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Sample records for fluid dynamic model

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling in yarn engineering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Patanaik, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This chapter deals with the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling in reducing yarn hairiness during the ring spinning process and thereby “engineering” yarn with desired properties. Hairiness significantly affects the appearance...

  2. Hidden Symmetry of a Fluid Dynamical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Neves, C

    2001-01-01

    A connection between solutions of the relativistic d-brane system in (d+1) dimensions with the solutions of a Galileo invariant fluid in d-dimensions is by now well established. However, the physical nature of the light-cone gauge description of a relativistic membrane changes after the reduction to the fluid dynamical model since the gauge symmetry is lost. In this work we argue that the original gauge symmetry present in a relativistic d-brane system can be recovered after the reduction process to a d-dimensional fluid model. To this end we propose, without introducing Wess-Zumino fields, a gauge invariant theory of isentropic fluid dynamics and show that this symmetry corresponds to the invariance under local translation of the velocity potential in the fluid dynamics picture. We show that different but equivalent choices of the sympletic sector lead to distinct representations of the embedded gauge algebra.

  3. Direct modeling for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun

    2015-06-01

    All fluid dynamic equations are valid under their modeling scales, such as the particle mean free path and mean collision time scale of the Boltzmann equation and the hydrodynamic scale of the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. The current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) focuses on the numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDEs), and its aim is to get the accurate solution of these governing equations. Under such a CFD practice, it is hard to develop a unified scheme that covers flow physics from kinetic to hydrodynamic scales continuously because there is no such governing equation which could make a smooth transition from the Boltzmann to the NS modeling. The study of fluid dynamics needs to go beyond the traditional numerical partial differential equations. The emerging engineering applications, such as air-vehicle design for near-space flight and flow and heat transfer in micro-devices, do require further expansion of the concept of gas dynamics to a larger domain of physical reality, rather than the traditional distinguishable governing equations. At the current stage, the non-equilibrium flow physics has not yet been well explored or clearly understood due to the lack of appropriate tools. Unfortunately, under the current numerical PDE approach, it is hard to develop such a meaningful tool due to the absence of valid PDEs. In order to construct multiscale and multiphysics simulation methods similar to the modeling process of constructing the Boltzmann or the NS governing equations, the development of a numerical algorithm should be based on the first principle of physical modeling. In this paper, instead of following the traditional numerical PDE path, we introduce direct modeling as a principle for CFD algorithm development. Since all computations are conducted in a discretized space with limited cell resolution, the flow physics to be modeled has to be done in the mesh size and time step scales. Here, the CFD is more or less a direct

  4. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-03-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics modelling in cardiovascular medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul D; Narracott, Andrew; von Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik; Silva Soto, Daniel Alejandro; Hsiao, Sarah; Lungu, Angela; Evans, Paul; Bressloff, Neil W; Lawford, Patricia V; Hose, D Rodney; Gunn, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    This paper reviews the methods, benefits and challenges associated with the adoption and translation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling within cardiovascular medicine. CFD, a specialist area of mathematics and a branch of fluid mechanics, is used routinely in a diverse range of safety-critical engineering systems, which increasingly is being applied to the cardiovascular system. By facilitating rapid, economical, low-risk prototyping, CFD modelling has already revolutionised research and development of devices such as stents, valve prostheses, and ventricular assist devices. Combined with cardiovascular imaging, CFD simulation enables detailed characterisation of complex physiological pressure and flow fields and the computation of metrics which cannot be directly measured, for example, wall shear stress. CFD models are now being translated into clinical tools for physicians to use across the spectrum of coronary, valvular, congenital, myocardial and peripheral vascular diseases. CFD modelling is apposite for minimally-invasive patient assessment. Patient-specific (incorporating data unique to the individual) and multi-scale (combining models of different length- and time-scales) modelling enables individualised risk prediction and virtual treatment planning. This represents a significant departure from traditional dependence upon registry-based, population-averaged data. Model integration is progressively moving towards 'digital patient' or 'virtual physiological human' representations. When combined with population-scale numerical models, these models have the potential to reduce the cost, time and risk associated with clinical trials. The adoption of CFD modelling signals a new era in cardiovascular medicine. While potentially highly beneficial, a number of academic and commercial groups are addressing the associated methodological, regulatory, education- and service-related challenges.

  6. Modeling Tools Predict Flow in Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    "Because rocket engines operate under extreme temperature and pressure, they present a unique challenge to designers who must test and simulate the technology. To this end, CRAFT Tech Inc., of Pipersville, Pennsylvania, won Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Marshall Space Flight Center to develop software to simulate cryogenic fluid flows and related phenomena. CRAFT Tech enhanced its CRUNCH CFD (computational fluid dynamics) software to simulate phenomena in various liquid propulsion components and systems. Today, both government and industry clients in the aerospace, utilities, and petrochemical industries use the software for analyzing existing systems as well as designing new ones."

  7. Baroclinic Channel Model in Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharatti Lal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A complex flow structure is studied using a 2-dimentional baroclinic channel model Unsteady Navier - stokes equation coupled with equation of thermal energy ,salinity and the equation of state are implemented .System closure is achieved through a modified Prandtl, s mixing length formulation of turbulence dissipation The model is applied in a region where the fluid flow is effected by various forcing equation .In this case ,flow is estuarine region affected by diurnal tide and the fresh water inflow in to the estuary and a submerged structure is considered giving possible insight in to stress effects on submerged structure .the result show that in the time evolution of the vertical velocity along downstream edge changes sign from negative to positive .as the dike length increases the primary cell splits and flow becomes turbulent du e to the non-linear effect caused by the dike .these are found to agree favourably with result published in the open literature.

  8. Meteorological fluid dynamics asymptotic modelling, stability and chaotic atmospheric motion

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour K

    1991-01-01

    The author considers meteorology as a part of fluid dynamics. He tries to derive the properties of atmospheric flows from a rational analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations, at the same time analyzing various types of initial and boundary problems. This approach to simulate nature by models from fluid dynamics will be of interest to both scientists and students of physics and theoretical meteorology.

  9. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... history term. For general valve geometries there are no simple solution to either of these terms. During development and design of such switching valves, it is therefore, common practice to use simple models to describe the opposing fluid forces, neglecting all but the viscous term which is determined...... based on shearing areas and venting channels. For fast acting valves the opposing fluid force may retard the valve performance significantly, if appropriate measures are not taken during the valve design. Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are available to simulate the total fluid...

  10. Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brorsen, Michael

    These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University.......These lecture notes are intended mainly for the 7th semester course "Fluid Dynamics" offered by the Study Committee on Civil Engineering, Aalborg University....

  11. Modelling Emission from Building Materials with Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Claus; Nielsen, Peter V.; Heiselberg, Per

    This paper presents a numerical model that by means of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is capable of dealing with both pollutant transport across the boundary layer and internal diffusion in the source without prior knowledge of which is the limiting process. The model provides the concentration...

  12. Computational modeling of glow discharge-induced fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Balaji

    Glow discharge at atmospheric pressure using a dielectric barrier discharge can induce fluid flow and operate as an actuator for flow control. The largely isothermal surface plasma generation realized above can modify the near-wall flow structure by means of Lorentzian collisions between the ionized fluid and the neutral fluid. Such an actuator has advantages of no moving parts, performance at atmospheric conditions and devising complex control strategies through the applied voltage. However, the mechanism of the momentum coupling between the plasma and the fluid flow is not yet adequately understood. In the present work, a modeling framework is presented to simulate athermal, non-equilibrium plasma discharges in conjunction with low Mach number fluid dynamics at atmospheric pressure. The plasma and fluid species are treated as a two-fluid system exhibiting a few decades of length and time scales. The effect of the plasma dynamics on the fluid dynamics is devised via a body force treatment in the Navier-Stokes equations. Two different approaches of different degrees of fidelity are presented for modeling the plasma dynamics. The first approach, a phenomenological model, is based on a linearized force distribution approximating the discharge structure, and utilizing experimental guidance to deduce the empirical constants. A high fidelity approach is to model the plasma dynamics in a self-consistent manner using a first principle-based hydrodynamic plasma model. The atmospheric pressure regime of interest here enables us to employ local equilibrium assumptions, signifying efficient collisional energy exchange as against thermal heating from inelastic collision processes. The time scale ratios between convection, diffusion, and reaction/ionization mechanisms are O(107), making the system computationally stiff. To handle the stiffness, a sequential finite-volume operator-splitting algorithm capable of conserving space charge is developed; the approach can handle time

  13. A dynamic neutral fluid model for the PIC scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Alan; Lieberman, Michael; Verboncoeur, John

    2010-11-01

    Fluid diffusion is an important aspect of plasma simulation. A new dynamic model is implemented using the continuity and boundary equations in OOPD1, an object oriented one-dimensional particle-in-cell code developed at UC Berkeley. The model is described and compared with analytical methods given in [1]. A boundary absorption parameter can be adjusted from ideal absorption to ideal reflection. Simulations exhibit good agreement with analytic time dependent solutions for the two ideal cases, as well as steady state solutions for mixed cases. For the next step, fluid sources and sinks due to particle-particle or particle-fluid collisions within the simulation volume and to surface reactions resulting in emission or absorption of fluid species will be implemented. The resulting dynamic interaction between particle and fluid species will be an improvement to the static fluid in the existing code. As the final step in the development, diffusion for multiple fluid species will be implemented. [4pt] [1] M.A. Lieberman and A.J. Lichtenberg, Principles of Plasma Discharges and Materials Processing, 2nd Ed, Wiley, 2005.

  14. Dynamic Modeling of ThermoFluid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Munch

    2003-01-01

    formulated. The different models deviate with respect to the detail¿s included and calculation time in connection with simulation. The models have been implemented in a new library named ThermoTwoPhase to the programming language Modelica. A test rig has been built with an evaporator instrumented in a way...

  15. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular Chlamydomonas to multicellular Volvox, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 μm to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  16. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard, Peter S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a focused, readable account of the principal physical and mathematical ideas at the heart of fluid dynamics. Graduate students in engineering, applied math, and physics who are taking their first graduate course in fluids will find this book invaluable in providing the background in physics and mathematics necessary to pursue advanced study. The book includes a detailed derivation of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations, followed by many examples of their use in studying the dynamics of fluid flows. Modern tensor analysis is used to simplify the mathematical derivations, thus allowing a clearer view of the physics. Peter Bernard also covers the motivation behind many fundamental concepts such as Bernoulli's equation and the stream function. Many exercises are designed with a view toward using MATLAB or its equivalent to simplify and extend the analysis of fluid motion including developing flow simulations based on techniques described in the book.

  17. A Dynamical System Analysis of Three Fluid cosmological Model

    CERN Document Server

    Mahata, Nilanjana

    2015-01-01

    In Friedman-Robertson-Walker flat spacetime, we consider a three fluid cosmological model which contains dark matter, dark energy and baryonic matter in the form of perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state. Dark matter is taken in form of dust and dark energy is described by a scalar field with a potential $V(\\phi)$. Einstein's field equations are reduced to an autonomous dynamical system by suitable redefinition of basic variables. Considering exponential potential for the scalar field, critical points are obtained for the autonomous system. Finally stability of the critical points and cosmological implications are analyzed.

  18. Coupling lattice Boltzmann and molecular dynamics models for dense fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, A.; Kotsalis, E. M.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2007-04-01

    We propose a hybrid model, coupling lattice Boltzmann (LB) and molecular dynamics (MD) models, for the simulation of dense fluids. Time and length scales are decoupled by using an iterative Schwarz domain decomposition algorithm. The MD and LB formulations communicate via the exchange of velocities and velocity gradients at the interface. We validate the present LB-MD model in simulations of two- and three-dimensional flows of liquid argon past and through a carbon nanotube. Comparisons with existing hybrid algorithms and with reference MD solutions demonstrate the validity of the present approach.

  19. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  20. Fluid dynamics of dilatant fluid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakanishi, Hiizu; Nagahiro, Shin-ichiro; Mitarai, Namiko

    2012-01-01

    A dense mixture of granules and liquid often shows a severe shear thickening and is called a dilatant fluid. We construct a fluid dynamics model for the dilatant fluid by introducing a phenomenological state variable for a local state of dispersed particles. With simple assumptions for an equation...... of the state variable, we demonstrate that the model can describe basic features of the dilatant fluid such as the stress-shear rate curve that represents discontinuous severe shear thickening, hysteresis upon changing shear rate, and instantaneous hardening upon external impact. An analysis of the model...... reveals that the shear thickening fluid shows an instability in a shear flow for some regime and exhibits the shear thickening oscillation (i.e., the oscillatory shear flow alternating between the thickened and the relaxed states). The results of numerical simulations are presented for one- and two...

  1. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rokkam, Ram [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  2. Fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, Anatoly I

    This is the first book in a four-part series designed to give a comprehensive and coherent description of Fluid Dynamics, starting with chapters on classical theory suitable for an introductory undergraduate lecture course, and then progressing through more advanced material up to the level of modern research in the field. The present Part 1 consists of four chapters. Chapter 1 begins with a discussion of Continuum Hypothesis, which is followed by an introduction to macroscopic functions, the velocity vector, pressure, density, and enthalpy. We then analyse the forces acting inside a fluid, and deduce the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible and compressible fluids in Cartesian and curvilinear coordinates. In Chapter 2 we study the properties of a number of flows that are presented by the so-called exact solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations, including the Couette flow between two parallel plates, Hagen-Poiseuille flow through a pipe, and Karman flow above an infinite rotating disk. Chapter 3 is d...

  3. Improvement of Basic Fluid Dynamics Models for the COMPASS Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Morita, Koji; Shirakawa, Noriyuki; Yamamoto, Yuichi

    The COMPASS code is a new next generation safety analysis code to provide local information for various key phenomena in core disruptive accidents of sodium-cooled fast reactors, which is based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. In this study, improvement of basic fluid dynamics models for the COMPASS code was carried out and verified with fundamental verification calculations. A fully implicit pressure solution algorithm was introduced to improve the numerical stability of MPS simulations. With a newly developed free surface model, numerical difficulty caused by poor pressure solutions is overcome by involving free surface particles in the pressure Poisson equation. In addition, applicability of the MPS method to interactions between fluid and multi-solid bodies was investigated in comparison with dam-break experiments with solid balls. It was found that the PISO algorithm and free surface model makes simulation with the passively moving solid model stable numerically. The characteristic behavior of solid balls was successfully reproduced by the present numerical simulations.

  4. A fully dynamic magneto-rheological fluid damper model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Z.; Christenson, R. E.

    2012-06-01

    Control devices can be used to dissipate the energy of a civil structure subjected to dynamic loading, thus reducing structural damage and preventing failure. Semiactive control devices have received significant attention in recent years. The magneto-rheological (MR) fluid damper is a promising type of semiactive device for civil structures due to its mechanical simplicity, inherent stability, high dynamic range, large temperature operating range, robust performance, and low power requirements. The MR damper is intrinsically nonlinear and rate-dependent, both as a function of the displacement across the MR damper and the command current being supplied to the MR damper. As such, to develop control algorithms that take maximum advantage of the unique features of the MR damper, accurate models must be developed to describe its behavior for both displacement and current. In this paper, a new MR damper model that includes a model of the pulse-width modulated (PWM) power amplifier providing current to the damper, a proposed model of the time varying inductance of the large-scale 200 kN MR dampers coils and surrounding MR fluid—a dynamic behavior that is not typically modeled—and a hyperbolic tangent model of the controllable force behavior of the MR damper is presented. Validation experimental tests are conducted with two 200 kN large-scale MR dampers located at the Smart Structures Technology Laboratory (SSTL) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Lehigh University Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) facility. Comparison with experimental test results for both prescribed motion and current and real-time hybrid simulation of semiactive control of the MR damper shows that the proposed MR damper model can accurately predict the fully dynamic behavior of the large-scale 200 kN MR damper.

  5. Computational fluid dynamics framework for aerodynamic model assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallespin, D.; Badcock, K. J.; Da Ronch, A.; White, M. D.; Perfect, P.; Ghoreyshi, M.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the work carried out at the University of Liverpool to assess the use of CFD methods for aircraft flight dynamics applications. Three test cases are discussed in the paper, namely, the Standard Dynamic Model, the Ranger 2000 jet trainer and the Stability and Control Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle. For each of these, a tabular aerodynamic model based on CFD predictions is generated along with validation against wind tunnel experiments and flight test measurements. The main purpose of the paper is to assess the validity of the tables of aerodynamic data for the force and moment prediction of realistic aircraft manoeuvres. This is done by generating a manoeuvre based on the tables of aerodynamic data, and then replaying the motion through a time-accurate computational fluid dynamics calculation. The resulting forces and moments from these simulations were compared with predictions from the tables. As the latter are based on a set of steady-state predictions, the comparisons showed perfect agreement for slow manoeuvres. As manoeuvres became more aggressive some disagreement was seen, particularly during periods of large rates of change in attitudes. Finally, the Ranger 2000 model was used on a flight simulator.

  6. Computational methods of the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohl, W.R.; Wilhelm, D.; Parker, F.R.; Berthier, J.; Maudlin, P.J.; Schmuck, P.; Goutagny, L.; Ichikawa, S.; Ninokata, H.; Luck, L.B.

    1987-01-01

    To more accurately treat severe accidents in fast reactors, a program has been set up to investigate new computational models and approaches. The product of this effort is a computer code, the Advanced Fluid Dynamics Model (AFDM). This paper describes some of the basic features of the numerical algorithm used in AFDM. Aspects receiving particular emphasis are the fractional-step method of time integration, the semi-implicit pressure iteration, the virtual mass inertial terms, the use of three velocity fields, higher order differencing, convection of interfacial area with source and sink terms, multicomponent diffusion processes in heat and mass transfer, the SESAME equation of state, and vectorized programming. A calculated comparison with an isothermal tetralin/ammonia experiment is performed. We conclude that significant improvements are possible in reliably calculating the progression of severe accidents with further development.

  7. Dynamic dielectrophoresis model of multi-phase ionic fluids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yan

    Full Text Available Ionic-based dielectrophoretic microchips have attracted significant attention due to their wide-ranging applications in electro kinetic and biological experiments. In this work, a numerical method is used to simulate the dynamic behaviors of ionic droplets in a microchannel under the effect of dielectrophoresis. When a discrete liquid dielectric is encompassed within a continuous fluid dielectric placed in an electric field, an electric force is produced due to the dielectrophoresis effect. If either or both of the fluids are ionic liquids, the magnitude and even the direction of the force will be changed because the net ionic charge induced by an electric field can affect the polarization degree of the dielectrics. However, using a dielectrophoresis model, assuming ideal dielectrics, results in significant errors. To avoid the inaccuracy caused by the model, this work incorporates the electrode kinetic equation and defines a relationship between the polarization charge and the net ionic charge. According to the simulation conditions presented herein, the electric force obtained in this work has an error exceeding 70% of the actual value if the false effect of net ionic charge is not accounted for, which would result in significant issues in the design and optimization of experimental parameters. Therefore, there is a clear motivation for developing a model adapted to ionic liquids to provide precise control for the dielectrophoresis of multi-phase ionic liquids.

  8. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shivamoggi, Bhimsen K

    1998-01-01

    "Although there are many texts and monographs on fluid dynamics, I do not know of any which is as comprehensive as the present book. It surveys nearly the entire field of classical fluid dynamics in an advanced, compact, and clear manner, and discusses the various conceptual and analytical models of fluid flow." - Foundations of Physics on the first edition. Theoretical Fluid Dynamics functions equally well as a graduate-level text and a professional reference. Steering a middle course between the empiricism of engineering and the abstractions of pure mathematics, the author focuses

  9. Computational fluid dynamics modeling for emergency preparedness and response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, R.L.; Albritton, J.R.; Ermak, D.L.; Kim, J.

    1995-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has (CFD) has played an increasing in the improvement of atmospheric dispersion modeling. This is because many dispersion models are now driven by meteorological fields generated from CFD models or, in numerical weather prediction`s terminology, prognostic models. Whereas most dispersion models typically involve one or a few scalar, uncoupled equations, the prognostic equations are a set of highly-couple equations whose solution requires a significant level of computational power. Recent advances in computer hardware and software have enabled modestly-priced, high performance, workstations to exhibit the equivalent computation power of some mainframes. Thus desktop-class machines that were limited to performing dispersion calculations driven by diagnostic wind fields may now be used to calculate complex flows using prognostic CFD models. The Release and Advisory Capability (ARAC) program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has, for the past several years, taken advantage of the improvements in hardware technology to develop a national emergency response capability based on executing diagnostic models on workstations. Diagnostic models that provide wind fields are, in general, simple to implement, robust and require minimal time for execution. Because these models typically contain little physics beyond mass-conservation, their performance is extremely sensitive to the quantity and quality of input meteorological data and, in spite of their utility, can be applied with confidence to only modestly complex flows. We are now embarking on a development program to incorporate prognostic models to generate, in real-time, the meteorological fields for the dispersion models. In contrast to diagnostic models, prognostic models are physically-based and are capable of incorporating many physical processes to treat highly complex flow scenarios.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics investigation of turbulence models for non-newtonian fluid flow in anaerobic digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Binxin

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, 12 turbulence models for single-phase non-newtonian fluid flow in a pipe are evaluated by comparing the frictional pressure drops obtained from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with those from three friction factor correlations. The turbulence models studied are (1) three high-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (2) six low-Reynolds-number k-ε models, (3) two k-ω models, and (4) the Reynolds stress model. The simulation results indicate that the Chang-Hsieh-Chen version of the low-Reynolds-number k-ε model performs better than the other models in predicting the frictional pressure drops while the standard k-ω model has an acceptable accuracy and a low computing cost. In the model applications, CFD simulation of mixing in a full-scale anaerobic digester with pumped circulation is performed to propose an improvement in the effective mixing standards recommended by the U.S. EPA based on the effect of rheology on the flow fields. Characterization of the velocity gradient is conducted to quantify the growth or breakage of an assumed floc size. Placement of two discharge nozzles in the digester is analyzed to show that spacing two nozzles 180° apart with each one discharging at an angle of 45° off the wall is the most efficient. Moreover, the similarity rules of geometry and mixing energy are checked for scaling up the digester.

  11. Model Order Reduction for Fluid Dynamics with Moving Solid Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haotian; Wei, Mingjun

    2016-11-01

    We extended the application of POD-Galerkin projection for model order reduction from usual fixed-domain problems to more general fluid-solid systems when moving boundary/interface is involved. The idea is similar to numerical simulation approaches using embedded forcing terms to represent boundary motion and domain change. However, such a modified approach will not get away with the unsteadiness of boundary terms which appear as time-dependent coefficients in the new Galerkin model. These coefficients need to be pre-computed for prescribed motion, or worse, to be computed at each time step for non-prescribed motion. The extra computational cost gets expensive in some cases and eventually undermines the value of using reduced-order models. One solution is to decompose the moving boundary/domain to orthogonal modes and derive another low-order model with fixed coefficients for boundary motion. Further study shows that the most expensive integrations resulted from the unsteady motion (in both original and domain-decomposition approaches) have almost negligible impact on the overall dynamics. Dropping these expensive terms reduces the computation cost by at least one order while no obvious effect on model accuracy is noticed. Supported by ARL.

  12. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen;

    2015-01-01

    force, but these models are computationally expensive and are not suitable for evaluating large numbers of different operation conditions or even design optimization. In the present paper, an effort is done to describe these fluid forces and their origin. An example of the total opposing fluid force...

  13. Microchannel Emulsification: From Computational Fluid Dynamics to Predictive Analytical Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijke, van K.C.; Schroën, C.G.P.H.; Boom, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Emulsion droplet formation was investigated in terrace-based microchannel systems that generate droplets through spontaneous Laplace pressure driven snap-off. The droplet formation mechanism was investigated through high-speed imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, and we found g

  14. Modeling of Dynamic Fluid Forces in Fast Switching Valves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roemer, Daniel Beck; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik Clemmensen

    2015-01-01

    Switching valves experience opposing fluid forces due to movement of the moving member itself, as the surrounding fluid volume must move to accommodate the movement. This movement-induced fluid force may be divided into three main components; the added mass term, the viscous term and the socalled...... is given using an analytically solvable example, showing the explicit form of the force terms and highlighting the significance of the added mass and history term in certain fast switching valve applications. A general approximate model for arbitrary valve geometries is then proposed with offset...

  15. Critical Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification Models. Part II: Kinetic and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Żogała

    2014-01-01

    Originality/value: This paper presents state of art in the field of coal gasification modeling using kinetic and computational fluid dynamics approach. The paper also presents own comparative analysis (concerned with mathematical formulation, input data and parameters, basic assumptions, obtained results etc. of the most important models of underground coal gasification.

  16. Computational fluid dynamics in fire engineering theory, modelling and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Yuen, Kwok Kit

    2009-01-01

    Fire and combustion presents a significant engineering challenge to mechanical, civil and dedicated fire engineers, as well as specialists in the process and chemical, safety, buildings and structural fields. We are reminded of the tragic outcomes of 'untenable' fire disasters such as at King's Cross underground station or Switzerland's St Gotthard tunnel. In these and many other cases, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is at the forefront of active research into unravelling the probable causes of fires and helping to design structures and systems to ensure that they are less likely in the f

  17. Modeling of a continuous pretreatment reactor using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berson, R Eric; Dasari, Rajesh K; Hanley, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamic simulations are employed to predict flow characteristics in a continuous auger driven reactor designed for the dilute acid pretreatment of biomass. Slurry containing a high concentration of biomass solids exhibits a high viscosity, which poses unique mixing issues within the reactor. The viscosity increases significantly with a small increase in solids concentration and also varies with temperature. A well-mixed slurry is desirable to evenly distribute acid on biomass, prevent buildup on the walls of the reactor, and provides an uniform final product. Simulations provide flow patterns obtained over a wide range of viscosities and pressure distributions, which may affect reaction rates. Results provide a tool for analyzing sources of inconsistencies in product quality and insight into future design and operating parameters.

  18. Simulation of Tailrace Hydrodynamics Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2001-05-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to investigate hydrodynamic flow fields surrounding the tailrace zone below large hydraulic structures. Previous and ongoing studies using CFD tools to simulate gradually varied flow with multiple constituents and forebay/intake hydrodynamics have shown that CFD tools can provide valuable information for hydraulic and biological evaluation of fish passage near hydraulic structures. These studies however are incapable of simulating the rapidly varying flow fields that involving breakup of the free-surface, such as those through and below high flow outfalls and spillways. Although the use of CFD tools for these types of flow are still an active area of research, initial applications discussed in this report show that these tools are capable of simulating the primary features of these highly transient flow fields.

  19. Many-body dissipative particle dynamics modeling of fluid flow in fine-grained nanoporous shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yidong; Goral, Jan; Huang, Hai; Miskovic, Ilija; Meakin, Paul; Deo, Milind

    2017-05-01

    A many-body dissipative particle dynamics model, namely, MDPD, is applied for simulation of pore-scale, multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in fine-grained, nanoporous shales. Since this model is able to simultaneously capture the discrete features of fluid molecules in nanometer size pores and continuum fluid dynamics in larger pores, and is relatively easy to parameterize, it has been recognized as being particularly suitable for simulating complex fluid flow in multi-length-scale nanopore networks of shales. A remarkable feature of this work is the integration of a high-resolution FIB-SEM (focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy) digital imaging technique to the MDPD model for providing 3D voxel data that contain the invaluable geometrical and compositional information of shale samples. This is the first time that FIB-SEM is seamlessly linked to a Lagrangian model like MDPD for fluid flow simulation, which offers a robust approach to bridging gaps between the molecular- and continuum-scales, since the relevant spatial and temporal scales are too big for molecular dynamics, and too small for computational fluid dynamics with known constitutive models. Simulations ranging from a number of benchmark problems to a forced two-fluid flow in a Woodford shale sample are presented. Results indicate that this model can be used to deliver reasonable simulations for multi-component, multi-phase fluid flows in arbitrarily complex pore networks in shales.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors During Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Jensen, Mette; Ingildsen, Pernille; Rasmussen, Michael R.;

    2005-01-01

    shown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. The paper discusses the results at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...... been suggested and tested by means of computational fluid dynamics modelling. The most promissing design change have been found and reported....

  1. Dynamic modeling of fluid power transmissions for wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin Laguna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid power transmission for wind turbines is quietly gaining more ground/interest. The principle of the various concepts presented so far is to convert aerodynamic torque of the rotor blades into a pressurized fluid flow by means of a positive displacement pump. At the other end of the fluid power

  2. Dynamic modeling of fluid power transmissions for wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diepeveen, N.F.B.; Jarquin Laguna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Fluid power transmission for wind turbines is quietly gaining more ground/interest. The principle of the various concepts presented so far is to convert aerodynamic torque of the rotor blades into a pressurized fluid flow by means of a positive displacement pump. At the other end of the fluid power

  3. Computational fluid dynamics model of WTP clearwell: Evaluation of critical parameters influencing model performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducoste, J.; Brauer, R.

    1999-07-01

    Analysis of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for a water treatment plant clearwell was done. Model parameters were analyzed to determine their influence on the effluent-residence time distribution (RTD) function. The study revealed that several model parameters could have significant impact on the shape of the RTD function and consequently raise the level of uncertainty on accurate predictions of clearwell hydraulics. The study also revealed that although the modeler could select a distribution of values for some of the model parameters, most of these values can be ruled out by requiring the difference between the calculated and theoretical hydraulic retention time to within 5% of the theoretical value.

  4. Mathematical Models of Fluid Dynamics Modeling, Theory, Basic Numerical Facts An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Ansorge, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    Without sacrificing scientific strictness, this introduction to the field guides readers through mathematical modeling, the theoretical treatment of the underlying physical laws and the construction and effective use of numerical procedures to describe the behavior of the dynamics of physical flow. The book is carefully divided into three main parts:. - The design of mathematical models of physical fluid flow;. - A theoretical treatment of the equations representing the model, as Navier-Stokes, Euler, and boundary layer equations, models of turbulence, in order to gain qualitative as well as q

  5. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K.; Chu, Jhih-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  6. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei, E-mail: jwchu@nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K. [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99372 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ϕ in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ϕ-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ϕ-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ϕ-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ϕ-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Magoules, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Exploring new variations of classical methods as well as recent approaches appearing in the field, Computational Fluid Dynamics demonstrates the extensive use of numerical techniques and mathematical models in fluid mechanics. It presents various numerical methods, including finite volume, finite difference, finite element, spectral, smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), mixed-element-volume, and free surface flow.Taking a unified point of view, the book first introduces the basis of finite volume, weighted residual, and spectral approaches. The contributors present the SPH method, a novel ap

  8. A Cell Dynamical System Model for Simulation of Continuum Dynamics of Turbulent Fluid Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Selvam, A M

    2006-01-01

    Atmospheric flows exhibit long-range spatiotemporal correlations manifested as the fractal geometry to the global cloud cover pattern concomitant with inverse power-law form for power spectra of temporal fluctuations of all scales ranging from turbulence (millimeters-seconds) to climate (thousands of kilometers-years). Long-range spatiotemporal correlations are ubiquitous to dynamical systems in nature and are identified as signatures of self-organized criticality. Standard models for turbulent fluid flows in meteorological theory cannot explain satisfactorily the observed multifractal (space-time) structures in atmospheric flows. Numerical models for simulation and prediction of atmospheric flows are subject to deterministic chaos and give unrealistic solutions. Deterministic chaos is a direct consequence of round-off error growth in iterative computations. Round-off error of finite precision computations doubles on an average at each step of iterative computations. Round-off error will propagate to the main...

  9. Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Gordon I.

    2016-06-01

    > These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is `frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, including shocks and other discontinuities, are discussed. The spherical blast wave resulting from a supernova, and involving a strong shock, is a classic problem that can be solved analytically. Steady solutions with spherical or axial symmetry reveal the physics of winds and jets from stars and discs. The linearized equations determine the oscillation modes of astrophysical bodies, as well as their stability and their response to tidal forcing.

  10. A computational fluid dynamics model for designing heat exchangers based on natural convection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkse, M.H.; Loon, van W.K.P.; Walle, van der T.; Speetjens, S.L.; Bot, G.P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics model was created for the design of a natural convection shell-and-tube heat exchanger with baffles. The flow regime proved to be turbulent and this was modelled using the k¿¿ turbulence model. The features of the complex geometry were simplified considerably resulting

  11. Optimization of a new flow design for solid oxide cells using computational fluid dynamics modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duhn, Jakob Dragsbæk; Jensen, Anker Degn; Wedel, Stig;

    2016-01-01

    Design of a gas distributor to distribute gas flow into parallel channels for Solid Oxide Cells (SOC) is optimized, with respect to flow distribution, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling. The CFD model is based on a 3d geometric model and the optimized structural parameters include...

  12. A computational fluid dynamics model for wind simulation:model implementation and experimental validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuo-dong ZHANG; Ralf WIELAND; Matthias REICHE; Roger FUNK; Carsten HOFFMANN; Yong LI; Michael SOMMER

    2012-01-01

    To provide physically based wind modelling for wind erosion research at regional scale,a 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) wind model was developed.The model was programmed in C language based on the Navier-Stokes equations,and it is freely available as open source.Integrated with the spatial analysis and modelling tool (SAMT),the wind model has convenient input preparation and powerful output visualization.To validate the wind model,a series of experiments was conducted in a wind tunnel.A blocking inflow experiment was designed to test the performance of the model on simulation of basic fluid processes.A round obstacle experiment was designed to check if the model could simulate the influences of the obstacle on wind field.Results show that measured and simulated wind fields have high correlations,and the wind model can simulate both the basic processes of the wind and the influences of the obstacle on the wind field.These results show the high reliability of the wind model.A digital elevation model (DEM) of an area (3800 m long and 1700 m wide) in the Xilingele grassland in Inner Mongolia (autonomous region,China) was applied to the model,and a 3D wind field has been successfully generated.The clear implementation of the model and the adequate validation by wind tunnel experiments laid a solid foundation for the prediction and assessment of wind erosion at regional scale.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in Chiari malformation and syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth C; Fletcher, David F; Stoodley, Marcus A; Bilston, Lynne E

    2013-07-26

    The pathogenesis of syringomyelia in association with Chiari malformation (CM) is unclear. Studies of patients with CM have shown alterations in the CSF velocity profile and these could contribute to syrinx development or enlargement. Few studies have considered the fluid mechanics of CM patients with and without syringomyelia separately. Three subject-specific CFD models were developed for a normal participant, a CM patient with syringomyelia and a CM patient without syringomyelia. Model geometries, CSF flow rate data and CSF velocity validation data were collected from MRI scans of the 3 subjects. The predicted peak CSF pressure was compared for the 3 models. An extension of the study performed geometry and flow substitution to investigate the relative effects of anatomy and CSF flow profile on resulting spinal CSF pressure. Based on 50 monitoring locations for each of the models, the CM models had significantly higher magnitude (psyringomyelia mechanisms and relative effects of CSF velocity profile and spinal geometry on CSF pressure.

  14. Good modelling practice in applying computational fluid dynamics for WWTP modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicklein, Edward; Batstone, Damien J; Ducoste, Joel; Laurent, Julien; Griborio, Alonso; Wicks, Jim; Saunders, Stephen; Samstag, Randal; Potier, Olivier; Nopens, Ingmar

    2016-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling in the wastewater treatment (WWT) field is continuing to grow and be used to solve increasingly complex problems. However, the future of CFD models and their value to the wastewater field are a function of their proper application and knowledge of their limits. As has been established for other types of wastewater modelling (i.e. biokinetic models), it is timely to define a good modelling practice (GMP) for wastewater CFD applications. An International Water Association (IWA) working group has been formed to investigate a variety of issues and challenges related to CFD modelling in water and WWT. This paper summarizes the recommendations for GMP of the IWA working group on CFD. The paper provides an overview of GMP and, though it is written for the wastewater application, is based on general CFD procedures. A forthcoming companion paper to provide specific details on modelling of individual wastewater components forms the next step of the working group.

  15. An Eulerian-based Bubble Dynamics Model for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Asish; Kinzel, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Cavitation dynamics of nuclei are largely governed by the Rayleigh-Plesset Equation (RPE). This research explores the implementation of a one-way coupling to the solution of the RPE to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation in an Eulerian-framework. In this work, we used transport equations (i.e., advection) of the bubble radius and bubble growth rate, both of which are governed by advection mechanisms and coupling to the RPE through the CFD pressure field. The method is validated in the context of hypothetical pressure fields by prescribing a temporally varying pressure. Then, it is extended to one-way coupling with cavitation development in three different flow situations: (1) flow over a cylinder, (2) bubble formation during a bottle collapse event, and (3) cavitation in a tip vortex. In the context of these flows, the CFD simulations replicate an equivalent MATLAB-based solution to the RPE, thus validating the model. Additionally, an analytical formulation for appropriate upper and lower bounds for the bubble's physical properties is presented. These boundary values allow the CFD solver to run at larger time steps, therefore increasing the rate of convergence as well as maintaining solution accuracy. The results from this work suggest that Eulerian-based RPE cavitation models are practical and have the potential to simulate large numbers of bubbles that challenge Lagrangian methods.

  16. A Modelling Approach to Multibody Dynamics of Fluid Power Machinery with Hydrodynamic Lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per; Rømer, Daniel; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency potential of the digital displacement technology and the increasing interest in hydraulic transmissions in wind and wave energy applications has created an incentive for development of high efficiency fluid power machinery. Modelling and analysis of fluid power machinery loss...... to be coupled with multibody dynamics models. The focus of the current paper is an approach where the transient pressure field in hydrodynamic lubricated joint clearances are modelled by a set of control volumes and coupled with the fluid power machinery mechanics....... mechanisms is necessary in order to accommodate this demand. At present fully coupled thermo-elastic models for various tribological interfaces has been presented. However, in order to analyse the interaction between tribological interfaces in fluid power pumps and motors, these interface models needs...

  17. Coupling of Coastal Wave Transformation and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Seakeeping Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-03

    and Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Seakeeping Analysis Awardee: University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii Technical Contact: Kwok Fai...the coast to provide important information for seakeeping analysis . However, such endeavors involve appreciable numerical errors and complex near...nonlinear and dispersive theories, present-day computational models based on Boussinesq-type equations are being applied over vast regions from deep to

  18. Investigations to improve and assess the accuracy of computational fluid dynamic based explosion models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popat, N.R.; Catlin, C.A.; Arntzen, B.J.; Lindstedt, R.P.; Hjertager, B.H.; Solberg, T.; Saeter, O.; Berg, A.C. van den

    1996-01-01

    A summary is given of part of the CEC co-sponsored project MERGE (Modelling and Experimental Research into Gas Explosions). The objective of this part of the project was to provide improved Computational Fluid Dynamic explosion models with the potential for use in hazard assessments. Five organisati

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamic Model of Steam Ingestion into a Transonic Compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    DYNAMIC MODEL OF STEAM INGESTION INTO A TRANSONIC COMPRESSOR by Collin R. Hedges June 2009 Thesis Advisor: Anthony J. Gannon Second...TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Computational Fluid Dynamic Model of Steam Ingestion into a Transonic Compressor 6...flight deck. When ingested into jet engines, this steam may increase the engines’ susceptibility to stall. The serpentine air inlet ducts and single

  20. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  1. Fluid dynamics transactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiszdon, W

    1965-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Transactions, Volume 2 compiles 46 papers on fluid dynamics, a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that deals with fluid flow. The topics discussed in this book include developments in interference theory for aeronautical applications; diffusion from sources in a turbulent boundary layer; unsteady motion of a finite wing span in a compressible medium; and wall pressure covariance and comparison with experiment. The certain classes of non-stationary axially symmetric flows in magneto-gas-dynamics; description of the phenomenon of secondary flows in curved channels by means of co

  2. Applications of fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Round, G.R.; Garg, V.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book describes flexible and practical approach to learning the basics of fluid dynamics. Each chapter is a self-contained work session and includes a fluid dynamics concept, an explanation of the principles involved, an illustration of their application and references on where more detailed discussions can be found.

  3. Modeling the Fluid Dynamics in a Human Stomach to Gain Insight of Food Digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrua, MJ; Singh, RP

    2010-01-01

    During gastric digestion, food is disintegrated by a complex interaction of chemical and mechanical effects. Although the mechanisms of chemical digestion are usually characterized by using in vitro analysis, the difficulty in reproducing the stomach geometry and motility has prevented a good understanding of the local fluid dynamics of gastric contents. The goal of this study was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to develop a 3-D model of the shape and motility pattern of the stomach wall during digestion, and use it to characterize the fluid dynamics of gastric contents of different viscosities. A geometrical model of an averaged-sized human stomach was created, and its motility was characterized by a series of antral-contraction waves of up to 80% relative occlusion. The flow field within the model (predicted using the software Fluent™) strongly depended on the viscosity of gastric contents. By increasing the viscosity, the formation of the 2 flow patterns commonly regarded as the main mechanisms driving digestion (i.e., the retropulsive jet-like motion and eddy structures) was significantly diminished, while a significant increase of the pressure field was predicted. These results were in good agreement with experimental data previously reported in the literature, and suggest that, contrary to the traditional idea of a rapid and complete homogenization of the meal, gastric contents associated with high viscous meals are poorly mixed. This study illustrates the capability of CFD to provide a unique insight into the fluid dynamics of the gastric contents, and points out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the mechanisms involved in the digestion process. Practical Application This study illustrates the capability of computational fluid dynamic techniques to provide a unique insight into the dynamics of the gastric contents, pointing out its potential to develop a fundamental understanding and modeling of the human

  4. Modelling dynamic liquid-gas systems: Extensions to the volume-of-fluid solver

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, Johan A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the extension of the volume-of-fluid solver, interFoam, for improved accuracy and efficiency when modelling dynamic liquid-gas systems. Examples of these include the transportation of liquids, such as in the case of fuel carried...

  5. Preliminary analysis of the MER magnetic properties experiment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, K.M.; Merrison, J.P.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.;

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by questions raised by the magnetic properties experiments on the NASA Mars Pathfinder and Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions, we have studied in detail the capture of airborne magnetic dust by permanent magnets using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model supported by laboratory...

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics model of stratified atmospheric boundary-layer flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koblitz, Tilman; Bechmann, Andreas; Sogachev, Andrey;

    2015-01-01

    For wind resource assessment, the wind industry is increasingly relying on computational fluid dynamics models of the neutrally stratified surface-layer. So far, physical processes that are important to the whole atmospheric boundary-layer, such as the Coriolis effect, buoyancy forces and heat...

  7. THE DYNAMIC BEHAVIORS OF VISCOELASTIC PIPE CONVEYING FLUID WITH THE KELVIN MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhongmin; Zhao Fengqun; Feng Zhenyu; Liu Hongzhao

    2000-01-01

    Based on the differential constitutive relationship of linear viscoelastic material, a solid-liquid coupling vibration equation for viscoelastic pipe conveying fluid is derived by the D'Alembert's principle. The critical flow velocities and natural frequencies of the cantilever pipe conveying fluid with the Kelvin model ( flutter instability) are calculated with the modified finite difference method in the form of the recurrence for mula. The curves between the complex frequencies of the first, second and third mode and flow velocity of the pipe are plotted. On the basis of the numerical calculation results, the dynamic behaviors and stability of the pipe are discussed. It should be pointed out that the delay time of viscoelastic material with the Kelvin model has a remarkable effect on the dynamic characteristics and stability behaviors of the cantilevered pipe conveying fluid, which is a gyroscopic non-conservative system.

  8. Five decades of tackling models for stiff fluid dynamics problems a scientific autobiography

    CERN Document Server

    Zeytounian, Radyadour Kh

    2014-01-01

    Rationality - as opposed to 'ad-hoc' - and asymptotics - to emphasize the fact that perturbative methods are at the core of the theory - are the two main concepts associated with the Rational Asymptotic Modeling (RAM) approach in fluid dynamics when the goal is to specifically provide useful models accessible to numerical simulation via high-speed computing. This approach has contributed to a fresh understanding of Newtonian fluid flow problems and has opened up new avenues for tackling real fluid flow phenomena, which are known to lead to very difficult mathematical and numerical problems irrespective of turbulence. With the present scientific autobiography the author guides the reader through his somewhat non-traditional career; first discovering fluid mechanics, and then devoting more than fifty years to intense work in the field. Using both personal and general historical contexts, this account will be of benefit to anyone interested in the early and contemporary developments of an important branch of the...

  9. Numerical Modelling of Ore-forming Dynamics of Fractal Dispersive Fluid Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓军; 方云; 杨立强; 杨军臣; 孙忠实; 王建平; 丁式江; 王庆飞

    2001-01-01

    Based on an analysis of the fractal structures and mass transport mechanism of typical shear-fluid-ore formation system, the fractal dispersion theory of the fluid system was used in the dynamic study of the ore formation system. The model of point-source diffusive illuviation of the shear-fluid-ore formation system was constructed, and the numerical simulation of dynamics of the ore formation system was finished. The result shows that: (1) The metallogenic system have nested fractal structure. Different fractal dimension values in different systems show unbalance and inhomogeneity of ore-forming processes in the geohistory. It is an important parameter to symbolize the process of remobilization and accumulation of ore-forming materials. Also it can indicate the dynamics of the metallogenic system quantitatively to some extent. (2) In essence, the fractal dispersive ore-forming dynamics is a combination of multi-processes dominated by fluid dynamics and supplemented by molecule dispersion in fluids and fluid-rock interaction. It changes components and physico-chemical properties of primary rocks and fluids, favouring deposition and mineralization of ore-forming materials. (3) Gold ore-forming processes in different types of shear zones are quite different. (1) In a metallogenic system with inhomogeneous volumetric change and inhomogeneous shear, mineralization occurs in structural barriers in the centre of a shear zone and in geochemical barriers in the shear zone near its boundaries. But there is little possibility of mineralization out of the shear zone. (2) As to a metallogenic system with inhomogeneous volumetric change and simple shear, mineralization may occur only in structural barriers near the centre of the shear zone. (3) In a metallogenic system with homogeneous volumetric change and inhomogeneous shear, mineralization may occur in geochemical barriers both within and out of the shear zone.

  10. Modeling of fluid dynamics interacting with ductile fraction propagation in high pressure pipeline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mihaela Popescu

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model for the fluid dynamics in a fractured ductile pipe under high pressure. The pressure profile in front of the crack tip, which is the driving source of crack propagation, is computed using a nonlinear wave equation. The solution is coupled with a one dimensional choked flow analysis behind the crack. The simulation utilizes a high order optimized prefactored com-pact-finite volume method in space, and low dispersion and dissipation Runge-Kutta in time. As the pipe fractures the rapid depressurization take place inside the pipe and the prop-agation of the crack-induced waves strongly influences the outflow dynamics. Consistent with the experimental observa-tion, the model predicts the expansion wave inside the pipe, and the reflection and outflow of the wave. The model also helps characterize the propagation of the crack dynamics and fluid flows around the tip of the crack.

  11. A fluid dynamics model of the growth of phototrophic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarelli, F; Di Russo, C; Natalini, R; Ribot, M

    2013-06-01

    A system of nonlinear hyperbolic partial differential equations is derived using mixture theory to model the formation of biofilms. In contrast with most of the existing models, our equations have a finite speed of propagation, without using artificial free boundary conditions. Adapted numerical scheme will be described in detail and several simulations will be presented in one and more space dimensions in the particular case of cyanobacteria biofilms. Besides, the numerical scheme we present is able to deal in a natural and effective way with regions where one of the phases is vanishing.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the John Day Dam Tailrace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-07-08

    US Army Corps of Engineers - Portland District required that a two-dimensional (2D) depth-averaged and a three-dimensional (3D) free-surface numerical models to be developed and validated for the John Day tailrace. These models were used to assess potential impact of a select group of structural and operational alternatives to tailrace flows aimed at improving fish survival at John Day Dam. The 2D model was used for the initial assessment of the alternatives in conjunction with a reduced-scale physical model of the John Day Project. A finer resolution 3D model was used to more accurately model the details of flow in the stilling basin and near-project tailrace hydraulics. Three-dimensional model results were used as input to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory particle tracking software, and particle paths and times to pass a downstream cross section were used to assess the relative differences in travel times resulting from project operations and structural scenarios for multiple total river flows. Streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles were seeded in all turbine and spill bays with flows. For a Total River of 250 kcfs running with the Fish Passage Plan spill pattern and a spillwall, the mean residence times for all particles were little changed; however the tails of the distribution were truncated for both spillway and powerhouse release points, and, for the powerhouse releases, reduced the residence time for 75% of the particles to pass a downstream cross section from 45.5 minutes to 41.3 minutes. For a total river of 125 kcfs configured with the operations from the Fish Passage Plan for the temporary spillway weirs and for a proposed spillwall, the neutrally-buoyant particle tracking data showed that the river with a spillwall in place had the overall mean residence time increase; however, the residence time for 75% of the powerhouse-released particles to pass a downstream cross section was reduced from 102.4 min to 89 minutes.

  13. Polymer Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. Byron

    1980-01-01

    Problems in polymer fluid dynamics are described, including development of constitutive equations, rheometry, kinetic theory, flow visualization, heat transfer studies, flows with phase change, two-phase flow, polymer unit operations, and drag reduction. (JN)

  14. Modeling fluid dynamics on type II quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoville, James; Weeks, David; Yepez, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    A quantum algorithm is presented for modeling the time evolution of density and flow fields governed by classical equations, such as the diffusion equation, the nonlinear Burgers equation, and the damped wave equation. The algorithm is intended to run on a type-II quantum computer, a parallel quantum computer consisting of a lattice of small type I quantum computers undergoing unitary evolution and interacting via information interchanges represented by an orthogonal matrices. Information is effectively transferred between adjacent quantum computers over classical communications channels because of controlled state demolition following local quantum mechanical qubit-qubit interactions within each quantum computer. The type-II quantum algorithm presented in this paper describes a methodology for generating quantum logic operations as a generalization of classical operations associated with finite-point group symmetries. The quantum mechanical evolution of multiple qubits within each node is described. Presented is a proof that the parallel quantum system obeys a finite-difference quantum Boltzman equation at the mesoscopic scale, leading in turn to various classical linear and nonlinear effective field theories at the macroscopic scale depending on the details of the local qubit-qubit interactions.

  15. Inertial forces affect fluid front displacement dynamics in a pore-throat network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, Franziska; Or, Dani

    2014-08-01

    The seemingly regular and continuous motion of fluid displacement fronts in porous media at the macroscopic scale is propelled by numerous (largely invisible) pore-scale abrupt interfacial jumps and pressure bursts. Fluid fronts in porous media are characterized by sharp phase discontinuities and by rapid pore-scale dynamics that underlie their motion; both attributes challenge standard continuum theories of these flow processes. Moreover, details of pore-scale dynamics affect front morphology and subsequent phase entrapment behind a front and thereby shape key macroscopic transport properties of the unsaturated zone. The study presents a pore-throat network model that focuses on quantifying interfacial dynamics and interactions along fluid displacement fronts. The porous medium is represented by a lattice of connected pore throats capable of detaining menisci and giving rise to fluid-fluid interfacial jumps (the study focuses on flow rate controlled drainage). For each meniscus along the displacement front we formulate a local inertial, capillary, viscous, and hydrostatic force balance that is then solved simultaneously for the entire front. The model enables systematic evaluation of the role of inertia and boundary conditions. Results show that while displacement patterns are affected by inertial forces mainly by invasion of throats with higher capillary resistance, phase entrapment (residual saturation) is largely unaffected by inertia, limiting inertial effects on hydrological properties behind a front. Interfacial jump velocities are often an order of magnitude larger than mean front velocity, are strongly dependent on geometrical throat dimensions, and become less predictable (more scattered) when inertia is considered. Model simulations of the distributions of capillary pressure fluctuations and waiting times between invasion events follow an exponential distribution and are in good agreement with experimental results. The modeling approach provides insights

  16. Considerations of blood properties, outlet boundary conditions and energy loss approaches in computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji Young; Suh, Dae Chul; Lee, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Woo; Lee, Joon Sang

    2014-02-01

    Despite recent development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research, analysis of computational fluid dynamics of cerebral vessels has several limitations. Although blood is a non-Newtonian fluid, velocity and pressure fields were computed under the assumptions of incompressible, laminar, steady-state flows and Newtonian fluid dynamics. The pulsatile nature of blood flow is not properly applied in inlet and outlet boundaries. Therefore, we present these technical limitations and discuss the possible solution by comparing the theoretical and computational studies.

  17. Unsteady Vibration Aerodynamic Modeling and Evaluation of Dynamic Derivatives Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Unsteady aerodynamic system modeling is widely used to solve the dynamic stability problems encountering aircraft design. In this paper, single degree-of-freedom (SDF vibration model and forced simple harmonic motion (SHM model for dynamic derivative prediction are developed on the basis of modified Etkin model. In the light of the characteristics of SDF time domain solution, the free vibration identification methods for dynamic stability parameters are extended and applied to the time domain numerical simulation of blunted cone calibration model examples. The dynamic stability parameters by numerical identification are no more than 0.15% deviated from those by experimental simulation, confirming the correctness of SDF vibration model. The acceleration derivatives, rotary derivatives, and combination derivatives of Army-Navy Spinner Rocket are numerically identified by using unsteady N-S equation and solving different SHV patterns. Comparison with the experimental result of Army Ballistic Research Laboratories confirmed the correctness of the SHV model and dynamic derivative identification. The calculation result of forced SHM is better than that by the slender body theory of engineering approximation. SDF vibration model and SHM model for dynamic stability parameters provide a solution to the dynamic stability problem encountering aircraft design.

  18. A comparison of molecular dynamics and diffuse interface model predictions of Lennard-Jones fluid evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbante, Paolo [Dipartimento di Matematica, Politecnico di Milano - Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32 - 20133 Milano (Italy); Frezzotti, Aldo; Gibelli, Livio [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Aerospaziali, Politecnico di Milano - Via La Masa 34 - 20156 Milano (Italy)

    2014-12-09

    The unsteady evaporation of a thin planar liquid film is studied by molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones fluid. The obtained results are compared with the predictions of a diffuse interface model in which capillary Korteweg contributions are added to hydrodynamic equations, in order to obtain a unified description of the liquid bulk, liquid-vapor interface and vapor region. Particular care has been taken in constructing a diffuse interface model matching the thermodynamic and transport properties of the Lennard-Jones fluid. The comparison of diffuse interface model and molecular dynamics results shows that, although good agreement is obtained in equilibrium conditions, remarkable deviations of diffuse interface model predictions from the reference molecular dynamics results are observed in the simulation of liquid film evaporation. It is also observed that molecular dynamics results are in good agreement with preliminary results obtained from a composite model which describes the liquid film by a standard hydrodynamic model and the vapor by the Boltzmann equation. The two mathematical model models are connected by kinetic boundary conditions assuming unit evaporation coefficient.

  19. Local equilibrium solutions in simple anisotropic cosmological models, as described by relativistic fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shogin, Dmitry; Amund Amundsen, Per

    2016-10-01

    We test the physical relevance of the full and the truncated versions of the Israel–Stewart (IS) theory of irreversible thermodynamics in a cosmological setting. Using a dynamical systems method, we determine the asymptotic future of plane symmetric Bianchi type I spacetimes with a viscous mathematical fluid, keeping track of the magnitude of the relative dissipative fluxes, which determines the applicability of the IS theory. We consider the situations where the dissipative mechanisms of shear and bulk viscosity are involved separately and simultaneously. It is demonstrated that the only case in the given model when the fluid asymptotically approaches local thermal equilibrium, and the underlying assumptions of the IS theory are therefore not violated, is that of a dissipative fluid with vanishing bulk viscosity. The truncated IS equations for shear viscosity are found to produce solutions which manifest pathological dynamical features and, in addition, to be strongly sensitive to the choice of initial conditions. Since these features are observed already in the case of an oversimplified mathematical fluid model, we have no reason to assume that the truncation of the IS transport equations will produce relevant results for physically more realistic fluids. The possible role of bulk and shear viscosity in cosmological evolution is also discussed.

  20. Validation of a multidimensional computational fluid dynamics model for subcooled flow boiling analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Filho, Francisco A.; Caldeira, Alexandre D.; Borges, Eduardo M., E-mail: fbraz@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: alexdc@ieav.cta.b, E-mail: eduardo@ieav.cta.b [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In a heated vertical channel, the subcooled flow boiling regime occurs when the bulk fluid temperature is lower than the saturation temperature, but the fluid temperature reaches the saturation point near the channel wall. This phenomenon produces a significant increase in heat flux, limited by the critical heat flux. This study is particularly important to the thermal-hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactors. The purpose of this work is the validation of a multidimensional model to analyze the subcooled flow boiling comparing the results with experimental data found in literature. The computational fluid dynamics code FLUENT was used with Eulerian multiphase model option. The calculated values of wall temperature in the liquid-solid interface presented an excellent agreement when compared to the experimental data. Void fraction calculations presented satisfactory results in relation to the experimental data in pressures of 15, 30 and 45 bars. (author)

  1. A thermo fluid dynamic model of wood particle gasification- and combustion processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Boiger

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In order to qualitatively understand and evaluate the thermo- fluid dynamic situation within a wood gasification reactor, a 1D particle model has been created. The presented tool accounts for the highly in- stationary, kinetic- and thermo chemical effects, leading to partial gasification and combustion of a wood particle embedded within a packed bed collective. It considers the fluid- dynamic situation within the changing porous bulk structure of the packed bed, its impact on species- and heat transition mechanisms, the energy- and mass balances of wood, coal, pyrolysis-gas, wood- gas and off- gas phases, the thermodynamics of locally developing gasification- and combustion reaction equilibria, as well as the presence of the chemical species hydrogen, water, carbon (di- oxide, methane, oxygen, solid carbon and gaseous, longer chain hydrocarbons from pyrolysis. Model results can be shown to yield very good, qualitative agreement with measurements, found in literature.

  2. International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Partridge, P; Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics

    1992-01-01

    This book Boundary Elements in Fluid Dynamics is the second volume of the two volume proceedings of the International Conference on Computer Modelling of Seas and Coastal Regions and Boundary Elements and Fluid Dynamics, held in Southampton, U.K., in April 1992. The Boundary Element Method (BEM) is now fully established as an ac­ curate and successful technique for solving engineering problems in a wide range of fields. The success of the method is due to its advantages in data reduction, as only the boundary of the region is modelled. Thus moving boundaries may be more easily handled, which is not the case if domain methods are used. In addition, the method is easily able to model regions to extending to infinity. Fluid mechanics is traditionally one of the most challenging areas of engi­ neering, the simulation of fluid motion, particularly in three dimensions, is always a serious test for any numerical method, and is an area in which BEM analysis may be used taking full advantage of its special character...

  3. Lecture notes: Astrophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ogilvie, Gordon I

    2016-01-01

    These lecture notes and example problems are based on a course given at the University of Cambridge in Part III of the Mathematical Tripos. Fluid dynamics is involved in a very wide range of astrophysical phenomena, such as the formation and internal dynamics of stars and giant planets, the workings of jets and accretion discs around stars and black holes, and the dynamics of the expanding Universe. Effects that can be important in astrophysical fluids include compressibility, self-gravitation and the dynamical influence of the magnetic field that is 'frozen in' to a highly conducting plasma. The basic models introduced and applied in this course are Newtonian gas dynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) for an ideal compressible fluid. The mathematical structure of the governing equations and the associated conservation laws are explored in some detail because of their importance for both analytical and numerical methods of solution, as well as for physical interpretation. Linear and nonlinear waves, includin...

  4. Modeling Fluctuating Winds by Blending Mesoscale Model Data with Computational Fluid Dynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, S. E.; Zajaczkowski, F. J.; Schmehl, K. J.

    2010-12-01

    Wind energy companies require information regarding details of the wind field for both micrositing new wind farms and the specific turbines within them as well as for forecasting power production at particular sites. Although Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models applied on the mesoscale can provide information regarding the general flow characteristics, the very fine scale details (on the order of meters to tens of meters) dependent on local features are not available. That is precisely the realm in which Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models excel. These CFD models are capable of capturing details of the boundary layer dynamics and turbulent structures over a finer range of scales as well as flow around features such as buildings. They are not generally configured, however, to include radiation, moist convection physics, land surface parameterizations, and other physics packages commonly available within the NWP models. The solution proposed here is to blend the information provided by the mesoscale NWP models with the details of CFD by assimilating the NWP data directly into the CFD model. The assimilation occurs both at the boundaries as an inflow condition for the CFD model and internally by assimilating an NWP wind and temperature profile at the vertical gridlines of the mesoscale model run. This internal assimilation uses the Newtonian Relaxation technique, in which the solution is nudged toward the mesoscale values in the vicinity of the grid line while maintaining the internal mass and momentum consistency of the CFD model. The assimilation blending technique is demonstrated in the Rock Springs valley nestled between rolling ridges in the central Pennsylvania countryside in the vicinity of several wind farms. Two specific case days are chosen to represent typical summer and winter characteristics. The WRF-ARW NWP model is run with four dimensional data assimilation to produce a 1.3 km resolution mesoscale analysis. That data provide the basis for

  5. Dynamic analysis of electro- and magneto-rheological fluid dampers using duct flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteki, Kambiz; Bagchi, Ashutosh; Sedaghati, Ramin

    2014-03-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) and electro-rheological (ER) fluid dampers provide a semi-active control mechanism for suppressing vibration responses of a structure. MR and ER fluids change their viscosity under the influence of magnetic and electrical fields, respectively, which facilitates automatic control when these fluids are used in damping devices. The existing models, namely the phenomenological models for simulating the behavior of MR and ER dampers, rely on various parameters determined experimentally by the manufacturers for each damper configuration. It is of interest to develop mechanistic models of these dampers which can be applied to various configurations so that their fundamental characteristics can be studied to develop flexible design solutions for smart structures. This paper presents a formulation for dynamic analysis of electro-rheological (ER) and magneto-rheological (MR) fluid dampers in flow and mix mode configurations under harmonic and random excitations. The procedure employs the vorticity transport equation and the regularization function to deal with the unsteady flow and nonlinear behavior of ER/MR fluid in general motion. The finite difference method has been used to solve the governing differential equations. Using the developed approach, the damping force of ER/MR dampers can be calculated under any type of excitation.

  6. Noncommutative geometry and fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Praloy; Ghosh, Subir [Indian Statistical Institute, Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Kolkata (India)

    2016-11-15

    In the present paper we have developed a Non-Commutative (NC) generalization of perfect fluid model from first principles, in a Hamiltonian framework. The noncommutativity is introduced at the Lagrangian (particle) coordinate space brackets and the induced NC fluid bracket algebra for the Eulerian (fluid) field variables is derived. Together with a Hamiltonian this NC algebra generates the generalized fluid dynamics that satisfies exact local conservation laws for mass and energy, thereby maintaining mass and energy conservation. However, nontrivial NC correction terms appear in the charge and energy fluxes. Other non-relativistic spacetime symmetries of the NC fluid are also discussed in detail. This constitutes the study of kinematics and dynamics of NC fluid. In the second part we construct an extension of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) cosmological model based on the NC fluid dynamics presented here. We outline the way in which NC effects generate cosmological perturbations bringing about anisotropy and inhomogeneity in the model. We also derive a NC extended Friedmann equation. (orig.)

  7. Cold phase fluid model of the longitudinal dynamics ofspace-charged dominated beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Lee, Edward P.; Barnard, John J.; Friedman, Alex

    2002-03-01

    The dynamics of a longitudinally cold, charged-particle beam can be simulated by dividing the beam into slices and calculating the motion of the slice boundaries due to the longitudinal electric field generated by the beam. On each time step, the beam charge is deposited onto an (r, z) grid, and an existing (r, z) electrostatic field solver is used to find the longitudinal electric field. Transversely, the beam envelope equation is used for each slice boundary separately. In contrast to the g-factor model, it can be shown analytically that the repulsive electric field of a slice compressed to zero length is bounded. Consequently, this model allows slices to overtake their neighbors, effectively incorporating mixing. The model then effectively describes a cold fluid in longitudinal z, v{sub z} phase space. Longitudinal beam compression calculations based on this cold phase fluid model showed that slice overtaking reflects local mixing, while the global phase space structure is preserved.

  8. Local equilibrium solutions in simple anisotropic cosmological models, as described by relativistic fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Shogin, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    We test the physical relevance of the full and truncated versions of the Israel-Stewart theory of irreversible thermodynamics in a cosmological setting. Using a dynamical systems method, we determine the asymptotic future of plane symmetric Bianchi type I spacetimes filled with a viscous {\\gamma}-fluid, keeping track of the magnitude of relative dissipative fluxes, which determines the applicability of the Israel-Stewart theory. We consider the situations when the dissipative mechanisms of shear and bulk viscosity are involved separately and simultaneously. Also, we apply two different temperature models in the full version of the theory in order to compare the results. We demonstrate that the only case when the fluid asymptotically approaches local equilibrium, and the underlying assumptions of the IS theory are therefore not violated, is that of a dissipative fluid with vanishing bulk viscosity. The truncated Israel-Stewart equations for shear viscosity are found to produce solutions which manifest patholog...

  9. Modeling near-road air quality using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Jason; Zhang, K Max

    2009-10-15

    It is well recognized that dilution is an important mechanism governing the near-road air pollutant concentrations. In this paper, we aim to advance our understanding of turbulent mixing mechanisms on and near roadways using computation fluid dynamics. Turbulent mixing mechanisms can be classified into three categories according to their origins: vehicle-induced turbulence (VIT), road-induced turbulence (RIT), and atmospheric boundary layer turbulence. RIT includes the turbulence generated by road embankment, road surface thermal effects, and roadside structures. Both VIT and RIT are affected by the roadway designs. We incorporate the detailed treatment of VIT and RIT into the CFD (namely CFD-VIT-RIT) and apply the model in simulating the spatial gradients of carbon monoxide near two major highways with different traffic mix and roadway configurations. The modeling results are compared to the field measurements and those from CALINE4 and CFD without considering VIT and RIT. We demonstrate that the incorporation of VIT and RIT considerably improves the modeling predictions, especially on vertical gradients and seasonal variations of carbon monoxide. Our study implies that roadway design can significantly influence the near-road air pollution. Thus we recommend that mitigating near-road air pollution through roadway designs be considered in the air quality and transportation management In addition, thanks to the rigorous representation of turbulent mixing mechanisms, CFD-VIT-RIT can become valuable tools in the roadway designs process.

  10. Towards a review of computational fluid dynamic models for safety assessment of vapour-cloud explosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann-Delius, C.; Okafor, E. [Rheinisch-Westfaelische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen (Germany)

    2006-03-15

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling is the most promising method for safety assessment of hazardous fluid releases around oil and gas installations. By resolving several fluctuating quantities of such flows, these models have the potential to become a widely used decision tool for rapid assessment of explosion overpressures resulting from spilled hydrocarbons. The present paper reviews the current state of the art in vapour cloud or gas explosion modelling using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. Description of six recognisable CFD-based explosion codes currently used by industry and research communities in explosion hazard analysis will be presented. Appraisal of geometry or sub-grid modelling using porosity/distributed resistances (PDRs) will be made. This paper also explains how the unstructured adaptive gridding approach can become a viable alternative for better-resolved predictions of gas or vapour cloud explosions in complex geometries. A brief but comprehensive analysis of combustion and turbulence models used within the codes including their limitations will be presented. The paper concludes by suggesting key areas for further work. (orig.)

  11. Computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Blazek, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics: Principles and Applications, Third Edition presents students, engineers, and scientists with all they need to gain a solid understanding of the numerical methods and principles underlying modern computation techniques in fluid dynamics. By providing complete coverage of the essential knowledge required in order to write codes or understand commercial codes, the book gives the reader an overview of fundamentals and solution strategies in the early chapters before moving on to cover the details of different solution techniques. This updated edition includes new

  12. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  13. Videotapes and Movies on Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Bobbie; Young, Virginia E.

    1996-01-01

    Chapter 17 of Handbook of Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machinery: Experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics, Volume 11. A list of videorecordings and 16mm motion pictures about Fluid Dynamics and Fluid Machines.

  14. Multibody Dynamics of a Fluid Power Radial Piston Motor Including Transient Hydrodynamic Pressure Models of Lubricating Gaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Per; Rømer, Daniel; Andersen, Torben Ole

    2014-01-01

    is a multibody dynamics model of a radial piston fluid power motor, which connects the rigid bodies through models of the transient hydrodynamic lubrication pressure in the joint clearance. A finite volume approach is used to model the pressure dynamics of the fluid film lubrication. The model structure......The increasing interest in hydraulic transmissions in wind and wave energy applications has created an incentive for the development of high efficiency fluid power machinery. Modeling and analysis of fluid power machinery loss mechanisms are necessary in order to accommodate this demand. At present...... fully coupled thermo-elastic models has been used to simulate and study loss mechanisms in various tribological interfaces. Consequently, a reasonable focus of further development is to couple the interface models and the rigid body mechanics of fluid power machinery. The focus of the current paper...

  15. Application of computational fluid dynamics modelling in the process of forensic fire investigation: problems and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delémont, O; Martin, J-C

    2007-04-11

    Fire modelling has been gaining more and more interest into the community of forensic fire investigation. Despite an attractiveness that is partially justified, the application of fire models in that field of investigation rises some difficulties. Therefore, the understanding of the basic principles of the two main categories of fire models, the knowledge of their effective potential and their limitations are crucial for a valid and reliable application in forensic science. The present article gives an overview of the principle and basics that characterise the two kinds of fire models: zone models and field models. Whereas the first ones are developed on the basis of mathematical relation from empirical observations, such as stratification of fluid zones, and give a relatively broad view of mass and energy exchanges in an enclosure, the latter are based on fundamentals of fluid mechanics and represent the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to fire scenarii. Consequently, the data that are obtained from these two categories of fire models differ in nature, quality and quantity. First used in a fire safety perspective, fire models are not easily applied to assess parts of forensic fire investigation. A suggestion is proposed for the role of fire modelling in this domain of competence: a new tool for the evaluation of alternative hypotheses of origin and cause by considering the dynamic development of the fire. An example of a real case where such an approach was followed is explained and the evaluation of the obtained results comparing to traces revealed during the on-site investigation is enlightened.

  16. A discrete force allocation algorithm for modelling wind turbines in computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an algorithm for allocating discrete forces in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Discrete forces are useful in wind energy CFD. They are used as an approximation of the wind turbine blades’ action on the wind (actuator disc/line), to model forests and to model turbulent......, this algorithm does not address the specific cases where discrete forces are present. The velocities and pressure exhibit some significant numerical fluctuations at the position where the body forces are applied. While this issue is limited in space, it is usually critical to accurately estimate the velocity...

  17. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  18. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition.

  19. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Rine, Kyle P.; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M.; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, a Superfund site, are currently being investigated through in situ field measurements and computational fluid dynamics modeling. These tailings are heavily contaminated with lead and arsenic. Using a computational fluid dynamics model, we model dust transport from the mine tailings to the surrounding region. The model includes gaseous plume dispersion to simulate the transport of the fine aerosols, while individual particle transport is used to track the trajectories of larger particles and to monitor their deposition locations. In order to improve the accuracy of the dust transport simulations, both regional topographical features and local weather patterns have been incorporated into the model simulations. Results show that local topography and wind velocity profiles are the major factors that control deposition. PMID:25621085

  20. Steady shear rheometry of dissipative particle dynamics models of polymer fluids in reverse Poiseuille flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedosov, Dmitry A; Karniadakis, George Em; Caswell, Bruce

    2010-04-14

    Polymer fluids are modeled with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) as undiluted bead-spring chains and their solutions. The models are assessed by investigating their steady shear-rate properties. Non-Newtonian viscosity and normal stress coefficients, for shear rates from the lower to the upper Newtonian regimes, are calculated from both plane Couette and plane Poiseuille flows. The latter is realized as reverse Poiseuille flow (RPF) generated from two Poiseuille flows driven by uniform body forces in opposite directions along two-halves of a computational domain. Periodic boundary conditions ensure the RPF wall velocity to be zero without density fluctuations. In overlapping shear-rate regimes the RPF properties are confirmed to be in good agreement with those calculated from plane Couette flow with Lees-Edwards periodic boundary conditions (LECs), the standard virtual rheometer for steady shear-rate properties. The concentration and the temperature dependence of the properties of the model fluids are shown to satisfy the principles of concentration and temperature superposition commonly employed in the empirical correlation of real polymer-fluid properties. The thermodynamic validity of the equation of state is found to be a crucial factor for the achievement of time-temperature superposition. With these models, RPF is demonstrated to be an accurate and convenient virtual rheometer for the acquisition of steady shear-rate rheological properties. It complements, confirms, and extends the results obtained with the standard LEC configuration, and it can be used with the output from other particle-based methods, including molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, smooth particle hydrodynamics, and the lattice Boltzmann method.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Pulsatile Blood Flow Behavior in Modelled Stenosed Vessels with Different Severities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mehrabi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the behavior of blood flow in the stenosed vessels. Blood is modelled as an incompressible non-Newtonian fluid which is based on the power law viscosity model. A numerical technique based on the finite difference method is developed to simulate the blood flow taking into account the transient periodic behaviour of the blood flow in cardiac cycles. Also, pulsatile blood flow in the stenosed vessel is based on the Womersley model, and fluid flow in the lumen region is governed by the continuity equation and the Navier-Stokes equations. In this study, the stenosis shape is cosine by using Tu and Devil model. Comparing the results obtained from three stenosed vessels with 30%, 50%, and 75% area severity, we find that higher percent-area severity of stenosis leads to higher extrapressure jumps and higher blood speeds around the stenosis site. Also, we observe that the size of the stenosis in stenosed vessels does influence the blood flow. A little change on the cross-sectional value makes vast change on the blood flow rate. This simulation helps the people working in the field of physiological fluid dynamics as well as the medical practitioners.

  2. Fluid dynamics [and gas compressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurz, Rainer [Solar Turbines Inc. (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The author examines the use of computational fluid dynamics in the development of gas compressors. The background to CFD is explained including modelling the geometry and the effects of turbulence. A typical design process is briefly explained and its limitations discussed. (UK)

  3. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (aortic stenosis, mitral stenosis, aortic regurgitation, mitral regurgitation). Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid ...

  4. Modelling the dynamics of condensation and evaporation of fluids in three-dimensional slit pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselman, Joshua A.; Desouza, Anish; Monson, Peter A.

    2015-05-01

    We present an application of dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of confined fluids to the case of a fluid in a three-dimensional narrow slit between two plates. We consider a process where the slit is in contact with a subcritical bulk vapour and the bulk chemical potential is changed from a dilute gas value to a value close to that of the bulk saturated vapour so that capillary condensation occurs in the pore. DMFT predicts that the nucleation process during the condensation occurs by the formation of multiple liquid bridges spanning the pore walls, starting in the corners of the slit. These bridges eventually coalesce and the condensation transition terminates through the shrinkage and disappearance of a vapour bubble. We find that the density distribution is sensitive to the dimensions of the slit, with the number of bridges increasing with the slit area.

  5. Computational Modeling and Analysis of the Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat

    2009-11-01

    In order to swim efficiently and/or fast, a swimmer needs to master the subtle cause-and-effect relationship that exists between his/her movements and the surrounding fluid. This is what makes swimming one of the most technical of all sports. For the most part, science has played little if any role in helping swimmers and coaches improve swimming techniques or even to better understand the fluid dynamics of human swimming. Experiments of free swimming humans are extremely difficult to conduct and computational modeling approaches have, in the past, been unable to address this very complex problem. However, the development of a new class of numerical methods, coupled with unique animation and analysis tools is making it possible to analyze swimming strokes in all their complexity. The talk will focus on describing a relatively new numerical method that has been developed to solve flows with highly complex, moving/deforming boundaries. Numerical simulations are used to perform a detailed analysis of the dolphin kick. This stroke has emerged as an important component of competitive swimming in recent years and our analysis has allowed us to extract some useful insights into the fluid dynamics of this stroke. In addition, we also address the continuing debate about the role of lift versus drag in thrust production for human swimming.

  6. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluid mixtures confined in mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, J R; Monson, P A

    2013-11-12

    We present the extension of dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for fluids in porous materials (Monson, P. A. J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 084701) to the case of mixtures. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states for fluids in pores after a change in the bulk pressure or composition. It is especially useful for studying systems where there are capillary condensation or evaporation transitions. Nucleation processes associated with these transitions are emergent features of the theory and can be visualized via the time dependence of the density distribution and composition distribution in the system. For mixtures an important component of the dynamics is relaxation of the composition distribution in the system, especially in the neighborhood of vapor-liquid interfaces. We consider two different types of mixtures, modeling hydrocarbon adsorption in carbon-like slit pores. We first present results on bulk phase equilibria of the mixtures and then the equilibrium (stable/metastable) behavior of these mixtures in a finite slit pore and an inkbottle pore. We then use DMFT to describe the evolution of the density and composition in the pore in the approach to equilibrium after changing the state of the bulk fluid via composition or pressure changes.

  7. An application of partial differential equations and boundary value problems in computational fluid dynamic modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collino, B.J.; Gangadharan, S.; Wimberly, C.R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper outlines a method used to create a complex grid map for a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling conducted at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida. The investigators used a Laplace operator in the CFD software Fluent to create an imaginary flow domain around a hydrofoil that runs nearly parallel to the stream function. The goal of this project is to eventually study the evolution of lift, drag, and pitching moment for the hydrofoil as a result of changing boundary layer conditions due to growth of the biological fouling Enteromorpha Clathrata.

  8. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  9. Transient computation fluid dynamics modeling of a single proton exchange membrane fuel cell with serpentine channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guilin; Fan, Jianren

    The proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has become a promising candidate for the power source of electrical vehicles because of its low pollution, low noise and especially fast startup and transient responses at low temperatures. A transient, three-dimensional, non-isothermal and single-phase mathematical model based on computation fluid dynamics has been developed to describe the transient process and the dynamic characteristics of a PEMFC with a serpentine fluid channel. The effects of water phase change and heat transfer, as well as electrochemical kinetics and multicomponent transport on the cell performance are taken into account simultaneously in this comprehensive model. The developed model was employed to simulate a single laboratory-scale PEMFC with an electrode area about 20 cm 2. The dynamic behavior of the characteristic parameters such as reactant concentration, pressure loss, temperature on the membrane surface of cathode side and current density during start-up process were computed and are discussed in detail. Furthermore, transient responses of the fuel cell characteristics during step changes and sinusoidal changes in the stoichiometric flow ratio of the cathode inlet stream, cathode inlet stream humidity and cell voltage are also studied and analyzed and interesting undershoot/overshoot behavior of some variables was found. It was also found that the startup and transient response time of a PEM fuel cell is of the order of a second, which is similar to the simulation results predicted by most models. The result is an important guide for the optimization of PEMFC designs and dynamic operation.

  10. Analytical structure, dynamics, and coarse graining of a kinetic model of an active fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tong; Betterton, Meredith D.; Jhang, An-Sheng; Shelley, Michael J.

    2017-09-01

    We analyze one of the simplest active suspensions with complex dynamics: a suspension of immotile "extensor" particles that exert active extensile dipolar stresses on the fluid in which they are immersed. This is relevant to several experimental systems, such as recently studied tripartite rods that create extensile flows by consuming a chemical fuel. We first describe the system through a Doi-Onsager kinetic theory based on microscopic modeling. This theory captures the active stresses produced by the particles that can drive hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as the steric interactions of rodlike particles that lead to nematic alignment. This active nematic system yields complex flows and disclination defect dynamics very similar to phenomenological Landau-deGennes Q -tensor theories for active nematic fluids, as well as by more complex Doi-Onsager theories for polar microtubule-motor-protein systems. We apply the quasiequilibrium Bingham closure, used to study suspensions of passive microscopic rods, to develop a nonstandard Q -tensor theory. We demonstrate through simulation that this B Q -tensor theory gives an excellent analytical and statistical accounting of the suspension's complex dynamics, at a far reduced computational cost. Finally, we apply the B Q -tensor model to study the dynamics of extensor suspensions in circular and biconcave domains. In circular domains, we reproduce previous results for systems with weak nematic alignment, but for strong alignment we find unusual dynamics with activity-controlled defect production and absorption at the boundaries of the domain. In biconcave domains, a Fredericks-like transition occurs as the width of the neck connecting the two disks is varied.

  11. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which I and my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same ti...

  12. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which land my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same tim...

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of a lithium/thionyl chloride battery with electrolyte flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, J.W.; Jungst, R.G.; Nagasubramanian, G.

    2000-02-01

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. As in earlier one-dimensional models, the model accounts for transport of species and charge, and electrode porosity variations and electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures show good agreement with published experimental data, and are essentially identical to results published for one-dimensional models. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulations show that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell head space predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mixed convection flows in buildings enclosures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Kayne, Ramesh K. Agarwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulations are increasingly used to model the air circulation and temperature environment inside the rooms of residential and office buildings to gain insight into the relative energy consumptions of various HVAC systems for cooling/heating for climate control and thermal comfort. This requires accurate simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer for various types of ventilation systems using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS equations of fluid dynamics. Large Eddy Simulation (LES or Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS of Navier-Stokes equations is computationally intensive and expensive for simulations of this kind. As a result, vast majority of CFD simulations employ RANS equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. In order to assess the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc. for accurate simulations, it is critical to validate the calculations against the experimental data. For this purpose, we use three well known benchmark validation cases, one for natural convection in 2D closed vertical cavity, second for forced convection in a 2D rectangular cavity and the third for mixed convection in a 2D square cavity. The simulations are performed on a number of meshes of different density using a number of turbulence models. It is found that k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model with a second-order algorithm on a reasonable mesh gives the best results. This information is then used to determine the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc. for flows in 3D enclosures with different ventilation systems. In particular two cases are considered for which the experimental data is available. These cases are (1 air flow and heat transfer in a naturally ventilated room and (2 airflow and temperature distribution in an atrium. Good agreement with the experimental data and computations of other investigators is obtained.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of mixed convection flows in buildings enclosures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayne, Alexander; Agarwal, Ramesh K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    In recent years Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations are increasingly used to model the air circulation and temperature environment inside the rooms of residential and office buildings to gain insight into the relative energy consumptions of various HVAC systems for cooling/heating for climate control and thermal comfort. This requires accurate simulation of turbulent flow and heat transfer for various types of ventilation systems using the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations of fluid dynamics. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) or Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of Navier-Stokes equations is computationally intensive and expensive for simulations of this kind. As a result, vast majority of CFD simulations employ RANS equations in conjunction with a turbulence model. In order to assess the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for accurate simulations, it is critical to validate the calculations against the experimental data. For this purpose, we use three well known benchmark validation cases, one for natural convection in 2D closed vertical cavity, second for forced convection in a 2D rectangular cavity and the third for mixed convection in a 2D square cavity. The simulations are performed on a number of meshes of different density using a number of turbulence models. It is found that k-epsilon two-equation turbulence model with a second-order algorithm on a reasonable mesh gives the best results. This information is then used to determine the modeling requirements (mesh, numerical algorithm, turbulence model etc.) for flows in 3D enclosures with different ventilation systems. In particular two cases are considered for which the experimental data is available. These cases are (1) air flow and heat transfer in a naturally ventilated room and (2) airflow and temperature distribution in an atrium. Good agreement with the experimental data and computations of other investigators is obtained.

  16. Dynamic analysis of polymeric fluid in shear flow for dumbbell model with internal viscosity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓东; R.V.N.MELNIK

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of semi-flexible polymers,such as DNA molecules,is an important multiscale problem with a wide range of applications in science and bioengineering.In this contribution,a dumbbell model with internal viscosity was studied in steady shear flows of polymeric fluid.The tensors with moments other than second moment were approximated in the terms of second moment tensor.Then,the nonlinear algebraic equation of the second moment conformation tensor was calculated in closed form.Finally,substituting the resulting conformation tensor into the Kramers equation of Hookean spring force,the constitutive equations were obtained.The shear material properties were discussed for different internal viscosities and compared with the results of Brownian dynamics simulation.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of perfusion measurements in dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography: development, validation and clinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peladeau-Pigeon, M.; Coolens, C.

    2013-09-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) is an imaging tool that aids in evaluating functional characteristics of tissue at different stages of disease management: diagnostic, radiation treatment planning, treatment effectiveness, and monitoring. Clinical validation of DCE-derived perfusion parameters remains an outstanding problem to address prior to perfusion imaging becoming a widespread standard as a non-invasive quantitative measurement tool. One approach to this validation process has been the development of quality assurance phantoms in order to facilitate controlled perfusion ex vivo. However, most of these systems fail to establish and accurately replicate physiologically relevant capillary permeability and exchange performance. The current work presents the first step in the development of a prospective suite of physics-based perfusion simulations based on coupled fluid flow and particle transport phenomena with the goal of enhancing the understanding of clinical contrast agent kinetics. Existing knowledge about a controllable, two-compartmental fluid exchange phantom was used to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation model presented herein. The sensitivity of CFD-derived contrast uptake curves to contrast injection parameters, including injection duration and flow rate, were quantified and found to be within 10% accuracy. The CFD model was employed to evaluate two commonly used clinical kinetic algorithms used to derive perfusion parameters: Fick's principle and the modified Tofts model. Neither kinetic model was able to capture the true transport phenomena it aimed to represent but if the overall contrast concentration after injection remained identical, then successive DCE-CT evaluations could be compared and could indeed reflect differences in regional tissue flow. This study sets the groundwork for future explorations in phantom development and pharmaco-kinetic modelling, as well as the development of novel contrast

  18. Improvement performance of secondary clarifiers by a computational fluid dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghawi, Ali G.; Kriš, J.

    2011-12-01

    Secondary clarifier is one of the most commonly used unit operations in wastewater treatment plants. It is customarily designed to achieve the separation of solids from biologically treated effluents through the clarification of biological solids and the thickening of sludge. As treatment plants receive increasingly high wastewater flows, conventional sedimentation tanks suffer from overloading problems, which result in poor performance. Modification of inlet baffles through the use of an energy dissipating inlet (EDI) was proposed to enhance the performance in the circular clarifiers at the Al-Dewanyia wastewater treatment plant. A 3-dimensional fully mass conservative clarifier model, based on modern computational fluid dynamics theory, was applied to evaluate the proposed tank modification and to estimate the maximum capacity of the existing and modified clarifiers. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model was formulated to describe the tank is performance, and design parameters were obtained based on the experimental results. The study revealed that velocity and (suspended solids) SS is a better parameter than TS (total solids), (Biochemical Oxygen Demand) BOD, (Chemical Oxygen Demand) COD to evaluate the performance of sedimentation tanks and that the removal efficiencies of the suspended solids, biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand were higher in the baffle.

  19. Airflow in a world exposition pavilion studied by scale-model experiments and computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, P.V. [Aalborg Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Building Technology and Structural Engineering

    1995-12-31

    The ventilation design concept, model experiment results, two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation, and on-site measurements are presented for the Danish Pavilion project at the 1992 World Exhibition in Seville. The paper gives a short project history for the building and the ventilation system. The air-conditioned restaurant and exhibition hall have a floor area of 450 m{sup 2} (4,850 ft{sup 2}) and a mean height of 18 m (59 ft). It is ventilated by a cooling wall with a height of 12 m (39 ft). The flow from the cooling wall is similar to the flow in a room and displacement ventilation. Scale-model experiments and computational fluid dynamics simulations indicate a velocity level in the occupied zone of approximately 0.6 m/s ({approximately} 120 fpm) and the results are confirmed by on-site measurement in the exhibition hall. It is shown that even a simplified two-dimensional flow simulation will give valuable information to be used in the design procedure.

  20. A fluid dynamics multidimensional model of biofilm growth: stability, influence of environment and sensitivity

    CERN Document Server

    Clarelli, Fabrizio; Natalini, Roberto; Ribot, Magali

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we study in details the fluid dynamics system proposed in Clarelli et al (2013) to model the formation of cyanobacteria biofilms. After analyzing the linear stability of the unique non trivial equilibrium of the system, we introduce in the model the influence of light and temperature, which are two important factors for the development of cyanobacteria biofilm. Since the values of the coefficients we use for our simulations are estimated through information found in the literature, some sensitivity and robustness analyses on these parameters are performed. All these elements enable us to control and to validate the model we have already derived and to present some numerical simulations in the 2D and the 3D cases.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  2. A fluid dynamics multidimensional model of biofilm growth: stability, influence of environment and sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarelli, F; Di Russo, C; Natalini, R; Ribot, M

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we study in detail the fluid dynamics system proposed in Clarelli et al. (2013, J. Math. Biol., 66, 1387-1408) to model the formation of cyanobacteria biofilms. After analysing the linear stability of the unique non-trivial equilibrium of the system, we introduce in the model the influence of light and temperature, which are two important factors for the development of a cyanobacteria biofilm. Since the values of the coefficients we use for our simulations are estimated through information found in the literature, some sensitivity and robustness analyses on these parameters are performed. All these elements enable us to control and to validate the model we have already derived and to present some numerical simulations in the 2D and the 3D cases.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Supersonic Nozzle and Integration into a Variable Cycle Engine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Joseph W.; Friedlander, David; Kopasakis, George

    2015-01-01

    This paper covers the development of an integrated nonlinear dynamic simulation for a variable cycle turbofan engine and nozzle that can be integrated with an overall vehicle Aero-Propulso-Servo-Elastic (APSE) model. A previously developed variable cycle turbofan engine model is used for this study and is enhanced here to include variable guide vanes allowing for operation across the supersonic flight regime. The primary focus of this study is to improve the fidelity of the model's thrust response by replacing the simple choked flow equation convergent-divergent nozzle model with a MacCormack method based quasi-1D model. The dynamic response of the nozzle model using the MacCormack method is verified by comparing it against a model of the nozzle using the conservation element/solution element method. A methodology is also presented for the integration of the MacCormack nozzle model with the variable cycle engine.

  4. Essential Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zikanov, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    This book serves as a complete and self-contained introduction to the principles of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) analysis. It is deliberately short (at approximately 300 pages) and can be used as a text for the first part of the course of applied CFD followed by a software tutorial. The main objectives of this non-traditional format are: 1) To introduce and explain, using simple examples where possible, the principles and methods of CFD analysis and to demystify the `black box’ of a CFD software tool, and 2) To provide a basic understanding of how CFD problems are set and

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, W.B.; Jungst, Rudolph G.; Nagasubramanian, Ganesan; Wang, C.Y.; Weidner, John.

    1999-06-11

    A two-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a lithium/thionyl chloride primary battery. The model accounts for not only transport of species and charge, but also the electrode porosity variations and the electrolyte flow induced by the volume reduction caused by electrochemical reactions. Numerical simulations are performed using a finite volume method of computational fluid dynamics. The predicted discharge curves for various temperatures are compared to the experimental data with excellent agreement. Moreover, the simulation results. in conjunction with computer visualization and animation techniques, confirm that cell utilization in the temperature and current range of interest is limited by pore plugging or clogging of the front side of the cathode as a result of LiCl precipitation. The detailed two-dimensional flow simulation also shows that the electrolyte is replenished from the cell header predominantly through the separator into the front of the cathode during most parts of the discharge, especially for higher cell temperatures.

  6. Issues associated with modelling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell by computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarek, Tomasz; Tsotridis, Georgios

    2017-03-01

    The objective of the current study is to highlight possible limitations and difficulties associated with Computational Fluid Dynamics in PEM single fuel cell modelling. It is shown that an appropriate convergence methodology should be applied for steady-state solutions, due to inherent numerical instabilities. A single channel fuel cell model has been taken as numerical example. Results are evaluated for quantitative as well qualitative points of view. The contribution to the polarization curve of the different fuel cell components such as bi-polar plates, gas diffusion layers, catalyst layers and membrane was investigated via their effects on the overpotentials. Furthermore, the potential losses corresponding to reaction kinetics, due to ohmic and mas transport limitations and the effect of the exchange current density and open circuit voltage, were also investigated. It is highlighted that the lack of reliable and robust input data is one of the issues for obtaining accurate results.

  7. Dust emission modelling around a stockpile by using computational fluid dynamics and discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshani, S. M.; Schott, D. L.; Lodewijks, G.

    2013-06-01

    Dust emissions can have significant effects on the human health, environment and industry equipment. Understanding the dust generation process helps to select a suitable dust preventing approach and also is useful to evaluate the environmental impact of dust emission. To describe these processes, numerical methods such as Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are widely used, however nowadays particle based methods like Discrete Element Method (DEM) allow researchers to model interaction between particles and fluid flow. In this study, air flow over a stockpile, dust emission, erosion and surface deformation of granular material in the form of stockpile are studied by using DEM and CFD as a coupled method. Two and three dimensional simulations are respectively developed for CFD and DEM methods to minimize CPU time. The standard κ-ɛ turbulence model is used in a fully developed turbulent flow. The continuous gas phase and the discrete particle phase link to each other through gas-particle void fractions and momentum transfer. In addition to stockpile deformation, dust dispersion is studied and finally the accuracy of stockpile deformation results obtained by CFD-DEM modelling will be validated by the agreement with the existing experimental data.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics of the right ventricular outflow tract and of the pulmonary artery: a bench model of flow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosbahi, Selim; Mickaily-Huber, Elizabeth; Charbonnier, Dominique; Hullin, Roger; Burki, Marco; Ferrari, Enrico; von Segesser, Ludwig K; Berdajs, Denis A

    2014-10-01

    The reconstruction of the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) with valved conduits remains a challenge. The reoperation rate at 5 years can be as high as 25% and depends on age, type of conduit, conduit diameter and principal heart malformation. The aim of this study is to provide a bench model with computer fluid dynamics to analyse the haemodynamics of the RVOT, pulmonary artery, its bifurcation, and left and right pulmonary arteries that in the future may serve as a tool for analysis and prediction of outcome following RVOT reconstruction. Pressure, flow and diameter at the RVOT, pulmonary artery, bifurcation of the pulmonary artery, and left and right pulmonary arteries were measured in five normal pigs with a mean weight of 24.6 ± 0.89 kg. Data obtained were used for a 3D computer fluid-dynamics simulation of flow conditions, focusing on the pressure, flow and shear stress profile of the pulmonary trunk to the level of the left and right pulmonary arteries. Three inlet steady flow profiles were obtained at 0.2, 0.29 and 0.36 m/s that correspond to the flow rates of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 l/min flow at the RVOT. The flow velocity profile was constant at the RVOT down to the bifurcation and decreased at the left and right pulmonary arteries. In all three inlet velocity profiles, low sheer stress and low-velocity areas were detected along the left wall of the pulmonary artery, at the pulmonary artery bifurcation and at the ostia of both pulmonary arteries. This computed fluid real-time model provides us with a realistic picture of fluid dynamics in the pulmonary tract area. Deep shear stress areas correspond to a turbulent flow profile that is a predictive factor for the development of vessel wall arteriosclerosis. We believe that this bench model may be a useful tool for further evaluation of RVOT pathology following surgical reconstructions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of a Midlatitude Small Scale upper Ocean Front

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Cornejo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model is implemented to describe fluid dynamic processes associated with mid-latitude small- scale (10 km upper ocean fronts by using modified state of the art computational fluid dynamics tools. A periodic system was simulated using three different turbulent closures: 1 URANS-Reynolds Stress Model (RSM, seven equation turbulence model, 2 LES-Standard Smagorinsky (SS, algebraic model, and 3 LES-Modified Smagorinsky, introducing a correction for non-isotropic grids (MS. The results show the front developing instabilities and generating submesoscale structures after four days of simulation. A strongly unstable shear flow is found to be confined within the mixed layer with a high Rossby number (Ro > 1 and high vertical velocity zones. The positive (negative vertical velocity magnitude is found to be approximately O(10−3 m/s(O(10−2 m/s, one (two order(s of magnitude larger than the vertical velocity outside the sub-mesoscale structures, where the magnitude is stable at O(10−4 m/s. The latter value is consistent with previous numerical and experimental studies that use coarser grid sizes and therefore do not explicitly calculate the small scale structures. The nonlinear flow introduced by the sub-mesoscale dynamics within the mixed layer and the non-isotropic grid used in the calculations generates a disparity between the predicted horizontal wave-number spectra computed using the RSM model with respect to the linear eddy viscosity model SS. The MS approach improves SS predictions. This improvement is more significant below the mixed layer in the absence of flow nonlinearities. The horizontal spectra predicted with the RSM model fits a slope of −3 for large scale structures and a slope between −2 and −5/3 for turbulent structures smaller than 300 m. This work contributes to the investigation of the physical and methodological aspects for the detailed modelling and understanding of small scale structures in ocean turbulence.

  10. HIGH-FIDELITY SIMULATION-DRIVEN MODEL DEVELOPMENT FOR COARSE-GRAINED COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Botros N.; Dinh, Nam T.; Bolotnov, Igor A.

    2016-06-01

    Nuclear reactor safety analysis requires identifying various credible accident scenarios and determining their consequences. For a full-scale nuclear power plant system behavior, it is impossible to obtain sufficient experimental data for a broad range of risk-significant accident scenarios. In single-phase flow convective problems, Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) can provide us with high fidelity results when physical data are unavailable. However, these methods are computationally expensive and cannot be afforded for simulation of long transient scenarios in nuclear accidents despite extraordinary advances in high performance scientific computing over the past decades. The major issue is the inability to make the transient computation parallel, thus making number of time steps required in high-fidelity methods unaffordable for long transients. In this work, we propose to apply a high fidelity simulation-driven approach to model sub-grid scale (SGS) effect in Coarse Grained Computational Fluid Dynamics CG-CFD. This approach aims to develop a statistical surrogate model instead of the deterministic SGS model. We chose to start with a turbulent natural convection case with volumetric heating in a horizontal fluid layer with a rigid, insulated lower boundary and isothermal (cold) upper boundary. This scenario of unstable stratification is relevant to turbulent natural convection in a molten corium pool during a severe nuclear reactor accident, as well as in containment mixing and passive cooling. The presented approach demonstrates how to create a correction for the CG-CFD solution by modifying the energy balance equation. A global correction for the temperature equation proves to achieve a significant improvement to the prediction of steady state temperature distribution through the fluid layer.

  11. Benchmarking Computational Fluid Dynamics Models for Application to Lava Flow Simulations and Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, H. R.; Lev, E.; Chen, J.; Cashman, K. V.; Honor, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent eruptions in Hawai'i, Iceland, and Cape Verde highlight the need for improved lava flow models for forecasting and hazard assessment. Existing models used for lava flow simulation range in assumptions, complexity, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess the capabilities of existing models and test the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics models for lava flows, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, Flow3D, and COMSOL. Using new benchmark scenarios defined in Cordonnier et al. (2015) as a guide, we model Newtonian, Herschel-Bulkley and cooling flows over inclined planes, obstacles, and digital elevation models with a wide range of source conditions. Results are compared to analytical theory, analogue and molten basalt experiments, and measurements from natural lava flows. Our study highlights the strengths and weakness of each code, including accuracy and computational costs, and provides insights regarding code selection. We apply the best-fit codes to simulate the lava flows in Harrat Rahat, a predominately mafic volcanic field in Saudi Arabia. Input parameters are assembled from rheology and volume measurements of past flows using geochemistry, crystallinity, and present-day lidar and photogrammetric digital elevation models. With these data, we use our verified models to reconstruct historic and prehistoric events, in order to assess the hazards posed by lava flows for Harrat Rahat.

  12. Capturing nonlinear dynamics of two-fluid Couette flows with asymptotic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios; Cimpeanu, Radu; Kalogirou, Anna; Keaveny, Eric

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear stability of two-fluid Couette flows is studied using a novel evolution equation whose dynamics are validated by direct numerical simulations (DNS). The evolution equation incorporates inertial effects at arbitrary Reynolds numbers through a nonlocal term arising from the coupling between the two fluid regions, and is valid when one of the layers is thin. The equation predicts asymmetric solutions and exhibits bistability as seen in experiments. Related low-inertia models have been used in qualitative predictions using ad hoc modifications rather than the direct comparisons carried out here. Comparisons between model solutions and DNS show excellent agreement at Reynolds numbers of O (103) found in experiments. Direct comparisons are also made with the available experimental results of Barthelet et al. (1995) when the thin layer occupies 1 / 5 of the channel height. Pointwise comparisons of the travelling wave shapes are carried out and once again the agreement is very good. EPSRC Grant Numbers EP/K041134 and EP/L020564.

  13. Bedrock Channel and Cave Evolution Models Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perne, M.; Covington, M. D.; Cooper, M.

    2014-12-01

    Models of bedrock channel cross-section evolution typically rely on simple approximations of boundary shear stress to calculate erosion rates across the channel. While such models provide a useful tool for gaining general insight into channel dynamics, they also exhibit a narrower range of behaviors than seen in nature and scale experiments. Recent computational advances enable use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to relax many of the assumptions used in these simple models by simulating the full 3D flow field and resulting erosion. We have developed a model of bedrock channel evolution at the reach scale, using CFD, that alternates flow simulation steps with channel evolution steps and evolves the channel in time according to shear stresses calculated from the CFD runs. Caves provide an ideal field setting for studying bedrock channel dynamics, because long records of incision are often preserved in the form of channel widths, meander patterns, and sculpted forms, such as scallops, that indicate flow velocity and direction. However, most existing numerical models of cave formation investigate processes on larger scales, treat conduits as simple shapes, such as cylinders, and deal with the early stages of speleogenesis when sediment transport and erosion mechanisms other than dissolution do not have to be taken into account. Therefore, initial applications of the CFD model focus on the dynamics of cave channels, and particularly on the controls of channel width. While discharge, base level, sediment supply, and the ratio of dissolution to mechanical erosion, are likely to play important roles in determining channel width, we lack a quantitative understanding for the importance of these various factors. Notches in passage walls are thought to result from lateral erosion during periods of increased sediment load when the bed is armored. Modeling is used to check the plausibility of this explanation, and examine whether other mechanisms may also produce notches

  14. New methods for computational fluid dynamics modeling of carotid artery from magnetic resonance angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebral, Juan R.; Yim, Peter J.; Loehner, Rainald; Soto, Orlando; Marcos, Hani; Choyke, Peter L.

    2001-05-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the carotid artery are constructed from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) using a deformable model and a surface-merging algorithm. Physiologic flow conditions are obtained from cine phase-contrast MRA at two slice locations below and above the carotid bifurcation. The methodology was tested on image data from a rigid flow-through phantom of a carotid artery with 65% degree stenosis. Predicted flow patterns are in good agreement with MR flow measurements at intermediate slice locations. Our results show that flow in a rigid flow-through phantom of the carotid bifurcation with stenosis can be simulated accurately with CFD. The methodology was then tested on flow and anatomical data from a normal human subject. The sum of the instantaneous flows measured at the internal and external carotids differs from that at the common carotid, indicating that wall compliance must be modeled. Coupled fluid-structure calculations were able to reproduce the significant dampening of the velocity waveform observed between different slices along the common carotid artery. Visualizations of the blood flow in a compliant model of the carotid bifurcation were produced. A comparison between compliant and rigid models shows significant differences in the time-dependent wall shear stress at selected locations. Our results confirm that image-based CFD techniques can be applied to the modeling of hemodynamics in compliant carotid arteries. These capabilities may eventually allow physicians to enhance current image-based diagnosis, and to predict and evaluate the outcome of interventional procedures non- invasively.

  15. A review of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) airflow modelling over aeolian landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Thomas A. G.

    2016-09-01

    Aeolian landforms occur on all earths' continents as well as on Mars, Titan and Venus and are typically formed where sediment is eroded and/or deposited by near surface wind flow. As wind flow approaches an aeolian landform, secondary flow patterns are created that cause wind to deviate in both speed and direction, producing complex patterns of sediment erosion, deposition and transportation. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling of wind flow has become a common tool to predict and understand secondary wind flow and resulting sediment transport. Its use has progressed from simulating wind flow over simple two dimensional dune shapes, to calculating a multitude of flow parameters over a range of increasingly complex landforms. Analysis of 25 peer reviewed journal articles, found that CFD has been crucial to providing additional insight to flow dynamics on the stoss slope of dunes, the structure and nature of wind flow separation in the lee of landforms and information on localised wind flow variations in large-scale dune fields. The findings of this assay demonstrate that further research is required regarding the parameterisation and modelling of surface roughness, the incorporation of accurate sediment transport to wind flow models, and the prediction of topographic surface changes. CFD is anticipated to be increasingly utilised in aeolian geomorphology and this work aims to be a starting point for aeolian geomorphologists wishing to better understand and review the utilisation of the technique to date.

  16. Model of skyscraper evacuation with the use of space symmetry and fluid dynamic approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Sikora, W; Kupczak, A

    2011-01-01

    The simulation of evacuation of pedestrians from skyscraper is a situation where the symmetry analysis method and equations of fluid dynamics finds to be very useful. When applied, they strongly reduce the number of free parameters used in simulations and in such a way speed up the calculations and make them easier to manage by the programmer and what is even more important, they can give a fresh insight into a problem of evacuation and help with incorporation of "Ambient Intelligent Devices" into future real buildings. We have analyzed various, simplified, cases of evacuation from skyscraper by employing improved "Social Force Model". For each of them we obtained the average force acting on the pedestrian as a function of the evacuation time. The results clearly show that both methods mentioned above, can be successfully implemented in the simulation process and return with satisfactory conclusions.

  17. Investigation of different modeling approaches for computational fluid dynamics simulation of high-pressure rocket combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, B.; Riedmann, H.; Frey, M.; Knab, O.; Karl, S.; Hannemann, K.

    2016-07-01

    The paper summarizes technical results and first highlights of the cooperation between DLR and Airbus Defence and Space (DS) within the work package "CFD Modeling of Combustion Chamber Processes" conducted in the frame of the Propulsion 2020 Project. Within the addressed work package, DLR Göttingen and Airbus DS Ottobrunn have identified several test cases where adequate test data are available and which can be used for proper validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools. In this paper, the first test case, the Penn State chamber (RCM1), is discussed. Presenting the simulation results from three different tools, it is shown that the test case can be computed properly with steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) approaches. The achieved simulation results reproduce the measured wall heat flux as an important validation parameter very well but also reveal some inconsistencies in the test data which are addressed in this paper.

  18. Assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Models for Shock Boundary-Layer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBonis, James R.; Oberkampf, William L.; Wolf, Richard T.; Orkwis, Paul D.; Turner, Mark G.; Babinsky, Holger

    2011-01-01

    A workshop on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) prediction of shock boundary-layer interactions (SBLIs) was held at the 48th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting. As part of the workshop numerous CFD analysts submitted solutions to four experimentally measured SBLIs. This paper describes the assessment of the CFD predictions. The assessment includes an uncertainty analysis of the experimental data, the definition of an error metric and the application of that metric to the CFD solutions. The CFD solutions provided very similar levels of error and in general it was difficult to discern clear trends in the data. For the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods the choice of turbulence model appeared to be the largest factor in solution accuracy. Large-eddy simulation methods produced error levels similar to RANS methods but provided superior predictions of normal stresses.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of left valvular heart diseases during atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarsoglio, Stefania; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca; Anselmino, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Although atrial fibrillation (AF), a common arrhythmia, frequently presents in patients with underlying valvular disease, its hemodynamic contributions are not fully understood. The present work aimed to computationally study how physical conditions imposed by pathologic valvular anatomy act on AF hemodynamics. We simulated AF with different severity grades of left-sided valvular diseases and compared the cardiovascular effects that they exert during AF, compared to lone AF. The fluid dynamics model used here has been recently validated for lone AF and relies on a lumped parameterization of the four heart chambers, together with the systemic and pulmonary circulation. The AF modelling involves: (i) irregular, uncorrelated and faster heart rate; (ii) atrial contractility dysfunction. Three different grades of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analyzed for each of the four valvulopathies (AS, aortic stenosis, MS, mitral stenosis, AR, aortic regurgitation, MR, mitral regurgitation), by varying-through the valve opening angle-the valve area. Regurgitation was hemodynamically more relevant than stenosis, as the latter led to inefficient cardiac flow, while the former introduced more drastic fluid dynamics variation. Moreover, mitral valvulopathies were more significant than aortic ones. In case of aortic valve diseases, proper mitral functioning damps out changes at atrial and pulmonary levels. In the case of mitral valvulopathy, the mitral valve lost its regulating capability, thus hemodynamic variations almost equally affected regions upstream and downstream of the valve. In particular, the present study revealed that both mitral and aortic regurgitation strongly affect hemodynamics, followed by mitral stenosis, while aortic stenosis has the least impact among the analyzed valvular diseases. The proposed approach can provide new mechanistic insights as to which valvular pathologies merit more aggressive treatment of AF. Present findings, if clinically confirmed

  20. AFDM: An advanced fluid-dynamics model. Volume 6: EOS-AFDM interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henneges, G.; Kleinheins, S. [comps.] [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) documents the modeling of the equation of state (EOS) in the code. The authors present an overview of the basic concepts underlying the thermodynamics modeling and resulting EOS, which is a set of relations between the thermodynamic properties of materials. The AFDM code allows for multiphase-multimaterial systems, which they explore in three phase models: two-material solid, two-material liquid, and three-material vapor. They describe and compare two ways of specifying the EOS of materials: (1) as simplified analytic expressions, or (2) as tables that precisely describe the properties of materials and their interactions for mechanical equilibrium. Either of the two EOS models implemented in AFDM can be selected by specifying the option when preprocessing the source code for compilation. Last, the authors determine thermophysical properties such as surface tension, thermal conductivities, and viscosities in the model for the intracell exchanges of AFDM. Specific notations, routines, EOS data, plots, test results, and corrections to the code are available in the appendices.

  1. The effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow in root canals evaluated using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of apical preparation size on irrigant flow inside a root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two different needles types, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate the irrigant flow from either

  2. Evaluation of irrigant flow in the root canal using different needle types by an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Wesselink, P.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle tip design on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods A CFD model was created to simulate the irrigant flow inside

  3. Evaluation of Irrigant Flow in the Root Canal Using Different Needle Types by an Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, Christos; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios; Wesselink, Paul R.; Sluis, van der Lucas W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle tip design on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe using a validated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods: A CFD model was created to simulate the irrigant flow insi

  4. The effect of root canal taper on the irrigant flow: evaluation using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of root canal taper on irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two types of needles, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate irrigant flow from either a side-ve

  5. The effect of root canal taper on the irrigant flow: evaluation using an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Gogos, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To evaluate the effect of root canal taper on irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two types of needles, using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methodology  A validated CFD model was used to simulate irrigant flow from either a side-v

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a wood-burning stove-heated sauna using NIST's Fire Dynamics Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Macqueron, Corentin

    2014-01-01

    The traditional sauna is studied from a thermal and fluid dynamics standpoint using the NIST's Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) software. Calculations are performed in order to determine temperature and velocity fields, heat flux, soot and steam cloud transport, etc. Results are discussed in order to assess the reliability of this new kind of utilization of the FDS fire safety engineering software.

  7. Modelling and computational fluid dynamic behaviour of a biofilter treating benzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul; Mathur, Anil Kumar; Bala, Shashi; Majumder, Chandrajitbalo

    2012-12-01

    Biofiltration of an air stream containing benzene has been studied in a laboratory biofilter packed with a mixture of compost, sugar cane bagasse and GAC. In this study, the overall performance of a biofilter has been evaluated in terms of its elimination capacity by using 3-D mesh techniques. The overall results indicate that the agreement between experimental data and estimated model predictions is excellent for benzene. The benzene concentration profiles along the depth of biofilter have also been determined using a convection-diffusion reactor (CDR) model and computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique. At low flow rates and low concentrations of benzene, the concentration profile throughout the biofilter shows good agreement with CDR model and it becomes more curved and resembles typical decay. Combined analysis of experimental results with CDR model and the CFD shows that the profile of benzene at low concentration becomes more curved and then linear at high concentration. The benzene profiles obtained by CFD are within 5% accuracy of experimental results. The CDR and CFD models are found to be able to predict concentration profiles preciously with depth under the experimental conditions. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Hierarchical calibration and validation of computational fluid dynamics models for solid sorbent-based carbon capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Canhai; Xu, Zhijie; Pan, Wenxiao; Sun, Xin; Storlie, Curtis; Marcy, Peter; Dietiker, Jean-François; Li, Tingwen; Spenik, James

    2016-01-01

    To quantify the predictive confidence of a solid sorbent-based carbon capture design, a hierarchical validation methodology—consisting of basic unit problems with increasing physical complexity coupled with filtered model-based geometric upscaling has been developed and implemented. This paper describes the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) multi-phase reactive flow simulations and the associated data flows among different unit problems performed within the said hierarchical validation approach. The bench-top experiments used in this calibration and validation effort were carefully designed to follow the desired simple-to-complex unit problem hierarchy, with corresponding data acquisition to support model parameters calibrations at each unit problem level. A Bayesian calibration procedure is employed and the posterior model parameter distributions obtained at one unit-problem level are used as prior distributions for the same parameters in the next-tier simulations. Overall, the results have demonstrated that the multiphase reactive flow models within MFIX can be used to capture the bed pressure, temperature, CO2 capture capacity, and kinetics with quantitative accuracy. The CFD modeling methodology and associated uncertainty quantification techniques presented herein offer a solid framework for estimating the predictive confidence in the virtual scale up of a larger carbon capture device.

  9. Supersonic Retro-Propulsion Experimental Design for Computational Fluid Dynamics Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Scott A.; Laws, Christopher T.; Kleb, W. L.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Spells, Courtney; McCrea, Andrew C.; Truble, Kerry A.; Schauerhamer, Daniel G.; Oberkampf, William L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of supersonic retro-propulsion, an enabling technology for heavy payload exploration missions to Mars, is the primary focus for the present paper. A new experimental model, intended to provide computational fluid dynamics model validation data, was recently designed for the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel Test Section 2. Pre-test computations were instrumental for sizing and refining the model, over the Mach number range of 2.4 to 4.6, such that tunnel blockage and internal flow separation issues would be minimized. A 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody, which accommodates up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, followed by a 10-in long cylindrical aftbody was developed for this study based on the computational results. The model was designed to allow for a large number of surface pressure measurements on the forebody and aftbody. Supplemental data included high-speed Schlieren video and internal pressures and temperatures. The run matrix was developed to allow for the quantification of various sources of experimental uncertainty, such as random errors due to run-to-run variations and bias errors due to flow field or model misalignments. Some preliminary results and observations from the test are presented, although detailed analyses of the data and uncertainties are still on going.

  10. Fluid dynamics of heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhanakrishnan, Arvind; Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The morphology, muscle mechanics, fluid dynamics, conduction properties, and molecular biology of the developing embryonic heart have received much attention in recent years due to the importance of both fluid and elastic forces in shaping the heart as well as the striking relationship between the heart's evolution and development. Although few studies have directly addressed the connection between fluid dynamics and heart development, a number of studies suggest that fluids may play a key role in morphogenic signaling. For example, fluid shear stress may trigger biochemical cascades within the endothelial cells of the developing heart that regulate chamber and valve morphogenesis. Myocardial activity generates forces on the intracardiac blood, creating pressure gradients across the cardiac wall. These pressures may also serve as epigenetic signals. In this article, the fluid dynamics of the early stages of heart development is reviewed. The relevant work in cardiac morphology, muscle mechanics, regulatory networks, and electrophysiology is also reviewed in the context of intracardial fluid dynamics.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling and Experimental Study on a Single Silica Gel Type B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John White

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of computational fluid dynamics (CFDs in the area of porous media and adsorption cooling system is becoming more practical due to the significant improvement in computer power. The results from previous studies have shown that CFD can be useful tool for predicting the water vapour flow pattern, temperature, heat transfer and flow velocity and adsorption rate. This paper investigates the effect of silica gel granular size on the water adsorption rate using computational fluid dynamics and gravimetric experimental (TGA method.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bubbling in a Viscous Fluid for Validation of Waste Glass Melter Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abboud, Alexander William [Idaho National Laboratory; Guillen, Donna Post [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-01-01

    At the Hanford site, radioactive waste stored in underground tanks is slated for vitrification for final disposal. A comprehensive knowledge of the glass batch melting process will be useful in optimizing the process, which could potentially reduce the cost and duration of this multi-billion dollar cleanup effort. We are developing a high-fidelity heat transfer model of a Joule-heated ceramic lined melter to improve the understanding of the complex, inter-related processes occurring with the melter. The glass conversion rates in the cold cap layer are dependent on promoting efficient heat transfer. In practice, heat transfer is augmented by inserting air bubblers into the molten glass. However, the computational simulations must be validated to provide confidence in the solutions. As part of a larger validation procedure, it is beneficial to split the physics of the melter into smaller systems to validate individually. The substitution of molten glass for a simulant liquid with similar density and viscosity at room temperature provides a way to study mixing through bubbling as an isolated effect without considering the heat transfer dynamics. The simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained by the Vitreous State Laboratory at the Catholic University of America using bubblers placed within a large acrylic tank that is similar in scale to a pilot glass waste melter. Comparisons are made for surface area of the rising air bubbles between experiments and CFD simulations for a variety of air flow rates and bubble injection depths. Also, computed bubble rise velocity is compared to a well-accepted expression for bubble terminal velocity.

  13. Effect of dynamic contact angle in a volume of fluid (VOF) model for a microfluidic capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish Saha, Auro; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2009-11-15

    We perform three-dimensional numerical and experimental study of the dynamic contact angle using volume of fluid (VOF) method applied to microfluidic channels with integrated pillars. Initially, we evaluated different dynamic contact angle models (hydrodynamic, molecular kinetic and empirical) for capillary filling of a two-dimensional microchannel using analytical formulation. Further, the models which require a minimum prescription of adjustable parameters are only used for the study of capillary filling of microchannels with integrated pillars using different working fluids such as DI water, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. Different microchannel geometry with varying diameter/height/spacing were studied for circular pillars. Effect of square pillars and changing the overall number of pillars on the capillary phenomena were also simulated. Our study demonstrated that the dynamic contact angle models modifies the transient response of the meniscus displacement and also the observed trends are model specific for the various microchannel geometries and working fluids. However, the different models have minimal effect on the meniscus profile. Different inlet boundary conditions were applied to observe the effect of grid resolution selected for numerical study on the capillary filling time. A grid dependent dynamic contact angle model which incorporates effective slip in the model was also used to observe the grid convergence of the numerical results. The grid independence was shown to improve marginally by applying the grid dependent dynamic contact angle model. Further we did numerical experiments of capillary filling considering variable surface wettability on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel with alternate hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns. The meniscus front pinning was noticed for a high wetting contrast between the patterns. Non uniform streamline patterns indicated mixing of the fluid when using patterned walls. Such a microfluidic device with

  14. Magnetoviscous model fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Kröger, M; Hess, S

    2003-01-01

    We review, apply and compare diverse approaches to the theoretical understanding of the dynamical and rheological behaviour of ferrofluids and magnetorheological (MR) fluids subject to external magnetic and flow fields. Simple models are introduced which are directly solvable by nonequilibrium Brownian or molecular dynamics computer simulation. In particular, the numerical results for ferrofluids quantify the domain of validity of uniaxial alignment of magnetic moments (in and) out of equilibrium. A Fokker-Planck equation for the dynamics of the magnetic moments - corresponding to the Brownian dynamics approach - and its implications are analysed under this approximation. The basic approach considers the effect of external fields on the dynamics of ellipsoid shaped permanent ferromagnetic domains (aggregates), whose size should depend on the strength of flow and magnetic field, the magnetic interaction parameter and concentration (or packing fraction). Results from analytic calculations and from simulation ar...

  15. Dynamic bulk and shear moduli due to grain-scale local fluid flow in fluid-saturated cracked poroelastic rocks: Theoretical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongjia; Hu, Hengshan; Rudnicki, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Grain-scale local fluid flow is an important loss mechanism for attenuating waves in cracked fluid-saturated poroelastic rocks. In this study, a dynamic elastic modulus model is developed to quantify local flow effect on wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in porous isotropic rocks. The Eshelby transform technique, inclusion-based effective medium model (the Mori-Tanaka scheme), fluid dynamics and mass conservation principle are combined to analyze pore-fluid pressure relaxation and its influences on overall elastic properties. The derivation gives fully analytic, frequency-dependent effective bulk and shear moduli of a fluid-saturated porous rock. It is shown that the derived bulk and shear moduli rigorously satisfy the Biot-Gassmann relationship of poroelasticity in the low-frequency limit, while they are consistent with isolated-pore effective medium theory in the high-frequency limit. In particular, a simplified model is proposed to quantify the squirt-flow dispersion for frequencies lower than stiff-pore relaxation frequency. The main advantage of the proposed model over previous models is its ability to predict the dispersion due to squirt flow between pores and cracks with distributed aspect ratio instead of flow in a simply conceptual double-porosity structure. Independent input parameters include pore aspect ratio distribution, fluid bulk modulus and viscosity, and bulk and shear moduli of the solid grain. Physical assumptions made in this model include (1) pores are inter-connected and (2) crack thickness is smaller than the viscous skin depth. This study is restricted to linear elastic, well-consolidated granular rocks.

  16. Observation and modeling of the storm-induced fluid mud dynamics in a muddy-estuarine navigational channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuanyang; Roelvink, Dano; Li, Weihua; Qi, Dingman; Gu, Fengfeng

    2014-07-01

    Observations of storm-induced fluid mud dynamics have been conducted at the North Passage deepwater navigational channel (DNC) of the Yangtze Estuary in October to December 2010, during the occurrence of a cold-air front. The measurement data reveal that just after the critical wind wave event, a large amount of fine sediment was trapped in a state of fluid mud along the channel. The observed thickness of the fluid mud was up to about 1-5 m, which caused some significant economic and safety problems for shipping traffic in the Yangtze Delta area. The mechanisms and transport processes of the storm-induced fluid mud are analyzed and presented from the angles of both process-oriented and engineering-oriented methods. With the help of hydrodynamics and wave modeling, it could be inferred that the behavior of the storm-induced fluid mud event mainly depends on the overall hydrodynamic regimes and the exchanges of sediment, which is released by storm-wave agitation from adjacent tidal flats. These sediments are accumulated as fluid mud, and subsequently oscillate and persist at those locations with weaker longitudinal residuals in the river- and tide-dominated estuary. In addition, the downslope transport of fluid mud is also thought to have stimulated and worsened the fluid mud event observed in this study. Our modeling results and observations demonstrate that: (1) the transport of fluid mud is an advective phenomenon determining the central position of fluid mud layer along the channel, and it's also a tidal energy influenced phenomenon controlling the erosion and accumulation of fluid mud; and (2) both suspended particulate matter availability and local residual flow regime are of critical importance in determining the trapping probability of sediment and the occurrence of fluid mud.

  17. Synchronized Chaos in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and in the Predictive Modeling of Natural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Gregory S.

    2008-03-01

    The ubiquitous phenomenon of synchronization among regular oscillators in Nature has been shown, in the past two decades, to extend to chaotic systems. Despite sensitive dependence on initial conditions, two chaotic systems will commonly fall into synchronized motion along their strange attractors when only some of the many degrees of freedom of one system are coupled to corresponding variables in the other. In geophysical fluid models, synchronization can mediate scale interactions, so that coupling of degrees of freedom that describe medium-scale components of the flow can result in synchronization, or partial synchronization, at all scales. Chaos synchronization has been used to interpret non-local "teleconnection" patterns in the Earth's climate system and to predict new ones. In the realm of practical meteorology, the fact that two PDE systems, conceived as "truth" and "model", respectively, can be made to synchronize when coupled at only a discrete set of points, explains how observations at a discrete set of weather stations can be sufficient for weather prediction by a synchronously coupled model. Minimizing synchronization error leads to general recipes for assimilation of observed data into a running model that systematize the treatment of nonlinearities in the dynamical equations. Equations can generally be added to adapt parameters as well as states as the model is running, so that the model "learns". The synchronization view of predictive modelling extends to any translationally- any PDE with constant coefficients, the general form of physical theories. The reliance on synchronicity as an organizing principle in Nature, alternative to causality, has philosophical roots in the collaboration of Carl Jung and Wolfgang Pauli, on the one hand, and in traditions outside of European science, on the other.

  18. Benchmarking computational fluid dynamics models of lava flow simulation for hazard assessment, forecasting, and risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietterich, Hannah; Lev, Einat; Chen, Jiangzhi; Richardson, Jacob A.; Cashman, Katharine V.

    2017-01-01

    Numerical simulations of lava flow emplacement are valuable for assessing lava flow hazards, forecasting active flows, designing flow mitigation measures, interpreting past eruptions, and understanding the controls on lava flow behavior. Existing lava flow models vary in simplifying assumptions, physics, dimensionality, and the degree to which they have been validated against analytical solutions, experiments, and natural observations. In order to assess existing models and guide the development of new codes, we conduct a benchmarking study of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models for lava flow emplacement, including VolcFlow, OpenFOAM, FLOW-3D, COMSOL, and MOLASSES. We model viscous, cooling, and solidifying flows over horizontal planes, sloping surfaces, and into topographic obstacles. We compare model results to physical observations made during well-controlled analogue and molten basalt experiments, and to analytical theory when available. Overall, the models accurately simulate viscous flow with some variability in flow thickness where flows intersect obstacles. OpenFOAM, COMSOL, and FLOW-3D can each reproduce experimental measurements of cooling viscous flows, and OpenFOAM and FLOW-3D simulations with temperature-dependent rheology match results from molten basalt experiments. We assess the goodness-of-fit of the simulation results and the computational cost. Our results guide the selection of numerical simulation codes for different applications, including inferring emplacement conditions of past lava flows, modeling the temporal evolution of ongoing flows during eruption, and probabilistic assessment of lava flow hazard prior to eruption. Finally, we outline potential experiments and desired key observational data from future flows that would extend existing benchmarking data sets.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of Bacillus anthracis spore deposition in rabbit and human respiratory airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, S.; Suffield, S. R.; Recknagle, K. P.; Jacob, R. E.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Carson, J. P.; Colby, S. M.; Saunders, J. H.; Hines, S. A.; Teeguarden, J. G.; Straub, T. M.; Moe, M.; Taft, S. C.; Corley, R. A.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived respectively from computed tomography (CT) and µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation–exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. Two different exposure scenarios were modeled in the rabbit based upon experimental inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulations were conducted at the highest exposure concentration used during the rabbit experimental exposures. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the nasal sinus compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. In contrast, higher spore deposition was predicted in the lower conducting airways of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology for deposition.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Bacillus anthracis Spore Deposition in Rabbit and Human Respiratory Airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabilan, Senthil; Suffield, Sarah R.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jacob, Rick E.; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Carson, James P.; Colby, Sean M.; Saunders, James H.; Hines, Stephanie; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Straub, Tim M.; Moe, M.; Taft, Sarah; Corley, Richard A.

    2016-09-30

    Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and Lagrangian particle deposition models were developed to compare the deposition of aerosolized Bacillus anthracis spores in the respiratory airways of a human with that of the rabbit, a species commonly used in the study of anthrax disease. The respiratory airway geometries for each species were derived from computed tomography (CT) or µCT images. Both models encompassed airways that extended from the external nose to the lung with a total of 272 outlets in the human model and 2878 outlets in the rabbit model. All simulations of spore deposition were conducted under transient, inhalation-exhalation breathing conditions using average species-specific minute volumes. The highest exposure concentration was modeled in the rabbit based upon prior acute inhalation studies. For comparison, human simulation was also conducted at the same concentration. Results demonstrated that regional spore deposition patterns were sensitive to airway geometry and ventilation profiles. Due to the complex airway geometries in the rabbit nose, higher spore deposition efficiency was predicted in the upper conducting airways compared to the human at the same air concentration of anthrax spores. As a result, higher particle deposition was predicted in the conducting airways and deep lung of the human compared to the rabbit lung due to differences in airway branching pattern. This information can be used to refine published and ongoing biokinetic models of inhalation anthrax spore exposures, which currently estimate deposited spore concentrations based solely upon exposure concentrations and inhaled doses that do not factor in species-specific anatomy and physiology.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of transport and deposition of pesticides in an aircraft cabin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isukapalli, Sastry S; Mazumdar, Sagnik; George, Pradeep; Wei, Binnian; Jones, Byron; Weisel, Clifford P

    2013-04-01

    Spraying of pesticides in aircraft cabins is required by some countries as part of a disinsection process to kill insects that pose a public health threat. However, public health concerns remain regarding exposures of cabin crew and passengers to pesticides in aircraft cabins. While large scale field measurements of pesticide residues and air concentrations in aircraft cabins scenarios are expensive and time consuming, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models provide an effective alternative for characterizing concentration distributions and exposures. This study involved CFD modeling of a twin-aisle 11 row cabin mockup with heated manikins, mimicking a part of a fully occupied Boeing 767 cabin. The model was applied to study the flow and deposition of pesticides under representative scenarios with different spraying patterns (sideways and overhead) and cabin air exchange rates (low and high). Corresponding spraying experiments were conducted in the cabin mockup, and pesticide deposition samples were collected at the manikin's lap and seat top for a limited set of five seats. The CFD model performed well for scenarios corresponding to high air exchange rates, captured the concentration profiles for middle seats under low air exchange rates, and underestimated the concentrations at window seats under low air exchange rates. Additionally, both the CFD and experimental measurements showed no major variation in deposition characteristics between sideways and overhead spraying. The CFD model can estimate concentration fields and deposition profiles at very high resolutions, which can be used for characterizing the overall variability in air concentrations and surface loadings. Additionally, these model results can also provide a realistic range of surface and air concentrations of pesticides in the cabin that can be used to estimate potential exposures of cabin crew and passengers to these pesticides.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling of contrast transport in basilar aneurysms following flow-altering surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, Alireza; Abla, Adib A; Lawton, Michael T; Saloner, David; Rayz, Vitaliy L

    2017-01-04

    In vivo measurement of blood velocity fields and flow descriptors remains challenging due to image artifacts and limited resolution of current imaging methods; however, in vivo imaging data can be used to inform and validate patient-specific computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Image-based CFD can be particularly useful for planning surgical interventions in complicated cases such as fusiform aneurysms of the basilar artery, where it is crucial to alter pathological hemodynamics while preserving flow to the distal vasculature. In this study, patient-specific CFD modeling was conducted for two basilar aneurysm patients considered for surgical treatment. In addition to velocity fields, transport of contrast agent was simulated for the preoperative and postoperative conditions using two approaches. The transport of a virtual contrast passively following the flow streamlines was simulated to predict post-surgical flow regions prone to thrombus deposition. In addition, the transport of a mixture of blood with an iodine-based contrast agent was modeled to compare and verify the CFD results with X-ray angiograms. The CFD-predicted patterns of contrast flow were qualitatively compared to in vivo X-ray angiograms acquired before and after the intervention. The results suggest that the mixture modeling approach, accounting for the flow rates and properties of the contrast injection, is in better agreement with the X-ray angiography data. The virtual contrast modeling assessed the residence time based on flow patterns unaffected by the injection procedure, which makes the virtual contrast modeling approach better suited for prediction of thrombus deposition, which is not limited to the peri-procedural state.

  3. Development and verification of the modified dynamic two-fluid model GOPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chengyi; Li, Yuxing; Meng, Lan; Wang, Haiyan

    2013-07-01

    In the oil and gas industry, many versions of software have been developed to calculate the flow parameters of multiphase flow. However, the existing software is not perfect. To improve the accuracy, a new version of software GOPS has been developed by Daqing Oilfield Construction Design and Research Institute, and China University of Petroleum. GOPS modifies the general extended two-fluid model, and considers the gas bubble phase in liquid and liquid droplet phase in gas. There are four continuity equations, two momentum equations, one mixture energy-conservation equation and one pressure-conservation equation in the controlling equations of GOPS. These controlling equations are combined with flow pattern transition model and closure relationships for every flow pattern. By this way, GOPS can simulate the dynamic variation of multiphase flow. To verify GOPS, relevant experiment has been made in Surface Engineering Pilot Test Center, CNPC. The experimental pressure gradients are compared with the results from GOPS, and the accuracy of GOPS is high.

  4. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  5. DYNAMIC STABILITY OF A BEAM-MODEL VISCOELASTIC PIPE FOR CONVEYING PULSATIVE FLUID

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Yang; Tianzhi Yang; Jiduo Jin

    2007-01-01

    The dynamic stability in transverse vibration of a viscoelastic pipe for conveying pulsative fluid is investigated for the simply-supported case. The material property of the beammodel pipe is described by the Kelvin-type viscoelastic constitutive relation. The axial fluid speed is characterized as simple harmonic variation about a constant mean speed. The method of multiple scales is applied directly to the governing partial differential equation without discretization when the viscoelastic damping and the periodical excitation are considered small. The stability conditions are presented in the case of subharmonic and combination resonance. Numerical results show the effect of viscosity and mass ratio on instability regions.

  6. Construction of Hierarchical Models for Fluid Dynamics in Earth and Planetary Sciences : DCMODEL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y. O.; Takehiro, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Odaka, M.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Ishioka, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    ) is a collection of various sample programs using ``SPML''. These sample programs provide the basekit for simple numerical experiments of geophysical fluid dynamics. For example, SPMODEL includes 1-dimensional KdV equation model, 2-dimensional barotropic, shallow water, Boussinesq models, 3-dimensional MHD dynamo models in rotating spherical shells. These models are written in the common style in harmony with SPML functions. ``Deepconv'' (Sugiyama et al., 2010) and ``Dcpam'' are a cloud resolving model and a general circulation model for the purpose of applications to the planetary atmospheres, respectively. ``Deepconv'' includes several physical processes appropriate for simulations of Jupiter and Mars atmospheres, while ``Dcpam'' does for simulations of Earth, Mars, and Venus-like atmospheres. ``Rdoc-f95'' is a automatic generator of reference manuals of Fortran90/95 programs, which is an extension of ruby documentation tool kit ``rdoc''. It analyzes dependency of modules, functions, and subroutines in the multiple program source codes. At the same time, it can list up the namelist variables in the programs.

  7. The fluid dynamics of climate

    CERN Document Server

    Palazzi, Elisa; Fraedrich, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    This volume provides an overview of the fluid aspects of the climate system, focusing on basic aspects as well as recent research developments. It will bring together contributions from diverse fields of the physical, mathematical and engineering sciences. The volume will be useful to doctorate students, postdocs and researchers working on different aspects of atmospheric, oceanic and environmental fluid dynamics. It will also be of interest to researchers interested in quantitatively understanding how fluid dynamics can be applied to the climate system, and to climate scientists willing to gain a deeper insight into the fluid mechanics underlying climate processes.

  8. Development of an innovative spacer grid model utilizing computational fluid dynamics within a subchannel analysis tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Maria

    In the past few decades the need for improved nuclear reactor safety analyses has led to a rapid development of advanced methods for multidimensional thermal-hydraulic analyses. These methods have become progressively more complex in order to account for the many physical phenomena anticipated during steady state and transient Light Water Reactor (LWR) conditions. The advanced thermal-hydraulic subchannel code COBRA-TF (Thurgood, M. J. et al., 1983) is used worldwide for best-estimate evaluations of the nuclear reactor safety margins. In the framework of a joint research project between the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) and AREVA NP GmbH, the theoretical models and numerics of COBRA-TF have been improved. Under the name F-COBRA-TF, the code has been subjected to an extensive verification and validation program and has been applied to variety of LWR steady state and transient simulations. To enable F-COBRA-TF for industrial applications, including safety margins evaluations and design analyses, the code spacer grid models were revised and substantially improved. The state-of-the-art in the modeling of the spacer grid effects on the flow thermal-hydraulic performance in rod bundles employs numerical experiments performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. Because of the involved computational cost, the CFD codes cannot be yet used for full bundle predictions, but their capabilities can be utilized for development of more advanced and sophisticated models for subchannel-level analyses. A subchannel code, equipped with improved physical models, can be then a powerful tool for LWR safety and design evaluations. The unique contributions of this PhD research are seen as development, implementation, and qualification of an innovative spacer grid model by utilizing CFD results within a framework of a subchannel analysis code. Usually, the spacer grid models are mostly related to modeling of the entrainment and deposition phenomena and the heat

  9. Dynamics of Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents an overview of recent progress in modelling the behaviour of complex fluid–fluid interfaces with non-equilibrium thermodynamics. We will limit ourselves to frameworks employing the Gibbs dividing surface model, and start with a general discussion of the surface excess variables

  10. A CFD Model for Fluid Dynamics in a Gas-fluidised Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Kai; Stefano Brandani

    2004-01-01

    A modified particle bed model derived from the two-fluid momentum balance equations was employed to predict the gas-fluidised bed behaviour. Additional terms are included in both the fluid and the particle momentum balance equations to take into account the effect of the dispersed solid phase. This model has been extended to two-dimensional formulations and has been implemented in the commercial code CFX 4.3. The model correctly simulates the homogeneous fluidisation of Geldart Group A and the bubbling fluidisation of Geldart Group B in gas-solid fluidised beds.

  11. Application of computational fluid dynamic to model the hydraulic performance of subsurface flow wetlands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Liwei; Hai Reti; WANG Wenxing; LU Zexiang; YANG Zhiming

    2008-01-01

    A subsurface flow wetland (SSFW) was simulated using a commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) code. The constructed media was simulated using porous media and the liquid resident time distribution (RTD) in the SSFW was obtained using the particle trajectory model. The effect of wetland configuration and operating conditions on the hydraulic performance of the SSFW were investigated. The results indicated that the hydraulic performance of the SSFW was predominantly affected by the wetland configuration. The hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW with an inlet at the middle edge of the upper media was 0.584 and the best among the SSFWs with an inlet at the top, the middle, and the bottom edge of the upper media. The constructed media affected the hydraulic performance by the ratio (K) of the upper and lower media resistance. The selection of appropriate media resistance in the protection layer can improve the hydraulic efficiency. When the viscous resistance coefficient of the media in the protection layer changed from 2.315×105 to 1.200×108, the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW increased from 0.301 to 0.751. However, the effect of operating conditions on the hydraulic efficiency of the SSFW was slight.

  12. A modeling approach to energy savings of flying Canada geese using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeng, Joo-Sung; Park, Jae-Hyung; Jang, Seong-Min; Han, Seog-Young

    2013-03-07

    A flapping flight mechanism of the Canada goose (Branta canadensis) was estimated using a two-jointed arm model in unsteady aerodynamic performance to examine how much energy can be saved in migration. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to evaluate airflow fields around the wing and in the wake. From the distributions of velocity and pressure on the wing, it was found that about 15% of goose flight energy could be saved by drag reduction from changing the morphology of the wing. From the airflow field in the wake, it was found that a pair of three-dimensional spiral flapping advantage vortices (FAV) was alternately generated. We quantitatively deduced that the optimal depth (the distance along the flight path between birds) was around 4m from the wing tip of a goose ahead, and optimal wing tip spacing (WTS, the distance between wing tips of adjacent birds perpendicular to the flight path) ranged between 0 and -0.40m in the spanwise section. It was found that a goose behind can save about 16% of its energy by induced power from FAV in V-formation. The phase difference of flapping between the goose ahead and behind was estimated at around 90.7° to take full aerodynamic benefit caused by FAV.

  13. OBJECTIVITY REQUIREMENT FOR FLUID DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹文楠

    2003-01-01

    A new flow theory is established through the objectivity requirement on the fluid dynamics. It was known that inhomogeneous fluid motion gave rise to viscous force while the selection of observers on different space-time points would change such an inhomogeneous character. Therefore, when the viscous force was considered as an objective existence foreign to the selection of observers, the form invariances of viscous force and momentum equation under local rotation transformation required a new dynamic field,namely the vortex field to be introduced. Then the dynamical equations of all flow fields were obtained through constructing the Lagrangian density of fluid system and using the variational approach of energy.

  14. Characterization of the Scale Model Acoustic Test Overpressure Environment using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The pressure waves that propagate from the mobile launcher (ML) exhaust hole are defined as the ignition overpressure (IOP), while the portion of the pressure waves that exit the duct or trench are the duct overpressure (DOP). Distinguishing the IOP and DOP in scale model test data has been difficult in past experiences and in early SMAT results, due to the effects of scaling the geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs in full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is twenty times smaller, allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust hole, through the trench and duct, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. The DOP waves impact portions of the vehicle at the same time as the IOP waves, making it difficult to distinguish the different waves and fully understand the data. To better understand the SMAT data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed with a fictitious geometry that isolates the IOP and DOP. The upper and lower portions of the domain were segregated to accomplish the isolation in such a way that the flow physics were not significantly altered. The Loci/CHEM CFD software program was used to perform this analysis.

  15. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study on the Effects of RATO Timing on the Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tanner; Williams, B.; West, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale test of the Space Launch System (SLS), which is currently being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The purpose of this test is to characterize and understand a variety of acoustic phenomena that occur during the early portions of lift off, one being the overpressure environment that develops shortly after booster ignition. The SLS lift off configuration consists of four RS-25 liquid thrusters on the core stage, with two solid boosters connected to each side. Past experience with scale model testing at MSFC (in ER42), has shown that there is a delay in the ignition of the Rocket Assisted Take Off (RATO) motor, which is used as the 5% scale analog of the solid boosters, after the signal to ignite is given. This delay can range from 0 to 16.5ms. While this small of a delay maybe insignificant in the case of the full scale SLS, it can significantly alter the data obtained during the SMAT due to the much smaller geometry. The speed of sound of the air and combustion gas constituents is not scaled, and therefore the SMAT pressure waves propagate at approximately the same speed as occurs during full scale. However, the SMAT geometry is much smaller allowing the pressure waves to move down the exhaust duct, through the trench, and impact the vehicle model much faster than occurs at full scale. To better understand the effect of the RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT IOP test data, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed using the Loci/CHEM CFD software program. Five different timing offsets, based on RATO ignition delay statistics, were simulated. A variety of results and comparisons will be given, assessing the overall effect of RATO timing simultaneity on the SMAT overpressure environment.

  16. Integrating aerodynamic surface modeling for computational fluid dynamics with computer aided structural analysis, design, and manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorp, Scott A.

    1992-01-01

    This presentation will discuss the development of a NASA Geometry Exchange Specification for transferring aerodynamic surface geometry between LeRC systems and grid generation software used for computational fluid dynamics research. The proposed specification is based on a subset of the Initial Graphics Exchange Specification (IGES). The presentation will include discussion of how the NASA-IGES standard will accommodate improved computer aided design inspection methods and reverse engineering techniques currently being developed. The presentation is in viewgraph format.

  17. Amniotic fluid water dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, M H; van den Wijngaard, J P H M; van Gemert, M J C; Ross, M G

    2007-01-01

    Water arrives in the mammalian gestation from the maternal circulation across the placenta. It then circulates between the fetal water compartments, including the fetal body compartments, the placenta and the amniotic fluid. Amniotic fluid is created by the flow of fluid from the fetal lung and bladder. A major pathway for amniotic fluid resorption is fetal swallowing; however in many cases the amounts of fluid produced and absorbed do not balance. A second resorption pathway, the intramembranous pathway (across the amnion to the fetal circulation), has been proposed to explain the maintenance of normal amniotic fluid volume. Amniotic fluid volume is thus a function both of the amount of water transferred to the gestation across the placental membrane, and the flux of water across the amnion. Membrane water flux is a function of the water permeability of the membrane; available data suggests that the amnion is the structure limiting intramembranous water flow. In the placenta, the syncytiotrophoblast is likely to be responsible for limiting water flow across the placenta. In human tissues, placental trophoblast membrane permeability increases with gestational age, suggesting a mechanism for the increased water flow necessary in late gestation. Membrane water flow can be driven by both hydrostatic and osmotic forces. Changes in both osmotic/oncotic and hydrostatic forces in the placenta my alter maternal-fetal water flow. A normal amniotic fluid volume is critical for normal fetal growth and development. The study of amniotic fluid volume regulation may yield important insights into the mechanisms used by the fetus to maintain water homeostasis. Knowledge of these mechanisms may allow novel treatments for amniotic fluid volume abnormalities with resultant improvement in clinical outcome.

  18. Computational Models for Nanoscale Fluid Dynamics and Transport Inspired by Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Yu, Hsiu-Yu; Eckmann, David M; Ayyaswamy, Portonovo S

    2017-03-01

    Traditionally, the numerical computation of particle motion in a fluid is resolved through computational fluid dynamics (CFD). However, resolving the motion of nanoparticles poses additional challenges due to the coupling between the Brownian and hydrodynamic forces. Here, we focus on the Brownian motion of a nanoparticle coupled to adhesive interactions and confining-wall-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. We discuss several techniques that are founded on the basis of combining CFD methods with the theory of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in order to simultaneously conserve thermal equipartition and to show correct hydrodynamic correlations. These include the fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) method, the generalized Langevin method, the hybrid method, and the deterministic method. Through the examples discussed, we also show a top-down multiscale progression of temporal dynamics from the colloidal scales to the molecular scales, and the associated fluctuations, hydrodynamic correlations. While the motivation and the examples discussed here pertain to nanoscale fluid dynamics and mass transport, the methodologies presented are rather general and can be easily adopted to applications in convective heat transfer.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of cyclist aerodynamics: performance of different turbulence-modelling and boundary-layer modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defraeye, Thijs; Blocken, Bert; Koninckx, Erwin; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Jan

    2010-08-26

    This study aims at assessing the accuracy of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for applications in sports aerodynamics, for example for drag predictions of swimmers, cyclists or skiers, by evaluating the applied numerical modelling techniques by means of detailed validation experiments. In this study, a wind-tunnel experiment on a scale model of a cyclist (scale 1:2) is presented. Apart from three-component forces and moments, also high-resolution surface pressure measurements on the scale model's surface, i.e. at 115 locations, are performed to provide detailed information on the flow field. These data are used to compare the performance of different turbulence-modelling techniques, such as steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), with several k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models, and unsteady large-eddy simulation (LES), and also boundary-layer modelling techniques, namely wall functions and low-Reynolds number modelling (LRNM). The commercial CFD code Fluent 6.3 is used for the simulations. The RANS shear-stress transport (SST) k-omega model shows the best overall performance, followed by the more computationally expensive LES. Furthermore, LRNM is clearly preferred over wall functions to model the boundary layer. This study showed that there are more accurate alternatives for evaluating flow around bluff bodies with CFD than the standard k-epsilon model combined with wall functions, which is often used in CFD studies in sports.

  20. Fetal fluid and protein dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis fetal fluid and protein dynamics are investigated to gain insight in fetal (patho-)physiology. Studies were performed in fetuses with severe anemia and/or hydrops fetalis. Measurements were performed in fetal blood or amniotic fluid, obtained before or during intrauterine transfusion.

  1. An Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor, G. K.

    2000-02-01

    First published in 1967, Professor Batchelor's classic work is still one of the foremost texts on fluid dynamics. His careful presentation of the underlying theories of fluids is still timely and applicable, even in these days of almost limitless computer power. This reissue ensures that a new generation of graduate students experiences the elegance of Professor Batchelor's writing.

  2. Modeling the fluid-dynamics and oxygen consumption in a porous scaffold stimulated by cyclic squeeze pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Marco; Giusti, Serena; Nascimento, Diana; Silva, Ana; Boschetti, Federica; Ahluwalia, Arti

    2016-08-01

    The architecture and dynamic physical environment of tissues can be recreated in-vitro by combining 3D porous scaffolds and bioreactors able to apply controlled mechanical stimuli on cells. In such systems, the entity of the stimuli and the distribution of nutrients within the engineered construct depend on the micro-structure of the scaffolds. In this work, we present a new approach for optimizing computational fluid-dynamics (CFD) models for the investigation of fluid-induced forces generated by cyclic squeeze pressure within a porous construct, coupled with oxygen consumption of cardiomyocytes. A 2D axial symmetric macro-scaled model of a squeeze pressure bioreactor chamber was used as starting point for generating time dependent pressure profiles. Subsequently the fluid movement generated by the pressure fields was coupled with a complete 3D micro-scaled model of a porous protein cryogel. Oxygen transport and consumption inside the scaffold was evaluated considering a homogeneous distribution of cardiomyocytes throughout the structure, as confirmed by preliminary cell culture experiments. The results show that a 3D description of the system, coupling a porous geometry and time dependent pressure driven flow with fluid-structure-interaction provides an accurate and meaningful description of the microenvironment in terms of shear stress and oxygen distribution than simple stationary 2D models.

  3. Optimization and scale-up of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors using computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfrum, Christian; Josten, Andre; Götz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for the analysis of oligonucleotide synthesis in packed bed reactors was developed and used to optimize the scale up of the process. The model includes reaction kinetics data obtained under well defined conditions comparable to the situation in the packed bed. The model was validated in terms of flow conditions and reaction kinetics by comparison with experimental data. Experimental validation and the following model parameter studies by simulation were performed on the basis of a column with 0.3 g oligonucleotide capacity. The scale-up studies based on CFD modelling were calculated on a 440 g scale (oligonucleotide capacity).

  4. Hybrid models for complex fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Tronci, Cesare

    2010-01-01

    This paper formulates a new approach to complex fluid dynamics, which accounts for microscopic statistical effects in the micromotion. While the ordinary fluid variables (mass density and momentum) undergo usual dynamics, the order parameter field is replaced by a statistical distribution on the order parameter space. This distribution depends also on the point in physical space and its dynamics retains the usual fluid transport features while containing the statistical information on the order parameter space. This approach is based on a hybrid moment closure for Yang-Mills Vlasov plasmas, which replaces the usual cold-plasma assumption. After presenting the basic properties of the hybrid closure, such as momentum map features, singular solutions and Casimir invariants, the effect of Yang-Mills fields is considered and a direct application to ferromagnetic fluids is presented. Hybrid models are also formulated for complex fluids with symmetry breaking. For the special case of liquid crystals, a hybrid formul...

  5. Basic developments in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Basic Developments in Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2 focuses on the developments, approaches, methodologies, reactions, and processes involved in fluid dynamics, including sea motion, wave interactions, and motion of spheres in a viscous fluid.The selection first offers information on inviscid cavity and wake flows and weak-interaction theory of ocean waves. Discussions focus on steady and unsteady cavity flows, radiation balance, theory of weak interactions in random fields, interactions between gravity waves and the atmosphere, and interactions within the ocean. The text then examines low Reynolds

  6. A computational fluid dynamics modeling study of guide walls for downstream fish passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Kevin; Towler, Brett; Haro, Alexander J.; Ahlfeld, David P.

    2017-01-01

    A partial-depth, impermeable guidance structure (or guide wall) for downstream fish passage is typically constructed as a series of panels attached to a floating boom and anchored across a water body (e.g. river channel, reservoir, or power canal). The downstream terminus of the wall is generally located nearby to a fish bypass structure. If guidance is successful, the fish will avoid entrainment in a dangerous intake structure (i.e. turbine intakes) while passing from the headpond to the tailwater of a hydroelectric facility through a safer passage route (i.e. the bypass). The goal of this study is to determine the combination of guide wall design parameters that will most likely increase the chance of surface-oriented fish being successfully guided to the bypass. To evaluate the flow field immediately upstream of a guide wall, a parameterized computational fluid dynamics model of an idealized power canal was constructed in © ANSYS Fluent v 14.5 (ANSYS Inc., 2012). The design parameters investigated were the angle and depth of the guide wall and the average approach velocity in the power canal. Results call attention to the importance of the downward to sweeping flow ratio and demonstrate how a change in guide wall depth and angle can affect this important hydraulic cue to out-migrating fish. The key findings indicate that a guide wall set at a small angle (15° is the minimum in this study) and deep enough such that sweeping flow dominant conditions prevail within the expected vertical distribution of fish approaching the structure will produce hydraulic conditions that are more likely to result in effective passage.

  7. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Lee

    Full Text Available Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS and pressure gradients (∇P across the atrioventricular (AV canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP (y1 transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV across the atrioventricular (AV canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf, simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6, whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  8. Moving domain computational fluid dynamics to interface with an embryonic model of cardiac morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juhyun; Moghadam, Mahdi Esmaily; Kung, Ethan; Cao, Hung; Beebe, Tyler; Miller, Yury; Roman, Beth L; Lien, Ching-Ling; Chi, Neil C; Marsden, Alison L; Hsiai, Tzung K

    2013-01-01

    Peristaltic contraction of the embryonic heart tube produces time- and spatial-varying wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure gradients (∇P) across the atrioventricular (AV) canal. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are a genetically tractable system to investigate cardiac morphogenesis. The use of Tg(fli1a:EGFP) (y1) transgenic embryos allowed for delineation and two-dimensional reconstruction of the endocardium. This time-varying wall motion was then prescribed in a two-dimensional moving domain computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, providing new insights into spatial and temporal variations in WSS and ∇P during cardiac development. The CFD simulations were validated with particle image velocimetry (PIV) across the atrioventricular (AV) canal, revealing an increase in both velocities and heart rates, but a decrease in the duration of atrial systole from early to later stages. At 20-30 hours post fertilization (hpf), simulation results revealed bidirectional WSS across the AV canal in the heart tube in response to peristaltic motion of the wall. At 40-50 hpf, the tube structure undergoes cardiac looping, accompanied by a nearly 3-fold increase in WSS magnitude. At 110-120 hpf, distinct AV valve, atrium, ventricle, and bulbus arteriosus form, accompanied by incremental increases in both WSS magnitude and ∇P, but a decrease in bi-directional flow. Laminar flow develops across the AV canal at 20-30 hpf, and persists at 110-120 hpf. Reynolds numbers at the AV canal increase from 0.07±0.03 at 20-30 hpf to 0.23±0.07 at 110-120 hpf (p< 0.05, n=6), whereas Womersley numbers remain relatively unchanged from 0.11 to 0.13. Our moving domain simulations highlights hemodynamic changes in relation to cardiac morphogenesis; thereby, providing a 2-D quantitative approach to complement imaging analysis.

  9. Multi-solid and multi-fluid diffuse interface model: Applications to dynamic fracture and fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ndanou, S., E-mail: serge.ndanou@univ-amu.fr; Favrie, N., E-mail: nicolas.favrie@univ-amu.fr; Gavrilyuk, S., E-mail: sergey.gavrilyuk@univ-amu.fr

    2015-08-15

    We extend the model of diffuse solid–fluid interfaces developed earlier by authors of this paper to the case of arbitrary number of interacting hyperelastic solids. Plastic transformations of solids are taken into account through a Maxwell type model. The specific energy of each solid is given in separable form: it is the sum of a hydrodynamic part of the energy depending only on the density and the entropy, and an elastic part of the energy which is unaffected by the volume change. It allows us to naturally pass to the fluid description in the limit of vanishing shear modulus. In spite of a large number of governing equations, the model has a quite simple mathematical structure: it is a duplication of a single visco-elastic model. The model is well posed both mathematically and thermodynamically: it is hyperbolic and compatible with the second law of thermodynamics. The resulting model can be applied in the situations involving an arbitrary number of fluids and solids. In particular, we show the ability of the model to describe spallation and penetration phenomena occurring during high velocity impacts.

  10. Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope: computational fluid dynamic analyses and evaluation of the air knife model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, Isaac; Phelps, LeEllen; Warner, Mark; Hubbard, Robert

    2016-08-01

    Implementation of an air curtain at the thermal boundary between conditioned and ambient spaces allows for observation over wavelength ranges not practical when using optical glass as a window. The air knife model of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) project, a 4-meter solar observatory that will be built on Haleakalā, Hawai'i, deploys such an air curtain while also supplying ventilation through the ceiling of the coudé laboratory. The findings of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis and subsequent changes to the air knife model are presented. Major design constraints include adherence to the Interface Control Document (ICD), separation of ambient and conditioned air, unidirectional outflow into the coudé laboratory, integration of a deployable glass window, and maintenance and accessibility requirements. Optimized design of the air knife successfully holds full 12 Pa backpressure under temperature gradients of up to 20°C while maintaining unidirectional outflow. This is a significant improvement upon the .25 Pa pressure differential that the initial configuration, tested by Linden and Phelps, indicated the curtain could hold. CFD post- processing, developed by Vogiatzis, is validated against interferometry results of initial air knife seeing evaluation, performed by Hubbard and Schoening. This is done by developing a CFD simulation of the initial experiment and using Vogiatzis' method to calculate error introduced along the optical path. Seeing error, for both temperature differentials tested in the initial experiment, match well with seeing results obtained from the CFD analysis and thus validate the post-processing model. Application of this model to the realizable air knife assembly yields seeing errors that are well within the error budget under which the air knife interface falls, even with a temperature differential of 20°C between laboratory and ambient spaces. With ambient temperature set to 0°C and conditioned temperature set to 20

  11. Dynamic modelling and simulation of linear Fresnel solar field model based on molten salt heat transfer fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Elina; Tähtinen, Matti

    2016-05-01

    Demonstrations of direct steam generation (DSG) in linear Fresnel collectors (LFC) have given promising results related to higher steam parameters compared to the current state-of-the-art parabolic trough collector (PTC) technology using oil as heat transfer fluid (HTF). However, DSG technology lacks feasible solution for long-term thermal energy storage (TES) system. This option is important for CSP technology in order to offer dispatchable power. Recently, molten salts have been proposed to be used as HTF and directly as storage medium in both line-focusing solar fields, offering storage capacity of several hours. This direct molten salt (DMS) storage concept has already gained operational experience in solar tower power plant, and it is under demonstration phase both in the case of LFC and PTC systems. Dynamic simulation programs offer a valuable effort for design and optimization of solar power plants. In this work, APROS dynamic simulation program is used to model a DMS linear Fresnel solar field with two-tank TES system, and example simulation results are presented in order to verify the functionality of the model and capability of APROS for CSP modelling and simulation.

  12. Irregular vocal fold dynamics incited by asymmetric fluid loading in a model of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, David; Erath, Byron D.; Zanartu, Matias; Peterson, Sean D.

    2011-11-01

    Voiced speech is produced by dynamic fluid-structure interactions in the larynx. Traditionally, reduced order models of speech have relied upon simplified inviscid flow solvers to prescribe the fluid loadings that drive vocal fold motion, neglecting viscous flow effects that occur naturally in voiced speech. Viscous phenomena, such as skewing of the intraglottal jet, have the most pronounced effect on voiced speech in cases of vocal fold paralysis where one vocal fold loses some, or all, muscular control. The impact of asymmetric intraglottal flow in pathological speech is captured in a reduced order two-mass model of speech by coupling a boundary-layer estimation of the asymmetric pressures with asymmetric tissue parameters that are representative of recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Nonlinear analysis identifies the emergence of irregular and chaotic vocal fold dynamics at values representative of pathological speech conditions.

  13. Reduced MHD and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arter, Wayne

    2011-08-01

    Recent work has shown a relationship between between the equations of Reduced Magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD), used to model magnetic fusion laboratory experiments, and incompressible magnetoconvection (IMC), employed in the simulation of astrophysical fluid dynamics (AFD), which means that the two systems are mathematically equivalent in certain geometries. Limitations on the modelling of RMHD, which were found over twenty years ago, are reviewed for an AFD audience, together with hitherto unpublished material on the role of finite-time singularities in the discrete equations used to model fluid dynamical systems. Possible implications for turbulence modelling are mentioned.

  14. Dynamic modelling of an adsorption storage tank using a hybrid approach combining computational fluid dynamics and process simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, J.P.B.; Esteves, I.A.A.C.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    2004-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package has been coupled with the dynamic process simulator of an adsorption storage tank for methane fuelled vehicles. The two solvers run as independent processes and handle non-overlapping portions of the computational domain. The codes exchange data on the boundary interface of the two domains to ensure continuity of the solution and of its gradient. A software interface was developed to dynamically suspend and activate each process as necessary, and be responsible for data exchange and process synchronization. This hybrid computational tool has been successfully employed to accurately simulate the discharge of a new tank design and evaluate its performance. The case study presented here shows that CFD and process simulation are highly complementary computational tools, and that there are clear benefits to be gained from a close integration of the two. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS FOR DENSE GAS-SOLID FLUIDIZED BEDS: A MULTI-SCALE MODELING STRATEGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.; A.; van; der; Hoef; M.; van; Sint; Annaland; J.; A.; M.; Kuipers

    2005-01-01

    Dense gas-particle flows are encountered in a variety of industrially important processes for large scale production of fuels, fertilizers and base chemicals. The scale-up of these processes is often problematic and is related to the intrinsic complexities of these flows which are unfortunately not yet fully understood despite significant efforts made in both academic and industrial research laboratories. In dense gas-particle flows both (effective) fluid-particle and (dissipative) particle-particle interactions need to be accounted for because these phenomena to a large extent govern the prevailing flow phenomena, i.e. the formation and evolution of heterogeneous structures. These structures have significant impact on the quality of the gas-solid contact and as a direct consequence thereof strongly affect the performance of the process. Due to the inherent complexity of dense gas-particles flows, we have adopted a multi-scale modeling approach in which both fluid-particle and particle-particle interactions can be properly accounted for. The idea is essentially that fundamental models, taking into account the relevant details of fluid-particle (lattice Boltzmann model) and particle-particle (discrete particle model) interactions, are used to develop closure laws to feed continuum models which can be used to compute the flow structures on a much larger (industrial) scale. Our multi-scale approach (see Fig. 1 ) involves the lattice Boltzmann model, the discrete particle model, the continuum model based on the kinetic theory of granular flow,and the discrete bubble model. In this paper we give an overview of the multi-scale modeling strategy, accompanied by illustrative computational results for bubble formation. In addition, areas which need substantial further attention will be highlighted.

  16. Connecting Pore Scale Dynamics to Macroscopic Models for Two-Fluid Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, J. E.; Dye, A. L.; Miller, C. T.; Gray, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Imaging technologies such as computed micro-tomography (CMT) provide high resolution three-dimensional images of real porous medium systems that reveal the true geometric structure of fluid and solid phases. Simulation and analysis tools are essential to extract knowledge from this raw data, and can be applied in tandem to provide information that is otherwise inaccessible. Guidance from multi-scale averaging theory is used to develop a multi-scale analysis framework to determine phase connectivity and extract interfacial areas, curvatures, common line length, contact angle and the velocities of the interface and common curve. The approach is applied to analyze pore-scale dynamics based on a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. Dense sets of simulations are performed to evaluate the equilibrium relationship between capillary pressure, saturation and interfacial area for several experimentally imaged porous media. The approach is also used study the evolution of macroscopic quantities under dynamic conditions, which is compared to the equilibrium data.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis.

  18. Thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling of a cold store for cheese maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruccio Giametta

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, drying tests on fresh cheeses were carried out in a cold store equipped with a Munters MG90 dehumidifier that controls the humidity of the room air. In this system, the condensation/drainage stage is omitted since the humid room air is directed out of the cold store (process air and the dried air is introduced by the dehumidifier inside the cold store. Eight air temperature probes were introduced in the store; two probes (HOBO U12-012, 1 HOBO – Onset Computer Corporation, Cape Cod, MA, USA were also introduced and used to measure relative humidity and temperature together with an anemometer to analyse any changes in thermal and fluid dynamics in the cell environment. COMSOL multiphysics software (Comsol Group, Stockolm, Sweden was used to simulate the store environment based on the finite elements method. This allowed us to compare and discuss the experimental data collected and the results obtained by the thermo- fluid-dynamic simulation.

  19. Otto Laporte Lecture: Fluid Dynamics Prize Talk: Simple Models for Turbulent Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Stephen B.

    2009-11-01

    We focus on the modeling of two turbulent flows: dispersion from a line source in grid turbulence; and, a lifted non-premixed turbulent jet flame. Stochastic Lagrangian models and PDF methods are described, and are shown to model these flows satisfactorily. For the line source, a Lagrangian approach is taken, with the Langevin equation modeling the velocity following a fluid particle, and with a simple relaxation model for the particle temperature. Comparison with experimental data shows that the resulting model describes accurately the dispersion from single and multiple line sources. These simple stochastic Lagrangian models are then applied to the much more challenging case of a lifted non-premixed jet flame. The stochastic Lagrangian models form the basis for a particle/mesh numerical method for solving a modeled transport equation for the Eulerian joint probability density function (PDF) of velocity and composition. The PDF calculations are in excellent agreement with the experimental data, and exhibit the observed extreme sensitivity of the flame to the temperature of the co-flow. The PDF model calculations presented clearly demonstrate that simple models can be very useful, even though aspects of their behavior may be inaccurate or incomplete. The shortcomings of the Langevin equation are examined, and more advanced models (designed to overcome some of these shortcomings) are described. These include models for fluid-particle acceleration, including the effects of intermittency; models accounting for mean shear, which are correct in the rapid- distortion limit; and models designed for use in conjunction with large-eddy simulations (LES).

  20. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Construction of dissipative particle dynamics models for complex fluids via the Mori-Zwanzig formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Bian, Xin; Caswell, Bruce; Karniadakis, George Em

    2014-11-21

    We present a bottom-up coarse-graining procedure to construct mesoscopic force fields directly from microscopic dynamics. By grouping many bonded atoms in the molecular dynamics (MD) system into a single cluster, we compute both the conservative and non-conservative interactions between neighboring clusters. In particular, we perform MD simulations of polymer melts to provide microscopic trajectories for evaluating coarse-grained (CG) interactions. Subsequently, dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is considered as the effective dynamics resulting from the Mori-Zwanzig (MZ) projection of the underlying atomistic dynamics. The forces between finite-size clusters have, in general, both radial and transverse components and hence we employ four different DPD models to account differently for such interactions. Quantitative comparisons between these DPD models indicate that the DPD models with MZ-guided force fields yield much better static and dynamics properties, which are consistent with the underlying MD system, compared to standard DPD with empirical formulae. When the rotational motion of the particle is properly taken into account, the entire velocity autocorrelation function of the MD system as well as the pair correlation function can be accurately reproduced by the MD-informed DPD model. Since this coarse-graining procedure is performed on an unconstrained MD system, our framework is general and can be used in other soft matter systems in which the clusters can be faithfully defined as CG particles.

  2. Conformal fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, P D

    2006-01-01

    We present a conformal theory of a dissipationless relativistic fluid in 2 space-time dimensions. The theory carries with it a representation of the algebra of 2-$D$ area-preserving diffeomorphisms in the target space of the complex scalar potentials. A complete canonical description is given, and the central charge of the current algebra is calculated. The passage to the quantum theory is discussed in some detail; as a result of operator ordering problems, full quantization at the level of the fields is as yet an open problem.

  3. Body fluid dynamics: back to the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G

    2011-12-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing particular attention to the interstitium operating as a dynamic interface for water and solute distribution rather than as a static reservoir. Newer work now supports an evolving model of body fluid dynamics that integrates exchangeable Na(+) stores and transcapillary dynamics with advances in interstitial matrix biology.

  4. A Novel Dynamic Model for Predicting Pressure Wave Velocity in Four-Phase Fluid Flowing along the Drilling Annulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangwei Kong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic pressure wave velocity model is presented based on momentum equation, mass-balance equation, equation of state, and small perturbation theory. Simultaneously, the drift model was used to analyze the flow characteristics of oil, gas, water, and drilling fluid multiphase flow. In addition, the dynamic model considers the gas dissolution, virtual mass force, drag force, and relative motion of the interphase as well. Finite difference and Newton-Raphson iterative are introduced to the numerical simulation of the dynamic model. The calculation results indicate that the wave velocity is more sensitive to the increase of gas influx rate than the increase of oil/water influx rate. Wave velocity decreases significantly with the increase of gas influx. Influenced by the pressure drop of four-phase fluid flowing along the annulus, wave velocity tends to increase with respect to well depth, contrary to the gradual reduction of gas void fraction at different depths with the increase of backpressure (BP. Analysis also found that the growth of angular frequency will lead to an increase of wave velocity at low range. Comparison with the calculation results without considering virtual mass force demonstrates that the calculated wave velocity is relatively bigger by using the presented model.

  5. Calculation of noise distribution in mesoscopic dynamics models for phase separation of multicomponent complex fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanVlimmeren, BAC; Fraaije, JGEM

    1996-01-01

    We present a simple method for the numerical calculation of the noise distribution in multicomponent functional Langevin models. The topic is of considerable importance, in view of the increased interest in the application of mesoscopic dynamics simulation models to phase separation of complex

  6. Determination and modeling of the influence of the fluid-dynamics in hydro-treating bench scale plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhardt, T.

    1999-09-16

    At an industrial scale, the hydro-treating of oil fractions is carried out in multiphase fixed bed reactors. The oil and hydrogen cross the catalyst bed, usually in co-current downflow. Since the product specifications are steadily becoming more severe, the testing of new catalysts and of modified operating conditions in pilot plants becomes increasingly important. Although these pilot plants are frequently by a factor of 100 000 smaller than the industrial units, they still have to allow the up-scaling to industrial units. In the literature relatively low conversion degrees in pilot plants are frequently reported, especially in downflow. The significantly lower fluid velocities in pilot plants seem to be responsible for such differences, as the influence of fluid-dynamic non-idealities and of the extra-particle mass transfer phenomena increases with a decrease of the fluid velocities. In the present work, the influence of important fluid-dynamic non-idealities on the hydro-treating of gas oil fractions in pilot plants was examined. This was done on the one hand in experiments with different pilot plants and on the other hand by simulations with an especially developed multiphase model. The phenomena were considered as well in an isolated manner. In order to examine any interactions with the chemical reactions, they were also studied in a reactive system. This methodology was applied to the phenomena, 'axial dispersion'and 'gas-liquid mass transfer'. (author)

  7. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, T.A. [Brookhaven National Labs., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  9. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineers to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to il...

  10. Simulation and experimental validation of vehicle dynamic characteristics for displacement-sensitive shock absorber using fluid-flow modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choon-Tae; Moon, Byung-Young

    2006-02-01

    In this study, a new mathematical dynamic model of shock absorber is proposed to predict the dynamic characteristics of an automotive system. The performance of shock absorber is directly related to the car behaviours and performance, both for handling and ride comfort. Damping characteristics of automotive can be analysed by considering the performance of displacement-sensitive shock absorber (DSSA) for the ride comfort. The proposed model of the DSSA is considered as two modes of damping force (i.e. soft and hard) according to the position of piston. For the simulation validation of vehicle-dynamic characteristics, the DSSA is mathematically modelled by considering the fluid flow in chamber and valve in accordance with the hard, transient and soft zone. And the vehicle dynamic characteristic of the DSSA is analysed using quarter car model. To show the effectiveness of the proposed damper, the analysed results of damping characteristics were compared with the experimental results, which showed similar behaviour with the corresponding experimental one. The simulation results of frequency response are compared with the ones of passive shock absorber. From the simulation results of the DSSA, it can be concluded that the ride comfort of the DSSA increased at the low-amplitude road condition and the driving safety was increased partially at the high-amplitude road condition. The results reported herein will provide a better understanding of the shock absorber. Moreover, it is believed that those properties of the results can be utilised in the dynamic design of the automotive system.

  11. Variational principles for stochastic fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D

    2015-04-08

    This paper derives stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs) for fluid dynamics from a stochastic variational principle (SVP). The paper proceeds by taking variations in the SVP to derive stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations; writing their Itô representation; and then investigating the properties of these stochastic fluid models in comparison with each other, and with the corresponding deterministic fluid models. The circulation properties of the stochastic Stratonovich fluid equations are found to closely mimic those of the deterministic ideal fluid models. As with deterministic ideal flows, motion along the stochastic Stratonovich paths also preserves the helicity of the vortex field lines in incompressible stochastic flows. However, these Stratonovich properties are not apparent in the equivalent Itô representation, because they are disguised by the quadratic covariation drift term arising in the Stratonovich to Itô transformation. This term is a geometric generalization of the quadratic covariation drift term already found for scalar densities in Stratonovich's famous 1966 paper. The paper also derives motion equations for two examples of stochastic geophysical fluid dynamics; namely, the Euler-Boussinesq and quasi-geostropic approximations.

  12. Fluid Dynamics and Entropic Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Nagle, Ian

    2016-01-01

    A new entropic gravity inspired derivation of general relativity from thermodynamics is presented. This generalizes, within Einstein gravity, the "Thermodynamics of Spacetime" approach by T. Jacobson, which relies on the Raychaudhuri evolution equation. Here the rest of the first law of thermodynamics is incorporated by using the Damour-Navier-Stokes equation, known from the membrane paradigm for describing fluid dynamics on the horizon.

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.; Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B.;

    2008-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design is a new title in the is a new title in the REHVA guidebook series. The guidebook is written for people who need to use and discuss results based on CFD predictions, and it gives insight into the subject for those who are not used to work with CFD...

  14. Artificial Heart Fluid Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussivand, Tofigh Varcaneh

    Flow characteristics within pneumatic, pulsatile, and pusher plate prosthetic hearts were studied. The blood pumps evaluated were duplicates of pumps used for in vivo calf and for clinical implantation at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. Human dura mater bioprosthetic, caged disk, and Bjork-Shiley tilting disk valves were employed in the pumps. Dual camera video tape and synchronized still photography were used to study flow patterns. Diffused light and a planar laser source provided illumination. The laser light was fanned into a plane with a thickness of 0.2 mm to 10 mm. Magnesium oxide and Amberlite particles were used as tracers. Aqueous-glycerol, aqueous-sucrose solutions and mineral oil were used as blood analog fluids. Inflow, outflow, drive, and afterload pressures, diaphragm motion, cardiac output, and heart rate were measured and recorded. An electrical circuit was developed to synchronize pump diaphragm motion with captured images of flow trajectories. After digitizing the trajectories, velocities, global and local turbulence, and shear stresses were obtained. Disturbed and recirculating zones were identified. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were performed using data obtained from the digitization of flow trajectories. Simultaneous turbulence and stasis were observed during most phases of the cardiac cycles in all the pumps tested. A maximum Reynold's shear stress of 2889 dynes/cm ^2 occurred at 120 beats per minute (bpm). The peak velocity was 146 cm/sec during systole. The identified regions of recirculation, low velocity and disturbed flow were shown to correlate with thrombosed areas of explanted blood pumps. The maximum calculated turbulence intensity was 106 cm/sec which occurred at 120 bpm during systole.

  15. Kinetic modeling of a high power fast-axial-flow CO2 laser with computational fluid dynamics method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for the simulation of fast-axial-flow CO2 laser is developed.The model which is solved by CFD software uses a set of dynamic differential equations to describe the dynamic process in one discharge tube.The velocity,temperature,pressure and turbulence energy distributions in discharge passage are presented.There is a good agreement between the theoretical prediction and the experimental results.This result indicates that the parameters of the laser have significant effect on the flow distribution in the discharge passage.It is helpful to optimize the output of high power CO2 laser by mastering its kinetic characteristics.

  16. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saye, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of "gauge freedom" to reduce the numerical coupling between fluid velocity, pressure, and interface position, allowing high-order accurate numerical methods to be developed more easily. Making use of an implicit mesh discontinuous Galerkin framework, developed in tandem with this work, high-order results are demonstrated, including surface tension dynamics in which fluid velocity, pressure, and interface geometry are computed with fourth-order spatial accuracy in the maximum norm. Applications are demonstrated with two-phase fluid flow displaying fine-scaled capillary wave dynamics, rigid body fluid-structure interaction, and a fluid-jet free surface flow problem exhibiting vortex shedding induced by a type of Plateau-Rayleigh instability. The developed methods can be generalized to other types of interfacial flow and facilitate precise computation of complex fluid interface phenomena.

  17. Prediction of gasoline yield in a fluid catalytic cracking (FCC riser using k-epsilon turbulence and 4-lump kinetic models: A computational fluid dynamics (CFD approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ahsan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC is an essential process for the conversion of gas oil to gasoline. This study is an effort to model the phenomenon numerically using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software, heavy density catalyst and 4-lump kinetic model. Geometry, boundary conditions and dimensions of industrial riser for catalytic cracking unit are conferred for 2D simulation using commercial CFD code FLUENT 6.3. Continuity, momentum, energy and species transport equations, applicable to two phase solid and gas flow, are used to simulate the physical phenomenon as efficient as possible. This study implements and predicts the use of the granular Eulerian multiphase model with species transport. Time accurate transient problem is solved with the prediction of mass fraction profiles of gas oil, gasoline, light gas and coke. The output curves demonstrate the breaking of heavy hydrocarbon in the presence of catalyst. An approach proposed in this study shows good agreement with the experimental and numerical data available in the literature.

  18. Electromagnetics and Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitonde, Datta

    1998-01-01

    Previous efforts focused on developing tools for design of low observables were sustained. The final product was the maturation of a high-order accurate finite-volume based code to solve Maxwell's equations. One of the primary achievements was the development and implementation of efficient filtering techniques which enhance the robustness of high-order and optimized schemes without significant adverse impact on accuracy. This has eliminated the stability barrier which restrains the common use of high-order schemes for conservative wave propagation phenomena on curvilinear meshes. A study was performed of crossing shock interactions under conditions of increasing interaction strength and asymmetry. In the first category, the observed computed topological bifurcations were correlated with the formation of various lines of coalescence and divergence evident in experimental and computed surf-ace oil maps. ne flow structure arising from asymmetric interactions was investigated with particular emphasis on: 1) vorticity dynamics, 2) shock-structure and 3) sidewall vortex loading. Several efforts of the prior year were successfully published in archival journals. The high-order algorithms developed for CEM have been implemented into the FDL3DI CFD code are presently undergoing extensive testing. Preliminary results are highly encouraging.

  19. Computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasen, G. A.

    The primary consequence of CFD methodologies for future weapons systems involves the reduction of design risks and development costs for aircraft that cannot be fully tested in flight. CFD will accordingly be one of the critical enabling technologies for the National Aerospace Plane and X-30 hypersonic test vehicle. CFD is also useful in submarine and surface naval vessel design for minimization of expensive model testing. CFD has also begun to be applied to the design of high-performance parachutes. Flight vehicles operating at very low speeds present unique flow problems which are readily addressed through the application of CFD. Useful CFD applications also exist in artillery internal and external ballistics investigations.

  20. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell under transient automotive operations

    OpenAIRE

    Choopanya, Pattarapong

    2016-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is probably the most promising technology that will replace conventional internal combustion engines in the near future. As a primary power source for an automobile, the transient performance of a PEM fuel cell is of prime importance. In this thesis, a comprehensive, three-dimensional, two-phase, multi-species computational fuel cell dynamics model is developed in order to investigate the effect of flow-field design on the magnitude of current ov...

  1. Engineering applications of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Awang, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis that can be used for conceptual studies of product design, detail product development, process troubleshooting. It demonstrates the benefit of CFD modeling as a cost saving, timely, safe and easy to scale-up methodology.

  2. Initial computational fluid dynamics modeling of the Giant Magellan Telescope site and enclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danks, Ryan; Smeaton, William; Bigelow, Bruce; Burgett, William

    2016-08-01

    In the era of extremely large telescopes (ELTs), with telescope apertures growing in size and tighter image quality requirements, maintaining a controlled observation environment is critical. Image quality is directly influenced by thermal gradients, the level of turbulence in the incoming air flow and the wind forces acting on the telescope. Thus any ELT enclosure must be able to modulate the speed and direction of the incoming air and limit the inflow of disturbed ground-layer air. However, gaining an a priori understanding of the wind environment's impacts on a proposed telescope is complicated by the fact that telescopes are usually located in remote, mountainous areas, which often do not have high quality historic records of the wind conditions, and can be subjected to highly complex flow patterns that may not be well represented by the traditional analytic approaches used in typical building design. As part of the design process for the Giant Magellan Telescope at Cerro Las Campanas, Chile; the authors conducted a parametric design study using computational fluid dynamics which assessed how the telescope's position on the mesa, its ventilation configuration and the design of the enclosure and windscreens could be optimized to minimize the infiltration of ground-layer air. These simulations yielded an understanding of how the enclosure and the natural wind flows at the site could best work together to provide a consistent, well controlled observation environment. Future work will seek to quantify the aerothermal environment in terms of image quality.

  3. Bloodstain Pattern Analysis: implementation of a fluid dynamic model for position determination of victims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laan, Nick; de Bruin, Karla G.; Slenter, Denise; Wilhelm, Julie; Jermy, Mark; Bonn, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    Bloodstain Pattern Analysis is a forensic discipline in which, among others, the position of victims can be determined at crime scenes on which blood has been shed. To determine where the blood source was investigators use a straight-line approximation for the trajectory, ignoring effects of gravity and drag and thus overestimating the height of the source. We determined how accurately the location of the origin can be estimated when including gravity and drag into the trajectory reconstruction. We created eight bloodstain patterns at one meter distance from the wall. The origin’s location was determined for each pattern with: the straight-line approximation, our method including gravity, and our method including both gravity and drag. The latter two methods require the volume and impact velocity of each bloodstain, which we are able to determine with a 3D scanner and advanced fluid dynamics, respectively. We conclude that by including gravity and drag in the trajectory calculation, the origin’s location can be determined roughly four times more accurately than with the straight-line approximation. Our study enables investigators to determine if the victim was sitting or standing, or it might be possible to connect wounds on the body to specific patterns, which is important for crime scene reconstruction.

  4. Fluid dynamics of planetary ices

    CERN Document Server

    Greve, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The role of water ice in the solar system is reviewed from a fluid-dynamical point of view. On Earth and Mars, water ice forms ice sheets, ice caps and glaciers at the surface, which show glacial flow under their own weight. By contrast, water ice is a major constituent of the bulk volume of the icy satellites in the outer solar system, and ice flow can occur as thermal convection. The rheology of polycrystalline aggregates of ordinary, hexagonal ice Ih is described by a power law, different forms of which are discussed. The temperature dependence of the ice viscosity follows an Arrhenius law. Therefore, the flow of ice in a planetary environment constitutes a thermo-mechanically coupled problem; its model equations are obtained by inserting the flow law and the thermodynamic material equations in the balance laws of mass, momentum and energy. As an example of gravity-driven flow, the polar caps of Mars are discussed. For the north-polar cap, large-scale flow velocities of the order of 0.1...1 mm/a are likely...

  5. 2D fluid simulations of interchange turbulence with ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens; Xu, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a first principle global two-dimensional fluid model. The HESEL (Hot Edge SOL Electrostatic) model is a 2D numerical fluid code, based on interchange dynamics and includes besides electron also the ion pressure dynamic. In the limit of cold ions the model almost reduces...

  6. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  7. Modeling optimizes PEM fuel cell durability using three-dimensional multi-phase computational fluid dynamics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Damage mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cell are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running, because it consists of the materials with different thermal expansion and swelling coefficients. Therefore, in order to acquire a complete understanding of the damage mechanisms in the membrane and gas diffusion layers, mechanical response under steady-state hygro-thermal stresses should be studied under real cell operating conditions and in real cell geometry (three-dimensional. In this work, full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to simulate the hygro and thermal stresses in PEM fuel cell, which are occurring during the cell operation due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. A unique feature of the present model is to incorporate the effect of hygro and thermal stresses into actual three-dimensional fuel cell model. The mechanical behaviour of the membrane, catalyst layers, and gas diffusion layers during the operation of a unit cell has been studied and investigated. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and stresses distribution that have limited experimental data. The results show that the non-uniform distribution of stresses, caused by the temperature gradient in the cell, induces localized bending stresses, which can contribute to delaminating between the membrane and the gas diffusion layers. These results may explain the occurrence of cracks and pinholes in the membrane during regular cell operation. This model is used to study the effect of operating, design, and material parameters on fuel cell hygro-thermal stresses in polymer membrane, catalyst layers, and gas diffusion layers. Detailed analyses of the fuel cell durability under various operating conditions have been

  8. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of gas flow characteristics of the high-power CW CO2 laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyau Huang; Youqing Wang

    2011-01-01

    @@ To increase the photoelectronic conversion efficiency of the single discharge tube and to meet the requirements of the laser cutting system, optimization of the discharge tube structure and gas flow field is necessary. We present a computational fluid dynamic model to predict the gas flow characteristics of high-power fast-axial flow CO2 laser. A set of differential equations is used to describe the operation of the laser. Gas flow characteristics, are calculated. The effects of gas velocity and turbulence intensity on discharge stability are studied. Computational results are compared with experimental values, and a good agreement is observed. The method presented and the results obtained can make the design process more efficient.%To increase the photoelectronic conversion efficiency of the single discharge tube and to meet the requirements of the laser cutting system, optimization of the discharge tube structure and gas flow field is necessary. We present a computational fluid dynamic model to predict the gas flow characteristics of high-power fast-axial flow CO2 laser. A set of differential equations is used to describe the operation of the laser. Gas flow characteristics, are calculated. The effects of gas velocity and turbulence intensity on discharge stability are studied. Computational results are compared with experimental values, and a good agreement is observed. The method presented and the results obtained can make the design process more efficient.

  9. Multi-objective optimization of internal combustion engine by means of 1D fluid-dynamic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, G.; Cerri, T.; Pertusi, G. [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambruschini 4, 20156 Milan (Italy)

    2011-03-15

    The definition of an efficient optimization methodology for internal combustion engine design using 1D fluid dynamic simulation models is presented. This work aims at discussing the fundamental numerical and fluid dynamic aspects which can lead to the definition of a best practice technique, depending on the complexity of the problem to be dealt with, on the number of design parameters, objective variables and constrains. For these reasons, both single-and multi-objective problems will be addressed, where the former are still of relevant interest (i.e. optimization of engine performances), while the latter have a much wider range of applications and are often characterized by conflicting objectives. The Mesh Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) was chosen among the class of direct search methods and compared with the Genetic Algorithms to solve single-objective problems, and similarly two different algorithms were chosen and compared to solve multi-objective problems: the {epsilon}-constraint method and the NSGA-II (Non-Dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm). A single cylinder spark ignition engine, used in a motorbike application, was chosen as test case, to allow reduced computational times, without any loss of generality of the results. The analysis evaluate the convergence and efficiency of each methodology for the different problems which are solved. The achieved goal is not the definition of an ever valid mathematical strategy, but here focus is given on the parallel application of a detailed fluid dynamic analysis and automated optimization techniques to suggest a best practice technique to be employed depending on the characteristic of the optimization problem to be solved. (author)

  10. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Two-phase Flow in a Structured Packing Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小斌; 姚蕾; 邱利民; 张学军

    2013-01-01

    Characterizing the complex two-phase hydrodynamics in structured packed columns requires a power-ful modeling tool. The traditional two-dimensional model exhibits limitations when one attempts to model the de-tailed two-phase flow inside the columns. The present paper presents a three-dimensional computational fluid dy-namics (CFD) model to simulate the two-phase flow in a representative unit of the column. The unit consists of an entire corrugation channel and describes well the real liquid flow conditions. The detailed unsteady two-phase 3D CFD calculations on column packed with Flexipak 1Y were implemented within the volume of fluid (VOF) mathe-matical framework. The CFD model was validated by comparing the calculated thickness of liquid film with the available experimental data. Special attention was given to quantitative analysis of the effects of gravity on the hy-drodynamics. Fluctuations in the liquid mass flow rate and the calculated pressure drop loss were found to be quali-tatively in agreement with the experimental observations.

  11. Development and validation of computational fluid dynamics models for prediction of heat transfer and thermal microenvironments of corals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Ong

    Full Text Available We present Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD models of the coupled dynamics of water flow, heat transfer and irradiance in and around corals to predict temperatures experienced by corals. These models were validated against controlled laboratory experiments, under constant and transient irradiance, for hemispherical and branching corals. Our CFD models agree very well with experimental studies. A linear relationship between irradiance and coral surface warming was evident in both the simulation and experimental result agreeing with heat transfer theory. However, CFD models for the steady state simulation produced a better fit to the linear relationship than the experimental data, likely due to experimental error in the empirical measurements. The consistency of our modelling results with experimental observations demonstrates the applicability of CFD simulations, such as the models developed here, to coral bleaching studies. A study of the influence of coral skeletal porosity and skeletal bulk density on surface warming was also undertaken, demonstrating boundary layer behaviour, and interstitial flow magnitude and temperature profiles in coral cross sections. Our models compliment recent studies showing systematic changes in these parameters in some coral colonies and have utility in the prediction of coral bleaching.

  12. Reduced combustion mechanism for C1-C4 hydrocarbons and its application in computational fluid dynamics flare modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damodara, Vijaya; Chen, Daniel H; Lou, Helen H; Rasel, Kader M A; Richmond, Peyton; Wang, Anan; Li, Xianchang

    2017-05-01

    Emissions from flares constitute unburned hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), soot, and other partially burned and altered hydrocarbons along with carbon dioxide (CO2) and water. Soot or visible smoke is of particular concern for flare operators/regulatory agencies. The goal of the study is to develop a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model capable of predicting flare combustion efficiency (CE) and soot emission. Since detailed combustion mechanisms are too complicated for (CFD) application, a 50-species reduced mechanism, LU 3.0.1, was developed. LU 3.0.1 is capable of handling C4 hydrocarbons and soot precursor species (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6). The new reduced mechanism LU 3.0.1 was first validated against experimental performance indicators: laminar flame speed, adiabatic flame temperature, and ignition delay. Further, CFD simulations using LU 3.0.1 were run to predict soot emission and CE of air-assisted flare tests conducted in 2010 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, using ANSYS Fluent software. Results of non-premixed probability density function (PDF) model and eddy dissipation concept (EDC) model are discussed. It is also noteworthy that when used in conjunction with the EDC turbulence-chemistry model, LU 3.0.1 can reasonably predict volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions as well. A reduced combustion mechanism containing 50 C1-C4 species and soot precursors has been developed and validated against experimental data. The combustion mechanism is then employed in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of modeling of soot emission and combustion efficiency (CE) of controlled flares for which experimental soot and CE data are available. The validated CFD modeling tools are useful for oil, gas, and chemical industries to comply with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) mandate to achieve smokeless flaring with a high CE.

  13. Incremental Model Identification of Fluid-Fluid Reaction Systems – Dynamic Accumulation and Reactions in the Diffusion Layer

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The identification of kinetic models is an important step for the monitoring, control and optimization of industrial processes. This is particularly the case for highly competitive business sectors such as chemical and pharmaceutical industries, where the current trend of changing markets and strong competition leads to a reduction in the process development costs [1]. Moreover, the PAT initiative of the FDA advocates a better understanding and control of manufacturing processes by the use of...

  14. Fluid Dynamic Verification Experiments on STS-70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleis, Stanley J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluid dynamic experiments were flown on STS-70 as phase two of the engineering evaluation of the first bioreactor Engineering Development Unit (EDU#1). The phase one experiments were comparative cell cultures in identical units on earth and onboard STS-70. In phase two, two types of fluid dynamic experiments were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the basic flow patterns were evaluated with the use of 'dye' streaklines formed from alternate injections of either a mild acid or base solution into the external flow loop that was then perfused into the vessel. The presence of Bromothymol Blue in the fluid then caused color changes from yellow to blue or vice versa, indicating the basic fluid motions. This reversible change could be repeated as desired. In the absence of significant density differences in the fluid, the flow patterns in space should be the same as on earth. Video tape records of the flow patterns for a wide range of operating conditions were obtained. The second type of fluid dynamic experiment was the quantitative evaluation of the trajectories of solid beads of various densities and sizes. The beads were introduced into the vessel and the paths recorded on video tape, with the vessel operated at various rotation rates and flow perfusion rates. Because of space limitations, the video camera was placed as close as possible to the vessel, resulting in significant optical distortion. This report describes the analysis methods to obtain comparisons between the in-flight fluid dynamics and numerical models of the flow field. The methods include optical corrections to the video images and calculation of the bead trajectories for given operating conditions and initial bead locations.

  15. Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelson, Roger M.

    The fluid kaleidoscope of the Earth's ocean and atmosphere churns and sparkles with jets, gyres, eddies, waves, streams, and cyclones. These vast circulations, essential elements of the physical environment that support human life, are given a special character by the Earth's rotation and by their confinement to a shallow surficial layer, thin relative to the solid Earth in roughly the same proportion as an apple skin is to an apple. Geophysical fluid dynamics exploits this special character to develop a unified theoretical approach to the physics of the ocean and atmosphere.With Lectures on Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Rick Salmon has added an insightful and provocative volume to the handful of authoritative texts currently available on the subject. The book is intended for first-year graduate students, but advanced students and researchers also will find it useful. It is divided into seven chapters, the first four of these adapted from course lectures. The book is well written and presents a fresh and stimulating perspective that complements existing texts. It would serve equally well either as the main text for a core graduate curriculum or as a supplementary resource for students and teachers seeking new approaches to both classical and contemporary problems. A lively set of footnotes contains many references to very recent work. The printing is attractive, the binding is of high quality, and typographical errors are few.

  16. A quantitative comparison between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation results for the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongbin

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative comparisons were made between the flow factor approach model and the molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) results both of which describe the flow of a molecularly thin fluid film confined between two solid walls. Although these two approaches, respectively, calculate the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film by different ways, very good agreements were found between them when the Couette and Poiseuille flows, respectively, calculated from them were compared. It strongly indicates the validity of the flow factor approach model in modeling the flow of a confined molecularly thin fluid film.

  17. The growth and the fluid dynamics of protein crystals and soft organic tissues: models and simulations, similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappa, Marcello

    2003-09-21

    The fluid-dynamic environment within typical growth reactors as well as the interaction of such flow with the intrinsic kinetics of the growth process are investigated in the frame of the new fields of protein crystal and tissue engineering. The paper uses available data to introduce a set of novel growth models. The surface conditions are coupled to the exchange mass flux at the specimen/culture-medium interface and lead to the introduction of a group of differential equations for the nutrient concentration around the sample and for the evolution of the construct mass displacement. These models take into account the sensitivity of the construct/liquid interface to the level of supersaturation in the case of macromolecular crystal growth and to the "direct" effect of the fluid-dynamic shear stress in the case of biological tissue growth. They then are used to show how the proposed surface kinetic laws can predict (through sophisticated numerical simulations) many of the known characteristics of protein crystals and biological tissues produced using well-known and widely used reactors. This procedure provides validation of the models and associated numerical method and at the same time gives insights into the mechanisms of the phenomena. The onset of morphological instabilities is discussed and investigated in detail. The interplay between the increasing size of the sample and the structure of the convective field established inside the reactor is analysed. It is shown that this interaction is essential in determining the time evolution of the specimen shape. Analogies about growing macromolecular crystals and growing biological tissues are pointed out in terms of behaviours and cause-and-effect relationships. These aspects lead to a common source (in terms of original mathematical models, ideas and results) made available for the scientific community under the optimistic idea that the contacts established between the "two fields of engineering" will develop into an

  18. A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model of shear stress distribution during neotissue growth in a perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Y; Luyten, F P; Schrooten, J; Papantoniou, I; Geris, L

    2015-12-01

    Bone tissue engineering strategies use flow through perfusion bioreactors to apply mechanical stimuli to cells seeded on porous scaffolds. Cells grow on the scaffold surface but also by bridging the scaffold pores leading a fully filled scaffold following the scaffold's geometric characteristics. Current computational fluid dynamic approaches for tissue engineering bioreactor systems have been mostly carried out for empty scaffolds. The effect of 3D cell growth and extracellular matrix formation (termed in this study as neotissue growth), on its surrounding fluid flow field is a challenge yet to be tackled. In this work a combined approach was followed linking curvature driven cell growth to fluid dynamics modeling. The level-set method (LSM) was employed to capture neotissue growth driven by curvature, while the Stokes and Darcy equations, combined in the Brinkman equation, provided information regarding the distribution of the shear stress profile at the neotissue/medium interface and within the neotissue itself during growth. The neotissue was assumed to be micro-porous allowing flow through its structure while at the same time allowing the simulation of complete scaffold filling without numerical convergence issues. The results show a significant difference in the amplitude of shear stress for cells located within the micro-porous neo-tissue or at the neotissue/medium interface, demonstrating the importance of taking along the neotissue in the calculation of the mechanical stimulation of cells during culture.The presented computational framework is used on different scaffold pore geometries demonstrating its potential to be used a design as tool for scaffold architecture taking into account the growing neotissue. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2015;112: 2591-2600. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Microemulsions as model fluids for enhanced oil recovery: dynamics adjacent to planar hydrophilic walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattauch S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available After the dynamics of microemulsions adjacent to a planar hydrophilic wall have been characterized using grazing incidence neutron spin echo spectroscopy, the model of Seifert was employed to explain the discovered acceleration for the surface near lamellar ordered membranes. Reflections of hydrodynamic waves by the wall – or the volume conservation between the membrane and the wall – explain faster relaxations and, therefore, a lubrication effect that is important for flow fields in narrow pores. The whole scenery is now spectated by using different scenarios of a bicontinuous microemulsion exposed to clay particles and of a lamellar microemulsion adjacent to a planar wall. The Seifert concept could successfully be transferred to the new problems.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Paul

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics has reached a stage where flow field in practical situation can be predicted to aid the design and to probe into the fundamental flow physics to understand and resolve the issues in fundamental fluid mechanics. The study examines the computation of reacting flows. After exploring the conservation equations for species and energy, the methods of closing the reaction rate terms in turbulent flow have been examined briefly. Two cases of computation, where combustion-flow interaction plays important role, have been discussed to illustrate the computational aspects and the physical insight that can be gained by the reacting flow computation.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.577-582, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.600

  1. Can a stepwise steady flow computational fluid dynamics model reproduce unsteady particulate matter separation for common unit operations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathapati, Subbu-Srikanth; Sansalone, John J

    2011-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is emerging as a model for resolving the fate of particulate matter (PM) by unit operations subject to rainfall-runoff loadings. However, compared to steady flow CFD models, there are greater computational requirements for unsteady hydrodynamics and PM loading models. Therefore this study examines if integrating a stepwise steady flow CFD model can reproduce PM separation by common unit operations loaded by unsteady flow and PM loadings, thereby reducing computational effort. Utilizing monitored unit operation data from unsteady events as a metric, this study compares the two CFD modeling approaches for a hydrodynamic separator (HS), a primary clarifier (PC) tank, and a volumetric clarifying filtration system (VCF). Results indicate that while unsteady CFD models reproduce PM separation of each unit operation, stepwise steady CFD models result in significant deviation for HS and PC models as compared to monitored data; overestimating the physical size requirements of each unit required to reproduce monitored PM separation results. In contrast, the stepwise steady flow approach reproduces PM separation by the VCF, a combined gravitational sedimentation and media filtration unit operation that provides attenuation of turbulent energy and flow velocity.

  2. Fingerprint of a submerged-arc Furnace. Optimising energy consumption through data mining, dynamic modelling and computational fluid dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheepers, E.

    2008-06-26

    This study imparts a scientific perception of a phosphorous-producing submerged arc furnace never seen before; a proverbial fingerprint that can improve problem identification, disturbance diagnostics, process prediction, dynamic modelling and model predictive control of this type of furnace. It successfully incorporates accurate, multi-field thermodynamic-, kinetic- and industrial data with computational flow dynamic calculations; thus further unifying the sciences of kinetics and equilibrium thermodynamics. The true power of this study is the extensive and methodical validation that ensures industrially endorsed results. To facilitate all this the author spent six uninterrupted months at an industrial plant (Thermphos International), twice walked inside a cold submerged-arc furnace, gathered and analysed more than thirty-four mineralogical samples, managed an extensive and insightful sampling campaign on the slag streams, performed feed material porosity tests and had thirteen additional temperature probes installed inside the furnace lining. The author also scrutinised over years of industrial data, inspected many industrial drawing and partook in countless valuable conversations with industrial and technical experts to guarantee, not only a valuable scientific contribution, but one that is deep-rooted in authentic engineering principles.

  3. Colour in visualisation for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, David; Atherton, Mark; Collins, Michael; Dokhan, Jason; Karayiannis, Tassos

    2006-06-01

    Colour is used in computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations in two key ways. First it is used to visualise the geometry and allow the engineer to be confident that the model constructed is a good representation of the engineering situation. Once an analysis has been completed, colour is used in post-processing the data from the simulations to illustrate the complex fluid mechanic phenomena under investigation. This paper describes these two uses of colour and provides some examples to illustrate the key visualisation approaches used in CFD.

  4. Implementing fluid dynamics obtained from GeoPET in reactive transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna; Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Kulenkampff, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Flow and transport simulations in geomaterials are commonly conducted on high-resolution tomograms (μCT) of the pore structure or stochastic models that are calibrated with measured integral quantities, like break through curves (BTC). Yet, there existed virtually no method for experimental verification of the simulated velocity distribution results. Positron emission tomography (PET) has unrivaled sensitivity and robustness for non-destructive, quantitative, spatio-temporal measurement of tracer concentrations in body tissue. In the past decade, we empowered PET for its applicability in opaque/geological media - GeoPET (Kulenkampff et al.; Kulenkampff et al., 2008; Zakhnini et al., 2013) and have developed detailed correction schemes to bring the images into sharp focus. Thereby it is the appropriate method for experimental verification and calibration of computer simulations of pore-scale transport by means of the observed propagation of a tracer pulse, c_PET(x,y,z,t). In parallel, we aimed at deriving velocity and porosity distributions directly from our concentration time series of fluid flow processes in geomaterials. This would allow us to directly benefit from lab scale observations and to parameterize respective numerical transport models. For this we have developed a robust spatiotemporal (3D+t) parameter extraction algorithm. Here, we will present its functionality, and demonstrate the use of obtained velocity distributions in finite element simulations of reactive transport processes on drill core scale. Kulenkampff, J., Gruendig, M., Zakhnini, A., Gerasch, R., and Lippmann-Pipke, J.: Process tomography of diffusion with PET for evaluating anisotropy and heterogeneity, Clay Minerals, in press. Kulenkampff, J., Gründig, M., Richter, M., and Enzmann, F.: Evaluation of positron emission tomography for visualisation of migration processes in geomaterials, Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 33, 937-942, 2008. Zakhnini, A., Kulenkampff, J., Sauerzapf, S

  5. Modeling of fluid injection and withdrawal induced fault activation using discrete element based hydro-mechanical and dynamic coupled simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeoung Seok; Zang, Arno; Zimmermann, Günter; Stephansson, Ove

    2016-04-01

    Operation of fluid injection into and withdrawal from the subsurface for various purposes has been known to induce earthquakes. Such operations include hydraulic fracturing for shale gas extraction, hydraulic stimulation for Enhanced Geothermal System development and waste water disposal. Among these, several damaging earthquakes have been reported in the USA in particular in the areas of high-rate massive amount of wastewater injection [1] mostly with natural fault systems. Oil and gas production have been known to induce earthquake where pore fluid pressure decreases in some cases by several tens of Mega Pascal. One recent seismic event occurred in November 2013 near Azle, Texas where a series of earthquakes began along a mapped ancient fault system [2]. It was studied that a combination of brine production and waste water injection near the fault generated subsurface pressures sufficient to induced earthquakes on near-critically stressed faults. This numerical study aims at investigating the occurrence mechanisms of such earthquakes induced by fluid injection [3] and withdrawal by using hydro-geomechanical coupled dynamic simulator (Itasca's Particle Flow Code 2D). Generic models are setup to investigate the sensitivity of several parameters which include fault orientation, frictional properties, distance from the injection well to the fault, amount of fluid withdrawal around the injection well, to the response of the fault systems and the activation magnitude. Fault slip movement over time in relation to the diffusion of pore pressure is analyzed in detail. Moreover, correlations between the spatial distribution of pore pressure change and the locations of induced seismic events and fault slip rate are investigated. References [1] Keranen KM, Weingarten M, Albers GA, Bekins BA, Ge S, 2014. Sharp increase in central Oklahoma seismicity since 2008 induced by massive wastewater injection, Science 345, 448, DOI: 10.1126/science.1255802. [2] Hornbach MJ, DeShon HR

  6. Collective dynamics of sperm in viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    Collective dynamics in biology is an interesting subject for physicists, in part because of its close relations to emergent behaviors in condensed matter, such as phase separation and criticality. However, the emergence of order is often less drastic in systems composed of the living cells, sometimes due to the natural variability among individual organisms. Here, using bull sperm as a model system, we demonstrate that the cells migrate collectively in viscoelastic fluids, exhibiting behavior similar to ``flocking''. This collectiveness is greatly reduced in similarly viscous Newtonian fluids, suggesting that the cell-cell interaction is primarily a result of the elastic property or the memory effect of the fluids, instead of pure hydrodynamic interactions. Unlike bacterial swarming, this collectiveness does not require a change in phenotype of the cells; therefore, it is a better model system for physicists. Supported by NIH grant 1R01HD070038.

  7. Analysis of ionization wave dynamics in low-temperature plasma jets from fluid modeling supported by experimental investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.; Merbahi, N.; Jomaa, N.

    2012-08-01

    This work is devoted to fluid modeling based on experimental investigations of a classical setup of a low-temperature plasma jet. The latter is generated at atmospheric pressure using a quartz tube of small diameter crossed by helium gas flow and surrounded by an electrode system powered by a mono-polar high-voltage pulse. The streamer-like behavior of the fast plasma bullets or ionization waves launched in ambient air for every high-voltage pulse, already emphasized in the literature from experimental or analytical considerations or recent preliminary fluid models, is confirmed by a numerical one-moment fluid model for the simulation of the ionization wave dynamics. The dominant interactions between electron and the main ions present in He-air mixtures with their associated basic data are taken into account. The gradual dilution of helium in air outside the tube along the axis is also considered using a gas hydrodynamics model based on the Navier-Stokes equation assuming a laminar flow. Due to the low magnitude of the reduced electric field E/N (not exceeding 15 Td), it is first shown that consideration of the stepwise ionization of helium metastables is required to reach the critical size of the electron avalanches in order to initiate the formation of ionization waves. It is also shown that a gas pre-ionization ahead of the wave front of about 109 cm-3 (coming from Penning ionization without considering the gas photo-ionization) is required for the propagation. Furthermore, the second ionization wave experimentally observed during the falling time of the voltage pulse, between the powered electrode and the tube exit, is correlated with the electric field increase inside the ionized channel in the whole region between the electrode and the tube exit. The propagation velocity and the distance traveled by the front of the ionization wave outside the tube in the downstream side are consistent with the present experimental measurements. In comparison with the

  8. Balanced models in geophysical fluid dynamics: Hamiltonian formulation, constraints and formal stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhove, O.; Norbury, J.; Roulstone, I.

    2002-01-01

    Most fluid systems, such as the three-dimensional compressible Euler equations, are too complicated to yield general analytical solutions, and approximation methods are needed to make progress in understanding aspects of particular flows. This chapter reviews derivations of approximate or reduced ge

  9. A Poroelastic Fluid/Structure-Interaction Model of Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cord With Syringomyelia and Adjacent Subarachnoid-Space Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, C D; Heil, M

    2017-01-01

    An existing axisymmetric fluid/structure-interaction (FSI) model of the spinal cord, pia mater, subarachnoid space, and dura mater in the presence of syringomyelia and subarachnoid-space stenosis was modified to include porous solids. This allowed investigation of a hypothesis for syrinx fluid ingress from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Gross model deformation was unchanged by the addition of porosity, but pressure oscillated more in the syrinx and the subarachnoid space below the stenosis. The poroelastic model still exhibited elevated mean pressure in the subarachnoid space below the stenosis and in the syrinx. With realistic cord permeability, there was slight oscillatory shunt flow bypassing the stenosis via the porous tissue over the syrinx. Weak steady streaming flow occurred in a circuit involving craniocaudal flow through the stenosis and back via the syrinx. Mean syrinx volume was scarcely altered when the adjacent stenosis bisected the syrinx, but increased slightly when the syrinx was predominantly located caudal to the stenosis. The fluid content of the tissues over the syrinx oscillated, absorbing most of the radial flow seeping from the subarachnoid space so that it did not reach the syrinx. To a lesser extent, this cyclic swelling in a boundary layer of cord tissue just below the pia occurred all along the cord, representing a mechanism for exchange of interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid which could explain recent tracer findings without invoking perivascular conduits. The model demonstrates that syrinx volume increase is possible when there is subarachnoid-space stenosis and the cord and pia are permeable.

  10. The Effect of Needle-insertion Depth on the Irrigant Flow in the Root Canal : Evaluation Using an Unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, Christos; Lambrianidis, Theodor; Verhaagen, Bram; Versluis, Michel; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios; Wesselink, Paul R.; van der Sluis, Lucas W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle-insertion depth on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two different needle types using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods: A validated CFD model was used t

  11. The effect of needle-insertion depth on the irrigant flow in the root canal: evaluation using an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Lambrianidis, T.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Wesselink, P.R.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of needle-insertion depth on the irrigant flow inside a prepared root canal during final irrigation with a syringe and two different needle types using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. Methods A validated CFD model was used to

  12. Computational fluid dynamics in ventilation design

    CERN Document Server

    Allard, Francis; Awbi, Hazim B; Davidson, Lars; Schälin, Alois

    2007-01-01

    CFD-calculations have been rapidly developed to a powerful tool for the analysis of air pollution distribution in various spaces. However, the user of CFD-calculation should be aware of the basic principles of calculations and specifically the boundary conditions. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) – in Ventilation Design models is written by a working group of highly qualified international experts representing research, consulting and design.

  13. Interfacial gauge methods for incompressible fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Saye, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Designing numerical methods for incompressible fluid flow involving moving interfaces, for example, in the computational modeling of bubble dynamics, swimming organisms, or surface waves, presents challenges due to the coupling of interfacial forces with incompressibility constraints. A class of methods, denoted interfacial gauge methods, is introduced for computing solutions to the corresponding incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. These methods use a type of “gauge freedom” to reduce the...

  14. Finite-size effects in molecular dynamics simulations: Static structure factor and compressibility. II. Application to a model krypton fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salacuse, J. J.; Denton, A. R.; Egelstaff, P. A.; Tau, M.; Reatto, L.

    1996-03-01

    The method described in the preceding paper [J. J. Salacuse, A. R. Denton, and P. A. Egelstaff, preceding paper, Phys. Rev. E 53, 2382 (1996)] for computing the static structure factor S(Q) of a bulk fluid is used to analyze molecular dynamics computer simulation data for a model krypton fluid whose atoms interact via a truncated Aziz pair potential. Simulations have been carried out for two system sizes of N=706 and 2048 particles and two thermodynamic states, described by a common reduced temperature T*=1.51 and reduced densities ρ*=0.25 and 0.4. Results presented include the N-particle radial distribution function gN(r) and the bulk static structure factor S(Q). In addition we calculate the direct correlation function c(r) from the full S(Q). In comparison with corresponding predictions of the modified hypernetted chain theory, the results are generally in excellent agreement at all r and Q, to within random statistical errors in the simulation data.

  15. Non-metric fluid dynamics and cosmology on Finsler spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Hohmann, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the kinetic theory of fluids, in which the description of fluids is based on the geodesic motion of particles, to spacetimes modeled by Finsler geometry. Our results show that Finsler spacetimes are a suitable background for fluid dynamics and that the equation of motion for a collisionless fluid is given by the Liouville equation, as it is also the case for a metric background geometry. We finally apply this model to collisionless dust and a general fluid with cosmological symmetry and derive the corresponding equations of motion. It turns out that the equation of motion for a dust fluid is a simple generalization of the well-known Euler equations.

  16. Dynamics of capillary condensation in lattice gas models of confined fluids: A comparison of dynamic mean field theory with dynamic Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, John R.; Monson, Peter A.

    2013-06-01

    This article addresses the accuracy of a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128, 084701 (2008)], 10.1063/1.2837287. The theory is used to study the relaxation processes of fluids in pores driven by step changes made to a bulk reservoir in contact with the pore. We compare the results of the DMFT to those obtained by averaging over large numbers of dynamic Monte Carlo (DMC) simulation trajectories. The problem chosen for comparison is capillary condensation in slit pores, driven by step changes in the chemical potential in the bulk reservoir and involving a nucleation process via the formation of a liquid bridge. The principal difference between the DMFT results and DMC is the replacement of a distribution of nucleation times and location along the pore for the formation of liquid bridges by a single time and location. DMFT is seen to yield an otherwise qualitatively accurate description of the dynamic behavior.

  17. Modeling industrial thickener using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a case study:Tailing thickener in the Sarcheshmeh copper mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Majid Ebrahimzadeh Gheshlaghi; Ataallah Soltani Goharrizi; Alireza Aghajani Shahrivar; Hadi Abdollahi

    2013-01-01

    Separation of particles from liquid in the large gravitational tanks is widely used in mining and industrial wastewater treatment process. Thickener is key unit in the operational processes of hydrometallurgy and is used to separate solid from liquid. In this study, population balance models were combined with com-putational fluid dynamics (CFD) for modeling the tailing thickener. Parameters such as feed flow rate, flocculant dosage, inlet solid percent and feedwell were investigated. CFD was used to simulate the industrial tailing thickener with settled bed of 120 m diameter which is located in the Sarcheshmeh cop-per mine. Important factor of drag force that defines the rake torque of rotating paddles on the bed was also determined. Two phases turbulence model of Eulerian/Eulerian in accordance with turbulence model of k-e was used in the steady-state. Also population balance model consists of 15 groups of particle sizes with Luo and Lehr kernel was used for aggregation/breakage kernel. The simulation results showed good agreement with the operational data.

  18. Computational fluid dynamics model for predicting flow of viscous fluids in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers and internal cooling coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly; Humphrey

    1998-03-01

    Considerable debate has occurred over the use of hydrofoil impellers in large-scale fermentors to improve mixing and mass transfer in highly viscous non-Newtonian systems. Using a computational fluid dynamics software package (Fluent, version 4.30) extensive calculations were performed to study the effect of impeller speed (70-130 rpm), broth rheology (value of power law flow behavior index from 0.2 to 0.6), and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall (6-18 in.) on flow near the perimeter of a large (75-m3) fermentor equipped with A315 impellers. A quadratic model utilizing the data was developed in an attempt to correlate the effect of A315 impeller speed, power law flow behavior index, and distance between the cooling coil bank and the fermentor wall on the average axial velocity in the coil bank-wall region. The results suggest that there is a potential for slow or stagnant flow in the coil bank-wall region which could result in poor oxygen and heat transfer for highly viscous fermentations. The results also indicate that there is the potential for slow or stagnant flow in the region between the top impeller and the gas headspace when flow through the coil bank-wall region is slow. Finally, a simple guideline was developed to allow fermentor design engineers to predict the degree of flow behind a bank of helical cooling coils in a large fermentor with hydrofoil flow impellers.

  19. Fluid Dynamics and Viscosity in Strongly Correlated Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review the modern view of fluid dynamics as an effective low energy, long wavelength theory of many body systems at finite temperature. We introduce the notion of a nearly perfect fluid, defined by a ratio $\\eta/s$ of shear viscosity to entropy density of order $\\hbar/k_B$ or less. Nearly perfect fluids exhibit hydrodynamic behavior at all distances down to the microscopic length scale of the fluid. We summarize arguments that suggest that there is fundamental limit to fluidity, and review the current experimental situation with regard to measurements of $\\eta/s$ in strongly coupled quantum fluids.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of force acting on a model nano particle immersed in fluid with temperature gradient: Effect of interaction potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Tetsuro; Iseki, Hirotaka; Hanasaki, Itsuo; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2016-11-01

    Thermophoresis of a nano particle in a fluid is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. In order to elucidate effective factors on the characteristics of thermophoresis, simple models for both the fluid and the nano particle are considered, namely, the surrounding fluid consists of Lennard-Jones (LJ) particles and the model nano particle is a cluster consisting of several tens of LJ particles. Interaction between the fluid particle and the model nano particle is described by the LJ interaction potential or repulsive interaction potential with the Lorentz-Berthelot mixing rule. As a preliminary result, the effect of mass on thermophoretic force acting on the model nano particle is investigated for both interaction potentials.

  1. IMPROVEMENT OF FLUID PIPE LUMPED PARAMETER MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kong Xiaowu; Wei Jianhua; Qiu Minxiu; Wu Genmao

    2004-01-01

    The traditional lumped parameter model of fluid pipe is introduced and its drawbacks are pointed out.Furthermore, two suggestions are put forward to remove these drawbacks.Firstly, the structure of equivalent circuit is modified, and then the evaluation of equivalent fluid resistance is change to take the frequency-dependent friction into account.Both simulation and experiment prove that this model is precise to characterize the dynamic behaviors of fluid in pipe.

  2. A methodology to urban air quality assessment during large time periods of winter using computational fluid dynamic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, M. A.; Santiago, J. L.; Martín, F.; Martilli, A.; Santamaría, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    The representativeness of point measurements in urban areas is limited due to the strong heterogeneity of the atmospheric flows in cities. To get information on air quality in the gaps between measurement points, and have a 3D field of pollutant concentration, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models can be used. However, unsteady simulations during time periods of the order of months, often required for regulatory purposes, are not possible for computational reasons. The main objective of this study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the air quality in a real urban area during large time periods by means of steady CFD simulations. One steady simulation for each inlet wind direction was performed and factors like the number of cars inside each street, the length of streets and the wind speed and direction were taken into account to compute the pollutant concentration. This approach is only valid in winter time when the pollutant concentrations are less affected by atmospheric chemistry. A model based on the steady-state Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations (RANS) and standard k-ɛ turbulence model was used to simulate a set of 16 different inlet wind directions over a real urban area (downtown Pamplona, Spain). The temporal series of NO x and PM 10 and the spatial differences in pollutant concentration of NO 2 and BTEX obtained were in agreement with experimental data. Inside urban canopy, an important influence of urban boundary layer dynamics on the pollutant concentration patterns was observed. Large concentration differences between different zones of the same square were found. This showed that concentration levels measured by an automatic monitoring station depend on its location in the street or square, and a modelling methodology like this is useful to complement the experimental information. On the other hand, this methodology can also be applied to evaluate abatement strategies by redistributing traffic emissions.

  3. Computational methods for fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H

    2002-01-01

    In its 3rd revised and extended edition the book offers an overview of the techniques used to solve problems in fluid mechanics on computers and describes in detail those most often used in practice. Included are advanced methods in computational fluid dynamics, like direct and large-eddy simulation of turbulence, multigrid methods, parallel computing, moving grids, structured, block-structured and unstructured boundary-fitted grids, free surface flows. The 3rd edition contains a new section dealing with grid quality and an extended description of discretization methods. The book shows common roots and basic principles for many different methods. The book also contains a great deal of practical advice for code developers and users, it is designed to be equally useful to beginners and experts. The issues of numerical accuracy, estimation and reduction of numerical errors are dealt with in detail, with many examples. A full-feature user-friendly demo-version of a commercial CFD software has been added, which ca...

  4. Principles of computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Wesseling, Pieter

    2001-01-01

    The book is aimed at graduate students, researchers, engineers and physicists involved in flow computations. An up-to-date account is given of the present state-of-the-art of numerical methods employed in computational fluid dynamics. The underlying numerical principles are treated with a fair amount of detail, using elementary mathematical analysis. Attention is given to difficulties arising from geometric complexity of the flow domain and of nonuniform structured boundary-fitted grids. Uniform accuracy and efficiency for singular perturbation problems is studied, pointing the way to accurate computation of flows at high Reynolds number. Much attention is given to stability analysis, and useful stability conditions are provided, some of them new, for many numerical schemes used in practice. Unified methods for compressible and incompressible flows are discussed. Numerical analysis of the shallow-water equations is included. The theory of hyperbolic conservation laws is treated. Godunov's order barrier and ho...

  5. Techno-economic and Fluid Dynamics Analysis for Growing Microalgae with the Intent of Producing Biofuel Using a System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaeli, Leah R.

    Techno-economic and systems studies on microalgal growth scenarios to date are abbreviated and missing a number of important variables. By including these variables in a detailed model integrating biology, chemistry, engineering, and financial aspects, a more defined systems analysis is possible. Through optimizing the model productivity based on the resulting net profit, the system analysis results in a more accurate assessment of environmental and economic sustainability of specific algal growth scenarios. Photobioreactor algal growth scenario optimization in the system model has resulted in realistic engineering design requirements based on algal growth requirements and fluid dynamics analysis. Results show feasibility for photobioreactor growth scenarios to be economically sustainable when co-products are included, but definite technological advancements and productivity improvements must be made. The main factors inhibiting a cost effective photobioreactor growth scenario are culture density, temperature, and lighting distribution for solar illuminated photobioreactors, and lighting cost for artificially illuminated photobioreactors. Open pond algal growth scenarios do not show any prospect of economic or environmental sustainability with current technology due to the large amount of surface area required, inefficient water use, and low culture density. All algal growth scenarios are inferior to petro-diesel regarding energy inputs, carbon emissions, and environmental sustainability. No algal growth scenarios analyzed in this study meet the U.S. requirement of biofuel emitting at least 20% less carbon emissions than diesel from crude oil.

  6. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady Computational Fluid Dynamics model using high-speed imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; Verhaagen, B.; Versluis, M.; Kastrinakis, E.; Sluis, van der L.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the

  7. Irrigant flow in the root canal: experimental validation of an unsteady computational fluid dynamics model using high-speed imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Boutsioukis; B. Verhaagen; M. Versluis; E. Kastrinakis; L.W.M. van der Sluis

    2010-01-01

    Aim  To compare the results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of the irrigant flow within a prepared root canal, during final irrigation with a syringe and a needle, with experimental high-speed visualizations and theoretical calculations of an identical geometry and to evaluate the

  8. Batch top-spray fluid bed coating: Scale-up insight using dynamic heat- and mass-transfer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hede, Peter Dybdahl; Bach, P.; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2009-01-01

    A mathematical model was developed for batch top-spray fluid bed coating processes based on Ronsse et al. [2007a.b. Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part I-model development and validation. journal of Food Engineering 78......, 296-307; Combined population balance and thermodynamic modelling of the batch top-spray fluidised bed coating process. Part II-model and process analysis. journal of Food Engineering 78, 308-322]. The model is based on one-dimensional discretisation of the fluid bed into a number of well-mixed control...

  9. Modelling of Mass Transfer Phenomena in Chemical and Biochemical Reactor Systems using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, Hilde Kristina

    are subsequently evaluated based on their applicability in the four case studies. The evaluations especially focus on the impact of the choice of turbulence model and other modelling decisions made by the user. The conclusion is that CFD is a highly valuable tool for modelling several important parameters...... are presented as well as the theory behind the SST and the k-ε turbulence models. Modelling of additional variables, porous materials and twophase flows are also introduced. The two-phase flows are modelled using the Euler-Euler method, and both dispersed and free-surface flows are simulated. The importance...... of mass transfer with a focus on mixing, gas-liquid transfer of oxygen, and heterogeneous reactor systems is reviewed and mathematical models for these applications are presented. A review of how these mass transfer phenomena have been modelled in the scientific literature is also included. The models...

  10. Thermodynamic properties of Fe-S alloys from molecular dynamics modeling: Implications for the lunar fluid core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, Oleg L.; Belashchenko, David K.

    2016-09-01

    Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids for the P-T parameters of the lunar core have not been constrained well. From the analysis of seismic wave travel time, Weber et al. (2011) proposed that the lunar core is composed of iron alloyed with ⩽6 wt% of light elements, such as S. A controversial issue in models of planetary core composition concerns whether Fe-S liquids under high pressure - temperature conditions provide sound velocity and density data, which match the seismic model. Here we report the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of iron-sulfur alloys based on Embedded Atom Model (EAM). The results of calculations include caloric, thermal and elastic properties of Fe-S alloys at concentrations of sulfur 0-18 at.%, temperatures up to 2500 K and pressures up to 14 GPa. The effect of sulfur on the elastic properties of Fe-rich melts is most evident in the notably decreased density with added S content. In the MD simulation, the density and bulk modulus KT of liquid Fe-S decrease with increasing sulfur content, while the bulk modulus KS decreases as a whole but has some fluctuations with increasing sulfur content. The sound velocity increases with increasing pressure, but depends weakly on temperature and the concentration of sulfur. For a fluid Fe-S core of the Moon (∼5 GPa/2000 K) with 6-16 at.% S (3.5-10 wt%), the sound velocity and density may be estimated at the level of 4000 m s-1 and 6.25-7.0 g cm-3. Comparison of thermodynamic calculations with the results of interpretation of seismic observations shows good agreement of P-wave velocities in the liquid outer core, while the core density does not match the seismic models. At such concentrations of sulfur and a density by 20-35% higher than the model seismic density, a radius for the fluid outer core should be less than about 330 km found by Weber et al. because at the specified mass and moment of inertia values of the Moon an increase of the core density leads to a decrease of the core

  11. Dynamics of the Gay-Berne fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Miguel, E.; Rull, L.F. (Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, Sevilla 41080 (Spain)); Gubbins, K.E. (School of Chemical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States))

    1992-03-15

    Using molecular-dynamics computer simulation, we study the dynamical behavior of the isotropic and nematic phases of highly anisotropic molecular fluids. The interactions are modeled by means of the Gay-Berne potential with anisotropy parameters {kappa}=3 and {kappa}{prime}=5. The linear-velocity autocorrelation function shows no evidence of a negative region in the isotropic phase, even at the higher densities considered. The self-diffusion coefficient parallel to the molecular axis shows an anomalous increase with density as the system enters the nematic region. This enhancement in parallel diffusion is also observed in the isotropic side of the transition as a precursor effect. The molecular reorientation is discussed in the light of different theoretical models. The Debye diffusion model appears to explain the reorientational mechanism in the nematic phase. None of the models gives a satisfactory account of the reorientation process in the isotropic phase.

  12. Nanoparticle scattering characterization and mechanistic modelling of UV-TiO2 photocatalytic reactors using computational fluid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turolla, Andrea; Santoro, Domenico; de Bruyn, John R; Crapulli, Ferdinando; Antonelli, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to describe the process performance of a semi-batch annular TiO2-UV photoreactor in an Eulerian framework. The model accounted for the optical behaviour of titanium dioxide (TiO2) suspensions, the flow distribution and the oxalic acid degradation in the reactor. The scattering component of the optical model, explicitly included in the CFD simulations using a TiO2-specific scattering phase function integrated in the radiative transfer equation, was calibrated using an optical goniometer by comparing simulated scattering light profiles against irradiance measurements collected for various TiO2 concentrations and UV wavelengths and subsequently solved by the discrete ordinate (DO) radiation model. Several scattering phase functions were tested against the goniometric measurements confirming that the Henyey-Greenstein (HG) equation was the most appropriate angular distribution function at 254 and 355 nm, irrespective of the TiO2 concentration. Using the calibrated HG function, a new approach for quantifying the absolute values of absorption and scattering coefficients in TiO2 suspensions was proposed. It consists of iteratively solving, using the DO model, the radiative transfer equation for various combinations of absorption and scattering coefficients until the error between observed and predicted angular irradiance measurements is minimized. The accuracy of the optical parameters was verified with independent CFD simulations carried out for an annular photoreactor and already available in the literature. Predicted and simulated irradiance and oxalic acid degradation data were found to be in excellent agreement, confirming the considerable potential of the integrated modelling approach presented in this paper for the design, optimization and scale-up of photocatalytic technologies for water and wastewater treatment applications.

  13. Grain-scale numerical modeling of granular mechanics and fluid dynamics and application in a glacial context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Anders; Egholm, David Lundbek; Beem, Lucas H.

    rheology, which limit our ability to predict ice sheet dynamics in a changing climate. In this talk I will present the soft-body Discrete Element Method which is a Lagrangian method I use in order to simulate the unique and diverse nature of granular dynamics in the subglacial environment. However......, the method imposes intense computational requirements on the computational time step. The majority of steps in the granular dynamics algorithm are massively parallel, which makes the DEM an obvious candidate for exploiting the capabilities of modern GPUs. The granular computations are coupled to a fluid...

  14. COUPLED CHEMOTAXIS FLUID MODEL

    KAUST Repository

    LORZ, ALEXANDER

    2010-06-01

    We consider a model system for the collective behavior of oxygen-driven swimming bacteria in an aquatic fluid. In certain parameter regimes, such suspensions of bacteria feature large-scale convection patterns as a result of the hydrodynamic interaction between bacteria. The presented model consist of a parabolicparabolic chemotaxis system for the oxygen concentration and the bacteria density coupled to an incompressible Stokes equation for the fluid driven by a gravitational force of the heavier bacteria. We show local existence of weak solutions in a bounded domain in d, d = 2, 3 with no-flux boundary condition and in 2 in the case of inhomogeneous Dirichlet conditions for the oxygen. © 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  15. Evaluation of flow velocities after carotid artery stenting through split spectrum Doppler optical coherence tomography and computational fluid dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Barry; Genis, Helen; Wong, Ronnie; Ramjist, Joel; Jivraj, Jamil; Farooq, Hamza; Sun, Cuiru; Yang, Victor X D

    2014-12-01

    Hemodynamics plays a critical role in the development of atherosclerosis, specifically in regions of curved vasculature such as bifurcations exhibiting irregular blood flow profiles. Carotid atherosclerotic disease can be intervened by stent implantation, but this may result in greater alterations to local blood flow and consequently further complications. This study demonstrates the use of a variant of Doppler optical coherence tomography (DOCT) known as split spectrum DOCT (ssDOCT) to evaluate hemodynamic patterns both before and after stent implantation in the bifurcation junction in the internal carotid artery (ICA). Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were constructed to simulate blood velocity profiles and compared to the findings achieved through ssDOCT images. Both methods demonstrated noticeable alterations in hemodynamic patterns following stent implantation, with features such as slow velocity regions at the neck of the bifurcation and recirculation zones at the stent struts. Strong correlation between CFD models and ssDOCT images demonstrate the potential of ssDOCT imaging in the optimization of stent implantation in the clinical setting.

  16. A Performance Prediction Method for Pumps as Turbines (PAT Using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Frosina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Small and micro hydropower systems represent an attractive solution for generating electricity at low cost and with low environmental impact. The pump-as-turbine (PAT approach has promise in this application due to its low purchase and maintenance costs. In this paper, a new method to predict the inverse characteristic of industrial centrifugal pumps is presented. This method is based on results of simulations performed with commercial three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD software. Model results have been first validated in pumping mode using data supplied by pump manufacturers. Then, the results have been compared to experimental data for a pump running in reverse. Experimentation has been performed on a dedicated test bench installed in the Department of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering of the University of Naples Federico II. Three different pumps, with different specific speeds, have been analyzed. Using the model results, the inverse characteristic and the best efficiency point have been evaluated. Finally, results have been compared to prediction methods available in the literature.

  17. Two-compartmental population balance modeling of a pulsed spray fluidized bed granulation based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huolong; Li, Mingzhong

    2014-11-20

    In this work a two-compartmental population balance model (TCPBM) was proposed to model a pulsed top-spray fluidized bed granulation. The proposed TCPBM considered the spatially heterogeneous granulation mechanisms of the granule growth by dividing the granulator into two perfectly mixed zones of the wetting compartment and drying compartment, in which the aggregation mechanism was assumed in the wetting compartment and the breakage mechanism was considered in the drying compartment. The sizes of the wetting and drying compartments were constant in the TCPBM, in which 30% of the bed was the wetting compartment and 70% of the bed was the drying compartment. The exchange rate of particles between the wetting and drying compartments was determined by the details of the flow properties and distribution of particles predicted by the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. The experimental validation has shown that the proposed TCPBM can predict evolution of the granule size and distribution within the granulator under different binder spray operating conditions accurately. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coupling Fluid and Solute Dynamics Within the Ocular Surface Tear Film: A Modelling Study of Black Line Osmolarity

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2012-07-06

    We present a mathematical model describing the spatial distribution of tear film osmolarity across the ocular surface of a human eye during one blink cycle, incorporating detailed fluid and solute dynamics. Based on the lubrication approximation, our model comprises three coupled equations tracking the depth of the aqueous layer of the tear film, the concentration of the polar lipid, and the concentration of physiological salts contained in the aqueous layer. Diffusive boundary layers in the salt concentration occur at the thinnest regions of the tear film, the black lines. Thus, despite large Peclet numbers, diffusion ameliorates osmolarity around the black lines, but nonetheless is insufficient to eliminate the build-up of solute in these regions. More generally, a heterogeneous distribution of solute concentration is predicted across the ocular surface, indicating that measurements of lower meniscus osmolarity are not globally representative, especially in the presence of dry eye. Vertical saccadic eyelid motion can reduce osmolarity at the lower black line, raising the prospect that select eyeball motions more generally can assist in alleviating tear film hyperosmolarity. Finally, our results indicate that measured evaporative rates will induce excessive hyperosmolarity at the black lines, even for the healthy eye. This suggests that further evaporative retardation at the black lines, for instance due to the cellular glycocalyx at the ocular surface or increasing concentrations of mucus, will be important for controlling hyperosmolarity as the black line thins. © 2012 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  19. Applications of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the modelling and design of ventilation systems in the agricultural industry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Tomás; Sun, Da-Wen; Grant, Jim; Fallon, Richard; Dodd, Vincent

    2007-09-01

    The application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in the agricultural industry is becoming ever more important. Over the years, the versatility, accuracy and user-friendliness offered by CFD has led to its increased take-up by the agricultural engineering community. Now CFD is regularly employed to solve environmental problems of greenhouses and animal production facilities. However, due to a combination of increased computer efficacy and advanced numerical techniques, the realism of these simulations has only been enhanced in recent years. This study provides a state-of-the-art review of CFD, its current applications in the design of ventilation systems for agricultural production systems, and the outstanding challenging issues that confront CFD modellers. The current status of greenhouse CFD modelling was found to be at a higher standard than that of animal housing, owing to the incorporation of user-defined routines that simulate crop biological responses as a function of local environmental conditions. Nevertheless, the most recent animal housing simulations have addressed this issue and in turn have become more physically realistic.

  20. A systematic comparison of jet quenching in different fluid-dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Renk, Thorsten; Heinz, Ulrich; Shen, Chun

    2010-01-01

    Comparing four different (ideal and viscous) hydrodynamic models for the evolution of the medium created in 200 AGeV Au-Au collisions, combined with two different models for the path length dependence of parton energy loss, we study the effects of jet quenching on the emission-angle dependence of the nuclear suppression factor R_AA(phi) and the away-side per trigger yield I_AA(phi). Each hydrodynamic model was tuned to provide a reasonable description of the single-particle transverse momentum spectra for all collision centralities, and the energy loss models were adjusted to yield the same pion nuclear suppression factor in central Au-Au collisions. We find that the experimentally measured in-plane vs. out-of-plane spread in R_AA(phi) is better reproduced by models that shift the weight of the parton energy loss to later times along its path. Among the models studied here, this is best achieved by energy loss models that suppress energy loss at early times, combined with hydrodynamic models that delay the di...

  1. Energy loss and coronary flow simulation following hybrid stage I palliation: a hypoplastic left heart computational fluid dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaiber, Jeffrey H; Niehaus, Justin; Gottliebson, William; Abdallah, Shaaban

    2013-08-01

    The theoretical differences in energy losses as well as coronary flow with different band sizes for branch pulmonary arteries (PA) in hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) remain unknown. Our objective was to develop a computational fluid dynamic model (CFD) to determine the energy losses and pulmonary-to-systemic flow rates. This study was done for three different PA band sizes. Three-dimensional computer models of the hybrid procedure were constructed using the standard commercial CFD softwares Fluent and Gambit. The computer models were controlled for bilateral PA reduction to 25% (restrictive), 50% (intermediate) and 75% (loose) of the native branch pulmonary artery diameter. Velocity and pressure data were calculated throughout the heart geometry using the finite volume numerical method. Coronary flow was measured simultaneously with each model. Wall shear stress and the ratio of pulmonary-to-systemic volume flow rates were calculated. Computer simulations were compared at fixed points utilizing echocardiographic and catheter-based metric dimensions. Restricting the PA band to a 25% diameter demonstrated the greatest energy loss. The 25% banding model produced an energy loss of 16.76% systolic and 24.91% diastolic vs loose banding at 7.36% systolic and 17.90% diastolic. Also, restrictive PA bands had greater coronary flow compared with loose PA bands (50.2 vs 41.9 ml/min). Shear stress ranged from 3.75 Pascals with restrictive PA banding to 2.84 Pascals with loose banding. Intermediate PA banding at 50% diameter achieved a Qp/Qs (closest to 1) at 1.46 systolic and 0.66 diastolic compared with loose or restrictive banding without excess energy loss. CFD provides a unique platform to simulate pressure, shear stress as well as energy losses of the hybrid procedure. PA banding at 50% provided a balanced pulmonary and systemic circulation with adequate coronary flow but without extra energy losses incurred.

  2. Introducing fluid dynamics using dimensional analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Højgaard

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of fluid dynamics can be introduced using dimensional analysis, combined with some basic physical principles. This approach is concise and allows exploration of both the laminar and turbulent limits—including important phenomena that are not normally dealt with when fluid dynamics...

  3. Dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y; Rame, E; Walker, L M; Garoff, S

    2009-11-18

    We examine various aspects of dynamic wetting with viscous Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids. Rather than concentrating on the mechanisms that relieve the classic contact line stress singularity, we focus on the behavior in the wedge flow near the contact line which has the dominant influence on wetting with these fluids. Our experiments show that a Newtonian polymer melt composed of highly flexible molecules exhibits dynamic wetting behavior described very well by hydrodynamic models that capture the critical properties of the Newtonian wedge flow near the contact line. We find that shear thinning has a strong impact on dynamic wetting, by reducing the drag of the solid on the fluid near the contact line, while the elasticity of a Boger fluid has a weaker impact on dynamic wetting. Finally, we find that other polymeric fluids, nominally Newtonian in rheometric measurements, exhibit deviations from Newtonian dynamic wetting behavior.

  4. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  5. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Johansen, Per Michael; Lynov, Jens-Peter;

    2001-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has corecompetences in: optical sensors, optical materials......, optical storage, biooptics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danishresearch councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2000 is presented....

  6. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lynov, Jens-Peter;

    2003-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The departmenthas core competences in: optical sensors......, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, includingEURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2002...

  7. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Johansen, Per Michael; Lynov, Jens-Peter;

    2000-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within the three programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in:optical sensors, optical materials, biooptics......, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. Asummary of the activities in 1999 is presented....

  8. Characterization and Modeling of Insect Swarms Using tools from Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    quantitatively measuring the flight trajectories of swarming insects and to use the resulting data to evaluate currently used models of collective...for quantitatively measuring the flight trajectories of swarming insects and to use the resulting data to evaluate currently used models of...of personnel receiving PHDs Names of other research staff Inventions (DD882) Scientific Progress See Attachment Technology Transfer None. Number of

  9. From many body wee partons dynamics to perfect fluid: a standard model for heavy ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopalan, R.

    2010-07-22

    We discuss a standard model of heavy ion collisions that has emerged both from experimental results of the RHIC program and associated theoretical developments. We comment briefly on the impact of early results of the LHC program on this picture. We consider how this standard model of heavy ion collisions could be solidified or falsified in future experiments at RHIC, the LHC and a future Electro-Ion Collider.

  10. Geophysical fluid dynamics: whence, whither and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallis, Geoffrey K.

    2016-08-01

    This article discusses the role of geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) in understanding the natural environment, and in particular the dynamics of atmospheres and oceans on Earth and elsewhere. GFD, as usually understood, is a branch of the geosciences that deals with fluid dynamics and that, by tradition, seeks to extract the bare essence of a phenomenon, omitting detail where possible. The geosciences in general deal with complex interacting systems and in some ways resemble condensed matter physics or aspects of biology, where we seek explanations of phenomena at a higher level than simply directly calculating the interactions of all the constituent parts. That is, we try to develop theories or make simple models of the behaviour of the system as a whole. However, these days in many geophysical systems of interest, we can also obtain information for how the system behaves by almost direct numerical simulation from the governing equations. The numerical model itself then explicitly predicts the emergent phenomena-the Gulf Stream, for example-something that is still usually impossible in biology or condensed matter physics. Such simulations, as manifested, for example, in complicated general circulation models, have in some ways been extremely successful and one may reasonably now ask whether understanding a complex geophysical system is necessary for predicting it. In what follows we discuss such issues and the roles that GFD has played in the past and will play in the future.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Operation of a Flame Ionization Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huckaby, E.D.; Chorpening, B.T.; Thornton, J.D.

    2007-03-01

    The sensors and controls research group at the United States Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is continuing to develop the Combustion Control and Diagnostics Sensor (CCADS) for gas turbine applications. CCADS uses the electrical conduction of the charged species generated during the combustion process to detect combustion instabilities and monitor equivalence ratio. As part of this effort, combustion models are being developed which include the interaction between the electric field and the transport of charged species. The primary combustion process is computed using a flame wrinkling model (Weller et. al. 1998) which is a component of the OpenFOAM toolkit (Jasak et. al. 2004). A sub-model for the transport of charged species is attached to this model. The formulation of the charged-species model similar that applied by Penderson and Brown (1993) for the simulation of laminar flames. The sub-model consists of an additional flux due to the electric field (drift flux) added to the equations for the charged species concentrations and the solution the electric potential from the resolved charge density. The subgrid interactions between the electric field and charged species transport have been neglected. Using the above procedure, numerical simulations are performed and the results compared with several recent CCADS experiments.

  12. Silverton Conference on Applications of the Zero Gravity Space Shuttle Environment to Problems in Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, M. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The possible utilization of the zero gravity resource for studies in a variety of fluid dynamics and fluid-dynamic related problems was investigated. A group of experiments are discussed and described in detail; these include experiments in the areas of geophysical fluid models, fluid dynamics, mass transfer processes, electrokinetic separation of large particles, and biophysical and physiological areas.

  13. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes Two distinguishing features of the discourse are solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty Matlab codes are presented and discussed for a broad...

  14. Fluid Dynamics Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2009-01-01

    Fluid Dynamics: Theory, Computation, and Numerical Simulation is the only available book that extends the classical field of fluid dynamics into the realm of scientific computing in a way that is both comprehensive and accessible to the beginner. The theory of fluid dynamics, and the implementation of solution procedures into numerical algorithms, are discussed hand-in-hand and with reference to computer programming. This book is an accessible introduction to theoretical and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), written from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical practice. There are several additions and subject expansions in the Second Edition of Fluid Dynamics, including new Matlab and FORTRAN codes. Two distinguishing features of the discourse are: solution procedures and algorithms are developed immediately after problem formulations are presented, and numerical methods are introduced on a need-to-know basis and in increasing order of difficulty. Matlab codes are presented and discussed for ...

  15. Computational fluid dynamics modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in fluidised bed reactors, focusing different kinetic schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Panneerselvam; Gu, Sai

    2016-08-01

    The present work concerns with CFD modelling of biomass fast pyrolysis in a fluidised bed reactor. Initially, a study was conducted to understand the hydrodynamics of the fluidised bed reactor by investigating the particle density and size, and gas velocity effect. With the basic understanding of hydrodynamics, the study was further extended to investigate the different kinetic schemes for biomass fast pyrolysis process. The Eulerian-Eulerian approach was used to model the complex multiphase flows in the reactor. The yield of the products from the simulation was compared with the experimental data. A good comparison was obtained between the literature results and CFD simulation. It is also found that CFD prediction with the advanced kinetic scheme is better when compared to other schemes. With the confidence obtained from the CFD models, a parametric study was carried out to study the effect of biomass particle type and size and temperature on the yield of the products.

  16. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  17. A new fluid dynamics model to evaluate the contractile force of a biological spring, Vorticella convallaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sangjin; Matsudaira, Paul

    2008-11-01

    Vorticella convallaria, a sessile peritrich having a body and spring-like stalk, is a model for a bioinspired actuator because of its remarkably fast (msec) and powerful contractions (nN). An example of a biological spring, the stalk converts biochemical energy to physical motion, but the mechanics of contraction are poorly understood. To evaluate contraction force, past models have assumed the body to be a sphere moving in quiescent water and have equated contraction force to drag force on the body described by Stokes' law. However, flow induced by contracting Vorticella does not satisfy conditions of Stokes' law because the flow is unsteady (Womersley number > 1) and bound with a solid substrate to which the cell is tethered. We develop a more rigorous model for contraction force evaluation by assuming the body to be a sphere unsteadily moving perpendicularly toward a solid surface. The model comprises quasi-steady drag force, added mass force and history force with wall effect correction terms for each force. Vorticella not only generates a maximum contraction force greater than Stokes' drag, but it also experiences drag force in the direction of contraction in the later stage of contraction due to the memory effect of water.

  18. A Critical Review of Dynamic Wetting by Complex Fluids: From Newtonian Fluids to Non-Newtonian Fluids and Nanofluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Gui; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic wetting is an important interfacial phenomenon in many industrial applications. There have been many excellent reviews of dynamic wetting, especially on super-hydrophobic surfaces with physical or chemical coatings, porous layers, hybrid micro/nano structures and biomimetic structures. This review summarizes recent research on dynamic wetting from the viewpoint of the fluids rather than the solid surfaces. The reviewed fluids range from simple Newtonian fluids to non-Newtonian fluids and complex nanofluids. The fundamental physical concepts and principles involved in dynamic wetting phenomena are also reviewed. This review focus on recent investigations of dynamic wetting by non-Newtonian fluids, including the latest experimental studies with a thorough review of the best dynamic wetting models for non-Newtonian fluids, to illustrate their successes and limitations. This paper also reports on new results on the still fledgling field of nanofluid wetting kinetics. The challenges of research on nanofluid dynamic wetting is not only due to the lack of nanoscale experimental techniques to probe the complex nanoparticle random motion, but also the lack of multiscale experimental techniques or theories to describe the effects of nanoparticle motion at the nanometer scale (10(-9) m) on the dynamic wetting taking place at the macroscopic scale (10(-3) m). This paper describes the various types of nanofluid dynamic wetting behaviors. Two nanoparticle dissipation modes, the bulk dissipation mode and the local dissipation mode, are proposed to resolve the uncertainties related to the various types of dynamic wetting mechanisms reported in the literature.

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modelling of Hydraulics and Sedimentation in Process Reactors during Aeration Tank Settling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, M.D.; Ingildsen, P.; Rasmussen, Michael R.;

    2006-01-01

    Aeration tank settling is a control method allowing settling in the process tank during highhydraulic load. The control method is patented. Aeration tank settling has been applied in several wastewater treatment plants using the present design of the process tanks. Some process tank designs...... haveshown to be more effective than others. To improve the design of less effective plants, computational fluiddynamics (CFD) modelling of hydraulics and sedimentation has been applied. This paper discusses theresults at one particular plant experiencing problems with partly short-circuiting of the inlet...... and outletcausing a disruption of the sludge blanket at the outlet and thereby reducing the retention of sludge in theprocess tank. The model has allowed us to establish a clear picture of the problems arising at the plantduring aeration tank settling. Secondly, several process tank design changes have been...

  20. Modeling and simulation of membrane separation process using computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Tahvildari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Separation of CO2 from air was simulated in this work. The considered process for removal of CO2 was a hollow-fiber membrane contactor and an aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-metyl-1-propanol (AMP as absorbent. The model was developed based on mass transfer as well as chemical reaction for CO2 and solvent in the contactor. The equations of model were solved using finite element method. Simulation results were compared with experimental data, and good agreement was observed. The results revealed that increasing solvent velocity enhances removal of CO2 in the hollow-fiber membrane contactor. Moreover, it was found that counter-current process mode is more favorable to achieve the highest separation efficiency.

  1. Simulation of windblown dust transport from a mine tailings impoundment using a computational fluid dynamics model

    OpenAIRE

    Stovern, Michael; Felix, Omar; Csavina, Janae; Kyle P. Rine; Russell, MacKenzie R.; Jones, Robert M; King, Matt; Betterton, Eric A.; Sáez, A. Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Mining operations are potential sources of airborne particulate metal and metalloid contaminants through both direct smelter emissions and wind erosion of mine tailings. The warmer, drier conditions predicted for the Southwestern US by climate models may make contaminated atmospheric dust and aerosols increasingly important, due to potential deleterious effects on human health and ecology. Dust emissions and dispersion of dust and aerosol from the Iron King Mine tailings in Dewey-Humboldt, Ar...

  2. 2D fluid simulations of interchange turbulence with ion dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Madsen, Jens; Xu, G. S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a first principle global two-dimensional fluid model. The HESEL (Hot Edge SOL Electrostatic) model is a 2D numerical fluid code, based on interchange dynamics and includes besides electron also the ion pressure dynamic. In the limit of cold ions the model almost reduces......B vorticity as well as the ion diamagnetic vorticity. The 2D domain includes both open and closed field lines and is located on the out-board midplane of a tokamak. On open field field lines the parallel dynamics are parametrized as sink terms depending on the dynamic quantities; density, electron and ion...

  3. Subchannel and Computational Fluid Dynamic Analyses of a Model Pin Bundle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gairola, A.; Arif, M.; Suh, K. Y. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The current study showed that the simplistic approach of subchannel analysis code MATRA was not good in capturing the physical behavior of the coolant inside the rod bundle. With the incorporation of more detailed geometry of the grid spacer in the CFX code it was possible to approach the experimental values. However, it is vital to incorporate more advanced turbulence mixing models to more realistically simulate behavior of the liquid metal coolant inside the model pin bundle in parallel with the incorporation of the bottom and top grid structures. In the framework of the 11{sup th} international meeting of International Association for Hydraulic Research and Engineering (IAHR) working group on the advanced reactor thermal hydraulics a standard problem was conducted. The quintessence of the problem was to check on the hydraulics and heat transfer in a novel pin bundle with different pitch to rod diameter ratio and heat flux cooled by liquid metal. The standard problem stems from the field of nuclear safety research with the idea of validating and checking the performances of computer codes against the experimental results. Comprehensive checks between the two will succor in improving the dependability and exactness of the codes used for accident simulations.

  4. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Dijksman, Joshua; Shearer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    An axisymmetric fluid cavity at the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls is studied, as it is filled in by the wetting fluid. Lubrication theory is applied to reduce the governing equations to a single evolution equation for the film thickness. In the quasi-static regime the contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the effective contact angle to the contact-line speed. The dependence of the collapse time on the initial hole size is calculated. For small holes, surface tension dominates the dynamics, leading to a universal power law that compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Further verification of the model is obtained through comparison of volume dependence with experimental results.

  5. Mathematical model of microbicidal flow dynamics and optimization of rheological properties for intra-vaginal drug delivery: Role of tissue mechanics and fluid rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Md Rajib; Camarda, Kyle V; Kieweg, Sarah L

    2015-06-25

    Topically applied microbicide gels can provide a self-administered and effective strategy to prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs). We have investigated the interplay between vaginal tissue elasticity and the yield-stress of non-Newtonian fluids during microbicide deployment. We have developed a mathematical model of tissue deformation driven spreading of microbicidal gels based on thin film lubrication approximation and demonstrated the effect of tissue elasticity and fluid yield-stress on the spreading dynamics. Our results show that both elasticity of tissue and yield-stress rheology of gel are strong determinants of the coating behavior. An optimization framework has been demonstrated which leverages the flow dynamics of yield-stress fluid during deployment to maximize retention while reaching target coating length for a given tissue elasticity.

  6. Multidimensional modeling of biofilm development and fluid dynamics in a hydrogen-based, membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kelly J; Picioreanu, Cristian; Nerenberg, Robert

    2013-09-01

    A two-dimensional, particle-based biofilm model coupled with mass transport and computational fluid dynamics was developed to simulate autotrophic denitrification in a spiral-wound membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR), where hydrogen is supplied via hollow-fiber membrane fabric. The spiral-wound configuration consists of alternating layers of plastic spacer net and membrane fabric that create rows of flow channels, with the top and bottom walls comprised of membranes. The transversal filaments of the spacer partially obstruct the channel flow, producing complex mixing and shear patterns that require multidimensional representation. This study investigated the effect of hydrogen and nitrate concentrations, as well as spacer configuration, on biofilm development and denitrification fluxes. The model results indicate that the cavity spacer filaments, which rest on the bottom membranes, cause uneven biofilm growth. Most biofilm resided on the bottom membranes, only in the wake of the filaments where low shear zones formed. In this way, filament configuration may help achieve a desired biofilm thickness. For the conditions tested in this study, the highest nitrate fluxes were attained by minimizing the filament diameter and maximizing the filament spacing. This lowered the shear stress at the top membranes, allowing for more biofilm growth. For the scenarios studied, biomass limitation at the top membranes hindered performance more significantly than diffusion limitation in the thick biofilms at the bottom membranes. The results also highlighted the importance of two-dimensional modeling to capture uneven biofilm growth on a substratum with geometrical complexity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Coupled Dynamical Model of Redox Flow Battery Based on Chemical Reaction, Fluid Flow, and Electrical Circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Minghua; Hikihara, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    The redox (Reduction-Oxidation) flow battery is one of the most promising rechargeable batteries due to its ability to average loads and output of power sources. The transient characteristics are well known as the remarkable feature of the battery. Then it can also compensate for a sudden voltage drop. The dynamics are governed by the chemical reactions, fluid flow, and electrical circuit of its structure. This causes the difficulty of the analysis at transient state. This paper discusses the...

  8. Dynamic and fluid-structure interaction simulations of bioprosthetic heart valves using parametric design with T-splines and Fung-type material models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ming-Chen; Kamensky, David; Xu, Fei; Kiendl, Josef; Wang, Chenglong; Wu, Michael C. H.; Mineroff, Joshua; Reali, Alessandro; Bazilevs, Yuri; Sacks, Michael S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper builds on a recently developed immersogeometric fluid-structure interaction (FSI) methodology for bioprosthetic heart valve (BHV) modeling and simulation. It enhances the proposed framework in the areas of geometry design and constitutive modeling. With these enhancements, BHV FSI simulations may be performed with greater levels of automation, robustness and physical realism. In addition, the paper presents a comparison between FSI analysis and standalone structural dynamics simulation driven by prescribed transvalvular pressure, the latter being a more common modeling choice for this class of problems. The FSI computation achieved better physiological realism in predicting the valve leaflet deformation than its standalone structural dynamics counterpart.

  9. Development of a theoretical framework for analyzing cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Benjamin; Voorhees, Abram; Vedel, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume conservat......Background: To date hydrocephalus researchers acknowledge the need for rigorous but utilitarian fluid mechanics understanding and methodologies in studying normal and hydrocephalic intracranial dynamics. Pressure volume models and electric circuit analogs introduced pressure into volume...

  10. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yi; Ramaswamy, V.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Russell, Lynn M.

    2005-11-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) atmosphere general circulation model, with its new cloud scheme, is employed to study the indirect radiative effect of anthropogenic sulfate aerosol during the industrial period. The preindustrial and present-day monthly mean aerosol climatologies are generated from running the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers (MOZART) chemistry-transport model. The respective global annual mean sulfate burdens are 0.22 and 0.81 Tg S. Cloud droplet number concentrations are related to sulfate mass concentrations using an empirical relationship (Boucher and Lohmann, 1995). A distinction is made between "forcing" and flux change at the top of the atmosphere in this study. The simulations, performed with prescribed sea surface temperature, show that the first indirect "forcing" ("Twomey" effect) amounts to an annual mean of -1.5 W m-2, concentrated largely over the oceans in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The annual mean flux change owing to the response of the model to the first indirect effect is -1.4 W m-2, similar to the annual mean forcing. However, the model's response causes a rearrangement of cloud distribution as well as changes in longwave flux (smaller than solar flux changes). There is thus a differing geographical nature of the radiation field than for the forcing even though the global means are similar. The second indirect effect, which is necessarily an estimate made in terms of the model's response, amounts to -0.9 W m-2, but the statistical significance of the simulated geographical distribution of this effect is relatively low owing to the model's natural variability. Both the first and second effects are approximately linearly additive, giving rise to a combined annual mean flux change of -2.3 W m-2, with the NH responsible for 77% of the total flux change. Statistically significant model responses are obtained for the zonal mean total indirect effect in the entire NH and in the Southern Hemisphere low

  11. Domain decomposition algorithms and computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the new domain decomposition algorithms are applied to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics: the two-dimensional convection-diffusion problem and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. First, a brief introduction to the various approaches of domain decomposition is given, and a survey of domain decomposition preconditioners for the operator on the interface separating the subdomains is then presented. For the convection-diffusion problem, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is examined.

  12. Modeling-gas phase reactions in indoor environments using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    This CFD modeling study examines the concentrations of two gaseous compounds that react in an indoor setting to produce a hypothetical product. The reactants are ozone and either d-limonene or alpha-terpinene (which reacts with ozone about 40 times faster than d-limonene). In addition to two...... different terpenes, the scenarios include two air exchange rates (0.5 and 2.0 h(-1)). The terpene is introduced as a floor source with an emission pattern similar to a floor-care product. These four scenarios have been set in a fairly large two-dimensional room (13.6 x 40.6 m) with a supply at the top...... of the left wall and an exhaust at the bottom of the right wall. The room has been deliberately scaled so that the Reynolds numbers for key flow regimes match those of a room in which the calculated flow field has been validated against measured data. It has been further assumed that ozone interacts with room...

  13. Validation of a loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellecci, C.; Gaudio, P. [EURATOM-Faculty of Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Lupelli, I., E-mail: ivan.lupelli@uniroma2.it [EURATOM-Faculty of Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Malizia, A. [EURATOM-Faculty of Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Porfiri, M.T. [ENEA Nuclear Fusion Tecnologies, Via Enrico Fermi, 45 I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Quaranta, R.; Richetta, M. [EURATOM-Faculty of Engineering, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    Intense thermal loads in fusion devices occur during plasma disruptions, Edge Localized Modes (ELM) and Vertical Displacement Events (VDE). They will result in macroscopic erosion of the plasma facing materials and consequent accumulation of activated dust into the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV). A recognized safety issue for future fusion reactors fueled with deuterium and tritium is the generation of sizeable quantities of dust. In case of LOVA, air inlet occurs due to the pressure difference between the atmospheric condition and the internal condition. It causes mobilization of the dust that can exit the VV threatening public safety because it may contain tritium, may be radioactive from activation products, and may be chemically reactive and/or toxic (Sharpe et al.; Sharpe and Humrickhouse). Several experiments have been conducted with STARDUST facility in order to reproduce a low pressurization rate (300 Pa/s) LOVA event in ITER due to a small air leakage for two different positions of the leak, at the equatorial port level and at the divertor port level, in order to evaluate the velocity magnitude in case of a LOVA that is strictly connected with dust mobilization phenomena. A two-dimensional (2D) modelling of STARDUST, made with the CFD commercial code FLUENT, has been carried out. The results of these simulations were compared against the experimental data for CFD code validation. For validation purposes, the CFD simulation data were extracted at the same locations as the experimental data were collected. In this paper, the authors present and discuss the computer-simulation data and compare them with data collected during the laboratory studies at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' Quantum Electronics and Plasmas lab.

  14. An introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Schiøtt

    1999-01-01

    CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building.......CFD is the shortname for Computational Fluid Dynamics and is a numerical method by means of which we can analyze systems containing fluids. For instance systems dealing with heat flow or smoke control systems acting when a fire occur in a building....

  15. Experimental and theoretical advances in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Klapp, Jaime; Fuentes, Oscar Velasco

    2011-01-01

    The book is comprised of lectures and selected contributions presented at the Enzo Levi and XVI Annual Meeting of the Fluid Dynamic Division of the Mexican Physical Society in 2010. It is aimed at fourth year undergraduate and graduate students, as well as scientists in the fields of physics, engineering and chemistry with an interest in fluid dynamics from the experimental and theoretical point of view. The lectures are introductory and avoid the use of complicated mathematics. The other selected contributions are also geared to fourth year undergraduate and graduate students. The fluid dynam

  16. Introduction to mathematical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to the behavior of liquids and gases, this volume provides excellent coverage of kinematics, momentum principle, Newtonian fluid, rotating fluids, compressibility, and more. It is geared toward advanced undergraduate and graduate students of mathematics and general science, and it requires a background in calculus and vector analysis. 1971 edition.

  17. Fluid Dynamics in an Ecological Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2007-11-01

    Fluid dynamics has long been an invaluable tool in the study of biological mechanics, helping to explain how animals swim and fly, how blood is pumped, gases are exchanged, and propagules are dispersed. The goal of understanding how the physics of fluids has affected the evolution of individual organisms provides strong impetus for teaching and learning fluid mechanics; a viable alternative to the more traditional goals of engineering. In recent years, a third alternative has arisen. The principles of fluid dynamics can be used to specify when and where individual organisms will exceed their physical capabilities, information that can in turn be used to predict species-specific survivorship in a given environment. In other words, biological fluid dynamics can be extended beyond the study of individual organisms to play an important role in our understanding of ecological dynamics. In a world where environmental change is of increasing concern, fluid dynamic aspect of ``ecomechanics'' may be of considerable practical importance. Teaching fluid mechanics in ecology will be discussed in the context of wave-swept rocky shores. Various wave theories can be used to predict the maximum water velocities and accelerations impinging on specific surf-zone plants and animals. Theories of lift, drag, and accelerational forces can then be used to predict the maximum loads imposed on these organisms, loads that can be compared to the organisms' structural limits to predict the fraction of the species that will be dislodged or damaged. Taken across relevant species, this information goes far towards explaining shoreline community dynamics. .

  18. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 1: Theory and Computational Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, B.D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G.A.; Travis, J.R.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Royl, P.; Redlinger, R.; Wilson, T.L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior (1) in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and (2) during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included

  19. Dual pairs in fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gay-Balmaz, François

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a rigorous study of the dual pair structure of the ideal fluid and the dual pair structure for the $n$-dimensional Camassa-Holm (EPDiff) equation, including the proofs of the necessary transitivity results. In the case of the ideal fluid, we show that a careful definition of the momentum maps leads naturally to central extensions of diffeomorphism groups such as the group of quantomorphisms and the Ismagilov central extension.

  20. Neural Tissue Motion Impacts Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics at the Cervical Medullary Junction: A Patient-Specific Moving-Boundary Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlavian, Soroush Heidari; Loth, Francis; Luciano, Mark; Oshinski, John; Martin, Bryn A

    2015-12-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tissue motion of the brain occurs over 30 million cardiac cycles per year due to intracranial pressure differences caused by the pulsatile blood flow and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) motion within the intracranial space. This motion has been found to be elevated in type 1 Chiari malformation. The impact of CNS tissue motion on CSF dynamics was assessed using a moving-boundary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the cervical-medullary junction (CMJ). The cerebellar tonsils and spinal cord were modeled as rigid surfaces moving in the caudocranial direction over the cardiac cycle. The CFD boundary conditions were based on in vivo MR imaging of a 35-year old female Chiari malformation patient with ~150-300 µm motion of the cerebellar tonsils and spinal cord, respectively. Results showed that tissue motion increased CSF pressure dissociation across the CMJ and peak velocities up to 120 and 60%, respectively. Alterations in CSF dynamics were most pronounced near the CMJ and during peak tonsillar velocity. These results show a small CNS tissue motion at the CMJ can alter CSF dynamics for a portion of the cardiac cycle and demonstrate the utility of CFD modeling coupled with MR imaging to help understand CSF dynamics.

  1. Fundamental algorithms in computational fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pulliam, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    Intended as a textbook for courses in computational fluid dynamics at the senior undergraduate or graduate level, this book is a follow-up to the book Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by the same authors, which was published in the series Scientific Computation in 2001. Whereas the earlier book concentrated on the analysis of numerical methods applied to model equations, this new book concentrates on algorithms for the numerical solution of the Euler and Navier-Stokes equations. It focuses on some classical algorithms as well as the underlying ideas based on the latest methods. A key feature of the book is the inclusion of programming exercises at the end of each chapter based on the numerical solution of the quasi-one-dimensional Euler equations and the shock-tube problem. These exercises can be included in the context of a typical course, and sample solutions are provided in each chapter, so readers can confirm that they have coded the algorithms correctly.

  2. Domain decomposition algorithms and computation fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tony F.

    1988-01-01

    In the past several years, domain decomposition was a very popular topic, partly motivated by the potential of parallelization. While a large body of theory and algorithms were developed for model elliptic problems, they are only recently starting to be tested on realistic applications. The application of some of these methods to two model problems in computational fluid dynamics are investigated. Some examples are two dimensional convection-diffusion problems and the incompressible driven cavity flow problem. The construction and analysis of efficient preconditioners for the interface operator to be used in the iterative solution of the interface solution is described. For the convection-diffusion problems, the effect of the convection term and its discretization on the performance of some of the preconditioners is discussed. For the driven cavity problem, the effectiveness of a class of boundary probe preconditioners is discussed.

  3. International Conference on Mathematical Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Yukihito

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents original papers ranging from an experimental study on cavitation jets to an up-to-date mathematical analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations for free boundary problems, reflecting topics featured at the International Conference on Mathematical Fluid Dynamics, Present and Future, held 11–14 November 2014 at Waseda University in Tokyo. The contributions address subjects in one- and two-phase fluid flows, including cavitation, liquid crystal flows, plasma flows, and blood flows. Written by internationally respected experts, these papers highlight the connections between mathematical, experimental, and computational fluid dynamics. The book is aimed at a wide readership in mathematics and engineering, including researchers and graduate students interested in mathematical fluid dynamics.

  4. Modern fluid dynamics for physics and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Regev, Oded; Yecko, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    This book grew out of the need to provide students with a solid introduction to modern fluid dynamics. It offers a broad grounding in the underlying principles and techniques used, with some emphasis on applications in astrophysics and planetary science. The book comprehensively covers recent developments, methods and techniques, including, for example, new ideas on transitions to turbulence (via transiently growing stable linear modes), new approaches to turbulence (which remains the enigma of fluid dynamics), and the use of asymptotic approximation methods, which can give analytical or semi-analytical results and complement fully numerical treatments. The authors also briefly discuss some important considerations to be taken into account when developing a numerical code for computer simulation of fluid flows. Although the text is populated throughout with examples and problems from the field of astrophysics and planetary science, the text is eminently suitable as a general introduction to fluid dynamics. It...

  5. Vortex dynamics in plasmas and fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Hesthaven, J.S.;

    1994-01-01

    The existence and dynamics of vortical structures in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems will be discussed. In particular the dynamics of monopolar and dipolar vortices in a plasma with nonuniform density and in a rotating fluid with varying Coriolis force is described. The role of vortical...

  6. Computational fluid dynamics in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2011-08-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. However, in the biomedical field, CFD is still emerging. The main reason why CFD in the biomedical field has lagged behind is the tremendous complexity of human body fluid behavior. Recently, CFD biomedical research is more accessible, because high performance hardware and software are easily available with advances in computer science. All CFD processes contain three main components to provide useful information, such as pre-processing, solving mathematical equations, and post-processing. Initial accurate geometric modeling and boundary conditions are essential to achieve adequate results. Medical imaging, such as ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging can be used for modeling, and Doppler ultrasound, pressure wire, and non-invasive pressure measurements are used for flow velocity and pressure as a boundary condition. Many simulations and clinical results have been used to study congenital heart disease, heart failure, ventricle function, aortic disease, and carotid and intra-cranial cerebrovascular diseases. With decreasing hardware costs and rapid computing times, researchers and medical scientists may increasingly use this reliable CFD tool to deliver accurate results. A realistic, multidisciplinary approach is essential to accomplish these tasks. Indefinite collaborations between mechanical engineers and clinical and medical scientists are essential. CFD may be an important methodology to understand the pathophysiology of the development and

  7. Prediction of Dynamic Wellbore Pressure in Gasified Fluid Drilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhiming; Ping Liqiu; Zou Ke

    2007-01-01

    The basis of designing gasified drilling is to understand the behavior of gas/liquid two-phase flow in the wellbore. The equations of mass and momentum conservation and equation of fluid flow in porous media were used to establish a dynamic model to predict weIlbore pressure according to the study results of Ansari and Beggs-Brill on gas-liquid two-phase flow. The dynamic model was solved by the finite difference approach combined with the mechanistic steady state model. The mechanistic dynamic model was numerically implemented into a FORTRAN 90 computer program and could simulate the coupled flow of fluid in wellbore and reservoir. The dynamic model revealed the effects of wellhead back pressure and injection rate of gas/liquid on bottomhole pressure. The model was validated against full-scale experimental data, and its 5.0% of average relative error could satisfy the accuracy requirements in engineering design.

  8. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics II: Application to type Ia supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, W; Hillebrandt, W; Roepke, F K

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics of the explosive burning process is highly sensitive to the flame speed model in numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae. Based upon the hypothesis that the effective flame speed is determined by the unresolved turbulent velocity fluctuations, we employ a new subgrid scale model which includes a localised treatment of the energy transfer through the turbulence cascade in combination with semi-statistical closures for the dissipation and non-local transport of turbulence energy. In addition, subgrid scale buoyancy effects are included. In the limit of negligible energy transfer and transport, the dynamical model reduces to the Sharp-Wheeler relation. According to our findings, the Sharp-Wheeler relation is insuffcient to account for the complicated turbulent dynamics of flames in thermonuclear supernovae. The application of a co-moving grid technique enables us to achieve very high spatial resolution in the burning region. Turbulence is produced mostly at the flame surface and in the interior ...

  9. Cardiac fluid dynamics anticipates heart adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrizzetti, Gianni; Martiniello, Alfonso R; Bianchi, Valter; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Caso, Pio; Tonti, Giovanni

    2015-01-21

    Hemodynamic forces represent an epigenetic factor during heart development and are supposed to influence the pathology of the grown heart. Cardiac blood motion is characterized by a vortical dynamics, and it is common belief that the cardiac vortex has a role in disease progressions or regression. Here we provide a preliminary demonstration about the relevance of maladaptive intra-cardiac vortex dynamics in the geometrical adaptation of the dysfunctional heart. We employed an in vivo model of patients who present a stable normal heart function in virtue of the cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, bi-ventricular pace-maker) and who are expected to develop left ventricle remodeling if pace-maker was switched off. Intra-ventricular fluid dynamics is analyzed by echocardiography (Echo-PIV). Under normal conditions, the flow presents a longitudinal alignment of the intraventricular hemodynamic forces. When pacing is temporarily switched off, flow forces develop a misalignment hammering onto lateral walls, despite no other electro-mechanical change is noticed. Hemodynamic forces result to be the first event that evokes a physiological activity anticipating cardiac changes and could help in the prediction of longer term heart adaptations.

  10. Estimation of shock loss factors at shaft bottom junction using computational fluid dynamics and scale model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purushotham, T. [Alaska Univ., Fairbanks, AK (United States); Sastry, B.S.; Samanta, B. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2010-07-01

    This article described the design of an effective ventilation system for underground mines that meets the air and pressure requirements of a mine. The distribution of the air quantity in the mine network is determined by the mine operating conditions and the characteristics of the mine fans. Shock losses generally account for 40 percent of the total pressure losses in mines. These losses must therefore be quantified for the different flow geometries found in mine ventilation systems. The shaft bottom junction in a mine ventilation system is an important source of shock loss due to the combined effect of bend and area change. Computational fluid dynamic techniques were used in this study examined the effects of the plat roughness and the shaft bottom length on the shock loss factor values. The results will be useful in designing effective air-crossings that minimize the amount of shock losses and reduce ventilation costs. 26 refs., 6 tabs., 6 figs.

  11. A New Class of High-Order Methods for Fluid Dynamics Simulations using Gaussian Process Modeling: I. One-dimensional Case

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Adam; Graziani, Carlo; Tzeferacos, Petros

    2016-01-01

    We introduce an entirely new class of varying high-order methods for computational fluid dynamics based on a stochastic model of Gaussian process (GP). The new approach is based on GP modeling that generalizes Gaussian probability distributions for stochastic data predictions. Our approach is to adapt the idea of the GP prediction technique that utilizes the covariance kernel functions, and use the GP prediction to interpolate/reconstruct high-order approximations for solving hyperbolic PDEs. We present the GP high-order approach as a new class of numerical high-order formulations, alternative to the conventional polynomial-based approaches.

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byoung-kwon

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a mechanical engineering field for analyzing fluid flow, heat transfer, and associated phenomena, using computer-based simulation. CFD is a widely adopted methodology for solving complex problems in many modern engineering fields. The merit of CFD is developing new and improved devices and system designs, and optimization is conducted on existing equipment through computational simulations, resulting in enhanced efficiency and lower operating costs. Howev...

  13. Hard sphere dynamics for normal and granular fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufty, James W; Baskaran, Aparna

    2005-06-01

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collision) and granular (inelastic collision) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so that the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics system is identified in a special stationary representation. This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  14. Space Shuttle Propulsion Systems Plume Modeling and Simulation for the Lift-Off Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, L. L.; Dougherty, N. S.; Liever, P. A.; West, J. S.; Smith, S. D.

    2007-01-01

    This paper details advances being made in the development of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes numerical simulation tools, models, and methods for the integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle at launch. The conceptual model and modeling approach described includes the development of multiple computational models to appropriately analyze the potential debris transport for critical debris sources at Lift-Off. The conceptual model described herein involves the integration of propulsion analysis for the nozzle/plume flow with the overall 3D vehicle flowfield at Lift-Off. Debris Transport Analyses are being performed using the Shuttle Lift-Off models to assess the risk to the vehicle from Lift-Off debris and appropriately prioritized mitigation of potential debris sources to continue to reduce vehicle risk. These integrated simulations are being used to evaluate plume-induced debris environments where the multi-plume interactions with the launch facility can potentially accelerate debris particles toward the vehicle.

  15. Fluid dynamics theory, computation, and numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, C

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an accessible introduction to the basic theory of fluid mechanics and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) from a modern perspective that unifies theory and numerical computation. Methods of scientific computing are introduced alongside with theoretical analysis and MATLAB® codes are presented and discussed for a broad range of topics: from interfacial shapes in hydrostatics, to vortex dynamics, to viscous flow, to turbulent flow, to panel methods for flow past airfoils. The third edition includes new topics, additional examples, solved and unsolved problems, and revised images. It adds more computational algorithms and MATLAB programs. It also incorporates discussion of the latest version of the fluid dynamics software library FDLIB, which is freely available online. FDLIB offers an extensive range of computer codes that demonstrate the implementation of elementary and advanced algorithms and provide an invaluable resource for research, teaching, classroom instruction, and self-study. This ...

  16. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report for 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B. (eds.)

    2002-03-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: 1) laser systems and optical materials, 2) optical diagnostics and information processing and 3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competence in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, bio-optics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2001 is presented. (au)

  17. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B. (eds.)

    2001-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competence in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, bio-optics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2000 is presented. (au)

  18. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lynov, Jens-Peter;

    2002-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The departmenthas core competences in: optical sensors......, optical materials, optical storage, biooptics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM,by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2001 is presented....

  19. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual Progress Report for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B

    2003-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) Laser systems and optical materials (2) Optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) Plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2002 is presented. (au)

  20. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report for 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B. (eds.)

    2004-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1 laser systems and optical materials, (2 optical diagnostics and information processing and (3 plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics, fusion plasma physics and plasma technology. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2003 is presented. (au)

  1. Fluid flow dynamics in MAS systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Dirk; Purea, Armin; Engelke, Frank

    2015-08-01

    The turbine system and the radial bearing of a high performance magic angle spinning (MAS) probe with 1.3mm-rotor diameter has been analyzed for spinning rates up to 67kHz. We focused mainly on the fluid flow properties of the MAS system. Therefore, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations and fluid measurements of the turbine and the radial bearings have been performed. CFD simulation and measurement results of the 1.3mm-MAS rotor system show relatively low efficiency (about 25%) compared to standard turbo machines outside the realm of MAS. However, in particular, MAS turbines are mainly optimized for speed and stability instead of efficiency. We have compared MAS systems for rotor diameter of 1.3-7mm converted to dimensionless values with classical turbomachinery systems showing that the operation parameters (rotor diameter, inlet mass flow, spinning rate) are in the favorable range. This dimensionless analysis also supports radial turbines for low speed MAS probes and diagonal turbines for high speed MAS probes. Consequently, a change from Pelton type MAS turbines to diagonal turbines might be worth considering for high speed applications. CFD simulations of the radial bearings have been compared with basic theoretical values proposing considerably smaller frictional loss values. The discrepancies might be due to the simple linear flow profile employed for the theoretical model. Frictional losses generated inside the radial bearings result in undesired heat-up of the rotor. The rotor surface temperature distribution computed by CFD simulations show a large temperature gradient over the rotor.

  2. Relativistic fluid dynamics in heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Pu, Shi

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation is about the study of three important issues in the theory of relativistic fluid dynamics: the stability of dissipative fluid dynamics, the shear viscosity, and fluid dynamics with triangle anomaly.(1)The second order theory of fluid dynamics is necessary for causality. However the causality cannot be guaranteed for all parameters. The constraints for parameters are then given. We also point out that the causality and the stability are inter-correlated. It is found that a causal system must be stable, but an acausal system in the boost frame at high speed must be unstable. (2)The transport coefficients can be determined in kinetic theory. We will firstly discuss about derivation of the shear viscosity via variational method in the Boltzmann equation. Secondly, we will compute the shear viscosity via AdS/CFT duality in a Bjorken boost invariant fluid with radial flow. It is found that the ratio of the shear viscosity to entropy density is consistent with the work of Policastro, Son and Starin...

  3. Validation of mathematical models to describe fluid dynamics of a cold riser by gamma ray attenuation; Validacao de modelos matematicos para descrever a fluidodinamica de um riser utilizando atenuacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, Ana Cristina Bezerra Azedo de

    2004-12-15

    The fluid dynamic behavior of a riser in a cold type FCC model was investigated by means of catalyst concentration distribution measured with gamma attenuation and simulated with a mathematical model. In the riser of the cold model, MEF, 0,032 m in diameter, 2,30 m in length the fluidized bed, whose components are air and FCC catalyst, circulates. The MEF is operated by automatic control and instruments for measuring fluid dynamic variables. An axial catalyst concentration distribution was measured using an Am-241 gamma source and a NaI detector coupled to a multichannel provided with a software for data acquisition and evaluation. The MEF was adapted for a fluid dynamic model validation which describes the flow in the riser, for example, by introducing an injector for controlling the solid flow in circulation. Mathematical models were selected from literature, analyzed and tested to simulate the fluid dynamic of the riser. A methodology for validating fluid dynamic models was studied and implemented. The stages of the work were developed according to the validation methodology, such as data planning experiments, study of the equations which describe the fluidodynamic, computational solvers application and comparison with experimental data. Operational sequences were carried out keeping the MEF conditions for measuring catalyst concentration and simultaneously measuring the fluid dynamic variables, velocity of the components and pressure drop in the riser. Following this, simulated and experimental values were compared and statistical data treatment done, aiming at the required precision to validate the fluid dynamic model. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data were carried out under validation criteria. The fluid dynamic behavior of the riser was analyzed and the results and the agreement with literature were discussed. The adopt model was validated under the MEF operational conditions, for a 3 to 6 m/s gas velocity in the riser and a slip

  4. Engineering Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics: Volume 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chapter 1: CFD Modeling of Methane Reforming in Compact Reformers. Meng Ni Chapter 2: FEM Based Solution of Thermo Fluid Dynamic Phenomena in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCS. F. Arpino, A. Carotenuto, N. Massarotti, A. Mauro Chapter 3: Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Development of a 3D Simulator for Testing Pollution Monitoring Robotic Fishes. John Oyekan, Bowen Lu, Huosheng Hu Chapter 4: CFD Applications in Electronic Packaging. C.Y. Khor, Chun-Sean Lau, M.Z. Abdullah Chapter 5: CFD Simulation of Savonius Wind Turbine Operation. Jo?o Vicente Akwa, Adriane Prisco Petry Chapter 6: Intermittency Modelling of Transitional Boundary Layer Flows on Steam and Gas Turbine Blades. Erik Dick, Slawomir Kubacki, Koen Lodefier, Witold Elsner Chapter 7: Numerical Analysis of the Flow through Fitting in Air Conditioning Systems. N.C. Uz?rraga-Rodriguez, A. Gallegos-Mu?oz, J.M. Belman-Flores, J.C. Rubio-Arana Chapter 8: Design and Optimization of Food Processing Equipments using Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling. N. Chhanwal and C. Anandharamakrishnan Chapter 9: Fuel and Intake Systems Optimization of a Converted LPG Engine: Steady and Unsteady in-Cylinder Flow CFD Investigations and Experiments Validation. M. A. Jemni, G. Kantchev, Z. Driss, M. S. Abid Chapter 10: Computational Fluid Dynamics Application for Thermal Management in Underground Mines. Agus P. Sasmito, Jundika C. Kurnia, Guan Mengzhao, Erik Birgersson, Arun S. Mujumdar Chapter 11: Computational Fluid Dynamics and its Applications. R.Parthiban, C.Muthuraj, A.Rajakumar

  5. Fluid-Solid Interaction and Multiscale Dynamic Processes: Experimental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniega-Ceballos, Alejandra; Spina, Laura; Mendo-Pérez, Gerardo M.; Guzmán-Vázquez, Enrique; Scheu, Bettina; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-04-01

    The speed and the style of a pressure drop in fluid-filled conduits determines the dynamics of multiscale processes and the elastic interaction between the fluid and the confining solid. To observe this dynamics we performed experiments using fluid-filled transparent tubes (15-50 cm long, 2-4 cm diameter and 0.3-1 cm thickness) instrumented with high-dynamic piezoelectric sensors and filmed the evolution of these processes with a high speed camera. We analyzed the response of Newtonian fluids to slow and sudden pressure drops from 3 bar-10 MPa to ambient pressure. We used fluids with viscosities of mafic to intermediate silicate melts of 1 to 1000 Pa s and water. The processes observed are fluid mass expansion, fluid flow, jets, bubbles nucleation, growth, coalescence and collapse, degassing, foam building at the surface and vertical wagging. All these processes (in fine and coarse scales) are triggered by the pressure drop and are sequentially coupled in time while interacting with the solid. During slow decompression, the multiscale processes are recognized occurring within specific pressure intervals, and exhibit a localized distribution along the conduit. In this, degassing predominates near the surface and may present piston-like oscillations. In contrast, during sudden decompression the fluid-flow reaches higher velocities, the dynamics is dominated by a sequence of gas-packet pulses driving jets of the gas-fluid mixture. The evolution of this multiscale phenomenon generates complex non-stationary microseismic signals recorded along the conduit. We discuss distinctive characteristics of these signals depending on the decompression style and compare them with synthetics. These synthetics are obtained numerically under an averaging modeling scheme, that accounted for the stress-strain of the cyclic dynamic interaction between the fluid and the solid wall, assuming an incompressible and viscous fluid that flows while the elastic solid responds oscillating

  6. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Date, Anil W.

    2005-08-01

    This is a textbook for advanced undergraduate and first-year graduate students in mechanical, aerospace, and chemical engineering. The book emphasizes understanding CFD through physical principles and examples. The author follows a consistent philosophy of control volume formulation of the fundamental laws of fluid motion and energy transfer, and introduces a novel notion of 'smoothing pressure correction' for solution of flow equations on collocated grids within the framework of the well-known SIMPLE algorithm. The subject matter is developed by considering pure conduction/diffusion, convective transport in 2-dimensional boundary layers and in fully elliptic flow situations and phase-change problems in succession. The book includes chapters on discretization of equations for transport of mass, momentum and energy on Cartesian, structured curvilinear and unstructured meshes, solution of discretised equations, numerical grid generation and convergence enhancement. Practicing engineers will find this particularly useful for reference and for continuing education.

  7. Surface accumulation of spermatozoa: a fluid dynamic phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, David J

    2010-01-01

    Recent mathematical fluid dynamics models have shed light into an outstanding problem in reproductive biology: why do spermatozoa cells show a 'preference' for swimming near to surfaces? In this paper we review quantitative approaches to the problem, originating with the classic paper of Lord Rothschild in 1963. A recent 'boundary integral/slender body theory' mathematical model for the fluid dynamics is described, and we discuss how it gives insight into the mechanisms that may be responsible for the surface accumulation behaviour. We use the simulation model to explore these mechanisms in more detail, and discuss whether simplified models can capture the behaviour of sperm cells. The far-field decay of the fluid flow around the cell is calculated, and compared with a stresslet model. Finally we present some new findings showing how, despite having a relatively small hydrodynamic drag, the sperm cell 'head' has very significant effects on surface accumulation and trajectory.

  8. Fiber bundle model under fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitrano, David; Girard, Lucas

    2016-03-01

    Internal fluid pressure often plays an important role in the rupture of brittle materials. This is a major concern for many engineering applications and for natural hazards. More specifically, the mechanisms through which fluid pressure, applied at a microscale, can enhance the failure at a macroscale and accelerate damage dynamics leading to failure remains unclear. Here we revisit the fiber bundle model by accounting for the effect of fluid under pressure that contributes to the global load supported by the fiber bundle. Fluid pressure is applied on the broken fibers, following Biot's theory. The statistical properties of damage avalanches and their evolution toward macrofailure are analyzed for a wide range of fluid pressures. The macroscopic strength of the new model appears to be strongly controlled by the action of the fluid, particularly when the fluid pressure becomes comparable with the fiber strength. The behavior remains consistent with continuous transition, i.e., second order, including for large pressure. The main change concerns the damage acceleration toward the failure that is well modeled by the concept of sweeping of an instability. When pressure is increased, the exponent β characterizing the power-law distribution avalanche sizes significantly decreases and the exponent γ characterizing the cutoff divergence when failure is approached significantly increases. This proves that fluid pressure plays a key role in failure process acting as destabilization factor. This indicates that macrofailure occurs more readily under fluid pressure, with a behavior that becomes progressively unstable as fluid pressure increases. This may have considerable consequences on our ability to forecast failure when fluid pressure is acting.

  9. New weighted sum of gray gases model applicable to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of oxy-fuel combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Chungen; Johansen, Lars Christian Riis; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2010-01-01

    Radiation is the principal mode of heat transfer in furnaces. Models for gaseous radiative properties have been well established for air combustion. However, there is uncertainty regarding their applicability to oxy-fuel conditions. In this paper, a new and complete set of weighted sum of gray...

  10. The problem of fluid-dynamics in semicircular canal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An analytical solution with high accuracy which holds for any values of ε for fluid-dynamics model equation in a single semicircular canal presented by Buskirk and his co-workers has been obtained.It not only includes all of the results of Buskirk et al.but also covers three possible kinds of dynamical response modes in practice.The theoretical results are in better agreement with those of experimental observations.This investigation has laid a reliable theoretical foundation for quantitatively understanding fluid-dynamics in semicircular canal,especially fluid dynamical response.The distribution of the velocity of the endolymph in semicircular canal is given.A nonstandard method of the inverse Laplace transform is presented.

  11. The problem of fluid-dynamics in semicircular canal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐明瑜; 谭文长

    2000-01-01

    An analytical solution with high accuracy which holds for any values of E for fluid-dynamics model eguation in a single semicircular canal presented by Buskirk and his co-workers has been ob-tained. it not only includes ali of the results of Buskirk et al. but also covers three possible kinds of dy-namical response modes in practice. The theoretical results are in betler agreement with those of ex-perimental observations. This investigation has laid a reliable theoretical foundation for quantitatively understanding fluid-dynamics in semicircular canal, especially fluid dynamical response. The distribu-tion of the velocity of the endolymph in semicircular canal is given. A nonstandard method of the in-verse Laplace transform is presented.

  12. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros, E-mail: theosama@auth.g [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2010-10-07

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 x 10{sup -4} m s{sup -1}. The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  13. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edison, John R; Monson, Peter A

    2014-07-14

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  14. Validation of computational fluid dynamics calculation using Rossendorf coolant mixing model flow measurements in primary loop of coolant in a pressurized water reactor model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, Istvan; Hutli, Ezddin; Faekas, Tatiana; Takacs, Antal; Guba, Attila; Toth, Ivan [Dept. of Thermohydraulics, Centre for Energy Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-08-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate the thermohydraulic consequences of a main steam line break and to compare the obtained results with Rossendorf Coolant Mixing Model (ROCOM) 1.1 experimental results. The objective is to utilize data from steady-state mixing experiments and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations to determine the flow distribution and the effect of thermal mixing phenomena in the primary loops for the improvement of normal operation conditions and structural integrity assessment of pressurized water reactors. The numerical model of ROCOM was developed using the FLUENT code. The positions of the inlet and outlet boundary conditions and the distribution of detailed velocity/turbulence parameters were determined by preliminary calculations. The temperature fields of transient calculation were averaged in time and compared with time-averaged experimental data. The perforated barrel under the core inlet homogenizes the flow, and therefore, a uniform temperature distribution is formed in the pressure vessel bottom. The calculated and measured values of lowest temperature were equal. The inlet temperature is an essential parameter for safety assessment. The calculation predicts precisely the experimental results at the core inlet central region. CFD results showed a good agreement (both qualitatively and quantitatively) with experimental results.

  15. Fluid Dynamics of Human Phonation and Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Rajat; Erath, Byron D.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of the fluid dynamics, flow-structure interactions, and acoustics associated with human phonation and speech. Our voice is produced through the process of phonation in the larynx, and an improved understanding of the underlying physics of this process is essential to advancing the treatment of voice disorders. Insights into the physics of phonation and speech can also contribute to improved vocal training and the development of new speech compression and synthesis schemes. This article introduces the key biomechanical features of the laryngeal physiology, reviews the basic principles of voice production, and summarizes the progress made over the past half-century in understanding the flow physics of phonation and speech. Laryngeal pathologies, which significantly enhance the complexity of phonatory dynamics, are discussed. After a thorough examination of the state of the art in computational modeling and experimental investigations of phonatory biomechanics, we present a synopsis of the pacing issues in this arena and an outlook for research in this fascinating subject.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Desulfurization Behavior in Gas-Stirred Systems Based on Computation Fluid Dynamics-Simultaneous Reaction Model (CFD-SRM) Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2014-10-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to describe the desulfurization behavior in a gas-stirred ladle. For the desulfurization thermodynamics, different models were investigated to determine sulfide capacity and oxygen activity. For the desulfurization kinetic, the effect of bubbly plume flow, as well as oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are considered. The thermodynamic and kinetic modification coefficients are proposed to fit the measured data, respectively. Finally, the effects of slag basicity and gas flow rate on the desulfurization efficiency are investigated. The results show that as the interfacial reactions (Al2O3)-(FeO)-(SiO2)-(MnO)-[S]-[O] simultaneous kinetic equilibrium is adopted to determine the oxygen activity, and the Young's model with the modification coefficient R th of 1.5 is adopted to determine slag sulfide capacity, the predicted sulfur distribution ratio LS agrees well with the measured data. With an increase of the gas blowing time, the predicted desulfurization rate gradually decreased, and when the modification parameter R k is 0.8, the predicted sulfur content changing with time in ladle agrees well with the measured data. If the oxygen absorption and oxidation reactions in slag eyes are not considered in this model, then the sulfur removal rate in the ladle would be overestimated, and this trend would become more obvious with an increase of the gas flow rate and decrease of the slag layer height. With the slag basicity increasing, the total desulfurization ratio increases; however, the total desulfurization ratio changes weakly as the slag basicity exceeds 7. With the increase of the gas flow rate, the desulfurization ratio first increases and then decreases. When the gas flow rate is 200 NL/min, the desulfurization ratio reaches a maximum value in an 80-ton gas-stirred ladle.

  17. The Fluid Dynamics of Competitive Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Timothy; Mark, Russell; Hutchison, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Nowhere in sport is performance so dependent on the interaction of the athlete with the surrounding medium than in competitive swimming. As a result, understanding (at least implicitly) and controlling (explicitly) the fluid dynamics of swimming are essential to earning a spot on the medal stand. This is an extremely complex, highly multidisciplinary problem with a broad spectrum of research approaches. This review attempts to provide a historical framework for the fluid dynamics-related aspects of human swimming research, principally conducted roughly over the past five decades, with an emphasis on the past 25 years. The literature is organized below to show a continuous integration of computational and experimental technologies into the sport. Illustrations from the authors' collaborations over a 10-year period, coupling the knowledge and experience of an elite-level coach, a lead biomechanician at USA Swimming, and an experimental fluid dynamicist, are intended to bring relevance and immediacy to the review.

  18. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rodrigo C. V.; Neumann, Rodrigo F.

    2016-09-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through them in order to calculate their permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualise these concepts, we analyse the applicability of the Kozeny-Carman equation, which is a well-known permeability-porosity relation, to our artificial samples.

  19. Fluid dynamics in porous media with Sailfish

    CERN Document Server

    Coelho, Rodrigo C V

    2016-01-01

    In this work we show the application of Sailfish to the study of fluid dynamics in porous media. Sailfish is an open-source software based on the lattice-Boltzmann method. This application of computational fluid dynamics is of particular interest to the oil and gas industry and the subject could be a starting point for an undergraduate or graduate student in physics or engineering. We built artificial samples of porous media with different porosities and used Sailfish to simulate the fluid flow through in order to calculate permeability and tortuosity. We also present a simple way to obtain the specific superficial area of porous media using Python libraries. To contextualize these concepts, we test the Kozeny--Carman equation, discuss its validity and calculate the Kozeny's constant for our artificial samples.

  20. Syringe irrigation: blending endodontics and fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Boutsioukis; L.W.M. van der Sluis

    2015-01-01

    Syringe irrigation remains a widely used irrigant delivery method during root canal treatment. An interdisciplinary approach involving well-established methods from the field of fluid dynamics can provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in cleaning and disinfection of the root canal system

  1. Syringe irrigation: blending endodontics and fluid dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutsioukis, C.; van der Sluis, L.W.M.; Basrani, B.

    2015-01-01

    Syringe irrigation remains a widely used irrigant delivery method during root canal treatment. An interdisciplinary approach involving well-established methods from the field of fluid dynamics can provide new insights into the mechanisms involved in cleaning and disinfection of the root canal system

  2. Modern Fluid Dynamics Intermediate Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2010-01-01

    Features pedagogical elements that include consistent 50/50 physics-mathematics approach when introducing material, illustrating concepts, showing flow visualizations, and solving problems. This title intends to help serious undergraduate student solve basic fluid dynamics problems independently, and suggest system design improvements

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Ventilation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is based on the new REHVA Guidebook Computational Fluid  Dynamics in Ventilation Design (Nielsen et al. 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis(Nielsen 2007) written by Peter V. Nielsen, Francis Allard, Hazim B. Awbi, Lars Davidson and Alois Schälin. The guidebook is made for people...

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Ventilation Airflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was first introduced in the ventilation industry in the 1970s. CFD has been increasingly used since then, as testified by the number of peer-reviewed articles, which was less than 10 per year in the 1990s, and which is now 60 to 70 per year. This article discusses...

  5. Droplet breakup dynamics of weakly viscoelastic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin; Walker, Travis

    2016-11-01

    The addition of macromolecules to solvent, even in dilute quantities, can alter a fluid's response in an extensional flow. For low-viscosity fluids, the presence of elasticity may not be apparent when measured using a standard rotational rheometer, yet it may still alter the response of a fluid when undergoing an extensional deformation, especially at small length scales where elastic effects are enhanced. Applications such as microfluidics necessitate investigating the dynamics of fluids with elastic properties that are not pronounced at large length scales. In the present work, a microfluidic cross-slot configuration is used to study the effects of elasticity on droplet breakup. Droplet breakup and the subsequent iterated-stretching - where beads form along a filament connecting two primary droplets - were observed for a variety of material and flow conditions. We present a relationship on the modes of bead formation and how and when these modes will form based on key parameters such as the properties of the outer continuous-phase fluid. The results are vital not only for simulating the droplet breakup of weakly viscoelastic fluids but also for understanding how the droplet breakup event can be used for characterizing the extensional properties of weakly-viscoelastic fluids.

  6. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Output and documentation from a set of multi-century experiments performed using NOAA/GFDL's climate models. Users can download files, display data file attributes,...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of protein adsorption at fluid interfaces: a comparison of all-atom and coarse-grained models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euston, Stephen R

    2010-10-11

    The adsorption of LTP at the decane-water interface was modeled using all-atom and coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations. The CG model (300 ns simulation, 1200 ns scaled time) generates equilibrium adsorbed conformations in about 12 h, whereas the equivalent 1200 ns simulation would take about 300 days for the all-atom model. In both models the LTP molecule adsorbs with α-helical regions parallel to the interface with an average tilt angle normal to the interface of 73° for the all-atom model and 62° for the CG model. In the all-atom model, the secondary structure of the LTP is conserved upon adsorption. A considerable proportion of the N-terminal loop of LTP can be found in the decane phase for the all-atom model, whereas in the CG model the protein only penetrates as far as the mixed water-decane interfacial region. This difference may arise due to the different schemes used to parametrize force field parameters in the two models.

  8. Multiscale modelling of fluid-immersed granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Clément, Christian Paul André René

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis we present numerical simulation studies of fluid-immersed granular systems using models of varying scales and complexities. These techniques are used to examine the effects of an interstitial fluid on the dynamics of dense granular beds within a number of vibrated systems. After an introduction to the field of granular materials, we present the techniques used to model both the granular dynamics and the fluid flow. We introduce various multiscale techniques to couple the mo...

  9. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the

  10. A physical framework for implementing virtual models of intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in hydrocephalus shunt testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Pranav; Browd, Samuel R; Lutz, Barry R

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The surgical placement of a shunt designed to resolve the brain's impaired ability to drain excess CSF is one of the most common treatments for hydrocephalus. The use of a dynamic testing platform is an important part of shunt testing that can faithfully reproduce the physiological environment of the implanted shunts. METHODS A simulation-based framework that serves as a proof of concept for enabling the application of virtual intracranial pressure (ICP) and CSF models to a physical shunt-testing system was engineered. This was achieved by designing hardware and software that enabled the application of dynamic model-driven inlet and outlet pressures to a shunt and the subsequent measurement of the resulting drainage rate. RESULTS A set of common physiological scenarios was simulated, including oscillations in ICP due to respiratory and cardiac cycles, changes in baseline ICP due to changes in patient posture, and transient ICP spikes caused by activities such as exercise, coughing, sneezing, and the Valsalva maneuver. The behavior of the Strata valve under a few of these physiological conditions is also demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS Testing shunts with dynamic ICP and CSF simulations can facilitate the optimization of shunts to be more failure resistant and better suited to patient physiology.

  11. Compatible finite element spaces for geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Natale, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Compatible finite elements provide a framework for preserving important structures in equations of geophysical fluid dynamics, and are becoming important in their use for building atmosphere and ocean models. We survey the application of compatible finite element spaces to geophysical fluid dynamics, including the application to the nonlinear rotating shallow water equations, and the three-dimensional compressible Euler equations. We summarise analytic results about dispersion relations and conservation properties, and present new results on approximation properties in three dimensions on the sphere, and on hydrostatic balance properties.

  12. Thermo-Fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ishii, Mamrou

    2011-01-01

    "Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Two-Phase Flow, Second Edition" is focused on the fundamental physics of two-phase flow. The authors present the detailed theoretical foundation of multi-phase flow thermo-fluid dynamics as they apply to: Nuclear reactor transient and accident analysis; Energy systems; Power generation systems; Chemical reactors and process systems; Space propulsion; Transport processes. This edition features updates on two-phase flow formulation and constitutive equations and CFD simulation codes such as FLUENT and CFX, new coverage of the lift force model, which is of part

  13. Stochastic hard-sphere dynamics for hydrodynamics of nonideal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Alder, Berni J; Garcia, Alejandro L

    2008-08-15

    A novel stochastic fluid model is proposed with a nonideal structure factor consistent with compressibility, and adjustable transport coefficients. This stochastic hard-sphere dynamics (SHSD) algorithm is a modification of the direct simulation Monte Carlo algorithm and has several computational advantages over event-driven hard-sphere molecular dynamics. Surprisingly, SHSD results in an equation of state and a pair correlation function identical to that of a deterministic Hamiltonian system of penetrable spheres interacting with linear core pair potentials. The fluctuating hydrodynamic behavior of the SHSD fluid is verified for the Brownian motion of a nanoparticle suspended in a compressible solvent.

  14. A Holographic Model for Pseudogap in BCS-BEC Crossover (I): Pairing Fluctuations, Double-Trace Deformation and Dynamics of Bulk Bosonic Fluid

    CERN Document Server

    DeWolfe, Oliver; Wu, Chaolun

    2016-01-01

    We build a holographic model for the pairing fluctuation pseudogap phase in fermionic high temperature superconductivity/superfluidity based on the BCS-BEC crossover scenario. The pseudogap originates from incoherent Cooper pairing and has been observed in recent cold atom experiments. The strength of Cooper pairing and hence the BCS-BEC crossover is controlled by an effective 4-Fermi interaction and we argue that the double-trace deformation for charged scalar operator is a close analog in large N field theories. We employ the double-trace deformed Abelian Higgs model of holographic superconductors and propose that the incoherent fluctuations of the charged scalar in the bulk is the holographic dual of the fluctuating Cooper pairs. Using a Madelung transformation and the velocity-potential formalism, we develop a quantum fluid dynamics as an effective theory for these bulk fluctuations. The new fluid dynamics takes care of the boundary conditions required by AdS/CFT and encodes the vacuum polarization effect...

  15. Computational fluid dynamics incompressible turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Kajishima, Takeo

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents numerical solution techniques for incompressible turbulent flows that occur in a variety of scientific and engineering settings including aerodynamics of ground-based vehicles and low-speed aircraft, fluid flows in energy systems, atmospheric flows, and biological flows. This book encompasses fluid mechanics, partial differential equations, numerical methods, and turbulence models, and emphasizes the foundation on how the governing partial differential equations for incompressible fluid flow can be solved numerically in an accurate and efficient manner. Extensive discussions on incompressible flow solvers and turbulence modeling are also offered. This text is an ideal instructional resource and reference for students, research scientists, and professional engineers interested in analyzing fluid flows using numerical simulations for fundamental research and industrial applications. • Introduces CFD techniques for incompressible flow and turbulence with a comprehensive approach; • Enr...

  16. A fluid dynamic model for catalyst flow in riser of a FCC cold pilot unity is validated by gamma ray transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza Netto, Wilson F. de; Brito, Marcio F. P.; Dantas, Carlos C.; Silva, Jose Marcos F. da; Freitas, Romero B., E-mail: wilson.netto@ufpe.br, E-mail: jmfs5@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: romero.borgesf@gmail.com, E-mail: ccd@ufpe.br, E-mail: marciopaixaobrito@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, Valdemir A. dos, E-mail: vas@unicap.br [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco (UNICAP), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Barbosa, Enivaldo S., E-mail: enivaldo@dem.ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Mecanica

    2013-07-01

    An one-dimensional model was previously used to describe solid flow and operational conditions tests. By radial gamma ray profile a two-dimensional model was evaluated taken volumetric solid fraction as experimental parameters. Literature data provide a first test for solution of the two-dimensional model equations. Then, Axial and radial catalyst profiles were measured by gamma ray transmission in the riser of the Cold Flow Pilot Unit. For fluid flow, the mathematical model is established based on the equations of conservation of momentum and mass. However, in multicomponent flows, one should have a correction factor in these equations taking into account the influence of each component in the flow. This factor is the volumetric fraction of each component. The volumetric fraction of solids was obtained by measuring the pressure profile and calculating the solids specific mass relative to riser volume. With the technique of gamma transmission radiation could be measured in one single point of the riser, direct measurement, then several points to get a more precise axial profile and better definition. The data obtained were used as parameters for the differential equations of fluid dynamic model and MATLAB solved. (author)

  17. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lofthouse, J T

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  18. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics – Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design – The secondary clarifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models – computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective...... using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor...... both in 2-D and 1-D was undertaken. Results suggest that the iCFD model developed for the SST through the proposed methodology is able to predict solid distribution with high accuracy – taking a reasonable computational effort – when compared to multi-dimensional numerical experiments, under a wide...

  19. Development of computational fluid dynamics--habitat suitability (CFD-HSI) models to identify potential passage--Challenge zones for migratory fishes in the Penobscot River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, Alexander J.; Dudley, Robert W.; Chelminski, Michael

    2012-01-01

    A two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics-habitat suitability (CFD–HSI) model was developed to identify potential zones of shallow depth and high water velocity that may present passage challenges for five anadromous fish species in the Penobscot River, Maine, upstream from two existing dams and as a result of the proposed future removal of the dams. Potential depth-challenge zones were predicted for larger species at the lowest flow modeled in the dam-removal scenario. Increasing flows under both scenarios increased the number and size of potential velocity-challenge zones, especially for smaller species. This application of the two-dimensional CFD–HSI model demonstrated its capabilities to estimate the potential effects of flow and hydraulic alteration on the passage of migratory fish.

  20. Computational fluid dynamic model for thermohydraulic calculation for the steady-state of the real scale HTR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamez, Abel; Rojas, Leorlen; Rosales, Jesus; Castro, Landy Y.; Gonzalez, Daniel; Garcia, Carlos, E-mail: agamezgmf@gmail.com, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com, E-mail: jrosales@instec.cu, E-mail: lcastro@instec.cu, E-mail: danielgonro@gmail.com, E-mail: cgr@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira, Carlos B. de, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Dominguez, Dany S., E-mail: dsdominguez@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz (UESC), Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is one of candidates of next generation of nuclear reactor according to IAEA report 2013. Evaluation of thermohydraulic performance and an experimental comparison results were proposed to the international research community. In this article, the tree dimensional CFD thermohydraulic modelation of steady state of HTR-10 modular reactor, using ANSYS CFX v14.0, has been done. Code-to-code and Code-to-experiment benchmark analyses, related to the testing program of the HTR-10 plant including steady state temperature distribution with the reactor at full power, were developed. The 3D real scale representation of reflector zone and fluid path flow inner and outer reflector blocks and cold helium cavity were carried out. The porous medium model was used to simulate the core zone in the reactor. The power distribution of the initial core published by IAEA-TECDOC-1694 obtained by Chief Scientific Investigators (CSIs) from China was used as heat sources in the core zone. (author)

  1. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny M Pedersen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics (CFD to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were 1 minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, 2 rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and 3 delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices — RealBio® (RB and QuasiVivo® (QV — and a custom developed fluidized bed (FB bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results.Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able

  2. Fluid Dynamic Modeling to Support the Development of Flow-Based Hepatocyte Culture Systems for Metabolism Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Jenny M.; Shim, Yoo-Sik; Hans, Vaibhav; Phillips, Martin B.; Macdonald, Jeffrey M.; Walker, Glenn; Andersen, Melvin E.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Yoon, Miyoung

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of metabolism is a significant outstanding challenge in toxicology. The best predictions are based on experimental data from in vitro systems using primary hepatocytes. The predictivity of the primary hepatocyte-based culture systems, however, is still limited due to well-known phenotypic instability and rapid decline of metabolic competence within a few hours. Dynamic flow bioreactors for three-dimensional cell cultures are thought to be better at recapitulating tissue microenvironments and show potential to improve in vivo extrapolations of chemical or drug toxicity based on in vitro test results. These more physiologically relevant culture systems hold potential for extending metabolic competence of primary hepatocyte cultures as well. In this investigation, we used computational fluid dynamics to determine the optimal design of a flow-based hepatocyte culture system for evaluating chemical metabolism in vitro. The main design goals were (1) minimization of shear stress experienced by the cells to maximize viability, (2) rapid establishment of a uniform distribution of test compound in the chamber, and (3) delivery of sufficient oxygen to cells to support aerobic respiration. Two commercially available flow devices – RealBio® and QuasiVivo® (QV) – and a custom developed fluidized bed bioreactor were simulated, and turbulence, flow characteristics, test compound distribution, oxygen distribution, and cellular oxygen consumption were analyzed. Experimental results from the bioreactors were used to validate the simulation results. Our results indicate that maintaining adequate oxygen supply is the most important factor to the long-term viability of liver bioreactor cultures. Cell density and system flow patterns were the major determinants of local oxygen concentrations. The experimental results closely corresponded to the in silico predictions. Of the three bioreactors examined in this study, we were able to optimize the experimental

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamics in Hypersonic Aerothermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Sinha

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypersonic flows are characterised by high Mach number and high total enthalpy. An elevated temperature often results in thermo-chemical reactions in the gas, which p lay a major role in aerothermodynamic characterisation of high-speed aerospace vehicles. Hypersonic flows in propulsion components are usually turbulent, resulting in additional effects. Computational simulation of such flows, therefore, need to account for a range of physical phenomena. Further, the numerical challenges involved in resolving strong gradients and discontinuities add to the complexity of computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulation. In this article, physical modelling and numerical methodology-related issues involved in hypersonic flow simulation are highlighted. State-of-the-art CFD challenges are discussed in the context of two prominent applications-the flow in a scramjet inlet and the flow field around a re-entry capsule.Defence Science Journal, 2010, 60(6, pp.663-671, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.60.604

  4. A Textbook for a First Course in Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, D. W.; Pulliam, T. H.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the textbook, Fundamentals of Computational Fluid Dynamics by Lomax, Pulliam, and Zingg, which is intended for a graduate level first course in computational fluid dynamics. This textbook emphasizes fundamental concepts in developing, analyzing, and understanding numerical methods for the partial differential equations governing the physics of fluid flow. Its underlying philosophy is that the theory of linear algebra and the attendant eigenanalysis of linear systems provides a mathematical framework to describe and unify most numerical methods in common use in the field of fluid dynamics. Two linear model equations, the linear convection and diffusion equations, are used to illustrate concepts throughout. Emphasis is on the semi-discrete approach, in which the governing partial differential equations (PDE's) are reduced to systems of ordinary differential equations (ODE's) through a discretization of the spatial derivatives. The ordinary differential equations are then reduced to ordinary difference equations (O(Delta)E's) using a time-marching method. This methodology, using the progression from PDE through ODE's to O(Delta)E's, together with the use of the eigensystems of tridiagonal matrices and the theory of O(Delta)E's, gives the book its distinctiveness and provides a sound basis for a deep understanding of fundamental concepts in computational fluid dynamics.

  5. Meshfree methods for computational fluid dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Jícha M.; Čermák L.; Niedoba P.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the convergence problem of the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics) meshfree method for the solution of fluid dynamics tasks. In the introductory part, fundamental aspects of mesh- free methods, their definition, computational approaches and classification are discussed. In the following part, the methods of local integral representation, where SPH belongs are analyzed and specifically the method RKPM (Reproducing Kernel Particle Method) is described. In the contribution...

  6. Delaunay triangulation and computational fluid dynamics meshes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posenau, Mary-Anne K.; Mount, David M.

    1992-01-01

    In aerospace computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations, the Delaunay triangulation of suitable quadrilateral meshes can lead to unsuitable triangulated meshes. Here, we present case studies which illustrate the limitations of using structured grid generation methods which produce points in a curvilinear coordinate system for subsequent triangulations for CFD applications. We discuss conditions under which meshes of quadrilateral elements may not produce a Delaunay triangulation suitable for CFD calculations, particularly with regard to high aspect ratio, skewed quadrilateral elements.

  7. Statics and dynamics of fluids in nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Gouin, Henri

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study the statics and dynamics of nanotubes by using the methods of continuum mechanics. The nanotube can be filled with only a liquid or a vapour phase according to the physicochemical characteristics of the wall and to the disjoining pressure associated with the liquid and vapour mother bulks of the fluid, regardless of the nature of the external mother bulk. In dynamics, flows through nanotubes can be much more important than classical Poiseuille flows. When the external mother bulk is of vapour, the flow can be a million times larger than the classical flows when slippage on wall does not exist.

  8. Shearfree Spherically Symmetric Fluid Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2013-01-01

    We try to find some exact analytical models of spherically symmetric spacetime of collapsing fluid under shearfree condition. We consider two types of solutions: one is to impose a condition on the mass function while the other is to restrict the pressure. We obtain totally of five exact models, and some of them satisfy the Darmois conditions.

  9. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  10. Evaluation of reptation-based modeling of entangled polymeric fluids including chain rotation via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafar Sefiddashti, Mohammad Hadi; Edwards, Brian J.; Khomami, Bamin

    2017-08-01

    Recent simulation results of a moderately entangled linear polyethylene C700H1402 liquid have confirmed prior simulation and experimental evidence that individual polymer molecules experience periodic rotation and retraction cycles under steady shear flow at high Weissenberg number. With this insight, theoreticians have begun to grapple with this additional complicating physical phenomenon that needs to be incorporated into rheological models to help explain the data under conditions of high shear. In this paper we examine these recent efforts by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations to provide insight into the requisite theoretical variables and their assigned evolution equations to evaluate the capability of these tube-based models to predict accurately the simulated data sets. This analysis reveals that the primary variables used in tube models to impart a conceptual basis to the theory, namely, the tube orientation tensor and the tube stretch, remain fundamental system properties even far away from equilibrium; however, the theory describing their evolution under flow is not well suited to quantitative prediction. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that key system properties, such as the entanglement number and disengagement time, should play a more significant role in model development since these quantities can change dramatically under flow, particularly at high Weissenberg number where the chain rotation and retraction cycles dominate the system physics.

  11. Rheology and density of glucose syrup and honey: Determining their suitability for usage in analogue and fluid dynamic models of geological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellart, W. P.

    2011-06-01

    Analogue models of lithospheric deformation and fluid dynamic models of mantle flow mostly use some kind of syrup such as honey or glucose syrup to simulate the low-viscosity sub-lithospheric mantle. This paper describes detailed rheological tests and density measurements of three brands of glucose syrup and three brands of honey. Additional tests have been done for one brand of glucose syrup that was diluted with water to various degrees (2%, 5% and 10% by weight). The rheological tests have been done to test the effect of shear strain, shear rate and temperature on the dynamic viscosity of the syrup. The results show that the viscosity of all glucose syrups and honeys is independent of shear strain (i.e. no strain hardening or softening). The viscosity of the glucose syrups is independent of shear rate (γ˙), i.e. linear-viscous or Newtonian, in the range γ˙=10-4-10 s with stress exponents that are almost identical to one ( n = 0.995-1.004). All the honeys show a very weak, but consistent, decrease in viscosity with increasing shear rate of 7-14% from 10 -3 to 10 0 s -1 and have stress exponents more distinct from one ( n = 1.007-1.026). All syrups have a viscosity that is strongly dependent on temperature in the range 0-50 °C, where viscosity decreases with increasing temperature. Such decrease can be fitted with exponential and Arrhenius functions, with the latter giving the best results. Furthermore, the viscosity of glucose syrup decreases approximately exponentially with increasing water content. Oscillation tests indicate that the rheology of all the syrups is entirely dominated by viscous behaviour and not by elastic behaviour at frequencies of 10 -3-10 2 Hz. Finally, the density investigations show that the density of glucose syrup and honey decreases approximately linearly with increasing temperature in the range 10-70 °C, with coefficients of thermal volumetric expansion at 20 °C of 3.89-3.95 × 10 -4 °C -1 and 4.57-4.81 × 10 -4 °C -1 for

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Mechanics and Its Coupling to Cerebrovascular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linninger, Andreas A.; Tangen, Kevin; Hsu, Chih-Yang; Frim, David

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is not stagnant but displays fascinating oscillatory flow patterns inside the ventricular system and reversing fluid exchange between the cranial vault and spinal compartment. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of pulsatile CSF motion. Observations contradicting classical views about its bulk production and clearance are highlighted. A clinical account of diseases of abnormal CSF flow dynamics, including hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, Chiari malformation type 1, and pseudotumor cerebri, is also given. We survey medical imaging modalities used to observe intracranial dynamics in vivo. Additionally, we assess the state of the art in predictive models of CSF dynamics. The discussion addresses open questions regarding CSF dynamics as they relate to the understanding and management of diseases.

  13. Location identification for indoor instantaneous point contaminant source by probability-based inverse Computational Fluid Dynamics modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Zhai, Z

    2008-02-01

    Indoor pollutions jeopardize human health and welfare and may even cause serious morbidity and mortality under extreme conditions. To effectively control and improve indoor environment quality requires immediate interpretation of pollutant sensor readings and accurate identification of indoor pollution history and source characteristics (e.g. source location and release time). This procedure is complicated by non-uniform and dynamic contaminant indoor dispersion behaviors as well as diverse sensor network distributions. This paper introduces a probability concept based inverse modeling method that is able to identify the source location for an instantaneous point source placed in an enclosed environment with known source release time. The study presents the mathematical models that address three different sensing scenarios: sensors without concentration readings, sensors with spatial concentration readings, and sensors with temporal concentration readings. The paper demonstrates the inverse modeling method and algorithm with two case studies: air pollution in an office space and in an aircraft cabin. The predictions were successfully verified against the forward simulation settings, indicating good capability of the method in finding indoor pollutant sources. The research lays a solid ground for further study of the method for more complicated indoor contamination problems. The method developed can help track indoor contaminant source location with limited sensor outputs. This will ensure an effective and prompt execution of building control strategies and thus achieve a healthy and safe indoor environment. The method can also assist the design of optimal sensor networks.

  14. A new scenario of the universe dynamics with interacting fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    In this study, I discuss universe dynamics by considering mutual and self-interactions between fluid components such as dark energy, dark, matter etc, in the the spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker space-time. I show that dynamics of the interacting two-fluid with linear EoS can be given by Lotka-Volterra equations. On the other hand, I show that interacting two-fluid model with quadratic EoS can be transformed to the self-interacting Lotka-Volterra equations. Finally I show that these equations can be generalized to $N$ interacting Lotka-Volterra equations for more interacting fluids. Also I find fixed points of these equations and discuss the dynamics of universe. Even though present model needs to be confirmed experimentally, obtained results clearly show that dynamics of universe at large scale and within the time may have stable, unstable or chaotic behaviour in the presence of the interaction and self-interaction in between dark energy, dark matter, matter and others components of the universe unl...

  15. Fluid and hybrid models for streamers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Zdeněk

    2016-09-01

    Streamers are contracted ionizing waves with self-generated field enhancement that propagate into a low-ionized medium exposed to high electric field leaving filamentary trails of plasma behind. The widely used model to study streamer dynamics is based on drift-diffusion equations for electrons and ions, assuming local field approximation, coupled with Poisson's equation. For problems where presence of energetic electrons become important a fluid approach needs to be extended by a particle model, accompanied also with Monte Carlo Collision technique, that takes care of motion of these electrons. A combined fluid-particle approach is used to study an influence of surface emission processes on a fast-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. It is found that fluid-only model predicts substantially faster reignition dynamics compared to coupled fluid-particle model. Furthermore, a hybrid model can be created in which the population of electrons is divided in the energy space into two distinct groups: (1) low energy `bulk' electrons that are treated with fluid model, and (2) high energy `beam' electrons, followed as particles. The hybrid model is then capable not only to deal with streamer discharges in laboratory conditions, but also allows us to study electron acceleration in streamer zone of lighting leaders. There, the production of fast electrons from streamers is investigated, since these (runaway) electrons act as seeds for the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) mechanism, important for high-energy atmospheric physics phenomena. Results suggest that high energy electrons effect the streamer propagation, namely the velocity, the peak electric field, and thus also the production rate of runaway electrons. This work has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation research project 15-04023S.

  16. A phase-field approach to no-slip boundary conditions in dissipative particle dynamics and other particle models for fluid flow in geometrically complex confined systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhijie; Meakin, Paul

    2009-06-21

    Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) is an effective mesoscopic particle model with a lower computational cost than molecular dynamics because of the soft potentials that it employs. However, the soft potential is not strong enough to prevent the DPD particles that are used to represent the fluid from penetrating solid boundaries represented by stationary DPD particles. A phase-field variable, phi(x,t), is used to indicate the phase at point x and time t, with a smooth transition from -1 (phase 1) to +1 (phase 2) across the interface. We describe an efficient implementation of no-slip boundary conditions in DPD models that combines solid-liquid particle-particle interactions with reflection at a sharp boundary located with subgrid scale accuracy using the phase field. This approach can be used for arbitrarily complex flow geometries and other similar particle models (such as smoothed particle hydrodynamics), and the validity of the model is demonstrated by DPD simulations of flow in confined systems with various geometries.

  17. Flow modification in canine intracranial aneurysm model by an asymmetric stent: studies using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Yiemeng; Ionita, Ciprian N.; Tranquebar, Rekha V.; Hoffmann, Kenneth R.; Woodward, Scott H.; Taulbee, Dale B.; Meng, Hui; Rudin, Stephen

    2006-03-01

    An asymmetric stent with low porosity patch across the intracranial aneurysm neck and high porosity elsewhere is designed to modify the flow to result in thrombogenesis and occlusion of the aneurysm and yet to reduce the possibility of also occluding adjacent perforator vessels. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the flow field induced by an asymmetric stent using both numerical and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) methods and to quantify the flow dynamics of an asymmetric stent in an in vivo aneurysm model. We created a vein-pouch aneurysm model on the canine carotid artery. An asymmetric stent was implanted at the aneurysm, with 25% porosity across the aneurysm neck and 80% porosity elsewhere. The aneurysm geometry, before and after stent implantation, was acquired using cone beam CT and reconstructed for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Both steady-state and pulsatile flow conditions using the measured waveforms from the aneurysm model were studied. To reduce computational costs, we modeled the asymmetric stent effect by specifying a pressure drop over the layer across the aneurysm orifice where the low porosity patch was located. From the CFD results, we found the asymmetric stent reduced the inflow into the aneurysm by 51%, and appeared to create a stasis-like environment which favors thrombus formation. The DSA sequences also showed substantial flow reduction into the aneurysm. Asymmetric stents may be a viable image guided intervention for treating intracranial aneurysms with desired flow modification features.

  18. Comparison of the fluid dynamic models of solids density profile in a FCC cold riser with aid of gamma-ray transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Valdemir A. dos, E-mail: valdemir.alexandre@pq.cnpq.b [Universidade Catolica de Pernambuco, Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Ciencia e Tecnologia; Dantas, Carlos C., E-mail: ccd@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Luna-Finkler, Christine L., E-mail: chrislluna@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Vitoria de Santo Antao, PE (Brazil). Centro Academico de Vitoria; Silva, Jose M.F., E-mail: jmfs5@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    To measure the axial concentration of the solid component with aid of gamma radiation to compare two fluid dynamic models was the goal of this work. An {sup 241}Am radioactive source of a 9 7.4 centre dot10{sup 9} Bq intensity and the detector were collimated. A support of the arrangement allows dislocating source and detector in order to scan along of riser axial length. The gamma measurements are taken with a 0.05 m x 0.05 m NaI(Tl) detector associated to a mono and to a multichannel analyser which is provided by a Genie 2000, Canberra software for spectrum evaluation. By integrating the 0.060 MeV photopeak of the {sup 241}Am gamma spectrum all the attenuation measurements are taken. The catalyst mass absorption coefficient, mu =331 m{sup 2}/kg, was determined in a previous experiment. For the solid volumetric fraction about 0.02, in the solid entrance in riser, the fluid dynamic model performances were compared by four different search numeric methods (Quasi-Newton, Hook-Jeeves Pattern Mooves, Rosenbrock Pattern Search and Simplex Procedure) from user-specified regression (Custom loss function) from nonlinear estimation of SIMULINK/Matlab{sup R} and Statistica software. In this standard multiple regression type it estimates the regression coefficients by 'finding' those coefficients that minimize the residual variance (sum of squared residuals) around the regression line. Any deviation of an observed score from a predicted score signifies some loss in the accuracy of prediction. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data showed that the Santana's model was more indicated to simulate the solid axial density profile in a cold flow riser of a FCC pilot unit. (author)

  19. Quality control of computational fluid dynamics in indoor environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Nielsen, P. V.

    2003-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used routinely to predict air movement and distributions of temperature and concentrations in indoor environments. Modelling and numerical errors are inherent in such studies and must be considered when the results are presented. Here, we discuss modelling as...... the quality of CFD calculations, as well as guidelines for the minimum information that should accompany all CFD-related publications to enable a scientific judgment of the quality of the study....

  20. Wetting dynamics of a collapsing fluid hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, J. B.; Dijksman, J. A.; Shearer, M.

    2017-01-01

    The collapse dynamics of an axisymmetric fluid cavity that wets the bottom of a rotating bucket bound by vertical sidewalls are studied. Lubrication theory is applied to the governing field equations for the thin film to yield an evolution equation that captures the effect of capillary, gravitational, and centrifugal forces on this converging flow. The focus is on the quasistatic spreading regime, whereby contact-line motion is governed by a constitutive law relating the contact-angle to the contact-line speed. Surface tension forces dominate the collapse dynamics for small holes with the collapse time appearing as a power law whose exponent compares favorably to experiments in the literature. Gravity accelerates the collapse process. Volume dependence is predicted and compared with experiment. Centrifugal forces slow the collapse process and lead to complex dynamics characterized by stalled spreading behavior that separates the large and small hole asymptotic regimes.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics - Applications in Manufacturing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beninati, Maria Laura; Kathol, Austin; Ziemian, Constance

    2012-11-01

    A new Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) exercise has been developed for the undergraduate introductory fluid mechanics course at Bucknell University. The goal is to develop a computational exercise that students complete which links the manufacturing processes course and the concurrent fluid mechanics course in a way that reinforces the concepts in both. In general, CFD is used as a tool to increase student understanding of the fundamentals in a virtual world. A ``learning factory,'' which is currently in development at Bucknell seeks to use the laboratory as a means to link courses that previously seemed to have little correlation at first glance. A large part of the manufacturing processes course is a project using an injection molding machine. The flow of pressurized molten polyurethane into the mold cavity can also be an example of fluid motion (a jet of liquid hitting a plate) that is applied in manufacturing. The students will run a CFD process that captures this flow using their virtual mold created with a graphics package, such as SolidWorks. The laboratory structure is currently being implemented and analyzed as a part of the ``learning factory''. Lastly, a survey taken before and after the CFD exercise demonstrate a better understanding of both the CFD and manufacturing process.

  2. Dynamic model of intrusion of magma and/or magmatic fluids in the large-scale deformation source of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescentini, Luca; Amoruso, Antonella; Luongo, Annamaria

    2015-04-01

    The Campi Flegrei (CF) caldera is located in a densely populated area close to Naples (Southern Italy). It is renowned as a site of continual slow vertical movements. After the last eruption in 1538, the caldera generally subsided until 1969 when minor uplift occurred. In the early 1970s this uplift became significant (~1.5 m max). A further large uplift episode occurred from 1982 to 1984 (~1.8 m max), and subsequently smaller uplift episodes have occurred since then. Amoruso et al. (2014a,b) have recently shown that the CF surface deformation field from 1980 to 2013 can be decomposed into two stationary parts. Large-scale deformation can be explained by a quasi-horizontal source, oriented NW to SE and mathematically represented by a pressurized finite triaxial ellipsoid (PTE) ~4 km deep, possibly related to the injection of magma and/or magmatic fluids from a deeper magma chamber into a sill, or pressurization of interconnected (micro)cavities. Residual deformation not accounted for by PTE is confined to the Solfatara fumarolic area and can be mathematically explained by a small (point) pressurized oblate spheroid (PS) ~2 km below the Solfatara fumarolic field, that has been equated with a poroelastic response of the substratum to pore pressure increases near the injection point of hot magmatic fluids into the hydrothermal system. A satisfying feature of this double source model is that the geometric source parameters of each are constant over the period 1980-2013 with the exception of volume changes (potencies). Several papers have ascribed CF deformation to the injection of magmatic fluids at the base of the hydrothermal system. All models predict complex spatial and temporal evolution of the deformation pattern and consequently contrast with the observed deformation pattern stationarity. Also recently proposed dynamic models of sill intrusion in a shallow volcanic environment do not satisfy the observed CF deformation pattern stationarity. We have developed an

  3. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  4. Topological fluid dynamics of interfacial flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    1994-01-01

    The topological description of flows in the vicinity of a solid boundary, that is familiar from the aerodynamics literature, has recently been extended to the case of flow at a liquid–gas interface or a free surface by Lugt [Phys. Fluids 30, 3647 (1987)]. Lugt's work is revisited in a more general...... setting, including nonconstant curvature of the interface and gradients of surface tension, using tools of modern nonlinear dynamics. Bifurcations of the flow pattern occur at degenerate configurations. Using the theory of unfolding, this paper gives a complete description of the bifurcations that depend...... on terms up to the second order. The general theory of this paper is applied to the topology of streamlines during the breaking of a wave and to the flow below a stagnant surface film. Physics of Fluids is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  5. Computational Fluid and Particle Dynamics in the Human Respiratory System

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Jiyuan; Ahmadi, Goodarz

    2013-01-01

    Traditional research methodologies in the human respiratory system have always been challenging due to their invasive nature. Recent advances in medical imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have accelerated this research. This book compiles and details recent advances in the modelling of the respiratory system for researchers, engineers, scientists, and health practitioners. It breaks down the complexities of this field and provides both students and scientists with an introduction and starting point to the physiology of the respiratory system, fluid dynamics and advanced CFD modeling tools. In addition to a brief introduction to the physics of the respiratory system and an overview of computational methods, the book contains best-practice guidelines for establishing high-quality computational models and simulations. Inspiration for new simulations can be gained through innovative case studies as well as hands-on practice using pre-made computational code. Last but not least, students and researcher...

  6. A model of scientific attitudes assessment by observation in physics learning based scientific approach: case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusliana Ekawati, Elvin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to produce a model of scientific attitude assessment in terms of the observations for physics learning based scientific approach (case study of dynamic fluid topic in high school). Development of instruments in this study adaptation of the Plomp model, the procedure includes the initial investigation, design, construction, testing, evaluation and revision. The test is done in Surakarta, so that the data obtained are analyzed using Aiken formula to determine the validity of the content of the instrument, Cronbach’s alpha to determine the reliability of the instrument, and construct validity using confirmatory factor analysis with LISREL 8.50 program. The results of this research were conceptual models, instruments and guidelines on scientific attitudes assessment by observation. The construct assessment instruments include components of curiosity, objectivity, suspended judgment, open-mindedness, honesty and perseverance. The construct validity of instruments has been qualified (rated load factor > 0.3). The reliability of the model is quite good with the Alpha value 0.899 (> 0.7). The test showed that the model fits the theoretical models are supported by empirical data, namely p-value 0.315 (≥ 0.05), RMSEA 0.027 (≤ 0.08)

  7. Simplified 3D model of a PWR reactor vessel using fluid dynamics code ANSYS CFX computational; Modelo simplificado 3D de la vasija de un reactor PWR mediante el codigo de dinamica de fluidos computacional ANSYS CFX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, M.; Miro, R.; Barrachina, T.; Verdu, G.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the results from the calculation of the steady state simulation with model of CFD (computational fluid dynamic) operating under conditions of operation at full power (Hot Full Power). Development and the CFD model results show the usefulness of these codes for calculating 3D of the variable thermohydraulics of these reactors.

  8. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  9. Computational fluid dynamics using CATIA created geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gengler, Jeanne E.

    1989-07-01

    A method has been developed to link the geometry definition residing on a CAD/CAM system with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tool needed to evaluate aerodynamic designs and requiring the memory capacity of a supercomputer. Requirements for surfaces suitable for CFD analysis are discussed. Techniques for developing surfaces and verifying their smoothness are compared, showing the capability of the CAD/CAM system. The utilization of a CAD/CAM system to create a computational mesh is explained, and the mesh interaction with the geometry and input file preparation for the CFD analysis is discussed.

  10. Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics of Jellyfish Maneuvering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura; Hoover, Alex

    2014-11-01

    Jellyfish propel themselves through the water through periodic contractions of their elastic bells. Some jellyfish, such as the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita and the upside down jellyfish Cassiopea xamachana, can perform turns via asymmetric contractions of the bell. The fluid dynamics of jellyfish forward propulsion and turning is explored here by analyzing the contraction kinematics of several species and using flow visualization to quantify the resulting flow fields. The asymmetric contraction and structure of the jellyfish generates asymmetries in the starting and stopping vortices. This creates a diagonal jet and a net torque acting on the jellyfish. Results are compared to immersed boundary simulations

  11. DYNAMICS OF RELATIVISTIC FLUID FOR COMPRESSIBLE GAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the relativistic fluid dynamics for compressible gas is studied.We show that the strict convexity of the negative thermodynamical entropy preserves invariant under the Lorentz transformation if and only if the local speed of sound in this gas is strictly less than that of light in the vacuum.A symmetric form for the equations of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented,and thus the local classical solutions to these equations can be deduced.At last,the non-relativistic limits of these local cla...

  12. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics modeling of particle uptake by an occupational air sampler using manually-scaled and adaptive grids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landázuri, Andrea C; Sáez, A Eduardo; Anthony, T Renée

    2016-05-01

    This work presents fluid flow and particle trajectory simulation studies to determine the aspiration efficiency of a horizontally oriented occupational air sampler using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Grid adaption and manual scaling of the grids were applied to two sampler prototypes based on a 37-mm cassette. The standard k-ε model was used to simulate the turbulent air flow and a second order streamline-upwind discretization scheme was used to stabilize convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations. Successively scaled grids for each configuration were created manually and by means of grid adaption using the velocity gradient in the main flow direction. Solutions were verified to assess iterative convergence, grid independence and monotonic convergence. Particle aspiration efficiencies determined for both prototype samplers were undistinguishable, indicating that the porous filter does not play a noticeable role in particle aspiration. Results conclude that grid adaption is a powerful tool that allows to refine specific regions that require lots of detail and therefore better resolve flow detail. It was verified that adaptive grids provided a higher number of locations with monotonic convergence than the manual grids and required the least computational effort.

  13. Finite-size effects in molecular dynamics simulations: Intermediate scattering function and velocity of sound. III. Theory and application to a model krypton fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salacuse, J. J.; Egelstaff, P. A.

    2001-11-01

    We describe a method for obtaining the intermediate scattering function I(Q,t) from a computer simulation: it is an extension of our earlier calculation [Salacuse, Denton, and Egelstaff, Phys. Rev. E 53, 2382 (1996)] for the t-->0 limit. We use this approach to obtain I(Q,t) for low Q and t from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of a model krypton fluid whose atoms interact via a truncated Aziz pair potential, and the results are compared over their range of validity to I(Q,t) determined by the standard MD method and also by a time expansion approach. In its range of validity our approach is much more efficient than the standard MD method; however, it covers a restricted range of t due to the movement of density fluctuations (sound waves) through the simulated fluid which produces an anomaly in the time behavior of I(Q,t). By analyzing I(Q=0,t) the velocity of sound in the simulation is determined, and the results compare favorably with published experimental results for the sound velocity of liquid krypton.

  14. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B. [eds.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following two programme areas: (1) optical diagnostics and information processing and (2) plasma and fluid dynamics. The optical activities are concentrated on optical materials, diagnostics and sensors. The plasma and fluid dynamics activities are concentrated on nonlinear dynamics in fluids, plasmas and optics as well as on plasma and fluid diagnostics. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1995 is presented. (au) 36 ills., 166 refs.

  15. Computational fluid dynamics: Transition to design applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, R. G.; Bhateley, I. C.; Howell, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    The development of aerospace vehicles, over the years, was an evolutionary process in which engineering progress in the aerospace community was based, generally, on prior experience and data bases obtained through wind tunnel and flight testing. Advances in the fundamental understanding of flow physics, wind tunnel and flight test capability, and mathematical insights into the governing flow equations were translated into improved air vehicle design. The modern day field of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a continuation of the growth in analytical capability and the digital mathematics needed to solve the more rigorous form of the flow equations. Some of the technical and managerial challenges that result from rapidly developing CFD capabilites, some of the steps being taken by the Fort Worth Division of General Dynamics to meet these challenges, and some of the specific areas of application for high performance air vehicles are presented.

  16. Bioreactor Studies and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H.; Hutmacher, D. W.

    The hydrodynamic environment “created” by bioreactors for the culture of a tissue engineered construct (TEC) is known to influence cell migration, proliferation and extra cellular matrix production. However, tissue engineers have looked at bioreactors as black boxes within which TECs are cultured mainly by trial and error, as the complex relationship between the hydrodynamic environment and tissue properties remains elusive, yet is critical to the production of clinically useful tissues. It is well known in the chemical and biotechnology field that a more detailed description of fluid mechanics and nutrient transport within process equipment can be achieved via the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology. Hence, the coupling of experimental methods and computational simulations forms a synergistic relationship that can potentially yield greater and yet, more cohesive data sets for bioreactor studies. This review aims at discussing the rationale of using CFD in bioreactor studies related to tissue engineering, as fluid flow processes and phenomena have direct implications on cellular response such as migration and/or proliferation. We conclude that CFD should be seen by tissue engineers as an invaluable tool allowing us to analyze and visualize the impact of fluidic forces and stresses on cells and TECs.

  17. BÄCKLUND Transformation and Analytic Solutions for a Generalized Variable-Coefficient Modified Korteweg-De Vries Model from Fluid Dynamics and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fu-Wei; Gao, Yi-Tian; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Xu, Xiao-Ge

    We investigate a generalized variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries model with perturbed factor and external force (vc-GmKdV) describing fluid dynamics and space plasmas. In this paper, we propose an extended variable-coefficient balancing-act method (Evc-BAM), which is concise and straightforward, to obtain the generalized analytic solutions including solitary wave solution of the vc-GmKdV model with symbolic computation. Meanwhile, using the Evc-BAM, we obtain an auto-Bäcklund transformation for the vc-GmKdV model on the relevant constraint conditions of the coefficient functions. Using the given auto-Bäcklund transformation, the solutions of special equations for the vc-GmKdV model are also obtained as the variable-coefficient Korteweg-de Vries (vc-KdV) equation, the generalized KdV equation with perturbed factor and external force (GKdV), the variable-coefficient modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-mKdV) equation, and the variable-coefficient cylindrical modified Korteweg-de Vries (vc-cmKdV) equation, respectively.

  18. Conservation Form of Helbing' s Fluid Dynamic Traffic Flow Model%Helbing流体力学交通流模型的守恒形式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李书峰; 张鹏; 黄仕进

    2011-01-01

    A standard conservation form was derived, the hyperbolicity of Helbing' s fluid dynamic traffic flow model was proved, which was essential for general analytical and numerical study of this model. On the basis of this conservation form, a local discontinuous Galerkin scheme is designed to solve the resulting model efficiently. The evolution of an unstable equilibrium traffic state leading to a stable stop-and-go traveling wave was simulated. This simulation also verifies that the model has been truly improved through the introduction of modified diffusion coefficients, thereby helping to protect vehicles from collisions and avoiding the appearance of extremely large density.%得到了Helbing交通流流体力学模型的标准守恒形式,并证明了模型的双曲性,这对研究模型的解析性质和数值格式至关重要.基于给出的守恒形式,设计了高效求解模型方程的LDG(local discontinuous Galerkin)格式,并模拟了由不稳定平衡态到稳定的时停时走波的演化.数值模拟也表明,通过扩散系数校正确实使模型得到改进,避免了车辆碰撞和出现极端高密度.

  19. Spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X D; Lee, D J; Peng, X F; Lai, J Y

    2007-07-17

    The spreading dynamics of power-law fluids, both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids, that completely or partially wet solid substrate was investigated theoretically and experimentally. An evolution equation for liquid-film thickness was derived using a lubrication approximation, from which the dynamic contact angle versus the contact line moving velocity relationship was evaluated. In the capillary spreading regime, film thickness h is proportional to xi3/(n+2) (xi is the distance from the contact line), whereas in the gravitational regime, h is proportional to xi1/(n+2), relating to the rheological power exponent n. The derived model fit the experimental data well for a shear-thinning fluid (0.2% w/w xanthan solution) or a shear-thickening fluid (7.5% w/w 10 nm silica in polypropylene glycol) on a completely wetted substrate. The derived model was extended using Hoffmann's proposal for partially wetting fluids. Good agreement was also attained between model predictions and the shear-thinning fluid (1% w/w cmc solution) and shear-thickening fluid (10% w/w 15 nm silica) on partially wetted surfaces.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics. [numerical methods and algorithm development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    This collection of papers was presented at the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Conference held at Ames Research Center in California on March 12 through 14, 1991. It is an overview of CFD activities at NASA Lewis Research Center. The main thrust of computational work at Lewis is aimed at propulsion systems. Specific issues related to propulsion CFD and associated modeling will also be presented. Examples of results obtained with the most recent algorithm development will also be presented.

  1. Unsteady bio-fluid dynamics in flying and swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hao; Kolomenskiy, Dmitry; Nakata, Toshiyuki; Li, Gen

    2017-08-01

    Flying and swimming in nature present sophisticated and exciting ventures in biomimetics, which seeks sustainable solutions and solves practical problems by emulating nature's time-tested patterns, functions, and strategies. Bio-fluids in insect and bird flight, as well as in fish swimming are highly dynamic and unsteady; however, they have been studied mostly with a focus on the phenomena associated with a body or wings moving in a steady flow. Characterized by unsteady wing flapping and body undulation, fluid-structure interactions, flexible wings and bodies, turbulent environments, and complex maneuver, bio-fluid dynamics normally have challenges associated with low Reynolds number regime and high unsteadiness in modeling and analysis of flow physics. In this article, we review and highlight recent advances in unsteady bio-fluid dynamics in terms of leading-edge vortices, passive mechanisms in flexible wings and hinges, flapping flight in unsteady environments, and micro-structured aerodynamics in flapping flight, as well as undulatory swimming, flapping-fin hydrodynamics, body-fin interaction, C-start and maneuvering, swimming in turbulence, collective swimming, and micro-structured hydrodynamics in swimming. We further give a perspective outlook on future challenges and tasks of several key issues of the field.

  2. Automated Computational Fluid Dynamics Design With Shape Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used as an analysis tool to help the designer gain greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the...

  3. Automated Computational Fluid Dynamics Design With Shape Optimization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is used as an analysis tool to help the designer gain greater understanding of the fluid flow phenomena involved in the components...

  4. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  5. Dynamic scaling of unsteady shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluid flows in a large-scale model of a distal anastomosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, J. D.; Owen, I.; Escudier, M. P.

    2007-10-01

    Dimensional analysis has been applied to an unsteady pulsatile flow of a shear-thinning power-law non-Newtonian liquid. An experiment was then designed in which both Newtonian and non-Newtonian liquids were used to model blood flow through a large-scale (38.5 mm dia.), simplified, rigid arterial junction (a distal anastomosis of a femorodistal bypass). The flow field within the junction was obtained by Particle Imaging Velocimetry and near-wall velocities were used to calculate the wall shear stresses. Dimensionless wall shear stresses were obtained at different points in the cardiac cycle for two different but dynamically similar non-Newtonian fluids; the good agreement between the measured dimensionless wall shear stresses confirm the validity of the dimensional analysis. However, blood exhibits a constant viscosity at high-shear rates and to obtain complete dynamic similarity between large-scale experiments and life-scale flows, the high-shear viscosity also needs to be included in the analysis. How this might be done is discussed in the paper.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of The Dalles Project: Effects of Spill Flow Distribution Between the Washington Shore and the Tailrace Spillwall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Portland District (CENWP) has ongoing work to improve the survival of juvenile salmonids (smolt) migrating past The Dalles Dam. As part of that effort, a spillwall was constructed to improve juvenile egress through the tailrace downstream of the stilling basin. The spillwall was designed to improve smolt survival by decreasing smolt retention time in the spillway tailrace and the exposure to predators on the spillway shelf. The spillwall guides spillway flows, and hence smolt, more quickly into the thalweg. In this study, an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified and used to characterize tailrace hydraulics between the new spillwall and the Washington shore for six different total river flows. The effect of spillway flow distribution was simulated for three spill patterns at the lowest total river flow. The commercial CFD solver, STAR-CD version 4.1, was used to solve the unsteady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with the k-epsilon turbulence model. Free surface motion was simulated using the volume-of-fluid (VOF) technique. The model results were used in two ways. First, results graphics were provided to CENWP and regional fisheries agency representatives for use and comparison to the same flow conditions at a reduced-scale physical model. The CFD results were very similar in flow pattern to that produced by the reduced-scale physical model but these graphics provided a quantitative view of velocity distribution. During the physical model work, an additional spill pattern was tested. Subsequently, that spill pattern was also simulated in the numerical model. The CFD streamlines showed that the hydraulic conditions were likely to be beneficial to fish egress at the higher total river flows (120 kcfs and greater, uniform flow distribution). At the lowest flow case, 90 kcfs, it was necessary to use a non-uniform distribution. Of the three distributions tested, splitting the flow evenly between

  7. Dynamical fluid-type Universe scenario with dust and radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Mihu, Denisa-Andreea

    2016-01-01

    Within the context of a cosmic space whose energy source is modeled with a perfect fluid, a uniform model of Universe based on a standard FRW cosmology containing decoupled mixed matter sources namely stiff matter and cosmic dust together with a positive cosmological constant, has been studied. Within the scenario of a $k=0-$ spatially-flat geometry, we analysed the geometrodynamics of the theoretical cosmology. For the model with an added cosmological constant, the main scope was to point out the effects of it on the universe' dynamics. In this last case, the thermodynamics of the model was also considered together with the relation between the cosmological energy density and fluid pressure in terms of the inverse function of the equation of state.

  8. Use of computational fluid dynamics in respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Tena, Ana; Casan Clarà, Pere

    2015-06-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a computer-based tool for simulating fluid movement. The main advantages of CFD over other fluid mechanics studies include: substantial savings in time and cost, the analysis of systems or conditions that are very difficult to simulate experimentally (as is the case of the airways), and a practically unlimited level of detail. We used the Ansys-Fluent CFD program to develop a conducting airway model to simulate different inspiratory flow rates and the deposition of inhaled particles of varying diameters, obtaining results consistent with those reported in the literature using other procedures. We hope this approach will enable clinicians to further individualize the treatment of different respiratory diseases.

  9. iCFD: Interpreted Computational Fluid Dynamics - Degeneration of CFD to one-dimensional advection-dispersion models using statistical experimental design - The secondary clarifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyonvarch, Estelle; Ramin, Elham; Kulahci, Murat; Plósz, Benedek Gy

    2015-10-15

    The present study aims at using statistically designed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations as numerical experiments for the identification of one-dimensional (1-D) advection-dispersion models - computationally light tools, used e.g., as sub-models in systems analysis. The objective is to develop a new 1-D framework, referred to as interpreted CFD (iCFD) models, in which statistical meta-models are used to calculate the pseudo-dispersion coefficient (D) as a function of design and flow boundary conditions. The method - presented in a straightforward and transparent way - is illustrated using the example of a circular secondary settling tank (SST). First, the significant design and flow factors are screened out by applying the statistical method of two-level fractional factorial design of experiments. Second, based on the number of significant factors identified through the factor screening study and system understanding, 50 different sets of design and flow conditions are selected using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS). The boundary condition sets are imposed on a 2-D axi-symmetrical CFD simulation model of the SST. In the framework, to degenerate the 2-D model structure, CFD model outputs are approximated by the 1-D model through the calibration of three different model structures for D. Correlation equations for the D parameter then are identified as a function of the selected design and flow boundary conditions (meta-models), and their accuracy is evaluated against D values estimated in each numerical experiment. The evaluation and validation of the iCFD model structure is carried out using scenario simulation results obtained with parameters sampled from the corners of the LHS experimental region. For the studied SST, additional iCFD model development was carried out in terms of (i) assessing different density current sub-models; (ii) implementation of a combined flocculation, hindered, transient and compression settling velocity function; and (iii

  10. Turbulence Model Evaluation Study for a Secondary Flow and a Flow Pulsation in the Sub-Channels of an 18-Finned Rod Bundle by Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Kim, Heon Il

    2008-09-15

    Since the heat flux of the rod type fuel used in the HANARO, a research reactor being operated in the KAERI, is substantially higher than the heat flux of power reactors, the HANARO fuel has 8 longitudinal fins for enhancing the heat release from the fuel rod surface. This unique shape of a nuclear fuel led us to study the flows and thermal hydraulic characteristics of it. Especially because the flows through the narrow channels built up by these finned rod fuels would be different from the flow characteristics in the coolant channels formed by bare rod fuels, some experimental studies to investigate the flow behaviors and structures in a finned rod bundle were done by other researchers. But because of the very complex geometries of the flow channels in the finned rod bundle only allowed us to obtain limited information about the flow characteristics, a numerical study by a computational fluid dynamics technique has been adopted to elucidate more about such a complicated flow in a finned rod bundle. In this study, for the development of an adequate computational model to simulate such a complex geometry, a mesh sensitivity study and the effects of various turbulence models were examined. The CFD analysis results were compared with the experimental results. Some of them have a good agreement with the experimental results. All linear eddy viscosity turbulence models could hardly predict the secondary flows near the fuel surfaces and in the sub-channel, but the RSM (Reynolds Stress Model) revealed very different results from the eddy viscosity turbulence models. In the transient analysis all turbulence model predicted flow pulsation at the center of a subchannel as well as at the gap between rods in spite of large P/D. The flow pulsation showed different results with turbulence models and the location in the sub-channels.

  11. Complex fluids modeling and algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Saramito, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive overview of the modeling of complex fluids, including many common substances, such as toothpaste, hair gel, mayonnaise, liquid foam, cement and blood, which cannot be described by Navier-Stokes equations. It also offers an up-to-date mathematical and numerical analysis of the corresponding equations, as well as several practical numerical algorithms and software solutions for the approximation of the solutions. It discusses industrial (molten plastics, forming process), geophysical (mud flows, volcanic lava, glaciers and snow avalanches), and biological (blood flows, tissues) modeling applications. This book is a valuable resource for undergraduate students and researchers in applied mathematics, mechanical engineering and physics.

  12. Quantifying Chiral Magnetic Effect from Anomalous-Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yin; Yin, Yi; Liao, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is the macroscopic manifestation of the fundamental chiral anomaly in a many-body system of chiral fermions, and emerges as anomalous transport current in the fluid dynamics framework. Experimental observation of CME is of great interest and has been reported in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. Significant efforts have also been made to search for CME in heavy ion collisions. Encouraging evidence of CME-induced charge separation in those collisions has been reported, albeit with ambiguity due to background contamination. Crucial for addressing such issue, is the need of quantitative predictions for CME signal with sophisticated modelings. In this paper we develop such a tool, the Anomalous Viscous Fluid Dynamics (AVFD) framework, which simulates the evolution of fermion currents in QGP on top of the data-validated VISHNU bulk hydrodynamic flow. With realistic initial conditions and magnetic field lifetime, the AVFD-predicted CME signal could be quantitatively consistent with measured ch...

  13. Dynamic instability analysis of single walled Carbone Nano Tubes conveying fluid under generalized boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azrar A.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic instabilities of Carbon NanoTubes (CNTs conveying fluid are modeled and numerically simulated based on the nonlocal elasticity theory. The small scale parameter and the fluid-tube interaction effects on the dynamic behaviors of the CNT-fluid system as well as the instabilities induced by the fluid-velocity are investigated. The critical fluid-velocity and frequency-amplitude relationships as well as the flutter and divergence instability types and the associated time responses can be obtained based on the presented methodological approach.

  14. The Fluid-Mosaic Model of Membrane Structure: still relevant to understanding the structure, function and dynamics of biological membranes after more than 40 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolson, Garth L

    2014-06-01

    In 1972 the Fluid-Mosaic Membrane Model of membrane structure was proposed based on thermodynamic principals of organization of membrane lipids and proteins and available evidence of asymmetry and lateral mobility within the membrane matrix [S. J. Singer and G. L. Nicolson, Science 175 (1972) 720-731]. After over 40years, this basic model of the cell membrane remains relevant for describing the basic nano-structures of a variety of intracellular and cellular membranes of plant and animal cells and lower forms of life. In the intervening years, however, new information has documented the importance and roles of specialized membrane domains, such as lipid rafts and protein/glycoprotein complexes, in describing the macrostructure, dynamics and functions of cellular membranes as well as the roles of membrane-associated cytoskeletal fences and extracellular matrix structures in limiting the lateral diffusion and range of motion of membrane components. These newer data build on the foundation of the original model and add new layers of complexity and hierarchy, but the concepts described in the original model are still applicable today. In updated versions of the model more emphasis has been placed on the mosaic nature of the macrostructure of cellular membranes where many protein and lipid components are limited in their rotational and lateral motilities in the membrane plane, especially in their natural states where lipid-lipid, protein-protein and lipid-protein interactions as well as cell-matrix, cell-cell and intracellular membrane-associated protein and cytoskeletal interactions are important in restraining the lateral motility and range of motion of particular membrane components. The formation of specialized membrane domains and the presence of tightly packed integral membrane protein complexes due to membrane-associated fences, fenceposts and other structures are considered very important in describing membrane dynamics and architecture. These structures along

  15. 交通流流体力学模型与非线性波%Fluid Dynamics Traffic Flow Models and Their Related Non-Linear Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 王卓; 黄仕进

    2013-01-01

    Fluid dynamics methods were used in modeling traffic flow problems, which demonstrated many interesting non-linear propagation phenomena. It was summarized that the propagation was related to traffic pressures and self-driven forces, which generated shock and rarefaction waves in the LWR model, stop-and-go waves in the higher-order model, overtaking waves (shock or rarefaction waves) in the multi-class LWR model, and a contact discontinuity in problems with discontinuous fluxes. The Riemann problem arising from extension of the LWR model to traffic networks was also introduced in detail. And a system based on the Navi-er-Stokes equations was proposed to model the 2-dimensional pedestrian flow problem with application of the Eikon equation for determination of a pedestrian' s desired motion direction.%介绍了交通流问题中的流体力学描述方法,分析了交通流在受压力和自驱动力等因素作用下所产生的非线性波动现象.这些描述包括LWR运动学模型,考虑动力学效应的高阶模型,考虑超车效应的多车种LWR(Lighthill-Whitham-Richards)模型,以及考虑流通量间断的模型方程.此外,还介绍了LWR网络推广模型在交叉口的Riemann问题求解;提出了描述二维行人流问题的Navier-Stokes-Eikon方程模型并描述了确定行人流运动期盼方向的基本思想.

  16. Issues in computational fluid dynamics code verification and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberkampf, W.L.; Blottner, F.G.

    1997-09-01

    A broad range of mathematical modeling errors of fluid flow physics and numerical approximation errors are addressed in computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It is strongly believed that if CFD is to have a major impact on the design of engineering hardware and flight systems, the level of confidence in complex simulations must substantially improve. To better understand the present limitations of CFD simulations, a wide variety of physical modeling, discretization, and solution errors are identified and discussed. Here, discretization and solution errors refer to all errors caused by conversion of the original partial differential, or integral, conservation equations representing the physical process, to algebraic equations and their solution on a computer. The impact of boundary conditions on the solution of the partial differential equations and their discrete representation will also be discussed. Throughout the article, clear distinctions are made between the analytical mathematical models of fluid dynamics and the numerical models. Lax`s Equivalence Theorem and its frailties in practical CFD solutions are pointed out. Distinctions are also made between the existence and uniqueness of solutions to the partial differential equations as opposed to the discrete equations. Two techniques are briefly discussed for the detection and quantification of certain types of discretization and grid resolution errors.

  17. Geochemical modeling of fluid-fluid and fluid-mineral interactions during geological CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C.; Ji, X.; Lu, P.

    2013-12-01

    The long time required for effective CO2 storage makes geochemical modeling an indispensable tool for CCUS. One area of geochemical modeling research that is in urgent need is impurities in CO2 streams. Permitting impurities, such as H2S, in CO2 streams can lead to potential capital and energy savings. However, predicting the consequences of co-injection of CO2 and impurities into geological formations requires the understanding of the phase equilibrium and fluid-fluid interactions. To meet this need, we developed a statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT)-based equation of state (EOS) for the H2S-CO2-H2O-NaCl system at 373.15 dew pressures decrease with increasing H2S content, while the mass density increases at low pressures and decreases at high pressures. Furthermore, the EoS can be incorporated into reservoir simulators so that the dynamic development of mixed fluid plumes in the reservoir can be simulated. Accurate modeling of fluid-mineral interactions must confront unresolved uncertainties of silicate dissolution - precipitation reaction kinetics. Most prominent among these uncertainties is the well-known lab-field apparent discrepancy in dissolution rates. Although reactive transport models that simulate the interactions between reservoir rocks and brine, and their attendant effects on porosity and permeability changes, have proliferated, whether these results have acceptable uncertainties are unknown. We have conducted a series of batch experiments at elevated temperatures and numerical simulations of coupled dissolution and precipitation reactions. The results show that taking into account of reaction coupling is able to reduce the gap between the field and lab rates by about two orders of magnitude at elevated temperatures of 200-300 oC. Currently, we are using Si isotopes as a new tool to unravel the coupled reactions in ambient temperature laboratory experiments. These new experimental data, together with coupled reactive mass transport modeling

  18. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  19. A modular system for computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. R.; Foutch, D. W.; Shurtleff, G. E.

    This paper describes the Modular System for Compuational Fluid Dynamics (MOSYS), a software facility for the construction and execution of arbitrary solution procedures on multizone, structured body-fitted grids. It focuses on the structure and capabilities of MOSYS and the philosophy underlying its design. The system offers different levels of capability depending on the objectives of the user. It enables the applications engineer to quickly apply a variety of methods to geometrically complex problems. The methods developer can implement new algorithms in a simple form, and immediately apply them to problems of both theoretical and practical interest. And for the code builder it consitutes a toolkit for fast construction of CFD codes tailored to various purposes. These capabilities are illustrated through applications to a particularly complex problem encountered in aircraft propulsion systems, namely, the analysis of a landing aircraft in reverse thrust.

  20. Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics via Direct Statistical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Tobias, S M; Marston, J B

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Direct Statistical Simulation (DSS) for astrophysical flows. This technique may be appropriate for problems in astrophysical fluids where the instantaneous dynamics of the flows are of secondary importance to their statistical properties. We give examples of such problems including mixing and transport in planets, stars and disks. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, before we consider the specific case of a spectral method optimised for problems on a spherical surface. The method is illustrated for the simplest non-trivial example of hydrodynamics and MHD on a rotating spherical surface. We then discuss possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical problems that are of interest.

  1. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics In GARUDA Grid Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Chandra Bhushan

    2011-01-01

    GARUDA Grid developed on NKN (National Knowledge Network) network by Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) hubs High Performance Computing (HPC) Clusters which are geographically separated all over India. C-DAC has been associated with development of HPC infrastructure since its establishment in year 1988. The Grid infrastructure provides a secure and efficient way of accessing heterogeneous resource . Enabling scientific applications on Grid has been researched for some time now. In this regard we have successfully enabled Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) application which can help CFD community as a whole in effective manner to carry out computational research which requires huge compuational resource beyond once in house capability. This work is part of current on-going project Grid GARUDA funded by Department of Information Technology.

  3. Artificial Intelligence In Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Alison Andrews

    1991-01-01

    Paper compares four first-generation artificial-intelligence (Al) software systems for computational fluid dynamics. Includes: Expert Cooling Fan Design System (EXFAN), PAN AIR Knowledge System (PAKS), grid-adaptation program MITOSIS, and Expert Zonal Grid Generation (EZGrid). Focuses on knowledge-based ("expert") software systems. Analyzes intended tasks, kinds of knowledge possessed, magnitude of effort required to codify knowledge, how quickly constructed, performances, and return on investment. On basis of comparison, concludes Al most successful when applied to well-formulated problems solved by classifying or selecting preenumerated solutions. In contrast, application of Al to poorly understood or poorly formulated problems generally results in long development time and large investment of effort, with no guarantee of success.

  4. A General Strategy for Physics-Based Model Validation Illustrated with Earthquake Phenomenology, Atmospheric Radiative Transfer, and Computational Fluid Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, Didier; Kamm, James R; Ide, Kayo

    2007-01-01

    Validation is often defined as the process of determining the degree to which a model is an accurate representation of the real world from the perspective of its intended uses. Validation is crucial as industries and governments depend increasingly on predictions by computer models to justify their decisions. In this article, we survey the model validation literature and propose to formulate validation as an iterative construction process that mimics the process occurring implicitly in the minds of scientists. We thus offer a formal representation of the progressive build-up of trust in the model, and thereby replace incapacitating claims on the impossibility of validating a given model by an adaptive process of constructive approximation. This approach is better adapted to the fuzzy, coarse-grained nature of validation. Our procedure factors in the degree of redundancy versus novelty of the experiments used for validation as well as the degree to which the model predicts the observations. We illustrate the n...

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Multiphase Flow in Structured Packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shojaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A volume of fluid multiphase flow model was used to investigate the effective area and the created liquid film in the structured packings. The computational results revealed that the gas and liquid flow rates play significant roles in the effective interfacial area of the packing. In particular, the effective area increases as the flow rates of both phases increase. Numerical results were compared with the Brunazzi and SRP models, and a good agreement between them was found. Attention was given to the process of liquid film formation in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D models. The current study revealed that computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be used as an effective tool to provide information on the details of gas and liquid flows in complex packing geometries.

  6. A Study on the Impact of Vegetation and Green Roof on Increasing the Wind Speed and Pollutants Dispersion in the Urban Canyons Based on Computational Fluid Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH Hosseini

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Increasing population growth and construction of high-rise buildings have doubled the amount of environmental pollution in the cities. Moreover, people use the open urban spaces more than before in order to meet their ecological needs. Accordingly, some parameters such as various vegetation and continuous winds streams can be considerably influential in transmittance of the particle pollution.  Therefore, the aim of this research was to study the impacts of different green roofs on the dispersion of pollutants in the standpoint of height and density for urban airflow condition of Shiraz City, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study, a literature review in the field computer simulation with the help of computational fluid dynamics (CFD model in Envi-met software environment was used. Results: Regarding the importance of using vegetation in the urban spaces, vertical dispersion of the particles in presence of vegetation was explored. By comparing the basic model (without vegetation results with models including vegetation with short, medium and high crowns, it was revealed that vegetation with medium crowns is the closest model to the basic model with a difference of 7.65 m2/s in terms of vertical dispersion of particles; in fact, it was the most optimized condition for maximizing the dispersion of environmental pollutants. Conclusion: The results showed that the green roofs in the buildings increase the horizontal dispersion of the particulate pollution and decrease this term in the vertical dispersion. Finally, by an expansion of green roof usage in the buildings the sustainability in architecture and urbanism can be achieved.

  7. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  8. Fluid Dynamics with Cryogenic Fluid Transfer in Space Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During chilldown of cryogenic fluid tanks and lines, the interface between the liquid and vapor rapidly changes. Understanding these rapid changes is key...

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Steam Condensation on Nuclear Containment Wall Surfaces Based on Semiempirical Generalized Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K. Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled nuclear power reactors, significant quantities of steam and hydrogen could be produced within the primary containment following the postulated design basis accidents (DBA or beyond design basis accidents (BDBA. For accurate calculation of the temperature/pressure rise and hydrogen transport calculation in nuclear reactor containment due to such scenarios, wall condensation heat transfer coefficient (HTC is used. In the present work, the adaptation of a commercial CFD code with the implementation of models for steam condensation on wall surfaces in presence of noncondensable gases is explained. Steam condensation has been modeled using the empirical average HTC, which was originally developed to be used for “lumped-parameter” (volume-averaged modeling of steam condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases. The present paper suggests a generalized HTC based on curve fitting of most of the reported semiempirical condensation models, which are valid for specific wall conditions. The present methodology has been validated against limited reported experimental data from the COPAIN experimental facility. This is the first step towards the CFD-based generalized analysis procedure for condensation modeling applicable for containment wall surfaces that is being evolved further for specific wall surfaces within the multicompartment containment atmosphere.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve fluid flow, heat and mass transfer, providing det...

  11. Development, Verification and Use of Gust Modeling in the NASA Computational Fluid Dynamics Code FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the implementation of gust modeling capability in the CFD code FUN3D. The gust capability is verified by computing the response of an airfoil to a sharp edged gust. This result is compared with the theoretical result. The present simulations will be compared with other CFD gust simulations. This paper also serves as a users manual for FUN3D gust analyses using a variety of gust profiles. Finally, the development of an Auto-Regressive Moving-Average (ARMA) reduced order gust model using a gust with a Gaussian profile in the FUN3D code is presented. ARMA simulated results of a sequence of one-minus-cosine gusts is shown to compare well with the same gust profile computed with FUN3D. Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) is combined with the ARMA modeling technique to predict the time varying pressure coefficient increment distribution due to a novel gust profile. The aeroelastic response of a pitch/plunge airfoil to a gust environment is computed with a reduced order model, and compared with a direct simulation of the system in the FUN3D code. The two results are found to agree very well.

  12. Applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations in Urban Environments and Experiments Designed to Aid the Development and Evaluation of these Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinn, J; Gouveia, F J

    2001-08-22

    Progress in development of CFD models has shown their great potential for prediction of air flow, heat dissipation, and dispersion of air pollutants in the urban environment. Work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has progressed using the finite element code FEM3 which has been ''massively parallelized'' to produce flow fields and pollutant dispersion in a grid encompassing many city blocks and with high resolution. While it may be argued that urban CFD models are not yet economical for emergency response applications, there are many applications in assessments and air quality management where CFD models are unrivaled in the level of detail that they provide. We have conducted field experiments to define the flow field and air tracer dispersion around buildings as a means of critiquing and evaluating the CFD models. The first experiment, the ''B170 study'', was a study of flow field, turbulence, and tracer dispersion in separation zones around a complex, single building. The second was the URBAN 2000 experiment in downtown Salt Lake City where flow fields and tracers were studied in nested resolution from the single building scale up to larger scales of 25 city blocks, and out to 6 km. For the future an URBAN 2003 experiment is being planned. We review the salient features of these experiments. A ''breakthrough'' technology in urban diffusion modeling is the use of modified computational fluid dynamics models (CFD) that use the meteorological conventions of large eddy simulation to represent the flow field. These CFD models have been initialized from the output of mesoscale atmospheric models with 4 km grid resolution, apparently with no problems although questions remain about aliasing and sources of bias. While more work remains, it is clear that should progress continue a remarkable tool should be available for such applications as: (1) Vulnerability studies for chemical, biological, and nuclear

  13. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Matthew [Lake Superior State University; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  14. Viscous fluid dynamics in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, A K

    2008-01-01

    We have studied the space-time evolution of minimally viscous ($\\frac{\\eta}{s}$=0.08) QGP fluid, undergoing boost-invariant longitudinal motion and arbitrary transverse expansion. Relaxation equations for the shear stress tensor components, derived from the phenomenological Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative relativistic fluid, are solved simultaneously with the energy-momentum conservation equations. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialized under the similar conditions, e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, indicate that in viscous fluid, energy density or temperature of the fluid evolve slowly than in an ideal fluid. Transverse expansion is also more in viscous evolution. We have also studied particle production in viscous dynamics. Compared to ideal dynamics, in viscous dynamics, particle yield at high $p_T$ is increased. Elliptic flow on the other hand decreases. Minimally viscous QGP fluid, initialized at entropy density $s_{ini}$=110 $fm^{-3}$...

  15. Comparison of particle-wall interaction boundary conditions in the prediction of cyclone collection efficiency in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valverde Ramirez, M.; Coury, J.R.; Goncalves, J.A.S., E-mail: jasgon@ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Quimica

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies have appeared attempting to predict cyclone pressure drop and collection efficiency. While these studies have been able to predict pressure drop well, they have been only moderately successful in predicting collection efficiency. Part of the reason for this failure has been attributed to the relatively simple wall boundary conditions implemented in the commercially available CFD software, which are not capable of accurately describing the complex particle-wall interaction present in a cyclone. According, researches have proposed a number of different boundary conditions in order to improve the model performance. This work implemented the critical velocity boundary condition through a user defined function (UDF) in the Fluent software and compared its predictions both with experimental data and with the predictions obtained when using Fluent's built-in boundary conditions. Experimental data was obtained from eight laboratory scale cyclones with varying geometric ratios. The CFD simulations were made using the software Fluent 6.3.26. (author)

  16. Axial stent strut angle influences wall shear stress after stent implantation: analysis using 3D computational fluid dynamics models of stent foreshortening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warltier David C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The success of vascular stents in the restoration of blood flow is limited by restenosis. Recent data generated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD models suggest that the vascular geometry created by an implanted stent causes local alterations in wall shear stress (WSS that are associated with neointimal hyperplasia (NH. Foreshortening is a potential limitation of stent design that may affect stent performance and the rate of restenosis. The angle created between axially aligned stent struts and the principal direction of blood flow varies with the degree to which the stent foreshortens after implantation. Methods In the current investigation, we tested the hypothesis that stent foreshortening adversely influences the distribution of WSS and WSS gradients using time-dependent 3D CFD simulations of normal arteries based on canine coronary artery measurements of diameter and blood flow. WSS and WSS gradients were calculated using conventional techniques in ideal (16 mm and progressively foreshortened (14 and 12 mm stented computational vessels. Results Stent foreshortening increased the intrastrut area of the luminal surface exposed to low WSS and elevated spatial WSS gradients. Progressive degrees of stent foreshortening were also associated with strut misalignment relative to the direction of blood flow as indicated by analysis of near-wall velocity vectors. Conclusion The current results suggest that foreshortening may predispose the stented vessel to a higher risk of neointimal hyperplasia.

  17. Computational fluid dynamics for modeling the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Guillén, I.; Xamán, J.; Álvarez, G.; Arce, J.; Hernández-Pérez, I.; Gijón-Rivera, M.

    2016-03-01

    This study reports the modeling of the turbulent natural convection in a double air-channel solar chimney (SC-DC) and its comparison with a single air-channel solar chimney (SC-C). Prediction of the mass flow and the thermal behavior of the SC-DC were obtained under three different climates of Mexico during one summer day. The climates correspond to: tropical savannah (Mérida), arid desert (Hermosillo) and temperate with warm summer (Mexico City). A code based on the Finite Volume Method was developed and a k-ω turbulence model has been used to model air turbulence in the solar chimney (SC). The code was validated against experimental data. The results indicate that during the day the SC-DC extracts about 50% more mass flow than the SC-C. When the SC-DC is located in Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, the air-changes extracted along the day were 60, 63 and 52, respectively. The air temperature at the outlet of the chimney increased up to 33%, 38% and 61% with respect to the temperature it has at the inlet for Mérida, Hermosillo and Mexico City, respectively.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Rong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods and Their Applications in Medical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewski Wojciech; Roszak Magdalena; Kołodziejczak Barbara; Ren-Kurc Anna; Bręborowicz Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    As defined by the National Institutes of Health: “Biomedical engineering integrates physical, chemical, mathematical, and computational sciences and engineering principles to study biology, medicine, behavior, and health”. Many issues in this area are closely related to fluid dynamics. This paper provides an overview of the basic concepts concerning Computational Fluid Dynamics and its applications in medicine.

  20. Spinodal decomposition in multicomponent fluid mixtures: A molecular dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laradji, Mohamed; Mouritsen, Ole G.; Toxvaerd, Søren

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the number p of components on the dynamics of phase separation in two-dimensional symmetric multicomponent fluids. In contrast to concentrated two-dimensional binary fluids, where the growth dynamics is controlled by the coupling of the velocity held to the orde...

  1. Creation of an idealized nasopharynx geometry for accurate computational fluid dynamics simulations of nasal airflow in patient-specific models lacking the nasopharynx anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A T Borojeni, Azadeh; Frank-Ito, Dennis O; Kimbell, Julia S; Rhee, John S; Garcia, Guilherme J M

    2017-05-01

    Virtual surgery planning based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations has the potential to improve surgical outcomes for nasal airway obstruction patients, but the benefits of virtual surgery planning must outweigh the risks of radiation exposure. Cone beam computed tomography (CT) scans represent an attractive imaging modality for virtual surgery planning due to lower costs and lower radiation exposures compared with conventional CT scans. However, to minimize the radiation exposure, the cone beam CT sinusitis protocol sometimes images only the nasal cavity, excluding the nasopharynx. The goal of this study was to develop an idealized nasopharynx geometry for accurate representation of outlet boundary conditions when the nasopharynx geometry is unavailable. Anatomically accurate models of the nasopharynx created from 30 CT scans were intersected with planes rotated at different angles to obtain an average geometry. Cross sections of the idealized nasopharynx were approximated as ellipses with cross-sectional areas and aspect ratios equal to the average in the actual patient-specific models. CFD simulations were performed to investigate whether nasal airflow patterns were affected when the CT-based nasopharynx was replaced by the idealized nasopharynx in 10 nasal airway obstruction patients. Despite the simple form of the idealized geometry, all biophysical variables (nasal resistance, airflow rate, and heat fluxes) were very similar in the idealized vs patient-specific models. The results confirmed the expectation that the nasopharynx geometry has a minimal effect in the nasal airflow patterns during inspiration. The idealized nasopharynx geometry will be useful in future CFD studies of nasal airflow based on medical images that exclude the nasopharynx. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Dynamics of fluid-conveying pipes: effects of velocity profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enz, Stephanie; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Varying velocity profiles and internal fluid loads on fluid-conveying pipes are investigated. Different geometric layouts of the fluid domain and inflow velocity profiles are considered. It is found that the variation of the velocity profiles along the bended pipe is considerable. A determination...... of the resulting fluid loads on the pipe walls is of interest e.g, for evaluating the dynamical behaviour of lightly damped structures like Coriolis flow meters....

  3. Electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) and gamma radiation meter for comparison with and validation and tuning of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep, Chaminda; Yan, Ru; Vestøl, Sondre; Melaaen, Morten C.; Mylvaganam, Saba

    2014-07-01

    The electrical capacitance tomographic (ECT) approach is increasingly seen as attractive for measurement and control applications in the process industries. Recently, there is increased interest in using the tomographic details from ECT for comparing with and validating and tuning CFD models of multiphase flow. Collaboration with researchers working in the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of multiphase flows gives valuable information for both groups of researchers in the field of ECT and CFD. By studying the ECT tomograms of multiphase flows under carefully monitored inflow conditions of the different media and by obtaining the capacitance values, C(i, j, t) with i = 1…N, j = 1, 2,…N and i ≠ j obtained from ECT modules with N electrodes, it is shown how the interface heights in a pipe with stratified flow of oil and air can be fruitfully compared to the values of those obtained from ECT and gamma radiation meter (GRM) for improving CFD modeling. Monitored inflow conditions in this study are flow rates of air, water and oil into a pipe which can be positioned at varying inclinations to the horizontal, thus emulating the pipelines laid in subsea installations. It is found that ECT-based tomograms show most of the features seen in the GRM-based visualizations with nearly one-to-one correspondence to interface heights obtained from these two methods, albeit some anomalies at the pipe wall. However, there are some interesting features the ECT manages to capture: features which the GRM or the CFD modeling apparently do not show, possibly due to parameters not defined in the inputs to the CFD model or much slower response of the GRM. Results presented in this paper indicate that a combination of ECT and GRM and preferably with other modalities with enhanced data fusion and analysis combined with CFD modeling can help to improve the modeling, measurement and control of multiphase flow in the oil and gas industries and in the process industries

  4. Water Channel Facility for Fluid Dynamics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslam-Panah, Azar; Sabatino, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    This study presents the design, assembly, and verification process of the circulating water channel constructed by undergraduate students at the Penn State University at Berks. This work was significantly inspired from the closed-loop free-surface water channel at Lafayette College (Sabatino and Maharjan, 2015) and employed for experiments in fluid dynamics. The channel has a 11 ft length, 2.5 ft width, and 2 ft height glass test section with a maximum velocity of 3.3 ft/s. First, the investigation justifies the needs of a water channel in an undergraduate institute and its potential applications in the whole field of engineering. Then, the design procedures applied to find the geometry and material of some elements of the channel, especially the contraction, the test section, the inlet and end tanks, and the pump system are described. The optimization of the contraction design, including the maintenance of uniform exit flow and avoidance of flow separation, is also included. Finally, the discussion concludes by identifying the problems with the undergraduate education through this capstone project and suggesting some new investigations to improve flow quality.

  5. Meshfree methods for computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jícha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the convergence problem of the SPH (Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics meshfree method for the solution of fluid dynamics tasks. In the introductory part, fundamental aspects of mesh- free methods, their definition, computational approaches and classification are discussed. In the following part, the methods of local integral representation, where SPH belongs are analyzed and specifically the method RKPM (Reproducing Kernel Particle Method is described. In the contribution, also the influence of boundary conditions on the SPH approximation consistence is analyzed, which has a direct impact on the convergence of the method. A classical boundary condition in the form of virtual particles does not ensure a sufficient order of consistence near the boundary of the definition domain of the task. This problem is solved by using ghost particles as a boundary condition, which was implemented into the SPH code as part of this work. Further, several numerical aspects linked with the SPH method are described. In the concluding part, results are presented of the application of the SPH method with ghost particles to the 2D shock tube example. Also results of tests of several parameters and modifications of the SPH code are shown.

  6. Transcapillary fluid dynamics during the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oian, P; Tollan, A; Fadnes, H O; Noddeland, H; Maltau, J M

    1987-04-01

    Transcapillary fluid dynamics in the follicular and luteal phase in women without symptoms of premenstrual syndrome were studied. Interstitial colloid osmotic pressure was measured by the "wick" method and interstitial hydrostatic pressure by the "wick-in-needle" method in subcutaneous tissue on the thorax and ankle. From follicular to luteal phase, the following changes were observed: Colloid osmotic pressures were significantly reduced, both in plasma (mean 2.5 mm Hg) and in the interstitium (thorax mean 1.9 mm Hg and ankle mean 2.0 mm Hg). The interstitial hydrostatic pressures did not change. There were no significant changes in serum albumin, hemoglobin, or hematocrit. A slight, but significant, weight gain was observed (mean 0.7 kg). The reduced plasma and interstitial colloid osmotic pressures in the luteal phase may be due to water retention, but the observed reductions in colloid osmotic pressures are probably not fully explained by simple dilution. A reduction in total protein mass in the luteal phase is suggested.

  7. Fluid dynamic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Erica; Bayles, Kenneth; Endres, Jennifer; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. It is known that flow conditions play a role in the development, dispersion and propagation of biofilms in general. The influence of flow on tower formation, however, is not at all understood. This work is focused on the effect of applied shear on tower development. The hypothesis being examined is that tower structures form within a specific range of shear stresses and that there is an as yet ill defined fluid dynamic phenomenon that occurs hours before a tower forms. In this study, a range of shear stresses is examined that brackets 0.6 dynes/cm2, the nominal shear stress where towers seem most likely to form. This talk will include µPTV measurements and cell density data indicating variations in flow and biofilm evolution as a function of the applied shear. Causal relations between flow and biofilm development will be discussed.

  8. Particle Dynamics of Polydisperse Magnetorheological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjit Sarkar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present research work, three dimensional simulations of magnetorheological fluids, containing soft magnetic polydisperse particles in silicone oil, has been presented. The computer simulation helps to visualize and analyze the formed transient microstructures. The initial positions of particle-centres were decided based on random distribution. The particle positions were updated considering magnetic, hydrodynamic and repulsions forces on each particle along with explicit time marching scheme. Finally the particle’s positions at 10 ms have been plotted. The yield behaviors of MRFXXS (small sized: 2 to 33 µm and MRFXXL (large sized: 45 to 212 µm have been estimated using particle dynamic simulations and the predicted results have been compared with the results obtained from experiments. Due to large number of particles and limitations of computer hardware, the yield behavior of MRFXXM1 i.e. mixed (2 to 212 µm sized magnetic particles could not be simulated. However, experiments were performed to investigate the yield behavior of MRFXXM1. The results show that MRFXXM1 is better than MRFXXS and MRFXXL.

  9. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  10. Emergent geometries and nonlinear-wave dynamics in photon fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, F; Maitland, C; Vocke, D; Ortolan, A; Faccio, D

    2016-03-22

    Nonlinear waves in defocusing media are investigated in the framework of the hydrodynamic description of light as a photon fluid. The observations are interpreted in terms of an emergent curved spacetime generated by the waves themselves, which fully determines their dynamics. The spacetime geometry emerges naturally as a result of the nonlinear interaction between the waves and the self-induced background flow. In particular, as observed in real fluids, different points of the wave profile propagate at different velocities leading to the self-steepening of the wave front and to the formation of a shock. This phenomenon can be associated to a curvature singularity of the emergent metric. Our analysis offers an alternative insight into the problem of shock formation and provides a demonstration of an analogue gravity model that goes beyond the kinematic level.

  11. Fluid Dynamics Lagrangian Simulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-02-08

    1 (3c as coordinate system, the Navier-Stoaks equations gay - OT arming compressible lows may be written as: e kT6 , = ko (3c, f) = + L+u where T...13) (18 AA 1 1V . - + 2r (~3 + p(p~ T• ,s~s A o. n.•u.e" Mas A, atrie.ft o TF~a’Ij=IS of view in whether the cosm maw matfri, which iobtaine by uramblg

  12. Fluid dynamics of ventricular filling in the embryonic heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura A

    2011-09-01

    The vertebrate embryonic heart first forms as a valveless tube that pumps blood using waves of contraction. As the heart develops, the atrium and ventricle bulge out from the heart tube, and valves begin to form through the expansion of the endocardial cushions. As a result of changes in geometry, conduction velocities, and material properties of the heart wall, the fluid dynamics and resulting spatial patterns of shear stress and transmural pressure change dramatically. Recent work suggests that these transitions are significant because fluid forces acting on the cardiac walls, as well as the activity of myocardial cells that drive the flow, are necessary for correct chamber and valve morphogenesis. In this article, computational fluid dynamics was used to explore how spatial distributions of the normal forces acting on the heart wall change as the endocardial cushions grow and as the cardiac wall increases in stiffness. The immersed boundary method was used to simulate the fluid-moving boundary problem of the cardiac wall driving the motion of the blood in a simplified model of a two-dimensional heart. The normal forces acting on the heart walls increased during the period of one atrial contraction because inertial forces are negligible and the ventricular walls must be stretched during filling. Furthermore, the force required to fill the ventricle increased as the stiffness of the ventricular wall was increased. Increased endocardial cushion height also drastically increased the force necessary to contract the ventricle. Finally, flow in the moving boundary model was compared to flow through immobile rigid chambers, and the forces acting normal to the walls were substantially different.

  13. Relativistic Fluid Dynamics: Physics for Many Different Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comer Gregory L.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The relativistic fluid is a highly successful model used to describe the dynamics of many-particle, relativistic systems. It takes as input basic physics from microscopic scales and yields as output predictions of bulk, macroscopic motion. By inverting the process, an understanding of bulk features can lead to insight into physics on the microscopic scale. Relativistic fluids have been used to model systems as “small” as heavy ions in collisions, and as large as the Universe itself, with “intermediate” sized objects like neutron stars being considered along the way. The purpose of this review is to discuss the mathematical and theoretical physics underpinnings of the relativistic (multiple fluid model. We focus on the variational principle approach championed by Brandon Carter and his collaborators, in which a crucial element is to distinguish the momenta that are conjugate to the particle number density currents. This approach differs from the “standard” text-book derivation of the equations of motion from the divergence of the stress-energy tensor in that one explicitly obtains the relativistic Euler equation as an “integrability” condition on the relativistic vorticity. We discuss the conservation laws and the equations of motion in detail, and provide a number of (in our opinion interesting and relevant applications of the general theory.

  14. Body Fluid Dynamics: Back to the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Bhave, Gautam; Neilson, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    Pioneering investigations conducted over a half century ago on tonicity, transcapillary fluid exchange, and the distribution of water and solute serve as a foundation for understanding the physiology of body fluid spaces. With passage of time, however, some of these concepts have lost their connectivity to more contemporary information. Here we examine the physical forces determining the compartmentalization of body fluid and its movement across capillary and cell membrane barriers, drawing p...

  15. The fluid dynamics of a downer fluidised bed using a cluster-based approach (CBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán González Silva

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The fluid dynamics of a downer reactor were numerically resolved by adapting a mathematical conservation model. The mathematical model was based on the solid and fluid properties and physical characteristics using a cluster-based approach (CBA. Comparing the numerical results to the experimental data found in the literature indicated that the mathematical model could satisfactorily predict the experimental data. The mathematical simulation determined that there were three fluid dynamic areas in the downer reactor which were characterized by accelerated, slowed-down and fully-developed flow. The fully developed flow area in the downer decreased with increased gas surface speed keeping solid flux constant.

  16. The Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) Modeling of the Horizontal Single Belt Casting (HSBC) Processing of Al-Mg-Sc-Zr Alloy Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, S.; Isac, M.; Guthrie, R. I. L.

    2015-10-01

    Al-Mg-Sc-Zr alloys have shown exceptional potential as structural materials for transportation applications. These alloys have proved to be good candidates to be processed as thin strips via the horizontal single belt casting (HSBC) process. The HSBC process is a near-net-shape casting technology, which involves casting molten metal directly into thin strips, close to the final product thickness, at higher cooling rates than conventional continuous casting and thin-slab casting processes. It offers an efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly approach to the production of metal strips. Fluid mechanics and associated heat transfer are important aspects of any casting process, and the novel HSBC process is no exception. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations using ANSYS FLUENT 14.5 were performed, in order to assess the importance and effects of the various operational conditions of the HSBC process. This enabled process parameter optimization. Numerical predictions were validated against experimental casting results.

  17. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme 1995- 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haekkinen, R.J.; Hirsch, C.; Krause, E.; Kytoemaa, H.K. [eds.

    1997-12-31

    The report is a mid-term evaluation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Technology Programme started by Technology Development Centre Finland (TEKES) in 1995 as a five-year initiative to be concluded in 1999. The main goal of the programme is to increase the know-how and application of CFD in Finnish industry, to coordinate and thus provide a better basis for co-operation between national CFD activities and encouraging research laboratories and industry to establish co-operation with the international CFD community. The projects of the programme focus on the following areas: (1) studies of modeling the physics and dynamics of the behaviour of fluid material, (2) expressing the physical models in a numerical mode and developing a computer codes, (3) evaluating and testing current physical models and developing new ones, (4) developing new numerical algorithms, solvers, and pre- and post-processing software, and (5) applying the new computational tools to problems relevant to their ultimate industrial use. The report consists of two sections. The first considers issues concerning the whole programme and the second reviews each project

  18. Modeling of Non-Isothermal Cryogenic Fluid Sloshing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agui, Juan H.; Moder, Jeffrey P.

    2015-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamic model was used to simulate the thermal destratification in an upright self-pressurized cryostat approximately half-filled with liquid nitrogen and subjected to forced sinusoidal lateral shaking. A full three-dimensional computational grid was used to model the tank dynamics, fluid flow and thermodynamics using the ANSYS Fluent code. A non-inertial grid was used which required the addition of momentum and energy source terms to account for the inertial forces, energy transfer and wall reaction forces produced by the shaken tank. The kinetics-based Schrage mass transfer model provided the interfacial mass transfer due to evaporation and condensation at the sloshing interface. The dynamic behavior of the sloshing interface, its amplitude and transition to different wave modes, provided insight into the fluid process at the interface. The tank pressure evolution and temperature profiles compared relatively well with the shaken cryostat experimental test data provided by the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales.

  19. Fluid Dynamics in Rotary Piston Blood Pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wappenschmidt, Johannes; Sonntag, Simon J; Buesen, Martin; Gross-Hardt, Sascha; Kaufmann, Tim; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Autschbach, Ruediger; Goetzenich, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical circulatory support can maintain a sufficient blood circulation if the native heart is failing. The first implantable devices were displacement pumps with membranes. They were able to provide a sufficient blood flow, yet, were limited because of size and low durability. Rotary pumps have resolved these technical drawbacks, enabled a growing number of mechanical circulatory support therapy and a safer application. However, clinical complications like gastrointestinal bleeding, aortic insufficiency, thromboembolic complications, and impaired renal function are observed with their application. This is traced back to their working principle with attenuated or non-pulsatile flow and high shear stress. Rotary piston pumps potentially merge the benefits of available pump types and seem to avoid their complications. However, a profound assessment and their development requires the knowledge of the flow characteristics. This study aimed at their investigation. A functional model was manufactured and investigated with particle image velocimetry. Furthermore, a fluid-structure interaction computational simulation was established to extend the laboratory capabilities. The numerical results precisely converged with the laboratory measurements. Thus, the in silico model enabled the investigation of relevant areas like gap flows that were hardly feasible with laboratory means. Moreover, an economic method for the investigation of design variations was established.

  20. Dynamic Analysis of Fluid Power Drive-trains for Variable Speed Wind Turbines: a Parameter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarquin Laguna, A.; Diepeveen, N.F.B.

    2013-01-01

    In the pursuit of making wind energy technology more economically attractive, the application of fluid power technology for the transmission of wind energy is being developed by several parties all over the world. This paper presents a dynamic model of a fluid power transmission for variable speed w

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Fluid Power Drive-trains for Variable Speed Wind Turbines: a Parameter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jarquin Laguna, A.; Diepeveen, N.F.B.

    2013-01-01

    In the pursuit of making wind energy technology more economically attractive, the application of fluid power technology for the transmission of wind energy is being developed by several parties all over the world. This paper presents a dynamic model of a fluid power transmission for variable speed w

  2. Ringin' the water bell: dynamic modes of curved fluid sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolinski, John; Aharoni, Hillel; Fineberg, Jay; Sharon, Eran

    2015-11-01

    A water bell is formed by fluid flowing in a thin, coherent sheet in the shape of a bell. Experimentally, a water bell is created via the impact of a cylindrical jet on a flat surface. Its shape is set by the splash angle (the separation angle) of the resulting cylindrically symmetric water sheet. The separation angle is altered by adjusting the height of a lip surrounding the impact point, as in a water sprinkler. We drive the lip's height sinusoidally, altering the separation angle, and ringin' the water bell. This forcing generates disturbances on the steady-state water bell that propagate forward and backward in the fluid's reference frame at well-defined velocities, and interact, resulting in the emergence of an interference pattern unique to each steady-state geometry. We analytically model these dynamics by linearizing the amplitude of the bell's response about the underlying curved geometry. This simple model predicts the nodal structure over a wide range of steady-state water bell configurations and driving frequencies. Due to the curved water bell geometry, the nodal structure is quite complex; nevertheless, the predicted nodal structure agrees extremely well with the experimental data. When we drive the bell beyond perturbative separation angles, the nodal locations surprisingly persist, despite the strikingly altered underlying water bell shape. At extreme driving amplitudes the water sheet assumes a rich variety of tortuous, non-convex shapes; nevertheless, the fluid sheet remains intact.

  3. An integrated, multi-sensing approach to describe the dynamic relations between turbulence, fluid-forces, and reconfiguration of a submerged plant model in steady flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Pierre-Yves; Aberle, Jochen; Dijkstra, Jasper; Myrhaug, Dag

    2016-04-01

    Aquatic vegetation plays a vital role in ecohydrological systems regulating many physical, chemical, and biological processes across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. As a consequence, plant-flow interactions are of particular interest to a wide range of disciplines. While early studies of the interactions between vegetation and flowing water employed simplified and non-flexible structures such as rigid cylinders, recent studies have included flexible plants to identify the main characteristics of the hydrodynamics of vegetated flows. However, the description of plant reconfiguration has often been based on a static approach, i.e. considering the plant's deformation under a static load and neglecting turbulent fluctuations. Correlations between drag fluctuations, plant movements, and upstream turbulence were recently established showing that shear layer turbulence at the surface of the different plant elements (such as blades or stems) can contribute significantly to the dynamic behaviour of the plant. However, the relations between plant movement and force fluctuations might change under varying flow velocities, and although this point is crucial for mixing processes and plant dislodgement by fatigue, these aspects of fluid-structure interactions applied to aquatic vegetation remain largely unexplored. Using an innovative combination of sensing techniques in one set of experiments, this study investigates the relations between turbulence, fluctuating fluid forces and movements of a flexible cylindrical plant surrogate. A silicone-based flexible cylinder was attached at the bottom of a 1m wide flume in fully-developed uniform flow. The lower 22 cm of the plant surrogate were made of plain flexible silicone, while the higher 13cm included a casted rigid sensor, measuring accelerations at the tip of the surrogate. Forces were sampled at high frequencies at the surrogate's base by a 6-degrees-of-freedom force/torque sensor measuring down to the gram

  4. 气体扩散CFD建模敏感性分析%Sensitivity Analysis on Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Gas Dispersion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章博; 陈国明

    2011-01-01

    The definition of sensitivity analysis on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling for gas dispersion has been presented.It is an uncertainty analysis method during the modeling process which firstly identifies the most sensitive ones from a number of uncertain factors.and then monitors and anlyzes their impacts on the simulation results.and lastly selects the most suitable modeling parameters.The advised orders for the analysis should be grid depemderey.boundary conditions.turbulence models.and parameter analysis for solution controls.successively.The analysis theories and methods for two key factors including grid dependency and turbulence model sensitivity have been discussed.A case study of gas dispersion in a station for high sulfide hydrogen natural gas gathering has also been carried out.The results show that grid dependency analysis could obtain a balance point between model prediction accuracy and computation cost;most suitable turbulence description method could be selected by means of comparison between the prediction results made by both trubulence models and empirical formulas.Sensitivity analysis is important for establishing proper computation models.enhancing prediction accuracy.and reducing computation cost, and it is an indispensable step for gas dispersion CFD modeling.%提出气体扩散计算流体力学建模敏感性分析的概念,即从众多影响模拟结果的不确定性因素中找出对建模有重要影响的方面,并监测、分析其对模拟结果的影响程度,进而选定最佳建模参数的一种不确定性分析方法.建议敏感性分析顺序应为网格依赖、边界条件、湍流模型及求解控制参数分析.重点对网格依赖和湍流模型敏感性分析的原理和方法进行了论证,并结合某高含硫集气站气体泄漏扩散建模进行了算例研究.研究结果表明,网格依赖分析可在模型预测精度和计算成本间获取平衡点;通过将各湍流模型预测结果与经验公

  5. PREFACE: Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Kahl, Gerhard; Krakoviack, Vincent

    2011-06-01

    discussions it became evident that the close scientific contact between theory, simulation and experiment brought along a fruitful and mutually inspiring atmosphere. On the theoretical side, these discussions have allowed clarification of several connections between the dynamics of models of fluids in porous media (quenched-annealed, pinned particles models), those of well-known limiting cases (Lorentz gas), of realistic models of liquids with strong dynamic asymmetry (asymmetric size and mass mixtures, sodium silicates, polymers blends) and even of bulk glass-formers. On the experimental side, it appeared that soft matter systems may provide an excellent test-bed to verify the theoretical predictions. From the concluding discussion it was also clear that addressing related issues relevant to biology still remains an open challenge for the future. In view of all this, it was concluded that within a short time period a workshop with analogous scope should be organized to address the progress made on both fundamental and interdisciplinary aspects. The realization of this workshop was made possible by generous financial support from CECAM, Centre Blaise Pascal-ENS de Lyon, and the ESF network 'Molecular Simulations in Biosystems and Material Science' (SimBioMa). Complex dynamics of fluids in disordered and crowded environments contents Phonon dispersions of cluster crystals Tim Neuhaus and Christos N Likos Challenges in determining anomalous diffusion in crowded fluids Marcel Hellmann, Joseph Klafter, Dieter W Heermann and Matthias Weiss Diffusion of active tracers in fluctuating fields David S Dean and Vincent Démery Self-diffusion of non-interacting hard spheres in particle gels Jean-Christophe Gimel and Taco Nicolai Probing glassy states in binary mixtures of soft interpenetrable colloids E Stiakakis, B M Erwin, D Vlassopoulos, M Cloitre, A Munam, M Gauthier, H Iatrou and N Hadjichristidis Fluids with quenched disorder: scaling of the free energy barrier near critical points

  6. Dynamic hysteresis in the rheology of complex fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puisto, Antti; Mohtaschemi, Mikael; Alava, Mikko J; Illa, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Recently, rheological hysteresis has been studied systematically in a wide range of complex fluids combining global rheology and time-resolved velocimetry. In this paper we present an analysis of the roles of the three most fundamental mechanisms in simple-yield-stress fluids: structure dynamics, viscoelastic response, and spatial flow heterogeneities, i.e., time-dependent shear bands. Dynamical hysteresis simulations are done analogously to rheological ramp-up and -down experiments on a coupled model which incorporates viscoelasticity and time-dependent structure evolution. Based on experimental data, a coupling between hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and that measured from the global flow curve has been suggested. According to the present model, even if transient shear banding appears during the shear ramps, in typical narrow-gap devices, only a small part of the hysteretic response can be attributed to heterogeneous flow. This results in decoupling of the hysteresis measured from the local velocity profiles and the global flow curve, demonstrating that for an arbitrary time-dependent rheological response this proposed coupling can be very weak.

  7. Meniscal Tear Film Fluid Dynamics Near Marx’s Line

    KAUST Repository

    Zubkov, V. S.

    2013-07-03

    Extensive studies have explored the dynamics of the ocular surface fluid, though theoretical investigations are typically limited to the use of the lubrication approximation, which is not guaranteed to be uniformly valid a-priori throughout the tear meniscus. However, resolving tear film behaviour within the meniscus and especially its apices is required to characterise the flow dynamics where the tear film is especially thin, and thus most susceptible to evaporatively induced hyperosmolarity and subsequent epithelial damage. Hence, we have explored the accuracy of the standard lubrication approximation for the tear film by explicit comparisons with the 2D Navier-Stokes model, considering both stationary and moving eyelids. Our results demonstrate that the lubrication model is qualitatively accurate except in the vicinity of the eyelids. In particular, and in contrast to lubrication theory, the solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations predict a distinct absence of fluid flow, and thus convective mixing in the region adjacent to the tear film contact line. These observations not only support emergent hypotheses concerning the formation of Marx\\'s line, a region of epithelial cell staining adjacent to the contact line on the eyelid, but also enhance our understanding of the pathophysiological consequences of the flow profile near the tear film contact line. © 2013 Society for Mathematical Biology.

  8. Ultrasonic fluid quantity measurement in dynamic vehicular applications a support vector machine approach

    CERN Document Server

    Terzic, Jenny; Nagarajah, Romesh; Alamgir, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Accurate fluid level measurement in dynamic environments can be assessed using a Support Vector Machine (SVM) approach. SVM is a supervised learning model that analyzes and recognizes patterns. It is a signal classification technique which has far greater accuracy than conventional signal averaging methods. Ultrasonic Fluid Quantity Measurement in Dynamic Vehicular Applications: A Support Vector Machine Approach describes the research and development of a fluid level measurement system for dynamic environments. The measurement system is based on a single ultrasonic sensor. A Support Vector Machines (SVM) based signal characterization and processing system has been developed to compensate for the effects of slosh and temperature variation in fluid level measurement systems used in dynamic environments including automotive applications. It has been demonstrated that a simple ν-SVM model with Radial Basis Function (RBF) Kernel with the inclusion of a Moving Median filter could be used to achieve the high levels...

  9. Dynamic Characteristics of Magneto-Fluid Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Chernobai

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a vibro-protective magneto-fluid support that uses elastic properties of magnetic fluid with a free surface in magnetic field.The paper has experimentally revealed that the analyzed structure is characterized by better noise absorbing characteristics.The conducted experiments have made it possible to conclude that there is a possibility to use vibro-protective magneto-fluid supports within the frequency range from 0 to 300 Hz, amplitudes up to 2 mm and unit load up to 2,5 · 10 4 Н/м².

  10. Computational fluid dynamics for defect control in semiconductor processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempka, S. N.; Geller, A. S.

    Finite element simulations of mixed convection flow (Re less than 100, Gr less than 10(exp 6)) are presented for two gas flow reactors characteristic of those used in the manufacture of microchips. The simulations demonstrate the usefulness of FIDAP (a finite element, Navier-Stokes code developed by Fluid Dynamics International, Inc.) as a tool to design new reactors and to assess the effects of varying operating conditions in present reactors. The calculations predict the existence of thermal plumes and recirculation regions within reactors. These flow nonuniformities are important since they can result in fatal defects in microchips. Comparisons between solutions obtained using a Boussinesq model and FIDAP's variable density model are presented. The FIDAP calculations agree with previous simulations using more detailed models, supporting the use of FIDAP as a design tool in the semiconductor industry.

  11. Introduction to Magneto-Fluid-Dynamics for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-08

    incisive understanding is strongly dependent on how knowledge is accumulated and transferred in times. The growth of magneto- fluid-dynamics is not...S. Goldstein, Lectures on Fluid Mechanics (Interscience Publishers Ltd, London, 1960). [15] B. Finzi, Principio d’Azione Stazionaria

  12. Effect of Fluid Dynamic Viscosity on the Strength of Chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, K.; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    The mechanical strength of high porosity and weakly cemented chalk is affected by the fluid in the pores. In this study, the effect of the dynamic viscosity of non-polar fluids has been measured on outcrop chalk from Sigerslev Quarry, Stevns, Denmark. The outcome is that the measured strength...

  13. The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Suliman, Ridhwaan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available ECCOMAS Young Investigators Conference 6th GACM Colloquium, July 20–23, 2015, Aachen, Germany The stability and dynamic behaviour of fluid-loaded structures R. Suliman, N. Peake Abstract. The deformation of slender elastic structures due...

  14. Multiscale Turbulence Models Based on Convected Fluid Microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, Darryl D

    2012-01-01

    The Euler-Poincar\\'e approach to complex fluids is used to derive multiscale equations for computationally modelling Euler flows as a basis for modelling turbulence. The model is based on a \\emph{kinematic sweeping ansatz} (KSA) which assumes that the mean fluid flow serves as a Lagrangian frame of motion for the fluctuation dynamics. Thus, we regard the motion of a fluid parcel on the computationally resolvable length scales as a moving Lagrange coordinate for the fluctuating (zero-mean) motion of fluid parcels at the unresolved scales. Even in the simplest 2-scale version on which we concentrate here, the contributions of the fluctuating motion under the KSA to the mean motion yields a system of equations that extends known results and appears to be suitable for modelling nonlinear backscatter (energy transfer from smaller to larger scales) in turbulence using multiscale methods.

  15. Mathematical Fluid Dynamics of Store and Stage Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    34Theoretical Aerodynamics in Today’s Real World," Opportunities and Challenges," Julian D. Cole Lecture , 4 th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Dynamics Meeting, June...Reports A 4th AIAA Theoretical Fluid Dynamics Meeting Julian D. Cole Lecture June 6-9, 2005 Toronto, Canada AIAA 2005-5059 Theoretical Aerodynamics in...technique was developed to treat the problem of shock manipulation by MHD Lorentz forces in Ref. 68 that has been validated by large scale CFD and

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movassat, Mohammad; Bailey, Joanne; Yetisir, Metin

    2015-11-01

    A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation was performed on the proposed design for the Canadian SuperCritical Water Reactor (SCWR). The proposed Canadian SCWR is a 1200 MW(e) supercritical light-water cooled nuclear reactor with pressurized fuel channels. The reactor concept uses an inlet plenum that all fuel channels are attached to and an outlet header nested inside the inlet plenum. The coolant enters the inlet plenum at 350 C and exits the outlet header at 625 C. The operating pressure is approximately 26 MPa. The high pressure and high temperature outlet conditions result in a higher electric conversion efficiency as compared to existing light water reactors. In this work, CFD simulations were performed to model fluid flow and heat transfer in the inlet plenum, outlet header, and various parts of the fuel assembly. The ANSYS Fluent solver was used for simulations. Results showed that mass flow rate distribution in fuel channels varies radially and the inner channels achieve higher outlet temperatures. At the outlet header, zones with rotational flow were formed as the fluid from 336 fuel channels merged. Results also suggested that insulation of the outlet header should be considered to reduce the thermal stresses caused by the large temperature gradients.

  17. Molecular dynamics of a dense fluid of polydisperse hard spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Sear, Richard P.

    2000-01-01

    Slow dynamics in a fluid are studied in one of the most basic systems possible: polydisperse hard spheres. Monodisperse hard spheres cannot be studied as the slow down in dynamics as the density is increased is preempted by crystallisation. As the dynamics slow they become more heterogeneous, the spread in the distances traveled by different particles in the same time increases. However, the dynamics appears to be less heterogeneous than in hard-sphere-like colloids at the same volume fractio...

  18. The dynamics of vortex structures and states of current in plasma-like fluids and the electrical explosion of conductors; 1, the model of a non-equilibrium phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Volkov, N B

    1993-01-01

    A set of equations according to which the conducting medium consists of two fluids - laminar and vortex, has been obtained in the present paper by transforming MHD equations. In a similar way, an electronic fluid is assumed to consist of a laminar and a vortex fluid. This system allows one to study the formation and the dynamics of large-scale hydrodynamic fluctuations. From this model a model of a non-equilibrium phase transition belonging to a class of the Lorenz-type models has been developed [Lorenz E N 1963 J. Atmos. Sci. {\\bf 20} 130]. Vortex structures resulting in the increase in an effective resistance of the conducting medium and the interruption of current have been shown to appear even at constant transport coefficients in a laminar electronic fluid. Critical exponents of the parameters of an order (amplitudes), which for a direct current coincide with the critical exponents in the Lorenz model, have been found. A spatial scale of the structure described by the theory is in good agreement with exp...

  19. Fluid-dynamic design optimization of hydraulic proportional directional valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirante, Riccardo; Catalano, Luciano Andrea; Poloni, Carlo; Tamburrano, Paolo

    2014-10-01

    This article proposes an effective methodology for the fluid-dynamic design optimization of the sliding spool of a hydraulic proportional directional valve: the goal is the minimization of the flow force at a prescribed flow rate, so as to reduce the required opening force while keeping the operation features unchanged. A full three-dimensional model of the flow field within the valve is employed to accurately predict the flow force acting on the spool. A theoretical analysis, based on both the axial momentum equation and flow simulations, is conducted to define the design parameters, which need to be properly selected in order to reduce the flow force without significantly affecting the flow rate. A genetic algorithm, coupled with a computational fluid dynamics flow solver, is employed to minimize the flow force acting on the valve spool at the maximum opening. A comparison with a typical single-objective optimization algorithm is performed to evaluate performance and effectiveness of the employed genetic algorithm. The optimized spool develops a maximum flow force which is smaller than that produced by the commercially available valve, mainly due to some major modifications occurring in the discharge section. Reducing the flow force and thus the electromagnetic force exerted by the solenoid actuators allows the operational range of direct (single-stage) driven valves to be enlarged.

  20. Fluid dynamics in airway bifurcations: I. Primary flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonen, T B; Guan, X; Schreck, R M

    2001-04-01

    The subject of fluid dynamics within human airways is of great importance for the risk assessment of air pollutants (inhalation toxicology) and the targeted delivery of inhaled pharmacologic drugs (aerosol therapy). As cited herein, experimental investigations of flow patterns have been performed on airway models and casts by a number of investigators. We have simulated flow patterns in human lung bifurcations and compared the results with the experimental data of Schreck (1972). The theoretical analyses were performed using a third-party software package, FIDAP, on the Cray T90 supercomputer. This effort is part of a systematic investigation where the effects of inlet conditions, Reynolds numbers, and dimensions and orientations of airways were addressed. This article focuses on primary flows using convective motion and isovelocity contour formats to describe fluid dynamics; subsequent articles in this issue consider secondary currents (Part II) and localized conditions (Part III). The agreement between calculated and measured results, for laminar flows with either parabolic or blunt inlet conditions to the bifurcations, was very good. To our knowledge, this work is the first to present such detailed comparisons of theoretical and experimental flow patterns in airway bifurcations. The agreement suggests that the methodologies can be employed to study factors affecting airflow patterns and particle behavior in human lungs.