For that evaluation, currently available seals were physically and environmentally evaluated under two broad categories: handling durability and tamper resistance. Our study indicated that the environmental testing had no negative effects on the results of the mechanical tests. In Volume II, we evaluate some loop, fiber optic loop, and pressure-sensitive seals that are not used at DOE facilities. However, we continue to focus on qualities required by DOE: durability and tamper resistance. The seals are comparatively rated, and recommendations are made for using currently available seals and new tamper-indicating device technology

  16. Standard Test Method for Testing Polymeric Seal Materials for Geothermal and/or High Temperature Service Under Sealing Stress

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1985-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the initial evaluation of (screening) polymeric materials for seals under static sealing stress and at elevated temperatures. 1.2 This test method applies to geothermal service only if used in conjunction with Test Method E 1068. 1.3 The test fluid is distilled water. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  17. Turbine Seal Research at NASA GRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.; Steinetz, Bruce M.; Delgado, Irebert R.; Hendricks, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Low-leakage, long-life turbomachinery seals are important to both Space and Aeronautics Missions. (1) Increased payload capability (2) Decreased specific fuel consumption and emissions (3) Decreased direct operating costs. NASA GRC has a history of significant accomplishments and collaboration with industry and academia in seals research. NASA's unique, state-of-the-art High Temperature, High Speed Turbine Seal Test Facility is an asset to the U.S. Engine / Seal Community. Current focus is on developing experimentally validated compliant, non-contacting, high temperature seal designs, analysis, and design methodologies to enable commercialization.

  18. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location, Location, Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Paul [Gas Equipment Engineering Corp., Milford, CT (United States); Selman, Nancy [Gas Equipment Engineering Corp., Milford, CT (United States); Volpe, Anthony Della [Gas Equipment Engineering Corp., Milford, CT (United States); Moss, Deborah [Gas Equipment Engineering Corp., Milford, CT (United States); Mobley, Rick [Plasma Energy Services, LLC, Putnam, CT (United States); Dickey, Halley [Turbine Air Systems, Houston, TX (United States); Unruh, Jeffery [Fugro NV/Wm. Lettis & Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Hitchcock, Chris [Fugro NV/Wm. Lettis & Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Tanguay, Jasmine [Conservation Law Foundation/CLF Ventures, Boston, MA (United States); Larsen, Walker [Conservation Law Foundation/CLF Ventures, Boston, MA (United States); Sanyal, Sabir [GeothermEx, Inc., San Pablo, CA (United States); Butler, Steven [GeothermEx, Inc., San Pablo, CA (United States); Stacey, Robert [GeothermEx, Inc., San Pablo, CA (United States); Robertson-Tait, Ann [GeothermEx, Inc., San Pablo, CA (United States); Pruess, Karsten [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gutoski, Greg [Fairbanks Morse Engines (FME), Beloit, WI (United States); Fay, Jamie M. [Fort Point Associates, Boston, MA (United States); Stitzer, John T. [Fort Point Associates, Boston, MA (United States); Oglesby, Ken [Impact Technologies LLC, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    2012-04-30

    Substantial unexploited opportunity exists for the US, and the world, in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). As a result of US DOE investment, new drilling technology, new power generation equipment and cycles enable meaningful power production, in a compact and modular fashion; at lower and lower top side EGS working fluid temperatures and in a broader range of geologies and geographies. This cost analysis effort supports the expansion of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), furthering DOE strategic themes of energy security and sub goal of energy diversity; reducing the Nation's dependence on foreign oil while improving the environment.

  19. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  20. Controlling fugitive emissions from mechanical seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that enactment of the 1990 Federal Clean Air Amendments will sharply focus efforts in the process industries to reduce fugitive emissions. Moreover, state and local governments may be imposing stricter laws and regulations which will affect allowable fugitive emissions from U.S. refineries and process plants. Plants outside the U.S. have similar concerns. Clearly, mechanical seals for process pumps represent an enormous population and is one category of equipment destined for careful evaluation as a means to control fugitive emissions. Fugitive are unintentional emissions from valves, pumps, flanges, compressors, etc., as opposed to point-source emissions from stacks, vents and flares. Fugitive emissions do not occur as a part of normal plant operations, but result from the effects of: Malfunctions, Age, Lack of proper maintenance, Operator error, Improper equipment specification, Use of inferior technology, and externally caused damage

  1. An implantable centrifugal blood pump with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal system).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, K; Litwak, P; Tagusari, O; Mori, T; Kono, K; Kameneva, M; Watach, M; Gordon, L; Miyagishima, M; Tomioka, J; Umezu, M; Outa, E; Antaki, J F; Kormos, R L; Koyanagi, H; Griffith, B P

    1998-06-01

    A compact centrifugal blood pump has been developed as an implantable left ventricular assist system. The impeller diameter is 40 mm, and pump dimensions are 55 x 64 mm. This first prototype, fabricated from titanium alloy, resulted in a pump weight of 400 g including a brushless DC motor. The weight of a second prototype pump was reduced to 280 g. The entire blood contacting surface is coated with diamond like carbon (DLC) to improve blood compatibility. Flow rates of over 7 L/min against 100 mm Hg pressure at 2,500 rpm with 9 W total power consumption have been measured. A newly designed mechanical seal with a recirculating purge system (Cool-Seal) is used for the shaft seal. In this seal system, the seal temperature is kept under 40 degrees C to prevent heat denaturation of blood proteins. Purge fluid also cools the pump motor coil and journal bearing. Purge fluid is continuously purified and sterilized by an ultrafiltration unit which is incorporated in the paracorporeal drive console. In vitro experiments with bovine blood demonstrated an acceptably low hemolysis rate (normalized index of hemolysis = 0.005 +/- 0.002 g/100 L). In vivo experiments are currently ongoing using calves. Via left thoracotomy, left ventricular (LV) apex descending aorta bypass was performed utilizing an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) vascular graft with the pump placed in the left thoracic cavity. In 2 in vivo experiments, the pump flow rate was maintained at 5-9 L/min, and pump power consumption remained stable at 9-10 W. All plasma free Hb levels were measured at less than 15 mg/dl. The seal system has demonstrated good seal capability with negligible purge fluid consumption (<0.5 ml/day). In both calves, the pumps demonstrated trouble free continuous function over 6 month (200 days and 222 days).

  2. Air riding seal with purge cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Thomas D; Mills, Jacob A

    2017-08-15

    An air riding seal for a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where an annular piston is axial moveable within an annular piston chamber formed in a stator of the turbine and forms a seal with a surface on the rotor using pressurized air that forms a cushion in a pocket of the annular piston. A purge cavity is formed on the annular piston and is connected to a purge hole that extends through the annular piston to a lower pressure region around the annular piston or through the rotor to an opposite side. The annular piston is sealed also with inner and outer seals that can be a labyrinth seal to form an additional seal than the cushion of air in the pocket to prevent the face of the air riding seal from overheating.

  3. Insecurity of imperfect quantum bit seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chau, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum bit seal is a way to encode a classical bit quantum mechanically so that everyone can obtain non-zero information on the value of the bit. Moreover, such an attempt should have a high chance of being detected by an authorized verifier. Surely, a reader looks for a way to get the maximum amount of information on the sealed bit and at the same time to minimize her chance of being caught. And a verifier picks a sealing scheme that maximizes his chance of detecting any measurement of the sealed bit. Here, I report a strategy that passes all measurement detection procedures at least half of the time for all quantum bit sealing schemes. This strategy also minimizes a reader's chance of being caught under a certain scheme. In this way, I extend the result of Bechmann-Pasquinucci et al. by proving that quantum seal is insecure in the case of imperfect sealed bit recovery

  4. Development of the seal for nuclear material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Feng; Lu Zhao; Zhao Yonggang; Zhang Qixin; Xiao Xuefu

    2000-01-01

    Two kinds of double cap metallic seal and an adhesive seal are developed for the purpose of the accounting for and control of nuclear material. Two kinds of double cap metallic seal are made of stainless steel and copper, respectively and the self-locked technique is used. The number and the random pattern are carved out side and in side of a cap, respectively, for the seal. The random pattern carved inside of a cap for seal is taken a picture using numeral camera and memorized in computer. Special software is developed for verification of the random pattern memorized in computer. The adhesive seal is made of special adhesive paper for purpose of security, and a special pattern guarded against falsification is printed on seal paper using ultraviolet fluorescent light technique

  5. Influence of steam parameters on static and dynamic characteristics of labyrinth seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Wenqiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] In order to study the influence of working medium parameters on the static and dynamic characteristics of seals in turbomachinery,[Methods] a three-dimensional model of a labyrinth seal was created, and air and steam were applied in the numerical simulation. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD method and a rotating frame were applied to analyze the influence of different steam parameters on the leakage characteristics and dynamic characteristic coefficients.[Results] The results show that great differences in leakage flow rate are apparent under different air and steam conditions, and the fluid-induced force shows linear and nonlinear variation with the increasing whirl speed. When the steam temperature increases, the system stability decreases as the dynamic characteristic coefficients change.[Conclusions] In consequence, working medium parameters are of great significance for turbine stability, and the influence of working medium parameters on the static and dynamic characteristics of seals should be given great attention in practical application.

  6. Core disruptive accident margin seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, J.; Belsick, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus for sealing the annulus defined between a substantially cylindrical rotatable first riser assembly and plug combination disposed in a substantially cylindrical second riser assembly and plug combination of a nuclear reactor system. The apparatus comprises a flexible member disposed between the first and second riser components and attached to a metal member which is attached to an actuating mechanism. When the actuating mechanism is not actuated, the flexible member does not contact the riser components thus allowing the free rotation of the riser components. When desired, the actuating mechanism causes the flexible member to contact the first and second riser components in a manner to block the annulus defined between the riser components, thereby sealing the annulus between the riser components

  7. Transport of multiassembly sealed canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, R.D.; Lehnert, R.A.; Rosa, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A significant portion of the commercial spent nuclear fuel in dry storage in the US will be stored in multiassembly sealed canisters before the DOE begins accepting fuel from utilities in 1998. This paper reports that it is desirable from economic and ALARA perspectives to transfer these canisters directly from the plant to the MRS. To this end, it is necessary that the multiassembly sealed canisters, which have been licensed for storage under 10CFR72, be qualified for shipment within a suitable shipping cask under the rules of 10CFR71. Preliminary work performed to date indicates that it is feasible to license a current canister design for transportation, and work is proceeding on obtaining NRC approval

  8. Mechanical seals qualification procedure of the main pumps of nuclear power plants in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchdahl, D.; Martin, R.; Girault, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    Many important pumps in the nuclear power plants are equipped with mechanical seals. The good behaviour and reliability of mechanical seals depend specially on the quality and the stability of an interface of several microns. Peripheral speed reaches 50 m/s and pressure 5 MPa, shaft diameter may be 200 mm. Any failure of the mechanical seals may stop the production of electricity or may compromise nuclear safety. As far back as 1970, EDF has conducted qualification actions for the most important mechanical seals in terms of availability and safety. A qualification of mechanical seals needs three steps: - constructor test (tuning) at normal conditions, -qualification test on test rig at EDF/DER (semi-industrial) at normal, exceptional and incidental conditions lasting about 1500 h, - industrial qualification test in nuclear power station over one year. Several supplying sources are absolutely necessary. Any pump may receive mechanical seals from at least two different suppliers. A compromise had to be found to restrict the suppliers' number down to three. This choice concerned three high technology suppliers. A consistent modification procedure had been developed (references file procedure). For each power plant series, about ten types of mechanical seals are concerned. The selection criteria are the higher loads factors P, Vg or the safety related importance. This expensive approach is useful for EDF, many functional failures have been detected before the serial mechanical seals installation in the power plants. (authors). 1 annexe

  9. A field trail for sealing abandoned mine shafts and adits with lightweight concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, E.H.; Beckett, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    An abandoned mine shaft near Omar, in Logan County, WV, was permanently sealed through a cooperative agreement between the West Virginia Department of Commerce, Labor, and Environmental Resources, Division of Environmental Protection, and the US Bureau of Mines (USBM), Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Program. An engineered shaft seal design was developed and demonstrated that featured lightweight concrete as a key material component at a wet density of about 45 lb/ft 3 . A reinforced concrete cap designed for 5 psi live load was placed over the shaft seal. Applicable new concrete technologies relating to a 100-yr design life were utilized to assure future integrity of the shaft seal. Waterproofing methods were included in the shaft seal design to provide protection from ambient moisture and corrosive mine waters and to increase the long-term durability of the shaft seal. All construction methods used in the field trial are fully adaptable for the mine-reclamation contractor. The USBM research objectives were to develop a broad generic design that will be widely applicable to other adit-sealing and shaft-sealing problems throughout the mining industry

  10. Validation Assessment of a Glass-to-Metal Seal Finite-Element Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamison, Ryan Dale [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Emery, John M [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Romero, Vicente J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Stavig, Mark E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newton, Clay S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, Arthur [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Sealing glasses are ubiquitous in high pressure and temperature engineering applications, such as hermetic feed-through electrical connectors. A common connector technology are glass-to-metal seals where a metal shell compresses a sealing glass to create a hermetic seal. Though finite-element analysis has been used to understand and design glass-to-metal seals for many years, there has been little validation of these models. An indentation technique was employed to measure the residual stress on the surface of a simple glass-to-metal seal. Recently developed rate- dependent material models of both Schott 8061 and 304L VAR stainless steel have been applied to a finite-element model of the simple glass-to-metal seal. Model predictions of residual stress based on the evolution of material models are shown. These model predictions are compared to measured data. Validity of the finite- element predictions is discussed. It will be shown that the finite-element model of the glass-to-metal seal accurately predicts the mean residual stress in the glass near the glass-to-metal interface and is valid for this quantity of interest.

  11. Fabrication of sealed radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mars, Jean.

    1977-01-01

    The description is given for fabricating a sealed radiation source, consisting in depositing on a metal substrate a thin active coat of a radioelement, termed first coat, submitting this coated substrate to an oxidation treatment in order to obtain on the first coat an inactive coat of an oxide of the metal, termed second coat, and depositing a coat of varnish on this second inactive coat [fr

  12. Fiscal 1995 research investigation on chemical process technology using supercritical fluid; 1995 nendo chorinkai ryutai wo riyoshita kagaku process gijutsu ni kansuru chosa kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    With relation to the supercritical fluid utilization technology, conducted in fiscal 1995 were collection of basic data, extraction of R and D subjects and survey/analysis of application fields based on the literature survey and overseas field survey. From the research results, the following were selected as research subjects: as to the clean/recycling process technology, non-selection cascade treatment process of mixed waste plastics, hazardous waste treatment process, and radioactive waste treatment process. As to the unused resource utilization process technology, the supercritical submerged combustion power generation process, heavy hydrocarbon resource reutilization process, biomass synthetic utilization process, and carbon dioxide reutilization process. As to the next generation reaction process technology, the simple reaction process, de-organic solvent process, chemical materialization process for methane, and reaction separation combined process. As the innovative material process technology, the plastic forming process, high-functional materials, high-efficiency energy conversion materials, and heightening of function of solid wastes. 537 refs., 116 figs., 54 tabs.

  13. Choice of rotatable plug seals for prototype fast breeder reactor: Review of historical perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, N.K., E-mail: nksinha@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev, E-mail: baldev.dr@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Choice and arrangement of elastomeric inflatable and backup seals as primary and secondary barriers. • With survey (mid-1930s onwards) of reactor, sealing, R&D and rubber technology. • Load, reliability, safety, life and economy of seals and reactors are key factors. • PFBR blends concepts and experience of MOX fuelled FBRs with original solutions. • R&D indicates inflatable seal advanced fluoroelastomer pivotal in unifying nuclear sealing. - Abstract: Choice and arrangement of elastomeric primary inflatable and secondary backup seals for the rotatable plugs (RPs) of 500 MW (e), sodium cooled, pool type, 2-loop, mixed oxide (MOX) fuelled Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is depicted with review of various historical perspectives. Static and dynamic operation, largest diameters (PFBR: ∼6.4 m, ∼4.2 m), widest gaps and variations (5 ± 2 mm) and demanding operating requirements make RP openings on top shield (TS) the most difficult to seal which necessitated extensive development from 1950s to early 1990s. Liquid metal freeze seals with life equivalent to reactor prevailed as primary barrier (France, Japan, U.S.S.R.) during pre-1980s in spite of bulk, cost and complexity due to the abilities to meet zero leakage and resist core disruptive accident (CDA). Redefinition of CDA as beyond design basis accident, tolerable leakage and enhanced economisation drive during post-1980s established elastomeric inflatable seal as primary barrier excepting in U.S.S.R. (MOX fuel, freeze seal) and U.S.A. (metallic fuel). Choice of inflatable seal for PFBR RPs considers these perspectives, inherent advantages of elastomers and those of inflatable seals which maximise seal life. Choice of elastomeric backup seal as secondary barrier was governed by reliability and minimisation as well as distribution of load (temperature, radiation, mist) to maximise seal life. The compact sealing combination brings the hanging RPs at about the same elevation to reduce

  14. Seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruns, H.J.; Huelsermann, K.H.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of seals for sealing a pressure vessel such as a nuclear reactor vessel, steam boiler vessel, or any other vessel which is desirably sealed against pressure of the type including a housing and a housing closure that present opposed vertical sealing surfaces which define the sides of a channel. The seals of the present invention comprise at least one sealing member disposed in the channel, having at least one stop face, a base portion and two shank portions extending from the base portion to form a groove-like recess. The shank portions are provided with sealing surfaces arranged to mate with the opposed vertical pressure vessel sealing surfaces. A shank-spreading wedge element also disposed in the channel has at least one stop face and is engaged in the groove-like recess with the sealing member and wedge element stop face adjacent to each other

  15. Seals monitoring systems using wireless communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermand, Guillaume; Bertrand, Johan; Farhoud, Radwan; Suzuki, Kei; ETO, Jiro; Tanabe, Hiromi; Takamura, Hisashi; Suyama, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Wireless monitoring based on electromagnetic waves is a promising application for deep geological nuclear waste repositories. It should allow data transmission without installing wires across the various seals (disposal cell plugs, gallery plugs, shaft plugs). Developments of the wireless system (e.g. transmitter and receiver) are in progress in order to fit the repository requirements. A common research program has been elaborated by RWMC and Andra. The present work aims at developing the wireless monitoring technology to intermediate level waste (ILW) disposal facilities concept. In this concept, ILW packages will be emplaced in disposal cells with concrete liner. After the operational phase, the cells will be backfilled with sealing material. In practice, this work demonstrates the feasibility of adapting and optimizing the wireless transmission system for specific repository cases. After preliminary transmission studies, it was decided to make a representative test in situ of a wireless transmission through the clay from a sealed side to an accessible side of the repository. In order to reduce the attenuation of magnetic flux caused by steel components between the transmitter and the receiver, the receiving antenna is installed in a dedicated borehole (drilled from the accessible side). Two types of reception antennas have been designed. According to its coil orientation, type A antenna measures the electromagnetic wave perpendicular to the borehole axis. On the other hand, type B antenna with a coil set in-line with the tubular casing, measures the electromagnetic wave parallel to the borehole axis. The outside cylinder (pressure tight case) is made of PVC considering the attenuation of electromagnetic flux. According to the direction of electromagnetic flux and position of the boreholes in the final repository design, type A or type B will be chosen. For the 'representative' test, a borehole, TSF1002 has been

  16. Combining microwave resonance technology to multivariate data analysis as a novel PAT tool to improve process understanding in fluid bed granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço, Vera; Herdling, Thorsten; Reich, Gabriele; Menezes, José C; Lochmann, Dirk

    2011-08-01

    A set of 192 fluid bed granulation batches at industrial scale were in-line monitored using microwave resonance technology (MRT) to determine moisture, temperature and density of the granules. Multivariate data analysis techniques such as multiway partial least squares (PLS), multiway principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate batch control charts were applied onto collected batch data sets. The combination of all these techniques, along with off-line particle size measurements, led to significantly increased process understanding. A seasonality effect could be put into evidence that impacted further processing through its influence on the final granule size. Moreover, it was demonstrated by means of a PLS that a relation between the particle size and the MRT measurements can be quantitatively defined, highlighting a potential ability of the MRT sensor to predict information about the final granule size. This study has contributed to improve a fluid bed granulation process, and the process knowledge obtained shows that the product quality can be built in process design, following Quality by Design (QbD) and Process Analytical Technology (PAT) principles. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Enhanced oral bioavailability of silymarin using liposomes containing a bile salt: preparation by supercritical fluid technology and evaluation in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Zhao, Yaping; Zhang, Yongtai; Dang, Beilei; Liu, Ying; Feng, Nianping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop a procedure to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of silymarin (SM) by using bile salt-containing liposomes that were prepared by supercritical fluid technology (ie, solution-enhanced dispersion by supercritical fluids [SEDS]). The process for the preparation of SM-loaded liposomes containing a bile salt (SM-Lip-SEDS) was optimized using a central composite design of response surface methodology with the ratio of SM to phospholipids (w/w), flow rate of solution (mL/min), and pressure (MPa) as independent variables. Particle size, entrapment efficiency (EE), and drug loading (DL) were dependent variables for optimization of the process and formulation variables. The particle size, zeta potential, EE, and DL of the optimized SM-Lip-SEDS were 160.5 nm, −62.3 mV, 91.4%, and 4.73%, respectively. Two other methods to produce SM liposomes were compared to the SEDS method. The liposomes obtained by the SEDS method exhibited the highest EE and DL, smallest particle size, and best stability compared to liposomes produced by the thin-film dispersion and reversed-phase evaporation methods. Compared to the SM powder, SM-Lip-SEDS showed increased in vitro drug release. The in vivo AUC0−t of SM-Lip-SEDS was 4.8-fold higher than that of the SM powder. These results illustrate that liposomes containing a bile salt can be used to enhance the oral bioavailability of SM and that supercritical fluid technology is suitable for the preparation of liposomes. PMID:26543366

  18. Prismatic sealed nickel-cadmium batteries utilizing fiber structured electrodes. II - Applications as a maintenance free aircraft battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Menahem; Benczur-Urmossy, Gabor; Haschka, Friedrich

    Test data on prismatic sealed Ni-Cd batteries utilizing fiber structured electrodes (sealed FNC) is discussed. It is shown that, under a voltage limited charging scheme, the charge acceptance of the sealed FNC battery is far superior to that of the standard vented aircraft Ni-Cd batteries. This results in the sealed FNC battery maintaining its capacity over several thousand cycles without any need for electrical conditioning or water topping. APU start data demonstrate superior power capabilities over existing technologies. Performance at low temperature is presented. Abuse test results reveal a safe fail mechanism even under severe electrical abuse.

  19. Oriented cluster perforating technology and its application in horizontal wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huabin Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An oriented cluster perforating technology, which integrates both advantages of cluster and oriented perforating, will help solve a series of technical complexities in horizontal well drilling. For realizing its better application in oil and gas development, a series of technologies were developed including perforator self-weight eccentricity, matching of the electronic selective module codes with the surface program control, axial centralized contact signal transmission, and post-perforation intercluster sealing insulation. In this way, the following functions could be realized, such as cable-transmission horizontal well perforator self-weight orientation, dynamic signal transmission, reliable addressing & selective perforation and post-perforation intercluster sealing. The combined perforation and bridge plug or the multi-cluster perforation can be fulfilled in one trip of perforation string. As a result, the horizontal-well oriented cluster perforating technology based on cable conveying was developed. This technology was successfully applied in unconventional gas reservoir exploitation, such as shale gas and coalbed methane, with accurate orientation, reliable selective perforation and satisfactory inter-cluster sealing. The horizontal-well oriented cluster perforating technology benefits the orientation of horizontal well drilling with a definite target and direction, which provides a powerful support for the subsequent reservoir stimulation. It also promotes the fracturing fluid to sweep the principal pay zones to the maximum extent. Moreover, it is conductive to the formation of complex fracture networks in the reservoirs, making quality and efficient development of unconventional gas reservoirs possible.

  20. C-188 cobalt-60 sealed source integrity: source monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defalco, G.M.; Shah, V.

    1995-01-01

    The integrity of C-188 cobalt-60 sealed sources used for radiation processing will be a key factor in the continued industrial acceptance and growth of gamma irradiation technology. Given the public's relatively poor understanding of most nuclear topics and the news media's tendency to sensationalize events, it is appropriate for suppliers and users of gamma technology to be vigilant and conservative regarding the application of cobalt-60 sources to industrial purposes. Nordion's recent decision to extend the optional warranty on its C-188 cobalt-60 sealed source from 15 years to 20 years is based on over 30 years of data generated from its on-going SOURCE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM. This paper presents an overview of the C-188 SOURCE SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM. (author)

  1. Planar ultra thin glass seals with optical fiber interface for monitoring tamper attacks on security eminent components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, M.; Flachenecker, G.; Schade, W.; Gorecki, C.; Thoma, A.; Rathje, R.

    2017-11-01

    Optical seals consisting of waveguide Bragg grating sensor structures in ultra thin glass transparencies have been developed to cover security relevant objects for detection of unauthorized access. For generation of optical signature in the seals, femtosecond laser pulses were used. The optical seals were connected with an optical fiber to enable external read out of the seal. Different attack scenarios for getting undetected access to the object, covered by the seal, were proven and evaluated. The results presented here, verify a very high level of security. An unauthorized detaching and subsequent replacement by original or copy of the seals for tampering would be accompanied with a very high technological effort, posing a substantial barrier towards an attacker. Additionally, environmental influences like temperature effects have a strong but reproducible influence on signature, which in context of a temperature reference database increases the level of security significantly.

  2. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitany, Sandor

    2013-01-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A waste

  3. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitany, Sandor [PURAM, Puskas Tivadar street 11, Budaors, Pest 2040 (Hungary)

    2013-07-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A

  4. Status of borehole plugging and shaft sealing for geologic isolation of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Activities in programs devoted to disposal of radioactive waste in deep geologic formations are reported. Research on borehole plugging and shaft sealing is emphasized. Past and current activities related to penetration sealing were assessed through an exhaustive literature review and contacts with industrial, governmental, and research organizations. Cited references are included along with a bibliography assembled for this study. Evaluation of literature reviewed and presentation of information obtained from personal contacts are summarized. Technical considerations for penetration sealing as related to nuclear waste isolation, but which may differ from conventional technology, are presented and research needs are identified

  5. Performance evaluation study of IHX-IV seal assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmakumar, G.; Venkatramanan, J.; Balasubramanian, V.; Prakash, V.; Vaidyanathan, G. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603102 (India); Konnur, M.S.; Ram Mohan, S.; Suresh, M.; Manikandan, S.; Rajesh, V. [Fluid Control Research Institute, Palakkad - 678 623 (India)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The construction of the 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) has commenced at IGCAR, Kalpakkam. PFBR has four intermediate Heat Exchangers (IHX) and two primary Sodium Pumps. The secondary circuits consist of two loops with each loop having one secondary pump, two intermediate heat exchangers, one surge tank and four steam generators. Primary circuit has both hot and cold sodium and is separated into hot and cold pools by Inner Vessel(IV). IHX forms the interface between the primary circuit and secondary circuit of PFBR. The IHX and pumps are supported from at the top in the roof slab and penetrate through the conical portion of inner vessel. Proper sealing arrangements are necessary to prevent leakage of hot sodium into the cold pool through the penetration. The Mechanical Seal is employed to minimize the leakage through the penetration. This seal arrangement can facilitate Differential radial and thermal expansion between IHX and IV stand pipe at the region of penetration Relative tilting between the axis of IHX and IV stand pipe Smooth installation during commissioning and easy removal during maintenance Minimizes the forces transmitted to IV The hydraulic simulation study, of the IHX - IV mechanical seal assembly was undertaken at the Fluid Control Research Institute, Palghat. The seal has two leakage paths viz. Axial and radial. The leakage depends on the contact pressure on the sealing surface and the head causing the leakage. High leakage flow may lead to damage of inner vessel and may affect the thermal efficiency of the IHX. CFD analysis of the geometry was done in detail. This was done for prototype and the model condition. The optimized design obtained using CFD was employed for experimental evaluation. In the experimental set up, the leakage characteristics was studied for varying axial and radial clearance that prevails during the various stages of operation of the seal assembly in the reactor. A 1/2 scaled

  6. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Ashish; Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar; Natu, Harshad; Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  7. Development of laser beam welding for the lip seal configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Ashish, E-mail: ashish.yadav@iter-india.org [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Joshi, Jaydeep; Singh, Dhananjay Kumar [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India); Natu, Harshad [Magod Laser Machining Pvt. Ltd., KIADB Ind. Area, Jigani, Anekal Taluk, Bengaluru 560105 (India); Rotti, Chandramouli; Bandyopadhyay, Mainak; Chakraborty, Arun [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Sector 25, Gandhinagar 382016, Gujarat (India)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Laser welding parameter optimization for required weld penetration. • Parametric study of actual scenarios like air gap, plate & beam misalignment. • Destructive and non-destructive examination of the welds and He-leak testing. - Abstract: A vacuum seal using the lip sealing technique is emerging as the most likely choice for fusion devices, to comply with the requirement of maintainability. The welding technology considered for lip sealing is laser welding, due to the attributes of small spot diameter, low concentrated heat input, high precision and penetration. To establish the process, an experiment has been conducted on a sample size of 150 mm × 50 mm having thickness of 2 mm, material AISI304L to assess the dependence of beam parameters like, laser power, speed and focusing distance on penetration and quality of weld joint. Further, the assessment of the effect of welding set-up variables like air-gap between plates, plate misalignment, and laser beam misalignment on the weld quality is also required. This paper presents the results of this experimental study and also the plan for developing a large (∼10 m) size laser welded seal, that simulates, appropriately, the configuration required in large dimension fusion devices.

  8. Methods of viscosity measurements in sealed ampoules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1999-07-01

    Viscosity of semiconductors and metallic melts is usually measured by oscillating cup method. This method utilizes the melts contained in vacuum sealed silica ampoules, thus the problems related to volatility, contamination, and high temperature and pressure can be alleviate. In a typical design, the time required for a single measurement is of the order of one hour. In order to reduce this time to a minute range, a high resolution angular detection system is implemented in our design of the viscometer. Furthermore, an electromagnet generating a rotational magnetic field (RMF) is incorporated into the apparatus. This magnetic field can be used to remotely and nonintrusively measure the electrical conductivity of the melt. It can also be used to induce a well controlled rotational flow in the system. The transient behavior of this flow can potentially yield of the fluid. Based on RMF implementation, two novel viscometry methods are proposed in this work: a) the transient torque method, b) the resonance method. A unified theoretical approach to the three methods is presented along with the initial test result of the constructed apparatus. Advantages of each of the method are discussed.

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant shaft sealing system compliance submittal design report. Volume 2 of 2: Appendix E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This report describes a shaft sealing design for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a proposed nuclear waste repository in bedded salt. The system is designed to limit entry of water and release of contaminants through the four existing shafts after the WIPP is decommissioned. The design approach applies redundancy to functional elements and specifies multiple, common, low-permeability materials to reduce uncertainty in performance. The system comprises 13 elements that completely fill the shafts with engineered materials possessing high density and low permeability. Laboratory and field measurements of component properties and performance provide the basis for the design and related evaluations. Hydrologic, mechanical, thermal, and physical features of the system are evaluated in a series of calculations. These evaluations indicate that the design guidance is addressed by effectively limiting transport of fluids within the shafts, thereby limiting transport of hazardous material to regulatory boundaries. Additionally, the use or adaptation of existing technologies for placement of the seal components combined with the use of available, common materials assure that the design can be constructed

  10. Stirling engine with air working fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, John A.

    1985-01-01

    A Stirling engine capable of utilizing air as a working fluid which includes a compact heat exchange module which includes heating tube units, regenerator and cooler positioned about the combustion chamber. This arrangement has the purpose and effect of allowing the construction of an efficient, high-speed, high power-density engine without the use of difficult to seal light gases as working fluids.

  11. Vacuum sealing with a spiral grooved gas dynamic seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tadashi

    1979-01-01

    Gas dynamic seals with rectangular spiral grooves are studied theoretically taking the effects of sidewalls of the grooves and the effects of gas compressibility into account, and slip boundary conditions are employed. The results are compared with the existing experimental data and the validity of the theory is confirmed over a wide pressure range except for the extremely low pressures. Suggestions are made regarding the choice of the geometrical dimensions, i.e., aspect ratio, helix angle, clearance parameter and groove width ratio. (author)

  12. Measurement of glucose area under the curve using minimally invasive interstitial fluid extraction technology: evaluation of glucose monitoring concepts without blood sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshiyuki; Okada, Seiki; Hagino, Kei; Asakura, Yoshihiro; Kikkawa, Yasuo; Kojima, Junko; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Maekawa, Yasunori; Isobe, Kazuki; Koike, Reona; Nakajima, Hiromu; Asano, Kaoru

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring postprandial hyperglycemia is crucial in treating diabetes, although its dynamics make accurate monitoring difficult. We developed a new technology for monitoring postprandial hyperglycemia using interstitial fluid (ISF) extraction technology without blood sampling. The glucose area under the curve (AUC) using this system was measured as accumulated ISF glucose (IG) with simultaneous calibration with sodium ions. The objective of this study was to evaluate this technological concept in healthy individuals. Minimally invasive ISF extraction technology (MIET) comprises two steps: pretreatment with microneedles and ISF accumulation over a specific time by contact with a solvent. The correlation between glucose and sodium ion levels using MIET was evaluated in 12 subjects with stable blood glucose (BG) levels during fasting. BG and IG time courses were evaluated in three subjects to confirm their relationship while BG was fluctuating. Furthermore, the accuracy of glucose AUC measurements by MIET was evaluated several hours after a meal in 30 subjects. A high correlation was observed between glucose and sodium ion levels when BG levels were stable (R=0.87), indicating that sodium ion is a good internal standard for calibration. The variation in IG and BG with MIET was similar, indicating that IG is an adequate substitute for BG. Finally, we showed a strong correlation (R=0.92) between IG-AUC and BG-AUC after a meal. These findings validate the adequacy of glucose AUC measurements using MIET. Monitoring glucose using MIET without blood sampling may be beneficial to patients with diabetes.

  13. Bioprocess scale-up/down as integrative enabling technology: from fluid mechanics to systems biology and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvigne, Frank; Takors, Ralf; Mudde, Rob; van Gulik, Walter; Noorman, Henk

    2017-09-01

    Efficient optimization of microbial processes is a critical issue for achieving a number of sustainable development goals, considering the impact of microbial biotechnology in agrofood, environment, biopharmaceutical and chemical industries. Many of these applications require scale-up after proof of concept. However, the behaviour of microbial systems remains unpredictable (at least partially) when shifting from laboratory-scale to industrial conditions. The need for robust microbial systems is thus highly needed in this context, as well as a better understanding of the interactions between fluid mechanics and cell physiology. For that purpose, a full scale-up/down computational framework is already available. This framework links computational fluid dynamics (CFD), metabolic flux analysis and agent-based modelling (ABM) for a better understanding of the cell lifelines in a heterogeneous environment. Ultimately, this framework can be used for the design of scale-down simulators and/or metabolically engineered cells able to cope with environmental fluctuations typically found in large-scale bioreactors. However, this framework still needs some refinements, such as a better integration of gas-liquid flows in CFD, and taking into account intrinsic biological noise in ABM. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Actively controlled shaft seals for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salant, Richard F.

    1995-07-01

    This study experimentally investigates an actively controlled mechanical seal for aerospace applications. The seal of interest is a gas seal, which is considerably more compact than previous actively controlled mechanical seals that were developed for industrial use. In a mechanical seal, the radial convergence of the seal interface has a primary effect on the film thickness. Active control of the film thickness is established by controlling the radial convergence of the seal interface with a piezoelectric actuator. An actively controlled mechanical seal was initially designed and evaluated using a mathematical model. Based on these results, a seal was fabricated and tested under laboratory conditions. The seal was tested with both helium and air, at rotational speeds up to 3770 rad/sec, and at sealed pressures as high as 1.48 x 10(exp 6) Pa. The seal was operated with both manual control and with a closed-loop control system that used either the leakage rate or face temperature as the feedback. The output of the controller was the voltage applied to the piezoelectric actuator. The seal operated successfully for both short term tests (less than one hour) and for longer term tests (four hours) with a closed-loop control system. The leakage rates were typically 5-15 slm (standard liters per minute), and the face temperatures were generally maintained below 100C. When leakage rate was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint leakage rate was typically maintained within 1 slm. However, larger deviations occurred during sudden changes in sealed pressure. When face temperature was used as the feedback signal, the setpoint face temperature was generally maintained within 3 C, with larger deviations occurring when the sealed pressure changes suddenly. the experimental results were compared to the predictions from the mathematical model. The model was successful in predicting the trends in leakage rate that occurred as the balance ratio and sealed pressure changed

  15. Ultrananocrystalline diamond film as a wear resistant and protective coating for mechanical seal applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumant, A.V.; Krauss, A.R.; Gruen, D.M.; Auciello, O.; Erdemir, A.; Williams, M.; Artiles, A.F.; Adams, W.

    2005-01-01

    Mechanical shaft seals used in pumps are critically important to the safe operation of the paper, pulp, and chemical process industry, as well as petroleum and nuclear power plants. Specifically, these seals prevent the leakage of toxic gases and hazardous chemicals to the environment and final products from the rotating equipment used in manufacturing processes. Diamond coatings have the potential to provide negligible wear, ultralow friction, and high corrosion resistance for the sliding surfaces of mechanical seals, because diamond exhibits outstanding tribological, physical, and chemical properties. However, diamond coatings produced by conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) exhibit high surface roughness (R a ≥ 1 μm), which results in high wear of the seal counterface, leading to premature seal failure. To avoid this problem, we have developed an ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) film formed by a unique CH 4 /Ar microwave plasma CVD method. This method yields extremely smooth diamond coatings with surface roughness R a = 20-30 nm and an average grain size of 2-5 nm. We report the results of a systematic test program involving uncoated and UNCD-coated SiC shaft seals. Results confirmed that the UNCD-coated seals exhibited neither measurable wear nor any leakage during long-duration tests that took 21 days to complete. In addition, the UNCD coatings reduced the frictional torque for seal rotation by five to six times compared with the uncoated seals. This work promises to lead to rotating shaft seals with much improved service life, reduced maintenance cost, reduced leakage of environmentally hazardous materials, and increased energy savings. This technology may also have many other tribological applications involving rolling or sliding contacts.

  16. Guide to optimized replacement of equipment seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, J.F.

    1990-03-01

    A reevaluation of current scheduled replacement intervals of polymeric seals in plant equipment can achieve significant benefits. Information is provided which has the potential for increasing replacement intervals based on better information on how seals have performed through unique nuclear industry tests to qualify equipment, improved elastomers and increased knowledge of the failure mechanisms and related performance. The research was performed by reviewing applications of elastomeric seals in nuclear plants and practice associated with defining seal replacement intervals in the nuclear power and other industries. Performance indicators and how they predict degradation of seals were evaluated. Guidelines and a flow chart for reevaluating seal replacement intervals are provided. 29 refs., 38 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Folded membrane dialyzer with mechanically sealed edges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markley, F.W.

    A semipermeable membrane is folded in accordion fashion to form a stack of pleats and the edges are sealed so as to isolate the opposite surfaces of the membrane. The stack is contained within a case that provides ports for flow of blood in contact with one surface of the membrane through channels formed by the pleats and also provides ports for flow of a dialysate through channels formed by the pleats in contact with the other surface of the membrane. The serpentine side edges of the membrane are sealed by a solidified plastic material, whereas effective mechanical means are provided to seal the end edges of the folded membrane. The mechanical means include a clamping strip which biases case sealing flanges into a sealed relationship with end portions of the membrane near the end edges, which portions extend from the stack and between the sealing flanges.

  18. Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-13

    412TW-PA-15560 Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrochemical Separation, Pumping, and Storage of Hydrogen or Oxygen into Nanocapillaries Via High Pressure MEA Seals...density storage of gases remains a major technological hurdle for many fields. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), for example, reduced their hydrogen

  19. Management of disused sealed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukauskas, D.; Skridaila, N.

    2003-01-01

    The report presents the requirements on management of disused sealed sources in Lithuania; disused sealed source disposal facilities; performed safety analysis and planed repository safety improvements. The requirements on pre-disposal management of Disused Sealed Sources (DSS) are presented. The requirements on disposal of short lived VLLW and LILW (A, B and C classes) radioactive waste approved in 2002-2003. Generic Waste Acceptance Criteria for Near Surface Disposal, P-2003-01 approved in 2003. Requirements on disposal of Low and intermediate level long lived waste do not exist (D and E classes). Requirements for the disposal of disused sealed sources (F class) do not exist. Disposal method for the F class - Near Surface or Deep geological repository, depending on the waste acceptance criteria. Only one repository for institutional radioactive waste exist in Lithuania - Maisiagala repository. It is near surface RADON type disposal facility, built in 1963 and closed in 1988. It was constructed of the monolithic reinforced concrete with the dimensions 5 m x 15 m x 3 m, the thickness of the sidewalls is about 0.25 m and the thickness of the bottom is about 0.2 m. The overall volume is about 200 m 3 . At time of closure only three fifths of the volume had been filled. The empty two fifths of the vault were filled with concrete, then with sand, then with the concrete (0.01 m), hot bitumen and the 0.05 m asphalt layers. Monolithic concrete that was covered with bitumen and 0.05 m thick layer of asphalt closed the vault. Sand layer the thickness of which was not less than 1.2 m formed the cap. Disused radioactive sources embedded in a biological shielding were buried together with their shielding, the sources without the shielding were buried in two stainless steel containers. The total activity of buried radioactive nuclides is 3.42.10 -15 Bq (calculated according the documentation). There are some uncertainties about the inventory: from 1963 to 1973. After the

  20. Sealing method and sealing device for radioactive waste containing vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Koji; Otsuki, Akira

    1998-01-01

    A radioactive waste-containing body is hoisted down into a strong-material vessel opened upwardly, and a strong-material lid is hoisted down to the opening of the strong-material-vessel and welded. The strong material vessel is hoisted up and loaded on a corrosion resistant-material bottom plate placed horizontally. A corrosion resistant-material vessel having one opening end and having a corrosion resistant-material flange on the other end and previously agreed with the strong material-vessel main body is hoisted up by a hoisting device having an inserting device so that the opening of the corrosion resistant vessel is directed downwardly. The corrosion resistant vessel is press-fitted to the outside of the strong material-vessel by the inserting device while being heated by a preheater to shrink. Subsequently, the lower end of the corrosion resistant-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material bottom plate are welded to constitute a corrosion resistant-material vessel. Then, the radioactive waste containing body can be sealed in a sealing vessel comprising the strong-material vessel and the corrosion resistant-material vessel. (N.H.)

  1. Analysis of Two-Phase Flow in Damper Seals for Cryogenic Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arauz, Grigory L.; SanAndres, Luis

    1996-01-01

    Cryogenic damper seals operating close to the liquid-vapor region (near the critical point or slightly su-cooled) are likely to present two-phase flow conditions. Under single phase flow conditions the mechanical energy conveyed to the fluid increases its temperature and causes a phase change when the fluid temperature reaches the saturation value. A bulk-flow analysis for the prediction of the dynamic force response of damper seals operating under two-phase conditions is presented as: all-liquid, liquid-vapor, and all-vapor, i.e. a 'continuous vaporization' model. The two phase region is considered as a homogeneous saturated mixture in thermodynamic equilibrium. Th flow in each region is described by continuity, momentum and energy transport equations. The interdependency of fluid temperatures and pressure in the two-phase region (saturated mixture) does not allow the use of an energy equation in terms of fluid temperature. Instead, the energy transport is expressed in terms of fluid enthalpy. Temperature in the single phase regions, or mixture composition in the two phase region are determined based on the fluid enthalpy. The flow is also regarded as adiabatic since the large axial velocities typical of the seal application determine small levels of heat conduction to the walls as compared to the heat carried by fluid advection. Static and dynamic force characteristics for the seal are obtained from a perturbation analysis of the governing equations. The solution expressed in terms of zeroth and first order fields provide the static (leakage, torque, velocity, pressure, temperature, and mixture composition fields) and dynamic (rotordynamic force coefficients) seal parameters. Theoretical predictions show good agreement with experimental leakage pressure profiles, available from a Nitrogen at cryogenic temperatures. Force coefficient predictions for two phase flow conditions show significant fluid compressibility effects, particularly for mixtures with low mass

  2. Comment on 'Quantum string seal is insecure'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guangping

    2007-01-01

    An attack strategy was recently proposed by Chau [Phys. Rev. A 75, 012327 (2007)], which was claimed to be able to break all quantum string seal protocols. Here it will be shown that the attack cannot obtain nontrivial information and escape the detection simultaneously in a class of quantum string seal, including the one proposed by He [Int. J. Quantum Inf. 4, 677 (2006)]. Thus it is insufficient to conclude that all quantum string seals are insecure

  3. A seal analyzer for testing container integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDaniel, P.; Jenkins, C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of laboratory and production seal analyzer that offers a rapid, nondestructive method of assuring the seal integrity of virtually any type of single or double sealed container. The system can test a broad range of metal cans, drums and trays, membrane-lidded vessels, flexible pouches, aerosol containers, and glass or metal containers with twist-top lids that are used in the chemical/pesticide (hazardous materials/waste), beverage, food, medical and pharmaceutical industries

  4. Optimization of material and production to develop fluoroelastomer inflatable seals for sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, N.K., E-mail: nksinha@igcar.gov.i [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev, E-mail: dir@igcar.gov.i [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), Kalpakkam, Tamilnadu 603102 (India)

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: Production of thin fluoroelastomer profiles by cold feed extrusion and continuous cure involving microwave and hot air heating. Use of peroxide curing in air during production. Use of fluoroelastomers based on advanced polymer architecture (APA) for the production of profiles. Use of the profiles in inflatable seals for critical application of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. Tailoring of material formulation by synchronized optimization of material and production technologies to ensure that the produced seal ensures significant gains in terms of performance and safety in reactor under synergistic influences of temperature, radiation, air and sodium aerosol. - Abstract: The feasibility of producing thin-walled fluoroelastomer profiles under continuous, atmospheric-pressure vulcanization conditions in air has been demonstrated by successful manufacture of {approx}2 m diameter test inflatable seals for the 500 MWe, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) using a 50/50 blend formulation of Viton GBL-200S/600S based on advanced polymer architecture (APA). A commercial cold feed screw extruder with 90 mm diameter screw was used along with continuous cure by microwave (2.45 GHz) and hot air heating (190 {sup o}C) at a line speed of 1 m/min to produce the seals. The blend formulation promises significant improvement in the performance and safety of the seals. This article depicts the relevant characteristics of the original inflatable seal compound that was used as reference to achieve the objectives through synchronized optimization of material and production technologies. The production trials are outlined and the blend formulation used with minor factory modifications to produce the test seals is reported. Progressive refinements of the original, Viton A-401C based compound to the blend formulation is presented along with an assessment of potential performance gains. Possible uses of the reported formulation and production technique for other large

  5. Optimization of material and production to develop fluoroelastomer inflatable seals for sodium cooled fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N.K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Production of thin fluoroelastomer profiles by cold feed extrusion and continuous cure involving microwave and hot air heating. → Use of peroxide curing in air during production. → Use of fluoroelastomers based on advanced polymer architecture (APA) for the production of profiles. → Use of the profiles in inflatable seals for critical application of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. → Tailoring of material formulation by synchronized optimization of material and production technologies to ensure that the produced seal ensures significant gains in terms of performance and safety in reactor under synergistic influences of temperature, radiation, air and sodium aerosol. - Abstract: The feasibility of producing thin-walled fluoroelastomer profiles under continuous, atmospheric-pressure vulcanization conditions in air has been demonstrated by successful manufacture of ∼2 m diameter test inflatable seals for the 500 MWe, Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) using a 50/50 blend formulation of Viton GBL-200S/600S based on advanced polymer architecture (APA). A commercial cold feed screw extruder with 90 mm diameter screw was used along with continuous cure by microwave (2.45 GHz) and hot air heating (190 o C) at a line speed of 1 m/min to produce the seals. The blend formulation promises significant improvement in the performance and safety of the seals. This article depicts the relevant characteristics of the original inflatable seal compound that was used as reference to achieve the objectives through synchronized optimization of material and production technologies. The production trials are outlined and the blend formulation used with minor factory modifications to produce the test seals is reported. Progressive refinements of the original, Viton A-401C based compound to the blend formulation is presented along with an assessment of potential performance gains. Possible uses of the reported formulation and production technique for

  6. Thermohydrodynamic analysis of cryogenic liquid turbulent flow fluid film bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Luis San

    1993-01-01

    A thermohydrodynamic analysis is presented and a computer code developed for prediction of the static and dynamic force response of hydrostatic journal bearings (HJB's), annular seals or damper bearing seals, and fixed arc pad bearings for cryogenic liquid applications. The study includes the most important flow characteristics found in cryogenic fluid film bearings such as flow turbulence, fluid inertia, liquid compressibility and thermal effects. The analysis and computational model devised allow the determination of the flow field in cryogenic fluid film bearings along with the dynamic force coefficients for rotor-bearing stability analysis.

  7. Ceramic blade with tip seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

    1997-08-05

    The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

  8. A comparison of the sealing ability of various temporary restorative materials to seal the access cavity: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji Markose

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In multiple-appointment root canal treatment, a temporary filling material is used to seal the access cavity between visits. The primary function of this material is to prevent the contamination of the root canal system by fluids, organic debris, and bacteria from the oral cavity. Material and Methods: A total of fifty extracted noncarious unrestored human maxillaryanterior teeth with intact crowns and roots were selected The canals were instrumented using stepback technique and sodium hypochlorite (3% and hydrogen peroxide (3% were used as irrigants for each specimen alternatively. The coronal two-thirds of each canal were flared using Gates-Glidden drills up to no. 3 size and obturated with Gutta-percha using zinc oxide-eugenol (ZnOE as sealer. The teeth were then randomly selected and divided into six groups out of which four were experimental groups and two control groups. The teeth were then immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 3 days. All sealing materials and Gutta-percha were gently removed from the walls of the canal, and the entire circumference of the canal wall examined for dye penetration. Results: The lowest mean leakage was in the Fermit-N group followed by Cavit-W, ZnOE, intermediate restorative materials (IRM, and positive control. Conclusion: Fermit-N showed better sealing ability compared to cavit, ZnOE and IRM.

  9. Upgrading primary heat transport pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, T.; Metcalfe, R.; Rhodes, D.; McInnes, D.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the operating environment at the Bruce-A Nuclear Generating Station created the need for an upgraded Primary Heat Transport Pump (PHTP) seal. In particular, the requirement for low pressure running during more frequent start-ups exposed a weakness of the CAN2 seal and reduced its reliability. The primary concern at Bruce-A was the rotation of the CAN2 No. 2 stators in their holders. The introduction of low pressure running exacerbated this problem, giving rapid wear of the stator back face, overheating, and thermocracking. In addition, the resulting increase in friction between the stator and its holder increased stationary-side hysteresis and thereby changed the seal characteristic to the point where interseal pressure oscillations became prevalent. The resultant increased hysteresis also led to hard rubbing of the seal faces during temperature transients. An upgraded seal was required for improved reliability to avoid forced outages and to reduce maintenance costs. This paper describes this upgraded 'replacement seal' and its performance history. In spite of the 'teething' problems detailed in this paper, there have been no forced outages due to the replacement seal, and in the words of a seal maintenance worker at Bruce-A, 'it allows me to go home and sleep at night instead of worrying about seal failures.' (author)

  10. Seal for an object containing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuerpflug, W.; Nentwich, D.

    1977-01-01

    This seal which cannot be counterfeited, specially for sealing nuclear objects, e.g. fuel rods, not only makes any damage which has taken place obvious, but makes identification according to a key possible. For this purpose a minimum number of 'particles' or small bodies, which are identical but of different permeability, are fixed inside a short tube during 'loading' of the seal in a certain or an accidental sequence. The sequence of the spheres, which represents a key, can only be determined by special electromagnetic measuring equipment. On first opening the seal, this key sequence is irrevocably destroyed. (HP) [de

  11. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampdla, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  12. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolia, D.S.; Speer, E.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed

  13. Reusable tamper-indicating security seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A reusable tamper-indicating mechanical security seal for use in safeguarding nuclear material has been developed. The high-security seal displays an unpredictable, randomly selected, five-digit code each time it is used. This five digit code serves the same purpose that the serial number does for conventional non-reusable seals - a unique identifier for each use or application. The newly developed reusable seal is completely enclosed within a seamless, tamper-indicating, plastic jacket. The jacket is designed to reveal any attempts to penetrate, section or to chemically remove and replace with a counterfeit for surreptitious purposes

  14. Ductile alloys for sealing modular component interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John J.; Wessell, Brian J.; James, Allister W.; Marsh, Jan H.; Gear, Paul J.

    2017-08-08

    A vane assembly (10) having: an airfoil (12) and a shroud (14) held together without metallurgical bonding there between; a channel (22) disposed circumferentially about the airfoil (12), between the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14); and a seal (20) disposed in the channel (22), wherein during operation of a turbine engine having the vane assembly (10) the seal (20) has a sufficient ductility such that a force generated on the seal (20) resulting from relative movement of the airfoil (12) and the shroud (14) is sufficient to plastically deform the seal (20).

  15. Quick-sealing design for radiological containment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampolia, Donald S.; Speer, Elmer

    1990-01-01

    A quick-sealing assembly and method for forming an adhesive seal on opposite sides of a mechanical seal for a flexible containment bag of the type used for working with radioactively contaminated objects. The assembly includes an elongated mechanical fastener having opposing engaging members affixed at a predetermined distance from each of the elongated edges, with an adhesive layer formed between the mechanical fastener and the elongated edge such that upon engagement of the mechanical fastener and adhesive layers to opposing containment fabric, a neat triple hermetic seal is formed.

  16. Properties of Sealing Materials in Groundwater Wells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köser, Claus

    pellets as sealing material in groundwater wells. The way and the pattern, in which bentonite pellets are deposited, have been shown to have an effect on the swelling pressure of the bentonite seal. During the transport phase of pellets from the terrain to a given sedimentation depth, a sorting process......) into densities for clay/water systems has been developed. This method has successfully been used to evaluate e.g., macroporosity, homogenization of the bentonite seal during the hydration of water, hydraulic conductivity and the creation of channels in the bentonite seals. Based on the results obtained...

  17. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, S. M.; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng, Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-12-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of "O"ring sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with "O" ring sealing.

  18. Bingham Sealing and Application in Vacuum Clamping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S M; Teo, Wee Kin; Geng Zunmin; Turner, Sam; Ridgway, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Vacuum clamping is extensively used in shell machining. In this paper a Bingham Sealing (BS) is presented and formulized based on Bingham plastic performance. The sealing capability of BS is evaluated in various cases. A new Bingham plastic is developed and the yield stress is measured. The performances of Or ing sealing and BS with the developed Bingham plastic are compared to the static experiment. In this experiment the same vacuum is achieved and the distortion of the blade with BS is better than that with 'O' ring sealing.

  19. Modeling the effect of seal leakage on spontaneous heating in a longwall gob area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.C.; Yuan, L. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Office of Mine Safety and Health Research

    2010-07-01

    Three coal mines in the United States with a history of spontaneous combustion use a bleederless ventilation system as a control measure. In a bleederless system, one of the headgate entries is used as the tailgate entry of the succeeding panel and is isolated from the gob of the active panel by gob seals that are installed in the headgate entry as the face advances. An active longwall panel using a Y-type bleederless ventilation system was simulated in this study. As longwall mining progresses, some seals are known to leak. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed to study the effect of seal leakage on spontaneous heating of coal in the longwall gob area. The simulation results showed that under typical bleederless ventilation conditions, the maximum temperature in the gob increased with an increase in leakage rate. The maximum temperature occurred at the headgate side corner at the back end of the panel. When only 1 or 2 seals were leaking, the maximum temperature occurred around the seal. The results demonstrate that complex interactions between pressure differential and gob permeability at different locations in the gob cause ventilation pathways. The interactions depend greatly on gob permeability and seal leakage rates. 8 refs., 1 tab., 14 figs.

  20. Numerical modeling of supercritical carbon dioxide flow in see-through labyrinth seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Haomin; Pidaparti, Sandeep; Wolf, Mathew; Edlebeck, John; Anderson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The supercritical carbon dioxide properties were implemented in an open source CFD code OpenFOAM. • Labyrinth seal was simulated with supercritical carbon dioxide to provide guidance for seal design for compressor. • Two-phase capability was implemented to handle the possible appearance of two-phase carbon dioxide. - Abstract: This paper presents a numerical study of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO_2) flow in see-through labyrinth seals. The computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulation of this scenario is performed under the framework of OpenFOAM. Properties of sCO_2 are implemented into OpenFOAM with a user-defined interface. A test facility was constructed to measure the leakage rate and pressure drop of sCO_2 in see-through labyrinth seals. Various designs and conditions have been tested to study the flow characteristic and provide validation data for the numerical model. The primary goal is to verify the model's capability to predict leakage rate, with a secondary goal focused on using the code to optimize the seal design for sCO_2. This research concludes with some guidelines for the see-through labyrinth seal optimization.