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Sample records for fluctuation measurements calibrating

  1. Measurement System of Reducing Temperature Fluctuation of Thermostat Bath for Calibrating Thermocouple

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Min; Liang, Feixia; Xie, Yue; Huang, Ruguo; Yuan, Haitao; Lu, Jiahua

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Based on the periodic unsteady state heat conduction theory, a new measurement system of reducing temperature fluctuation of thermostat bath was developed in order to obtain a liquid environment with uniform and constant temperature controlled for the measurement requirements of calibrating thermocouple. The experimental results show that the temperature stability in this measurement system is superior to that in traditional system. The measurement system had the advan...

  2. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  3. Chemical Measurement and Fluctuation Scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Quentin S

    2016-12-20

    Fluctuation scaling reports on all processes producing a data set. Some fluctuation scaling relationships, such as the Horwitz curve, follow exponential dispersion models which have useful properties. The mean-variance method applied to Poisson distributed data is a special case of these properties allowing the gain of a system to be measured. Here, a general method is described for investigating gain (G), dispersion (β), and process (α) in any system whose fluctuation scaling follows a simple exponential dispersion model, a segmented exponential dispersion model, or complex scaling following such a model locally. When gain and dispersion cannot be obtained directly, relative parameters, GR and βR, may be used. The method was demonstrated on data sets conforming to simple, segmented, and complex scaling. These included mass, fluorescence intensity, and absorbance measurements and specifications for classes of calibration weights. Changes in gain, dispersion, and process were observed in the scaling of these data sets in response to instrument parameters, photon fluxes, mathematical processing, and calibration weight class. The process parameter which limits the type of statistical process that can be invoked to explain a data set typically exhibited 0 4 possible. With two exceptions, calibration weight class definitions only affected β. Adjusting photomultiplier voltage while measuring fluorescence intensity changed all three parameters (0 < α < 0.8; 0 < βR < 3; 0 < GR < 4.1). The method provides a framework for calibrating and interpreting uncertainty in chemical measurement allowing robust comparison of specific instruments, conditions, and methods.

  4. Measurement System & Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report...

  5. Diagnostics for fluctuation measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    2000-01-01

    Transport of particles and heat in magnetic confinement devices is largely attributed to the presence of microscopic instabilities. To better understand the physical mechanisms underlying plasma transport processes it is necessary to diagnose the fluctuations in the various quantities along with the

  6. Neutron fluctuation measurements on TFTR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of fluctuations in the neutron yield are made on the tokamak fusion test reactor (TFTR) with plastic scintillators. Light from the scintillators is coupled through acrylic rods or fiber-optic cables to photomultipliers operated in current mode. Discrimination against hard x rays is accomplished through comparison with the signal from a ZnS(6Li) scintillator. These measurements are useful in studies of deuterium pellet deposition, of the acceleration of beam ions during major radial compression, and of MHD instabilities. Techniques for measuring the neutral beam density profile and Qequivdt using neutron fluctuation measurements during pellet injection also have been proposed.

  7. Antenna Calibration and Measurement Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochblatt, David J.; Cortes, Manuel Vazquez

    2012-01-01

    A document describes the Antenna Calibration & Measurement Equipment (ACME) system that will provide the Deep Space Network (DSN) with instrumentation enabling a trained RF engineer at each complex to perform antenna calibration measurements and to generate antenna calibration data. This data includes continuous-scan auto-bore-based data acquisition with all-sky data gathering in support of 4th order pointing model generation requirements. Other data includes antenna subreflector focus, system noise temperature and tipping curves, antenna efficiency, reports system linearity, and instrument calibration. The ACME system design is based on the on-the-fly (OTF) mapping technique and architecture. ACME has contributed to the improved RF performance of the DSN by approximately a factor of two. It improved the pointing performances of the DSN antennas and productivity of its personnel and calibration engineers.

  8. Measurement System and Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Carsten Weber; Vesth, Allan

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this report...

  9. Measurement System and Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Allan; Kock, Carsten Weber

    The report describes power curve measurements carried out on a given wind turbine. The measurements are carried out in accordance to Ref. [1]. A site calibration has been carried out; see Ref. [2], and the measured flow correction factors for different wind directions are used in the present...

  10. Measurement System and Calibration report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Arranz, Paula; Villanueva, Héctor

    This Measurement System & Calibration report is describing DTU’s measurement system installed at a specific wind turbine. A major part of the sensors has been installed by others (see [1]) the rest of the sensors have been installed by DTU. The results of the measurements, described in this repor...

  11. Measuring Molecular Forces Using Calibrated Optical Tweezers in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Adam G; Goldman, Yale E

    2017-01-01

    Optical tweezers have been instrumental in uncovering the mechanisms motor proteins use to generate and react to force. While optical traps have primarily been applied to purified, in vitro systems, emerging methods enable measurements in living cells where the actively fluctuating, viscoelastic environment and varying refractive index complicate calibration of the instrument. Here, we describe techniques to calibrate optical traps in living cells using the forced response to sinusoidal oscillations and spontaneous fluctuations, and to measure the forces exerted by endogenous ensembles of kinesin and dynein motor proteins as they transport cargoes in the cell.

  12. Measuring shape fluctuations in biological membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzel, C.; Sengupta, K.

    2016-06-01

    Shape fluctuations of lipid membranes have intrigued cell biologists and physicists alike. In the cellular context, their origin—thermal or active—and their physiological significance are open questions. These small incessant displacements, also called membrane undulations, have mostly been studied in model membranes and membranes of simple cells like erythrocytes. Thermal fluctuations of such membranes have been very well described both theoretically and experimentally; active fluctuations are a topic of current interest. Experimentally, membrane fluctuations are not easy to measure, the main challenge being to develop techniques which are capable of measuring very small displacements at very high speed, and preferably over a large area and long time. Scattering techniques have given access to fluctuations in membrane stacks and a variety of optical microscopy based techniques have been devised to study membrane fluctuations of unilamellar vesicles, erythrocytes and other cells. Among them are flicker spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, diffraction phase microscopy and reflection interference contrast microscopy. Each of these techniques has its advantages and limitations. Here we review the basic principles of the major experimental techniques used to measure bending or shape fluctuations of biomembranes. We report seminal results obtained with each technique and highlight how these studies furthered our understanding of physical properties of membranes and their interactions. We also discuss suggested role of membrane fluctuations in different biological processes.

  13. Calibration and Validation of Measurement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Riemann, Sven; Knapp, Wilfried

    The report deals with the calibration of the measuring equipment on board the Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning prototype.......The report deals with the calibration of the measuring equipment on board the Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning prototype....

  14. Calibration of atmospheric hydrogen measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jordan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interest in atmospheric hydrogen (H2 has been growing in recent years with the prospect of H2 being a potential alternative to fossil fuels as an energy carrier. This has intensified research for a quantitative understanding of the atmospheric hydrogen cycle and its total budget, including the expansion of the global atmospheric measurement network. However, inconsistencies in published observational data constitute a major limitation in exploring such data sets. The discrepancies can be mainly attributed to difficulties in the calibration of the measurements. In this study various factors that may interfere with accurate quantification of atmospheric H2 were investigated including drifts of standard gases in high pressure cylinders. As an experimental basis a procedure to generate precise mixtures of H2 within the atmospheric concentration range was established. Application of this method has enabled a thorough linearity characterization of the commonly used GC-HgO reduction detector. We discovered that the detector response was sensitive to the composition of the matrix gas. Addressing these systematic errors, a new calibration scale has been generated defined by thirteen standards with dry air mole fractions ranging from 139–1226 nmol mol−1. This new scale has been accepted as the official World Meteorological Organisation's (WMO Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW H2 mole fraction scale.

  15. Field fluctuations measured by interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glauber, R J [Lyman Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Orozco, L A [Joint Quantum Institute, Department of Physics, University of Maryland and National Institute of Standards and Technology, College Park, MD 20742-4111 (United States); Vogel, K; Schleich, W P [Institut fuer Quantenphysik, Universitaet Ulm, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Walther, H, E-mail: glauber@physics.harvard.ed, E-mail: karl.vogel@uni-ulm.d [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    We derive the complete photon count statistics of an interferometer based on two beam splitters. As a special case we consider a joint intensity-electric field measurement. Our approach is based on the transformation properties of state vectors as well as field operators at a beam splitter.

  16. Pressures Detector Calibration and Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2156315

    2016-01-01

    This is report of my first and second projects (of 3) in NA61. I did data taking and analysis in order to do calibration of pressure detectors and verified it. I analyzed the data by ROOT software using the C ++ programming language. The first part of my project was determination of calibration factor of pressure sensors. Based on that result, I examined the relation between pressure drop, gas flow rate of in paper filter and its diameter.

  17. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  18. Strongly intensive measures for multiplicity fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begun, V. V.; Konchakovski, V. P.; Gorenstein, M. I.; Bratkovskaya, E. L.

    2013-04-01

    The two recently proposed families of strongly intensive measures of fluctuations and correlations are studied within the hadron-string-dynamics (HSD) transport approach to nucleus-nucleus collisions. We consider the measures ΔKπ and ΣKπ for kaon and pion multiplicities in Au+Au collisions in a wide range of collision energies and centralities. These strongly intensive measures appear to cancel the participant number fluctuations. This allows to enlarge the centrality window in the analysis of event-by-event fluctuations for up to at least 10% of the most central collisions. We also present a comparison of the HSD results with the data of the NA49 and STAR Collaborations. HSD describes ΣKπ reasonably well. However, the HSD results depend monotonously on collision energy and do not reproduce the bump-dip structure of ΔKπ observed from the NA49 data in the region of the center of mass energy of the nucleon pair \\sqrt{s_{NN}}= 8{--}12 GeV. This observation deserves further study. The origin of this ‘structure’ is not connected with simple geometrical or limited acceptance effects, as these effects are taken into account in HSD simulations.

  19. Fluctuation Measurements at New Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Ryan; Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Drake, Dereth; Skiff, Fred

    2013-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements from a laser induced fluorescence detection system used to resolve ion density fluctuations on spatial scales approaching the ion Debye length ~0.5 mm. The detection system consists of a pair of moveable periscopes which collimate light collected from a small measurement region (~0.1 cm3) along the axis of a magnetized singly ionized Argon plasma column. The light is imaged onto a pair of 16-channel linear photomultiplier arrays with digitized photon counting on all 32 channels at 1 MHz or on 8 channels at 4 MHz. The viewing regions may be resolved spatially either along or radial to the magnetic field axis depending on the orientation of the entrance slit. Plasma fluctuations resolved in ion velocity have never been observed at this scale. Measurements may provide insight into transport phenomena, which are fundamentally linked to plasma fluctuations. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-99ER54543.

  20. Terminology of ranging measurements and DSS calibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarek, T. A.; Otoshi, T. Y.

    1976-01-01

    A set of basic terminology related to deep space ranging measurements is proposed. Calibration equations are derived for the dish-mounted zero delay device method for 26-m antenna systems and the translator method for 64-m antenna systems.

  1. Calibration for 3D Structured Light Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A calibration procedure was developed for three-dimensional(3D) binocular structured light measurement systems. In virtue of a specially designed pattern, matching points in stereo images are extracted. And then sufficient 3D space points are obtained through pairs of images with the intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of each camera estimated prior and consequently some lights are calibrated by means of multi point fitting. Finally, a mathematical model is applied to interpolate and approximate all dynamic scanning lights based on geometry. The process of calibration method is successfully used in the binocular 3D measurement system based on structured lights and the 3D reconstruction results are satisfying.

  2. Direct measurement of antiferromagnetic domain fluctuations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shpyrko, O. G.; Isaacs, E. D.; Logan, J. M.; Feng, Y.; Aeppli, G.; Jaramillo, R.; Kim, H. C.; Rosenbaum, T. F.; Zschack, P.; Sprung, M.; Narayanan, S.; Sandy, A.; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. College London

    2007-05-03

    Measurements of magnetic noise emanating from ferromagnets owing to domain motion were first carried out nearly 100 years ago1, and have underpinned much science and technology2, 3. Antiferromagnets, which carry no net external magnetic dipole moment, yet have a periodic arrangement of the electron spins extending over macroscopic distances, should also display magnetic noise. However, this must be sampled at spatial wavelengths of the order of several interatomic spacings, rather than the macroscopic scales characteristic of ferromagnets. Here we present a direct measurement of the fluctuations in the nanometer-scale superstructure of spin- and charge-density waves associated with antiferromagnetism in elemental chromium. The technique used is X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy, where coherent X-ray diffraction produces a speckle pattern that serves as a 'fingerprint' of a particular magnetic domain configuration. The temporal evolution of the patterns corresponds to domain walls advancing and retreating over micrometer distances. This work demonstrates a useful measurement tool for antiferromagnetic domain wall engineering, but also reveals a fundamental finding about spin dynamics in the simplest antiferromagnet: although the domain wall motion is thermally activated at temperatures above 100 K, it is not so at lower temperatures, and indeed has a rate that saturates at a finite value--consistent with quantum fluctuations--on cooling below 40 K.

  3. Calibration of imaging luminance measuring devices (ILMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liying; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Lingxi; Li, Ye; Huan, Kewei; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    A method of calibration of imaging luminance measuring devices has been studied. By the device-independent color space transformation, the color image by digital camera could be converted to the CIE's absolute color space lab. Then, the calibration model is fitted between ln(L/t) and luminance. At last, luminance image is obtained and the dynamic range of luminance image could be adjusted by shutter speed.

  4. Pulsed thrust measurements using electromagnetic calibration techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Haibin; Shi Chenbo; Zhang Xin' ai; Zhang Zun; Cheng Jiao [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2011-03-15

    A thrust stand for accurately measuring impulse bits, which ranged from 10-1000 {mu}N s using a noncontact electromagnetic calibration technique is described. In particular, a permanent magnet structure was designed to produce a uniform magnetic field, and a multiturn coil was made to produce a calibration force less than 10 mN. The electromagnetic calibration force for pulsed thrust measurements was linear to the coil current and changed less than 2.5% when the distance between the coil and magnet changed 6 mm. A pulsed plasma thruster was first tested on the thrust stand, and afterward five single impulse bits were measured to give a 310 {mu}N s average impulse bit. Uncertainty of the measured impulse bit was analyzed to evaluate the quality of the measurement and was found to be 10 {mu}N s with 95% credibility.

  5. Plume Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Atle Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, California 92126 and Craig Huhta JIMAR University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822...Measurement System (PLUMES) Calibration Experiment by Age Lohrmann SonTek, Inc. 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105 San Diego, CA 92126 Craig Huhta JIMAR...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) &. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION SonTek, Inc., 7940 Silverton Avenue, No. 105, San Diego, CA 92126 REPORT NUMBER

  6. Turbulent pressure fluctuations measured during CHATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven P. Oncley; William J. Massman; Edward G. Patton

    2008-01-01

    Fast-response pressure fluctuations were included in the Canopy Horizontal Array of Turbulence Study (CHATS) at several heights within and just above the canopy in a walnut orchard. Two independent systems were intercompared and then separated. We present an evaluation of turbulence statistics - including the pressure transport term in the turbulence kinetic energy...

  7. Ozone measurement systems: associated instrumentation and calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bellido

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects produced by ozone have lead to a vast regulation to define and establish the quality goals of ambient air, based on common methods and criteria. The surveillance nets of atmospheric pollution are worldwide extended systems and the applied technology for the ozone measurement is nowadays quite standardized. The aim of this paper is to give a general view of the most common systems used in the ozone measurement in ambient air from a practical point of view. The used instrumentation and the usual calibration methods will be described.

  8. Solar Cell Calibration and Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Brinker, Dave; Curtis, Henry; Jenkins, Phillip; Scheiman, Dave

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of space solar cells and the increasing international markets for both cells and arrays has resulted in workshops jointly sponsored by NASDA, ESA and NASA. These workshops are designed to obtain international agreement on standardized values for the AMO spectrum and constant, recommend laboratory measurement practices and establish a set of protocols for international comparison of laboratory measurements. A working draft of an ISO standard, WD15387, "Requirements for Measurement and Calibration Procedures for Space Solar Cells" was discussed with a focus on the scope of the document, a definition of primary standard cell, and required error analysis for all measurement techniques. Working groups addressed the issues of Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar constant and spectrum, laboratory measurement techniques, and te international round robin methodology. A summary is presented of the current state of each area and the formulation of the ISO document.

  9. Giada improved calibration of measurement subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Corte, V.; Rotundi, A.; Sordini, R.; Accolla, M.; Ferrari, M.; Ivanovski, S.; Lucarelli, F.; Mazzotta Epifani, E.; Palumbo, P.

    2014-12-01

    GIADA (Grain Impact Analyzer and Dust Accumulator) is an in-situ instrument devoted to measure the dynamical properties of the dust grains emitted by the comet. An Extended Calibration activity using the GIADA Flight Spare Model has been carried out taking into account the knowledge gained through the analyses of IDPs and cometary samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2. GIADA consists of three measurement subsystems: Grain Detection System, an optical device measuring the optical cross-section for individual dust; Impact Sensor an aluminum plate connected to 5 piezo-sensors measuring the momentum of impacting single dust grains; Micro Balance System measuring the cumulative deposition in time of dust grains smaller than 10 μm. The results of the analyses on data acquired with the GIADA PFM and the comparison with calibration data acquired during the pre-launch campaign allowed us to improve GIADA performances and capabilities. We will report the results of the following main activities: a) definition of a correlation between the 2 GIADA Models (PFM housed in laboratory and In-Flight Model on-board ROSETTA); b) characterization of the sub-systems performances (signal elaboration, sensitivities, space environment effects); c) new calibration measurements and related curves by means of the PFM model using realistic cometary dust analogues. Acknowledgements: GIADA was built by a consortium led by the Univ. Napoli "Parthenope" & INAF-Oss. Astr. Capodimonte, IT, in collaboration with the Inst. de Astrofisica de Andalucia, ES, Selex-ES s.p.a. and SENER. GIADA is presently managed & operated by Ist. di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali-INAF, IT. GIADA was funded and managed by the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana, IT, with a support of the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science MEC, ES. GIADA was developed from a University of Kent, UK, PI proposal; sci. & tech. contribution given by CISAS, IT, Lab. d'Astr. Spat., FR, and Institutions from UK, IT, FR, DE and USA. We thank

  10. Calibration Base Lines for Electronic Distance Measuring Instruments (EDMI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A calibration base line (CBL) is a precisely measured, straight-line course of approximately 1,400 m used to calibrate Electronic Distance Measuring Instruments...

  11. Neutron Imaging Calibration to Measure Void Fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Sharma, Vishaldeep [ORNL; Fricke, Brian A [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Void fraction is an intuitive parameter that describes the fraction of vapor in a two-phase flow. It appears as a key variable in most heat transfer and pressure drop correlations used to design evaporating and condensing heat exchangers, as well as determining charge inventory in refrigeration systems. Void fraction measurement is not straightforward, however, and assumptions on the invasiveness of the measuring technique must be made. Neutron radiography or neutron imaging has the potential to be a truly non-invasive void fraction measuring technique but has until recently only offered qualitative descriptions of two-phase flow, in terms of flow maldistributions, for example. This paper describes the calibration approach necessary to employ neutron imaging to measure steady-state void fraction. Experiments were conducted at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold Guide 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN, USA.

  12. An Optimal Calibration Method for a MEMS Inertial Measurement Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An optimal calibration method for a micro-electro-mechanical inertial measurement unit (MIMU is presented in this paper. The accuracy of the MIMU is highly dependent on calibration to remove the deterministic errors of systematic errors, which also contain random errors. The overlapping Allan variance is applied to characterize the types of random error terms in the measurements. The calibration model includes package misalignment error, sensor-to-sensor misalignment error and bias, and a scale factor is built. The new concept of a calibration method, which includes a calibration scheme and a calibration algorithm, is proposed. The calibration scheme is designed by D-optimal and the calibration algorithm is deduced by a Kalman filter. In addition, the thermal calibration is investigated, as the bias and scale factor varied with temperature. The simulations and real tests verify the effectiveness of the proposed calibration method and show that it is better than the traditional method.

  13. Temperature calibration of Pico-Rad detectors for radon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bem, H; Bem, E M; Chruścielewski, W; Skalski, H

    2000-01-01

    A simple mathematical equation linking the activity of adsorbed radon in the vials to the time and temperature of its exposure is discussed. The calibration coefficient--Ks, defined as activity measured in cpm after saturation time, corresponding to radon air concentration of 1 Bq m-3, was determined for four temperatures: 284, 291, 294 and 298 K. A linear relationship of ln Ks values versus T-1 was found. The relatively high difference in Ks values: 2.12 and 1.24 cpm/Bq m-3 for the temperatures of 284 and 298 K, respectively, was observed. It indicates that temperature fluctuations during Pico-Rad vial exposure may lead to erroneous results if the constant average temperature of exposure is introduced into a commonly used computer programme for calculating Rn concentration.

  14. Temperature calibration of PICO-RAD detectors for radon measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bem, H.; Bem, E.M.; Chruscielewski, W.; Skalski, H. [Politechnika Lodzka, Lodz (Poland)

    1996-10-01

    A simple mathematical equation linking the activity of adsorbed radon in the vials to the time of its exposure has been discussed. The calibration coefficient K{sub s}, defined as a measured activity in cpm after a saturation time, corresponding to a radon air concentration of 1 Bq m{sup -3} has been determined for four temperatures: 284, 291, 294 and 298 K. A linear relationship of ln K{sub s} values versus T{sup -1} has been found. The relatively high difference in K{sub s} values: 2.12 and 1.24 cpm/Bq m{sup 3} for the temperatures of 284 and 298 K, respectively, was observed. It indicates that temperature fluctuations during Pico-Rad vial exposure may lead to erroneous results if the constant average temperature of exposure is introduced into a commonly used computer program for calculating Rn concentration. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs.

  15. Direct Measurement of Thermal Fluctuation of High-Q Pendulum

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ohashi, Masatake; Kawamura, Seiji; Miyoki, Shinji; Miyakawa, Osamu; Telada, Souichi; Kuroda, Kazuaki

    2009-01-01

    We achieved for the first time a direct measurement of the thermal fluctuation of a pendulum in an off-resonant region using a laser interferometric gravitational wave detector. These measurements have been well identified for over one decade by an agreement with a theoretical prediction, which was derived by a fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Thermal fluctuation is dominated by the contribution of resistances in coil-magnet actuator circuits. When we tuned these resistances, the noise spectrum also changed according to a theoretical prediction. The measured thermal noise level corresponds to a high quality factor on the order of 10^5 of the pendulum.

  16. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  17. Self-Calibrating Surface Measuring Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, Allen H.

    1983-04-01

    A new kind of surface-measuring machine has been developed under government contract at Itek Optical Systems, a Division of Itek Corporation, to assist in the fabrication of large, highly aspheric optical elements. The machine uses four steerable distance-measuring interferometers at the corners of a tetrahedron to measure the positions of a retroreflective target placed at various locations against the surface being measured. Using four interferometers gives redundant information so that, from a set of measurement data, the dimensions of the machine as well as the coordinates of the measurement points can be determined. The machine is, therefore, self-calibrating and does not require a structure made to high accuracy. A wood-structured prototype of this machine was made whose key components are a simple form of air bearing steering mirror, a wide-angle cat's eye retroreflector used as the movable target, and tracking sensors and servos to provide automatic tracking of the cat's eye by the four laser beams. The data are taken and analyzed by computer. The output is given in terms of error relative to an equation of the desired surface. In tests of this machine, measurements of a 0.7 m diameter mirror blank have been made with an accuracy on the order of 0.2µm rms.

  18. Magnetic Fluctuation Measurement in Sino United Spherical Tokamak Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fei; WANG Wen-Hao; HE Ye-Xi; LIU Jun; TAN Yi; XIE Li-Feng; ZENG Long

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the magnetic fluctuations and for further transport study, the poloidal and radial magnetic field measurement is conducted on the Sino United Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). Auto-power spectral density indicates that the magnetic fluctuation energy mainly concentrates in the frequency region lower than 10kHz. The magnetic field oscillations, which are characterized by harmonic frequencies of 40 kHz, are observed in the scrapeoff layer; by contrast, in the plasma core, the magnetic fluctuations are of Gaussian type. The time-frequency profiles show that the poloidal magnetic fluctuations are temporally intermittent. The autocorrelation calculation indicates that the fluctuations in decorrelation time vary between the core and the edge.

  19. Calibration of spent fuel measurement assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleska, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan

    2014-11-01

    The LVR-15 research reactor (Czech Republic) had been converted from the highly enriched IRT-2M to the low enriched IRT-4M fuel. For the possibility of the independent pre-transport evaluation of IRT-2M burnup, a spectrometric system was developed. This spectrometric system consists of the fuel holder, the collimator and the portable Canberra Big MAC HPGe (High Purity Germanium) detector. In order to have well reproducible and reliable experimental data for modeling of the measurement system, calibration with the 110mAg isotope with known activity was performed. This isotope was chosen for having energies similar to isotopes measured in fuel assemblies. The 110mAg isotope was prepared by irradiating of the silver foil in LVR-15 research reactor; its activity was evaluated in the LVR-15's spectrometric laboratory. From the measured data, an efficiency curve of the spectrometric system has been determined. The experimental data were compared to the calculation results with the MCNPX model of the spectrometric system.

  20. Measuring the Behavioral Component of Financial Fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caporin, Massimiliano; Corazzini, Luca; Costola, Michele

    We study the evolution of the behavioral component of the financial market by estimating a Bayesian mixture model in which two types of investors coexist: one rational, with standard subjective expected utility theory (SEUT) preferences, and one behavioral, endowed with an S-shaped utility function....... We perform our analysis by using monthly data on the constituents of the S&P 500 index from January 1962 to April 2012. We assume that agents take investment decisions by ranking the alternative assets according to their performance measures. A tuning parameter blending the rational...... and the behavioral choices can be estimated by using a criterion function. The estimated parameter can be interpreted as an endogenous market sentiment index. This is confirmed by a number of checks controlling for the correlation of our endogenous index with measures of (implied) financial volatility, market...

  1. Fluctuation BES measurements with the ITER core CXRS prototype spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokol, G.I., E-mail: pokol@reak.bme.hu [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Marchuk, O. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Baross, T. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Grunda, G.; Kiss, I.G. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Kovacsik, A. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, PO Box 91, H-1521, Budapest (Hungary); Hellermann, M. von; Lischtschenko, O. [Dutch-Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster and ITER-NL, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Biel, W. [Institut für Energieforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich Gmbh, Association EURATOM-FZJ, member of Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Jaspers, R.J.E. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Durkut, M. [TNO Science and Industry, Partner in ITER-NL, PO Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We integrated a fluctuation beam emission measurement into the ITER CXRS prototype spectrometer. • The fluctuation BES measurement provided data at TEXTOR that agree well with the simulation based on the Simulation Of Spectra package. • The same simulation method has been used to evaluate the feasibility of a fluctuation BES measurement on the ITER DNB using the CXRS periscopes. -- Abstract: The ITER core CXRS diagnostic system collects the light emitted from the interaction of the diagnostic neutral beam with the core plasma and guides it via a mirror labyrinth through the upper port plug no. 3 towards a fiber bundle, which then transmits the light into a set of spectrometers for spectral analysis. In order to test the accessibility of the special parameter range required for the ITER measurement, a prototype spectrometer was built and operated successfully at the TEXTOR tokamak. In addition to the He/Be, C/Ne and H/D/T regular spectral channels, a fluctuation beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system has been integrated to measure core MHD activity, and validate corresponding ITER simulation results. The fluctuation system can be operated as an alternative to the spectral BES measurement, and has 8 spatial channels sampled at 2 MHz. In this paper, we present details of the fluctuation BES system and its interface to the ITER prototype spectrometer along with simulation and measurement results at TEXTOR. We show that the measurement fully confirms the simulation results on achievable photon current at the detector and on the signal to noise ratio.

  2. A molecular Rayleigh scattering setup to measure density fluctuations in thermal boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.

    2016-12-01

    A Rayleigh scattering-based density fluctuation measurement system was set up inside a low-speed wind tunnel of NASA Ames Research Center. The immediate goal was to study the thermal boundary layer on a heated flat plate. A large number of obstacles had to be overcome to set up the system, such as the removal of dust particles using air filters, the use of photoelectron counting electronics to measure low intensity light, an optical layout to minimize stray light contamination, the reduction in tunnel vibration, and an expanded calibration process to relate photoelectron arrival rate to air density close to the plate surface. To measure spectra of turbulent density fluctuations, a two-PMT cross-correlation system was used to minimize the shot noise floor. To validate the Rayleigh measurements, temperature fluctuations spectra were calculated from density spectra and then compared with temperature spectra measured with a cold-wire probe operated in constant current mode. The spectra from the downstream half of the plate were found to be in good agreement with cold-wire probe, whereas spectra from the leading edge differed. Various lessons learnt are discussed. It is believed that the present effort is the first measurement of density fluctuations spectra in a boundary layer flow.

  3. An upgraded interferometer-polarimeter system for broadband fluctuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parke, E., E-mail: eparke@ucla.edu; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Duff, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Measuring high-frequency fluctuations (above tearing mode frequencies) is important for diagnosing instabilities and transport phenomena. The Madison Symmetric Torus interferometer-polarimeter system has been upgraded to utilize improved planar-diode mixer technology. The new mixers reduce phase noise and allow more sensitive measurements of fluctuations at high frequency. Typical polarimeter rms phase noise values of 0.05°–0.07° are obtained with 400 kHz bandwidth. The low phase noise enables the resolution of fluctuations up to 250 kHz for polarimetry and 600 kHz for interferometry. The importance of probe beam alignment for polarimetry is also verified; previously reported tolerances of ≤0.1 mm displacement for equilibrium and tearing mode measurements minimize contamination due to spatial misalignment to within acceptable levels for chords near the magnetic axis.

  4. Cumulative sum quality control for calibrated breast density measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, John J.; Cao Ke; Beam, Craig [Cancer Prevention and Control Division, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago, 1603 W. Taylor St., Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Breast density is a significant breast cancer risk factor. Although various methods are used to estimate breast density, there is no standard measurement for this important factor. The authors are developing a breast density standardization method for use in full field digital mammography (FFDM). The approach calibrates for interpatient acquisition technique differences. The calibration produces a normalized breast density pixel value scale. The method relies on first generating a baseline (BL) calibration dataset, which required extensive phantom imaging. Standardizing prospective mammograms with calibration data generated in the past could introduce unanticipated error in the standardized output if the calibration dataset is no longer valid. Methods: Sample points from the BL calibration dataset were imaged approximately biweekly over an extended timeframe. These serial samples were used to evaluate the BL dataset reproducibility and quantify the serial calibration accuracy. The cumulative sum (Cusum) quality control method was used to evaluate the serial sampling. Results: There is considerable drift in the serial sample points from the BL calibration dataset that is x-ray beam dependent. Systematic deviation from the BL dataset caused significant calibration errors. This system drift was not captured with routine system quality control measures. Cusum analysis indicated that the drift is a sign of system wear and eventual x-ray tube failure. Conclusions: The BL calibration dataset must be monitored and periodically updated, when necessary, to account for sustained system variations to maintain the calibration accuracy.

  5. Calibrating short-timescale tropospheric phase fluctuations seen by a radio telescope: Limits from subreflector and Cassegrain feed ring radiometer placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linfield, Roger

    2002-10-01

    Water vapor radiometers (WVRs) measure tropospheric brightness temperatures and use those measurements to infer path delay. Calibration of short-timescale phase fluctuations at a radio telescope requires that the WVR and radio telescope sample a similar volume of the troposphere. Using a statistical (Kolmogorov frozen flow) model of tropospheric fluctuations, the short-timescale calibration capability of two WVR configurations has been quantified. The first configuration is a WVR mounted, with its own antenna, on the back side of the main radio telescope subreflector, giving a conical beam that is coaxial with the main cylindrical near-field beam of the large telescope. The second configuration uses a Cassegrain feed ring, with the WVR and radio astronomy feeds at different positions on the ring. This second configuration gives a cylindrical calibration near-field beam, offset in angle to the main cylindrical beam. An important application of short-timescale phase calibration is improving the coherence of high-frequency interferometric observations. For two cases of current/near future interest (86 GHz very long baseline interferometry with the Very Long Baseline Array; 350 GHz observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array, ALMA), useful calibration could be achieved with either geometry (coaxial conical beam or offset cylindrical beam). For a coaxial conical beam, a 2° WVR beam width would allow significant coherence improvement, but a beam width performance. For an offset cylindrical beam, the desired angular offset (on the sky) is 43 GHz Very Large Array observations, or <=0.3° for 350 GHz ALMA observations.

  6. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Shortis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  7. Calibration Techniques for Accurate Measurements by Underwater Camera Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortis, Mark

    2015-12-07

    Calibration of a camera system is essential to ensure that image measurements result in accurate estimates of locations and dimensions within the object space. In the underwater environment, the calibration must implicitly or explicitly model and compensate for the refractive effects of waterproof housings and the water medium. This paper reviews the different approaches to the calibration of underwater camera systems in theoretical and practical terms. The accuracy, reliability, validation and stability of underwater camera system calibration are also discussed. Samples of results from published reports are provided to demonstrate the range of possible accuracies for the measurements produced by underwater camera systems.

  8. Enhanced stochastic fluctuations to measure steep adhesive energy landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Ahmad; Potter, Daniel; Sulchek, Todd A

    2016-12-13

    Free-energy landscapes govern the behavior of all interactions in the presence of thermal fluctuations in the fields of physical chemistry, materials sciences, and the biological sciences. From the energy landscape, critical information about an interaction, such as the reaction kinetic rates, bond lifetimes, and the presence of intermediate states, can be determined. Despite the importance of energy landscapes to understanding reaction mechanisms, most experiments do not directly measure energy landscapes, particularly for interactions with steep force gradients that lead to premature jump to contact of the probe and insufficient sampling of transition regions. Here we present an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach for measuring energy landscapes that increases sampling of strongly adhesive interactions by using white-noise excitation to enhance the cantilever's thermal fluctuations. The enhanced fluctuations enable the recording of subtle deviations from a harmonic potential to accurately reconstruct interfacial energy landscapes with steep gradients. Comparing the measured energy landscape with adhesive force measurements reveals the existence of an optimal excitation voltage that enables the cantilever fluctuations to fully sample the shape and depth of the energy surface.

  9. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  10. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Yates, T Y

    2008-10-01

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  11. Wavenumber-frequency Spectra of Pressure Fluctuations Measured via Fast Response Pressure Sensitive Paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, J.; Roozeboom, N. H.; Ross, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement in fast-response Pressure-Sensitive Paint (PSP) allows time-resolved measurements of unsteady pressure fluctuations from a dense grid of spatial points on a wind tunnel model. This capability allows for direct calculations of the wavenumber-frequency (k-?) spectrum of pressure fluctuations. Such data, useful for the vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, are difficult to obtain otherwise. For the present work, time histories of pressure fluctuations on a flat plate subjected to vortex shedding from a rectangular bluff-body were measured using PSP. The light intensity levels in the photographic images were then converted to instantaneous pressure histories by applying calibration constants, which were calculated from a few dynamic pressure sensors placed at selective points on the plate. Fourier transform of the time-histories from a large number of spatial points provided k-? spectra for pressure fluctuations. The data provides first glimpse into the possibility of creating detailed forcing functions for vibro-acoustics analysis of aerospace vehicles, albeit for a limited frequency range.

  12. A detailed procedure for measuring turbulent velocity fluctuations using constant-voltage anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed-Taifour, Abdelouahab; Weiss, Julien; Sadeghi, Atabak; Vétel, Jérôme; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    A detailed procedure to use a constant-voltage anemometer (CVA) for the accurate measurement of turbulent flows is proposed. The procedure is based on the usual small-perturbation analysis of hot-wire signals. It consists in three steps: (1) the calibration of internal elements, required to estimate the two main electrical parameters of the CVA circuitry that are needed in the data analysis, (2) a flow calibration to relate the CVA output voltage and the hot-wire time constant to the flow velocity, and (3) a data-processing algorithm to recover the fluctuating flow quantities from the output voltage. The procedure is tested in two classical turbulent flows: a zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer and a round jet. In both cases, the CVA results are shown to be essentially indistinguishable from the results obtained with a research-grade constant-temperature anemometer.

  13. Measuring Happiness: From Fluctuating Happiness to Authentic–Durable Happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrun, Michaël; Ricard, Matthieu; Després, Gérard; Drelon, Emilie; Gibelin, Eva; Gibelin, Marion; Loubeyre, Mélanie; Py, Delphine; Delpy, Aurore; Garibbo, Céline; Bray, Elise; Lac, Gérard; Michaux, Odile

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the theoretical distinction between self-centeredness and selflessness (Dambrun and Ricard, 2011), the main goal of this research was to develop two new scales assessing distinct dimensions of happiness. By trying to maximize pleasures and to avoid displeasures, we propose that a self-centered functioning induces a fluctuating happiness in which phases of pleasure and displeasure alternate repeatedly (i.e., Fluctuating Happiness). In contrast, a selfless psychological functioning postulates the existence of a state of durable plenitude that is less dependent upon circumstances but rather is related to a person’s inner resources and abilities to deal with whatever comes his way in life (i.e., Authentic–Durable Happiness). Using various samples (n = 735), we developed a 10-item Scale measuring Subjective Fluctuating Happiness (SFHS) and a 13-item scale assessing Subjective Authentic–Durable Happiness (SA–DHS). Results indicated high internal consistencies, satisfactory test–retest validities, and adequate convergent and discriminant validities with various constructs including a biological marker of stress (salivary cortisol). Consistent with our theoretical framework, while self-enhancement values were related only to fluctuating happiness, self-transcendence values were related only to authentic–durable happiness. Support for the distinction between contentment and inner-peace, two related markers of authentic happiness, also was found. PMID:22347202

  14. EPR measurement and the origin of cosmic density fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morikawa Masahiro

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We explore consistent application of quantum mechanics to the objects in the Universe and in laboratories. The measurement dynamics in quantum mechanics is modeled as a physical process of spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB which is described by the generalized effective action method. A violation of the Bell inequality is observed in this model and the generation of the density fluctuations in the early Universe is described as the SSB process of the spatially translational symmetry.

  15. Superresolution measurement on the minute fluctuation of cell membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing; HUANG Yaoxiong; ZHAO Haiyan; TU Mei; CHEN Wenxin

    2006-01-01

    A novel method for measuring the minute fluctuation of cell membrane is developed by modifying the super-resolution theory, increasing dimension in Fourier space, enhancing brightness gradient and utilizing maximum adaptive weighted averaging filter (MAWA) in obstructing noise. The application of the method in studying aspergillus flavus cell (AFC) and red blood cell and the new findings from the study show that it is a useful tool.

  16. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for yaw misalignment measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Demurtas, Giorgio; Zahle, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    The spinner anemometer is an instrument for yaw misalignment measurements without the drawbacks of instruments mounted on the nacelle top. The spinner anemometer uses a non-linear conversion algorithm that converts the measured wind speeds by three sonic sensors on the spinner to horizontal wind...... constant, k1, mainly affects the measurement of wind speed. The ratio between the two constants, kα = k2/k1, however, only affects the measurement of flow angles. The calibration of kα is thus a basic calibration of the spinner anemometer. Theoretical background for the non-linear calibration is derived...... from the generic spinner anemometer conversion algorithm. Five different methods were evaluated for calibration of a spinner anemometer on a 500 kW wind turbine. The first three methods used rotor yaw direction as reference angular, while the wind turbine, was yawed in and out of the wind. The fourth...

  17. Calibration for Radiation Protection Equipment for the Measuring Airborne Tritium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Xi-lin; SHEN; En-wei; WEI; Ke-xin; WANG; Kong-zhao; LI; Hou-wen; GE; Jian-an; LV; Xiao-xia

    2012-01-01

    <正>Monitoring airborne tritium is an important routine work in heavy water reactor nuclear power stations and the units related with tritium. Nowadays direct measuring instruments like hand carrying tritium monitors are more often used in routine workshop environment check. Need for calibrating such monitors was suggested. A trial work about the calibration for radiation protection equipment for measuring airborne tritium was carried out with a domestic standard EJ/T 1077-1998 equivalent that of IEC 710.

  18. Measurement of the electric fluctuation spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D; Mozer, F S; Horbury, T S; Reme, H

    2005-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the solar wind is observed to show the spectral behavior of classical Kolmogorov fluid turbulence over an inertial subrange and departures from this at short wavelengths, where energy should be dissipated. Here we present the first measurements of the electric field fluctuation spectrum over the inertial and dissipative wavenumber ranges in a $\\beta \\gtrsim 1$ plasma. The $k^{-5/3}$ inertial subrange is observed and agrees strikingly with the magnetic fluctuation spectrum; the wave phase speed in this regime is shown to be consistent with the Alfv\\'en speed. At smaller wavelengths $k \\rho_i \\geq 1$ the electric spectrum is softer and is consistent with the expected dispersion relation of short-wavelength kinetic Alfv\\'en waves. Kinetic Alfv\\'en waves damp on the solar wind ions and electrons and may act to isotropize them. This effect may explain the fluid-like nature of the solar wind.

  19. The Measure-theoretic Identity Underlying Transient Fluctuation Theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Shargel, Benjamin Hertz

    2010-01-01

    We prove a measure-theoretic identity that underlies all transient fluctuation theorems (TFTs) for entropy production and dissipated work in inhomogeneous deterministic and stochastic processes, including those of Evans and Searles, Crooks, and Seifert. The identity is used to deduce a tautological physical interpretation of TFTs in terms of the arrow of time, and its generality reveals that the self-inverse nature of the various trajectory and process transformations historically relied upon to prove TFTs, while necessary for these theorems from a physical standpoint, is not necessary from a mathematical one. The moment generating functions of thermodynamic variables appearing in the identity are shown to converge in general only in a vertical strip in the complex plane, with the consequence that a TFT that holds over arbitrary timescales may fail to give rise to an asymptotic fluctuation theorem for any possible speed of the corresponding large deviation principle. The case of strongly biased birth-death ch...

  20. A new method for thread calibration on coordinate measuring machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmignato, Simone; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    CIRP Annals – Paper proposal temporary reference: P15. This paper presents a new method for the calibration of thread gauges on coordinate measuring machines. The procedure involves scanning of thread profiles using a needle-like probe, achieving traceability by substitution of different thread......-3 gave measuring uncertainties comparable to the values from usual calibration methods on dedicated equipment, e.g. a measuring uncertainty of 1.5 µm was achieved for measurement of the pitch, and 2-2.5 µm for diameter measurements....

  1. Calibration and validation of measurement system. Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofoed, J.P-; Riemann, S.; Knapp, W.

    2004-03-01

    This report deals with the calibration of the measuring equipment on board the Wave Dragon, Nissum Bredning (WD-NB) prototype. The report covers the following instruments on board WD-NB: 1) Pressure transducers. 2) Force transducers. 3) Accelerometers. 4) Displacement sensors. 5) Strain gauges. 6) Inclinometers. All of these instruments are connected to the HBM MGC+ amplifier and data acquisition unit. In the following the calibration will be dealt with individually. Furthermore, a preliminary calibration of the siphon and dummy turbines has been carried out and this is also described in the following. (au)

  2. Ion gyroscale fluctuation measurement with microwave imaging reflectometer on KSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W.; Leem, J.; Yun, G. S.; Park, H. K.; Ko, S. H.; Wang, W. X.; Budny, R. V.; Luhmann, N. C.; Kim, K. W.

    2016-11-01

    Ion gyroscale turbulent fluctuations with the poloidal wavenumber kθ ˜ 3 cm-1 have been measured in the core region of the neutral beam (NB) injected low confinement (L-mode) plasmas on Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research. The turbulence poloidal wavenumbers are deduced from the frequencies and poloidal rotation velocities in the laboratory frame, measured by the multichannel microwave imaging reflectometer. Linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations also predict the unstable modes with the normalized wavenumber kθρs ˜ 0.4, consistent with the measurement. Comparison of the measured frequencies with the intrinsic mode frequencies from the linear simulations indicates that the measured ones are primarily due to the E × B flow velocity in the NB-injected fast rotating plasmas.

  3. Radiometric Calibrations, Measurements, and Standards Development at NREL: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D. R.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.; Reda, I.; Wilcox, S.; Gotseff, P.; Kay, B.

    2001-10-01

    Presented at the 2001 NCPV Program Review Meeting: Radiometric calibrations, measurements, and standards development at NREL. We describe proposed revisions to current reference standard spectral distributions used to evaluate photovoltaic device performance and durability of materials. Improvements in broadband outdoor radiometer calibrations reduce uncertainties in broadband radiometer calibrations. We report a method to quantify the rate of change of broadband radiometer responsivities as a function of integrated exposure to irradiance and thermal energy. The results of applying a vector of calibration factors or responsivities to field data to remove zenith-angle dependent errors in global solar radiation measurements are shown. We report on the relative sensitivity of radiometers to daily versus biweekly cleaning.

  4. Active calibration target for bistatic radar cross-section measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienaar, M.; Odendaal, J. W.; Joubert, J.; Cilliers, J. E.; Smit, J. C.

    2016-05-01

    Either passive calibration targets are expensive and complex to manufacture or their bistatic radar cross section (RCS) levels are significantly lower than the monostatic RCS levels of targets such as spheres, dihedral, and trihedral corner reflectors. In this paper the performance of an active calibration target with relative high bistatic RCS values is illustrated as a reference target for bistatic RCS measurements. The reference target is simple to manufacture, operates over a wide frequency range, and can be configured to calibrate all four polarizations (VV, HH, HV, and VH). Bistatic RCS measurements of canonical targets, performed in a controlled environment, are calibrated with the reference target and the results are compared to simulated results using FEKO.

  5. Calibrating Car-Following Model Considering Measurement Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-qiao Shao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Car-following model has important applications in traffic and safety engineering. To enhance the accuracy of model in predicting behavior of individual driver, considerable studies strive to improve the model calibration technologies. However, microscopic car-following models are generally calibrated by using macroscopic traffic data ignoring measurement errors-in-variables that leads to unreliable and erroneous conclusions. This paper aims to develop a technology to calibrate the well-known Van Aerde model. Particularly, the effect of measurement errors-in-variables on the accuracy of estimate is considered. In order to complete calibration of the model using microscopic data, a new parameter estimate method named two-step approach is proposed. The result shows that the modified Van Aerde model to a certain extent is more reliable than the generic model.

  6. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qingzhong; Yang, Gongliu; Song, Ningfang; Liu, Yiliang

    2016-06-22

    An inertial navigation system (INS) has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10(-6)°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs) using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs.

  7. Systematic Calibration for Ultra-High Accuracy Inertial Measurement Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An inertial navigation system (INS has been widely used in challenging GPS environments. With the rapid development of modern physics, an atomic gyroscope will come into use in the near future with a predicted accuracy of 5 × 10−6°/h or better. However, existing calibration methods and devices can not satisfy the accuracy requirements of future ultra-high accuracy inertial sensors. In this paper, an improved calibration model is established by introducing gyro g-sensitivity errors, accelerometer cross-coupling errors and lever arm errors. A systematic calibration method is proposed based on a 51-state Kalman filter and smoother. Simulation results show that the proposed calibration method can realize the estimation of all the parameters using a common dual-axis turntable. Laboratory and sailing tests prove that the position accuracy in a five-day inertial navigation can be improved about 8% by the proposed calibration method. The accuracy can be improved at least 20% when the position accuracy of the atomic gyro INS can reach a level of 0.1 nautical miles/5 d. Compared with the existing calibration methods, the proposed method, with more error sources and high order small error parameters calibrated for ultra-high accuracy inertial measurement units (IMUs using common turntables, has a great application potential in future atomic gyro INSs.

  8. Atmospheric radiocarbon calibration to 45,000 yr BP : Late glacial fluctuations and cosmogenic isotope production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H; van der Plicht, J

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present), The results confirm the

  9. Calibration of Laser Beam Direction for Inner Diameter Measuring Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tongyu Yang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The laser triangulation method is one of the most advanced methods for large inner diameter measurement. Our research group proposed a kind of inner diameter measuring device that is principally composed of three laser displacement sensors known to be fixed in the same plane measurement position. It is necessary to calibrate the direction of the laser beams that are emitted by laser displacement sensors because they do not meet the theoretical model accurately. For the purpose of calibrating the direction of laser beams, a calibration method and mathematical model were proposed. The inner diameter measuring device is equipped with the spindle of the machine tool. The laser beams rotate and translate in the plane and constitute the rotary rays which are driven to scan the inner surface of the ring gauge. The direction calibration of the laser beams can be completed by the sensors’ distance information and corresponding data processing method. The corresponding error sources are analyzed and the validity of the method is verified. After the calibration, the measurement error of the inner diameter measuring device reduced from ± 25 μ m to ± 15 μ m and the relative error was not more than 0.011%.

  10. Precision of future experiments measuring primordial tensor fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Recently the second phase of Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP2) claimed a detection of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r$) of primordial fluctuation at $5\\sigma$ confidence level. If it is true, this large and measurable amplitude ($r \\simeq 0.2$) of B-mode polarization indicates that it is possible to measure the shape of CMB B-mode polarization with future experiments. Given the current understanding of the experimental noise and foreground contamination, we forecast the precision of $r$ and the tensor spectral index $n_{\\rm t}$ measurements from Planck, Spider and POLARBEAR with $n_{\\rm t}$ as a free parameter. We quantitatively determine the signal-to-noise of the measurement in $r$-$n_{\\rm t}$ parameter space for the three experiments. The forecasted signal-to-noise ratio of the B-mode polarization somewhat depends on $n_{\\rm t}$, but strongly depends on the true value of $r$.

  11. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  12. Fusion yield measurements on JET and their calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syme, D.B., E-mail: brian.syme@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Popovichev, S. [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Conroy, S. [EURATOM-VR Association, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Lengar, I.; Snoj, L. [EURATOM-MHEST Association, Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sowden, C. [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Giacomelli, L. [EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, CNR-IFP and Univ. di Milano-Bicocca, Milan (Italy); Hermon, G.; Allan, P.; Macheta, P.; Plummer, D.; Stephens, J. [EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OXON OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Batistoni, P. [EURATOM-ENEA Association, Via E. Fermi,40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Prokopowicz, R.; Jednorog, S. [EURATOM-IPPLM Association, Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Abhangi, M.R.; Makwana, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, 382 428 Gujarat (India)

    2014-11-15

    The power output of fusion experiments and fusion reactor-like devices is measured in terms of the neutron yields which relate directly to the fusion yield. In this paper we describe the devices and methods used to make the new in situ calibration of JET in April 2013 and its early results. The target accuracy of this calibration was 10%, just as in the earlier JET calibration and as required for ITER, where a precise neutron yield measurement is important, e.g., for tritium accountancy. We discuss the constraints and early decisions which defined the main calibration approach, e.g., the choice of source type and the deployment method. We describe the physics, source issues, safety and engineering aspects required to calibrate directly the Fission Chambers and the Activation System which carry the JET neutron calibration. In particular a direct calibration of the Activation system was planned for the first time in JET. We used the existing JET remote-handling system to deploy the {sup 252}Cf source and developed the compatible tooling and systems necessary to ensure safe and efficient deployment in these cases. The scientific programme has sought to better understand the limitations of the calibration, to optimise the measurements and other provisions, to provide corrections for perturbing factors (e.g., presence of the remote-handling boom and other non-standard torus conditions) and to ensure personnel safety and safe working conditions. Much of this work has been based on an extensive programme of Monte-Carlo calculations which, e.g., revealed a potential contribution to the neutron yield via a direct line of sight through the ports which presents individually depending on the details of the port geometry.

  13. Measurement quality assurance for beta particle calibrations at NIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, C.G.; Pruitt, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Standardized beta-particle fields have been established in an international standard and have been adopted for use in several U.S. dosimeter and instrument testing standards. Calibration methods and measurement quality assurance procedures employed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for beta-particle calibrations in these reference fields are discussed. The calibration facility including the NIST-automated extrapolation ionization chamber is described, and some sample results of calibrations are shown. Methods for establishing and maintaining traceability to NIST of secondary laboratories are discussed. Currently, there are problems in finding a good method for routine testing of traceability to NIST. Some examples of past testing methods are given and solutions to this problem are proposed.

  14. Novel analysis technique for measuring edge density fluctuation profiles with reflectometry in the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creely, A. J.; Ida, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tokuzawa, T.; Tsujimura, T.; Akiyama, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Emoto, M.; Tanaka, K.; Michael, C. A.

    2017-07-01

    A new method for measuring density fluctuation profiles near the edge of plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) has been developed utilizing reflectometry combined with pellet-induced fast density scans. Reflectometer cutoff location was calculated by proportionally scaling the cutoff location calculated with fast far infrared laser interferometer (FIR) density profiles to match the slower time resolution results of the ray-tracing code LHD-GAUSS. Plasma velocity profile peaks generated with this reflectometer mapping were checked against velocity measurements made with charge exchange spectroscopy (CXS) and were found to agree within experimental uncertainty once diagnostic differences were accounted for. Measured density fluctuation profiles were found to peak strongly near the edge of the plasma, as is the case in most tokamaks. These measurements can be used in the future to inform inversion methods of phase contrast imaging (PCI) measurements. This result was confirmed with both a fixed frequency reflectometer and calibrated data from a multi-frequency comb reflectometer, and this method was applied successfully to a series of discharges. The full width at half maximum of the turbulence layer near the edge of the plasma was found to be only 1.5-3 cm on a series of LHD discharges, less than 5% of the normalized minor radius.

  15. How reproducible are the measurements of leaf fluctuating asymmetry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail V. Kozlov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuating asymmetry (FA represents small, non-directional deviations from perfect symmetry in morphological characters. FA is generally assumed to increase in response to stress; therefore, FA is frequently used in ecological studies as an index of environmental or genetic stress experienced by an organism. The values of FA are usually small, and therefore the reliable detection of FA requires precise measurements. The reproducibility of fluctuating asymmetry (FA was explored by comparing the results of measurements of scanned images of 100 leaves of downy birch (Betula pubescens conducted by 31 volunteer scientists experienced in studying plant FA. The median values of FA varied significantly among the participants, from 0.000 to 0.074, and the coefficients of variation in FA for individual leaves ranged from 25% to 179%. The overall reproducibility of the results among the participants was rather low (0.074. Variation in instruments and methods used by the participants had little effect on the reported FA values, but the reproducibility of the measurements increased by 30% following exclusion of data provided by seven participants who had modified the suggested protocol for leaf measurements. The scientists working with plant FA are advised to pay utmost attention to adequate and detailed description of their data acquisition protocols in their forthcoming publications, because all characteristics of instruments and methods need to be controlled to increase the quality and reproducibility of the data. Whenever possible, the images of all measured objects and the results of primary measurements should be published as electronic appendices to scientific papers.

  16. Free-field calibration of measurement microphones at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Torras Rosell, Antoni;

    2011-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most of sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as assessment of the noise emitted by ultrasound clean...

  17. Measurement and Calibration of PSD with Phase-shifting Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehan, J. P.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the instrumental aspects affecting the measurement accuracy when determining PSD with phase shifting interferometers. These include the source coherence, optical train effects, and detector effects. The use of a carefully constructed calibration standard will also be discussed. We will end with a recommended measurement and data handling procedure.

  18. A New Full Pose Measurement Method for Robot Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jun Kang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of robot kinematic errors during the calibration process often requires accurate full pose measurements (position and orientation of robot end-effectors in Cartesian space. This paper proposes a new method of full pose measurement of robot end-effectors for calibration. This method is based on an analysis of the features of a set of target points (placed on a rotating end-effector on a circular trajectory. The accurate measurement is validated by computational simulation results from the Puma robot. Moreover, experimental calibration and validation results for the Hyundai HA-06 robot prove the effectiveness, correctness, and reliability of the proposed method. This method can be applied to robots that have entirely revolute joints or to robots for which only the last joint is revolute.

  19. Network analyzer calibration for cryogenic on-wafer measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hietala, V.M.; Housel, M.S.; Caldwell, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    A cryogenic probe station for on-wafer microwave measurements has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to explore the basic device physics and characterize advanced components for low-temperature applications. The station was designed to operate over a temperature range of 20 to 300 K with a frequency range of DC to 50 GHz. Due to the vacuum and the low temperature environment, the use of microwave probes and the calibration of network analyzer measurements are somewhat elaborate. This paper presents guidelines for probe use and calibration in this environment.

  20. Calibration of ipsilateral stimulus transducer for acoustic reflex measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, S; Osterhammel, P A; Rasmussen, A N; Nielsen, L H

    1995-01-01

    Pure-tone Reference Equivalent Threshold Sound Pressure Level (RETSPL) of the ipsilateral stimulus receiver for acoustic reflex measurements on Madsen Electronics type Zodiac 901 impedance audiometer is provided. The results, obtained from 20 normal-hearing subjects, are achieved by comparing hearing threshold levels measured using a TDH 39 telephone (calibrated to ISO 389) with thresholds recorded using the ipsilateral stimulus insert phone. The calibration is referenced to an IEC-711 ear simulator and comprises the following frequencies: 125, 250, 500, 750, 1000, 1500, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, 8000 Hz.

  1. IMAGE PROFILE AREA CALCULATION BASED ON CIRCULAR SAMPLE MEASUREMENT CALIBRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A practical approach of measurement calibration is presented for obtaining the true area of the photographed objects projected in the 2-D image scene. The calibration is performed using three circular samples with given diameters. The process is first to obtain the ratio mm/pixel in two orthogonal directions, and then use the obtained ratios with the total number of pixels scanned within projected area of the object of interest to compute the desired area. Compared the optically measured areas with their corresponding true areas, the results show that the proposed method is quite encouraging and the relevant application also proves the approach adequately accurate.

  2. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electron and photon is paramount for many ATLAS physics analysis. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed in-situ using a large statistics of Z->ee events. The results obtained with the pp collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at sqrt(s)= 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb-1 and 2.7 fb-1 respectively , as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented.

  3. Electron and photon energy measurement calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Manzoni, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An accurate calibration of the energy measurement of electrons and photons is paramount for many ATLAS physics analyses. The calibration of the energy measurement is performed $in$-$situ$ using a large statistics of $Z \\rightarrow ee$ events. The results obtained with the $pp$ collisions data recorded in 2015 and 2016 at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ and 2.7 fb$^{-1}$ respectively, as well as the corresponding uncertainties on the electron and photon energy scales, are presented

  4. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm.

  5. Fast temperature fluctuation measurements in SOL of tokamak TCV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horacek, J.; Nielsen, Anders Henry; Pitts, R.A.

    coupling both across the plasma sheath and in the probe circuit itself. Comparisons are also made between the results from higher frequency sweeping and the standard values derived from a slower sweep to show that the fast measurement is reliable. Considerable effort has been expended in recent years...... to compare the statistical character of turbulence in the SOL particle flux on TCV with results from the 2D fluid electrostatic model ESEL [2][4]. Using results from the fast sweeping, similar comparisons can now be made with the fluctuating Te and will be described in this contribution. We also present...... distribution function, introduced for SOL turbulence in [5]. The fast Te capability also allows the SOL response to Edge Localised Modes (ELMs) to be studied and new results will be presented for the far SOL Te response during Type III ELMs....

  6. Simplified calibration for broadband solar ultraviolet radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenrieder, A; Hoeppe, P; Koepke, P; Reuder, J; Schween, J; Schreder, J

    2003-12-01

    Aspects of different calibration procedures for erythemally weighing broadband radiometers are presented in this study. These instruments are common in projects dealing with ultraviolet radiation effects on humans. Many erythemally weighing broadband radiometers are still operated using a single calibration factor (cf) that is provided with the instrument. The individual characteristics of every instrument are strongly dependent on the total ozone amount and the solar elevation. Therefore, a calibration procedure also has to take into account the ozone concentrations and the solar elevation to compensate for the effects of the individual characteristics and to provide comparable measurements. Given the variation of the ozone concentrations and the solar elevation, an individual cf has to be calculated for every measurement. Using a simplified version of the calibration procedure, which is presented in this study, can lessen this effort. Taking into account the relevant meteorological conditions for a measuring site, a single cf is calculated to compensate the individual characteristics of the instruments and therefore deliver comparable measurements with less effort.

  7. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation...

  8. Calibration procedure of measuring system for vehicle wheel load estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluziewicz, M.; Maniowski, M.

    2016-09-01

    The calibration procedure of wheel load measuring system is presented. Designed method allows estimation of selected wheel load components while the vehicle is in motion. Mentioned system is developed to determine friction forces between tire and road surface, basing on measured internal reaction forces in wheel suspension mechanism. Three strain gauge bridges and three-component piezoelectric load cell are responsible for internal force measurement in suspension components, two wire sensors are measuring displacements. External load is calculated via kinematic model of suspension mechanism implemented in Matlab environment. In the described calibration procedure, internal reactions are measured on a test stand while the system is loaded by a force of known direction and value.

  9. A New Method to Calibrate Robot Visual Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to calibrate the robot visual measurement system. In the paper, a laser tracker is used to calibrate the robot twist angles. Each axis of the robot is moved to many positions and the positions measured by the laser tracker fit a plane. The normal vectors of the planes are the directions of the Z axes. According to the definition of the robot kinematics model parameters, the errors of the twist angles can be calculated. The joint angles zero offsets are calibrated by the constraint that the rotation relationship between the world frame and the robot base frame is relatively constant. A planar target with several parallel lines is used to obtain the pose of the camera relative to the planar target by the lines in the target plane and the vanishing line of the plane. The quantum behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO algorithm is used to calculate the parameters. Experiments are performed and the results show that the accuracy of the robot visual measurement system is improved about 10 times after being calibrated.

  10. Correlation and spectral measurements of fluctuating pressures and velocities in annular turbulent flow. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.J.; Jones, B.G.; Roy, R.P.

    1980-02-01

    An experimental study of the fluctuating velocity field, the fluctuating static wall pressure and the in-stream fluctuating static pressure in an annular turbulent air flow system with a radius ratio of 4.314 has been conducted. The study included direct measurements of the mean velocity profile, turbulent velocity field; fluctuating static wall pressure and in-stream fluctuating static pressure from which the statistical values of the turbulent intensity levels, power spectral densities of the turbulent quantities, the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating static pressure in the core region of the flow and the cross-correlation between the fluctuating static wall pressure and the fluctuating velocity field in the core region of the flow were obtained.

  11. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for wind speed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demurtas, Giorgio; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    of the spinner anemometer is based on the flow distortion caused by the wind turbine spinner. The flow on the spinner surface is measured by means of three 1D sonic sensors mounted on the spinner and a conversion algorithm to convert the wind velocity components measured by the three sonic sensors to horizontal...... wind speed, yaw misalignment and flow inclination angle. The algorithm utilizes two calibration constants that are specific to the spinner shape, blade root design and to the mounting positions of the sonic sensors on the spinner. The present analysis describes methods to determine the calibration......The power curve of a wind turbine can be measured, according to IEC 61400-12-2 with a nacelle-mounted anemometer. Typically, a sonic anemometer or a cup anemometer and a wind vane are mounted on the back of the nacelle roof. Another option is to use a spinner anemometer. The measurement principle...

  12. Progress report on Freeform Calibrations on Coordinate Measureing Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savio, Enrico; Meneghello, R.; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This report is made as a part of the project Easytrac, an EU project under the programme: Competitive and Sustainable Growth: Contract No: G6RD-CT-2000-00188, coordinated by UNIMETRIK S.A. (Spain). The project is concerned with low uncertainty calibrations on coordinate measuring machines....... The Centre for Geometrical Metrology (CGM) at the Technical University of Denmark takes care of free form measurements, in collaboration with DIMEG, University of Padova, Italy and Unilab Srl, Italy....

  13. Measurement of small antenna reflector losses for radiometer calibration budget

    OpenAIRE

    Skou, Niels

    1997-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small, they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiation. This paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental setup. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle

  14. Accurate antenna reflector loss measurements for radiometer calibration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skou, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Antenna reflector losses may play an important role in the calibration budget for a microwave radiometer. If the losses are small they are difficult to measure by traditional means. However, they can be assessed directly by radiometric means using the sky brightness temperature as incident radiat...... radiation. The paper describes how such measurements are carried out as well as a suitable experimental set-up. The main reflector of the European Space Agency's MIMR system is used to demonstrate the principle...

  15. Calibration of NASA Turbulent Air Motion Measurement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, John D. W.; Ritter, John A.; Watson, Catherine E.; Wynkoop, Mark W.; Quinn, John K.; Norfolk, Daniel R.

    1996-01-01

    A turbulent air motion measurement system (TAMMS) was integrated onboard the Lockheed 188 Electra airplane (designated NASA 429) based at the Wallops Flight Facility in support of the NASA role in global tropospheric research. The system provides air motion and turbulence measurements from an airborne platform which is capable of sampling tropospheric and planetary boundary-layer conditions. TAMMS consists of a gust probe with free-rotating vanes mounted on a 3.7-m epoxy-graphite composite nose boom, a high-resolution inertial navigation system (INS), and data acquisition system. A variation of the tower flyby method augmented with radar tracking was implemented for the calibration of static pressure position error and air temperature probe. Additional flight calibration maneuvers were performed remote from the tower in homogeneous atmospheric conditions. System hardware and instrumentation are described and the calibration procedures discussed. Calibration and flight results are presented to illustrate the overall ability of the system to determine the three-component ambient wind fields during straight and level flight conditions.

  16. Measurements of magnetic field fluctuations using an array of Hall detectors on the TEXTOR tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuran, I.; Stöckel, J.; Mank, G.; Finken, K. H.; Fuchs, G.; Oost, G. Van

    2002-10-01

    Hall detectors have been used to measure the magnetic field together with its' fluctuations in the boundary of a tokamak. The results show, that the measurements which have been performed so far, mainly by use of coils together with subsequent integration, either on-line or later by computer, can be substituted by Hall probe measurements giving the desired value of B directly. Because the integration of the coil signal becomes more and more difficult with long pulses, Hall detectors may give advantages in future fusion devices. We implemented a stack of nine Hall detectors mounted on three planes on a rod in such a way, that the three components of the magnetic field can be measured. To avoid capacitive and charge pickup from the plasma, the probes are electrically shielded. The damping due to skin effect within this shield has been taken into account. The probes have been calibrated using a known magnetic field of a straight wire driven with a LC bank. This field has been precisely measured with a Rogowski coil. The dependence of the Hall coefficient on the frequency has been measured and the pickup in the feeds due to Ḃ has been withdrawn from the results. We demonstrate the method with measurements on the TEXTOR tokamak, where we could clearly detect the small stray fields associated with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluctuations. On TEXTOR we have been able to detect the MHD activity preceding discharge disruptions as well as the precursors of the so called sawteeth. The results are compared to those of other diagnostics on TEXTOR as, e.g., magnetic loops and electron cyclotron emission, and they do well compare.

  17. Radar measurement of L-band signal fluctuations caused by propagation through trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Fluctuations of an L-band, horizontally polarized signal that was transmitted from the ground through a coniferous forest canopy to an airborne radar are examined. The azimuth synthetic aperture radar (SAR) impulse response in the presence of the measured magnitude fluctuations shows increased sidelobes over the case with no trees. Statistics of the observed fluctuations are similar to other observations.

  18. Design and calibration of the AWCC for measuring uranium hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, T.R.; Menlove, H.O.; WSalton, G.; Baca, J.

    1995-08-01

    An Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) has been modified to measure variable enrichment uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in storage bottles. An active assay technique was used to measure the {sup 235}U content because of the small quantity (nominal loading of 2 kg UF{sub 6}) and nonuniform distribution of UF{sub 6} in the storage bottles. A new insert was designed for the AWCC composed of graphite containing four americium-lithium sources. Monte Carlo calculations were used to design the insert and to calibrate the detector. Benchmark measurements and calculations were performed using uranium oxide resulted in assay values that agreed within 2 to 3% of destructive assay values. In addition to UF{sub 6}, the detector was also calibrated for HEU ingots, billets, and alloy scrap using the standard Mode 1 end-plug configuration.

  19. Calibration of Smartphone-Based Weather Measurements Using Pairwise Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and reliable daily global weather reports are necessary for weather forecasting and climate analysis. However, the availability of these reports continues to decline due to the lack of economic support and policies in maintaining ground weather measurement systems from where these reports are obtained. Thus, to mitigate data scarcity, it is required to utilize weather information from existing sensors and built-in smartphone sensors. However, as smartphone usage often varies according to human activity, it is difficult to obtain accurate measurement data. In this paper, we present a heuristic-based pairwise gossip algorithm that will calibrate smartphone-based pressure sensors with respect to fixed weather stations as our referential ground truth. Based on actual measurements, we have verified that smartphone-based readings are unstable when observed during movement. Using our calibration algorithm on actual smartphone-based pressure readings, the updated values were significantly closer to the ground truth values. PMID:26421312

  20. Calibration and Measurement Uncertainty Estimation of Radiometric Data: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Reda, I.; Andreas, A.; Konings, J.

    2014-11-01

    Evaluating the performance of photovoltaic cells, modules, and arrays that form large solar deployments relies on accurate measurements of the available solar resource. Therefore, determining the accuracy of these solar radiation measurements provides a better understanding of investment risks. This paper provides guidelines and recommended procedures for estimating the uncertainty in calibrations and measurements by radiometers using methods that follow the International Bureau of Weights and Measures Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty (GUM). Standardized analysis based on these procedures ensures that the uncertainty quoted is well documented.

  1. Spectrometric methods used in the calibration of radiodiagnostic measuring instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vries, W. [Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1995-12-01

    Recently a set of parameters for checking the quality of radiation for use in diagnostic radiology was established at the calibration facility of Nederlands Meetinstituut (NMI). The establishment of the radiation quality required re-evaluation of the correction factors for the primary air-kerma standards. Free-air ionisation chambers require several correction factors to measure air-kerma according to its definition. These correction factors were calculated for the NMi free-air chamber by Monte Carlo simulations for monoenergetic photons in the energy range from 10 keV to 320 keV. The actual correction factors follow from weighting these mono-energetic correction factors with the air-kerma spectrum of the photon beam. This paper describes the determination of the photon spectra of the X-ray qualities used for the calibration of dosimetric instruments used in radiodiagnostics. The detector used for these measurements is a planar HPGe-detector, placed in the direct beam of the X-ray machine. To convert the measured pulse height spectrum to the actual photon spectrum corrections must be made for fluorescent photon escape, single and multiple compton scattering inside the detector, and detector efficiency. From the calculated photon spectra a number of parameters of the X-ray beam can be calculated. The calculated first and second half value layer in aluminum and copper are compared with the measured values of these parameters to validate the method of spectrum reconstruction. Moreover the spectrum measurements offer the possibility to calibrate the X-ray generator in terms of maximum high voltage. The maximum photon energy in the spectrum is used as a standard for calibration of kVp-meters.

  2. An international round-robin calibration protocol for nanoindentation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabibbo, M; Ricci, P; Cecchini, R; Rymuza, Z; Sullivan, J; Dub, S; Cohen, S

    2012-02-01

    Nanoindentation has become a common technique for measuring the hardness and elastic-plastic properties of materials, including coatings and thin films. In recent years, different nanoindenter instruments have been commercialised and used for this purpose. Each instrument is equipped with its own analysis software for the derivation of the hardness and reduced Young's modulus from the raw data. These data are mostly analysed through the Oliver and Pharr method. In all cases, the calibration of compliance and area function is mandatory. The present work illustrates and describes a calibration procedure and an approach to raw data analysis carried out for six different nanoindentation instruments through several round-robin experiments. Three different indenters were used, Berkovich, cube corner, spherical, and three standardised reference samples were chosen, hard fused quartz, soft polycarbonate, and sapphire. It was clearly shown that the use of these common procedures consistently limited the hardness and reduced the Young's modulus data spread compared to the same measurements performed using instrument-specific procedures. The following recommendations for nanoindentation calibration must be followed: (a) use only sharp indenters, (b) set an upper cut-off value for the penetration depth below which measurements must be considered unreliable, (c) perform nanoindentation measurements with limited thermal drift, (d) ensure that the load-displacement curves are as smooth as possible, (e) perform stiffness measurements specific to each instrument/indenter couple, (f) use Fq and Sa as calibration reference samples for stiffness and area function determination, (g) use a function, rather than a single value, for the stiffness and (h) adopt a unique protocol and software for raw data analysis in order to limit the data spread related to the instruments (i.e. the level of drift or noise, defects of a given probe) and to make the H and E(r) data intercomparable.

  3. Measurements of conductivity nonuniformities and fluctuations in combustion MHD plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, R. M.

    1980-03-01

    Diagnostics for the characterization of electrical conductivity nonuniformities in combustion magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) plasmas were developed. An initial characterization of nonuniformities in the Stanford M-2 linear generator was obtained and recommendations were made concerning the use of the diagnostics in practical MHD generator configurations. A laser induced fluorescene (LIF) diagnostic for nonintrusive measurements of local conductivity fluctuations was developed. This diagnostic and other line of sight averaged optical nonuniformity diagnostics were successfully demonstrated in several experiments in the Standford M-2 combustion systems. Results were used to characterize the nonuniformities in the M-2 system and to compare and evaluate the diagnostics. Conductivity nonuniformities were found to be predominantly streamers which had relatively long length scales of the order of l m in the axial flow direction. Shortet transverse length scales of the order of 0.1 m were found perpendicular to the flow direction. A combination of LIF and plasma luminosity diagnostics is recommended for future characterizations of conductivity uniformities in combustion MHD plasmas.

  4. Laser Tracker Calibration - Testing the Angle Measurement System -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2008-12-05

    Physics experiments at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) usually require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. The accuracy of these measurements is related to the manufacturing tolerances of various individual components, the resolutions of measurement systems, the overall precision of the assembly, and how well imperfections can be modeled. As with theodolites and total stations, one can remove the effects of most assembly and calibration errors by measuring targets in both direct and reverse positions and computing the mean to obtain the result. However, this approach does not compensate for errors originating from the encoder system. In order to improve and gain a better understanding of laser tracker angle measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory's capabilities with the addition of a horizontal angle calibration test stand. This setup is based on the use of a high precision rotary table providing an angular accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. Presently, our setup permits only tests of the horizontal angle measurement system. A test stand for vertical angle calibration is under construction. Distance measurements (LECOCQ & FUSS, 2000) are compared to an interferometer bench for distances of up to 32 m. Together both tests provide a better understanding of the instrument and how it should be operated. The observations also provide a reasonable estimate of covariance information of the measurements according to their actual performance for network adjustments.

  5. Force spectroscopy with dual-trap optical tweezers: molecular stiffness measurements and coupled fluctuations analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribezzi-Crivellari, M; Ritort, F

    2012-11-07

    Dual-trap optical tweezers are often used in high-resolution measurements in single-molecule biophysics. Such measurements can be hindered by the presence of extraneous noise sources, the most prominent of which is the coupling of fluctuations along different spatial directions, which may affect any optical tweezers setup. In this article, we analyze, both from the theoretical and the experimental points of view, the most common source for these couplings in dual-trap optical-tweezers setups: the misalignment of traps and tether. We give criteria to distinguish different kinds of misalignment, to estimate their quantitative relevance and to include them in the data analysis. The experimental data is obtained in a, to our knowledge, novel dual-trap optical-tweezers setup that directly measures forces. In the case in which misalignment is negligible, we provide a method to measure the stiffness of traps and tether based on variance analysis. This method can be seen as a calibration technique valid beyond the linear trap region. Our analysis is then employed to measure the persistence length of dsDNA tethers of three different lengths spanning two orders of magnitude. The effective persistence length of such tethers is shown to decrease with the contour length, in accordance with previous studies. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. [SSAI, Lanham MD 20706 (United States); Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G., E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  7. System for Measuring Elevator Guide Rail Quality and Its Calibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A system for measuring the quality parameters of elevator guide rails is developed. The quality parameters the system can measure include straightness, flatness, squareness, width and height of the rail. The system consists of six parts:main guideway, auxiliary guideway, reference rail, saddle, control casing and measured rail. The guide rail to be measured is mounted on a bed.The straightness errors of surfaces are checked by five linear displacement sensors mounted on the saddle. The deviation of readings from the sensor, which is in contact with top guiding surface,gives the straightness error of the surface and height of the rail. The other four sensors are used to measure side guiding surfaces respectively and give other parameters including flatness on the surfaces, squareness, width and height of the rail. A novel calibration method is also developed to calibrate the straightness motion error of the system in horizontal and vertical directions. The deflection deformation of the measured rail is fitted by using a fourth-order polynomial. Experimental results show that the uncertainty of the system on the side surfaces after compensating the straightness motion error is less than 0.01 mm, and the uncertainty of the system on the top surface after compensating the straightness motion error and the deflection deformation of the rail is less than 0.03 mm.

  8. A calibration facility to provide traceable calibration to upper air humidity measuring sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Rosso, Lucia; Smorgon, Denis; Beltramino, Giulio; Fernicola, Vito

    2017-04-01

    Accurate knowledge and high quality measurement of the upper air humidity and of its profile in atmosphere is essential in many areas of the atmospheric research, for example in weather forecasting, environmental pollution studies and research in meteorology and climatology. Moving from the troposphere to the stratosphere, the water vapour amount varies between some percent to few part per million. For this reason, through the years, several methods and instruments have been developed for the measurement of the humidity in atmosphere. Among the instruments used for atmospheric sounding, radiosondes, airborne and balloon-borne chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) and tunable diode laser absorption spectrometers (TDLAS) play a key role. To avoid the presence of unknown biases and systematic errors and to obtain accurate and reliable humidity measurements, these instruments need a SI-traceable calibration, preferably carried out in conditions similar to those expected in the field. To satisfy such a need, a new calibration facility has been developed at INRIM. The facility is based on a thermodynamic-based frost-point generator designed to achieve a complete saturation of the carrier gas with a single passage through an isothermal saturator. The humidity generator covers the frost point temperature range between -98 °C and -20 °C and is able to work at any controlled pressure between 200 hPa and 1000 hPa (corresponding to a barometric altitude between ground level and approximately 12000 m). The paper reports the work carried out to test the generator performances, discusses the results and presents the evaluation of the measurement uncertainty. The present work was carried out within the European Joint Research Project "MeteoMet 2 - Metrology for Essential Climate Variables" co-funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP). The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union.

  9. Measurement and Simulation of Signal Fluctuations Caused by Propagation through Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Klein, Jeffrey D.; Zebker, Howard A.

    1993-01-01

    We present measured magnitude and phase fluctuations of UHF, L band, and C band signals that were transmitted from the ground through a forest canopy to an airborne radar. We find that the measured fluctuations are similar to those calculated by a simple Monte Carlo simulation. Both observed and calculated RMS fluctuations are typically several decibels in magnitude and tens of degrees in phase at all three frequencies.

  10. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  11. Density Fluctuation Measurements Using FIR Interferometer on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yan; PENG Bei-Bin; YANG Qing-wei; DUAN Xu-Ru; DING Xuan-Tong; LI Lian-Cai; LI Yong-Gao; JIAO Yi-Ming; DENG Zhong-Chao; YI Jiang; LIU Yi; ZHAO Kai-Jun; JI Xiao-Quan

    2008-01-01

    Denity fluctuations were first measured in the core region of HL-2A tokamak plasma using a newly developed multi-channel FIR interferometer system. In divertor ohmic discharges, we measured the radial density fluctuation levels of 5%, which increase to 10-20% during the appearance of MHD activity. Most of the power density in the density fluctuation spectrum is directly associated with m=2 tearing modes. The fluctuation levels reduce to 1/3 and plasma confinement is improved during off-axis electron-cyclotron-resonance heating (ECRH).Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 10575030 and 10675043.

  12. The StarScan plate measuring machine: overview and calibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Norbert; Holdenried, Ellis; de Cuyper, Jean-Pierre; Rafferty, Ted; Wycoff, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The StarScan machine at the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) completed measuring photographic astrograph plates to allow determination of proper motions for the USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC) program. All applicable 1940 AGK2 plates, about 2200 Hamburg Zone Astrograph plates, 900 Black Birch (USNO Twin Astrograph) plates, and 300 Lick Astrograph plates have been measured. StarScan comprises of a CCD camera, telecentric lens, air-bearing granite table, stepper motor screws, and Heidenhain scales to operate in a step-stare mode. The repeatability of StarScan measures is about 0.2 micrometer. The CCD mapping as well as the global table coordinate system has been calibrated using a special dot calibration plate and the overall accuracy of StarScan x,y data is derived to be 0.5 micrometer. Application to real photographic plate data shows that position information of at least 0.65 micrometer accuracy can be extracted from course grain 103a-type emulsion astrometric plates. Transformations between "direct" and "re...

  13. Density Fluctuation Measurements by Far-Forward Collective Scattering in the HSX Stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, C.; Brower, D. L.; Anderson, D. T.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K.; Lore, J.; Schmitt, J. C.; Talmadge, J. N.; Wilcox, R.; Zhai, K.

    2010-11-01

    The multichannel interferometer system on the HSX stellarator is reconfigured to perform far-forward collective scattering measurements of electron density fluctuations. The collective scattering system has 9 viewing chords with 1.5 cm spacing. The source is a bias-tuned Gunn diode at 96 GHz with passive solid-state tripler providing output at 288 GHz (˜5 mW). The scattered power is measured using a homodyne detection scheme. Far-forward collective scattering provides a line-integrated measurement of fluctuations within the divergence of the probe beam covering wave number range: k< 2 cm-1. The perpendicular wave number consists of poloidal and radial contributions which vary with chord position. Comparison of density fluctuations measured using scattering and interferometry techniques will be made. Both coherent modes and broadband fluctuations are measured. Comparison of fluctuation amplitude and frequency spectra for quasi-helically symmetric and non-axisymmetric magnetic configuration will be presented.

  14. AMS Ground Truth Measurements: Calibration and Test Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasiolek, P. [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Airborne gamma spectrometry is one of the primary techniques used to define the extent of ground contamination after a radiological incident. Its usefulness was demonstrated extensively during the response to the Fukushima nuclear power plant (NPP) accident in March-May 2011. To map ground contamination a set of scintillation detectors is mounted on an airborne platform (airplane or helicopter) and flown over contaminated areas. The acquisition system collects spectral information together with the aircraft position and altitude every second. To provide useful information to decision makers, the count rate data expressed in counts per second (cps) needs to be converted to the terrestrial component of the exposure rate 1 m above ground, or surface activity of isotopes of concern. This is done using conversion coefficients derived from calibration flights. During a large scale radiological event, multiple flights may be necessary and may require use of assets from different agencies. However, as the production of a single, consistent map product depicting the ground contamination is the primary goal, it is critical to establish very early into the event a common calibration line. Such a line should be flown periodically in order to normalize data collected from different aerial acquisition systems and potentially flown at different flight altitudes and speeds. In order to verify and validate individual aerial systems, the calibration line needs to be characterized in terms of ground truth measurements. This is especially important if the contamination is due to short-lived radionuclides. The process of establishing such a line, as well as necessary ground truth measurements, is described in this document.

  15. Standard guide for establishing calibration for a measurement method used to analyze nuclear fuel cycle materials

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides the basis for establishing calibration for a measurement method typically used in an analytical chemistry laboratory analyzing nuclear materials. Guidance is included for such activities as preparing a calibration procedure, selecting a calibration standard, controlling calibrated equipment, and documenting calibration. The guide is generic and any required technical information specific for a given method must be obtained from other sources.

  16. Calibration of absolute radial dimension of measurement for cylindrical coordinate measuring machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zexiang; Wang, Guixia; Zhao, Huiying; Li, Bin

    2010-08-01

    According to the definitions of the diameters in the new generation Geometrical Product Specifications(GPS), the evaluation models of least square diameter, minimum circumscribed diameter, maximum inscribed diameter, area diameter, circumference diameter and volume diameter are built on the cylindrical coordinate system for the section measuring path, the element measuring path and the bird-cage measuring path in this paper. A cylindrical coordinate measuring machine for the measurement of the diameters above is introduced. Based on the external standard cylinder with super high precision, a relative calibration method for the measurement of the radial size is promoted. The influence of several special cases of the installation of the cylinder on the calibrating results is analyzed, and the calibrating equation related to the special cases is given.

  17. Distance measurement in air without the precise knowledge of refractive index fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Morris; Bhattacharya, Nandini

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of long distance measurement in air is limited by the fluctuation of refractive index. In this paper, we propose a technique which allows us to measure an absolute distance in air without the knowledge of air turbulence. The technique is based on a femtosecond frequency comb. The fluctuation of the environmental conditions is monitored by two independently operating reference interferometers. The deviations of optical path lengths, caused by the fluctuation of air refractive index, is compensated by feedbacks from the reference interferometers. The measured optical path length is then locked to certain environmental conditions, determined at an optimized moment before the measurement process.

  18. Shadowgraph Analysis of Non-equilibrium Fluctuations for Measuring Transport Properties in Microgravity in the GRADFLEX Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croccolo, Fabrizio; Giraudet, Cédric; Bataller, Henri; Cerbino, Roberto; Vailati, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    In a fluid system driven out of equilibrium by the presence of a gradient, fluctuations become long-ranged and their intensity diverges at large spatial scales. This divergence is prevented by vertical confinement and, in a stable configuration, by gravity. Gravity and confinement also affect the dynamics of non-equilibrium fluctuations (NEFs). In fact, small wavelength fluctuations decay diffusively, while the decay of long wavelength ones is either dominated by buoyancy or by confinement. In normal gravity, from the analysis of the dynamics one can extract the diffusion coefficients as well as other transport properties. For example, in a thermodiffusion experiment one can measure the Soret coefficient. Under microgravity, the relaxation of fluctuations occurs by diffusion only and this prevents the determination of the Soret coefficient of a binary mixture from the study of the dynamics. In this work we propose an innovative self-referencing optical method for the determination of the thermal diffusion ratio of a binary mixture that does not require previous knowledge of the temperature difference applied to the sample. The method relies on the determination of the ratio between the mean squared amplitude of concentration and temperature fluctuations. We investigate data from the GRADFLEX experiment, an experiment flown onboard the Russian satellite FOTON M3 in 2007. The investigated sample is a suspension of polystyrene polymer chains (MW=9,100g/mol, concentration 1.8wt %) in toluene, stressed by different temperature gradients. The use of a quantitative shadowgraph technique allows to perform measurements in the absence of delicate alignment and calibration procedures. The statics of the concentration and temperature NEFs are obtained and their ratio is computed. At large wave vectors the ratio becomes constant and is shown to be proportional to the thermal diffusion ratio of the sample.

  19. 21 CFR 864.8165 - Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit....8165 Calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement. (a) Identification. A calibrator for hemoglobin or hematocrit measurement is a device that approximates whole blood, red blood cells, or...

  20. 40 CFR 92.117 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration, particulate measurement. 92.117 Section 92.117 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.117 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration, particulate measurement... orifice, a bellmouth nozzle, or a laminar flow element or an NIST traceable flow calibration device...

  1. Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woskov, Paul P.; Cohn, Daniel R.; Titus, Charles H.; Surma, Jeffrey E.

    1998-01-01

    Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

  2. Multiple calibrator measurements improve accuracy and stability estimates of automated assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbas, Neval; Budd, Jeffrey R; Klee, George G

    2016-01-01

    The effects of combining multiple calibrations on assay accuracy (bias) and measurement of calibration stability were investigated for total triiodothyronine (TT3), vitamin B12 and luteinizing hormone (LH) using Beckman Coulter's Access 2 analyzer. Three calibration procedures (CC1, CC2 and CC3) combined 12, 34 and 56 calibrator measurements over 1, 2, and 3 days. Bias was calculated between target values and average measured value over 3 consecutive days after calibration. Using regression analysis of calibrator measurements versus measurement date, calibration stability was determined as the maximum number of days before a calibrator measurement exceeded 5% tolerance limits. Competitive assays (TT3, vitamin B12) had positive time regression slopes, while sandwich assay (LH) had a negative slope. Bias values for TT3 were -2.49%, 1.49%, and -0.50% using CC1, CC2 and CC3 respectively, with calibrator stability of 32, 20, and 30 days. Bias values for vitamin B12 were 2.44%, 0.91%, and -0.50%, with calibrator stability of 4, 9, and 12 days. Bias values for LH were 2.26%, 1.44% and -0.29% with calibrator stability of >43, 39 and 36 days. Measured stability was more consistent across calibration procedures using percent change rather than difference from target: 26 days for TT3, 12 days for B12 and 31 days for LH. Averaging over multiple calibrations produced smaller bias, consistent with improved accuracy. Time regression slopes in percent change were unaffected by number of calibration measurements but calibrator stability measured from the target value was highly affected by the calibrator value at time zero.

  3. Development and calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform using self-calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Xiaomeng; Li, Chengwei; Yi, Jiajing; Lu, Rongsheng; Tao, Jiayue

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the design, working principle, as well as calibration of an air-floating six-axis force measurement platform, where the floating plate and nozzles were connected without contact, preventing inter-dimensional coupling and increasing precision significantly. The measurement repeatability error of the force size in the platform is less than 0.2% full scale (FS), which is significantly better than the precision of 1% FS in the six-axis force sensors on the current market. We overcame the difficulties of weight loading device in high-precision calibration by proposing a self-calibration method based on the floating plate gravity and met the calibration precision requirement of 0.02% FS. This study has general implications for the development and calibration of high-precision multi-axis force sensors. In particular, the air-floating six-axis force measurement platform could be applied to the calibration of some special sensors such as flexible tactile sensors and may be used as a micro-nano mechanical assembly platform for real-time assembly force testing.

  4. Composite resistor standard for calibration of measuring transducers in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urekar Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calibration of measuring transducers for precision measurement is done by measuring voltage drop at the resistor standard, produced by output dc current proportional to the input measured value. Resistance fluctuations due to the temperature coefficient of the resistor standard are minor, thanks to the stable temperature conditions in laboratory environment. This fact brings the need to calculate the effect of resistor self-heating on its resistance. This thermal effect, produced by the flow of current through the resistor, is often disregarded. For the precise measurements this can be a significant source of error and must be quantified. This paper describes mathematical model of measurement error, resistor self-heating coefficient is defined, as it’s not usually given in product datasheets. The effect on measurement results is given in detail. Composite resistor standard prototype is described, made from off-the-shelf mass produced components, calculated and hand selected to cancel the self-heating coefficient effects. The prototype is compared to the existing commercially available high performance resistor standard.

  5. Interferometric velocity measurements through a fluctuating gas-liquid interface employing adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büttner, Lars; Leithold, Christoph; Czarske, Jürgen

    2013-12-16

    Optical transmission through fluctuating interfaces of mediums with different refractive indexes is limited by the occurring distortions. Temporal fluctuations of such distortions deteriorate optical measurements. In order to overcome this shortcoming we propose the use of adaptive optics. For the first time, an interferometric velocity measurement technique with embedded adaptive optics is presented for flow velocity measurements through a fluctuating air-water interface. A low order distortion correction technique using a fast deformable mirror and a Hartmann-Shack camera with high frame rate is employed. The obtained high control bandwidth enables precise measurements also at fast fluctuating media interfaces. This methodology paves the way for several kinds of optical flow measurements in various complex environments.

  6. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as onboard aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, i.e. the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed via a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts. The uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1 %. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  7. An unheated permeation device for calibrating atmospheric VOC measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brito

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of an unpowered permeation device for continuous calibration of in-situ instruments measuring atmospheric volatile organic compounds (VOCs is described. Being lightweight and compact, and containing only negligible amounts of chemicals, the device is especially suited for field use such as on board aircraft. Its speciality is to maintain the permeation process in thermal equilibrium, so that the instantaneous permeation rate can be ascribed to a simple temperature measurement. This equilibrium state is maintained by a combination of three features: (i a thin PTFE membrane as permeation medium which guarantees short stabilization times, (ii a water bath as heat buffer, and (iii a vacuum-panel based insulation, in which features (ii and (iii minimize temperature drifts to ~30 mK h−1 per Kelvin temperature difference to the environment. The respective uncertainty of the permeation rate due to thermal non-equilibrium is kept below 1%. An extensive theory part details the major permeation processes of gases through porous polymers, being Fick's diffusion, Knudsen flow, and viscous flow. Both the measured stabilization time and the measured temperature dependence of the permeation rate independently indicate that the permeation can be described by a viscous flow model, where diffusion of the gas molecules in large pores (having a diameter of >0.05 μm dominates.

  8. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Accurate solar radiation data sets are critical to reducing the expenses associated with mitigating performance risk for solar energy conversion systems, and they help utility planners and grid system operators understand the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies and the resulting calibration responsivities provided by radiometric calibration service providers such as the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and manufacturers of radiometers. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors, and some are calibrated outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1% to 2% differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately assist in determining the uncertainties of the radiometer data and will assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  9. Computer Generated Hologram System for Wavefront Measurement System Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak, Gene

    2011-01-01

    Computer Generated Holograms (CGHs) have been used for some time to calibrate interferometers that require nulling optics. A typical scenario is the testing of aspheric surfaces with an interferometer placed near the paraxial center of curvature. Existing CGH technology suffers from a reduced capacity to calibrate middle and high spatial frequencies. The root cause of this shortcoming is as follows: the CGH is not placed at an image conjugate of the asphere due to limitations imposed by the geometry of the test and the allowable size of the CGH. This innovation provides a calibration system where the imaging properties in calibration can be made comparable to the test configuration. Thus, if the test is designed to have good imaging properties, then middle and high spatial frequency errors in the test system can be well calibrated. The improved imaging properties are provided by a rudimentary auxiliary optic as part of the calibration system. The auxiliary optic is simple to characterize and align to the CGH. Use of the auxiliary optic also reduces the size of the CGH required for calibration and the density of the lines required for the CGH. The resulting CGH is less expensive than the existing technology and has reduced write error and alignment error sensitivities. This CGH system is suitable for any kind of calibration using an interferometer when high spatial resolution is required. It is especially well suited for tests that include segmented optical components or large apertures.

  10. Characterization and calibration of 2nd generation slope measuring profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewert, Frank; Buchheim, Jana; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    High spectral resolution and nanometer sized foci of 3rd generation SR beamlines can only be achieved by means of ultra precise optical elements. The improved brilliance and the coherence of free electron lasers (FEL) even push the accuracy limits and make the development of a new generation of ultra precise reflective optical elements mandatory. Typical elements are wave front preserving plane mirrors (lengths of up to 1 m, residual slope errors ˜0.05 μrad (rms) and values of 0.1 nm (rms) for the micro-roughness) and curved optical elements like spheres, toroids or elliptical cylinder (residual slope error ˜0.25 μrad (rms) and better). These challenging specifications and the ongoing progress in finishing technology need to be matched by improved accuracy metrology instruments. We will discuss the results of recent developments in the field of metrology made in the BESSY-II-optics laboratory (BOL) at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB), by the use of vertical angle comparator (VAC) in use to calibrate the nanometer optical component measuring machine (NOM). The BESSY-NOM represents an ultra accurate type of slope measuring instruments characterized by an accuracy of 0.05 μrad (rms) for plane substrates and 0.2 μrad (rms) for significant curved surfaces.

  11. Calibration of thermocouple psychrometers and moisture measurements in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, Łukasz; Sobczuk, Henryk; Połednik, Bernard; Guz, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    The paper presents in situ method of peltier psychrometric sensors calibration which allow to determine water potential. Water potential can be easily recalculated into moisture content of the porous material. In order to obtain correct results of water potential, each probe should be calibrated. NaCl salt solutions with molar concentration of 0.4M, 0.7M, 1.0M and 1.4M, were used for calibration which enabled to obtain osmotic potential in range: -1791 kPa to -6487 kPa. Traditionally, the value of voltage generated on thermocouples during wet-bulb temperature depression is calculated in order to determine the calibration function for psychrometric in situ sensors. In the new method of calibration, the field under psychrometric curve along with peltier cooling current and duration was taken into consideration. During calibration, different cooling currents were applied for each salt solution, i.e. 3, 5, 8 mA respectively, as well as different cooling duration for each current (from 2 to 100 sec with 2 sec step). Afterwards, the shape of each psychrometric curve was thoroughly examined and a value of field under psychrometric curve was computed. Results of experiment indicate that there is a robust correlation between field under psychrometric curve and water potential. Calibrations formulas were designated on the basis of these features.

  12. Measurement of the internal magnetic fluctuation by the transport of runaways on J-TEXT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Tong, R. H.; Yan, W.; Wei, Y. N.; Ma, T. K.; Jiang, Z. H.; Zhang, X. Q.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-11-01

    The measurement of internal magnetic fluctuation is important for the study of transport in tokamak plasmas. The runaway electron transport induced by the sawtooth crash can be used to obtain the internal magnetic fluctuation. Inversed sawtooth-like activities on hard x-ray (HXR) fluxes following sawtooth activities were observed after the application of electrode biasing on J-TEXT tokamak. The runaway diffusion coefficient Dr is deduced to be about 30 m2/s according to the time delay of HXR flux peaks to the sawtooth crashes. The averaged value of normalized magnetic fluctuation in the discharges with electrode biasing was increased to the order of 1 × 10-4.

  13. Two dimensional density and its fluctuation measurements by using phase imaging method in GAMMA 10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, M.; Negishi, S.; Shima, Y.; Hojo, H.; Imai, T. [Plasma Research Center, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Mase, A. [Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kogi, Y. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, 3-30-1 Wajiro-higashi, Higashiku, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Two dimensional (2D) plasma image analysis is useful to study the improvement of plasma confinement in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. We have constructed a 2D interferometer system with phase imaging method for studying 2D plasma density distribution and its fluctuation measurement in the tandem mirror GAMMA 10. 2D profiles of electron density and its fluctuation have been successfully obtained by using this 2D phase imaging system. We show that 2D plasma density and fluctuation profiles clearly depends on the axial confining potential formation with application of plug electron cyclotron heating in GAMMA 10.

  14. Calibration of three rainfall simulators with automatic measurement methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, Margarita

    2010-05-01

    CALIBRATION OF THREE RAINFALL SIMULATORS WITH AUTOMATIC MEASUREMENT METHODS M. Roldán (1), I. Martín (2), F. Martín (2), S. de Alba(3), M. Alcázar(3), F.I. Cermeño(3) 1 Grupo de Investigación Ecología y Gestión Forestal Sostenible. ECOGESFOR-Universidad Politécnica de Madrid. E.U.I.T. Forestal. Avda. Ramiro de Maeztu s/n. Ciudad Universitaria. 28040 Madrid. margarita.roldan@upm.es 2 E.U.I.T. Forestal. Avda. Ramiro de Maeztu s/n. Ciudad Universitaria. 28040 Madrid. 3 Facultad de Ciencias Geológicas. Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Ciudad Universitaria s/n. 28040 Madrid The rainfall erosivity is the potential ability of rain to cause erosion. It is function of the physical characteristics of rainfall (Hudson, 1971). Most expressions describing erosivity are related to kinetic energy or momentum and so with drop mass or size and fall velocity. Therefore, research on factors determining erosivity leds to the necessity to study the relation between fall height and fall velocity for different drop sizes, generated in a rainfall simulator (Epema G.F.and Riezebos H.Th, 1983) Rainfall simulators are one of the most used tools for erosion studies and are used to determine fall velocity and drop size. Rainfall simulators allow repeated and multiple measurements The main reason for use of rainfall simulation as a research tool is to reproduce in a controlled way the behaviour expected in the natural environment. But in many occasions when simulated rain is used in order to compare it with natural rain, there is a lack of correspondence between natural and simulated rain and this can introduce some doubt about validity of data because the characteristics of natural rain are not adequately represented in rainfall simulation research (Dunkerley D., 2008). Many times the rainfall simulations have high rain rates and they do not resemble natural rain events and these measures are not comparables. And besides the intensity is related to the kinetic energy which

  15. UNIVERSAL AUTO-CALIBRATION FOR A RAPID BATTERY IMPEDANCE SPECTRUM MEASUREMENT DEVICE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon P. Christophersen; John L. Morrison; William H. Morrison

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been shown to be a valuable tool for diagnostics and prognostics of energy storage devices such as batteries and ultra-capacitors. Although measurements have been typically confined to laboratory environments, rapid impedance spectrum measurement techniques have been developed for on-line, embedded applications as well. The prototype hardware for the rapid technique has been validated using lithium-ion batteries, but issues with calibration had also been identified. A new, universal automatic calibration technique was developed to address the identified issues while also enabling a more simplified approach. A single, broad-frequency range is used to calibrate the system and then scaled to the actual range and conditions used when measuring a device under test. The range used for calibration must be broad relative to the expected measurement conditions for the scaling to be successful. Validation studies were performed by comparing the universal calibration approach with data acquired from targeted calibration ranges based on the expected range of performance for the device under test. First, a mid-level shunt range was used for calibration and used to measure devices with lower and higher impedance. Next, a high excitation current level was used for calibration, followed by measurements using lower currents. Finally, calibration was performed over a wide frequency range and used to measure test articles with a lower set of frequencies. In all cases, the universal calibration approach compared very well with results acquired following a targeted calibration. Additionally, the shunts used for the automated calibration technique were successfully characterized such that the rapid impedance measurements compare very well with laboratory-scale measurements. These data indicate that the universal approach can be successfully used for onboard rapid impedance spectra measurements for a broad set of test devices and range of

  16. A recommendation for revised dose calibrator measurement procedures for 89Zr and 124I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Beattie

    Full Text Available Because of their chemical properties and multiday half lives, iodine-124 and zirconium-89 are being used in a growing number of PET imaging studies. Some aspects of their quantitation, however, still need attention. For (89Zr the PET images should, in principle, be as quantitatively accurate as similarly reconstructed 18F measurements. We found, however, that images of a 20 cm well calibration phantom containing (89Zr underestimated the activity by approximately 10% relative to a dose calibrator measurement (Capintec CRC-15R using a published calibration setting number of 465. PET images of (124I, in contrast, are complicated by the contribution of decays in cascade that add spurious coincident events to the PET data. When these cascade coincidences are properly accounted for, quantitatively accurate images should be possible. We found, however, that even with this correction we still encountered what appeared to be a large variability in the accuracy of the PET images when compared to dose calibrator measurements made using the calibration setting number, 570, recommended by Capintec. We derive new calibration setting numbers for (89Zr and (124I based on their 511 keV photon peaks as measured on an HPGe detector. The peaks were calibrated relative to an 18F standard, the activity level of which was precisely measured in a dose calibrator under well-defined measurement conditions. When measuring (89Zr on a Capintec CRC-15R we propose the use of calibration setting number 517. And for (124I, we recommend the use of a copper filter surrounding the sample and the use of calibration setting number 494. The new dose calibrator measurement procedures we propose will result in more consistent and accurate radioactivity measurements of (89Zr and (124I. These and other positron emitting radionuclides can be accurately calibrated relative to 18F based on measurements of their 511 keV peaks and knowledge of their relative positron abundances.

  17. The Mars Science Laboratory APXS calibration target: Comparison of Martian measurements with the terrestrial calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.L., E-mail: icampbel@uoguelph.ca [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); King, P.L. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Burkemper, L. [Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Berger, J.A. [Institute of Meteoritics, University of New Mexico, NM 87131 (United States); Department of Earth Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario N6A3K7 (Canada); Gellert, R.; Boyd, N.I.; Perrett, G.M.; Pradler, I. [Guelph-Waterloo Physics Institute, University of Guelph, Ontario N1G2W1 (Canada); Thompson, L. [Planetary and Space Science Centre, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB E3B5A3 (Canada); Edgett, K.S. [Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, CA 92191-0148 (United States); Yingst, R.A. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719-2395 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover carries a basalt calibration target for monitoring the performance of the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer. The spectrum acquired on Sol 34 shows increased contributions from Mg, S, Cl and Fe relative to laboratory spectra recorded before launch. Mars Hand Lens Imager images confirm changes in the appearance of the surface. Spectra taken on Sols 179 and 411 indicate some loss of the deposited material. The observations suggest deposition of a surface film likely consisting of dust mobilized by impingement of the sky crane’s terminal descent engine plumes with surface fines during Curiosity’s landing. New APXS software has been used to model the thin film that coated the calibration target on landing. The results suggest that a film of about 100 nm thickness, and containing predominantly MgO, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}, Cl and Na{sub 2}O could give rise to the observed spectral changes. If this film is also present on the alpha particle sources within the APXS, then its effect is negligible and the terrestrial calibration remains appropriate.

  18. Measurements of Electric Field Fluctuations Using a Capacitive Probe on the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; McCollam, K. J.; Triana, J. C.; Li, H.; Ding, W. X.; Liu, W.

    2015-11-01

    Experimental measurements and extended MHD computation reveal that both flow and current density fluctuations are important for the magnetic relaxation of RFP plasmas via tearing fluctuations. Motivated by these results, we have developed a multi-electrode capacitive probe for radial profile measurements of the electrostatic potential deep in the plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac plasma potential via electrodes insulated from the plasma using an annular boron nitride dielectric (also the particle shield), provided the secondary emission is sufficiently large (Te>20 eV). The probe has ten sets of four capacitors with 1.5 cm radial separation. At each radius, four capacitors are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid. This probe has been inserted up to 15 cm from the wall in 200 kA deuterium plasmas. The fluctuation amplitudes increase during the sawtooth crash and the power spectrum broadens (similar to the behavior of magnetic field fluctuations). The frequency bandwidth allows measurements of the radial coherence and phase of the fluctuations associated with rotating tearing modes up to the Alfvénic range. A next-step goal is measurement of the total dynamo emf, ~ /B0 , to complement ongoing measurements of the Hall dynamo emf, / ne , using a deep-insertion magnetic probe. M. Tan is supported by ITER-China Program. Work is supported by US DOE.

  19. CALIBRATION OF PHOSWICH DETECTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEEGTE, HKW; KOLDENHOF, EE; BOONSTRA, AL; WILSCHUT, HW

    1992-01-01

    Two important aspects for the calibration of phoswich detector arrays have been investigated. It is shown that common gate ADCs can be used: The loss in particle identification due to fluctuations in the gate timing in multi-hit events can be corrected for by a simple procedure using the measured ti

  20. Preliminary results of flow fluctuation measurements in the cryogenic transonic wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovyev, V. N.; Lebiga, V. A.; Pak, A. Yu.; Quest, J.

    2012-01-01

    The detailed information about flow fluctuations structure inside the test section of Pilot of European Transonic Windtunnel (PETW) obtained by means of hot-wire anemometer and fluctuation diagram (FD) method within broad and narrow frequency band is presented. Fluctuation diagrams were derived from an array of hot wire output data measured at different overheating ratio of the probe (not less than 8) at freestream Mach numbers M = 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.7, and 0.8, total temperature T0 = 118 . . . 294.7 K and unit Reynolds numbers Re1 = (5.54 . . . 108.6) · 106 1/m, respectively. Time series of these output signal data were used to obtain information of statistical and correlation features, mode, and spectral composition of flow fluctuations.

  1. Investigation of zonal flows by using the collective scattering measurement of density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, H. G.; Yu, Y.; Lan, T.; Li, Y. D.; Liu, A. D.; Xie, J. L.; Liu, W. D.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ti, A.; Li, J. G.

    2015-09-01

    The poloidal {{E}r}× {{B}\\text{T}} rotation velocities in the core plasma region are studied using the instantaneous frequency method (IFM) with the density fluctuations measured by the CO2 laser collective scattering diagnostics on the HT-7 tokamak. A coherent mode is observed in the fluctuations of poloidal velocities with the mode frequency from 10 to 20 kHz. It is identified as geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) zonal flow with poloidal symmetry (m = 0) and its mode frequency coinciding with the theoretical expected GAM frequency. The nonlinear interactions are investigated by applying the envelope analysis on the density fluctuations. The results confirm that the envelope modulation in the high frequency density fluctuations only comes from the shearing by GAM. The comparison between IFM and envelope analysis is also discussed.

  2. Calibration of Instruments for Measuring Wind Velocity and Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Raymond D.; Pilny, Miroslav J.

    1950-01-01

    Signal Corps wind equipment AN/GMQ-1 consisting of a 3-cup anemometer and wind vane was calibrated for wind velocities from 1 to 200 miles per hour. Cup-shaft failure prevented calibration at higher wind velocities. The action of the wind vane was checked and found to have very poor directional accuracy below a velocity of 8 miles per hour. After shaft failure was reported to the Signal Corps, the cup rotors were redesigned by strengthening the shafts for better operation at high velocities. The anemometer with the redesigned cup rotors was recalibrated, but cup-shaft failure occurred again at a wind velocity of approximately 220 miles per hour. In the course of this calibration two standard generators were checked for signal output variation, and a wind-speed meter was calibrated for use with each of the redesigned cup rotors. The variation of pressure coefficient with air-flow direction at four orifices on a disk-shaped pitot head was obtained for wind velocities of 37.79 53.6, and 98.9 miles per hour. A pitot-static tube mounted in the nose of a vane was calibrated up to a dynamic pressure of 155 pounds per square foot, or approximately 256 miles per hour,

  3. Atmospheric Radiocarbon Calibration to 45,000 yr B.P. : Late Glacial Fluctuations and Cosmogenic Isotope Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kitagawa, H.; Plicht, J. van der

    1998-01-01

    More than 250 carbon-14 accelerator mass spectrometry dates of terrestrial macrofossils from annually laminated sediments from Lake Suigetsu (Japan) provide a first atmospheric calibration for almost the total range of the radiocarbon method (45,000 years before the present). The results confirm the

  4. The Impact of Indoor and Outdoor Radiometer Calibration on Solar Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-06-02

    This study addresses the effect of calibration methodologies on calibration responsivities and the resulting impact on radiometric measurements. The calibration responsivities used in this study are provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at a 45 degree solar zenith angle and responsivity as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons to reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison of the test radiometer under calibration to a reference radiometer of the same type. These different methods of calibration demonstrated 1percent to 2 percent differences in solar irradiance measurement. Analyzing these values will ultimately enable a reduction in radiometric measurement uncertainties and assist in developing consensus on a standard for calibration.

  5. Seismology on a Comet: Calibration Measurements, Modeling and Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faber, C.; Hoppe, J.; Knapmeyer, M.; Fischer, H.; Seidensticker, K. J.

    2011-12-01

    The Mission Rosetta was launched to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in 2004. It will finally reach the comet and will deliver the Lander Philae at the surface of the nucleus in November 2014. The Lander carries ten experiments, one of which is the Surface Electric Sounding and Acoustic Monitoring Experiment (SESAME). Part of this experiment is the Comet Acoustic Surface Sounding Experiment (CASSE) housed in the three feet of the lander. The primary goal of CASSE is to determine the elastic parameters of the surface material, like the Young's modulus and the Poisson ratio. Additional goals are the determination of shallow structure, quantification of porosity, and the location of activity spots and thermally and impact caused cometary activity. We conduct calibration measurements with accelerometers identical to the flight model. The goal of these measurements is to develop inversion procedures for travel times and to estimate the expected accuracy that CASSE can achieve in terms of elastic wave velocity, elastic parameters, and source location. The experiments are conducted mainly on sandy soil, in dry, wet or frozen conditions, and apart from buildings with their reflecting walls and artificial noise sources. We expect that natural sources, like thermal cracking at sunrise and sunset, can be located to an accuracy of about 10 degrees in direction and a few decimeters (1σ) in distance if occurring within the sensor triangle and from first arrivals alone. The accuracy of the direction is essentially independent of the distance, whereas distance determination depends critically on the identification of later arrivals. Determination of elastic wave velocities on the comet will be conducted with controlled sources at known positions and are likely to achieve an accuracy of σ=15% for the velocity of the first arriving wave. Limitations are due to the fixed source-receiver geometry and the wavelength emitted by the CASSE piezo-ceramic sources. In addition to the

  6. Effective temperatures from the fluctuation-dissipation measurements in soft glassy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari-Farouji, S.; Mizuno, D.; Derks, D.; Wegdam, G. H.; MacKintosh, F. C.; Schmidt, C. F.; Bonn, D.

    2008-10-01

    We have investigated the validity of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT) and the applicability of the concept of effective temperature in a number of non-equilibrium soft glassy materials. Using a combination of passive and active microrheology to measure displacement fluctuations and the mechanical response function of probe particles embedded in the materials, we have directly tested the validity of the FDT. Our results show no violation of the FDT over several decades in frequency (1-104 Hz) for hard-sphere colloidal glasses and colloidal glasses and gels of Laponite. We further extended the bandwidth of our measurements to lower frequencies (down to 0.1 Hz) using video microscopy to measure the displacement fluctuations, again without finding any deviations from the FDT.

  7. STRUCTURAL PARAMETERS CALIBRATION BY POSTURE MEASUREMENT ON PARALLEL 6-DOF PLATFORM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Some approaches to measure parallel 6-degree of freedom platform's posture statically and to calibrate theplatform's actual structural parameters by measuring a series of the platform's varying postures are studied. In the casewhere high posture accuracy is required reiatively, to obtain the platform's actual structural parameters is very important.Three dimensions measurement with 2 theodolites are used to obtain the platform's postures statically and Newton itera-tive method is adopted to calibrate structural parameters. Some measures taken in the measurement and the calibration arediscussed in detail. And the experiment results of the platform's posture control before and after the calibration are given.The results show that the platform's posture control accuracy after the calibration is improved notably.

  8. CALIBRATION OF DEVICES FOR MEASURING ELEMENTS OF MICRO-ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES

    OpenAIRE

    G. Trapashko

    2012-01-01

    Development of microelectronics requires solution of the problem ensuring unity of linear measurements in a submicron range. The problem can be solved on the condition that calibration of measuring devices shall be made in accordance with reference samples that is a short length scale.While making calibration of measuring equipment with the help of a reference measure it is important to investigate components of the method accuracy and their influence on measuring results. The paper considers...

  9. Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation from lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Mason G.

    Calibrated, multiband radiometric measurements of the optical radiation emitted by rocket-triggered lightning (RTL) have been made in the ultraviolet (UV, 200-360 nm), the visible and near infrared (VNIR, 400-1000 nm), and the long wave infrared (LWIR, 8-12 microm) spectral bands. Measurements were recorded from a distance of 198 m at the University of Florida International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) during the summers of 2011 and 2012. The ICLRT provided time-correlated measurements of the current at the base of the RTL channels. Following the onset of a return stroke, the dominant mechanism for the initial rise of the UV and VNIR waveforms was the geometrical growth of the channel in the field-of-view of the sensors. The UV emissions peaked about 0.7 micros after the current peak, with a peak spectral power emitted by the source per unit length of channel of 10 +/- 7 kW/(nm-m) in the UV. The VNIR emissions peaked 0.9 micros after the current peak, with a spectral power of at 7 +/- 4 kW/(nm-m). The LWIR emissions peaked 30-50 micros after the current peak, and the mean peak spectral power was 940 +/- 380 mW/(nm-m), a value that is about 4 orders of magnitude lower than the other spectral band emissions. In some returns strokes the LWIR peak coincides with a secondary maximum in the VNIR band that occurs during a steady decrease in channel current. Examples of the optical waveforms in each spectral band are shown as a function of time and are discussed in the context of the current measured at the channel base. Source power estimates in the VNIR band have a mean and standard deviation of 2.5 +/- 2.2 MW/m and are in excellent agreement with similar estimates of the emission from natural subsequent strokes that remain in a pre-existing channel which have a mean and standard deviation of 2.3 +/- 3.4 MW/m. The peak optical power emitted by RTL in the UV and VNIR bands are observed to be proportional to the square of the peak current at the

  10. Random fluctuations and validity in measuring disease management effectiveness for small populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J Ramsay; Kamali, Kyahn; Harner, Jeffrey; Duncan, Ian G; Messer, Thomas C

    2008-12-01

    One objective of a disease management (DM) program is the reduction of members' claims costs. A considerable amount of effort has been dedicated to standardizing the outcomes of DM measurement. An area that has not received as much attention is that of random fluctuations in measured outcomes and the related issue of the validity of outcomes subject to random fluctuation. From year to year, large random fluctuations in claims costs can increase or reduce actual savings from a DM program. Sponsors of DM programs want to know how large a group or sample is necessary to prevent the effect of random fluctuations from overwhelming the effect of claims reductions. In this paper, we measure the fluctuations in calculated DM savings in a large commercial population using an adjusted historical control methodology--the methodology that has become the industry standard and which is codified by DMAA's Guidelines. We then determine the sample size necessary to demonstrate DM program savings at different levels of confidence and model the effect on fluctuations in observed outcomes under different methods of choosing trend, different levels of truncation, and for different estimates of program savings. Some groups, particularly employers, will be smaller than the minimum size required for credible outcomes measurement. For groups smaller than this minimum size, we suggest a utilization-based outcomes measure that can be used as a proxy. For both claims- and utilization-based calculations, we provide confidence intervals to be placed around savings estimates. We do this for group sizes ranging from 1000 to 100,000 members.

  11. Extended fluctuation theorems for repeated measurements and feedback within Hamiltonian framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lahiri, Sourabh, E-mail: sourabhlahiri@gmail.com [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, ESPCI, 10 rue Vauquelin, F-75231 Paris (France); Jayannavar, A.M. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India)

    2016-04-29

    We derive the extended fluctuation theorems in presence of multiple measurements and feedback, when the system is governed by Hamiltonian dynamics. We use only the forward phase space trajectories in the derivation. However, to obtain an expression for the efficacy parameter, we must necessarily use the notion of reverse trajectory. Our results show that the correction term appearing in the exponent of the extended fluctuation theorems is non-unique, whereas the physical meaning of the efficacy parameter is unique. - Highlights: • Extended Fluctuation Theorems under multiple measurements and feedback have been derived using Hamiltonian dynamics. • We prove the theorems without using the notion of reverse trajectory. • We show that the correction terms are not unique. • The efficacy parameter is shown to have a unique physical meaning.

  12. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  13. Progress Toward a Technique for Measuring Electric Field Fluctuations in Tokamak Core Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. S.; Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Couto, H. P.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2014-10-01

    Measurements of electric field fluctuations in magnetic confinement experiments are desired for validating turbulence and transport models. A new diagnostic to measure Ez (r , t) fluctuations is in development on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. The approach is based on neutral beam emission spectroscopy using a high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer to resolve fluctuations in wavelength separation between components of the motional Stark effect spectrum. Fluctuations at mid-minor-radius, normalized to an estimated MSE field, are estimated to be δE /EMSE ~ 10-3. In order to resolve fluctuations at turbulent time scales (fNy ~ 500 kHz), beam and spectrometer designs minimize broadening and maximize signal-to-noise ratio. The diagnostic employs a Fabry-Pérot spectrometer with étendue-matched collection optics and low noise detectors. The interferometer spacing is varied across the face of the etalon to mitigate geometric Doppler broadening. An 80 keV H0 beam from PBX-M with a divergence Ω deployment on larger fusion facilities. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  14. Shortwave Radiometer Calibration Methods Comparison and Resulting Solar Irradiance Measurement Differences: A User Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habte, Aron; Sengupta, Manajit; Andreas, Afshin; Reda, Ibrahim; Robinson, Justin

    2016-11-21

    Banks financing solar energy projects require assurance that these systems will produce the energy predicted. Furthermore, utility planners and grid system operators need to understand the impact of the variable solar resource on solar energy conversion system performance. Accurate solar radiation data sets reduce the expense associated with mitigating performance risk and assist in understanding the impacts of solar resource variability. The accuracy of solar radiation measured by radiometers depends on the instrument performance specification, installation method, calibration procedure, measurement conditions, maintenance practices, location, and environmental conditions. This study addresses the effect of different calibration methods provided by radiometric calibration service providers, such as NREL and manufacturers of radiometers, on the resulting calibration responsivity. Some of these radiometers are calibrated indoors and some outdoors. To establish or understand the differences in calibration methodology, we processed and analyzed field-measured data from these radiometers. This study investigates calibration responsivities provided by NREL's broadband outdoor radiometer calibration (BORCAL) and a few prominent manufacturers. The BORCAL method provides the outdoor calibration responsivity of pyranometers and pyrheliometers at 45 degree solar zenith angle, and as a function of solar zenith angle determined by clear-sky comparisons with reference irradiance. The BORCAL method also employs a thermal offset correction to the calibration responsivity of single-black thermopile detectors used in pyranometers. Indoor calibrations of radiometers by their manufacturers are performed using a stable artificial light source in a side-by-side comparison between the test radiometer under calibration and a reference radiometer of the same type. In both methods, the reference radiometer calibrations are traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR). These

  15. Radar polarimeter measures orientation of calibration corner reflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebker, Howard A.; Norikane, Lynne

    1987-01-01

    Radar polarimeter signals from a set of trihedral corner reflectors located in the Goldstone Dry Lake in California were analyzed, and three types of scattering behavior were observed: (1) Bragg-like slightly rough surface scattering that represents the background signal from the dry lake, (2) trihedral corner reflector scattering that returns the incident polarization, and (3) two-bounce corner reflector scattering resulting from a particular alignment of a trihedral reflector. A radar calibration approach using trihedral corner reflectors should be designed such that precise alignment of the reflectors is ensured, as three-bounce and two-bounce geometries lead to very different cross sections and hence very different inferred calibration factors.

  16. Calibration procedure for 3D surface measurements using stereo vision and laser stripe

    OpenAIRE

    Vilaça, João L.; Fonseca, Jaime C.; Pinho, A. C. Marques de

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a new stereo vision calibration procedure and laser strip detection for 3D surface measurements. In this calibration procedure the laser plane is the one that matters, only one set of laser-coplanar calibration points is needed for image cameras calibration; and a dead- zone scan area is considered, since the igitalization arm is assembled in a 3 degree-freedom machine PC-based Motion Control with multiple scan paths. It is also presented some algorithms for 3D surface tre...

  17. Development and calibration of buried wire gages for wall shear stress measurements in fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Sreedhara V.; Steinle, Frank W.

    1988-01-01

    Special methods were developed to arrange 'Buried Wire Gage' inserts flush to the contoured flow surfaces of instrument plugs of a boundary-layer flow apparatus. The fabrication process was aimed at producing proper bonding of the sensor wire to the substrate surface, without causing excessive surface waviness. A large number of gages were built and first calibrated for the resistance-temperature characteristics. The gages were then installed in a flow calibration apparatus and operated from a constant temperature anemometer system for a series of flow settings to derive the calibration constants of each of the gages. The flow settings included a range of subsonic freestream Mach numbers in order to help establish the gage calibration characteristics for compressible flow fields. This paper provides a description of the buried wire gage technique, an explanation of the method evolved for making proper gages, the procedure for calibrating the gages and the results of measurements performed for determining the calibration constants.

  18. Measurement of laser quantum frequency fluctuations using a Pound-Drever stabilization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuh-Jen; Mussche, Paul L.; Siegman, Anthony E.

    1994-06-01

    We describe a method for measuring the frequency fluctuation spectrum of a laser oscillator, especially the weak noise contributions in the wings of the spectrum, and apply this method to confirm the existence of large excess quantum frequency fluctuations in a laser oscillator using an unstable optical resonator. Our measurement apparatus uses the Pound-Drever technique, which employs an RF phase modulator and a Fabry-Perot cavity to produce a sensitive high-speed frequency discrimination signal. We show that this signal can also be used to measure the quantum noise contributions to the frequency spectrum of a laser oscillator. Experimental measurements on a miniature diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser using a stable optical cavity closely match the predictions of the usual Schawlow-Townes theory, while the frequency fluctuations in a nearly identical laser employing an unstable optical resonator are approximately 1300 times larger. These much larger fluctuations arise in part from the larger output coupling and cavity bandwidth of the unstable cavity, but they also appear to confirm a predicted excess spontaneous emission factor (Petermann excess noise factor) of approximately = 180 times arising from the nonorthogonal transverse mode properties of the unstable cavity.

  19. Conserved charge fluctuations using the D measure in heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, D. K.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Garg, P.

    2017-05-01

    We study the net-charge fluctuation D -measure variable, in high-energy heavy-ion collisions in heavy-ion jet interaction generator (HIJING), ultrarelativistic quantum molecular dynamics (UrQMD), and hadron resonance gas (HRG) models for various center-of-mass energies (√{sNN}). The effects of kinematic acceptance and resonance decay, in the pseudorapidity acceptance interval (Δ η ) and lower transverse momentum (pTmin) threshold, on fluctuation measures are discussed. A strong dependence of D with the Δ η in HIJING and UrQMD models is observed as opposed to results obtained from the HRG model. The dissipation of fluctuation signal is estimated by fitting the D measure as a function of the Δ η . An extrapolated function for higher Δ η values at lower √{sNN} is different from the results obtained from models. Particle species dependence of D and the effect of the pTmin selection threshold are discussed in HIJING and HRG models. The comparison of D , at midrapidity, of net-charge fluctuations at various √{sNN} obtained from the models with the data from the A Large Ion Collider Experiment (ALICE) experiment is discussed. The results from the present paper as a function of Δ η and √{sNN} will provide a baseline for comparison to experimental measurements.

  20. Calibration of a distributed hydrology and land surface model using energy flux measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten Andreas Dahl; Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Jensen, Karsten H.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we develop and test a calibration approach on a spatially distributed groundwater-surface water catchment model (MIKE SHE) coupled to a land surface model component with particular focus on the water and energy fluxes. The model is calibrated against time series of eddy flux measure...

  1. A combined experimental with simulation approach to calibrated 3D strain measurement using shearography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goto, D.T.; Groves, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a calibrated 3D shearography strain measurement instrument, calibrated iteratively, using a combined mechanical-optical model and specially designed test objects. The test objects are a cylinder loaded by internal pressure and a flat plate under axial

  2. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  3. In search of traceability: two decades of calibrated Brewer UV measurements in Sodankylä and Jokioinen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Anu; Sakari Mäkelä, Jakke; Lakkala, Kaisa; Meinander, Outi; Kaurola, Jussi; Koskela, Tapani; Matti Karhu, Juha; Karppinen, Tomi; Kyrö, Esko; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2016-11-01

    The two Brewer spectrophotometers of the Finnish Meteorological Institute at Jokioinen and Sodankylä have been operated according to the highest levels of the WMO/GAW (World Meteorological Organization/Global Atmosphere Watch) recommendations with rigorous quality control and quality assurance. The calibration of the instruments is based on annual recalibrations of primary standard lamps in the VTT MIKES Metrology National Standards Laboratory in Finland and an exhaustive measurement program with measurements of standard and working lamps in the on-site optical laboratories. Over the years, the maintenance of the calibration has produced data sets of approximately 2000 lamp scans for both instruments. An extensive re-examination of the lamp measurements and the response of the spectrophotometers was carried out. The primary standard lamps were found to age on an average rate of 0.3 % per burn. The responsivity at wavelength 311 nm was found to exhibit both long-term and short-term changes. The overall long-term change was declining. In addition, abrupt changes of as large as 25 % were detected. The short-term changes were found to fluctuate on time frames shorter than the interval between the measurements of the primary standard lamps. This underlines the importance of the use of more frequently measured working standard lamps.

  4. Spectral irradiance measurement and actinic radiometer calibration for UV water disinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperfeld, Peter; Barton, Bettina; Pape, Sven; Towara, Anna-Lena; Eggers, Jutta; Hopfenmüller, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    In a joint project, sglux and PTB investigated and developed methods and equipment to measure the spectral and weighted irradiance of high-efficiency UV-C emitters used in water disinfection plants. A calibration facility was set up to calibrate the microbicidal irradiance responsivity of actinic radiometers with respect to the weighted spectral irradiance of specially selected low-pressure mercury and medium-pressure mercury UV lamps. To verify the calibration method and to perform on-site tests, spectral measurements were carried out directly at water disinfection plants in operation. The weighted microbicidal irradiance of the plants was calculated and compared to the measurements of various actinic radiometers.

  5. Measuring dynamic membrane fluctuations in cell membrane using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Park, YongKeun

    2017-02-01

    There is a strong correlation between the dynamic membrane fluctuations and the biomechanical properties of living cells. The dynamic membrane fluctuation consists of submicron displacements, and can be altered by changing the cells' pathophysiological conditions. These results have significant relevance to the understanding of RBC biophysics and pathology, as follows. RBCs must withstand large mechanical deformations during repeated passages through the microvasculature and the fenestrated walls of the splenic sinusoids. This essential ability is diminished with senescence, resulting in physiological destruction of the aging RBCs. Pathological destruction of the red cells, however, occurs in cells affected by a host of diseases such as spherocytosis, malaria, and Sickle cell disease, as RBCs depart from their normal discoid shape and lose their deformability. Therefore, quantifying the RBC deformability insight into a variety of problems regarding the interplay of cell structure, dynamics, and function. Furthermore, the ability to monitor mechanical properties of RBCs is of vital interest in monitoring disease progression or response to treatment as molecular and pharmaceutical approaches for treatment of chronic diseases. Here, we present the measurements of dynamic membrane fluctuations in live cells using quantitative phase imaging techniques. Measuring both the 3-D refractive index maps and the dynamic phase images of live cells are simultaneously measured, from which dynamic membrane fluctuation and deformability of cells are precisely calculated. We also present its applications to various diseases ranging from sickle cell diseases, babesiosis, and to diabetes.

  6. Experimental Results of Site Calibration and Sensitivity Measurements in OTR for UWB Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanadham, Chandana; Rao, P. Mallikrajuna

    2016-08-01

    System calibration and parameter accuracy measurement of electronic support measures (ESM) systems is a major activity, carried out by electronic warfare (EW) engineers. These activities are very critical and needs good understanding in the field of microwaves, antennas, wave propagation, digital and communication domains. EW systems are broad band, built with state-of-the art electronic hardware, installed on different varieties of military platforms to guard country's security from time to time. EW systems operate in wide frequency ranges, typically in the order of thousands of MHz, hence these are ultra wide band (UWB) systems. Few calibration activities are carried within the system and in the test sites, to meet the accuracies of final specifications. After calibration, parameters are measured for their accuracies either in feed mode by injecting the RF signals into the front end or in radiation mode by transmitting the RF signals on to system antenna. To carry out these activities in radiation mode, a calibrated open test range (OTR) is necessary in the frequency band of interest. Thus site calibration of OTR is necessary to be carried out before taking up system calibration and parameter measurements. This paper presents the experimental results of OTR site calibration and sensitivity measurements of UWB systems in radiation mode.

  7. Calibration of a flexible measurement system based on industrial articulated robot and structured light sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Nan; Wang, Kun; Xie, Zexiao; Ren, Ping

    2017-05-01

    To realize online rapid measurement for complex workpieces, a flexible measurement system based on an articulated industrial robot with a structured light sensor mounted on the end-effector is developed. A method for calibrating the system parameters is proposed in which the hand-eye transformation parameters and the robot kinematic parameters are synthesized in the calibration process. An initial hand-eye calibration is first performed using a standard sphere as the calibration target. By applying the modified complete and parametrically continuous method, we establish a synthesized kinematic model that combines the initial hand-eye transformation and distal link parameters as a whole with the sensor coordinate system as the tool frame. According to the synthesized kinematic model, an error model is constructed based on spheres' center-to-center distance errors. Consequently, the error model parameters can be identified in a calibration experiment using a three-standard-sphere target. Furthermore, the redundancy of error model parameters is eliminated to ensure the accuracy and robustness of the parameter identification. Calibration and measurement experiments are carried out based on an ER3A-C60 robot. The experimental results show that the proposed calibration method enjoys high measurement accuracy, and this efficient and flexible system is suitable for online measurement in industrial scenes.

  8. A novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Tomohiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Kato, Yukihiro; Kawada, Shin-ichi; Matsuda, Takeshi; Settles, Ronald Dean; Sugiyama, Akira; Takahashi, Tohru; Tian, Junping; Watanabe, Takashi; Yonamine, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors using a UV laser. The technique is simple and requires a short data-taking time of about ten minutes. Furthermore, it is applicable for relatively low gas gains. Our experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) operated in several gas mixtures are presented.

  9. A novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, M.; Ogawa, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Fujii, K.; Fusayasu, T.; Ikematsu, K.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, S.; Matsuda, T.; Settles, R. D.; Sugiyama, A.; Takahashi, T.; Tian, J.; Watanabe, T.; Yonamine, R.

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a novel technique for the measurement of the avalanche fluctuation of gaseous detectors using a UV laser. The technique is simple and requires a short data-taking time of about ten minutes. Furthermore, it is applicable for relatively low gas gains. Our experimental setup as well as the measurement principle, and the results obtained with a stack of Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) operated in several gas mixtures are presented.

  10. Calibration of stereo-digital image correlation for deformation measurement of large engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxing; Dai, Xiangjun; Chen, Zhenning; Dai, Yuntong; Dong, Shuai; He, Xiaoyuan

    2016-12-01

    The development of stereo-digital image correlation (stereo-DIC) enables the application of vision-based technique that uses digital cameras to the deformation measurement of materials and structures. Compared with traditional contact measurements, the stereo-DIC technique allows for non-contact measurement, has a non-intrusive characteristic, and can obtain full-field deformation information. In this paper, a speckle-based calibration method is developed to calibrate the stereo-DIC system when the system is applied for deformation measurement of large engineering components. By combining speckle analysis with the classical relative orientation algorithm, relative rotation and translation between cameras can be calibrated based on analysis of experimental speckle images. For validation, the strain fields of a four-point bending beam and an axially loaded concrete column were determined by the proposed calibration method and stereovision measurement. As a practical application, the proposed calibration method was applied for strain measurement of a ductile iron cylindrical vessel in the drop test. The measured results verify that the proposed calibration method is effective for deformation measurement of large engineering components.

  11. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  12. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  13. Cold wire constant voltage anemometry to measure temperature fluctuations and its application in a thermoacoustic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleve, Sarah; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of temperature fluctuations is essential for most thermoacoustic systems. In the present paper, cold wire constant-voltage anemometry (CVA) to measure temperature fluctuations is presented. Corrections for the thermal inertia and for the end losses of the wire are applied during the post-processing. The correction for the thermal inertia of the cold wire is achieved by applying a time dependent thermal lag as proposed originally for a constant-current anemometry (CCA) system. This thermal lag is measured in parallel by a hot wire. The thermal end losses of the wires to their supports are also considered and approximate corrections are proposed. The procedure for the cold wire CVA is validated in the acoustic field of an acoustic resonator with wires of different lengths. A comparison between a CVA and a CCA measurement also confirms the CVA measurement. Furthermore, the proposed measurement procedure is applied close to the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Supposing a two-dimensional flow, the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature fluctuations is possible. This allows a detailed examination of the acoustic field close to the stack, including the study of the correlation between temperature and velocity.

  14. Quantifying Measurement Fluctuations from Stochastic Surface Processes on Sensors with Heterogeneous Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmet, Jérôme; Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Daly, Ronan; Prasad, Abhinav; Thiruvenkathanathan, Pradyumna; Langley, Robin S.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in micro- and nanotechnology have enabled the development of ultrasensitive sensors capable of detecting small numbers of species. In general, however, the response induced by the random adsorption of a small number of objects onto the surface of such sensors results in significant fluctuations due to the heterogeneous sensitivity inherent to many such sensors coupled to statistical fluctuations in the particle number. At present, this issue is addressed by considering either the limit of very large numbers of analytes, where fluctuations vanish, or the converse limit, where the sensor response is governed by individual analytes. Many cases of practical interest, however, fall between these two limits and remain challenging to analyze. Here, we address this limitation by deriving a general theoretical framework for quantifying measurement variations on mechanical resonators resulting from statistical-number fluctuations of analyte species. Our results provide insights into the stochastic processes in the sensing environment and offer opportunities to improve the performance of mechanical-resonator-based sensors. This metric can be used, among others, to aid in the design of robust sensor platforms to reach ultrahigh-resolution measurements using an array of sensors. These concepts, illustrated here in the context of biosensing, are general and can therefore be adapted and extended to other sensors with heterogeneous sensitivity.

  15. Beam Forming HF Radar Beam Pattern Measurements and Phase Offset Calibration Using a UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahl, D.; Voulgaris, G.

    2016-12-01

    It has been shown that measuring antenna patterns for direction finding radars improves surface current measurements. For beam forming radars, the beam pattern of the receive array is assumed to be similar to that derived using theoretical calculations. However, local environmental conditions may lead to deviations (i.e., larger sidelobes and beamwidth) from this idealized beam pattern. This becomes particularly important for wave measurements that are sensitive to interference from sidelobes. Common techniques for beam forming HF radar phase calibration include "cross calibration", using a secondary beam forming site as the signal source, or calibration using a ship. The former method is limited to only one direction; on straight coastlines this is often at a large angle from the radar bore site where the beam width and uncertainty in phase calibration might be large. The latter technique requires chartering a ship with an appropriate reflector or transmitter, or the identification of ships of opportunity. Recent advances in UAV technology combined with an easement of FAA restrictions (Part 107) allows phase calibrations and beam pattern measurements to be completed on an HF radar site using a small transmitter attached to a UAV. This presentation describes the use of a UAV and the development of a method for beam forming phase calibration and beam pattern measurements. This method uses the UAV as a moving signal source to provide true sidelobe and beamwidth measurements. Results are shown from a calibration carried out at a beam forming (WERA) radar site (8.3 MHz) located in Georgetown, SC and are compared with results from a cross calibration. Phase calibrations acquired by the UAV showed a dependence on azimuthal angle from the radar bore site. Also, the beam patterns obtained were found to be narrower than those derived using the stationary source method. The effect of the new phase values derived using this method on the accuracy of radial velocities will be

  16. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  17. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  18. Review on common calibration and measurement practises for measuring gears on CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sammatini-Malberg, Maria-Pia; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The present report reviews the state of the art of metrology of cylindrical gears with involute toothing. The subjects covered in the state of the art range from gear measuring instruments to gear standards, together with a general introduction to international and national standards and guidelines......, in order to give an overview of the improvements achieved in the last 25 years. Special attention is paid to gear metrology on coordinate measuring machines (CMMs). Calibration chains for the major gear geometrical quantities developed by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) as well as their recent...... results obtained in gear standards measurement uncertainties are presented. This review also describes the design and development of a new type of master gear: the Gauge Block Gear (GBG).The GBG was developed for the performance verification of CMMs, for the specific task of pitch and chordal tooth...

  19. Misalignment calibration of geomagnetic vector measurement system using parallelepiped frame rotation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hongfeng; Zhu, XueJun; Pan, Mengchun; Zhang, Qi; Wan, Chengbiao; Luo, Shitu; Chen, Dixiang; Chen, Jinfei; Li, Ji; Lv, Yunxiao

    2016-12-01

    Misalignment error is one key factor influencing the measurement accuracy of geomagnetic vector measurement system, which should be calibrated with the difficulties that sensors measure different physical information and coordinates are invisible. A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. Simulation and experiment result show the effectiveness of calibration method. The experimental system mainly contains DM-050 three-axis fluxgate magnetometer, INS (inertia navigation system), aluminium parallelepiped frame, aluminium plane base. Misalignment angles are calculated by measured data of magnetometer and INS after rotating the aluminium parallelepiped frame on aluminium plane base. After calibration, RMS error of geomagnetic north, vertical and east are reduced from 349.441 nT, 392.530 nT and 562.316 nT to 40.130 nT, 91.586 nT and 141.989 nT respectively.

  20. Eccentricity fluctuations make flow measurable in high multiplicity p-p collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Elliptic flow is a hallmark of collectivity in hadronic collisions. Its measurement relies on analysis techniques which require high event multiplicity and could be applied so far to heavy ion collisions only. Here, we delineate the conditions under which elliptic flow becomes measurable in the samples of high-multiplicity ($dN_{\\rm ch}/dy \\geq 50$) p-p collisions, which will soon be collected at the LHC. We observe that fluctuations in the p-p interaction region can result in a sizable spatial eccentricity even for the most central p-p collisions. Under relatively mild assumptions on the nature of such fluctuations and on the eccentricity scaling of elliptic flow, we find that the resulting elliptic flow signal in high-multiplicity p-p collisions at the LHC becomes measurable with standard techniques.

  1. Measurements of plasma density fluctuations and electric wave fields using spherical electrostatic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A.I.; Bostroem, R.

    1995-04-01

    Spherical electrostatic probes are in wide use for the measurements of electric fields and plasma density. This report concentrates on the measurements of fluctuations of these quantities rather than background values. Potential problems with the technique include the influence of density fluctuations on electric field measurements and vice versa, effects of varying satellite potential, and non-linear rectification in the probe and satellite sheaths. To study the actual importance of these and other possible effects, we simulate the response of the probe-satellite system to various wave phenomena in the plasma by applying approximate analytical as well as numerical methods. We use a set of non-linear probe equations, based on probe characteristics experimentally obtained in space, and therefore essentially independent of any specific probe theory. This approach is very useful since the probe theory for magnetized plasmas is incomplete. 47 refs.

  2. Calibration procedure for plasma polarimetry based on the complex amplitude ratio measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bieg, Bohdan, E-mail: b.bieg@am.szczecin.pl [Maritime University, Szczecin (Poland); Kravtsov, Yury A.; Cieplik, Marek [Maritime University, Szczecin (Poland)

    2013-10-15

    New methodology for plasma polarimeters calibration is suggested, based on the complex amplitude ratio (CAR) measurements. This methodology reduces calibration to determination of three complex parameters of transfer matrix, characterizing polarization changes in optical system. Having obtained transfer matrix, full characteristic of the optic system could be obtained: eigenstates, phase shift and relative attenuation of the slow and fast wave. Polarization state of the sounding electromagnetic wave after the plasma is determined from the measured complex amplitude ratio by simple inversion of transfer matrix. Calibration procedure under discussion is simpler, more transparent and reliable than traditional procedures, using Stokes vector technique or angular parameters of polarization ellipse.

  3. Radiometric modeling and calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) ground based measurement experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere's thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  4. Calibrating a custom-made densitometer for radiation hardness measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vaananen, Mika Petteri

    2017-01-01

    A custom-made densitometer was set up to be used in radiation hardness measurements of scintillating fibres. Also, a measurement setup to measure the minimal bending radius of scintillating fibres was designed and implemented.

  5. Specifying and calibrating instrumentations for wideband electronic power measurements. [in switching circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesco, D. J.; Weikle, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    The wideband electric power measurement related topics of electronic wattmeter calibration and specification are discussed. Tested calibration techniques are described in detail. Analytical methods used to determine the bandwidth requirements of instrumentation for switching circuit waveforms are presented and illustrated with examples from electric vehicle type applications. Analog multiplier wattmeters, digital wattmeters and calculating digital oscilloscopes are compared. The instrumentation characteristics which are critical to accurate wideband power measurement are described.

  6. Calibration of excitation function measurement based on corona cage test results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lei; Chen, Xiaoyue; Wen, Xishan; Li, Wei; Xiao, Guozhou

    2016-11-01

    Corona cage approaches are crucial for research on the corona characteristics of conductors. Calibration is an indispensable task for determining excitation functions, which are used to predict corona performance of long transmission lines through extrapolation from measurements of short lines in corona cages. In this paper, the amplification factor G is calculated through a frequently adopted method, propagation analysis of high-frequency corona current along a short line. Another convenient calibration method, based on distributed parameter equivalent circuits, is established. The results for G obtained through propagation analysis and equivalent circuits are compared. To verify the rationality of calculation parameters in propagation analysis and equivalent circuits, a calibration experiment based on the excitation caused by a simulated monopulse current was performed. The results of the proposed calibration method and the calibration experiment are in good agreement.

  7. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  8. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmuck, S; Fessey, J; Gerbaud, T; Alper, B; Beurskens, M N A; de la Luna, E; Sirinelli, A; Zerbini, M

    2012-12-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron temperature is determined from the measurements. The current state of the interferometer hardware, the calibration setup, and the analysis technique for calibration and plasma operation are described. A new, full-system, absolute calibration employing continuous data acquisition has been performed recently and the calibration method and results are presented. The noise level in the measurement is very low and as a result the electron cyclotron emission spectrum and thus the spatial profile of the electron temperature are determined to within ±5% and in the most relevant region to within ±2%. The new calibration shows that the absolute response of the system has decreased by about 15% compared to that measured previously and possible reasons for this change are presented. Temperature profiles measured with the Michelson interferometer are compared with profiles measured independently using Thomson scattering diagnostics, which have also been recently refurbished and recalibrated, and agreement within experimental uncertainties is obtained.

  9. Misalignment calibration of geomagnetic vector measurement system using parallelepiped frame rotation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, Hongfeng [Academy of Equipment, Beijing 101416 (China); College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhu, XueJun, E-mail: zhuxuejun1990@126.com [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Pan, Mengchun; Zhang, Qi; Wan, Chengbiao; Luo, Shitu; Chen, Dixiang; Chen, Jinfei; Li, Ji; Lv, Yunxiao [College of Mechatronics Engineering and Automation, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Misalignment error is one key factor influencing the measurement accuracy of geomagnetic vector measurement system, which should be calibrated with the difficulties that sensors measure different physical information and coordinates are invisible. A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. Simulation and experiment result show the effectiveness of calibration method. The experimental system mainly contains DM-050 three-axis fluxgate magnetometer, INS (inertia navigation system), aluminium parallelepiped frame, aluminium plane base. Misalignment angles are calculated by measured data of magnetometer and INS after rotating the aluminium parallelepiped frame on aluminium plane base. After calibration, RMS error of geomagnetic north, vertical and east are reduced from 349.441 nT, 392.530 nT and 562.316 nT to 40.130 nT, 91.586 nT and 141.989 nT respectively. - Highlights: • A new misalignment calibration method by rotating a parallelepiped frame is proposed. • It does not need to know sensor attitude information or local dip angle. • The calibration system attitude change angle is not strictly required. • It can be widely used when sensors measure different physical information. • Geomagnetic vector measurement error is reduced evidently.

  10. Novel Local Calibration Method for Chemical Oxygen Demand Measurements by Using UV-Vis Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingtian, Hu; Chao, Liu; Xiaoping, Wang

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy has been widely used for chemical oxygen demand (COD) measurements of water. However, chemical compositions of substance in different water samples can cause measurement deviations, so a local calibration is needed. In this study, a novel local calibration method is proposed. The absorption spectra of COD standard solutions and wastewater samples taken from four factories were collected. We analyzed the impact of chemical compositions of substance in different water samples and extracted the morphology features of their absorptive spectra for recognition models. Furthermore, we calculated the local calibration parameters of the four categories of real water samples by specific modification based on the ability of light absorption in various water environments. After the process of local calibration, the root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the predictions were very small, which highlights the potential of this method for improving the accuracy and adaptability of COD measurements based on ultraviolet-visible spectrum.

  11. [Field measurement of Gobi surface emissivity spectrum at Dunhuang calibration site of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Yuan; Rong, Zhi-guo; Hu, Xiu-qing; Zhang, Li-jun; Liu, Jing-jing

    2009-05-01

    Gobi surface emissivity spectrum of Dunhuang radiometric calibration site of China is one of the key factors to calibrate the thermal infrared remote sensors using land surface. Based on the iterative spectrally smooth temperature/emissivity separation (ISSTES)algorithm, Dunhuang Gobi surface emissivity spectrum was measured using BOMEM MR154 Fourier transform spectroradiometer and Infrared Golden Board. Emissivity spectrum data were obtained at different time and locations. These spectrum data were convolved with the channel response function of CE312 radiometer and compared with the channel emissivity measured by the same instrument. The results showed that the difference between these two kinds of channel emissivity was within 0.012 and exhibited a good consistency. With these measured emissivity spectra, all of the mainstream thermal infrared remote sensors can be calibrated using Dunhuang Gobi surface at radiometric calibration site of China.

  12. Two-Step Calibration of a Multiwavelength Pyrometer for High Temperature Measurement Using a Quartz Lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    There is no theoretical upper temperature limit for pyrometer application in temperature measurements. NASA Glenn's multiwavelength pyrometer can make measurements over wide temperature ranges. However, the radiation spectral response of the pyrometer's detector must be calibrated before any temperature measurement is attempted, and it is recommended that calibration be done at temperatures close to those for which measurements will be made. Calibration is a determination of the constants of proportionality at all wavelengths between the detector's output (voltage) and its input signals (usually from a blackbody radiation source) in order to convert detector output into radiation intensity. To measure high temperatures, the detectors are chosen to be sensitive in the spectral range from 0.4 to 2.5 micrometers. A blackbody furnace equilibrated at around 1000 C is often used for this calibration. Though the detector may respond sensitively to short wavelengths radiation, a blackbody furnace at 1000 C emits only feebly at very short wavelengths. As a consequence, the calibration constants that result may not be the most accurate. For pyrometry calibration, a radiation source emitting strongly at the short wavelengths is preferred. We have chosen a quartz halogen lamp for this purpose.

  13. Calibrated automated thrombin generation measurement in clotting plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, H Coenraad; Giesen, Peter; Al Dieri, Raed; Regnault, Véronique; de Smedt, Eric; Wagenvoord, Rob; Lecompte, Thomas; Béguin, Suzette

    2003-01-01

    Calibrated automated thrombography displays the concentration of thrombin in clotting plasma with or without platelets (platelet-rich plasma/platelet-poor plasma, PRP/PPP) in up to 48 samples by monitoring the splitting of a fluorogenic substrate and comparing it to a constant known thrombin activity in a parallel, non-clotting sample. Thus, the non-linearity of the reaction rate with thrombin concentration is compensated for, and adding an excess of substrate can be avoided. Standard conditions were established at which acceptable experimental variation accompanies sensitivity to pathological changes. The coefficients of variation of the surface under the curve (endogenous thrombin potential) are: within experiment approximately 3%; intra-individual: AVK, heparin(-likes), direct inhibitors]. In PRP, it is diminished in von Willebrand's disease, but it also shows the effect of platelet inhibitors (e.g. aspirin and abciximab). Addition of activated protein C (APC) or thrombomodulin inhibits thrombin generation and reflects disorders of the APC system (congenital and acquired resistance, deficiencies and lupus antibodies) independent of concomitant inhibition of the procoagulant pathway as for example by anticoagulants.

  14. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with source state errors and statistical fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2017-03-01

    We show how to calculate the secure final key rate in the four-intensity decoy-state measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution protocol with both source errors and statistical fluctuations with a certain failure probability. Our results rely only on the range of only a few parameters in the source state. All imperfections in this protocol have been taken into consideration without assuming any specific error patterns of the source.

  15. A Probe Head for Simultaneous Measurements of Electrostatic and Magnetic Fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade Edge Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrittwieser, R W; Ionita, C; Vianello, N

    2010-01-01

    For ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) a new probe head was developed for simultaneous measurements of electric and magnetic fluctuations in the edge plasma region. The probe head consists of a cylindrical graphite case. On the front side six graphite pins are mounted. With this arrangement the poloidal and rad...... is inserted up to three times for 100 ms each by the midplane manipulator into the scrape-off layer. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim....

  16. A Collective Scattering System for Measuring Electron Gyroscale Fluctuations on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D. R.; Mazzucato, E.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, Jr., N. C.

    2009-02-13

    A collective scattering system has been installed on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to measure electron gyroscale fluctuations in NSTX plasmas. Up to five distinct wavenumbers are measured simultaneously, and the large toroidal curvature of NSTX plasmas provides enhanced spatial localization. Steerable optics can position the scattering volume throughout the plasma from the magnetic axis to the outboard edge. Initial measurements indicate rich turbulent dynamics on the electron gyroscale. The system will be a valuable tool for investigating the connection between electron temperature gradient turbulence and electron thermal transport in NSTX plasmas.

  17. Comparison of model measured runner blade pressure fluctuations with unsteady flow analysis predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnoli, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    An accurate prediction of pressure fluctuations in Francis turbines has become more and more important over the last years, due to the continuously increasing requirements of wide operating range capability. Depending on the machine operator, Francis turbines are operated at full load, part load, deep part load and speed-no-load. Each of these operating conditions is associated with different flow phenomena and pressure fluctuation levels. The better understanding of the pressure fluctuation phenomena and the more accurate prediction of their amplitude along the hydraulic surfaces can significantly contribute to improve the hydraulic and mechanical design of Francis turbines, their hydraulic stability and their reliability. With the objective to acquire a deeper knowledge about the pressure fluctuation characteristics in Francis turbines and to improve the accuracy of numerical simulation methods used for the prediction of the dynamic fluid flow through the turbine, pressure fluctuations were experimentally measured in a mid specific speed model machine. The turbine runner of a model machine with specific speed around nq,opt = 60 min-1, was instrumented with dynamic pressure transducers at the runner blades. The model machine shaft was equipped with a telemetry system able to transmit the measured pressure values to the data acquisition system. The transient pressure signal was measured at multiple locations on the blade and at several operating conditions. The stored time signal was also evaluated in terms of characteristic amplitude and dominating frequency. The dynamic fluid flow through the hydraulic turbine was numerically simulated with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for selected operating points. Among others, operating points at full load, part load and deep part load were calculated. For the fluid flow numerical simulations more advanced turbulence models were used, such as the detached eddy simulation (DES) and scale adaptive simulation (SAS). At the

  18. Easy calibration method of vision system for in-situ measurement of strain of thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Hyub PARK; Dong-Joong KANG; Myung-Soo SHIN; Sung-Jo LIM; Son-Cheol YU; Kwang-Soo LEE; Jong-Eun HA; Sung-Hoon CHOA

    2009-01-01

    An easy calibration method was presented for in-situ measurement of displacement in the order of nanometer during micro-tensile test for thin films by using CCD camera as a sensing device. The calibration of the sensing camera in the system is a central element part to measure displacement in the order of nanometer using images taken with the camera. This was accomplished by modeling the optical projection through the camera lens and relative locations between the object and camera in 3D space. A set of known 3D points on a plane where the film is located on is projected to an image plane as input data. These points, known as a calibration points, are then used to estimate the projection parameters of the camera. In the measurement system of the micro-scale by CCD camera, the calibration data acquisition and one-to-one matching steps between the image and 3D planes need precise data extraction procedures and repetitive user's operation to calibrate the measuring devices. The lack of the robust image feature extraction and easy matching prevent the practical use of these methods. A data selection method was proposed to overcome these limitations and offer an easy and convenient calibration of a vision system that has the CCD camera and the 3D reference plane with calibration marks of circular type on the surface of the plane. The method minimizes the user's intervention such as the fine tuning of illumination system and provides an efficient calibration method of the vision system for in-situ axial displacement measurement of the micro-tensile materials.

  19. On-body calibration and measurements using personal radiofrequency exposimeters in indoor diffuse and specular environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminzadeh, Reza; Thielens, Arno; Bamba, Aliou; Kone, Lamine; Gaillot, Davy Paul; Lienard, Martine; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2016-07-01

    For the first time, response of personal exposimeters (PEMs) is studied under diffuse field exposure in indoor environments. To this aim, both numerical simulations, using finite-difference time-domain method, and calibration measurements were performed in the range of 880-5875 MHz covering 10 frequency bands in Belgium. Two PEMs were mounted on the body of a human male subject and calibrated on-body in an anechoic chamber (non-diffuse) and a reverberation chamber (RC) (diffuse fields). This was motivated by the fact that electromagnetic waves in indoor environments have both specular and diffuse components. Both calibrations show that PEMs underestimate actual incident electromagnetic fields. This can be compensated by using an on-body response. Moreover, it is shown that these responses are different in anechoic chamber and RC. Therefore, it is advised to use an on-body calibration in an RC in future indoor PEM measurements where diffuse fields are present. Using the response averaged over two PEMs reduced measurement uncertainty compared to single PEMs. Following the calibration, measurements in a realistic indoor environment were done for wireless fidelity (WiFi-5G) band. Measured power density values are maximally 8.9 mW/m(2) and 165.8 μW/m(2) on average. These satisfy reference levels issued by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection in 1998. Power density values obtained by applying on-body calibration in RC are higher than values obtained from no body calibration (only PEMs) and on-body calibration in anechoic room, by factors of 7.55 and 2.21, respectively. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:298-309, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Calibration and efficiency curve of SANAEM ionization chamber for activity measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeltepe, Emin; Kossert, Karsten; Dirican, Abdullah; Nähle, Ole; Niedergesäß, Christiane; Kemal Şahin, Namik

    2016-03-01

    A commercially available Fidelis ionization chamber was calibrated and assessed in PTB with activity standard solutions. The long-term stability and linearity of the system was checked. Energy-dependent efficiency curves for photons and beta particles were determined, using an iterative method in Excel™, to enable calibration factors to be calculated for radionuclides which were not used in the calibration. Relative deviations between experimental and calculated radionuclide efficiencies are of the order of 1% for most photon emitters and below 5% for pure beta emitters. The system will enable TAEK-SANAEM to provide traceable activity measurements.

  1. Alignment of the Measurement Scale Mark during Immersion Hydrometer Calibration Using an Image Processing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Emilio Vargas-Soto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The present work presents an improved method to align the measurement scale mark in an immersion hydrometer calibration system of CENAM, the National Metrology Institute (NMI of Mexico, The proposed method uses a vision system to align the scale mark of the hydrometer to the surface of the liquid where it is immersed by implementing image processing algorithms. This approach reduces the variability in the apparent mass determination during the hydrostatic weighing in the calibration process, therefore decreasing the relative uncertainty of calibration.

  2. Fiber Bragg gratings strain measuring system and a sensor calibration setup based on mechanical nanomotion transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarev, Vladimir A.; Leonov, Stanislav O.; Tarabrin, Mikhail K.; Karasik, Valerii E.

    2017-06-01

    Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors are powerful tools for structural health monitoring applications. However, FBG sensor fabrication and packaging processes can lead to a non-linear behavior, that affects the accuracy of the strain measurements. Here we present a novel nondestructive calibration technique for FBG strain sensors that use a mechanical nanomotion transducer. A customized calibration setup was designed based on dovetail-type slideways that were mechanized using a stepping motor. The performance of the FBG strain sensor was investigated through analysis of experimental data, and the calibration curves for the FBG strain sensor are presented.

  3. Alignment of the Measurement Scale Mark during Immersion Hydrometer Calibration Using an Image Processing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Perez, Luis Manuel; Pedraza-Ortega, Jesus Carlos; Ramos-Arreguin, Juan Manuel; Arriaga, Saul Tovar; Fernandez, Marco Antonio Aceves; Becerra, Luis Omar; Hurtado, Efren Gorrostieta; Vargas-Soto, Jose Emilio

    2013-01-01

    The present work presents an improved method to align the measurement scale mark in an immersion hydrometer calibration system of CENAM, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of Mexico, The proposed method uses a vision system to align the scale mark of the hydrometer to the surface of the liquid where it is immersed by implementing image processing algorithms. This approach reduces the variability in the apparent mass determination during the hydrostatic weighing in the calibration process, therefore decreasing the relative uncertainty of calibration. PMID:24284770

  4. Efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector for [{sup 18}F] FDG activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Maria da Conceicao de Farias; Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de; Albuquerque, Antonio Morais de Sa, E-mail: mariacc05@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br, E-mail: moraisalbuquerque@hotmaiI.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Departamento de Energia Nuclear; Oliveira, Mercia Liane de; Hazin, Clovis Abrahao; Lima, Fernando Roberto de Andrade, E-mail: mercial@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: chazin@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    The radionuclide {sup 18}F, in the form of flurodeoxyglucose (FDG), is the most used radiopharmaceutical for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Due to [{sup 18}F]FDG increasing demand, it is important to ensure high quality activity measurements in the nuclear medicine practice. Therefore, standardized reference sources are necessary to calibrate of {sup 18}F measuring systems. Usually, the activity measurements are performed in re-entrant ionization chambers, also known as radionuclide calibrators. Among the existing alternatives for the standardization of radioactive sources, the method known as gamma spectrometry is widely used for short-lived radionuclides, since it is essential to minimize source preparation time. The purpose of this work was to perform the standardization of the [{sup 18}F]FDG solution by gamma spectrometry. In addition, the reference sources calibrated by this method can be used to calibrate and test the radionuclide calibrators from the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA) of the Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE). Standard sources of {sup 152}Eu, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 68}Ge were used for the efficiency calibration of the spectrometer system. As a result, the efficiency curve as a function of energy was determined in wide energy range from 122 to 1408 keV. Reference sources obtained by this method can be used in [{sup 18}F]FDG activity measurements comparison programs for PET services localized in the Brazilian Northeast region. (author)

  5. In situ calibrated defocusing PTV for wall-bounded measurement volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, T.; Hain, R.; Kähler, C. J.

    2016-08-01

    In many situations, 3D velocity measurements in thin (∼1 mm) but wide (∼100  ×  100 mm2) flow channels is an important task. To resolve the in-plane and out-of-plane velocity gradients properly, a precise calibration is required, since 3D measurement approaches rely strongly on the accuracy of the calibration procedure. It is likely that calibration targets do not fit domains with small depths, due to their size. Furthermore, in fields where such measurements are of interest, the accessibility of the measurement volume is often limited or even impossible. To overcome these drawbacks, this paper introduces an in situ calibrated defocusing particle tracking velocimetry approach for wall-bounded measurement domains with depths in the low millimeter range. The calibration function for the particle depth location is directly derived from the particle image geometries and their displacements between two frames. Employing only a single camera, this defocusing approach is capable of measuring the air flow between two parallel glass plates at a distance of 1 mm with an average uncertainty of 2.43% for each track, relative to the maximum velocity. A tomographic particle tracking velocimetry measurement, serving as a benchmark for the single camera technique, reaches an average uncertainty of 1.59%. Altogether, with its straightforward set-up and without requiring a calibration target, this in situ calibrated defocusing approach opens new areas of application for optical flow velocimetry. In particular, for measurement domains with small optical windows and a lack of accessibility.

  6. Semi-empirical approach for calibration of CR-39 detectors in diffusion chambers for radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra A, P.; Lopez H, M. E. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Av. Universitaria 1801, San Miguel Lima 32 (Peru); Palacios F, D.; Sajo B, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 89000 Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Valdivia, P., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru)

    2016-10-15

    Simulated and measured calibration of PADC detectors is given for cylindrical diffusion chambers employed in environmental radon measurements. The method is based on determining the minimum alpha energy (E{sub min}), average critical angle (<Θ{sub c}>), and fraction of {sup 218}Po atoms; the volume of the chamber (f{sub 1}), are compared to commercially available devices. Radon concentration for exposed detectors is obtained from induced track densities and the well-established calibration coefficient for NRPB monitor. Calibration coefficient of a PADC detector in a cylindrical diffusion chamber of any size is determined under the same chemical etching conditions and track analysis methodology. In this study the results of numerical examples and comparison between experimental calibration coefficients and simulation purpose made code. Results show that the developed method is applicable when uncertainties of 10% are acceptable. (Author)

  7. The calibration of the solid state nuclear track detector LR 115 for radon measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, C; Jönsson, G; Freyer, K; Treutler, H C; Enge, W

    1999-01-01

    An experimental calibration of indoor room and outdoor soil detector devices which are based on LR 115 as sensitive element has taken place at the Swedish Radiation Protection Institute in Stockholm (Sweden) in 1994 and 1996, at the Physikalisch-Technischen Bundesanstalt in Braunschweig (Germany) in 1997 and at the Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle (Germany) in 1997. Special properties of the used solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) material LR 115 have been measured to define the application of the experimental calibration.

  8. Hierarchy of individual calibration levels for heart rate and accelerometry to measure physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brage, Søren; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Niels

    2007-01-01

    Combining accelerometry with heart rate (HR) monitoring may improve precision of physical activity measurement. Considerable variation exists in the relationships between physical activity intensity (PAI) and HR and accelerometry, which may be reduced by individual calibration. However, individual......, submaximal step and walk tests with and without calorimetry, and nonexercise calibration using sleeping HR and gender. Reference accelerometry and HR models explained >95% of the between-individual variance in PAI (P

  9. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  10. Correcting for multivariate measurement error by regression calibration in meta-analyses of epidemiological studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Within-person variability in measured values of multiple risk factors can bias their associations with disease. The multivariate regression calibration (RC) approach can correct for such measurement error and has been applied to studies in which true values or independent repeat measurements of t...

  11. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for flow angle measurements by use of wind turbine yawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demurtas, Giorgio; Friis Pedersen, Troels

    The present report describes a method to calibrate a spinner anemometer ow angle measurements. The turbine is yawed several times (5 times approximately 60 with respect to the wind direction) in steady wind (> 6 m/s) and measurements of yaw position (measured by a yaw position sensor) and yaw...... misalignment (measured by the spinner anemometer under calibration) are recorded. The tangent of the two angles is plotted in a scatter plot. A linear fitting is made, and the slope coefficient is the correction factor Fα. The method applied to a Nordtank 500kW wind turbine erected at the Risø test site...

  12. Nanog Fluctuations in Embryonic Stem Cells Highlight the Problem of Measurement in Cell Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rosanna C G; Stumpf, Patrick S; Ridden, Sonya J; Sim, Aaron; Filippi, Sarah; Harrington, Heather A; MacArthur, Ben D

    2017-06-20

    A number of important pluripotency regulators, including the transcription factor Nanog, are observed to fluctuate stochastically in individual embryonic stem cells. By transiently priming cells for commitment to different lineages, these fluctuations are thought to be important to the maintenance of, and exit from, pluripotency. However, because temporal changes in intracellular protein abundances cannot be measured directly in live cells, fluctuations are typically assessed using genetically engineered reporter cell lines that produce a fluorescent signal as a proxy for protein expression. Here, using a combination of mathematical modeling and experiment, we show that there are unforeseen ways in which widely used reporter strategies can systematically disturb the dynamics they are intended to monitor, sometimes giving profoundly misleading results. In the case of Nanog, we show how genetic reporters can compromise the behavior of important pluripotency-sustaining positive feedback loops, and induce a bifurcation in the underlying dynamics that gives rise to heterogeneous Nanog expression patterns in reporter cell lines that are not representative of the wild-type. These findings help explain the range of published observations of Nanog variability and highlight the problem of measurement in live cells. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thin laser beam wandering and intensity fluctuations method for evapotranspiration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Antonin; Fernandez, Angel; Perez, Dario G.; Barille, Regis; Dupont, Jean-Charles

    2016-06-01

    We compare in this study two simple optical setups to measure the atmospheric turbulence characterized by the refractive index structure parameter Cn2. The corresponding heat flux values sensed by the laser beam propagation are calculated leading to the plant evapotranspiration. The results are discussed and compared to measurements obtained with a well-known and calibrated eddy-covariant instrument. A fine analysis gives a good insight of the accuracy of the optical devices proposed here to measure the crop evapotranspiration. Additional evapotranspiration values calculated with meteorological sensor data and the use of different models are also compared in parallel.

  14. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for wind speed measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Demurtas, Giorgio; Friis Pedersen, Troels; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The power curve of a wind turbine can be measured, according to IEC 61400-12-2 with a nacelle-mounted anemometer. Typically, a sonic anemometer or a cup anemometer and a wind vane are mounted on the back of the nacelle roof. Another option is to use a spinner anemometer. The measurement principle of the spinner anemometer is based on the flow distortion caused by the wind turbine spinner. The flow on the spinner surface is measured by means of three 1D sonic sensors mounted on the spinner and...

  15. Backside calibration potentiometry: ion activity measurements with selective supported liquid membranes by calibrating from the inner side of the membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malon, Adam; Bakker, Eric; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-01-15

    In direct potentiometry, the magnitude of the measured potentials is used to determine the composition of the sample. While this places rather formidable demands on the required reproducibility of the associated potential measurements, typically on the order of microvolts, in vitro clinical analyses of blood samples are today successfully performed with direct potentiometry using ion-selective electrodes (ISEs). Unfortunately, most other analytical situations do not permit the sensor to be recalibrated every few minutes, as in environmental monitoring or in vivo measurements, and direct potentiometry is often bound to fail as an accurate method in these circumstances. This paper introduces a novel direction for potentiometric sensing, termed backside calibration potentiometry. Chemical asymmetries across thin supported liquid ISE membranes are assessed by determining the direction of potential drift upon changing the stirring rate on either side of the membrane. Disappearance of this drift indicates the disappearance of concentration gradients across the membrane and is used to determine the sample composition if the solution composition at the backside of the membrane and the interfering ion concentration in the sample are known. For practical determinations, the concentration of either the primary or the interfering ion is varied in the reference solution until the stirring effect disappears. The procedure is demonstrated with a Ca2+-selective membrane using Ba2+ as the dominant interfering ion. Another example includes the determination of Pb2+ in environmental samples where the pH is adjusted to a known level. At pH 4.0, H+ turns out to be the dominant interfering ion. The practical applicability of the method is shown with different environmental water samples, for which the results obtained with the novel method are compared with those obtained by traditional calibration using standard additions. The limitations of the novel method in terms of accuracy and

  16. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for yaw misalignment measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Friis Pedersen, Troels; Demurtas, Giorgio; Zahle, Frederik

    2015-01-01

    The spinner anemometer is an instrument for yaw misalignment measurements without the drawbacks of instruments mounted on the nacelle top. The spinner anemometer uses a non-linear conversion algorithm that converts the measured wind speeds by three sonic sensors on the spinner to horizontal wind speed, yaw misalignment and flow inclination angle. The conversion algorithm utilizes two constants that are specific to the spinner and blade root design and to the mounting positions of the sonic se...

  17. Abundances of isotopologues and calibration of CO2 greenhouse gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tans, Pieter P.; Crotwell, Andrew M.; Thoning, Kirk W.

    2017-07-01

    We have developed a method to calculate the fractional distribution of CO2 across all of its component isotopologues based on measured δ13C and δ18O values. The fractional distribution can be used with known total CO2 to calculate the amount of substance fraction (mole fraction) of each component isotopologue in air individually. The technique is applicable to any molecule where isotopologue-specific values are desired. We used it with a new CO2 calibration system to account for isotopic differences among the primary CO2 standards that define the WMO X2007 CO2-in-air calibration scale and between the primary standards and standards in subsequent levels of the calibration hierarchy. The new calibration system uses multiple laser spectroscopic techniques to measure mole fractions of the three major CO2 isotopologues (16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, and 16O12C18O) individually. The three measured values are then combined into total CO2 (accounting for the rare unmeasured isotopologues), δ13C, and δ18O values. The new calibration system significantly improves our ability to transfer the WMO CO2 calibration scale with low uncertainty through our role as the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch Central Calibration Laboratory for CO2. Our current estimates for reproducibility of the new calibration system are ±0.01 µmol mol-1 CO2, ±0.2 ‰ δ13C, and ±0.2 ‰ δ18O, all at 68 % confidence interval (CI).

  18. Abundances of isotopologues and calibration of CO2 greenhouse gas measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Tans

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a method to calculate the fractional distribution of CO2 across all of its component isotopologues based on measured δ13C and δ18O values. The fractional distribution can be used with known total CO2 to calculate the amount of substance fraction (mole fraction of each component isotopologue in air individually. The technique is applicable to any molecule where isotopologue-specific values are desired. We used it with a new CO2 calibration system to account for isotopic differences among the primary CO2 standards that define the WMO X2007 CO2-in-air calibration scale and between the primary standards and standards in subsequent levels of the calibration hierarchy. The new calibration system uses multiple laser spectroscopic techniques to measure mole fractions of the three major CO2 isotopologues (16O12C16O, 16O13C16O, and 16O12C18O individually. The three measured values are then combined into total CO2 (accounting for the rare unmeasured isotopologues, δ13C, and δ18O values. The new calibration system significantly improves our ability to transfer the WMO CO2 calibration scale with low uncertainty through our role as the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch Central Calibration Laboratory for CO2. Our current estimates for reproducibility of the new calibration system are ±0.01 µmol mol−1 CO2, ±0.2 ‰ δ13C, and ±0.2 ‰ δ18O, all at 68 % confidence interval (CI.

  19. Radiochromic film calibration for low-energy seed brachytherapy dose measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, Hali, E-mail: hamorris@ualberta.ca; Menon, Geetha; Sloboda, Ron S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Radiochromic film dosimetry is typically performed for high energy photons and moderate doses characterizing external beam radiotherapy (XRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the accuracy of previously established film calibration procedures used in XRT when applied to low-energy, seed-based brachytherapy at higher doses, and to determine necessary modifications to achieve similar accuracy in absolute dose measurements. Methods: Gafchromic EBT3 film was used to measure radiation doses upwards of 35 Gy from 75 kVp, 200 kVp, 6 MV, and (∼28 keV) I-125 photon sources. For the latter irradiations a custom phantom was built to hold a single I-125 seed. Film pieces were scanned with an Epson 10000XL flatbed scanner and the resulting 48-bit RGB TIFF images were analyzed using both FilmQA Pro software andMATLAB. Calibration curves relating dose and optical density via a rational functional form for all three color channels at each irradiation energy were determined with and without the inclusion of uncertainties in the measured optical densities and dose values. The accuracy of calibration curve variations obtained using piecewise fitting, a reduced film measurement area for I-125 irradiation, and a reduced number of dose levels was also investigated. The energy dependence of the film lot used was also analyzed by calculating normalized optical density values. Results: Slight differences were found in the resulting calibration curves for the various fitting methods used. The accuracy of the calibration curves was found to improve at low doses and worsen at high doses when including uncertainties in optical densities and doses, which may better represent the variability that could be seen in film optical density measurements. When exposing the films to doses > 8 Gy, two-segment piecewise fitting was found to be necessary to achieve similar accuracies in absolute dose measurements as when using smaller dose ranges. When reducing the film measurement

  20. A Portable Ultra-Stable Calibration Source for Precision RV Measurements in NIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Ge, J.; Wan, X.; Delgado, A.; Jakeman, H.

    2011-09-01

    In the next decade, astronomers are aiming at reaching 0.1 m/s RV precision, which will enable discoveries of Earth-like planets around solar-type stars. However, the RV precision is currently limited by stellar activity, the stability and bandwidth of RV calibration sources. We proposed to use an ultra-stable monolithic Michelson interferometer as an RV calibration source. This monolithic interferometer source has several advantages over the conventional RV calibration sources: (1), it produces sinusoidal spectral features which can be easily processed, unlike gas absorption cells or emission lamps, which spectral line distributions are extremely nonuniform; (2), it has a wide spectral coverage from visible to near infrared (NIR); (3), it is designed to be thermal-stable (thermally compensated) so that the thermal induced RV drift is very small; (4), it is also field compensated to ensure a high optical efficiency so that a spatially incoherent continuum light source is suitable for producing bright calibration light (unlike the faint ThAr emission lamp); (5). it is extremely compact ( 10x10x10 cm3) and low cost compared to the bulky (more than 1x1x1 m3) and extremely high cost laser frequency combs. With the help of the proposed RV calibration source, the search of exoplanets around M dwarfs or even L, T dwarfs can be extended to the NIR band. The predicted sub m/s RV calibration precision will enable the discovery of Earth-like planets in the habitable zone around M dwarfs. The proposed calibration source may be quite useful for calibrating future space instruments for possible space RV exoplanet searches in the IR region where RV measurements are free of contamination of the Earth's telluric lines, which is a serious issue for ground-based IR RV observations. We will present our latest results of the calibration source on its application for both Echelle spectrograph and the instrument adopting DFDI method.

  1. Calibration and background measurements with a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autischer, M; Beck, P; Kindl, P; Latocha, M; Rollet, S

    2007-01-01

    A tissue-equivalent-proportional counter (TEPC) instrument has been used as the reference instrument for cosmic radiation measurement at flight altitudes by several institutes. For purposes of characterisation the response of the instrument has been investigated under different standard radiation conditions, in terms of radiation particle, energy and angle of incidence. Photon sources and photon beams of energies up to 6.6 MeV and neutron beams up to 200 MeV were used. To have a better understanding of the shielding influence of the instrument assembly, the angle dependence of response was analysed for several radiation conditions. Specific measurement conditions were simulated with the Monte Carlo transport code, FLUKA. The measured instrument response was compared with simulation results. It was demonstrated, that simulations were very helpful to understand the instrument's response. The TEPC instrument used by the Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf (ARCS) research simulates the energy deposition in a unit density tissue volume of 2 microm diameter, of similar size to a cell nucleus. Pure propane at low pressure is used as measurement gas. To characterise the instrument at low dose rates background measurements were done 800 m below ground and at the ultra low level laboratory in Gran Sasso, 1380 m below ground. These results were compared with measurements on the Earth's surface at different altitudes on mountains up to 3480 m above sea level. The significant increase of the expected dose rate is well reproduced by the experiments at mountain altitudes. As a result of this study a full characterisation and a thorough understanding of the performance and reliability of the detector was achieved.

  2. Calibrating surface weather observations to atmospheric attenuation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanii, Babak

    2001-06-01

    A correlation between near-IR atmospheric attenuation measurements made by the Atmospheric Visibility Monitor (AVM) at the Table Mountain Facility and airport surface weather observations at Edwards Air Force Base has been performed. High correlations (over 0.93) exist between the Edwards observed sky cover and the average AVM measured attenuations over the course of the 10 months analyzed. The statistical relationship between the data-sets allows the determination of coarse attenuation statistics from the surface observations, suggesting that such statistics may be extrapolated from any surface weather observation site. Furthermore, a superior technique for converting AVM images to attenuation values by way of MODTRAN predictions has been demonstrated.

  3. Ancilla-assisted calibration of a measuring apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brida, G; Ciavarella, L; Degiovanni, I P; Genovese, M; Migdall, A; Mingolla, M G; Paris, M G A; Piacentini, F; Polyakov, S V

    2012-06-22

    A quantum measurement can be described by a set of matrices, one for each possible outcome, which represents the positive operator-valued measure (POVM) of the sensor. Efficient protocols of POVM extraction for arbitrary sensors are required. We present the first experimental POVM reconstruction that takes explicit advantage of a quantum resource, i.e., nonclassical correlations with an ancillary state. A POVM of a photon-number-resolving detector is reconstructed by using strong quantum correlations of twin beams generated by parametric down-conversion. Our reconstruction method is more statistically robust than POVM reconstruction methods that use classical input states.

  4. A Time Efficient Adaptive Gridding Approach and Improved Calibrations in Five-Hole Probe Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Town

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Five-Hole Probes (FHP, being a dependable and accurate aerodynamic tool, are an excellent choice for measuring three-dimensional flow fields in turbomachinery. To improve spatial resolution, a subminiature FHP with a diameter of 1.68 mm is employed. High length to diameter ratio of the tubing and manual pitch and yaw calibration cause increased uncertainty. A new FHP calibrator is designed and built to reduce the uncertainty by precise, computer controlled movements and reduced calibration time. The calibrated FHP is then placed downstream of the nozzle guide vane (NGV assembly of a low-speed, large-scale, axial flow turbine. The cold flow HP turbine stage contains 29 vanes and 36 blades. A fast and computer controllable traversing system is implemented using an adaptive grid method for the refinement of measurements in regions such as vane wake, secondary flows, and boundary layers. The current approach increases the possible number of measurement points in a two-hour period by 160%. Flow structures behind the NGV measurement plane are identified with high spatial resolution and reduced uncertainty. The automated pitch and yaw calibration and the adaptive grid approach introduced in this study are shown to be a highly effective way of measuring complex flow fields in the research turbine.

  5. Cross-Wire Calibration for Freehand 3D Ultrasonography: Measurement and Numerical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jan

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D freehand ultrasound is an imaging technique, which is graduallyfinding clinical applications. A position sensor is attached to aconventional ultrasound probe, so that B-scans are acquired along withtheir relative locations. This allows the B-scans to be inserted into a3D regular voxel array, which can then be visualized usingarbitrary-plane slicing, and volume or surface rendering. A keyrequirement for correct reconstruction is the calibration: determiningthe position and orientation of the B-scans with respect to theposition sensor's receiver. Following calibration, interpolation in theset of irregularly spaced B-scans is required to reconstruct aregular-voxel array. This text describes a freehand measurement of 2Dultrasonic data, an approach to the calibration problem and severalnumerical issues concerned with the calibration and reconstruction.

  6. An interferometric scanning microwave microscope and calibration method for sub-fF microwave measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargent, T; Haddadi, K; Lasri, T; Clément, N; Ducatteau, D; Legrand, B; Tanbakuchi, H; Theron, D

    2013-12-01

    We report on an adjustable interferometric set-up for Scanning Microwave Microscopy. This interferometer is designed in order to combine simplicity, a relatively flexible choice of the frequency of interference used for measurements as well as the choice of impedances range where the interference occurs. A vectorial calibration method based on a modified 1-port error model is also proposed. Calibrated measurements of capacitors have been obtained around the test frequency of 3.5 GHz down to about 0.1 fF. Comparison with standard vector network analyzer measurements is shown to assess the performance of the proposed system.

  7. Calibrating Charisma: The many-facet Rasch model for leader measurement and automated coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barney, Matt

    2016-11-01

    No one is a leader unless others follow. Consequently, leadership is fundamentally a social judgment construct, and may be best measured via a Many Facet Rasch Model designed for this purpose. Uniquely, the MFRM allows for objective, accurate and precise estimation of leader attributes, along with identification of rater biases and other distortions of the available information. This presentation will outline a mobile computer-adaptive measurement system that measures and develops charisma, among others. Uniquely, the approach calibrates and mass-personalizes artificially intelligent, Rasch-calibrated electronic coaching that is neither too hard nor too easy but “just right” to help each unique leader develop improved charisma.

  8. Tropospheric temperature measurements with the pure rotational Raman lidar technique using nonlinear calibration functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Pavlinskiy, Aleksei V.; Nakhtigalova, Daria P.

    2017-01-01

    Among lidar techniques, the pure rotational Raman (PRR) technique is the best suited for tropospheric and lower stratospheric temperature measurements. Calibration functions are required for the PRR technique to retrieve temperature profiles from lidar remote sensing data. Both temperature retrieval accuracy and number of calibration coefficients depend on the selected function. The commonly used calibration function (linear in reciprocal temperature 1/T with two calibration coefficients) ignores all types of broadening of individual PRR lines of atmospheric N2 and O2 molecules. However, the collisional (pressure) broadening dominates over other types of broadening of PRR lines in the troposphere and can differently affect the accuracy of tropospheric temperature measurements depending on the PRR lidar system. We recently derived the calibration function in the general analytical form that takes into account the collisional broadening of all N2 and O2 PRR lines (Gerasimov and Zuev, 2016). This general calibration function represents an infinite series and, therefore, cannot be directly used in the temperature retrieval algorithm. For this reason, its four simplest special cases (calibration functions nonlinear in 1/T with three calibration coefficients), two of which have not been suggested before, were considered and analyzed. All the special cases take the collisional PRR lines broadening into account in varying degrees and the best function among them was determined via simulation. In this paper, we use the special cases to retrieve tropospheric temperature from real PRR lidar data. The calibration function best suited for tropospheric temperature retrievals is determined from the comparative analysis of temperature uncertainties yielded by using these functions. The absolute and relative statistical uncertainties of temperature retrieval are given in an analytical form assuming Poisson statistics of photon counting. The vertical tropospheric temperature

  9. On the use of mobile phones and wearable microphones for noise exposure measurements: Calibration and measurement accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Romain

    Despite the fact that noise-induced hearing loss remains the number one occupational disease in developed countries, individual noise exposure levels are still rarely known and infrequently tracked. Indeed, efforts to standardize noise exposure levels present disadvantages such as costly instrumentation and difficulties associated with on site implementation. Given their advanced technical capabilities and widespread daily usage, mobile phones could be used to measure noise levels and make noise monitoring more accessible. However, the use of mobile phones for measuring noise exposure is currently limited due to the lack of formal procedures for their calibration and challenges regarding the measurement procedure. Our research investigated the calibration of mobile phone-based solutions for measuring noise exposure using a mobile phone's built-in microphones and wearable external microphones. The proposed calibration approach integrated corrections that took into account microphone placement error. The corrections were of two types: frequency-dependent, using a digital filter and noise level-dependent, based on the difference between the C-weighted noise level minus A-weighted noise level of the noise measured by the phone. The electro-acoustical limitations and measurement calibration procedure of the mobile phone were investigated. The study also sought to quantify the effect of noise exposure characteristics on the accuracy of calibrated mobile phone measurements. Measurements were carried out in reverberant and semi-anechoic chambers with several mobiles phone units of the same model, two types of external devices (an earpiece and a headset with an in-line microphone) and an acoustical test fixture (ATF). The proposed calibration approach significantly improved the accuracy of the noise level measurements in diffuse and free fields, with better results in the diffuse field and with ATF positions causing little or no acoustic shadowing. Several sources of errors

  10. CALIBRATION OF DEVICES FOR MEASURING ELEMENTS OF MICRO-ELECTRONIC STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Trapashko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of microelectronics requires solution of the problem ensuring unity of linear measurements in a submicron range. The problem can be solved on the condition that calibration of measuring devices shall be made in accordance with reference samples that is a short length scale.While making calibration of measuring equipment with the help of a reference measure it is important to investigate components of the method accuracy and their influence on measuring results. The paper considers methodical errors which are specific for methods of optical and atomic force microscopy. Calibration results of an optical measuring microscope are given in the paper. The paper reveals that an additive error depends on parameters of a material and the form of measured elements for an optical measuring microscope. The methodical error of atomic force microscopes is predicated on the probe point shape. The paper considers a short length scale used for calibration of optical and atomic force microscopes. Recommendations for users of the measuring equipment are formulated in the paper.

  11. Assessment of measurement errors and dynamic calibration methods for three different tipping bucket rain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedekar, Vinayak S.; King, Kevin W.; Fausey, Norman R.; Soboyejo, Alfred B. O.; Harmel, R. Daren; Brown, Larry C.

    2016-09-01

    Three different models of tipping bucket rain gauges (TBRs), viz. HS-TB3 (Hydrological Services Pty Ltd.), ISCO-674 (Isco, Inc.) and TR-525 (Texas Electronics, Inc.), were calibrated in the lab to quantify measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities (5 mm·h- 1 to 250 mm·h- 1) and three different volumetric settings. Instantaneous and cumulative values of simulated rainfall were recorded at 1, 2, 5, 10 and 20-min intervals. All three TBR models showed a substantial deviation (α = 0.05) in measurements from actual rainfall depths, with increasing underestimation errors at greater rainfall intensities. Simple linear regression equations were developed for each TBR to correct the TBR readings based on measured intensities (R2 > 0.98). Additionally, two dynamic calibration techniques, viz. quadratic model (R2 > 0.7) and T vs. 1/Q model (R2 = > 0.98), were tested and found to be useful in situations when the volumetric settings of TBRs are unknown. The correction models were successfully applied to correct field-collected rainfall data from respective TBR models. The calibration parameters of correction models were found to be highly sensitive to changes in volumetric calibration of TBRs. Overall, the HS-TB3 model (with a better protected tipping bucket mechanism, and consistent measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) was found to be the most reliable and consistent for rainfall measurements, followed by the ISCO-674 (with susceptibility to clogging and relatively smaller measurement errors across a range of rainfall intensities) and the TR-525 (with high susceptibility to clogging and frequent changes in volumetric calibration, and highly intensity-dependent measurement errors). The study demonstrated that corrections based on dynamic and volumetric calibration can only help minimize-but not completely eliminate the measurement errors. The findings from this study will be useful for correcting field data from TBRs; and may have major

  12. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, Abdessamad [IEK-4 Forschungszentrum Juelich 52428 (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    A method to derive stochastic differential equations for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is presented. It uses a measured first four moments (mean, variance, Skewness and Kurtosis) and the correlation time of turbulence to write a Pearson equation for the probability distribution function of fluctuations. The Fokker-Planck equation is then used to derive a Langevin equation for the plasma density fluctuations. A theoretical expectations are used as a constraints to fix the nonlinearity structure of the stochastic differential equation. In particular when the quadratically nonlinear dynamics is assumed, then it is shown that the plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. Strong criteria for statistical discrimination of experimental time series are proposed as an alternative to the Kurtosis-Skewness scaling. This scaling is broadly used in contemporary literature to characterize edge turbulence, but it is inappropriate because a large family of distributions could share this scaling. Strong criteria allow us to focus on the relevant candidate distribution and approach a nonlinear structure of edge turbulence model.

  13. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    CERN Document Server

    Jourde, Kevin; Marteau, Jacques; d'Ars, Jean de Bremond; Gardien, Serge; Girerd, Claude; Ianigro, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring...

  14. Calibration of a Neutron Hydroprobe for Moisture Measurements in Small-Diameter Steel-Cased Boreholes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Anderson L.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2009-08-01

    Computation of soil moisture content from thermalized neutron counts for the T-Farm Interim cover requires a calibration relationship but none exists for 2-in tubes. A number of calibration options are available for the neutron probe, including vendor calibration, field calibration, but none of these methods were deemed appropriate for the configuration of interest. The objective of this work was to develop a calibration relation for converting neutron counts measured in 2-in access tubes to soil water content. The calibration method chosen for this study was a computational approach using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP). Model calibration was performed using field measurements in the Hanford calibration models with 6-in access tubes, in air and in the probe shield. The bet-fit model relating known water content to measured neutron counts was an exponential model that was essentially equivalent to that currently being used for 6-in steel cased wells. The MCNP simulations successfully predicted the neutron count rate for the neutron shield and the three calibration models for which data were collected in the field. However, predictions for air were about 65% lower than the measured counts . This discrepancy can be attributed to uncertainties in the configuration used for the air measurements. MCNP-simulated counts for the physical models were essentially equal to the measured counts with values. Accurate prediction of the response in 6-in casings in the three calibration models was motivation to predict the response in 2-in access tubes. Simulations were performed for six of the seven calibration models as well as 4 virtual models with the entire set covering a moisture range of 0 to 40%. Predicted counts for the calibration models with 2-in access tubes were 40 to 50% higher than in the 6-inch tubes. Predicted counts for water were about 60% higher in the 2-in tube than in the 6-in tube. The discrepancy between the 2-in and 6-in tube can be

  15. Calibrating the absolute amplitude scale for air showers measured at LOFAR

    CERN Document Server

    Nelles, A; Karskens, T; Krause, M; Buitink, S; Corstanje, A; Enriquez, J E; Erdmann, M; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Krause, R; Link, K; Norden, M J; Rachen, J P; Rossetto, L; Schellart, P; Scholten, O; Schröder, F G; ter Veen, S; Thoudam, S; Trinh, T N G; Weidenhaupt, K; Wijnholds, S J; Anderson, J; Bähren, L; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Bregman, J; Brouw, W N; Bruüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Carbone, D; Ciardi, B; de Gasperin, F; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fallows, R A; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; van Haarlem, M P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; Horneffer, A; Iacobelli, M; Juette, E; Karastergiou, A; Kohler, J; Kondratiev, V I; Kuniyoshi, M; Kuper, G; van Leeuwen, J; Maat, P; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Pandey, V N; Pizzo, R; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Röttgering, H; Schwarz, D; Serylak, M; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Tasse, C; Toribio, M C; Vermeulen, R; van Weeren, R J; Wijers, R A M J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P

    2015-01-01

    Air showers induced by cosmic rays create nanosecond pulses detectable at radio frequencies. These pulses have been measured successfully in the past few years at the LOw- Frequency ARray (LOFAR) and are used to study the properties of cosmic rays. For a complete understanding of this phenomenon and the underlying physical processes, an absolute calibration of the detecting antenna system is needed. We present three approaches that were used to check and improve the antenna model of LOFAR and to provide an absolute calibration for air shower measurements. Two methods are based on calibrated reference sources and one on a calibration approach using the diffuse radio emission of the Galaxy, optimized for short data-sets. An accuracy of 35% in amplitude is reached. The absolute calibration is also compared to predictions from air shower simulations. These results are used to set an absolute energy scale for air shower measurements and can be used as a basis for an absolute scale for the measurement of astronomic...

  16. Chemometric modelling based on 2D-fluorescence spectra without a calibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solle, D; Geissler, D; Stärk, E; Scheper, T; Hitzmann, B

    2003-01-22

    2D fluorescence spectra provide information from intracellular compounds. Fluorophores like trytophan, tyrosine and phenylalanin as well as NADH and flavins make the corresponding measurement systems very important for bioprocess supervision and control. The evaluation is usually based on chemometric modelling using for their calibration procedure off-line measurements of the desired process variables. Due to the data driven approach lots of off-line measurements are required. Here a methodology is presented, which enables to perform a calibration procedure of chemometric models without any further measurement. The necessary information for the calibration procedure is provided by means of the a priori knowledge about the process, i.e. a mathematical model, whose model parameters are estimated during the calibration procedure, as well as the fact that the substrate should be consumed at the end of the process run. The new methodology for chemometric calibration is applied for a batch cultivation of aerobically grown S. cerevisiae on the glucose Schatzmann medium. As will be presented the chemometric models, which are determined by this method, can be used for prediction during new process runs. The MATHLAB routine is free available on request from the authors.

  17. GROUNDWATER FLOW MODEL CALIBRATION USING WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS AT SHORT INTERVALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater flow models are usually calibrated with respect to water level measurements collected at intervals of several months or even years. Measurements of these kinds are not sensitive to sudden or short stress conditions, such as impact from stormwater drainage flow or flas...

  18. Displaced calibration of PM10 measurements using spatio-temporal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cocchi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available PM10 monitoring networks are equipped with heterogeneous samplers. Some of these samplers are known to underestimate true levels of concentrations (non-reference samplers. In this paper we propose a hierarchical spatio-temporal Bayesian model for the calibration of measurements recorded using non-reference samplers, by borrowing strength from non co-located reference sampler measurements.

  19. Optical modeling and polarization calibration for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    CERN Document Server

    Koopman, Brian; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P; Duff, Shannon M; Gallardo, Patricio A; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L; Simon, Sara M; Vavagiakis, Eve M; Ward, Jonathan T; Wollack, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. Located at an elevation of 5190 m, ACTPol measures the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization with arcminute-scale angular resolution. Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing maps of the CMB polarization. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We present our optical modeling and measurements associated with calibrating the detector angles in ACTPol.

  20. Results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R.; Emery, K. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Anevsky, S. [All-Union Research Inst. for Optophysical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of experts representing national laboratories from across the globe (i.e., the authors of this paper), was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set consisted of twenty silicon reference cells that would, hopefully, form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much larger differences among laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid.

  1. Objective measurement of erythema in psoriasis using digital color photography with color calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raina, A; Hennessy, R; Rains, M; Allred, J; Hirshburg, J M; Diven, D G; Markey, M K

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metrics for evaluating the severity of psoriasis are subjective, which complicates efforts to measure effective treatments in clinical trials. We collected images of psoriasis plaques and calibrated the coloration of the images according to an included color card. Features were extracted from the images and used to train a linear discriminant analysis classifier with cross-validation to automatically classify the degree of erythema. The results were tested against numerical scores obtained by a panel of dermatologists using a standard rating system. Quantitative measures of erythema based on the digital color images showed good agreement with subjective assessment of erythema severity (κ = 0.4203). The color calibration process improved the agreement from κ = 0.2364 to κ = 0.4203. We propose a method for the objective measurement of the psoriasis severity parameter of erythema and show that the calibration process improved the results. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Calibration of Fourier domain short coherence interferometer for absolute distance measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montonen, R; Kassamakov, I; Hæggström, E; Österberg, K

    2015-05-20

    We calibrated and determined the measurement uncertainty of a custom-made Fourier domain short coherence interferometer operated in laboratory conditions. We compared the optical thickness of two thickness standards and three coverslips determined with our interferometer to the geometric thickness determined by SEM. Using this calibration data, we derived a calibration function with a 95% confidence level system uncertainty of (5.9×10(-3)r+2.3)  μm, where r is the optical distance in μm, across the 240 μm optical measurement range. The confidence limit includes contributions from uncertainties in the optical thickness, geometric thickness, and refractive index measurements as well as uncertainties arising from cosine errors and thermal expansion. The results show feasibility for noncontacting absolute distance characterization with micrometer-level accuracy. This instrument is intended for verifying the alignment of the discs of an accelerating structure in the possible future compact linear collider.

  3. Calibration of an optical condensate measurement technique using indirect static headspace gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, P B; Loconto, P R; McGrath, J J

    2001-12-01

    Researchers in the Department of Mechanical Engineering seek to obtain a means to measure less than 3 mg of H2O that adheres to a metal surface as condensate. The objective is to calibrate optical reflectance measurements of an aluminum surface as a function of the condensate thickness present. Collaboration with the Hazardous Substance Research Center at Michigan State University results in the development of an indirect static headspace gas chromatographic technique capable of measuring H2O in low-milligram quantities. The technique utilizes manual headspace sampling, a megabore capillary column, and a flame ionization detector. A correlation of r2 = 0.999 is obtained for the calibration of the indirect measurement technique. The calibration of the analytical instrument demonstrates adequate precision (calcium carbide to convert the H2O to acetylene. A scaled calibration technique is used to simplify handling trace water volumes. The surface reflectance measurements are found to correlate well (r2 = 0.935) with measurements of the condensate mass. This result facilitates the development of an optical mass-transfer measurement technique. This study focuses on the analytical method and its relationship with engineering research.

  4. Cross-diagnostic comparison of fluctuation measurements in a linear plasma column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Adam D.; Archer, Nicholas A. A.; Bashyal, Atit; Chakraborty Thakur, Saikat; Tynan, George R.

    2015-11-01

    The advent of fast imaging diagnostics, which provide two-dimensional measurements on relevant plasma time scales, has proven invaluable for interpreting plasma dynamics in laboratory devices. Despite its success, imaging remains a qualitative aid for many studies, because intensity is difficult to map onto a single physical variable for use in a theoretical model. This work continues our exploration of the relationship between visible-light and electrostatic probe measurements in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment (CSDX). CSDX is a well-characterized linear machine producing dense plasmas relevant to the tokamak edge (Te ~ 3 eV, ne ~1013 /cc). Visible light from ArI and ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a fast digital camera. Floating potential and ion-saturation current are measured by an array of electrostatic probe tips. We present a detailed comparison between imaging and probe measurements of fluctuations, including temporal, spatial, and spectral properties in various operational regimes.

  5. Induced Dual-Nanospray: A Novel Internal Calibration Method for Convenient and Accurate Mass Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yafeng; Zhang, Ning; Zhou, Yueming; Wang, Jianing; Zhang, Yiming; Wang, Jiyun; Xiong, Caiqiao; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2013-09-01

    Accurate mass information is of great importance in the determination of unknown compounds. An effective and easy-to-control internal mass calibration method will dramatically benefit accurate mass measurement. Here we reported a simple induced dual-nanospray internal calibration device which has the following three advantages: (1) the two sprayers are in the same alternating current field; thus both reference ions and sample ions can be simultaneously generated and recorded. (2) It is very simple and can be easily assembled. Just two metal tubes, two nanosprayers, and an alternating current power supply are included. (3) With the low-flow-rate character and the versatility of nanoESI, this calibration method is capable of calibrating various samples, even untreated complex samples such as urine and other biological samples with small sample volumes. The calibration errors are around 1 ppm in positive ion mode and 3 ppm in negative ion mode with good repeatability. This new internal calibration method opens up new possibilities in the determination of unknown compounds, and it has great potential for the broad applications in biological and chemical analysis.

  6. An efficient calibration method for SQUID measurement system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Shu-Lin, Zhang; Chao-Xiang, Zhang; Xiang-Yan, Kong; Xiao-Ming, Xie

    2016-06-01

    For a practical superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) based measurement system, the Tesla/volt coefficient must be accurately calibrated. In this paper, we propose a highly efficient method of calibrating a SQUID magnetometer system using three orthogonal Helmholtz coils. The Tesla/volt coefficient is regarded as the magnitude of a vector pointing to the normal direction of the pickup coil. By applying magnetic fields through a three-dimensional Helmholtz coil, the Tesla/volt coefficient can be directly calculated from magnetometer responses to the three orthogonally applied magnetic fields. Calibration with alternating current (AC) field is normally used for better signal-to-noise ratio in noisy urban environments and the results are compared with the direct current (DC) calibration to avoid possible effects due to eddy current. In our experiment, a calibration relative error of about 6.89 × 10-4 is obtained, and the error is mainly caused by the non-orthogonality of three axes of the Helmholtz coils. The method does not need precise alignment of the magnetometer inside the Helmholtz coil. It can be used for the multichannel magnetometer system calibration effectively and accurately. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program (B)” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDB04020200) and the Shanghai Municipal Science and Technology Commission Project, China (Grant No. 15DZ1940902).

  7. Simultaneous Measurements of Electrostatic and Magnetic Fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade Edge Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ionita, Codrina; Vianello, Nicola; Müller, H.W.

    2009-01-01

    in such a way that simultaneously the poloidal and radial electric field components, the ion saturation current and the current-voltage characteristic can be registered. During the AUG discharges of 7 s lengths the probe head is inserted two to three times for 100 ms each by the midplane manipulator......In ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations in the edge plasma region were measured simultaneously during ELMy H-mode (high confinement) plasmas and L-mode (low confinement) plasmas and during a transition between the two modes. A special probe was used containing six Langmuir...

  8. Derivation of stochastic differential equations for scrape-off layer plasma fluctuations from experimentally measured statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekkaoui, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research-Plasma Physics, Research Center Juelich GmbH, Association FZJ-Euratom, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A stochastic differential equation for intermittent plasma density dynamics in magnetic fusion edge plasma is derived, which is consistent with the experimentally measured gamma distribution and the theoretically expected quadratic nonlinearity. The plasma density is driven by a multiplicative Wiener process and evolves on the turbulence correlation time scale, while the linear growth is quadratically damped by the fluctuation level. The sensitivity of intermittency to the nonlinear dynamics is investigated by analyzing the nonlinear Langevin representation of the beta process, which leads to a root-square nonlinearity.

  9. Resonance Frequency of Optical Microbubble Resonators: Direct Measurements and Mitigation of Fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosci, Alessandro; Berneschi, Simone; Giannetti, Ambra; Farnesi, Daniele; Cosi, Franco; Baldini, Francesco; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Soria, Silvia; Barucci, Andrea; Righini, Giancarlo; Pelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    This work shows the improvements in the sensing capabilities and precision of an Optical Microbubble Resonator due to the introduction of an encaging poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) box. A frequency fluctuation parameter σ was defined as a score of resonance stability and was evaluated in the presence and absence of the encaging system and in the case of air- or water-filling of the cavity. Furthermore, the noise interference introduced by the peristaltic and the syringe pumping system was studied. The measurements showed a reduction of σ in the presence of the encaging PMMA box and when the syringe pump was used as flowing system. PMID:27589761

  10. Calibrating NMR measured porosity/permeability relationships using µXRCT measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, H. E.; Smith, M. M.; Hao, Y.; Carroll, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbonate reservoirs have garnered interest for potential use in carbon capture and storage (CCS) activities. To be suitable for long term carbon dioxide (CO2) storage, they must possess sufficient permeability either through existing connected pore space, or due to reactivity with CO2-acidified fluids. Adequate assessment of the target formation permeability will rely on accurate downhole well-logging tools. Primary among these tools is nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) well-logging. Application of this tool relies on our ability to relate the porosity and pore distributions measured by NMR to permeability. These methods are challenging to apply in carbonate reservoirs with complex mineralogies where pores sizes often span orders of magnitudes. We have assessed the ability of NMR methods to measure permeability using rocks from the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project Saskatchewan, Canada and the Arbuckle injection zone at the Wellington CO2 storage demonstration site, Kansas. Results of laboratory measured permeability values of these rocks indicate that the standard NMR methods for predicting permeability values can produce values off by orders of magnitude within the same flow units. In this presentation, we present the results of a combined NMR and micro X-ray computed tomography (μXRCT) study of these rock cores to better estimate downhole permeability values of carbonate rocks. The results of the study suggest that the dramatic differences in predicted permeability values derive from large differences in the matrix porosity, pore network tortuosities, and mineralogy of the various rock units. We will present new laboratory measurements, and methodologies aimed at producing a universal NMR calibration procedure for determining permeability in carbonate reservoirs. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. First in situ measurement of electric field fluctuations during strong spread F in the Indian zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. S. Sinha

    Full Text Available An RH-560 rocket flight was conducted from Sriharikota rocket range (SHAR (14°N, 80°E, dip 14°N along with other experiments, as a part of equatorial spread F (ESF campaign, to study the nature of irregularities in electric field and electron density. The rocket was launched at 2130 local time (LT and it attained an apogee of 348 km. Results of vertical and horizontal electric field fluctuations are presented here. Scale sizes of electric field fluctuations were measured in the vertical direction only. Strong ESF irregularities were observed in three regions, viz., 160-190 km, 210-257 km and 290-330 km. Some of the valley region vertical electric field irregularities (at 165 km and 168 km, in the intermediate-scale size range, observed during this flight, show spectral peak at kilometer scales and can be interpreted in terms of the image striation theory suggested by Vickrey et al. The irregularities at 176 km do not exhibit any peak at kilometer scales and appear to be of a new type. Scale sizes of vertical electric field fluctuations showed a decrease with increasing altitude. The most prominent scales were of the order of a few kilometers around 170 km and a few hundred meters around 310 km. Spectra of intermediate-scale vertical electric field fluctuations below the base of the F region (210-257 km showed a tendency to become slightly flatter (spectral index n = -2.1 ± 0.7 as compared to the valley region (n = -3.6 ± 0.8 and the region below the F peak (n = -2.8 ± 0.5. Correlation analysis of the electron density and vertical electric field fluctuations suggests the presence of a sheared flow of current in 160-330 km region.

    Keywords: Ionosphere (Electric fields and currents; ionospheric irregularities; Radio science (ionospheric physics

  12. Measurement and Modeling of the Fluctuating Wall Pressure Field Beneath Transitional Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snarski, Stephen R.

    2001-11-01

    Measurements have been performed to better understand the space-varying character of the fluctuating wall pressure field beneath a transitional boundary layer and to develop an appropriate model for the space-varying (nonhomogeneous) wavenumber-frequency wall pressure spectrum. Although a great deal is understood regarding the structure of the wall pressure field beneath turbulent boundary layers, the current understanding of the wall pressure field beneath the transitional boundary layer is incomplete. Overlooked have been critical issues concerning spatial variations in turbulence structure and the convection and decay of pressure producing disturbances—properties that define the character of the field and resulting form of the wavenumber-frequency spectrum. The experiments involve measurement of the space-time fluctuating wall pressure field across the transition region of a flat plate boundary layer by means of a 64-element linear array of hearing-aid microphones and hot wire velocity measurements in the adjacent laminar, transitional, and turbulent boundary layers. Because the field is nonhomogeneous, wavelet based transform methods are required to appropriately resolve the space-varying structure of the field and form of the nonhomogeneous wavenumber-frequency spectrum.

  13. First absolutely calibrated on-axis ion flow measurements in MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, B.; Baltzer, M.; Craig, D.; den Hartog, D. J.; Nishizawa, T.; Nornberg, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Improvements in absolute calibration techniques allow for the first direct measurements of the flow profile in the core of MST. We use both active charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and passive emission near 343 nm to measure ion temperature and flow. It is generally assumed that O VI is the brightest passive emission source. However, we show that there are cases, such as high temperature, pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) plasmas where the passive emission is dominated by C VI. Differences in the fine structure for O VI and C VI result in a systematic velocity error of about 12 km/s if the wrong model is assumed. Active measurements, however, are relatively insensitive to background model choice. The dominant source of error in active velocity measurements remains the systematic errors in calibration. The first absolutely calibrated, localized toroidal velocity measurements were obtained using an updated calibration technique. During PPCD, the on-axis ion flow is up to 40 km/s larger than both the n = 6 mode velocity and the line-averaged ion velocity. These measurements provide the first direct look at the flow profile in the core of MST. This work has been supported by the US DOE and the Wheaton College summer research program.

  14. An indirect accuracy calibration and uncertainty evaluation method for large scale inner dimensional measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bai-Ling; Qu, Xing-Hua

    2013-10-01

    In view of present problem of low accuracy, limited range and low automaticity existing in the large-scale diameter inspection instrument, a precise measuring system (robot) was designed based on laser displacement sensor for large-scale inner diameter in this paper. Since the traditional measuring tool of the robot is expensive and hard to manufacture, an indirect calibration method is proposed. In this study, the system eccentric error is calibrated by ring gauge of laboratory. An experiment, which changes the installed order of located rods to introduce located rods' eccentric error, is designed to test whether the spindle eccentric error remains unchanged. The experiment result shows the variation of spindle's eccentricity after changing rods is within 0.02mm. Due to the spindle is an unchanged part of robot, based on Φ584 series robot calibrated by ring gauge, other series robot can be deduced combining with the length of extended arm.

  15. A new and simple calibration-independent method for measuring the beam energy of a cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Katherine; Jensen, Mikael; Thisgaard, Helge; Publicover, Julia; Lapi, Suzanne; McQuarrie, Steve A; Ruth, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    This work recommends a new and simple-to-perform method for measuring the beam energy of an accelerator. The proposed method requires the irradiation of two monitor foils interspaced by an energy degrader. The primary advantage of the proposed method, which makes this method unique from previous energy evaluation strategies that employ the use of monitor foils, is that this method is independent of the detector efficiency calibration. This method was evaluated by performing proton activation of (nat)Cu foils using both a cyclotron and a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The monitor foil activities were read using a dose calibrator set to an arbitrary calibration setting. Excellent agreement was noted between the nominal and measured proton energies.

  16. A new and simple calibration-independent method for measuring the beam energy of a cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, Katherine, E-mail: kgagnon1@ualberta.c [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton PET Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Jensen, Mikael; Thisgaard, Helge [Hevesy Laboratory, Risoe-DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Frederiksborgvej 399, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Publicover, Julia; Lapi, Suzanne [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada); McQuarrie, Steve A. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton PET Centre, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Ruth, Thomas J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    This work recommends a new and simple-to-perform method for measuring the beam energy of an accelerator. The proposed method requires the irradiation of two monitor foils interspaced by an energy degrader. The primary advantage of the proposed method, which makes this method unique from previous energy evaluation strategies that employ the use of monitor foils, is that this method is independent of the detector efficiency calibration. This method was evaluated by performing proton activation of {sup nat}Cu foils using both a cyclotron and a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. The monitor foil activities were read using a dose calibrator set to an arbitrary calibration setting. Excellent agreement was noted between the nominal and measured proton energies.

  17. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L., E-mail: lianglin@ucla.edu; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  18. 2D image of local density and magnetic fluctuations from line-integrated interferometry-polarimetry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, L; Ding, W X; Brower, D L

    2014-11-01

    Combined polarimetry-interferometry capability permits simultaneous measurement of line-integrated density and Faraday effect with fast time response (∼1 μs) and high sensitivity. Faraday effect fluctuations with phase shift of order 0.05° associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty ∼0.01°. For physics investigations, local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of the polarimetry data. Reconstructed 2D images of density and magnetic field fluctuations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved.

  19. Measurements of temperature and velocity fluctuations in oscillating flows using thermal anemometry – application to thermoacoustic refrigerators

    OpenAIRE

    Berson, Arganthaël; Poignand, Gaelle; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper summarizes our recent work on the development of thermal anemometry to measure velocity and temperature fluctuations in oscillating flows. First, we demonstrate that velocity cannot be measured accurately by hot-wire anemometry in oscillating flows when the flow reverses its direction. Indeed, there is no unique and well-defined correlation between the flow velocity and heat transfer near flow reversal, which prevents the recovery of velocity fluctuations fr...

  20. Vibration-Induced Conductivity Fluctuation Measurement for Soil Bulk Density Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Kishne, Andrea Sz; Chang, Hung-Chih; Kish, Laszlo B

    2007-01-01

    Soil bulk density affects water storage, water and nutrient movement, and plant root activity in the soil profile. Its measurement is difficult in field conditions. Vibration-induced conductivity fluctuation was investigated to quantify soil bulk density with possible field applications in the future. The AC electrical conductivity of soil was measured using a pair of blade-like electrodes while exposing the soil to periodic vibration. The blades were positioned longitudinally and transversally to the direction of the induced vibration to enable the calculation of a normalized index. The normalized index was expected to provide data independent from the vibration strength and to reduce the effect of soil salinity and water content. The experiment was conducted on natural and salinized fine sand at two moisture conditions and four bulk densities. The blade-shaped electrodes improved electrode-soil contact compared to cylindrical electrodes, and thereby, reduced measurement noise. Simulations on a simplified re...

  1. Faraday-effect polarimeter diagnostic for internal magnetic field fluctuation measurements in DIII-D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Ding, W X; Brower, D L; Finkenthal, D; Muscatello, C; Taussig, D; Boivin, R

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by the need to measure fast equilibrium temporal dynamics, non-axisymmetric structures, and core magnetic fluctuations (coherent and broadband), a three-chord Faraday-effect polarimeter-interferometer system with fast time response and high phase resolution has recently been installed on the DIII-D tokamak. A novel detection scheme utilizing two probe beams and two detectors for each chord results in reduced phase noise and increased time response [δb ∼ 1G with up to 3 MHz bandwidth]. First measurement results were obtained during the recent DIII-D experimental campaign. Simultaneous Faraday and density measurements have been successfully demonstrated and high-frequency, up to 100 kHz, Faraday-effect perturbations have been observed. Preliminary comparisons with EFIT are used to validate diagnostic performance. Principle of the diagnostic and first experimental results is presented.

  2. Calibrating cosmological radiative transfer simulations with Lyman alpha forest data: Evidence for large spatial UV background fluctuations at z ~ 5.6 - 5.8 due to rare bright sources

    CERN Document Server

    Chardin, Jonathan; Aubert, Dominique; Puchwein, Ewald

    2015-01-01

    We calibrate here cosmological radiative transfer simulation with ATON/RAMSES with a range of measurements of the Lyman alpha opacity from QSO absorption spectra. We find the Lyman alpha opacity to be very sensitive to the exact timing of hydrogen reionisation. Models reproducing the measured evolution of the mean photoionisation rate and average mean free path reach overlap at z ~ 7 and predict an accelerated evolution of the Lyman alpha opacity at z > 6 consistent with the rapidly evolving luminosity function of Lyman alpha emitters in this redshift range. Similar to "optically thin" simulations our full radiative transfer simulations fail, however, to reproduce the high-opacity tail of the Lyman alpha opacity PDF at z > 5. We argue that this is due to spatial UV fluctuations in the post-overlap phase of reionisation on substantially larger scales than predicted by our source model, where the ionising emissivity is dominated by large numbers of sub-L* galaxies. We further argue that this suggests a signific...

  3. Calibration of mass spectrometric measurements of gas phase reactions on steel surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, H., E-mail: heinzfalk@unitybox.de [Scientific Consultancy, Kleve (Germany); Falk, M. [Falk Steuerungssysteme GmbH, Stadthagen (Germany); Wuttke, T. [FuE-EV ThyssenKrupp Steel Europe, Dortmund (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    The sampling of the surface-near gas composition using a mass spectrometer (MS-Probe) is a valuable tool within a hot dip process simulator. Since reference samples with well characterized surface coverage are usually not available, steel samples can deliver quantifiable amounts of the process relevant species H{sub 2}O, CO and H{sub 2} using the decarburization reaction with water vapor. Such “artificial calibration samples” (ACS) can be used for the calibration of the MS-Probe measurements. The carbon release rate, which is governed by the diffusion law, was determined by GDOES, since the diffusion coefficients of carbon in steel samples are usually not known. The measured carbon concentration profiles in the ACS after the thermal treatment confirmed the validity of the diffusion model described in this paper. The carbon bulk concentration > 100 ppm is sufficient for the use of a steel material as ACS. The experimental results reported in this paper reveal, that with the MS-Probe the LOQ of less than one monolayer of iron oxide can be achieved. - Highlights: • Gas to surface reactions at steel sheets is monitored with a mass spectrometer on-line. • The experimental data are calibrated in absolute terms as oxide mass densities. • Standard steel samples can be used for the calibration procedure. • Additional GDOES analysis of the carbon depletion in the calibration samples was carried out. • Limits of quantitation below one monolayer of oxide surface coverage were achieved.

  4. Interspecies calibration of heavy-metal concentrations in nine mosses and lichens: Applicability to deposition measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkeson, L.

    1979-01-01

    The study describes a method for including nine alternative moss and lichen species in heavy-metal air-pollution surveys based on concentrations in one of the species. Iron, Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni and Cd concentrations have been measured in Dicranum polysetum, Hylocomium splendens, Hypnum cupressiforme, Pleurozium schreberi, Pohlia nutans, Cladonia rangiferina, Hypogymnia physodes, Pseudevernia furfuracea and Usnea filipendula from 57 sites in coniferous woodland surrounding a brass foundry in Sweden. Concentrations vary decidedly between species. The mosses frequently show higher concentrations than the lichens. The use of different monitor species in a deposition survey without interspecies calibration is not advised. Calibration factors for concentrations in different species can be calculated from the mean concentrations in each species. With the help of the factors, concentrations in a species not found in a certain site can be estimated from concentrations measured in any of the other species sampled. The applicability of the reported calibration factors to surveys in other regions is discussed. Where these factors are not applicable, local calibration factors to surveys in other regions is discussed. Where these factors are not applicable, local calibration factors for indicator species of interest can be set up using the method presented.

  5. RECIPROCITY CALIBRATION OF A SONAR TRANSDUCER FROM ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN WATER AND IN AIR : THE DELTA-Z RECIPROCITY CALIBRATION METHOD

    OpenAIRE

    S. Baker(Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London, United Kingdom); Bedard, R.; Patton, M.; Wilson, O.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described by which the free-field, open-circuit voltage sensitivity of a reversible underwater acoustic transducer may be obtained from measurements of its input electrical impedance in water and in air. This method, which we have termed the Delta-Z reciprocity calibration method, is being developed for the in-service calibration of sonar transducers installed in domes which can be flooded and purged. The application of the Delta-Z method to the calibration of a single tonpilz-typ...

  6. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun-Munzinger, P.; Rustamov, A.; Stachel, J.

    2017-04-01

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase-space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  7. Bridging the gap between event-by-event fluctuation measurements and theory predictions in relativistic nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun-Munzinger, P., E-mail: p.braun-munzinger@gsi.de [Extreme Matter Institute EMMI, GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Rustamov, A., E-mail: a.rustamov@cern.ch [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); National Nuclear Research Center, Baku (Azerbaijan); Stachel, J., E-mail: stachel@physi.uni-heidelberg.de [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    We develop methods to deal with non-dynamical contributions to event-by-event fluctuation measurements of net-particle numbers in relativistic nuclear collisions. These contributions arise from impact parameter fluctuations and from the requirement of overall net-baryon number or net-charge conservation and may mask the dynamical fluctuations of interest, such as those due to critical endpoints in the QCD phase diagram. Within a model of independent particle sources we derive formulae for net-particle fluctuations and develop a rigorous approach to take into account contributions from participant fluctuations in realistic experimental environments and at any cumulant order. Interestingly, contributions from participant fluctuations to the second and third cumulants of net-baryon distributions are found to vanish at mid-rapidity for LHC energies while higher cumulants of even order are non-zero even when the net-baryon number at mid-rapidity is zero. At lower beam energies the effect of participant fluctuations increases and induces spurious higher moments. The necessary corrections become large and need to be carefully taken into account before comparison to theory. We also provide a procedure for selecting the optimal phase–space coverage of particles for fluctuation analyses and discuss quantitatively the necessary correction due to global charge conservation.

  8. High Speed Peltier Calorimeter for the Calibration of High Bandwidth Power Measurement Equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Damien F

    2015-01-01

    Accurate power measurements of electronic components operating at high frequencies are vital in determining where power losses occur in a system such as a power converter. Such power measurements must be carried out with equipment that can accurately measure real power at high frequency. We present the design of a high speed calorimeter to address this requirement, capable of reaching a steady state in less than 10 minutes. The system uses Peltier thermoelectric coolers to remove heat generated in a load resistance, and was calibrated against known real power measurements using an artificial neural network. A dead zone controller was used to achieve stable power measurements. The calibration was validated and shown to have an absolute accuracy of +/-8 mW (95% confidence interval) for measurements of real power from 0.1 to 5 W.

  9. Calibration procedures for improved accuracy of wind turbine blade load measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlberg, J.Aa. [Aeronautical Research Inst. of Sweden, Bromma (Sweden); Johansson, Hjalmar [Teknikgruppen AB, Sollentuna (Sweden)

    1996-12-01

    External loads acting on wind turbine blades are mainly transferred via the hub to the rest of the structure. It is therefore a normal approach to measure the loads acting on the turbine by load measurements in the blade roots. The load measurement is often accomplished by measurements of strain on the surface of the blade or the hub. The strain signals are converted to loads by applying calibration factors to the measurements. This paper deals with difficulties associated with load measurements on two different wind turbines; one with strain gauges applied to a steel hub where a linear stress-load relationship is expected and the other with strain gauges applied to the GFRP blade close to the bearings where strong non-linearity`s and temperature effects are expected. This paper suggests calibration methods to overcome these problems. 2 refs, 11 figs

  10. Current Fluctuation Measurements of Amperometric Gas Sensors Constructed with Three Different Technology Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedlak Petr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical amperometric gas sensors represent a well-established and versatile type of devices with unique features: good sensitivity and stability, short response/recovery times, and low power consumption. These sensors operate at room temperature, and therefore have been applied in monitoring air pollutants and detection of toxic and hazardous gases in a number of areas. Some drawbacks of classical electrochemical sensors are overcome by the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE based on ionic liquids. This work presents evaluation of an SPE-based amperometric sensor from the point of view of current fluctuations. The sensor is based on a novel three-electrode sensor platform with solid polymer electrolytes containing ionic liquid for detection of nitrogen dioxide − a highly toxic gas that is harmful to the environment and presenting a possible threat to human health even at low concentrations. The paper focuses on using noise measurement (electric current fluctuation measurement for evaluation of electrochemical sensors which were constructed by different fabrication processes: (i lift-off and drop-casting technology, (ii screen printing technology on a ceramic substrate and (iii screen printing on a flexible substrate.

  11. A Proposed Calibration Method for Precise Wide Range Scatterometric Measurements%一种用于宽动态范围上的高精度散射测量的标准方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵恒凯; 方振和; 姚传亮; 蔡春富; 章俊

    2003-01-01

    The co-effect of transmitted power fluctuation and system nonlinearity produce deviations in scatterometer measurement results. An internal calibration method to deal with this problem is proposed. The method can result in more precise scatterometric measurements in a wide range. The basic principle of the method is combining real-transmitted-power detection with the calibration of system nonlinearity. A practical scheme to implement the method is also presented, which is developed based on a special designed mechanism of a microwave radiometer-scatterometer combined system.

  12. Calibrating Self-Reported Measures of Maternal Smoking in Pregnancy via Bioassays Using a Monte Carlo Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren S. Wakschlag

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Maternal smoking during pregnancy is a major public health problem that has been associated with numerous short- and long-term adverse health outcomes in offspring. However, characterizing smoking exposure during pregnancy precisely has been rather difficult: self-reported measures of smoking often suffer from recall bias, deliberate misreporting, and selective non-disclosure, while single bioassay measures of nicotine metabolites only reflect recent smoking history and cannot capture the fluctuating and complex patterns of varying exposure of the fetus. Recently, Dukic et al. [1] have proposed a statistical method for combining information from both sources in order to increase the precision of the exposure measurement and power to detect more subtle effects of smoking. In this paper, we extend the Dukic et al. [1] method to incorporate individual variation of the metabolic parameters (such as clearance rates into the calibration model of smoking exposure during pregnancy. We apply the new method to the Family Health and Development Project (FHDP, a small convenience sample of 96 predominantly working-class white pregnant women oversampled for smoking. We find that, on average, misreporters smoke 7.5 cigarettes more than what they report to smoke, with about one third underreporting by 1.5, one third under-reporting by about 6.5, and one third underreporting by 8.5 cigarettes. Partly due to the limited demographic heterogeneity in the FHDP sample, the results are similar to those obtained by the deterministic calibration model, whose adjustments were slightly lower (by 0.5 cigarettes on average. The new results are also, as expected, less sensitive to assumed values of cotinine half-life.

  13. Absolute calibration of a wideband antenna and spectrometer for sky noise spectral index measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Alan E E

    2012-01-01

    A new method of absolute calibration of sky noise temperature using a three-position switched spectrometer, measurements of antenna and low noise amplifier impedance with a vector network analyzer, and ancillary measurements of the amplifier noise waves is described. The details of the method and its application to accurate wideband measurements of the spectral index of the sky noise are described and compared with other methods.

  14. Calibration and characterisation with a new laser-based magnetostriction measurement system

    OpenAIRE

    Rafferty, Aran; Bakir, S.; BRABAZON, Dermot; Prescott, Tim

    2009-01-01

    A laser-based magnet measurement system has been developed to measure the magnetostrictive strain of large cylindrical samples. The measurement system incorporates a solenoid capable of generating a maximum magnetic field intensity of 3000 Oe and a laser displacement sensor. For calibration and evaluation purposes, the positive magnetostrictions of two different types of giant magnetostrictive Tb–Dy–Fe-based materials were accessed with this system. A magnetostrictive strain of 622 ppm was ob...

  15. A new automatic system for angular measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Jose Manuel Andujar; Bohórquez, Miguel Ángel Martínez; Garcia, Jonathan Medina; Nieto, Francisco Jose Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  16. A New Automatic System for Angular Measurement and Calibration in Radiometric Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Andujar Marquez

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward the design, construction and testing of a new automatic system for angular-response measurement and calibration in radiometric instruments. Its main characteristics include precision, speed, resolution, noise immunity, easy programming and operation. The developed system calculates the cosine error of the radiometer under test by means of a virtual instrument, from the measures it takes and through a mathematical procedure, thus allowing correcting the radiometer with the aim of preventing cosine error in its measurements.

  17. A Tall-Tower Instrument for Mean and Fluctuating Velocity, Fluctuating Temperature and Sensible Heat Flux Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Thomson, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor. The tem......For an ongoing elevated-source, urban-scale tracer experiment, an instrument system to measure the three-dimensional wind velocity and the turbulent sensible heat flux was developed. The wind velocity was measured with a combination of cup anemometer, propeller (vertical) and vane sensor...

  18. Calibrating a Measure of Gender Differences in Motivation for Learning Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Young Suk; Fisher, William; Vrongistinos, Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the theory, design, and calibration of an instrument for measuring gender difference in motivation for learning technology. The content of the instrument was developed based upon the motivational theories of Eccles and others. More specifically, the learners' self-concept of ability, perception of technology, perception of…

  19. Shading correction and calibration in bacterial fluorescence measurement by image processing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, M.H.F.

    1994-01-01

    An image processing system with applications in bacterial (immuno-)fluorescence measurement has been developed. To reach quantitative results, correction for non-uniformities in system sensitivity, both as a function of time (calibration for drifts) and as a function of image coordinates (shading co

  20. Shading correction and calibration in bacterial fluorescence measurement by image processing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkinson, M.H.F.

    1994-01-01

    An image processing system with applications in bacterial (immuno-)fluorescence measurement has been developed. To reach quantitative results, correction for non-uniformities in system sensitivity, both as a function of time (calibration for drifts) and as a function of image coordinates (shading co

  1. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Alper, B.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; de la Luna, E.; Sirinelli, A.; Zerbini, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron tempe

  2. Modelling and calibration of the laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Guoyu; Zheng, Bing; Li, Xin; Houkes, Z.; Regtien, P.P.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present an approach of modelling and calibration of an active laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system. The system works with the pattern of two-dimensional beam-scanning illumination and one-dimensional slit-scanning detection with a photo-multiplier tube instead of a CCD camera. By

  3. Development and calibration of an accurate 6-degree-of-freedom measurement system with total station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Lin, Jiarui; Yang, Linghui; Zhu, Jigui

    2016-12-01

    To meet the demand of high-accuracy, long-range and portable use in large-scale metrology for pose measurement, this paper develops a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) measurement system based on total station by utilizing its advantages of long range and relative high accuracy. The cooperative target sensor, which is mainly composed of a pinhole prism, an industrial lens, a camera and a biaxial inclinometer, is designed to be portable in use. Subsequently, a precise mathematical model is proposed from the input variables observed by total station, imaging system and inclinometer to the output six pose variables. The model must be calibrated in two levels: the intrinsic parameters of imaging system, and the rotation matrix between coordinate systems of the camera and the inclinometer. Then corresponding approaches are presented. For the first level, we introduce a precise two-axis rotary table as a calibration reference. And for the second level, we propose a calibration method by varying the pose of a rigid body with the target sensor and a reference prism on it. Finally, through simulations and various experiments, the feasibilities of the measurement model and calibration methods are validated, and the measurement accuracy of the system is evaluated.

  4. Modelling and calibration of the laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, G.Y.; Zheng, Bing; Li, Xin; Houkes, Z.; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2002-01-01

    We present an approach of modelling and calibration of an active laser beam-scanning triangulation measurement system. The system works with the pattern of two-dimensional beam-scanning illumination and one-dimensional slit-scanning detection with a photo-multiplier tube instead of a CCD camera. By

  5. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooraghi, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  6. Calibration standards and field instruments for the precision measurement of insolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. S.; Berdahl, C. M.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the development of an absolute calibration standard for irradiance measurements. This field instrument, designated the Kendall Radiometer System Mark 3, is identical to the PACRAD (Primary Absolute Cavity Radiometer) except for a modification to ensure all weather operation. Two Mark 3 radiometers have been in operation at the JPL's Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex for over two years and are continuing to provide data which are within plus or minus 1% of the absolute value. A calibration stability analysis is presented for the two instruments.

  7. Direct measurements reveal non-Markovian fluctuations of DNA threading through a solid-state nanopore

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Nicholas A W

    2016-01-01

    The threading of a polymer chain through a small pore is a classic problem in polymer dynamics and underlies nanopore sensing technology. However important experimental aspects of the polymer motion in a solid-state nanopore, such as an accurate measurement of the velocity variation during translocation, have remained elusive. In this work we analysed the translocation through conical quartz nanopores of a 7 kbp DNA double-strand labelled with six markers equally spaced along its contour. These markers, constructed from DNA hairpins, give direct experimental access to the translocation dynamics. On average we measure a 5% reduction in velocity during the translocation. We also find a striking correlation in velocity fluctuations with a decay constant of 100s of {\\mu}s. These results shed light on hitherto unresolved problems in the dynamics of DNA translocation and provide guidance for experiments seeking to determine positional information along a DNA strand.

  8. Experimental free energy measurements of kinetic molecular states using fluctuation theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Alemany, Anna; Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix; 10.1038/nphys2375

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and single molecule technologies make it possible to extract free energy differences from irreversible work measurements in pulling experiments. To date, free energy recovery has been focused on native or equilibrium molecular states, whereas free energy measurements of kinetic states (i.e. finite lifetime states that are generated dynamically and are metastable) have remained unexplored. Kinetic states can play an important role in various domains of physics, such as nanotechnology or condensed matter physics. In biophysics, there are many examples where they determine the fate of molecular reactions: protein and peptide-nucleic acid binding, specific cation binding, antigen-antibody interactions, transient states in enzymatic reactions or the formation of transient intermediates and non-native structures in molecular folders. Here we demonstrate that it is possible to obtain free energies of kinetic states by applying extended fluctuation relations. T...

  9. Fast Thermal Calibration of Low-Grade Inertial Sensors and Inertial Measurement Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalong Ban

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The errors of low-cost inertial sensors, especially Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS ones, are highly dependent on environmental conditions such as the temperature. Thus, there is a need for the development of accurate and reliable thermal compensation models to reduce the impact of such thermal drift of the sensors. Since the conventional thermal calibration methods are typically time-consuming and costly, an efficient thermal calibration method to investigate the thermal drift of a full set of gyroscope and accelerometer errors (i.e., biases, scale factor errors and non-orthogonalities over the entire temperature range in a few hours is proposed. The proposed method uses the idea of the Ramp method, which removes the time-consuming process of stabilizing the sensor temperature, and addresses its inherent problems with several improvements. We change the temperature linearly for a complete cycle and take a balanced strategy by making comprehensive use of the sensor measurements during both heating and cooling processes. Besides, an efficient 8-step rotate-and-static scheme is designed to further improve the calibration accuracy and efficiency. Real calibration tests showed that the proposed method is suitable for low-grade IMUs and for both lab and factory calibration due to its efficiency and sufficient accuracy.

  10. Fast thermal calibration of low-grade inertial sensors and inertial measurement units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaoji; Li, You; Zhang, Hongping; Wang, Qingjiang; Ban, Yalong

    2013-09-12

    The errors of low-cost inertial sensors, especially Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) ones, are highly dependent on environmental conditions such as the temperature. Thus, there is a need for the development of accurate and reliable thermal compensation models to reduce the impact of such thermal drift of the sensors. Since the conventional thermal calibration methods are typically time-consuming and costly, an efficient thermal calibration method to investigate the thermal drift of a full set of gyroscope and accelerometer errors (i.e., biases, scale factor errors and non-orthogonalities) over the entire temperature range in a few hours is proposed. The proposed method uses the idea of the Ramp method, which removes the time-consuming process of stabilizing the sensor temperature, and addresses its inherent problems with several improvements. We change the temperature linearly for a complete cycle and take a balanced strategy by making comprehensive use of the sensor measurements during both heating and cooling processes. Besides, an efficient 8-step rotate-and-static scheme is designed to further improve the calibration accuracy and efficiency. Real calibration tests showed that the proposed method is suitable for low-grade IMUs and for both lab and factory calibration due to its efficiency and sufficient accuracy.

  11. Measurements and analysis of solar direct irradiance-meter on Dunhuang radiometric calibration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, En-chao; Li, Xin; Zhang, Yan-na; Zheng, Xiao-bing; Yan, Jing

    2016-10-01

    In order to realize the quantitative application of satellite remote sensing data and adapt to the demand of field calibration of hyper-spectral remote sensors, the solar direct spectral irradiance-meter was developed. According to the sampling principle of spectral irradiance, the irradiance-meter was designed with some technical improvements, the radiometric calibration based on system-level detector were adopted. Irradiance-meter took part in field calibration experiment on Dunhuang radiometric calibration sites and the correct data results were collected. The measurement results of spectral irradiance were consistent with simulated ground irradiance by MODTRAN model. The relative deviation of atmospheric optical depth(AOD) compared with solar radiometer CE318 was less than 4.84%. The whole day results of the irradiance observations and atmospheric transmission in the data applications were collected, the local atmosphere mode and the change of environment were reflected accurately, the input information of the atmospheric parameter were provided for the study of atmospheric properties and field calibration of remote sensors.

  12. Extended Calibration Technique of a Four-Hole Probe for Three-Dimensional Flow Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Munivenkatareddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the development and nonnulling calibration technique to calibrate a cantilever type cylindrical four-hole probe of 2.54 mm diameter to measure three-dimensional flows. The probe is calibrated at a probe Reynolds number of 9525. The probe operative angular range is extended using a zonal method by dividing into three zones, namely, center, left, and right zone. Different calibration coefficients are defined for each zone. The attainable angular range achieved using the zonal method is ±60 degrees in the yaw plane and −50 to +30 degrees in the pitch plane. Sensitivity analysis of all the four calibration coefficients shows that probe pitch sensitivity is lower than the yaw sensitivity in the center zone, and extended left and right zones have lower sensitivity than the center zone. In addition, errors due to the data reduction program for the probe are presented. The errors are found to be reasonably small in all the three zones. However, the errors in the extended left and right zones have slightly larger magnitudes compared to those in the center zone.

  13. A liposome-based size calibration method for measuring microvesicles by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, J B

    2016-01-01

    ESSENTIALS: A gold standard to determine the sizes of microvesicles by flow cytometry is needed. We used fluorescently labeled liposomes to estimate the size of microvesicles with flow cytometry. We suggest that liposomes are more accurate size calibrators than the commonly used polystyrene beads. The liposome-based size calibrators improve the size assessment of microvesicle made with flow cytometry. During the past years, the need for a gold standard to determine the sizes of extracellular vesicles including microvesicles by flow cytometry has been emphasized. This work suggests that artificial vesicles can be used as calibrators to estimate the size of microvesicles from the side scattering (SSC) measured with flow cytometry. We prepared fluorescently labeled liposomes with different maximum sizes defined by the pore size (200, 400, 800, and 1000 nm) of the membrane used for the extrusion. The fluorescence strengths from the largest liposomes pertaining to each pore size enabled us to verify the correlation between the SSC from a liposome and the corresponding size. This study indicates that artificial vesicles are more accurate size calibrators compared to the commonly used polystyrene calibrator beads illustrated by the SSC from 110 nm polystyrene beads corresponds to the scattering from ~400 nm vesicle-like particles. We also show that this method of size assessment based on SSC has a low resolution that is roughly estimated to be between 60 and 200 nm, dependent on the vesicle size. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  14. Calibration of miniature prism-based stereoscopic imagers for precise spatial measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machikhin, Alexander S.; Gorevoy, Alexey V.

    2016-04-01

    The paper is targeted to find the optimal mathematical model and the calibration algorithm for the industrial endoscope equipped with the prism-based attachable stereo adapter, which allows imaging from two different points by a single sensor. We consider the conventional calibration methods for the pinhole camera model with polynomial distortion approximation and compared them with the ray tracing model based on the vector form of Snell's law. In order to evaluate each of the proposed models we have developed the software for the imitation of various calibration procedures using different types of calibration targets. We use the computer simulation to prove that the pinhole camera models, widely used in machine vision, are very limited for describing prism-based endoscopic measurement systems. Our analysis identified the main problems for these models, such as entrance pupil shift, non-homocentric beams and required number of coefficients for polynomial models and the iterative forward ray aiming for the ray-tracing model. The proposed technique is flexible and can also be used to test stability and convergence of the parameter estimation procedures and to compare calibration targets and strategies.

  15. A novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Bin, E-mail: wubin@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: xueting@tju.edu.cn; Yang, Fengting; Ding, Wen [State Key Laboratory of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Xue, Ting, E-mail: wubin@tju.edu.cn, E-mail: xueting@tju.edu.cn [College of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2016-03-15

    Non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite (N-theodolite) is a new kind of large-scale metrological instrument made up by two rotary tables and one collimated laser. There are three axes for an N-theodolite. According to naming conventions in traditional theodolite, rotary axes of two rotary tables are called as horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively, and the collimated laser beam is named as sight axis. And the difference between N-theodolite and traditional theodolite is obvious, since the former one with no orthogonal and intersecting accuracy requirements. So the calibration method for traditional theodolite is no longer suitable for N-theodolite, while the calibration method applied currently is really complicated. Thus this paper introduces a novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system to simplify the procedure and to improve the calibration accuracy. A simple two-step process, calibration for intrinsic parameters and for extrinsic parameters, is proposed by the novel method. And experiments have shown its efficiency and accuracy.

  16. A novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Yang, Fengting; Ding, Wen; Xue, Ting

    2016-03-01

    Non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite (N-theodolite) is a new kind of large-scale metrological instrument made up by two rotary tables and one collimated laser. There are three axes for an N-theodolite. According to naming conventions in traditional theodolite, rotary axes of two rotary tables are called as horizontal axis and vertical axis, respectively, and the collimated laser beam is named as sight axis. And the difference between N-theodolite and traditional theodolite is obvious, since the former one with no orthogonal and intersecting accuracy requirements. So the calibration method for traditional theodolite is no longer suitable for N-theodolite, while the calibration method applied currently is really complicated. Thus this paper introduces a novel calibration method for non-orthogonal shaft laser theodolite measurement system to simplify the procedure and to improve the calibration accuracy. A simple two-step process, calibration for intrinsic parameters and for extrinsic parameters, is proposed by the novel method. And experiments have shown its efficiency and accuracy.

  17. A List of Bright Interferometric Calibrators measured at the ESO VLTI

    CERN Document Server

    Richichi, A; Davis, J

    2009-01-01

    In a previous publication (Richichi & Percheron 2005) we described a program of observations of candidate calibrator stars at the ESO Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI), and presented the main results from a statistical point of view. In the present paper, we concentrate on establishing a new homogeneous group of bright interferometric calibrators, based entirely on publicly available K-band VLTI observations carried out with the VINCI instrument up to July 2004. For this, we have defined a number of selection criteria for the quality and volume of the observations, and we have accordingly selected a list of 17 primary and 47 secondary calibrators. We have developed an approach to a robust global fit for the angular diameters using the whole volume of quality-controlled data, largely independent of a priori assumptions. Our results have been compared with direct measurements, and indirect estimates based on spectrophotometric methods, and general agreement is found within the combined uncertaintie...

  18. Inertial measurement unit-camera calibration based on incomplete inertial sensor information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong LIU; Yu-long ZHOU; Zhao-peng GU

    2014-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of estimating the relative orientation between an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a camera. Unlike most existing IMU-camera calibrations, the main challenge in this paper is that the information output from the IMU is incomplete. For example, only two tilt information can be read from the gravity sensor of a smart phone. Despite incomplete inertial information, there are strong restrictions between the IMU and camera coordinate systems. This paper addresses the incomplete information based IMU-camera calibration problem by exploiting the intrinsic restrictions among the coordinate transformations. First, the IMU transformation between two poses is formulated with the unknown IMU information. Then the defective IMU information is restored using the complementary visual information. Finally, the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm is applied to estimate the optimal calibration result in noisy environments. Experiments on both synthetic and real data show the validity and robustness of our algorithm.

  19. The Calibration Algorithm of a 3D Color Measurement System based on the Line Feature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganhua Li

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a novel 3 dimensional color measurement system. After 3 kinds of geometrical features are analyzed, the line features were selected. A calibration board with right-angled triangle outline was designed to improve the calibration precision. For this system, two algorithms are presented. One is the calibration algorithm between 2 dimensional laser range finder (2D LRF, while the other is for 2D LRF and the color camera. The result parameters were obtained through solving the constrain equations by the correspond data between the 2D LRF and other two sensors. The 3D color reconstruction experiments of real data prove the effectiveness and the efficient of the system and the algorithms.

  20. Measuring fluctuations in paranoia: Validity and psychometric properties of brief state versions of the Paranoia Checklist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlier, Björn; Moritz, Steffen; Lincoln, Tania M

    2016-07-30

    Research increasingly assesses momentary changes in paranoia in order to elucidate causal mechanisms. Observed or manipulated changes in postulated causal factors should result in fluctuations in state paranoid ideation. Previous studies often employed a state-adapted Paranoia Checklist (Freeman et al., 2005) to measure state paranoia. This study examined whether the Paranoia Checklist or subsets of its items are appropriate for this purpose. Thirteen studies (N=860) were subjected to meta-analyses of each Paranoia Checklist item. We selected items based on (1) whether they showed pre-to-post change in the expected direction and (2) whether this effect was larger in experimental vs. control conditions. All resulting item selections were cross-validated on a hold-out sample (n=1893). Finally, we explored how much variation in paranoia was captured by the state-adapted version in a brief ambulatory assessment study (N=32). A thirteen item State Paranoia Checklist as well as a five item and a three item Brief State Paranoia Checklist were extracted. Cross validation revealed better model fit and increased sensitivity to change. Multilevel analysis indicated 25-30% of the variance in the Brief State Paranoia Checklists to be due to intra-individual daily fluctuations in paranoia. Our analyses produced reliable and valid revised scales. Increases in change sensitivity indicate that future assessment of state paranoia in experimental and ambulatory assessment studies can be optimized by using the revised scales.

  1. 2D spatial profile measurements of potential fluctuation with heavy ion beam probe on the Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, A.; Ido, T.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, K.; Takahashi, H.; Igami, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Kubo, S.; Shimozuma, T.

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional spatial profiles of potential fluctuation were measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) in the Large Helical Device (LHD). For 2D spatial profile measurements, the probe beam energy has to be changed, which requires the adjustment of many deflectors in the beam transport line to optimize the beam trajectory, since the transport line of LHD-HIBP system is long. The automatic beam adjustment system was developed, which allows us to adjust the beam trajectory easily. By analyzing coherence between potential fluctuation and magnetic probe signal, the noise level of the mode power spectrum of the potential fluctuation can be reduced. By using this method, the 2D spatial profile of potential fluctuation profile was successfully obtained.

  2. A thru-reflect-line calibration for measuring the characteristics of high power LDMOS transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuai; Li Ke; Jiang Yibo; Cong Mifang; Du Huan; Han Zhengsheng

    2013-01-01

    The impedance and output power measurements of LDMOS transistors are always a problem due to their low impedance and lead widths.An improved thru-reflect-line (TRL) calibration algorithm for measuring the characteristics of L-band high power LDMOS transistors is presented.According to the TRL algorithm,the individual two-port S parameters of each fixture half can be obtained.By de-embedding these S parameters of the test fixture,an accurate calibration can be made.The improved TRL calibration algorithm is successfully utilized to measure the characteristics of an L-band LDMOS transistor with a 90 mm gate width.The impedance of the transistor is obtained,and output power at 1 dB compression point can reach as much as 109.4 W at 1.2 GHz,achieving 1.2 W/mm power density.From the results,it is seen that the presented TRL calibration algorithm works well.

  3. Calibration approaches of cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture measurement in cropped fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Rivera Villarreyes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of soil moisture at the plot or hill-slope scale is an important link between local vadose-zone hydrology and catchment hydrology. This study evaluates the applicability of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing for soil moisture in cropped fields. Measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons (fast neutrons were performed at a lowland farmland in Bornim (Brandenburg, Germany cropped with sunflower and winter rye. Three field calibration approaches and four different ways of integration the soil moisture profile to an integral value for cosmic-ray neutron sensing were evaluated in this study. The cosmic-ray sensing (CRS probe was calibrated against a network of classical point-scale soil moisture measurements. A large CRS parameter variability was observed by choosing calibration periods within the different growing stages of sunflower and winter rye. Therefore, it was not possible to identify a single set of parameters perfectly estimating soil moisture for both sunflower and winter rye periods. On the other hand, CRS signal and its parameter variability could be understood by some crop characteristics and by predicting the attenuated neutrons by crop presence. This study proves the potentiality of the cosmic-ray neutron sensing at the field scale; however, its calibration needs to be adapted for seasonal vegetation in cropped fields.

  4. Absolute distance measurement using frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer calibrated by an optical frequency comb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuejian; Wei, Haoyun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Ren, Libing; Li, Yan; Zhang, Jitao

    2013-04-01

    We present a frequency-sweeping heterodyne interferometer to measure an absolute distance based on a frequency-tunable diode laser calibrated by an optical frequency comb (OFC) and an interferometric phase measurement system. The laser frequency-sweeping process is calibrated by the OFC within a range of 200 GHz and an accuracy of 1.3 kHz, which brings about a precise temporal synthetic wavelength of 1.499 mm. The interferometric phase measurement system consisting of the analog signal processing circuit and the digital phase meter achieves a phase difference resolution better than 0.1 deg. As the laser frequency is sweeping, the absolute distance can be determined by measuring the phase difference variation of the interference signals. In the laboratory condition, our experimental scheme realizes micrometer accuracy over meter distance.

  5. Calibration of a two-color soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reusch, L. M., E-mail: lmmcguire@wisc.edu; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J.; McGarry, M. B. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Franz, P. [Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Stephens, H. D. [University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53703 (United States); Pierce College Fort Steilacoom, Lakewood, Washington 98498 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    The two-color soft x-ray (SXR) tomography diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus is capable of making electron temperature measurements via the double-filter technique; however, there has been a 15% systematic discrepancy between the SXR double-filter (SXR{sub DF}) temperature and Thomson scattering (TS) temperature. Here we discuss calibration of the Be filters used in the SXR{sub DF} measurement using empirical measurements of the transmission function versus energy at the BESSY II electron storage ring, electron microprobe analysis of filter contaminants, and measurement of the effective density. The calibration does not account for the TS and SXR{sub DF} discrepancy, and evidence from experiments indicates that this discrepancy is due to physics missing from the SXR{sub DF} analysis rather than instrumentation effects.

  6. SPECTRAL REFLECTANCE MEASUREMENTS AT THE CHINA RADIOMETRIC CALIBRATION TEST SITE FOR THE REMOTE SENSING SATELITE SENSOR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉香; 张广顺; 刘志权; 张立军; 朱顺斌; 戎志国; 邱康睦

    2001-01-01

    A comprehensive field experiment was made with the support of the project of China Radiometric Calibration Site (CRCS) during June-July 1999. Ground reflectance spectra were measured at Dunhuang Calibration Test Site in the experiment. More than two thousands of spectral curves were acquired in a 20 km × 20 km area. The spectral coverage is from 350 nm to 2500 nm. The measurement values show that reflectance is between 10% and 33% at the VISSWIR spectral region. The standard deviation of reflectance is between 1.0% and 2.0% for the spectral range. Optical characteristics and ground reflectance measurements at the Dunhuang test site, result analysis and error source were described. In addition, a comparison of the reflectance obtained in 1999 with those measured in 1994 and 1996 was also made.

  7. Efficiency Calibration Measurement And Geant Simulation Of The Dragon Bgo Gamma Ray Array At Triumf

    CERN Document Server

    Gigliotti, D G

    2005-01-01

    A gamma ray array to detect the characteristic gammas emitted from astrophysically significant, radiative proton and alpha capture reactions, was built as part of the Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions (DRAGON) spectrometer at ISAC/TRIUMF. The DRAGON array consists of a collection of 30 hexagonal BGO detectors measuring 7.62 cm long by 5.58 cm across the face. A simulation was built with the particle-tracking program GEANT v3.21. The efficiency of the array was measured using calibrated sources of various gamma energies and compared to simulated results. For the cases where the activity of the source was not well known the sources were calibrated using a standard NaI detector of known efficiency. The agreement between simulation and measured differences is more than adequate for proposed DRAGON experiments. The analysis and results of the comparison between measured and simulated efficiency will be discussed in this thesis.

  8. Calibration of a two-color soft x-ray diagnostic for electron temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, L. M.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Franz, P.; Goetz, J.; McGarry, M. B.; Stephens, H. D.

    2016-11-01

    The two-color soft x-ray (SXR) tomography diagnostic on the Madison Symmetric Torus is capable of making electron temperature measurements via the double-filter technique; however, there has been a 15% systematic discrepancy between the SXR double-filter (SXRDF) temperature and Thomson scattering (TS) temperature. Here we discuss calibration of the Be filters used in the SXRDF measurement using empirical measurements of the transmission function versus energy at the BESSY II electron storage ring, electron microprobe analysis of filter contaminants, and measurement of the effective density. The calibration does not account for the TS and SXRDF discrepancy, and evidence from experiments indicates that this discrepancy is due to physics missing from the SXRDF analysis rather than instrumentation effects.

  9. Effects of Barometric Fluctuations on Well Water-Level Measurements and Aquifer Test Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FA Spane, Jr.

    1999-12-16

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as part of the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project, examines the potential for offsite migration of contamination within underlying aquifer systems. Well water-level elevation measurements from selected wells within these aquifer systems commonly form the basis for delineating groundwater-flow patterns (i.e., flow direction and hydraulic gradient). In addition, the analysis of water-level responses obtained in wells during hydrologic tests provides estimates of hydraulic properties that are important for evaluating groundwater-flow velocity and transport characteristics. Barometric pressure fluctuations, however, can have a discernible impact on well water-level measurements. These barometric effects may lead to erroneous indications of hydraulic head within the aquifer. Total hydraulic head (i.e., sum of the water-table elevation and the atmospheric pressure at the water-table surface) within the aquifer, not well water-level elevation, is the hydrologic parameter for determining groundwater-flow direction and hydraulic gradient conditions. Temporal variations in barometric pressure may also adversely affect well water-level responses obtained during hydrologic tests. If significant, adjustments or removal of these barometric effects from the test-response record may be required for quantitative hydraulic property determination. This report examines the effects of barometric fluctuations on well water-level measurements and evaluates adjustment and removal methods for determining areal aquifer head conditions and aquifer test analysis. Two examples of Hanford Site unconfined aquifer tests are examined that demonstrate barometric response analysis and illustrate the predictive/removal capabilities of various methods for well water-level and aquifer total head values. Good predictive/removal characteristics were demonstrated with best corrective results provided by multiple-regression deconvolution methods.

  10. Fine analysis of the calibration curve for a HPGe spectrometer in gamma ray energy measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Yhi Gang; Wei Long; Chang Tian Ba

    1999-01-01

    A computational method is suggested to analyze gamma ray peak position data of a series of closely shifted spectra of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir measured by a HPGe spectrometer and an iteration program, Recovery-98 has been designed to find the fine curve of the spectrometer nonlinearity for energy calibration. The program is applied to check a previous experiment (measuring the gamma energies of sup 8 sup 5 Sr, etc.), and the revised result has been reported. (author)

  11. Calibration and use of continuous heat-type automated seepage meters for submarine groundwater discharge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwashote, B.M.; Burnett, W.C.; Chanton, J.; Santos, I.R.; Dimova, N.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) assessments were conducted both in the laboratory and at a field site in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, using a continuous heat-type automated seepage meter (seepmeter). The functioning of the seepmeter is based on measurements of a temperature gradient in the water between downstream and upstream positions in its flow pipe. The device has the potential of providing long-term, high-resolution measurements of SGD. Using a simple inexpensive laboratory set-up, we have shown that connecting an extension cable to the seepmeter has a negligible effect on its measuring capability. Similarly, the observed influence of very low temperature (???3 ??C) on seepmeter measurements can be accounted for by conducting calibrations at such temperatures prior to field deployments. Compared to manual volumetric measurements, calibration experiments showed that at higher water flow rates (>28 cm day-1 or cm3 cm-2 day-1) an analog flowmeter overestimated flow rates by ???7%. This was apparently due to flow resistance, turbulence and formation of air bubbles in the seepmeter water flow tubes. Salinity had no significant effect on the performance of the seepmeter. Calibration results from fresh water and sea water showed close agreement at a 95% confidence level significance between the data sets from the two media (R2 = 0.98). Comparatively, the seepmeter SGD measurements provided data that are comparable to manually-operated seepage meters, the radon geochemical tracer approach, and an electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. An Accurate Non-Cooperative Method for Measuring Textureless Spherical Target Based on Calibrated Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Strong demands for accurate non-cooperative target measurement have been arising recently for the tasks of assembling and capturing. Spherical objects are one of the most common targets in these applications. However, the performance of the traditional vision-based reconstruction method was limited for practical use when handling poorly-textured targets. In this paper, we propose a novel multi-sensor fusion system for measuring and reconstructing textureless non-cooperative spherical targets. Our system consists of four simple lasers and a visual camera. This paper presents a complete framework of estimating the geometric parameters of textureless spherical targets: (1 an approach to calibrate the extrinsic parameters between a camera and simple lasers; and (2 a method to reconstruct the 3D position of the laser spots on the target surface and achieve the refined results via an optimized scheme. The experiment results show that our proposed calibration method can obtain a fine calibration result, which is comparable to the state-of-the-art LRF-based methods, and our calibrated system can estimate the geometric parameters with high accuracy in real time.

  13. Measurement of 21 cm brightness fluctuations at z ~ 0.8 in cross-correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Masui, K W; Banavar, N; Bandura, K; Blake, C; Calin, L -M; Chang, T -C; Chen, X; Li, Y -C; Liao, Y -W; Natarajan, A; Pen, U -L; Peterson, J B; Shaw, J R; Voytek, T C

    2012-01-01

    In this letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling ~41 deg. sq. and 190 hours of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains Omega_HI b_HI r = [0.43 \\pm 0.07 (stat.) \\pm 0.04(sys.)] x 10^-3, where Omega_HI is the neutral hydrogen HI fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b_HI is the HI bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z ~ 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  14. Experimental measurements of large-scale temperature fluctuation structures in a heated incompressible turbulent boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nader; White, Bruce R.

    1993-03-01

    Hot-wire anemometry measurements over a heated flat plate are made for three different temperature difference cases of 10, 15, and 20 C. Space-time correlations of temperature fluctuations T-prime are determined from which mean convection velocities, mean inclination angles, extent in space, and coherence characteristics of T-prime large-scale structure are calculated. The T-prime mean convection velocity is found as a function of y(+). The T-prime structure inclination angle is 30 deg. The T-prime structure is limited to the viscous defect length in the normal and spanwise directions. However, in the streamwise direction, the structure is mildly dependent on the temperature difference.

  15. Measurement of flow fluctuations in single longitudinal mode pulsed dye laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Rawat; N Kawade; G Sridhar; Sunita Singh; L M Gantayet

    2014-02-01

    A simple technique had been demonstrated for measuring flow-induced fluctuations in the single longitudinal mode (SLM) pulsed dye laser. Two prominent frequency components of 10.74 Hz and 48.83 Hz were present in the output of the Nd:YAG-pumped SLM dye laser. The flow-induced frequency component of 48.83 Hz was present due to the revolution per minute of the motor attached to the magnetically coupled gear pump. The time average bandwidth of 180 MHz has been obtained for this SLM dye laser. The effect of pump pulse energy on the bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was studied. The bandwidth of the SLM dye laser was increased to 285 MHz from 180 MHz, when the pump pulse energy was increased to 0.75 mJ from 0.15 mJ for a constant dye flow velocity of 0.5 m/s.

  16. Assessment of target volume doses in radiotherapy based on the standard and measured calibration curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Fallah Mohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In radiation treatments, estimation of the dose distribution in the target volume is one of the main components of the treatment planning procedure. To estimate the dose distribution, the information of electron densities is necessary. The standard curves determined by computed tomography (CT scanner that may be different from that of other oncology centers. In this study, the changes of dose calculation due to the different calibration curves (HU-ρel were investigated. Materials and Methods: Dose values were calculated based on the standard calibration curve that was predefined for the treatment planning system (TPS. The calibration curve was also extracted from the CT images of the phantom, and dose values were calculated based on this curve. The percentage errors of the calculated values were determined. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analyses of the mean differences were performed using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for both of the calibration curves. Results and Discussion: The results show no significant difference for both of the measured and standard calibration curves (HU-ρel in 6, 15, and 18 MeV energies. In Wilcoxon ranked sum nonparametric test for independent samples with P < 0.05, the equality of monitor units for both of the curves to transfer 200 cGy doses to reference points was resulted. The percentage errors of the calculated values were lower than 2% and 1.5% in 6 and 15 MeV, respectively. Conclusion: From the results, it could be concluded that the standard calibration curve could be used in TPS dose calculation accurately.

  17. Measuring Water Level Fluctuations of two Connected Wetlands in the Dominican Republic Using InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichardo Marcano, M. D.; Liu, L.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Wetlands are ecosystems of high endemism and great biodiversity. Using the double-reflected radar waves off the water surface and trunks of inundated vegetation, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is capable of measuring water level fluctuations from space at a cm-level accuracy in these ecosystems with emergent vegetation. InSAR can provide a high spatial resolution over a large area that the more traditional terrestrial-based methods lack. In this study, we applied InSAR to study the seasonal variations in water level of the wetlands near two lakes in the southwest of the Dominican Republic: Lake Enriquillo, a highly saline lake designated as a Wetland of International Importance under the Ramsar Convention in 2002, and Laguna del Limon. Both lake-wetland systems are located in the Jaragua-Bahoruco-Enriquillo Biosphere Reserve. Since 2003 the water level of Lake Enriquillo has increased drastically and caused the evacuation of many farmers from nearby villages. Lake level changes also affected the habitats of several native and migratory species. We used the data acquired by the Phased Array type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) sensor on board of the Japanese Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) from October 2008 to January 2011. For the smaller lake, Laguna del Limon, we found a seasonal variation of 10-15 centimeters. This result was confirmed using two different satellite paths. For Lake Enriquillo we found a net decrease of about 20 centimeters in the water level from September 2009 to January 2011. This result agrees with an independent estimation based on lake hydrodynamics model predictions. In addition, our InSAR-based time series of lake level fluctuations revealed distinct behaviors of the two wetlands. For the Lake Enriquillo we found a continuous decrease in the water level throughout 2010 with a brief increase of the water level during the summer months, while for Laguna del Limon during the summer months the water level

  18. Specific calibration problems for gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, D. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Wershofen, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Gammaspectrometric measurements of low-level radioactivity in environmental samples are always done in a close source detector geometry. This geometry causes coincidence-summing effects for measurements of multi-photon emitting nuclides. The measurements of radioactivity in environmental samples are also influenced by the absorption of photons in the materials which have to be analysed. Both effects must be taken into account by correction factors with respect to an energy-specific calibration of the detector system for a given geometry and a given composition of the calibration source. The importance of these corrections is emphasized. It is the aim of the present paper to compare different experimental and theoretical methods for the determination of these correction factors published by various authors and to report about efforts to refine them. (orig.)

  19. Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel, E-mail: atarifeno@cchen.cl, E-mail: atarisal@gmail.com; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4, Santiago (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Mayer, Roberto E. [Instituto Balseiro and Centro Atómico Bariloche, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica and Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, San Carlos de Bariloche R8402AGP (Argentina)

    2014-01-15

    This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

  20. Standard test method for calibration of surface/stress measuring devices

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1997-01-01

    Return to Contents page 1.1 This test method covers calibration or verification of calibration, or both, of surface-stress measuring devices used to measure stress in annealed and heat-strengthened or tempered glass using polariscopic or refractometry based principles. 1.2 This test method is nondestructive. 1.3 This test method uses transmitted light, and therefore, is applicable to light-transmitting glasses. 1.4 This test method is not applicable to chemically tempered glass. 1.5 Using the procedure described, surface stresses can be measured only on the “tin” side of float glass. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  1. Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Mayer, Roberto E; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

  2. Calibration and Measurement in Turbulence Research by the Hot-Wire Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovasznay, Kaszlo

    1947-01-01

    The problem of turbulence in aerodynamics is at present being attacked both theoretically and experimentally. In view of the fact however that purely theoretical considerations have not thus far led to satisfactory results the experimental treatment of the problem is of great importance. Among the different measuring procedures the hot wire methods are so far recognized as the most suitable for investigating the turbulence structure. The several disadvantages of these methods however, in particular those arising from the temperature lag of the wire can greatly impair the measurements and may easily render questionable the entire value of the experiment. The name turbulence is applied to that flow condition in which at any point of the stream the magnitude and direction of the velocity fluctuate arbitrarily about a well definable mean value. This fluctuation imparts a certain whirling characteristic to the flow.

  3. Statistical Evidence Measured on a Properly Calibrated Scale across Nested and Non-nested Hypothesis Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica J. Vieland

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Statistical modeling is often used to measure the strength of evidence for or against hypotheses about given data. We have previously proposed an information-dynamic framework in support of a properly calibrated measurement scale for statistical evidence, borrowing some mathematics from thermodynamics, and showing how an evidential analogue of the ideal gas equation of state could be used to measure evidence for a one-sided binomial hypothesis comparison (“coin is fair” vs. “coin is biased towards heads”. Here we take three important steps forward in generalizing the framework beyond this simple example, albeit still in the context of the binomial model. We: (1 extend the scope of application to other forms of hypothesis comparison; (2 show that doing so requires only the original ideal gas equation plus one simple extension, which has the form of the Van der Waals equation; (3 begin to develop the principles required to resolve a key constant, which enables us to calibrate the measurement scale across applications, and which we find to be related to the familiar statistical concept of degrees of freedom. This paper thus moves our information-dynamic theory substantially closer to the goal of producing a practical, properly calibrated measure of statistical evidence for use in general applications.

  4. Optical modeling and polarization calibration for CMB measurements with ACTPol and Advanced ACTPol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Brian; Austermann, Jason; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Coughlin, Kevin P.; Duff, Shannon M.; Gallardo, Patricio A.; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn W.; Ho, Shuay-Pwu Patty; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent D.; Li, Dale; McMahon, Jeff; Nati, Federico; Niemack, Michael D.; Newburgh, Laura; Page, Lyman A.; Salatino, Maria; Schillaci, Alessandro; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Simon, Sara M.; Vavagiakis, Eve M.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2016-07-01

    The Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter (ACTPol) is a polarization sensitive upgrade to the Atacama Cosmology Telescope, located at an elevation of 5190 m on Cerro Toco in Chile. ACTPol uses transition edge sensor bolometers coupled to orthomode transducers to measure both the temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Calibration of the detector angles is a critical step in producing polarization maps of the CMB. Polarization angle offsets in the detector calibration can cause leakage in polarization from E to B modes and induce a spurious signal in the EB and TB cross correlations, which eliminates our ability to measure potential cosmological sources of EB and TB signals, such as cosmic birefringence. We calibrate the ACTPol detector angles by ray tracing the designed detector angle through the entire optical chain to determine the projection of each detector angle on the sky. The distribution of calibrated detector polarization angles are consistent with a global offset angle from zero when compared to the EB-nulling offset angle, the angle required to null the EB cross-correlation power spectrum. We present the optical modeling process. The detector angles can be cross checked through observations of known polarized sources, whether this be a galactic source or a laboratory reference standard. To cross check the ACTPol detector angles, we use a thin film polarization grid placed in front of the receiver of the telescope, between the receiver and the secondary reflector. Making use of a rapidly rotating half-wave plate (HWP) mount we spin the polarizing grid at a constant speed, polarizing and rotating the incoming atmospheric signal. The resulting sinusoidal signal is used to determine the detector angles. The optical modeling calibration was shown to be consistent with a global offset angle of zero when compared to EB nulling in the first ACTPol results and will continue to be a part of our calibration implementation. The first

  5. Preliminary Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters By NuMI/MINOS and Calibration Studies for Improving this Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symes, Philip Andrew [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-01

    This thesis explains the origins of neutrinos and their interactions, and the phenomenon of neutrino oscillations. Experiments for measuring neutrino oscillations are mentioned and the experiment investigated in this thesis, the ''Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search'', and its neutrino beam, the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory's ''Neutrinos At The Main Injector'', are described. MINOS is a long baseline (735 km) neutrino oscillation experiment with a near and a far detector, intended to make precision measurements of the atmospheric sector neutrino oscillation parameters. A measurement is made of the ''atmospheric'' neutrino oscillation parameters, Δm$2\\atop{23}$ and sin2(2θ23), using neutrinos from the NuMI beam. The results of this analysis are compared to measurements at MINOS using neutrinos from the atmosphere and with other experiments. A more detailed method of beam neutrino analysis is discussed, and the extra calibrations needed to perform that analysis properly are described, with special attention paid to two aspects of the calibration, which comprise the bulk of work for this thesis. The light injection calibration system uses LEDs to illuminate the detector readout and provides a normalization of the stability of the detector over time. The hardware and different modi operandi of the system are described. There is a description of installation and commissioning of the system at one of the MINOS detectors. The response normalization of each detector with cosmic ray muons is described. Special attention is paid to the explanation of necessary corrections that must be made to the muon sample in order for the sample to be used to calibrate each detector to the specified accuracy. The performance of the calibration is shown.

  6. 40 CFR 86.120-94 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. 86.120-94 Section 86.120-94 Protection of... Procedures § 86.120-94 Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas...

  7. 40 CFR 86.1320-90 - Gas meter or flow instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. 86.1320-90 Section 86.1320-90 Protection of... instrumentation calibration; particulate, methanol, and formaldehyde measurement. (a) Sampling for particulate, methanol and formaldehyde emissions requires the use of gas meters or flow instrumentation to...

  8. Dynamic calibration of piezoelectric transducers for ballistic high-pressure measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkarous Lamine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of a dynamic calibration standard for high-amplitude pressure piezoelectric transducers implies the implementation of a system which can provide reference pressure values with known characteristics and uncertainty. The reference pressure must be issued by a sensor, as a part of a measuring chain, with a guaranteed traceability to an international standard. However, this operation has not been completely addressed yet until today and is still calling further investigations. In this paper, we introduce an experimental study carried out in order to contribute to current efforts for the establishment of a reference dynamic calibration method. A suitable practical calibration method based on the calculation of the reference pressure by measurement of the displacement of the piston in contact with an oil-filled cylindrical chamber is presented. This measurement was achieved thanks to a high speed camera and an accelerometer. Both measurements are then compared. In the first way, pressure was generated by impacting the piston with a free falling weight and, in the second way, with strikers of known weights and accelerated to the impact velocities with an air gun. The aim of the experimental setup is to work out a system which may generate known hydraulic pressure pulses with high-accuracy and known uncertainty. Moreover, physical models were also introduced to consolidate the experimental study. The change of striker’s velocities and masses allows tuning the reference pressure pulses with different shapes and, therefore, permits to sweep a wide range of magnitudes and frequencies.

  9. The ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. V. Measurement and Recalibration of Surface Brightness Fluctuations and a Precise Value of the Fornax--Virgo Relative Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Blakeslee, John P; Mei, Simona; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Infante, Leopoldo; Peng, Eric W; Tonry, John L; West, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    We present g-z color and z-band surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) measurements for 43 early-type galaxies in the Fornax cluster imaged with HST/ACS. These are combined with measurements for Virgo cluster galaxies to derive a revised, nonlinear calibration of the z-band SBF absolute magnitude as a function of g-z. In all, we tabulate recalibrated SBF distances for 134 galaxies in Virgo, Fornax, the Virgo W' group, and NGC4697 in the Virgo Southern Extension. The calibration procedure yields a precise relative distance modulus for Fornax with respect to Virgo of 0.42+/-0.03 mag, or a distance ratio 1.214 +/- 0.017. The resulting Fornax distance modulus is 31.51 +/-0.03 +/-0.15 mag, 20.0 +/-0.3 +/-1.4 Mpc, where the second set of error bars reflects systematic uncertainty from our assumed Virgo distance of 16.5 Mpc. The rms distance scatter for the early-type Fornax galaxies is 0.49^{+0.11}_{-0.15} Mpc, consistent with its compact appearance on the sky. This translates to a depth scatter smaller than the int...

  10. Transferring the calibration of direct solar irradiance to diffuse-sky radiance measurements for CIMEL Sun-sky radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Blarel, Luc; Podvin, Thierry; Goloub, Philippe; Buis, Jean-Pierre; Morel, Jean-Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Two types of sunphotometric measurement are considered in this study: direct-Sun irradiance and diffuse-sky radiance. Based on CIMEL CE318 Sun-sky radiometer characteristics, we introduce a gain-corrected solid angle that allows interconverting calibration coefficients of these two types of measurement, thus realizing a "vicarious" radiance calibration. The accuracy of the gain-corrected solid angle depends on the number of available historical calibration records. The method is easy to use, provided that at least one laboratory calibration has been made previously. Examples coming from three distinct CE318 versions belonging to the AERONET/PHOTONS network are presented to provide details on the vicarious calibration method and protocols. From the error propagation analysis and the comparison with laboratory results, the uncertainty of the vicarious radiance calibration is shown to be comparable with the laboratory one, e.g., 3%-5%.

  11. Precise and accurate measurements of strong-field photoionisation and a transferrable laser intensity calibration standard

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, W C; Khurmi, C; U., Satya Sainadh; Calvert, J E; Laban, D E; Pullen, M G; Bartschat, K; Grum-Grzhimailo, A N; Wells, D; Quiney, H M; Tong, X M; Litvinyuk, I V; Sang, R T; Kielpinski, D

    2016-01-01

    Ionization of atoms and molecules in strong laser fields is a fundamental process in many fields of research, especially in the emerging field of attosecond science. So far, demonstrably accurate data have only been acquired for atomic hydrogen (H), a species that is accessible to few investigators. Here we present measurements of the ionization yield for argon, krypton, and xenon with percentlevel accuracy, calibrated using H, in a laser regime widely used in attosecond science. We derive a transferrable calibration standard for laser peak intensity, accurate to 1.3%, that is based on a simple reference curve. In addition, our measurements provide a much-needed benchmark for testing models of ionisation in noble-gas atoms, such as the widely employed single-active electron approximation.

  12. Calibration of solid state nuclear track detector CR-39 for radon measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Marcia Pires de; Martins, Elaine Wirney [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: mpcampos@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) are widely used for radon measurements and CR-39 is one of the most popular SSNTD. In this work it was determined the calibration factor for radon concentration measurements through the passive method with CR-39 detectors. The detectors were put in a proper device (an adapted Lucas cell) and exposed to the standard radon concentration through the Pylon Model RN-150 flow through radon gas source. After exposure, the detectors were etched for 5.5 hours in a KOH solution at 80 deg C in a bath at a constant temperature. The track density was read in an Axiolab-Zeiss optical microscope, with nominal magnification of X10 connected to a video camera and to a personal computer. The calibration factor was obtained through the relation between standard radon concentration, track density and exposure time. (author)

  13. Calibration of Hall sensor array for critical current measurement of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Gang; Liu, Liyuan [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Yang, Xinsheng, E-mail: xsyang@swjtu.edu.cn [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Zhao, Yong [Key laboratory of Magnetic levitation Technologies and Maglev Trains (Ministry of Education), Superconductor and New Energy R& D Center, Mail Stop 165#, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, 610031 (China); Superconductivity Research Group, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wale, Sydney 2052, NSW (Australia)

    2015-12-15

    Abstract : HAS (Hall sensor array) is a powerful tool to detect the uniformity of HTS (high temperature superconductor) tape through mapping the distribution of remanent or shielding field along the surface of the tape. However, measurement of HTS tape with ferromagnetic parts by HSA is still an issue because the ferromagnetic substrate has influence on the magnetic field around the HTS layer. In this work, a continuous HSA system has been designed to measure the critical current of the YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate. The relationship between the remanent field and critical current was calibrated by the finite element method. The result showed that the HSA is an effective method for evaluating the critical current of the HTS tape with ferromagnetic substrate. - Highlight: • A continuous Hall sensor array system has been designed. • The inhomogeneity of YBCO tape with ferromagnetic substrate can be detected by HAS. • Finite element method is an effective method for calibrating the remanent field.

  14. Poster Abstract: Automatic Calibration of Device Attitude in Inertial Measurement Unit Based Traffic Probe Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Mousa, Mustafa

    2016-04-28

    Probe vehicles consist in mobile traffic sensor networks that evolve with the flow of vehicles, transmitting velocity and position measurements along their path, generated using GPSs. To address the urban positioning issues of GPSs, we propose to replace them with inertial measurement units onboard vehicles, to estimate vehicle location and attitude using inertial data only. While promising, this technology requires one to carefully calibrate the orientation of the device inside the vehicle to be able to process the acceleration and rate gyro data. In this article, we propose a scheme that can perform this calibration automatically by leveraging the kinematic constraints of ground vehicles, and that can be implemented on low-end computational platforms. Preliminary testing shows that the proposed scheme enables one to accurately estimate the actual accelerations and rotation rates in the vehicle coordinates. © 2016 IEEE.

  15. Field Measurement and Calibration of HDM-4 Fuel Consumption Model on Interstate Highway in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fuel consumptions are measured by operating passenger car and tractor-trailer on two interstate roadway sites in Florida. Each site contains flexible pavement and rigid pavement with similar pavement, traffic and environmental condition. Field test reveals that the average fuel consumption differences between vehicle operating on flexible pavement and rigid pavement at given test condition are 4.04% for tractor-trailer and 2.50% for passenger car, with a fuel saving on rigid pavement. The fuel consumption differences are found statistically significant at 95% confidence level for both vehicle types. Test data are then used to calibrate the Highway Development and Management IV (HDM-4 fuel consumption model and model coefficients are obtained for three sets of observations. Field measurement and prediction by calibrated model shows generally good agreement. Nevertheless, verification and adjustment with more experiment or data sources would be expected in future studies.

  16. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  17. A Method to Measure the Mass of Damped Ly-alpha Absorber Host Galaxies Using Fluctuations in 21cm Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Wyithe, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Observations of damped Ly-alpha absorbers (DLA) indicate that the fraction of hydrogen in its neutral form (HI) is significant by mass at all redshifts. This gas represents the reservoir of material that is available for star formation at late times. As a result, observational identification of the systems in which this neutral hydrogen resides is an important missing ingredient in models of galaxy formation. Precise identification of DLA host mass via traditional clustering studies is not practical owing to the small numbers of known systems being spread across sparsely distributed sight lines. However following the completion of reionization, 21cm surface brightness fluctuations will be dominated by neutral hydrogen in DLAs. Observations of these fluctuations will measure the combined clustering signal from all DLAs within a large volume. We show that measurement of the spherically averaged power-spectrum of 21cm intensity fluctuations due to DLAs could be used to measure the galaxy bias for DLA host galaxi...

  18. Modelling and Calibration Technique of Laser Triangulation Sensors for Integration in Robot Arms and Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Juan J.; Albajez, José A.; Carlos Cajal; David Guillomía; Jorge Santolaria

    2009-01-01

    A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS) integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic―laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry―and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been develope...

  19. Calibrating Momentum Measurements Of The CMS Detector Using Cosmic Ray Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaleski, Shawn

    2017-01-01

    We report results on the muon momentum calibration using cosmic-ray data taken by the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment during run 2 at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The momentum scale of high-pT muons is sensitive to a possible bias on the curvature coming from the alignment of the muon system. Cosmic rays are a source of high-pT muons that can be used to measure the momentum scale of muons with pT > 200 GeV. The present talk describes the method used to measure the momentum scale from cosmic data and the measurement using the 2016 cosmic data is presented.

  20. Comparison of the methods for determination of calibration and verification intervals of measuring devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toteva Pavlina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents different determination and optimisation methods for verification intervals of technical devices for monitoring and measurement based on the requirements of some widely used international standards, e.g. ISO 9001, ISO/IEC 17020, ISO/IEC 17025 etc., maintained by various organizations implementing measuring devices in practice. Comparative analysis of the reviewed methods is conducted in terms of opportunities for assessing the adequacy of interval(s for calibration of measuring devices and their optimisation accepted by an organization – an extension or reduction depending on the obtained results. The advantages and disadvantages of the reviewed methods are discussed, and recommendations for their applicability are provided.

  1. Optimization of method a load cell calibration for the measurement of coefficient of friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R. M.; Pereira, M.; Sousa, A. R.; Curi, E. I. M.; Izidoro, C. L.; Correa, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    The instrumentation of equipment for mechanical testing is used to optimize the time to deliver a result, besides minimizing errors associated with manual measurements. Given this context, this work aims to present a calibration method for a load cell to determine the measurement results of force and friction coefficient, developed from on rotary pin-on-disk tribometer. The results indicate that the procedure provides measurements reliable for the tribological phenomena, resulting in with proximity the values provided by the ASTM G99-04.

  2. Measurements of b-hadron lifetimes and the calibration and performance of the LHCb tracking system

    CERN Document Server

    Dupertuis, Frédéric Guillaume

    The LHCb experiment was designed to perform high precision measurements. The LHCb detector has excellent vertexing, momentum measurement and particle identification capabilities, with a detector geometry and trigger strategy specially adapted for the study of rare decays and $CP$ violation of $b$- and $c$-quarks. For accurate measurements, the detector needs to be perfectly calibrated and its performance monitored to achieve the required performance. The LHCb TELL1 boards are responsible for the acquisition and the pre-processing of the raw data. New effects on signals emitted by the front-end chip, the Beetle, of the Inner Tracker (IT) and Tracker Turicensis (TT) due to the different header configurations are discovered. Strategies to correct for these her effects are proposed and are implemented in the firmware of the IT and TT TELL1 boards. In addition, faster algorithms are developed to perform the calibration of the TELL1 boards and software is developed to perform the full calibration and a monitoring ...

  3. Determination of relative ion chamber calibration coefficients from depth-ionization measurements in clinical electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, B. R.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2014-10-01

    A method is presented to obtain ion chamber calibration coefficients relative to secondary standard reference chambers in electron beams using depth-ionization measurements. Results are obtained as a function of depth and average electron energy at depth in 4, 8, 12 and 18 MeV electron beams from the NRC Elekta Precise linac. The PTW Roos, Scanditronix NACP-02, PTW Advanced Markus and NE 2571 ion chambers are investigated. The challenges and limitations of the method are discussed. The proposed method produces useful data at shallow depths. At depths past the reference depth, small shifts in positioning or drifts in the incident beam energy affect the results, thereby providing a built-in test of incident electron energy drifts and/or chamber set-up. Polarity corrections for ion chambers as a function of average electron energy at depth agree with literature data. The proposed method produces results consistent with those obtained using the conventional calibration procedure while gaining much more information about the behavior of the ion chamber with similar data acquisition time. Measurement uncertainties in calibration coefficients obtained with this method are estimated to be less than 0.5%. These results open up the possibility of using depth-ionization measurements to yield chamber ratios which may be suitable for primary standards-level dissemination.

  4. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barada, K.; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  5. Measurement of Pressure Fluctuations inside a Model Thrust Bearing Using PVDF Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Andrew; Matthews, David; Guzzomi, Andrew; Pan, Jie

    2017-04-16

    Thrust bearings play a vital role in propulsion systems. They rely on a thin layer of oil being trapped between rotating surfaces to produce a low friction interface. The "quality" of this bearing affects many things from noise transmission to the ultimate catastrophic failure of the bearing itself. As a result, the direct measure of the forces and vibrations within the oil filled interface would be very desirable and would give an indication of the condition of the bearing in situ. The thickness of the oil film is, however, very small and conventional vibration sensors are too cumbersome to use in this confined space. This paper solves this problem by using a piezoelectric polymer film made from Polyvinylidine Fluoride (PVDF). These films are very thin (50 m) and flexible and easy to install in awkward spaces such as the inside of a thrust bearing. A model thrust bearing was constructed using a 3D printer and PVDF films inserted into the base of the bearing. In doing so, it was possible to directly measure the force fluctuations due to the rotating pads and investigate various properties of the thrust bearing itself.

  6. Precision calibration method for binocular vision measurement systems based on arbitrary translations and 3D-connection information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinghao; Jia, Zhenyuan; Liu, Wei; Fan, Chaonan; Xu, Pengtao; Wang, Fuji; Liu, Yang

    2016-10-01

    Binocular vision systems play an important role in computer vision, and high-precision system calibration is a necessary and indispensable process. In this paper, an improved calibration method for binocular stereo vision measurement systems based on arbitrary translations and 3D-connection information is proposed. First, a new method for calibrating the intrinsic parameters of binocular vision system based on two translations with an arbitrary angle difference is presented, which reduces the effect of the deviation of the motion actuator on calibration accuracy. This method is simpler and more accurate than existing active-vision calibration methods and can provide a better initial value for the determination of extrinsic parameters. Second, a 3D-connection calibration and optimization method is developed that links the information of the calibration target in different positions, further improving the accuracy of the system calibration. Calibration experiments show that the calibration error can be reduced to 0.09%, outperforming traditional methods for the experiments of this study.

  7. Comparative Calibration of Corrosion Measurements Using K-Nearest Neighbour Based Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Yaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Every measuring equipment or inspection tool is known to have its own accuracy, which may affect the reliability of its measurements. This includes oil and gas pipeline corrosion defects measurements. The inspection tolerance occurred in the measurements should be treated carefully for each equipment to prevent misinterpretation of the data which could lead to incorrect assessment. This paper presents a comparison between two K-Nearest Neighbour (KNN interpolation techniques used to calibrate corrosion measurements collected by Magnetic Flux Leakage Intelligent Pig (MFL-IP with the readings of Ultrasonic Testing (UT scan device. The comparison has relied on the position of the interpolators, the weight sequence, and the error in the final enhanced metrics compared to the original measurements. Both techniques have the potential to calibrate and enhance IP measurements, with relative advantage for one technique in reducing over fitting problem. This enhancement will be used to improve the integrity assessment report that depends on the disturbed corrosion metrics of oil and gas pipelines, to decide whether the pipeline is fit for service or needs certain maintenance.

  8. Experimental Measurement of Asymmetric Fluctuations of Poloidal Magnetic Field in Damavand Tokomak at Different Plasma Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi-Fard, Mahmoud; Alinejad, Naser; Rasouli, Chapar; Sadigzadeh, Asghar

    2012-08-01

    Toroidal and Poloidal magnetic fields have an important effect on the tokomak topology. Damavand Tokomak is a small size tokomak characterized with k = 1.2, B t = 1T, R 0 = 36 cm, maximum plasma current is about 35 KA with a discharge time of 21 ms. In this experimental work, the variation of poloidal magnetic field on the torodial cross section is measured and analyzed. In order to measure the polodial magnetic field, 18 probes were installed on the edge of tokomak plasma with ∆θ = 18°, while a limiter was installed inside the torus. Plasma current, I p, induces a polodial magnetic field, B p, smaller than the torodial magnetic field B t. Magnetic lines B produced as a combination of B t and B p, are localized on the nested toroidal magnetic surfaces. The presence of polodial magnetic field is necessary for particles confinement. Mirnov oscillations are the fluctuations of polodial magnetic field, detected by magnetic probes. Disrupted instability in Tokomak typically starts with mirnov oscillations which appear as fluctuations of polodial magnetic field and is detected by magnetic probes. Minor disruptions inside the plasma can contain principal magnetic islands and their satellites can cause the annihilation of plasma confinement. Production of thin layer of turbulent magnetic field lines cause minor disruption. Magnetic limiter may cause the deformation of symmetric equilibrium configuration and chaotic magnetic islands reveal in plasma occurring in thin region of chaotic field lines close to their separatrix. The width of this chaotic layer in the right side of poloidal profile of Damavand Tokomak is smaller than the width in the left side profile because of Shafranov displacement. Ergodic region in the left side of profile develops a perturbation on the magnetic polodial field lines, B p, that are greater in magnitude than that in the right side, although the values of B p on the left side are smaller than that on the right side of the profile. The Left

  9. DESIGN AND CALIBRATION OF A CAPILLARY FLOWMETER SET FOR MEASUREMENT OF GAS FLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menderes LEVENT

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, design and calibration of a capillary flowmeter set was represented. The capillary flowmeters will be used for measurements of small gas flows having laminar flow regime. The gases (such as, nitrogen, argon, methane, hydrogen and carbon-dioxide supplied from high pressure gas bottles and passed through capillary flowmeters (1 to 3 at various times. Each capillary flowmeter was made of glass and calibrated with one or two gases. Outlet of the capillary flowmeters were connected to the needle valves which have been used for regulating gas flowrates of the capillary flowmeters. Gases individually passed to a bubble flowmeter, and residence time of gases are recorded by using a stop watch. Then, from collected experimental results actual gas flowrates through the capillary flowmeters are calculated by using Hagen-Poiseuille equation.

  10. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K.B.; Keene, W.C.; Pszenny, A.A.P.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.W.; Sive, B.C.

    2012-01-01

    Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv) range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1) at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td). Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT) campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC). An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ), an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ) ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  11. Measuring the electrical properties of soil using a calibrated ground-coupled GPR system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oden, C.P.; Olhoeft, G.R.; Wright, D.L.; Powers, M.H.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating vadose zone soil properties using ground penetrating radar (GPR) include measuring travel time, fitting diffraction hyperbolae, and other methods exploiting geometry. Additional processing techniques for estimating soil properties are possible with properly calibrated GPR systems. Such calibration using ground-coupled antennas must account for the effects of the shallow soil on the antenna's response, because changing soil properties result in a changing antenna response. A prototype GPR system using ground-coupled antennas was calibrated using laboratory measurements and numerical simulations of the GPR components. Two methods for estimating subsurface properties that utilize the calibrated response were developed. First, a new nonlinear inversion algorithm to estimate shallow soil properties under ground-coupled antennas was evaluated. Tests with synthetic data showed that the inversion algorithm is well behaved across the allowed range of soil properties. A preliminary field test gave encouraging results, with estimated soil property uncertainties (????) of ??1.9 and ??4.4 mS/m for the relative dielectric permittivity and the electrical conductivity, respectively. Next, a deconvolution method for estimating the properties of subsurface reflectors with known shapes (e.g., pipes or planar interfaces) was developed. This method uses scattering matrices to account for the response of subsurface reflectors. The deconvolution method was evaluated for use with noisy data using synthetic data. Results indicate that the deconvolution method requires reflected waves with a signal/noise ratio of about 10:1 or greater. When applied to field data with a signal/noise ratio of 2:1, the method was able to estimate the reflection coefficient and relative permittivity, but the large uncertainty in this estimate precluded inversion for conductivity. ?? Soil Science Society of America.

  12. Calibration and intercomparison of acetic acid measurements using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Haase

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Acetic acid is one of the most abundant organic acids in the ambient atmosphere, with maximum mixing ratios reaching into the tens of parts per billion by volume (ppbv range. The identities and associated magnitudes of the major sources and sinks for acetic acid are poorly characterized, due in part to the limitation in available measurement techniques. This paper demonstrates that Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS can reliably quantify acetic acid vapor in ambient air. Three different PTR-MS configurations were calibrated at low ppbv mixing ratios using permeation tubes, which yielded calibration factors between 7.0 and 10.9 normalized counts per second per ppbv (ncps ppbv−1 at a drift tube field strength of 132 townsend (Td. Detection limits ranged from 0.06 to 0.32 ppbv with dwell times of 5 s. These calibration factors showed negligible humidity dependence. Using the experimentally determined calibration factors, PTR-MS measurements of acetic acid during the International Consortium for Atmospheric Research on Transport and Transformation (ICARTT campaign were validated against results obtained using Mist Chambers coupled with Ion Chromatography (MC/IC. An orthogonal least squares linear regression of paired data yielded a slope of 1.14 ± 0.06 (2σ, an intercept of 0.049 ± 20 (2σ ppbv, and an R2 of 0.78. The median mixing ratio of acetic acid on Appledore Island, ME during the ICARTT campaign was 0.530 ± 0.025 ppbv with a minimum of 0.075 ± 0.004 ppbv, and a maximum of 3.555 ± 0.171 ppbv.

  13. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  14. Calibration of 3-D wind measurements on a single engine research aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallaun, C.; Giez, A.; Baumann, R.

    2015-02-01

    An innovative calibration method for the wind speed measurement using a boom mounted Rosemount model 858 AJ air velocity probe is introduced. The method is demonstrated for a sensor system installed on a medium size research aircraft which is used for measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer. The method encounters a series of coordinated flight manoeuvres to directly estimate the aerodynamic influences on the probe and to calculate the measurement uncertainties. The introduction of a differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) combined with a high accuracy Inertial Reference System (IRS) has brought major advances to airborne measurement techniques. The exact determination of geometrical height allows the use of the pressure signal as an independent parameter. Furthermore, the exact height information and the stepwise calibration process lead to maximum accuracy. The results show a measurement uncertainty for the aerodynamic influence of the dynamic and static pressures of 0.1 hPa. The applied parametrisation does not require any height dependencies or time shifts. After extensive flight tests a correction for the flow angles (attack and sideslip angles) was found, which is necessary for a successful wind calculation. A new method is demonstrated to correct for the aerodynamic influence on the sideslip angle. For the 3-D wind vector (with 100 Hz resolution) a novel error propagation scheme is tested, which determines the measurement uncertainties to be 0.3 m s-1 for the horizontal and 0.2 m s-1 for the vertical wind components.

  15. Using Noise and Fluctuations for In Situ  Measurements of Nitrogen Diffusion Depth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Samoila

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In manufacturing processes involving diffusion (of C, N, S, etc., the evolution of the layer depth is of the utmost importance: the success of the entire process depends on this parameter. Currently, nitriding is typically either calibrated using a “post process” method or controlled via indirect measurements (H2, O2, H2O + CO2. In the absence of “in situ” monitoring, any variation in the process parameters (gas concentration, temperature, steel composition, distance between sensors and furnace chamber can cause expensive process inefficiency or failure. Indirect measurements can prevent process failure, but uncertainties and complications may arise in the relationship between the measured parameters and the actual diffusion process. In this paper, a method based on noise and fluctuation measurements is proposed that offers direct control of the layer depth evolution because the parameters of interest are measured in direct contact with the nitrided steel (represented by the active electrode. The paper addresses two related sets of experiments. The first set of experiments consisted of laboratory tests on nitrided samples using Barkhausen noise and yieded a linear relationship between the frequency exponent in the Hooge equation and the nitriding time. For the second set, a specific sensor based on conductivity noise (at the nitriding temperature was built for shop‐floor experiments. Although two different types of noise were measured in these two sets of experiments, the use of the frequency exponent to monitor the process evolution remained valid.

  16. A new sensor for stress measurement based on blood flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A. V.; Shenkman, L.

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that effective stress management could have a dramatic impact on health care and preventive medicine. In order to meet this need, efficient and seamless sensing and analytic tools for the non-invasive stress monitoring during daily life are required. The existing sensors still do not meet the needs in terms of specificity and robustness. We utilized a miniaturized dynamic light scattering sensor (mDLS) which is specially adjusted to measure skin blood flow fluctuations and provides multi- parametric capabilities. Based on the measured dynamic light scattering signal from the red blood cells flowing in skin, a new concept of hemodynamic indexes (HI) and oscillatory hemodynamic indexes (OHI) have been developed. This approach was utilized for stress level assessment for a few usecase scenario. The new stress index was generated through the HI and OHI parameters. In order to validate this new non-invasive stress index, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was studied by measuring the mDLS sensor located on the wrist. Mental stress was induced by using the cognitive dissonance test of Stroop. We found that OHIs indexes have high sensitivity to the mental stress response for most of the tested subjects. In addition, we examined the capability of using this new stress index for the individual monitoring of the diurnal stress level. We found that the new stress index exhibits similar trends as reported for to the well-known diurnal behavior of cortisol levels. Finally, we demonstrated that this new marker provides good sensitivity and specificity to the stress response to sound and musical emotional arousal.

  17. MEASUREMENT OF 21 cm BRIGHTNESS FLUCTUATIONS AT z {approx} 0.8 IN CROSS-CORRELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masui, K. W.; Switzer, E. R.; Calin, L.-M.; Pen, U.-L.; Shaw, J. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Banavar, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George St., Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3H4 (Canada); Bandura, K. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Blake, C. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Chang, T.-C.; Liao, Y.-W. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, X.; Li, Y.-C. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, 20A Datun Road, Beijing 100012 (China); Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Voytek, T. C. [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, 5000 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    In this Letter, 21 cm intensity maps acquired at the Green Bank Telescope are cross-correlated with large-scale structure traced by galaxies in the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey. The data span the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1 over two fields totaling {approx}41 deg. sq. and 190 hr of radio integration time. The cross-correlation constrains {Omega}{sub HI} b{sub HI} r = [0.43 {+-} 0.07(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.)] Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, where {Omega}{sub HI} is the neutral hydrogen (H I) fraction, r is the galaxy-hydrogen correlation coefficient, and b{sub HI} is the H I bias parameter. This is the most precise constraint on neutral hydrogen density fluctuations in a challenging redshift range. Our measurement improves the previous 21 cm cross-correlation at z {approx} 0.8 both in its precision and in the range of scales probed.

  18. A high speed compact microwave interferometer for density fluctuation measurements in Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, H.; Tan, Y.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xie, H. Q.; Gao, Z.

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel 3 mm interferometer has been developed for plasma density diagnostics in the Sino-UNIted Spherical Tokamak (SUNIST). The extremely compact microwave interferometer utilizes one corrugated feed horn antenna for both emitting and receiving the microwave. The beam path lies on the equatorial plane so the system would not suffer from beam path deflection problems due to the symmetry of the cross section. A focusing lens group and an oblique vacuum window are carefully designed to boost the signal to noise ratio, which allows this system to show good performance even with the small-diameter central column itself as a reflector, without a concave mirror. The whole system discards the reference leg for maximum compactness, which is particularly suitable for the small-sized tokamak. An auto-correcting algorithm is developed to calculate the phase evolution, and the result displays good phase stability of the whole system. The intermediate frequency is adjustable and can reach its full potential of 2 MHz for best temporal resolution. Multiple measurements during ohmic discharges proved the interferometer's capability to track typical density fluctuations in SUNIST, which enables this system to be utilized in the study of MHD activities.

  19. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, You-Qi; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Jun, E-mail: zhangjun@ustc.edu.cn; Pan, Jian-Wei [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Huang, Leilei; Payne, Frank [Department of Engineering Science, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  20. The generation of 68 Gbps quantum random number by measuring laser phase fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, You-Qi; Huang, Leilei; Liu, Yang; Payne, Frank; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-06-01

    The speed of a quantum random number generator is essential for practical applications, such as high-speed quantum key distribution systems. Here, we push the speed of a quantum random number generator to 68 Gbps by operating a laser around its threshold level. To achieve the rate, not only high-speed photodetector and high sampling rate are needed but also a very stable interferometer is required. A practical interferometer with active feedback instead of common temperature control is developed to meet the requirement of stability. Phase fluctuations of the laser are measured by the interferometer with a photodetector and then digitalized to raw random numbers with a rate of 80 Gbps. The min-entropy of the raw data is evaluated by modeling the system and is used to quantify the quantum randomness of the raw data. The bias of the raw data caused by other signals, such as classical and detection noises, can be removed by Toeplitz-matrix hashing randomness extraction. The final random numbers can pass through the standard randomness tests. Our demonstration shows that high-speed quantum random number generators are ready for practical usage.

  1. Application of microwave imaging system for density fluctuation measurements on Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlichenko, R.; Nagayama, Y.; Kawahata, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki (Japan); Ignatenko, M.; Kogi, Y.; Mase, A. [Kyushu Univ., KASTEC, Kasuga (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    This short paper describes the microwave imaging reflectometry system that has been installed on the Large Helical Device as a plasma diagnostic system for spatially resolved plasma density fluctuations.

  2. Hyper-Cam automated calibration method for continuous hyperspectral imaging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jean-Philippe; Habte, Zewdu; George, Jacks; Farley, Vincent; Tremblay, Pierre; Chamberland, Martin; Romano, Joao; Rosario, Dalton

    2010-04-01

    The midwave and longwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum contain rich information which can be captured by hyperspectral sensors thus enabling enhanced detection of targets of interest. A continuous hyperspectral imaging measurement capability operated 24/7 over varying seasons and weather conditions permits the evaluation of hyperspectral imaging for detection of different types of targets in real world environments. Such a measurement site was built at Picatinny Arsenal under the Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE), where two Hyper-Cam hyperspectral imagers are installed at the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) and are operated autonomously since Fall of 2009. The Hyper-Cam are currently collecting a complete hyperspectral database that contains the MWIR and LWIR hyperspectral measurements of several targets under day, night, sunny, cloudy, foggy, rainy and snowy conditions. The Telops Hyper-Cam sensor is an imaging spectrometer that enables the spatial and spectral analysis capabilities using a single sensor. It is based on the Fourier-transform technology yielding high spectral resolution and enabling high accuracy radiometric calibration. It provides datacubes of up to 320x256 pixels at spectral resolutions of up to 0.25 cm-1. The MWIR version covers the 3 to 5 μm spectral range and the LWIR version covers the 8 to 12 μm spectral range. This paper describes the automated operation of the two Hyper-Cam sensors being used in the SPICE data collection. The Reveal Automation Control Software (RACS) developed collaboratively between Telops, ARDEC, and ARL enables flexible operating parameters and autonomous calibration. Under the RACS software, the Hyper-Cam sensors can autonomously calibrate itself using their internal blackbody targets, and the calibration events are initiated by user defined time intervals and on internal beamsplitter temperature monitoring. The RACS software is the first software developed for

  3. Continuous measurements of instantaneous heart rate and its fluctuations before and after hatching in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriya, K; Pearson, J T; Burggren, W W; Ar, A; Tazawa, H

    2000-03-01

    There has been considerable interest in heart rate (fh) fluctuations in relation to cardiovascular control systems and foetal conditions during pregnancy in mammals. Prominent fluctuations in fh also occur in avian embryos, which are an important experimental model for studying developmental physiology. The present study determined the instantaneous fh of seven chick embryos continuously from the last stage of prenatal development (day 18), throughout the pipping (perinatal) period (days 19-21) until hatching and, subsequently, of newly hatched chicks (up to day 2). The distinctive patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations took the form of specific changes within a broad mean fh baseline. Cyclic oscillations (ultradian rhythm) occurred until an early stage of the perinatal period, when the fh baseline started rising. Subsequently, the baseline dropped and respiratory arrhythmia began to appear concomitant with external pipping. During the final stage of external pipping, when the fh baseline rose again prior to hatching, three unique patterns of instantaneous fh fluctuations were evident: relatively long-lasting cyclic small accelerations, irregular intermittent large accelerations and short-term repeated large accelerations. Furthermore, repeated alternate occurrences of the latter two types of acceleration formed an additional oscillating pattern with a period of 10-15 min. During the early period after hatching, when the fh baseline reached its maximum, instantaneous fh changed relatively slowly accompanied by transient rapid decelerations, probably due to augmented vagal tone. Subsequently, the mean fh baseline dropped to its minimum, and a circadian rhythm and three types of previously reported fh fluctuations (types I-III) appeared. Developmental patterns of mean fh and the appearance of distinctive patterns of instantaneous fluctuations in fh and circadian rhythms were not influenced by an ultimate failure of hatching after a normal development. The

  4. Humidity fluctuations in the marine boundary layer measured at a coastal site with an infrared humidity sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1996-01-01

    An extensive set of humidity turbulence data has been analyzed from 22-m height in the marine boundary layer. Fluctuations of humidity were measured by an ''OPHIR'', an infrared humidity sensor with a 10 Hz scanning frequency and humidity spectra were produced. The shapes of the normalized spectr...

  5. CO{sub 2} laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vyacheslavov, L.N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2001-04-01

    A CO{sub 2} laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  6. Modelling and Calibration Technique of Laser Triangulation Sensors for Integration in Robot Arms and Articulated Arm Coordinate Measuring Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J. Aguilar

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic―laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry―and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been developed. This allows the integration of LTS and AACMM mathematical models without the need of additional optimization methods after the prior sensor calibration, usually done in a coordinate measuring machine (CMM before the assembly of the sensor in the arm. The experimental tests results for accuracy and repeatability show the suitable performance of this technique, resulting in a reliable, quick and friendly calibration method for the AACMM final user. The presented method is also valid for sensor integration in robot arms and CMMs.

  7. Modelling and calibration technique of laser triangulation sensors for integration in robot arms and articulated arm coordinate measuring machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santolaria, Jorge; Guillomía, David; Cajal, Carlos; Albajez, José A; Aguilar, Juan J

    2009-01-01

    A technique for intrinsic and extrinsic calibration of a laser triangulation sensor (LTS) integrated in an articulated arm coordinate measuring machine (AACMM) is presented in this paper. After applying a novel approach to the AACMM kinematic parameter identification problem, by means of a single calibration gauge object, a one-step calibration method to obtain both intrinsic-laser plane, CCD sensor and camera geometry-and extrinsic parameters related to the AACMM main frame has been developed. This allows the integration of LTS and AACMM mathematical models without the need of additional optimization methods after the prior sensor calibration, usually done in a coordinate measuring machine (CMM) before the assembly of the sensor in the arm. The experimental tests results for accuracy and repeatability show the suitable performance of this technique, resulting in a reliable, quick and friendly calibration method for the AACMM final user. The presented method is also valid for sensor integration in robot arms and CMMs.

  8. Calibration of sensor for measurement of ice growth; Kalibrering av givare som maeter istillvaext

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerlund, Rolf (HoloOptics, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-10-15

    In regions subjected to a cold climate, wind turbines and other exposed structures are vulnerable to the deposition of ice, which may reduce the performance and constitute a danger for the structure itself as well as for the surroundings. These problems increase with the taller structures that follow with e.g. larger wind turbines. During several years the company HoloOptics has been engaged in the development of a sensor for measuring the rate of ice deposition on structures. This report covers the calibration of the sensor, which has been carried out in the icing wind tunnel of VTT in Esbo, Finland. The icing sensor is based on an optical method. The optical properties of any surface change when covered by ice, regardless of type. When using the sensor for measuring the icing rate, the measurement surface is de-iced electrically as soon as ice has been detected. When the surface is observed to be free of ice, the de-icing is cut off. If icing conditions are still prevalent, after a while ice will again be detected on the surface, and the deicing cycle starts once more. By studying how often these cycles are repeated during a certain time span, the icing rate can be calculated. During the tests in the icing wind tunnel the sensor was calibrated by comparison with the measured icing of a 30 mm diameter reference cylinder. The calibration revealed that the sensor is very sensitive when exposed to light icing up to 20 g/m,h. In the interval 20-140 g/m,h the sensor is less sensitive. Above 140 g/m,h the sensor is saturated and the reading constant. The preferred method is to record the number of indications during a fixed period of time. Variation of the direction of the wind does not influence the result by more than 8-10 %

  9. Evaluating the quality of ground-based microwave radiometer measurements and retrievals using detrended fluctuation and spectral analysis methods

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, K; Shirer, H N; Ackerman, T P; Liljegren, J C; Ausloos, M

    2001-01-01

    Time series both of microwave radiometer brightness temperature measurements at 23.8 and 31.4 GHz and of retrievals of water vapor and liquid water path from these brightness temperatures are evaluated using the detrended fluctuation analysis method. As quantified by the parameter $\\alpha$, this method (i) enables identification of the time scales over which noise dominates the time series and (ii) characterizes the temporal range of correlations in the time series. The more common spectral analysis method is also used to assess the data and its results are compared with those from detrended fluctuation analysis method. The assumption that measurements should have certain scaling properties allows the quality of the measurements to be characterized. The additional assumption that the scaling properties of the measurements of an atmospheric quantity are preserved in a useful retrieval provides a means for evaluating the retrieval itself. Applying these two assumptions to microwave radiometer measurements and r...

  10. The Research of Through-casing Resistivity Logging Logging Calibration System Leakage Current Measurement Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jiatian

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the logging principle of through-casing resistivity logging technology, finds a phenomenon that the leakage current measurements are susceptible to sufferring interferences. The through-casing resistivity logging technology in Russia and that of Schlumberger are studied, and the system of through-casing resistivity logging is established to improve the accuracy of calibrating, testing and measuring of the instrument. In this paper, distribution parameters of the form is replaced by the lumped parameter, and precision resistor array simulation in formation leakage current and scale pool simulation in different resistivity of formation are conducted, which make the dynamic range of the simulation in formation resistivity of the medium increase to 1- 300 Ω·m and meet the requirement of through-casing resistivity logging technology measurement range, 1 Ω·m ~ 100 Ω·m. Since the measuring signals of calibration acquisition and processing systems are extremely weak and calculation signals need to tell the nV (nanovolts level, the high accurate data acquisition system of 24 digits is applied.

  11. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and evaluation of calibration duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, W.; Wilbert, S.; Nouri, B.; Geuder, N.; Fritz, H.

    2015-10-01

    Resource assessment for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) needs accurate Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI) measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns are Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSIs) with a thorough calibration. Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors in general is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of such sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. A calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not work well for a different condition. This paper covers procedures and requirements for two calibration methods for the calibration of Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined in regard to the site specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain. Data sets of several long-term calibration periods from PSA are used to evaluate the deviation of results from calibrations with varying duration from the long-term result. The findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May) show a higher likelihood of particularly adverse calibration results. These effects can partially be compensated by increasing the inclusions of measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of the year in which measurements are commenced.

  12. Calibration methods for rotating shadowband irradiometers and evaluation of calibration duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Jessen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resource assessment for Concentrated Solar Power (CSP needs accurate Direct Normal Irradiance (DNI measurements. An option for such measurement campaigns are Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers (RSIs with a thorough calibration. Calibration of RSIs and Si-sensors in general is complex because of the inhomogeneous spectral response of such sensors and incorporates the use of several correction functions. A calibration for a given atmospheric condition and air mass might not work well for a different condition. This paper covers procedures and requirements for two calibration methods for the calibration of Rotating Shadowband Irradiometers. The necessary duration of acquisition of test measurements is examined in regard to the site specific conditions at Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA in Spain. Data sets of several long-term calibration periods from PSA are used to evaluate the deviation of results from calibrations with varying duration from the long-term result. The findings show that seasonal changes of environmental conditions are causing small but noticeable fluctuation of calibration results. Certain periods (i.e. November to January and April to May show a higher likelihood of particularly adverse calibration results. These effects can partially be compensated by increasing the inclusions of measurements from outside these periods. Consequently, the duration of calibrations at PSA can now be selected depending on the time of the year in which measurements are commenced.

  13. Tide-induced fluctuations of salinity and groundwater level in unconfined aquifers - Field measurements and numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanon, Elad; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gvirtzman, Haim; Shalev, Eyal

    2017-08-01

    The responses of the fresh-saline water interface (FSI) and the groundwater level (GWL) to the Mediterranean Sea tide were monitored in the coastal aquifer of Israel, modeled numerically and analyzed using cross-correlation analysis. Different time-lags between sea level fluctuations and hydraulic head and salinity fluctuations were detected for the FSI and the GWL. At the FSI, the time-lag of hydraulic head behind the sea level is much shorter than the lag of the salinity at the same point. Surprisingly, similar time-lags behind the sea level were measured for both the hydraulic head at the GWL and the salinity at the FSI, both at the same distance from the shoreline. Results from a numerical model, simulating the flow and transport processes at the field scale, agree with field measurements. In both, the GWL and the salinity in the FSI fluctuate almost simultaneously, while the hydraulic head in the FSI reacts faster to sea level fluctuations. The actual movement of the fresh water body, which is controlled by the unsaturated flow in the capillary fringe ('capillary effect'), lags behind the pressure head fluctuations in the deeper parts of the aquifer, which is controlled by saturated parameters of the aquifer. The overall results agree with the conceptual mechanism suggested by Levanon et al. (2016), in which the effect of sea tide on the coastal groundwater system comprises two main processes: (1) tidal fluctuations at the sea floor boundary which cause pressure wave propagation into the aquifer, and (2) attenuation at the GWL due to the capillary effect which control also the change in the salinity and the actual movement of the FSI.

  14. Calibrating 100 Years of Polar Faculae Measurements: Implications for the Evolution of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Zhang, Jie; DeLuca, Edward E; 10.1088/0004-637X/753/2/146

    2013-01-01

    Although the Sun's polar magnetic fields are thought to provide important clues for understanding the 11-year sunspot cycle, including the observed variations of its amplitude and period, the current database of high-quality polar-field measurements spans relatively few sunspot cycles. In this paper we address this deficiency by consolidating Mount Wilson Observatory polar faculae data from four data reduction campaigns, validating it through a comparison with facular data counted automatically from MDI intensitygrams, and calibrating it against polar field measurements taken by the Wilcox Solar Observatory and average polar field and total polar flux calculated using MDI line-of-sight magnetograms. Our results show that the consolidated polar facular measurements are in excellent agreement with both polar field and polar flux estimates, making them an ideal proxy to study the evolution of the polar magnetic field. Additionally, we combine this database with sunspot area measurements to study the role of the ...

  15. Calibration and optimization of an x-ray bendable mirror using displacement-measuring sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannoni, Maurizio; Martín, Idoia Freijo; Music, Valerija; Sinn, Harald

    2016-07-25

    We propose a method to control and to adjust in a closed-loop a bendable x-ray mirror using displacement-measuring devices. For this purpose, the usage of capacitive and interferometric sensors is investigated and compared. We installed the sensors in a bender setup and used them to continuously measure the position and shape of the mirror in the lab. The sensors are vacuum-compatible such that the same concept can also be applied in final conditions. The measurement is used to keep the calibration of the system and to create a closed-loop control compensating for external influences: in a demonstration measurement, using a 950 mm long bendable mirror, the mirror sagitta is kept stable inside a range of 10 nm Peak-To-Valley (P-V).

  16. Distribution of radionuclides in an iron calibration standard for a free release measurement facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hult, Mikael; Stroh, Heiko; Marissens, Gerd; Tzika, Faidra; Lutter, Guillaume; Šurán, Jiri; Kovar, Petr; Skala, Lukas; Sud, Jaromír

    2016-03-01

    A Europallet-sized calibration standard composed of 12 grey cast iron tubes contaminated with (60)Co and (110m)Ag with a mass of 246kg was developed. As the tubes were produced through centrifugal casting it was of particular concern to study the distribution of radionuclides in the radial direction of the tubes. This was done by removing 72 small samples (swarf) of ~0.3g each on both the inside and outside of the tubes. All of the samples were measured in the underground laboratory HADES.

  17. Co-calibration of two self-reported measures of adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Robin M; Delaney, J A Chris; Golin, Carol E; Wechsberg, Wendee M; Cunningham, Chinazo; Altice, Frederick; Christopoulos, Katerina; Knight, Kevin; Quan, Vu; Gordon, Michael S; Springer, Sandra; Young, Jeremy; Crane, Paul K; Mayer, Kenneth H; Mugavero, Michael J; Del Rio, Carlos; Kronmal, Richard A; Crane, Heidi M

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is an important determinant of clinical success assessed in many HIV studies. Harmonizing adherence data from studies that use different measures is difficult without a co-calibration equation to convert between validated instruments. Our purpose was to co-calibrate two commonly used adherence measures: the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) questionnaire and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS). We used robust linear regression to develop a co-calibration equation in a clinical care cohort. The outcome was the 30-day VAS percentage of ART taken and the predictors were ACTG questions. We evaluated the equation's goodness of fit in five STTR (Seek, Test, Treat, Retain) consortium studies where individuals completed both measures: 2 criminal justice; 2 international; and 1 other high-risk vulnerable population. We developed a three-phase decision rule to convert ACTG to VAS in 1045 participants. First, when the last missed dose on the ACTG was reported as >30 days ago, the VAS was set to 100% (N = 582). Second, if "doses missed" was zero for all items, VAS was 100% (N = 104). Third, among remaining participants (N = 359), VAS was estimated as 96.8% minus 2.9% times the number of missed doses ("doses per day" was non-significant). Correlation between predicted and reported VAS was r = 0.80 in the criminal justice group (N = 446), r = 0.46 in the international group (N = 311), r = 0.32 in the other vulnerable population (N = 63), and r = 0.66 overall. When outliers due to inversion of the VAS scale were excluded (n = 25), these correlations were 0.88, 0.78, 0.80, and 0.86, respectively. We concluded that a simple decision rule and equation allowed us to co-calibrate between two widely used adherence measures thus combining data from studies with different instruments. This study highlighted issues with VAS inversions and its limitations as a single item. Combining studies using different

  18. A time-delay calibrated method for cornea hysteresis and intraocular pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kuo-Jen; Tsai, Che-Liang; Wang, Wai; Hsu, Long; Hsu, Ken-Yuh

    2016-04-01

    The presence of cornea hysteresis (CH) in characterizing the intraocular pressure (IOP) of a human eye deteriorates the accuracy of IOP. To suppress CH, the pressure gauge of a tonometer must be located as close as possible to the cornea. However, this arrangement is unpractical because appropriate working distance to the cornea is required. In this paper, a time-delay calibrated (TDC) method is proposed to counteract the undesired effect of CH in characterizing the IOP. Employing this TDC method, the CH approaches to zero for most eyes measured.

  19. Results of experimental tests and calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, W.T.; Bussell, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The surface neutron moisture probe has been tested both to demonstrate that is is able to operate in the expected in-tank temperature and gamma-ray fields and to provide detector responses to known moisture concentration materials. The probe will properly function in a simultaneous high temperature (80 degrees C) and high gamma radiation field (210 rad/hr)environment. Comparisons between computer model predicted and experimentally measured detector responses to changes in moisture provide a basis for the probe calibration to in-tank moisture concentrations.

  20. Calibration of the QCM/SAW Cascade Impactor for Measurement of Ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Cassandra K.; Peterson, C. B.; Morris, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    The Quartz Crystal Microbalance Surface Acoustic Wave (QCM/SAW) cascade impactor is an instrument designed to collect size-fractionated distributions of aerosols on a series of quartz crystals and employ SAW devices coated with chemical sensors for gas detection. We are calibrating the cascade impactor in our laboratory for future deployment for in-situ experiments to measure ozone. Experiments have been performed to characterize the QCM and SAW mass loading, saturation limits, mass frequency relationships, and sensitivity. The characteristics of mass loading, saturation limits, mass-frequency relationships, sensitivity, and the loss of ozone on different materials have been quantified.

  1. A new method for the absolute radiance calibration for UV/vis measurements of scattered sun light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Absolute radiometric calibrations are important for measurements of the atmospheric spectral radiance. Such measurements can be used to determine actinic fluxes, the properties of aerosols and clouds and the short wave energy budget. Conventional calibration methods in the laboratory are based on calibrated light sources and reflectors and are expensive, time consuming and subject to relatively large uncertainties. Also, the calibrated instruments might change during transport from the laboratory to the measurement sites. Here we present a new calibration method for UV/vis instruments that measure the spectrally resolved sky radiance, like for example zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS- instruments or Multi-AXis (MAX- DOAS instruments. Our method is based on the comparison of the solar zenith angle dependence of the measured zenith sky radiance with radiative transfer simulations. For the application of our method clear sky measurements during periods with almost constant aerosol optical depth are needed. The radiative transfer simulations have to take polarisation into account. We show that the calibration results are almost independent from the knowledge of the aerosol optical properties and surface albedo, which causes a rather small uncertainty of about <7%. For wavelengths below about 330 nm it is essential that the ozone column density during the measurements is constant and known.

  2. Radiometric Modeling and Calibration of the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS)Ground Based Measurement Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jialin; Smith, William L.; Gazarik, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate remote sensing benefits of the high resolution Infrared radiance spectrometers will be realized with their geostationary satellite implementation in the form of imaging spectrometers. This will enable dynamic features of the atmosphere s thermodynamic fields and pollutant and greenhouse gas constituents to be observed for revolutionary improvements in weather forecasts and more accurate air quality and climate predictions. As an important step toward realizing this application objective, the Geostationary Imaging Fourier Transform Spectrometer (GIFTS) Engineering Demonstration Unit (EDU) was successfully developed under the NASA New Millennium Program, 2000-2006. The GIFTS-EDU instrument employs three focal plane arrays (FPAs), which gather measurements across the long-wave IR (LWIR), short/mid-wave IR (SMWIR), and visible spectral bands. The GIFTS calibration is achieved using internal blackbody calibration references at ambient (260 K) and hot (286 K) temperatures. In this paper, we introduce a refined calibration technique that utilizes Principle Component (PC) analysis to compensate for instrument distortions and artifacts, therefore, enhancing the absolute calibration accuracy. This method is applied to data collected during the GIFTS Ground Based Measurement (GBM) experiment, together with simultaneous observations by the accurately calibrated AERI (Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer), both simultaneously zenith viewing the sky through the same external scene mirror at ten-minute intervals throughout a cloudless day at Logan Utah on September 13, 2006. The accurately calibrated GIFTS radiances are produced using the first four PC scores in the GIFTS-AERI regression model. Temperature and moisture profiles retrieved from the PC-calibrated GIFTS radiances are verified against radiosonde measurements collected throughout the GIFTS sky measurement period. Using the GIFTS GBM calibration model, we compute the calibrated radiances from data

  3. Rigorous evaluation of chemical measurement uncertainty: liquid chromatographic analysis methods using detector response factor calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A.; Bedner, Mary

    2017-06-01

    Chemical measurement methods are designed to promote accurate knowledge of a measurand or system. As such, these methods often allow elicitation of latent sources of variability and correlation in experimental data. They typically implement measurement equations that support quantification of effects associated with calibration standards and other known or observed parametric variables. Additionally, multiple samples and calibrants are usually analyzed to assess accuracy of the measurement procedure and repeatability by the analyst. Thus, a realistic assessment of uncertainty for most chemical measurement methods is not purely bottom-up (based on the measurement equation) or top-down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. Confidence in results must be rigorously evaluated for the sources of variability in all of the bottom-up and top-down elements. This type of analysis presents unique challenges due to various statistical correlations among the outputs of measurement equations. One approach is to use a Bayesian hierarchical (BH) model which is intrinsically rigorous, thus making it a straightforward method for use with complex experimental designs, particularly when correlations among data are numerous and difficult to elucidate or explicitly quantify. In simpler cases, careful analysis using GUM Supplement 1 (MC) methods augmented with random effects meta analysis yields similar results to a full BH model analysis. In this article we describe both approaches to rigorous uncertainty evaluation using as examples measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in solution reference materials via liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection (LC-UV) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric detection using isotope dilution (LC-IDMS).

  4. Rigorous evaluation of chemical measurement uncertainty: Liquid chromatographic analysis methods using detector response factor calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toman, Blaza; Nelson, Michael A; Bedner, Mary

    2017-06-01

    Chemical measurement methods are designed to promote accurate knowledge of a measurand or system. As such, these methods often allow elicitation of latent sources of variability and correlation in experimental data. They typically implement measurement equations that support quantification of effects associated with calibration standards and other known or observed parametric variables. Additionally, multiple samples and calibrants are usually analyzed to assess accuracy of the measurement procedure and repeatability by the analyst. Thus, a realistic assessment of uncertainty for most chemical measurement methods is not purely bottom-up (based on the measurement equation) or top-down (based on the experimental design), but inherently contains elements of both. Confidence in results must be rigorously evaluated for the sources of variability in all of the bottom-up and top-down elements. This type of analysis presents unique challenges due to various statistical correlations among the outputs of measurement equations. One approach is to use a Bayesian hierarchical (BH) model which is intrinsically rigorous, thus making it a straightforward method for use with complex experimental designs, particularly when correlations among data are numerous and difficult to elucidate or explicitly quantify. In simpler cases, careful analysis using GUM Supplement 1 (MC) methods augmented with random effects meta analysis yields similar results to a full BH model analysis. In this article we describe both approaches to rigorous uncertainty evaluation using as examples measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in solution reference materials via liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection (LC-UV) and liquid chromatography mass spectrometric detection using isotope dilution (LC-IDMS).

  5. CBF/CMRO2 coupling measured with calibrated BOLD fMRI: sources of bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Dubowitz, David J; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-07-15

    The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index n, the ratio of fractional CBF changes to fractional CMRO2 changes. Measurements of n have yielded varying results, and it is not known if the observed variability is due to measurement techniques or underlying physiology. The calibrated BOLD approach using hypercapnia offers a promising tool for assessing changes in CBF/CMRO2 coupling in health and disease, but potential systematic errors have not yet been characterized. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the magnitude of bias in the estimate of n that arises from the way in which a region of interest (ROI) is chosen for averaging data and to relate this potential bias to a more general theoretical consideration of the sources of systematic errors in the calibrated BOLD experiment. Results were compared for different approaches for defining an ROI within the visual cortex based on: (1) retinotopically defined V1; (2) a functional CBF localizer; and (3) a functional BOLD localizer. Data in V1 yielded a significantly lower estimate of n (2.45) compared to either CBF (n=3.45) or BOLD (n=3.18) localizers. Different statistical thresholds produced biases in estimates of n with values ranging from 3.01 (low threshold) to 4.37 (high threshold). Possible sources of the observed biases are discussed. These results underscore the importance of a critical evaluation of the methodology, and the adoption of consistent standards for applying the calibrated BOLD approach to the evaluation of CBF/CMRO2 coupling.

  6. CBF/CMRO2 Coupling Measured with Calibrated-BOLD fMRI: Sources of Bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Dubowitz, David J.; Buxton, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    The coupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index n, the ratio of fractional CBF changes to fractional CMRO2 changes. Measurements of n have yielded varying results, and it is not known if the observed variability is due to measurement techniques or underlying physiology. The calibrated BOLD approach using hypercapnia offers a promising tool for assessing changes in CBF/CMRO2 coupling in health and disease, but potential systematic errors have not yet been characterized. The goal of this study was to experimentally evaluate the magnitude of bias in the estimate of n that arises from the way in which a region of interest (ROI) is chosen for averaging data, and to relate this potential bias to a more general theoretical consideration of the sources of systematic errors in the calibrated BOLD experiment. Results were compared for different approaches for defining an ROI within the visual cortex based on: 1) retinotopically-defined V1; 2) a functional CBF localizer; and 3) a functional BOLD localizer. Data in V1 yielded a significantly lower estimate of n (2.45) compared to either CBF (n = 3.45) or BOLD (n = 3.18) localizers. Different statistical thresholds produced biases in estimates of n with values ranging from 3.01 (low threshold) to 4.37 (high threshold). Possible sources of the observed biases are discussed. These results underscore the importance of a critical evaluation of the methodology, and the adoption of consistent standards for applying the calibrated BOLD approach to the evaluation of CBF/CMRO2 coupling. PMID:17524665

  7. Electric field measurement using a non-perturbative method based on a calibrated electric potential sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydin, A; Stiffell, P B, E-mail: a.aydin@sussex.ac.uk [Centre for Physical Electronics and Quantum Technology, School of Engineering and Design, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QT (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    We present results of finite element analysis for simple test structures which demonstrate clearly that the measurement situation is complex. The test structure consists of an open geometry parallel plate capacitor within a screened enclosure. Indeed, the presence of earthed objects, even at considerable distances, is shown to have a significant effect on the field geometry close to the source. These simulations are compared with field measurements made using an ultra-high input impedance sensor, the Electric Potential Sensor. A single experimentally determined calibration factor is all that is required to achieve excellent agreement between experimental measurements and the results of the simulations. Given this, the sensor is capable of mapping accurately, and in a non-perturbative manner, the spatial potential both within and outside of the test structure.

  8. Double-theodolite measurement system used in the image calibration of space photographic instrument

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; QIAO Yan-feng; SU Wan-xin; LIU Ze-xun

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of characterizing the image of space photographic instrument is to gain the space included angles from three coordinate axes in the three-dimensional coordinate of the image and the directionality of the three axes of coordinate in the frame of axes of the instrument. The two reference frames will keep in the same direction finally by adjusting according to space angles. This problem was solved by a new high-precision measurement system composed of a double-theodolite and a set of communication system. In the survey system, two TDA5005 total stations from Leica Company will be selected as the double-theodolite and the interdependence of both coordinate systems can be achieved by moving the stations only at one time. Therefore, this measurement system provides a highly efficient and high-precision surveying method to the image calibration of the space photographic instrument. According to the experiment, its measuring accuracy can reach arc-second level.

  9. A Practically Validated Intelligent Calibration Circuit Using Optimized ANN for Flow Measurement by Venturi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata, Santhosh Krishnan; Roy, Binoy Krishna

    2016-03-01

    Design of an intelligent flow measurement technique using venturi flow meter is reported in this paper. The objectives of the present work are: (1) to extend the linearity range of measurement to 100 % of full scale input range, (2) to make the measurement technique adaptive to variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio of venturi nozzle and pipe (β), liquid density, and liquid temperature, and (3) to achieve the objectives (1) and (2) using an optimized neural network. The output of venturi flow meter is differential pressure. It is converted to voltage by using a suitable data conversion unit. A suitable optimized artificial neural network (ANN) is added, in place of conventional calibration circuit. ANN is trained, tested with simulated data considering variations in discharge coefficient, diameter ratio between venturi nozzle and pipe, liquid density, and liquid temperature. The proposed technique is then subjected to practical data for validation. Results show that the proposed technique has fulfilled the objectives.

  10. Calibration of KRISS reference ionization chamber for key comparison of (99m)Tc measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Man; Lee, K B; Lee, S H; Park, Tae Soon

    2012-09-01

    KRISS, as the national metrology institute of Korea, has used a reference ionization chamber system to certify the activity of (99m)Tc aqueous sources, but could only recently participate in a comparison exercise by the BIPM (BIPM.RI(II)-K4.Tc-99m) to secure the international equivalence of (99m)Tc radioactivity measurement by way of the BIPM transfer instrument (SIRTI). The KRISS ionization chamber system was calibrated about 100 days before the comparison with a (99m)Tc solution source standardized by the 4πβ(LS)-γ(NaI(Tl)) coincidence counting method. During the comparison, beginning with a higher activity mother solution, the KRISS ionization chamber measured its specific activity without a dilution. The activity of a diluted-solution source was measured by the SIRTI at the same time.

  11. Development and calibration of a MFM-based system for local hysteresis loops measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coïsson, M.; Barrera, G.; Celegato, F.; Tiberto, P.

    2016-10-01

    A measurement technique derived from a field-dependent magnetic force microscope (MFM) is presented for the measurement of local hysteresis loops on patterned micrometric and sub-micrometric magnetic structures. The technique exploits the synchronisation of the applied field variations with the end-of-line signal of the microscope, while keeping the slow scan axis disabled. In this way, a single MFM image contains the whole field evolution of the magnetisation processes in the sample along a user-defined profile. An analysis procedure is presented for the subsequent determination of local hysteresis loops on magnetic dots. The system has been calibrated for what concerns the applied field values. No significant artifacts induced in the measurements by the applied field have been observed up to applied fields of ≈ 1000 Oe.

  12. Use of O2 airglow for calibrating direct atomic oxygen measurements from sounding rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Witt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Accurate knowledge about the distribution of atomic oxygen is crucial for many studies of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. Direct measurements of atomic oxygen by the resonance fluorescence technique at 130 nm have been made from many sounding rocket payloads in the past. This measurement technique yields atomic oxygen profiles with good sensitivity and altitude resolution. However, accuracy is a problem as calibration and aerodynamics make the quantitative analysis challenging. Most often, accuracies better than a factor 2 are not to be expected from direct atomic oxygen measurements. As an example, we present results from the NLTE (Non Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium sounding rocket campaign at Esrange, Sweden, in 1998, with simultaneous O2 airglow and O resonance fluorescence measurements. O number densities are found to be consistent with the nightglow analysis, but only within the uncertainty limits of the resonance fluorescence technique. Based on these results, we here describe how better atomic oxygen number densities can be obtained by calibrating direct techniques with complementary airglow photometer measurements and detailed aerodynamic analysis. Night-time direct O measurements can be complemented by photometric detection of the O2 (b1∑g+−X3∑g- Atmospheric Band at 762 nm, while during daytime the O2 (a1Δg−X3∑g- Infrared Atmospheric Band at 1.27 μm can be used. The combination of a photometer and a rather simple resonance fluorescence probe can provide atomic oxygen profiles with both good accuracy and good height resolution.

  13. Land surface model performance using cosmic-ray and point-scale soil moisture measurements for calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-06-01

    At very high resolution scale (i.e. grid cells of 1 km2), land surface model parameters can be calibrated with eddy-covariance flux data and point-scale soil moisture data. However, measurement scales of eddy-covariance and point-scale data differ substantially. In our study, we investigated the impact of reducing the scale mismatch between surface energy flux and soil moisture observations by replacing point-scale soil moisture data with observations derived from Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNSs) made at larger spatial scales. Five soil and evapotranspiration parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) were calibrated against point-scale and Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensor soil moisture data separately. We calibrated the model for 12 sites in the USA representing a range of climatic, soil, and vegetation conditions. The improvement in latent heat flux estimation for the two calibration solutions was assessed by comparison to eddy-covariance flux data and to JULES simulations with default parameter values. Calibrations against the two soil moisture products alone did show an advantage for the cosmic-ray technique. However, further analyses of two-objective calibrations with soil moisture and latent heat flux showed no substantial differences between both calibration strategies. This was mainly caused by the limited effect of calibrating soil parameters on soil moisture dynamics and surface energy fluxes. Other factors that played a role were limited spatial variability in surface fluxes implied by soil moisture spatio-temporal stability, and data quality issues.

  14. Calibration of a geophysically based model using soil moisture measurements in mountainous terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, Cécile; Hilbich, Christin; Marmy, Antoine; Hauck, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The use of geophysical methods in the field of permafrost research is well established and crucial since it is the only way to infer the composition of the subsurface material. Since geophysical measurements are indirect, ambiguities in the interpretation of the results can arise, hence the simultaneous use of several methods (e.g. electrical resistivity tomography and refraction seismics) is often necessary. The so-called four-phase model, 4PM (Hauck et al., 2011) constitutes a further step towards clarification of interpretation from geophysical measurements. It uses two well-known petrophysical relationships, namely Archie's law and an extension of Timur's time-averaged equation for seismic P-wave velocities, to quantitatively estimate the different phase contents (air, water and ice) in the ground from tomographic electric and seismic measurements. In this study, soil moisture measurements were used to calibrate the 4PM in order to assess the spatial distribution of water, ice and air content in the ground at three high elevation sites with different ground properties and thermal regimes. The datasets used here were collected as part of the SNF-project SOMOMOUNT. Within the framework of this project a network of six entirely automated soil moisture stations was installed in Switzerland along an altitudinal gradient ranging from 1'200 m. a.s.l. to 3'400 m. a.s.l. The standard instrumentation of each station comprises the installation of Frequency Domain Reflectometry (FDR) and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) sensors for long term monitoring coupled with repeated Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Refraction Seismic Tomography (RST) as well as spatial FDR (S-FDR) measurements. The use of spatially distributed soil moisture data significantly improved the 4PM calibration process and a semi-automatic calibration scheme was developed. This procedure was then tested at three different locations, yielding satisfactory two dimensional distributions of water

  15. Calibration of EcoBadge Test-Strips for Ozone Measurement for GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Linda C.

    2003-01-01

    The majority of our work, therefore, centered on experiments at an extended exposure period at low ozone concentrations, creating and programming the necessary calibration curve into a Zikua reader. and verifying that the Zikua would use the curve reliably. Zikua is a device supplied by Vistanomics to 'read' the exposed EcoBadge cards and provide a read-out of measured ozone concentration in ppb. This device replaces the visual comparison to a calibrated color chart. For our initial studies, test papers were prepared by the usual method in small batches. Although testing would also eventually include Vistanomics' EcoBadge papers, we began with papers prepared in our lab so that we could be assured of the freshness of each batch. We felt this would allow us better comparison among our runs as we varied exposure time. At the outset, our target acceptable error was about +/- 10%. For example, if the actual ozone concentration was 20 ppb, then we hoped to be in the range 18-22 ppb. If the actual ozone concentration was 100 ppb. then we hoped to fall within 90-110 ppb in our measurements. Clearly a systematic error in the range of 3-4 ppb or more would significantly affect the lower exposure data.

  16. Calibration of dimensional change in finite element models using AGR moderator brick measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNally, K., E-mail: kevin.mcnally@hsl.gsi.gov.uk [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Hall, G. [NGRG, School of MACE, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tan, E. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom); Marsden, B.J. [NGRG, School of MACE, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Warren, N. [Health and Safety Laboratory, Harpur Hill, Buxton, Derbyshire SK17 9JN (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Physically based models, resolved using the finite element (FE) method, are often used to model changes in geometry and the associated stress fields of graphite moderator bricks within a reactor. These models require inputs that describe the loading conditions (field variables), and coded relationships describing the behaviour of material properties. Historically, behaviour on material properties have been obtained from Materials Test Reactor (MTR) experiments, however data relating to samples trepanned from operating reactors are increasingly being used to improve models. Geometry measurements from operating reactors offer the potential for improving the coded relationship for dimensional change in FE models. A non-linear mixed-effect model is presented for calibrating the parameters of FE models that are sensitive to mid-brick diameter, using channel geometry measurements obtained from inspection campaigns. The work makes use of a novel technique: the development of a Bayesian emulator, which is a surrogate for the FE model. The use of an emulator allows the influence of the inputs to the finite element model to be evaluated, and delivers a substantial reduction in the computational burden of calibration.

  17. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  18. Design, calibration and error analysis of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, C. R.; Tree, D. R.; Dewitt, D. P.; Wahiduzzaman, S. A. H.

    1987-01-01

    The paper reports the methodology and uncertainty analyses of instrumentation for heat transfer measurements in internal combustion engines. Results are presented for determining the local wall heat flux in an internal combustion engine (using a surface thermocouple-type heat flux gage) and the apparent flame-temperature and soot volume fraction path length product in a diesel engine (using two-color pyrometry). It is shown that a surface thermocouple heat transfer gage suitably constructed and calibrated will have an accuracy of 5 to 10 percent. It is also shown that, when applying two-color pyrometry to measure the apparent flame temperature and soot volume fraction-path length, it is important to choose at least one of the two wavelengths to lie in the range of 1.3 to 2.3 micrometers. Carefully calibrated two-color pyrometer can ensure that random errors in the apparent flame temperature and in the soot volume fraction path length will remain small (within about 1 percent and 10-percent, respectively).

  19. Improved optical mass tracer for galaxy clusters calibrated using weak lensing measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Hirata, Christopher M; Bahcall, Neta; Seljak, Uros

    2008-01-01

    We develop an improved mass tracer for clusters of galaxies from optically observed parameters, and calibrate the mass relation using weak gravitational lensing measurements. We employ a sample of ~ 13,000 optically-selected clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) maxBCG catalog, with photometric redshifts in the range 0.1-0.3. The optical tracers we consider are cluster richness, cluster luminosity, luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), and combinations of these parameters. We measure the weak lensing signal around stacked clusters as a function of the different tracers, and use it to determine the tracer with the least amount of scatter. We further use the weak lensing data to calibrate the mass normalization. We find that the best mass estimator for massive clusters is a combination of cluster richness, N_{200}, and the luminosity of the brightest cluster galaxy, L_{BCG}: M_{200\\bar{\\rho}} = (1.27 +/- 0.08) (N_{200}/20)^{1.20 +/- 0.09} (L_{BCG}/\\bar{L}_{BCG}(N_{200}))^{0.71 +/- 0.14} ...

  20. Diamagnetic Levitation Cantilever System for the Calibration of Normal Force Atomic Force Microscopy Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jahn; Yi, Jin-Woo; Murphy, Colin; Kim, Kyung-Suk

    2011-03-01

    In this presentation we report a novel technique for normal force calibration for Atomic Force Microcopy (AFM) adhesion measurements known as the diamagnetic normal force calibration (D-NFC) system. The levitation produced by the repulsion between a diamagnetic graphite sheet and a set of rare-earth magnets is used in order to produce an oscillation due to an unstable mechanical moment produced by a silicon cantilever supported on the graphite. The measurement of the natural frequency of this oscillation allows for the calculation of the stiffness of the system to three-digit accuracy. The D-NFC response was proven to have a high sensitivity for the structure of water molecules collected on its surface. This in turns allows for the study of the effects of coatings on the structure of surface water. This work was supported by the Coatings/Biofouling Program and the Maritime Sensing Program of the Office of Naval Research as well as the ILIR Program of the Naval Undersea Warfare Center DIVNPT.

  1. Extending calibration-free force measurements to optically-trapped rod-shaped samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Català, Frederic; Marsà, Ferran; Montes-Usategui, Mario; Farré, Arnau; Martín-Badosa, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Optical trapping has become an optimal choice for biological research at the microscale due to its non-invasive performance and accessibility for quantitative studies, especially on the forces involved in biological processes. However, reliable force measurements depend on the calibration of the optical traps, which is different for each experiment and hence requires high control of the local variables, especially of the trapped object geometry. Many biological samples have an elongated, rod-like shape, such as chromosomes, intracellular organelles (e.g., peroxisomes), membrane tubules, certain microalgae, and a wide variety of bacteria and parasites. This type of samples often requires several optical traps to stabilize and orient them in the correct spatial direction, making it more difficult to determine the total force applied. Here, we manipulate glass microcylinders with holographic optical tweezers and show the accurate measurement of drag forces by calibration-free direct detection of beam momentum. The agreement between our results and slender-body hydrodynamic theoretical calculations indicates potential for this force-sensing method in studying protracted, rod-shaped specimens.

  2. Supercal: Cross-Calibration of Multiple Photometric Systems to Improve Cosmological Measurements with Type Ia Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Scolnic, D; Riess, A G; Rest, A; Schlafly, E; Foley, R J; Finkbeiner, D; Tang, C; Burgett, W S; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Hodapp, K W; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Stubbs, C W

    2015-01-01

    Current cosmological analyses which use Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations combine SN samples to expand the redshift range beyond that of a single sample and increase the overall sample size. The inhomogeneous photometric calibration between different SN samples is one of the largest systematic uncertainties of the cosmological parameter estimation. To place these different samples on a single system, analyses currently use observations of a small sample of very bright flux standards on the $HST$ system. We propose a complementary method, called `Supercal', in which we use measurements of secondary standards in each system, compare these to measurements of the same stars in the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) system, and determine offsets for each system relative to PS1, placing all SN observations on a single, consistent photometric system. PS1 has observed $3\\pi$ of the sky and has a relative calibration of better than 5 mmag (for $\\sim15

  3. Coordinates calibration in precision detection of 3D optical deformation measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Honggang; Hu, Chunsheng; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    In order to validate the detection precision of a three Dimensions Optical Deformation Measure System (3D-OMS), a calibration method of auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate base on theodolites has been proposed. The installation method by using theodolites to calibrate the auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate has been proposed. Specifically, after the auxiliary mirrors installed, the installation accuracy is detected, then we analyzed the influence of Axis-Error of theodolite under the practical condition of our experiment. Furthermore, the influence of validation precision for the 3D-OMS caused by the misalignment of auxiliary coordinate and optical coordinate is analyzed. According to our theoretical analysis and experiments results, the validation precision of the 3D-OMS can achieve an accuracy of 1″ at the conditions of the coordinate alignment accuracy is no more than 10' and the measuring range of 3D-OMS within +/-3'. Therefore, the proposed method can meet our high accuracy requirement while not sensitive to the installation error of auxiliary mirrors. This method is also available for other similar work.

  4. Cosmic infrared background fluctuations of the COSMOS field in the SPLASH survey: new measurements and the cosmological explanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is the integrated emission of all sources through cosmic time and carries an abundance of information about the star formation and galaxy growth in the Universe. Due to significant and complex foregrounds from our Galaxy, the optimal way to study the unresolved background is to actually study its fluctuations, especially at large angular scales where they reflect the clustering of unresolved galaxies. Our new measurements of the CIB fluctuations reach the largest angular scale to date for such a study, thanks to new observations of the COSMOS field from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We analyzed Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 um data of the whole field, with an average depth of 1.33 hour/pixel over 4 epochs spanning 2 years. We found that the auto-power spectra are consistent among various epochs and are correlated at the two channels. We confirmed the previously detected excess flux at large scales of the power spectra.The cross-correlation of the CIB fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths is an extremely useful technique to understand the excess flux. The previously seen CIB and X-ray background (CXB) cross-correlation suggests significant contribution to the CIB fluctuations from accreting black holes that is much higher than among any known populations, and such a cross-correlation is also used as an evidence for the existence of direct collapse black holes in the early Universe.In this talk, we will present the first CIB fluctuation measurements of the COSMOS field using the new SPLASH data and we will also revisit the CIB and CXB cross-correlation in this field, which is about 20 times larger than the previous study and therefore with much improved significance levels. Measuring CIB fluctuations is a powerful tool to study the large-scale structure of the Universe. The CIB and CXB cross-correlation can not only provide observational constrains on the theoretical modeling of the CIB

  5. Toward Improvements in Inter-laboratory Calibration of Argon Isotope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemming, S. R.; Deino, A. L.; Heizler, M. T.; Hodges, K. V.; McIntosh, W. C.; Renne, P. R.; Swisher, C. C., III; Turrin, B. D.; Van Soest, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    It is important to continue to develop strategies to improve our ability to compare results between laboratories chronometers. The U-Pb community has significantly reduced inter-laboratory biases with the application of a community tracer solution and the distribution of synthetic zircon solutions. Inevitably sample selection and processing and even biases in interpretations will still lead to some disagreements in the assignment of ages. Accordingly natural samples that are shared will be important for achievement of the highest levels of agreement. Analogous improvements in quality and inter-laboratory agreement of analytical aspects of Ar-Ar can be achieved through development of synthetic age standards in gas canisters with multiple pipettes to deliver various controlled amounts of argon to the mass spectrometer. A preliminary proof-of concept comes from the inter-laboratory calibration experiment for the 40Ar/39Ar community. This portable Argon Pipette Intercalibration System (APIS) consists of three 2.7 L canisters each equipped with three pipettes of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 cc volumes. The currently traveling APIS has the three canisters filled with air and 40Ar*/39Ar of 1.73 and canister 2 has a 40Ar*/39Ar of 40.98 (~ Alder Creek and Fish Canyon in the same irradiation). With these pipettes it is possible to combine them to provide 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 (0.1+0.2), 0.4, 0.5 (0.1+0.4), 0.6 (0.2+0.4), and 0.7 (0.1+0.2+0.4) cc. The configuration allows a simple test for inter-laboratory biases and for volume/pressure dependent mass fractionation on the measured ratios for a gas with a single argon isotope composition. Although not yet tested, it is also possible to mix gas from any one of the three canisters in proportions of these increments, allowing even more tightly controlled calibration of measurements. We suggest that ultimately each EARTHTIME lab should be equipped with such a system permanently, with a community plan for a traveling system to periodically repeat the

  6. In-situ Eh sensor measurement and calibration: application to seafloor observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, K.; Seyfried, W. E.; Tan, C.

    2013-12-01

    Eh measurement is often used with manned submersible and AUV assets as an effective way to detect and locate seafloor hydrothermal activity. Eh can be fundamentally and sensitively linked to dissolved H 2 , which, in turn, serves as a key constraint on subseafloor redox reactions. Moreover, Eh is now being increasingly relied on for event detection and process monitoring efforts intrinsic to cabled seafloor observatories. Due to seawater interaction with electrochemical components fundamental to the operation of the Eh sensor, however, the quality and reliability of the measurements are often compromised by signal drift, especially when the sensor is used for long term deployment. To solve this problem, a calibration protocol was developed and added to our previously constructed pH 'calibrator'. Thus, the integrated electrochemical system now permits the combined in-situ measurement and calibration of pH and Eh of seafloor hydrothermal fluids. Key aspects of the design for this calibration system are: (1) the sensing electrodes can be kept preserved in fluid of known pH, Eh and NaCl concentration prior to use, thereby preventing deterioration of electrode response characteristics by chemical and biological activity; (2) the system consists of valves and pumps for flow control, and therefore can be operated remotely with power from the seafloor cabled observatory, or as a stand-alone device, using battery power for shorter-term deployments. In both cases, standardization with on-board fluids of known redox, pH, and NaCl activity can be activated at any time, providing enhanced reliability (3) the current development is aimed at deep sea environments, cold seeps, and hydrothermal diffuse flow fluids at the temperatures up to 100°C and depths up to 4500 m. The in-situ operation is especially well-suited for use with cabled observatory for real time intervention and event response owing to enabled power supply and two way communications. Field tests have been

  7. Single-beam measurement of bose-einstein fluctuations in a natural gaussian radiation field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Bolwijn, P.T.; Veer, J.H.C. van der

    1966-01-01

    Excess noise caused by Bose-Einstein fluctuations in the radiation from the anode of a carbon-arc was detected in the photo current of a cooled InSb photodiode. Its dependence on several parameters was found to agree with our theory.

  8. Measuring Motion-Induced B0-Fluctuations in the Brain Using Field Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads; Hanson, Lars G.; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Fluctuations of the background magnetic field (B0) due to body and breathing motion can lead to significant artifacts in brain imaging at ultrahigh field. Corrections based on real-time sensing using external field probes show great potential. This study evaluates different aspects of fi...

  9. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunoro, H; Hyvönen, H; Uusi-Simola, J; Jokelainen, I; Kosunen, A; Kortesniemi, M; Seppälä, T; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2011-12-01

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam.

  10. Effect of the calibration in water and the build-up cap on the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivunoro, H., E-mail: hanna.koivunoro@helsinki.fi [Boneca Corporation, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland)] [Department of Physics, P.O.B. 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)] [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O.B. 180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Hyvoenen, H. [Boneca Corporation, FI-00290 Helsinki (Finland); Uusi-Simola, J. [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki (Finland); Jokelainen, I.; Kosunen, A. [Radiation Metrology Laboratory, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK, FI-00881 (Finland); Kortesniemi, M. [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki (Finland); Seppaelae, T. [Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, P.O.B. 180, 00029 HUS (Finland); Auterinen, I. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Savolainen, S. [Department of Physics, P.O.B. 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)] [HUS Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2011-12-15

    Magnesium-walled argon gas flow ionization chamber (Mg(Ar)) is used for photon dose measurements in the epithermal neutron beam of FiR 1 reactor in Finland. In this study, the photon dose measurements were re-evaluated against calculations applying a new chamber calibration factor defined in water instead of in air. Also, effect of the build-up cap on the measurements was investigated. The new calibration factor provides improved agreement between measured and calculated photon dose. Use of the build-up cap does not affect the measured signal in water in neutron beam.

  11. Optimization and application of cooled avalanche photodiodes for spectroscopic fluctuation measurements with ultra-fast charge exchange recombination spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, D. D.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    The Ultra-Fast Charge Exchange Recombination Spectroscopy (UF-CHERS) diagnostic is a highly specialized spectroscopic instrument with 2 spatial channels consisting of 8 spectral channels each and a resolution of ˜0.25 nm deployed at DIII-D to measure turbulent ion temperature fluctuations. Charge exchange emissions are obtained between 528 and 530 nm with 1 μs time resolution to study plasma instabilities. A primary challenge of extracting fluctuation measurements from raw UF-CHERS signals is photon and electronic noise. In order to reduce dark current, the Avalanche Photodiode (APD) detectors are thermo-electrically cooled. State-of-the-art components are used for the signal amplifiers and conditioners to minimize electronic noise. Due to the low incident photon power (≤1 nW), APDs with a gain of up to 300 are used to optimize the signal to noise ratio. Maximizing the APDs' gain while minimizing the excess noise factor (ENF) is essential since the total noise of the diagnostic sets a floor for the minimum level of detectable broadband fluctuations. The APDs' gain should be high enough that photon noise dominates electronic noise, but not excessive so that the ENF overwhelms plasma fluctuations. A new generation of cooled APDs and optimized preamplifiers exhibits significantly enhanced signal-to-noise compared to a previous generation. Experiments at DIII-D have allowed for characterization and optimization of the ENF vs. gain. A gain of ˜100 at 1700 V is found to be near optimal for most plasma conditions. Ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations due to the edge harmonic oscillation in quiescent H-mode plasmas are presented to demonstrate UF-CHERS' capabilities.

  12. Absolute Calibration of Si iRMs used for Measurements of Si Paleo-nutrient proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocke, R. D., Jr.; Rabb, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Silicon isotope variations (reported as δ30Si and δ29Si, relative to NBS28) in silicic acid dissolved in ocean waters, in biogenic silica and in diatoms are extremely informative paleo-nutrient proxies. The resolution and comparability of such measurements depend on the quality of the isotopic Reference Materials (iRMs) defining the delta scale. We report new absolute Si isotopic measurements on the iRMs NBS28 (RM 8546 - Silica Sand), Diatomite, and Big Batch using the Avogadro measurement approach and comparing them with prior assessments of these iRMs. The Avogadro Si measurement technique was developed by the German Physikalish-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) to provide a precise and highly accurate method to measure absolute isotopic ratios in highly enriched 28Si (99.996%) material. These measurements are part of an international effort to redefine the kg and mole based on the Planck constant h and the Avogadro constant NA, respectively (Vocke et al., 2014 Metrologia 51, 361, Azuma et al., 2015 Metrologia 52 360). This approach produces absolute Si isotope ratio data with lower levels of uncertainty when compared to the traditional "Atomic Weights" method of absolute isotope ratio measurement calibration. This is illustrated in Fig. 1 where absolute Si isotopic measurements on SRM 990, separated by 40+ years of advances in instrumentation, are compared. The availability of this new technique does not say that absolute Si isotopic ratios are or ever will be better for normal Si isotopic measurements when seeking isotopic variations in nature, because they are not. However, by determining the absolute isotopic ratios of all the Si iRM scale artifacts, such iRMs become traceable to the metric system (SI); thereby automatically conferring on all the artifact-based δ30Si and δ29Si measurements traceability to the base SI unit, the mole. Such traceability should help reduce the potential of bias between different iRMs and facilitate the replacement of delta

  13. In vivo liver visualizations with magnetic particle imaging based on the calibration measurement approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckhoff, J.; Kaul, M. G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Salamon, J.; Adam, G.; Knopp, T.; Ludwig, F.; Balceris, C.; Ittrich, H.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) facilitates the rapid determination of 3D in vivo magnetic nanoparticle distributions. In this work, liver MPI following intravenous injections of ferucarbotran (Resovist®) was studied. The image reconstruction was based on a calibration measurement, the so called system function. The application of an enhanced system function sample reflecting the particle mobility and aggregation status of ferucarbotran resulted in significantly improved image reconstructions. The finding was supported by characterizations of different ferucarbotran compositions with the magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy technique. For instance, similar results were obtained between ferucarbotran embedded in freeze-dried mannitol sugar and liver tissue harvested after a ferucarbotran injection. In addition, the combination of multiple shifted measurement patches for a joint reconstruction of the MPI data enlarged the field of view and increased the covering of liver MPI on magnetic resonance images noticeably.

  14. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, Valduc, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France); Chappert, F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  15. Calibration of Membrane Viscosity of the Reconstituted Vesicles by Measurement of the Rotational Diffusion of Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敖金; 胡坤生

    2002-01-01

    Membrane viscosity of the reconstituted vesicles was calibrated by rotational diffusion of bacteriorhodopsin (BR) in dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles. Rotational diffusion of BR in the vesicles was measured by flash-induced absorption anisotropy decay. BR was, for the first time, reconstituted successfully into DMPC and egg PC vesicles. From the measurement of flash-induced absorption anisotropy decay of BR, the value of rotational diffusion coefficient D was obtained from each curve fitting by a global fitting procedure and, in turn, membrane viscosity η was estimated from D. The results have shown that membrane viscosity is temperature-dependent. It was decreased as temperature increased, but a transition occurred in the region of the respective phase transition of DMPC and egg PC, respectively. The decrease of η was fast near the phase transition for DMPC and egg PC. Few effects of lipid/BR ratio and glycerol or sucrose in suspension medium on membrane viscosity were found.

  16. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Limburg, J.; Koomans, R. L.; Tijs, M.

    2011-01-01

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is const

  17. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Limburg, J.; Koomans, R. L.; Tijs, M.

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is

  18. Transmittance Measurement of a Heliostat Facility used in the Preflight Radiometric Calibration of Earth-Observing Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  19. Transmittance measurement of a heliostat facility used in the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czapla-Myers, J.; Thome, K.; Anderson, N.; McCorkel, J.; Leisso, N.; Good, W.; Collins, S.

    2009-08-01

    Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colorado, has developed a heliostat facility that will be used to determine the preflight radiometric calibration of Earth-observing sensors that operate in the solar-reflective regime. While automatically tracking the Sun, the heliostat directs the solar beam inside a thermal vacuum chamber, where the sensor under test resides. The main advantage to using the Sun as the illumination source for preflight radiometric calibration is because it will also be the source of illumination when the sensor is in flight. This minimizes errors in the pre- and post-launch calibration due to spectral mismatches. It also allows the instrument under test to operate at irradiance values similar to those on orbit. The Remote Sensing Group at the University of Arizona measured the transmittance of the heliostat facility using three methods, the first of which is a relative measurement made using a hyperspectral portable spectroradiometer and well-calibrated reference panel. The second method is also a relative measurement, and uses a 12-channel automated solar radiometer. The final method is an absolute measurement using a hyperspectral spectroradiometer and reference panel combination, where the spectroradiometer is calibrated on site using a solar-radiation-based calibration.

  20. Note: Design of a full photon-timing recorder down to 1-ns resolution for fluorescence fluctuation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Goro, E-mail: gnishi@imd.es.hokudai.ac.jp [Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0020 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    A photon timing recorder was realized in a field programmable gate array to capture all timing data of photons on multiple channels with down to a 1-ns resolution and to transfer all data to a host computer in real-time through universal serial bus with more than 10 M events/s transfer rate. The main concept is that photon time series can be regarded as a serial communication data stream. This recorder was successfully applied for simultaneous measurements of fluorescence fluctuation and lifetime of near-infrared dyes in solution. This design is not only limited to the fluorescence fluctuation measurement but also applicable to any kind of photon counting experiments in a nanosecond time range because of the simple and easily modifiable design.

  1. Radial profile measurements of plasma pressure-like fluctuations with the heavy ion beam diagnostic on the tokamak ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, R. B., E-mail: rhenriques@ipfn.ist.utl.pt; Malaquias, A.; Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Coelho, R.; Figueiredo, H.; Fernandes, H. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-11-15

    The Heavy Ion Beam Diagnostic (HIBD) on the tokamak ISTTOK (Instituto Superior Técnico TOKamak) has been modified, in terms of signal conditioning, to measure the local fluctuations of the n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) product (plasma density times the effective ionization cross-section) along the tokamak minor diameter, in 12 sample volumes in the range of −0.7a < r < 0.7a, with a maximum delay time of 1 μs. The corresponding signals show high correlation with the magnetic Mirnov coils in the characteristic MHD frequency range of ISTTOK plasmas and enable the identification of tearing modes. This paper describes the HIBD signal conditioning system and presents a preliminary analysis of the radial profile measurements of local n{sub e}σ{sub 1,2}(T{sub e}) fluctuations.

  2. Self-calibrating phase measurement based on diffraction theory and numerical simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Liao; Qi, Qiu; Hao, Xian

    2015-02-01

    To achieve a full-aperture, diffraction-limited image, a telescope's segmented primary mirror must be properly phased. Furthermore, it is crucial to detect the piston errors between individual segments with high accuracy. Based on the diffraction imaging theory, the symmetrically shaped aperture with an arbitrarily positioned entrance pupil would focus at the optical axis with a symmetrical diffraction pattern. By selecting a single mirror as a reference mirror and regarding the diffraction image's center as the calibration point, a function can be derived that expresses the relationship between the piston error and the distance from the center of the inference image to the calibration point is linearity within one-half wavelength. These theoretical results are shown to be consistent with the results of a numerical simulation. Using this method, not only the piston error, but also the tip-tilt error can be detected. This method is simple and effective; it yields high-accuracy measurements and requires less computation time.

  3. Measurement Uncertainty Analysis of an Accelerometer Calibration Using a POC Electromagnetic Launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timpson, Erik J.; Engel, T. G.

    2012-06-12

    A pulse forming network (PFN), helical electromagnetic launcher (HEML), command module (CM), and calibration table (CT) were built and evaluated for the combined ability to calibrate an accelerometer. The PFN has a maximum stored nergy of 19.25 kJ bank and is fired by a silicon controlled rectifier (SCR), with appropriate safety precautions. The HEML is constructed out of G-10 fiberglass reinforced epoxy and is designed to accelerate a mass of 600 grams to a velocity of 10 meters per second. The CM is microcontroller-based running Arduino Software. The CM has a keypad input and 7 segment outputs of the PFN voltage and desired charging voltage. After entering a desired PFN voltage, the CM controls the charging of the PFN. When the two voltages are equal it sends a pulse to the SCR to fire the PFN and in turn, the HEML. The HEML projectile’s tip hits a target that is held by the CT. The CT consists of a table to hold the PFN and HEML, a vacuum chuck, air bearing, velocimeter and catch pot. The target is held with the vacuum chuck awaiting impact. After impact, the air bearing allows the target to fall freely so that the velocimeter can accurately read. A known acceleration is determined from the known change in velocity of the target. Thus, if an accelerometer was attached to the target, the measured value can be compared to the known value.

  4. Main components and performances of the IMGC calibration facilities for liquid helium flow rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivetti, A.; Martini, G.; Goria, R.; Lorefice, S.

    Within the framework of a National Project on superconductivity two facilities have been designed and built at the Istituto di Metrologia 'G. Colonnetti' (IMGC) with the purpose of studying and calibrating liquid helium flowmeters in the range 1-20 g s -1 of liquid helium (LHe). After a brief description of these set-ups, this Paper examines in detail the solutions adopted in the design of the main calibration facility, particularly with regard to the circulating pump and the submerged driving motor. The latter has been devised for working only at LHe temperature, having an a.c. three-phase stator winding made of thin superconducting wire. The construction characteristics and operation conditions are discussed. As a flow rate reference, a new turbine flowmeter with its rotor magnetically suspended by the Meissner effect (described in another paper presented at the workshop), is used. A LHe flow rate transducer, based upon the measurement of the transit time of short thermal pulses, has been designed and tested with these facilities: the good results obtained using commercial low cost diodes as ΔT sensors are reported.

  5. Calibrated Fair Measures of Measure: Indices to Quantify an Individual's Scientific Research Output

    CERN Document Server

    Tawfik, A

    2013-01-01

    Are existing ways of measuring scientific quality reflecting disadvantages of not being part of giant collaborations? How could possible discrimination be avoided? We propose indices defined for each discipline (subfield) and which count the plausible contributions added up by collaborators maintaining the spirit of interdependency. Based on the growing debate about defining potential biases and detecting unethical behavior, a standardized method to measure contributions of the astronomical number of coauthors is introduced.

  6. Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trumpold, H.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    calibrator has been designed, built and tested. Primary calibration standards have been produced by ion-beam and plasma etching (step height standards), by holographic generation of sinusoidal structures with two-beam interference exposure and by ultra-precision diamond cutting. From primary standards...... to be replicated during all stages of the replication processes. Procedures for cleaning glass, PVC, PC, PMM and Ni-surfaces have been developed and tested. Calibration procedures for calibration standards and for calibrating instruments in X-, Y- and Z-direction have been developed and tested. Proposals...

  7. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J.; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  8. Method Specific Calibration Corrects for DNA Extraction Method Effects on Relative Telomere Length Measurements by Quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeker, Luise A; Holland, Rebecca; Underwood, Sarah; Fairlie, Jennifer; Psifidi, Androniki; Ilska, Joanna J; Bagnall, Ainsley; Whitelaw, Bruce; Coffey, Mike; Banos, Georgios; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Telomere length (TL) is increasingly being used as a biomarker in epidemiological, biomedical and ecological studies. A wide range of DNA extraction techniques have been used in telomere experiments and recent quantitative PCR (qPCR) based studies suggest that the choice of DNA extraction method may influence average relative TL (RTL) measurements. Such extraction method effects may limit the use of historically collected DNA samples extracted with different methods. However, if extraction method effects are systematic an extraction method specific (MS) calibrator might be able to correct for them, because systematic effects would influence the calibrator sample in the same way as all other samples. In the present study we tested whether leukocyte RTL in blood samples from Holstein Friesian cattle and Soay sheep measured by qPCR was influenced by DNA extraction method and whether MS calibration could account for any observed differences. We compared two silica membrane-based DNA extraction kits and a salting out method. All extraction methods were optimized to yield enough high quality DNA for TL measurement. In both species we found that silica membrane-based DNA extraction methods produced shorter RTL measurements than the non-membrane-based method when calibrated against an identical calibrator. However, these differences were not statistically detectable when a MS calibrator was used to calculate RTL. This approach produced RTL measurements that were highly correlated across extraction methods (r > 0.76) and had coefficients of variation lower than 10% across plates of identical samples extracted by different methods. Our results are consistent with previous findings that popular membrane-based DNA extraction methods may lead to shorter RTL measurements than non-membrane-based methods. However, we also demonstrate that these differences can be accounted for by using an extraction method-specific calibrator, offering researchers a simple means of accounting for

  9. Physical phantoms for counting efficiency calibration at in vivo measurements; Physikalische Kalibrierphantome in der In-vivo-Messtechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegenbart, Lars [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Abt. Strahlenschutzforschung; Schwabenland, Florian [Kerntechnische Hilfsdienst GmbH (KHG), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Gruppe Strahlenschutz

    2011-07-01

    The in vivo Measurement Laboratory at the Karlsruher Institute of Technologie (KIT) has several physical phantoms for counting efficiency calibration of whole- and partial body counters. A head phantom from the 1980s containing {sup 241}Am is available for the determination of counting efficiency for skull measurements. A virtual model of this head phantom was created with the aim to replace conventional efficiency calibration methods by Monte Carlo simulations. The counting efficiencies obtained from simulations have been compared with real in vivo measurements. Absolute counting efficiency values obtained from the best simulations deviate between 4.1 % bis 16.0 % from the measured values. (orig.)

  10. Use of Two-Part Regression Calibration Model to Correct for Measurement Error in Episodically Consumed Foods in a Single-Replicate Study Design: EPIC Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agogo, G.O.; Voet, van der H.; Veer, van 't P.; Ferrari, P.; Leenders, M.; Muller, D.C.; Sánchez-Cantalejo, E.; Bamia, C.; Braaten, T.; Knüppel, S.; Johansson, I.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.; Boshuizen, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference m

  11. Use of Two-Part Regression Calibration Model to Correct for Measurement Error in Episodically Consumed Foods in a Single-Replicate Study Design : EPIC Case Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agogo, George O; der Voet, Hilko van; Veer, Pieter Van't; Ferrari, Pietro; Leenders, Max; Muller, David C; Sánchez-Cantalejo, Emilio; Bamia, Christina; Braaten, Tonje; Knüppel, Sven; Johansson, Ingegerd; van Eeuwijk, Fred A; Boshuizen, Hendriek

    2014-01-01

    In epidemiologic studies, measurement error in dietary variables often attenuates association between dietary intake and disease occurrence. To adjust for the attenuation caused by error in dietary intake, regression calibration is commonly used. To apply regression calibration, unbiased reference m

  12. Measuring long wavelength plasma density fluctuations by CO2 laser scattering (abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. E.

    1985-05-01

    Long wavelength density fluctuations can be observed by scattering even with a probe beam of much shorter wavelength provided the scattering angle is small enough. This paper is concerned with experiments in which the scattering angle is comparable with the probe beam divergence so the scattered and incident radiation never achieve spatial separation. Under these circumstances, the role of diffraction is preeminent and Fourier optics methods are used to describe the propagation of the beam, which is taken to be TEM00 mode Gaussian. Interaction between the probe beam and the plasma disturbance is described by refraction and no appeal is made to explicit scattering theory. Analysis of the effect of a monochromatic wave disturbance confined to a plane perpendicular to the probe beam (a plane grating in effect) reveals oscillations at the wave frequency induced on the probe with an intensity varying over the beam profile in a regular pattern symmetric about the beam axis. Detail of the pattern depends on the wavelength of the disturbance, its direction, and its axial position relative to a local beam waist. These oscillations are readily identified as due to radiation scattered by the plasma wave into diffraction orders, beating with the unperturbed part of the beam. Indeed, it can be shown1 that Fourier optics plus refraction produce almost the same result as conventional scattering theory,2 the small discrepancy being traceable to the neglect in the latter of incident beam wavefront curvature. The results of the two approaches coincide in the Fraunhofer limit. Computations of this sort have been confirmed by experiments using transducer-driven waves in air3 and by plasma experiments where the same regular patterns are observed from spontaneous plasma waves.4,5 Calculation suggests and experiments have demonstrated6 that additional information, such as the absolute direction of wave propagation, can be deduced from phase, measured with a multichannel detector array

  13. Physiological HEPES buffer proposed as a calibrator for pH measurement in human blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, W; Zander, R

    1999-05-01

    N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-piperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid, known as HEPES buffer, with pK in the physiological range was studied for use as an alternative to conventional phosphate buffer for the calibration of pH in modern clinical analyzers. In different series of aqueous equimolar HEPES buffer, pH was measured at 37 degrees C with a capillary glass electrode standardized previously using phosphate, and variations due to changes in total HEPES buffer concentration (0.025 to 0.320 mol/l), and NaCl (0 to 0.250 mol/l) were monitored. For 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer without NaCl, the pH of 7.362+/-0.003 (n = 15) obtained coincided well with the reference pH (7.364) from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). In particular, in the preferred 0.05 equimolar HEPES buffer/0.110 mol/l NaCl, which is isotonic to human plasma (0.160 mol/l), and termed physiological HEPES buffer (PHB), the pH of 7.346+/-0.003 (n = 84) can be related to the calculated corresponding reference pH from NIST without liquid junction (7.374), and is also compatible with the pH measured in normal arterial blood, pH = 7.403+/-0.003 (n = 20). Hence, in the two-point calibration of clinical analyzers, PHB, which is defined operationally with respect to the glass electrode and to phosphate buffer, may be useful as a calibrator in the range of buffer adjustment control to meet the correct values for pH when measuring in blood. Whereas Na-HEPES salt is hygroscopic and does not meet the declared purity grade (> 99%), pure HEPES acid is non-hygroscopic and conforms to the manufacturer's purity grade (> or = 99%). Therefore, for easy preparation of PHB, HEPES acid is the preferred starting material.

  14. (abstract) A VLBI Test of Tropospheric Delay Calibration with WVRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linfield, R. P.; Teitelbaum, L. P.; Keihm, S. J.; Resch, G. M.; Mahoney, M. J.; Treuhaft, R. N.

    1994-01-01

    Dual frequency (S/X band) very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations were used to test troposphere calibration by water vapor radiometers (WVRs). Comparison of the VLBI and WVR measurements show a statistical agreement (specifically, their structure functions agree) on time scales less than 700 seconds. On longer time scales, VLBI instrumental errors become important. The improvement in VLBI residual delays from WVR calibration was consistent with the measured level of tropospheric fluctuations.

  15. Review on common calibration and measurement practises for measuring gears on CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sammatini-Malberg, Maria-Pia; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The present report reviews the state of the art of metrology of cylindrical gears with involute toothing. The subjects covered in the state of the art range from gear measuring instruments to gear standards, together with a general introduction to international and national standards and guidelin...

  16. Linear chirped slope profile for spatial calibration in slope measuring deflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siewert, F., E-mail: frank.siewert@helmholtz-berlin.de; Zeschke, T. [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, Institut für Nanometer Optik und Technologie, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Arnold, T.; Paetzelt, H. [Leibnitz Institut für Oberflächen Modifizierung Leipzig e.V., IOM, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Yashchuk, V. V. [Lawerence Berkeley National Laboratory, Advanced Light Source, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Slope measuring deflectometry is commonly used by the X-ray optics community to measure the long-spatial-wavelength surface figure error of optical components dedicated to guide and focus X-rays under grazing incidence condition at synchrotron and free electron laser beamlines. The best performing instruments of this kind are capable of absolute accuracy on the level of 30-50 nrad. However, the exact bandwidth of the measurements, determined at the higher spatial frequencies by the instrument’s spatial resolution, or more generally by the instrument’s modulation transfer function (MTF) is hard to determine. An MTF calibration method based on application of a test surface with a one-dimensional (1D) chirped height profile of constant amplitude was suggested in the past. In this work, we propose a new approach to designing the test surfaces with a 2D-chirped topography, specially optimized for MTF characterization of slope measuring instruments. The design of the developed MTF test samples based on the proposed linear chirped slope profiles (LCSPs) is free of the major drawback of the 1D chirped height profiles, where in the slope domain, the amplitude strongly increases with the local spatial frequency of the profile. We provide the details of fabrication of the LCSP samples. The results of first application of the developed test samples to measure the spatial resolution of the BESSY-NOM at different experimental arrangements are also presented and discussed.

  17. Variation of fractional electron density fluctuations inside 40 R(sub 0) observed by Ulysses ranging measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1995-01-01

    The first measurements of fractional electron density fluctuations delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e), where delta-n(sub e) is rms electron density fluctuation and n(sub e) is the mean electron density, have been carried out inside 40 R(sub 0) using 1991 Ulysses dual-frequency S- and X-band (13 and 3.6 cm) ranging (time delay) measurements. In the frequency band of approximately 6 x 10(exp -5) - 8 x 10(exp -4) Hz (periods of 20 min to 5 hr), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) varies from a high near 20% in the slow wind close to the neutral line to a low of 1% in the fast wind far from the neutral line. For spatial wavenumber K approximately = 1.4 x 10(exp -6)/km (period of 5 hr at 250 km/s), delta-n(sub e)/n(sub e) is essentially independent of heliocentric distance over 0.03-1.0 AU in the slow wind; it is a factor of 30 lower in the fast wind than in the slow wind inside 0.1 AU, but exhibits dramatic growth with heliocentric distance inside 0.3 AU. This latter result reinforces current views of the evolution of MHD turbulence and the association of Alfven waves with high speed streams based on in situ fields and particles measurements beyond 0.3 AU. That regions of enhanced density fluctuations near or above the neutral line coincide with regions of enhanced density confirms previous conclusions that they are the interplanetary manifestation of the heliospheric current sheet and extensions of coronal streamers. While the regions of enhanced density fluctuations lie within those of enhanced density, they have boundaries that are distinctly more abrupt, suggesting the separation of plasma of different nature and origin.

  18. A comparison of calibration techniques for hot-wires operated in subsonic compressible slip flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. C.; Nagabushana, K. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the correlation of constant temperature anemometer voltages to velocity, density, and total temperature in the transonic slip flow regime. Three different calibration schemes were evaluated. The ultimate use of these hot-wire calibrations is to obtain fluctuations in the flow variables. Without the appropriate mean flow sensitivities of the heated wire, the measurements of these fluctuations cannot be accurately determined.

  19. A general analysis of calibrated BOLD methodology for measuring CMRO2 responses: comparison of a new approach with existing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blockley, Nicholas P; Griffeth, Valerie E M; Buxton, Richard B

    2012-03-01

    The amplitude of the BOLD response to a stimulus is not only determined by changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and oxygen metabolism (CMRO(2)), but also by baseline physiological parameters such as haematocrit, oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) and blood volume. The calibrated BOLD approach aims to account for this physiological variation by performing an additional calibration scan. This calibration typically consists of a hypercapnia or hyperoxia respiratory challenge, although we propose that a measurement of the reversible transverse relaxation rate, R(2)', might also be used. A detailed model of the BOLD effect was used to simulate each of the calibration experiments, as well as the activation experiment, whilst varying a number of physiological parameters associated with the baseline state and response to activation. The effectiveness of the different calibration methods was considered by testing whether the BOLD response to activation scaled by the calibration parameter combined with the measured CBF provides sufficient information to reliably distinguish different levels of CMRO(2) response despite underlying physiological variability. In addition the effect of inaccuracies in the underlying assumptions of each technique were tested, e.g. isometabolism during hypercapnia. The three primary findings of the study were: 1) The new calibration method based on R(2)' worked reasonably well, although not as well as the ideal hypercapnia method; 2) The hyperoxia calibration method was significantly worse because baseline haematocrit and OEF must be assumed, and these physiological parameters have a significant effect on the measurements; and 3) the venous blood volume change with activation is an important confounding variable for all of the methods, with the hypercapnia method being the most robust when this is uncertain.

  20. A Measuring System for Well Logging Attitude and a Method of Sensor Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Ren

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an approach for measuring the azimuth angle and tilt angle of underground drilling tools with a MEMS three-axis accelerometer and a three-axis fluxgate sensor. A mathematical model of well logging attitude angle is deduced based on combining space coordinate transformations and algebraic equations. In addition, a system implementation plan of the inclinometer is given in this paper, which features low cost, small volume and integration. Aiming at the sensor and assembly errors, this paper analyses the sources of errors, and establishes two mathematical models of errors and calculates related parameters to achieve sensor calibration. The results show that this scheme can obtain a stable and high precision azimuth angle and tilt angle of drilling tools, with the deviation of the former less than ±1.4° and the deviation of the latter less than ±0.1°.

  1. A measuring system for well logging attitude and a method of sensor calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Wang, Yangdong; Wang, Mijian; Wu, Sheng; Wei, Biao

    2014-05-23

    This paper proposes an approach for measuring the azimuth angle and tilt angle of underground drilling tools with a MEMS three-axis accelerometer and a three-axis fluxgate sensor. A mathematical model of well logging attitude angle is deduced based on combining space coordinate transformations and algebraic equations. In addition, a system implementation plan of the inclinometer is given in this paper, which features low cost, small volume and integration. Aiming at the sensor and assembly errors, this paper analyses the sources of errors, and establishes two mathematical models of errors and calculates related parameters to achieve sensor calibration. The results show that this scheme can obtain a stable and high precision azimuth angle and tilt angle of drilling tools, with the deviation of the former less than ±1.4° and the deviation of the latter less than ±0.1°.

  2. On a Class of Statistical Distance Measures for Sales Distribution: Theory, Simulation and Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianhao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While firm-level and micro issue analysis become an important part in research of international trade, only a few work is concerned about the goodness-of-fit for size distribution of firms. In this paper, we revisit the statistical aspects of firm productivity and sales revenue, in order to compare different definitions of statistical distances. We first deduce the exact form of size distribution of firms by only implementing the assumptions of productivity and demand function, and then introduce the famous g-divergence as well as its statistical implications. We also do the simulation and calibration so as to compare those different divergences, moreover, tests the combined assumptions. We conclude that minimizing Pearson χ2 and Neyman χ2 produces similar results and minimizing Kullback-Leibler divergence is likely to take the expense of other distance measures. Additionally, selection among different statistical distances is much more significant than demand functions

  3. Relative blood flow changes measured using calibrated frequency-weighted Doppler power at different hematocrit levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sean; Logallo, Nicola; Faiz, Kashif W; Lund, Christian; Brucher, Rainer; Russell, David

    2014-04-01

    In theory, the power of a trans-cranial Doppler signal may be used to measure changes in blood flow and vessel diameter in addition to velocity. In this study, a flow index (FI) of relative changes in blood flow was derived from frequency-weighted Doppler power signals. The FI, plotted against velocity, was calibrated to the zero intercept with absent flow to reduce the effects of non-uniform vessel insonation. An area index was also calculated. FIs were compared with actual flow in four silicone tubes of different diameter at increasing flow rates and increasing hematocrit (Hct) in a closed-loop phantom model. FI values were strongly correlated with actual flow, at constant Hct, but varied substantially with changes in Hct. Percentage changes in area indexes, relative to the 4-mm tube, were strongly correlated with tube cross-sectional area. The implications of these results for in vivo use are discussed.

  4. Amplitude calibration of a digital radio antenna array for measuring cosmic ray air showers

    CERN Document Server

    Nehls, S; Arts, M J; Bluemer, J; Bozdog, H; van Cappellen, W A; Falcke, H; Haungs, A; Horneffer, A; Huege, T; Isar, P G; Krömer, O

    2008-01-01

    Radio pulses are emitted during the development of air showers, where air showers are generated by ultra-high energy cosmic rays entering the Earth's atmosphere. These nanosecond short pulses are presently investigated by various experiments for the purpose of using them as a new detection technique for cosmic particles. For an array of 30 digital radio antennas (LOPES experiment) an absolute amplitude calibration of the radio antennas including the full electronic chain of the data acquisition system is performed, in order to estimate absolute values of the electric field strength for these short radio pulses. This is mandatory, because the measured radio signals in the MHz frequency range have to be compared with theoretical estimates and with predictions from Monte Carlo simulations to reconstruct features of the primary cosmic particle. A commercial reference radio emitter is used to estimate frequency dependent correction factors for each single antenna of the radio antenna array. The expected received p...

  5. Age estimation in children by measurement of open apices in teeth with Bayesian calibration approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameriere, R; Pacifici, A; Pacifici, L; Polimeni, A; Federici, F; Cingolani, M; Ferrante, L

    2016-01-01

    Age estimation from teeth by radiological analysis, in both children and adolescents, has wide applications in several scientific and forensic fields. In 2006, Cameriere et al. proposed a regression method to estimate chronological age in children, according to measurements of open apices of permanent teeth. Although several regression models are used to analyze the relationship between age and dental development, one serious limitation is the unavoidable bias in age estimation when regression models are used. The aim of this paper is to develop a full Bayesian calibration method for age estimation in children according to the sum of open apices, S, of the seven left permanent mandibular teeth. This cross-sectional study included 2630 orthopantomographs (OPGs) from healthy living Italian subjects, aged between 4 and 17 years and with no obvious developmental abnormalities. All radiographs were in digital format and were processed by the ImageJ computer-aided drawing program. The distance between the inner side of the open apex was measured for each tooth. Dental maturity was then evaluated according to the sum of normalized open apices (S). Intra- and inter-observer agreement was satisfactory, according to an intra-class correlation coefficient of S on 50 randomly selected OPGs. Mean absolute errors were 0.72 years (standard deviation 0.60) and 0.73 years (standard deviation 0.61) in boys and girls, respectively. The mean interquartile range (MIQR) of the calibrating distribution was 1.37 years (standard deviation 0.46) and 1.51 years (standard deviation 0.52) in boys and girls, respectively. Estimate bias was βERR=-0.005 and 0.003 for boys and girls, corresponding to a bias of a few days for all individuals in the sample. Neither of the βERR values was significantly different from 0 (p>0.682). In conclusion, the Bayesian calibration method overcomes problems of bias in age estimation when regression models are used, and appears to be suitable for assessing both

  6. CryoSat-2: Measuring fluctuations of land and marine ice fields from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Richard; Wingham, Duncan; Cullen, Robert

    2010-05-01

    1. INTRODUCTION CryoSat was chosen as the first of ESA's Earth Explorer Opportunity missions in late 1999, following a competitive selection process [1]. Unfortunately, the CryoSat satellite was lost as the result of a launch failure on 8 October 2005. The decision was made to rebuild the satellite in order to complete the mission, and as a result of this the new satellite, CryoSat-2, will be launched on 25 February 2010. 2. MISSION OBJECTIVES The mission goal of CryoSat is the measurement of secular change in the cryosphere, particularly in the elevation of the ice caps and the thickness of sea ice [2]. The required accuracy corresponds to about half of the variation expected due to natural variability, over reasonable scales for the surfaces concerned. The selected technique is radar altimetry, although the instrument has been modified to provide the enhanced capabilities needed to significantly extend the spatial coverage of previous altimetry missions, particularly ERS and EnviSat. Thus the radar includes a synthetic aperture mode which enables the along- track resolution to be improved to about 250 m. This will enable detection of leads in sea-ice which are narrower than those detected hitherto, so that operation deeper into pack-ice can be achieved with a consequent reduction in errors due to omission. Altimetry over the steep edges of ice caps is hampered by the irregular topography which, since the radar ranging is performed to the closest reflector rather than the point directly below, introduces uncertainty into the exactitude of repeat measurements. CryoSat's radar includes a second antenna and receiver chain so that interferometry may be used to determine the arrival angle of the echo and so improve localisation of the reflection. The satellite payload, which includes a DORIS receiver for precise orbit determination and a set of star trackers to measure the orientation of the interferometer, is quite complex and demanding. 3. CRYOSAT-1 LAUNCH FAILURE

  7. The results of the PEP`93 intercomparison of reference cell calibrations and newer technology performance measurements: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Anevsky, S. [All-Union Research Inst. for Optophysical Measurements, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barua, A.K. [Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India)] [and others

    1998-03-01

    This report presents the results of an international intercomparison of photovoltaic (PV) performance measurements and calibrations that took place from 1993 to 1997. The intercomparison, which was organized and operated by a group of representatives from national PV measurements laboratories, was accomplished by circulating two sample sets. One set, consisting of 20 silicon reference cells, was intended to form the basis of an international PV reference scale. A qualification procedure applied to the calibration results gave average calibration numbers with an overall standard deviation of less than 2% for the entire set. The second sample set was assembled from a wide range of newer technologies that present unique problems for PV measurements. As might be expected, these results showed much greater differences among the laboratories. Methods were then identified that should be used to measure such devices, along with problems to avoid. The report concludes with recommendations for future intercomparisons.

  8. An innovative method for coordinate measuring machine one-dimensional self-calibration with simplified experimental process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Butler, David Lee

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, an innovative method for CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) self-calibration is proposed. In contrast to conventional CMM calibration that relies heavily on a high precision reference standard such as a laser interferometer, the proposed calibration method is based on a low-cost artefact which is fabricated with commercially available precision ball bearings. By optimizing the mathematical model and rearranging the data sampling positions, the experimental process and data analysis can be simplified. In mathematical expression, the samples can be minimized by eliminating the redundant equations among those configured by the experimental data array. The section lengths of the artefact are measured at arranged positions, with which an equation set can be configured to determine the measurement errors at the corresponding positions. With the proposed method, the equation set is short of one equation, which can be supplemented by either measuring the total length of the artefact with a higher-precision CMM or calibrating the single point error at the extreme position with a laser interferometer. In this paper, the latter is selected. With spline interpolation, the error compensation curve can be determined. To verify the proposed method, a simple calibration system was set up on a commercial CMM. Experimental results showed that with the error compensation curve uncertainty of the measurement can be reduced to 50%.

  9. A multi-channel capacitive probe for electrostatic fluctuation measurement in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mingsheng; Stone, Douglas R.; Triana, Joseph C.; Almagri, Abdulgader F.; Fiksel, Gennady; Ding, Weixing; Sarff, John S.; McCollam, Karsten J.; Li, Hong; Liu, Wandong

    2017-02-01

    A 40-channel capacitive probe has been developed to measure the electrostatic fluctuations associated with the tearing modes deep into Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) reversed field pinch plasma. The capacitive probe measures the ac component of the plasma potential via the voltage induced on stainless steel electrodes capacitively coupled with the plasma through a thin annular layer of boron nitride (BN) dielectric (also serves as the particle shield). When bombarded by the plasma electrons, BN provides a sufficiently large secondary electron emission for the induced voltage to be very close to the plasma potential. The probe consists of four stalks each with ten cylindrical capacitors that are radially separated by 1.5 cm. The four stalks are arranged on a 1.3 cm square grid so that at each radial position, there are four electrodes forming a square grid. Every two adjacent radial sets of four electrodes form a cube. The fluctuating electric field can be calculated by the gradient of the plasma potential fluctuations at the eight corners of the cube. The probe can be inserted up to 15 cm (r/a = 0.7) into the plasma. The capacitive probe has a frequency bandwidth from 13 Hz to 100 kHz, amplifier-circuit limit, sufficient for studying the tearing modes (5-30 kHz) in the MST reversed-field pinch.

  10. ULF fluctuations of the geomagnetic field and ionospheric sounding measurements at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Villante

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis of ULF geomagnetic field fluctuations at low latitudes during the first CAWSES campaign (29 March-3 April 2004. During the whole campaign, mainly in the prenoon sector, a moderate Pc3-4 pulsation activity is observed, clearly related to interplanetary upstream waves. On 3 April, in correspondence to the Earth's arrival of a coronal mass ejection, two SIs are observed whose waveforms are indicative of a contribution of the high-latitude ionospheric currents to the low-latitude ground field. During the following geomagnetic storm, low frequency (Pc5 waves are observed at discrete frequencies. Their correspondence with the same frequencies detected in the radial components of the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind speed suggests that Alfvénic solar wind fluctuations may act as direct drivers of magnetospheric fluctuations. A cross-phase analysis, using different pairs of stations, is also presented for identifying field line resonant frequencies and monitoring changes in plasmaspheric mass density. Lastly, an analysis of ionospheric vertical soundings, measured at the Rome ionosonde station (41.8° N, 12.5° E, and vertical TEC measurements deduced from GPS signals within an European network shows the relation between the ULF resonances in the inner magnetosphere and thermal plasma density variations during geomagnetically quiet conditions, in contrast to various storm phases at the end of the CAWSES campaign.

  11. Design and calibration of a test facility for MLI thermal performance measurements below 80K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroski, W.; Kunzelman, R.; Ruschman, M.; Schoo, C.

    1992-04-01

    The design geometry of the SSC dipole cryostat includes active thermal radiation shields operating at 80K and 20K respectively. Extensive measurements conducted in a Heat Leak Test Facility (HLTF) have been used to evaluate the thermal performance of candidate multilayer insulation (MLI) systems for the 80K thermal shield, with the present system design based upon those measurement results. With the 80K MLI geometry established, efforts have focused on measuring the performance of MLI systems near 20K. A redesign of the HLTF has produced a measurement facility capable of conducting measurements with the warm boundary fixed at 80K and the cold boundary variable from 10K to 50K. Removing the 80K shield permits measurements with a warm boundary at 300K. The 80K boundary consists of a copper shield thermally anchored to a liquid nitrogen reservoir. The cold boundary consists of a copper anchor plate whose temperature is varied through boil-off gas from a 500 liter helium supply dewar. A transfer line heat exchanger supplies the boil-off gas to the anchor plate at a constant and controlled rate. The gas, which serves as cooling gas, is routed through a copper cooling tube soldered into the anchor plate. Varying the cooling gas flow rate varies the amount of refrigeration supplied to the anchor plate, thereby determining the plate temperature. A resistance heater installed on the anchor plate is regulated by a cryogenic temperature controller to provide final temperature control. Heat leak values are measured using a heatmeter which senses heat flow as a temperature gradient across a fixed thermal impedance. Since the thermal conductivity of the thermal impedance changes with temperature, the heatmeter is calibrated at key cold boundary temperatures. Thus, the system is capable of obtaining measurement data under a variety of system conditions. 7 refs.

  12. Assessment of Average Tracer Concentration Approach for Flow Rate Measurement and Field Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sidauruk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tracer method is one of the methods available for open channel flow rate measurements such as in irrigation canals. Average tracer concentration approach is an instantaneous injection method that based on the average tracer concentrations value at the sampling point. If the procedures are correct and scientific considerations are justified, tracer method will give relatively high accuracy of measurements. The accuracy of the average tracer concentration approach has been assessed both in laboratory and field. The results of accuracy tests of open channel flow that has been conducted at the Center for Application Isotopes and Radiation Laboratory-BATAN showed that the accuracy level of average concentrations approach method was higher than 90% compared to the true value (volumetric flow rate. The accuracy of average tracer concentration approach was also assessed during the application of the method to measure flow rate of Mrican irrigation canals as an effort to perform field calibration of existing weirs. Both average tracer concentration approach and weirs can predict the trend of the flow correctly. However, it was observed that flow discrepancies between weirs measurement and average tracer concentration approach predictions were as high as 27%. The discrepancies might be due to the downgrading performances of the weirs because of previous floods and high sediment contents of the flow

  13. Simultaneous measurement of magnetic and density fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering and Doppler backscattering on the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, T. L.; Barada, K.; Peebles, W. A.; Crocker, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    An upgraded cross-polarization scattering (CPS) system for the simultaneous measurement of internal magnetic fluctuations B ˜ and density fluctuations ñ is presented. The system has eight radial quadrature channels acquired simultaneously with an eight-channel Doppler backscattering system (measures density fluctuations ñ and flows). 3-D ray tracing calculations based on the GENRAY ray tracing code are used to illustrate the scattering and geometric considerations involved in the CPS implementation on DIII-D. A unique quasi-optical design and IF electronics system allow direct comparison of B ˜ and ñ during dynamic or transient plasma events (e.g., Edge Localized Modes or ELMs, L to H-mode transitions, etc.). The system design allows the interesting possibility of both magnetic-density ( B ˜ -ñ) fluctuation and magnetic-temperature ( B ˜ - T ˜ ) fluctuation cross-phase measurements suitable for detailed tests of turbulence simulations.

  14. Solar Flare Track Exposure Ages in Regolith Particles: A Calibration for Transmission Electron Microscope Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Eve L.; Keller, Lindsay P.

    2015-01-01

    Mineral grains in lunar and asteroidal regolith samples provide a unique record of their interaction with the space environment. Space weathering effects result from multiple processes including: exposure to the solar wind, which results in ion damage and implantation effects that are preserved in the rims of grains (typically the outermost 100 nm); cosmic ray and solar flare activity, which result in track formation; and impact processes that result in the accumulation of vapor-deposited elements, impact melts and adhering grains on particle surfaces. Determining the rate at which these effects accumulate in the grains during their space exposure is critical to studies of the surface evolution of airless bodies. Solar flare energetic particles (mainly Fe-group nuclei) have a penetration depth of a few millimeters and leave a trail of ionization damage in insulating materials that is readily observable by transmission electron microscope (TEM) imaging. The density of solar flare particle tracks is used to infer the length of time an object was at or near the regolith surface (i.e., its exposure age). Track measurements by TEM methods are routine, yet track production rate calibrations have only been determined using chemical etching techniques [e.g., 1, and references therein]. We used focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) sample preparation techniques combined with TEM imaging to determine the track density/exposure age relations for lunar rock 64455. The 64455 sample was used earlier by [2] to determine a track production rate by chemical etching of tracks in anorthite. Here, we show that combined FIB/TEM techniques provide a more accurate determination of a track production rate and also allow us to extend the calibration to solar flare tracks in olivine.

  15. Calibration of an ultra-low-background proportional counter for measuring 37Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, A.; Aalseth, C. E.; Bonicalzi, R. M.; Bowyer, T. W.; Day, A. R.; Fuller, E. S.; Haas, D. A.; Hayes, J. C.; Hoppe, E. W.; Humble, P. H.; Keillor, M. E.; LaFerriere, B. D.; Mace, E. K.; McIntyre, J. I.; Merriman, J. H.; Miley, H. S.; Myers, A. W.; Orrell, J. L.; Overman, C. T.; Panisko, M. E.; Williams, R. M.

    2013-08-01

    An ultra-low-background proportional counter design has been developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using clean materials, primarily electro-chemically-purified copper. This detector, along with an ultra-low-background counting system (ULBCS), was developed to complement a new shallow underground laboratory (30 meters water-equivalent) at PNNL. The ULBCS design includes passive neutron and gamma shielding, along with an active cosmic-veto system. This system provides a capability for making ultra-sensitive measurements to support applications like age-dating soil hydrocarbons with 14C/3H, age-dating of groundwater with 39Ar, and soil-gas assay for 37Ar to support On-Site Inspection (OSI). On-Site Inspection is a key component of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Measurements of radionuclides created by an underground nuclear explosion are valuable signatures of a Treaty violation. For OSI, the 35-day half-life of 37Ar, produced from neutron interactions with calcium in soil, provides both high specific activity and sufficient time for inspection before decay limits sensitivity. This work describes the calibration techniques and analysis methods developed to enable quantitative measurements of 37Ar samples over a broad range of proportional counter operating pressures. These efforts, along with parallel work in progress on gas chemistry separation, are expected to provide a significant new capability for 37Ar soil gas background studies.

  16. Measurements of cross sections for Higgs boson production and forward jet calibration with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367060

    This thesis presents measurements of inclusive and differential cross sections for Higgs boson production in the fiducial and total phase space regions, as well as a calibration of the ATLAS calorimeter response to jets. The fiducial $pp \\rightarrow H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ cross section for $m_{H}=125.4$ GeV was measured at ${\\sqrt{s}=8}$ TeV with 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton-proton collision data collected by the ATLAS detector. The $H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ signal was extracted from the background with a fit to the diphoton invariant mass spectrum, within the fiducial phase space defined by two isolated photons with $|\\eta|<2.37$ and fractional transverse momentum greater than 0.35 and 0.25 relative to the diphoton invariant mass. The signal yields were corrected for inefficiency and resolution of the detector. The $pp \\rightarrow H \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ cross section is measured to be $\\sigma_{\\rm fid} = 43.2 \\pm 9.4 \\, ({\\rm stat.}) \\, {}^{+3.2}_{-2.9} \\, ({\\rm syst.}) \\pm 1.2 \\, ({\\rm ...

  17. Accounting for sensor calibration, data validation, measurement and sampling uncertainties in monitoring urban drainage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand-Krajewski, J L; Bardin, J P; Mourad, M; Béranger, Y

    2003-01-01

    Assessing the functioning and the performance of urban drainage systems on both rainfall event and yearly time scales is usually based on online measurements of flow rates and on samples of influent effluent for some rainfall events per year. In order to draw pertinent scientific and operational conclusions from the measurement results, it is absolutely necessary to use appropriate methods and techniques in order to i) calibrate sensors and analytical methods, ii) validate raw data, iii) evaluate measurement uncertainties, iv) evaluate the number of rainfall events to sample per year in order to determine performance indicator with a given uncertainty. Based an previous work, the paper gives a synthetic review of required and techniques, and illustrates their application to storage and settling tanks. Experiments show that, controlled and careful experimental conditions, relative uncertainties are about 20% for flow rates in sewer pipes, 6-10% for volumes, 25-35% for TSS concentrations and loads, and 18-276% for TSS removal rates. In order to evaluate the annual pollutant interception efficiency of storage and settling tanks with a given uncertainty, efforts should first be devoted to decrease the sampling uncertainty by increasing the number of sampled events.

  18. Spatial heterodyne spectrometer: modeling and interferogram processing for calibrated spectral radiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Cara P.; Kerekes, John P.; Gartley, Michael G.

    2013-09-01

    This work presents a radiometric model of a spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) and a corresponding interferogram-processing algorithm for the calculation of calibrated spectral radiance measurements. The SHS relies on Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (FTS) principles, and shares design similarities with the Michelson Interferometer. The advantages of the SHS design, including the lack of moving parts, high throughput, and instantaneous spectral measurements, make it suitable as a eld-deployable instrument. Operating in the long-wave infrared (LWIR), the imaging SHS design example included provides the capability of performing chemical detection based on re ectance and emissivity properties of surfaces of organic compounds. This LWIR SHS model outputs realistic, interferometric data and serves as a tool to nd optimal SHS design parameters for desired performance requirements and system application. It also assists in the data analysis and system characterization. The interferogram-processing algorithm performs at- elding and phase corrections as well as apodization before recovering the measured spectral radiance from the recorded interferogram via the Inverse Fourier Transform (IFT). The model and processing algorithm demonstrate results comparable to those in the literature with a noise-equivalent change in temperature of 0.35K. Additional experiments show the algorithm's real-time processing capability, indicating the LWIR SHS system presented is feasible.

  19. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  20. The System of the Calibration for Visibility Measurement Instrument Under the Atmospheric Aerosol Simulation Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Zhifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Visibility is one of the most important parameters for meteorological observation and numerical weather prediction (NWP.It is also an important factor in everyday life, mainly for surface and air traffic especially in the Aeronautical Meteorology. The visibility decides the taking off and landing of aircraft. If the airport visibility is lower than requirement for aircraft taking off stipulated by International Civil Aviation Administration, then the aircraft must be parked at the airport. So the accurate measurement of visibility is very important. Nowadays, many devices can be measured the visibility or meteorological optical range (MOR such as Scatterometers, Transmissometers and visibility lidar. But there is not effective way to verify the accuracy of these devices expect the artificial visual method. We have developed a visibility testing system that can be calibration and verification these devices. The system consists of laser transmitter, optical chopper, phase-locking amplifier, the moving optic receiving system, signal detection and data acquisition system, atmospheric aerosol simulation chamber. All of them were placed in the atmosphere aerosol simulation chamber with uniform aerosol concentration. The Continuous wave laser, wavelength 550nm, has been transmitted into the collimation system then the laser beam expanded into 40mm diameter for compressing the laser divergence angle before modulated by optical chopper. The expanding beam transmitting in the atmosphere aerosol cabin received by the optic receiving system moving in the 50m length precision guide with 100mm optical aperture. The data of laser signal has been acquired by phase-locking amplifier every 5 meter range. So the 10 data points can be detected in the 50 meters guide once. The slope of the fitting curve can be obtained by linear fitting these data using the least square method. The laser extinction coefficient was calculated from the slope using the Koschmieder

  1. Autocorrelation in ultraviolet radiation measured at ground level using detrended fluctuation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Filho, Paulo Cavalcante; da Silva, Francisco Raimundo; Corso, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the autocorrelation among four ultraviolet (UV) radiation data sets obtained at 305 nm, 320 nm, 340 nm, and 380 nm. The data were recorded at ground level at the INPE climate station in Natal, RN, Brazil, which is a site close to the equator. The autocorrelations were computed by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to estimate the index α. We found that the ​fluctuations in the UV radiation data were fractal, with scale-free behavior at a DFA index α ≃ 0.7. In addition, we performed a power law spectral analysis, which showed that the power spectrum exhibited a power law behavior with an exponent of β ≃ 0.45. Given that the theoretical result is β = 2 α - 1, these two results are in good agreement. Moreover, the application of the DFA ​method to the UV radiation data required detrending using a polynomial with an order of at least eight, which was related to the complex daily solar radiation curve obtained at ground level in a tropical region. The results indicated that the α exponent of UV radiation is similar to other climatic records such as air temperature, wind, or rain, but not solar activity.

  2. Lower-thermospheric wind fluctuations measured with an FPI during pulsating aurora at Tromsø, Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Oyama

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations were conducted with a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (FPI at a wavelength of 557.7 nm, an all-sky camera at a wavelength of 557.7 nm, and the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar during the Dynamics and Energetics of the Lower Thermosphere in Aurora 2 (DELTA-2 campaign in January 2009. This paper concentrated on two events during periods of pulsating aurora. The lower-thermospheric wind velocity measured with the FPI showed obvious fluctuations in both vertical and horizontal components. Of particular interest is that the location of the fluctuations was found in a darker area that appeared within the pulsating aurora. During the same time period, the EISCAT radar observed sporadic enhancements in the F-region backscatter echo power, which suggests the presence of low-energy electron (1 keV or lower precipitation coinciding with increase in amplitude of the electromagnetic wave (at the order of 10 Hz or higher. While we have not yet identified the dominant mechanism causing the fluctuations in FPI-derived wind velocity during the pulsating aurora, the frictional heating energy dissipated by the electric-field perturbations may be responsible for the increase in ionospheric thermal energy thus modifying the local wind dynamics in the lower thermosphere.

  3. Modified calibration procedures for a Yankee Environmental System UVB-1 biometer based on spectral measurements with a brewer spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilaplana, José M; Cachorro, Victoria E; Sorribas, Mar; Luccini, Eduardo; de Frutos, Angel M; Berjón, Alberto; de la Morena, Benito

    2006-01-01

    The calibration of the erythemal irradiance measured by a Yankee Environmental System (YES) UVB-1 biometer is presented using two methods of calibration with a wide range of experimental solar zenith angles (SZAs) and ozone values. The calibration is performed through simultaneous spectral measurements by a calibrated double-monochromator Brewer MK-III spectrophotometer at "El Arenosillo" station, located in southwestern Spain. Because the range of spectral measurements of the Brewer spectrophotometer is 290-363 nm, a previously validated radiative transfer model was used to account for the erythemal contribution between 363 and 400 nm. Both methods are recommended by the World Meteorological Organization and we present and discuss here a wide range of results and features given by modified procedures applied to these two general methods. As is well established, the calibration factor for this type of radiometric system is dependent on atmospheric conditions, the most important of which are the ozone content and the SZA. Although the first method is insensitive to these two factors, we analyze this behavior in terms of the range used for the SZA and the use of two different mathematical approaches for its determination. The second method shows the dependence on SZA and ozone content and, thus, a polynomial as a function of SZA or a matrix including SZA and ozone content were determined as general calibration factors for the UV radiometric system. We must note that the angular responses of the YES radiometer and Brewer spectroradiometer have not been considered, because of the difficulty in correcting them. The results show in detail the advantages and drawbacks (and the corresponding associated error) given by the different approaches used for the determination of these calibration coefficients.

  4. Aspirating probes for measurement of mean concentration and fluctuating quantities in supersonic air/helium shear layer

    OpenAIRE

    Ninnemann, Todd A.

    1990-01-01

    Two aspirating hot-film probes are developed to make measurements in supersonic air/helium shear layers. The first probe is designed to measure local mean gas composition and is referred to as the mean concentration probe. This probe consists of a constant temperature hot-film sensor operating in a channel with a choked exit. The flow over the hot-fifm is influenced only by total temperature, total pressure, and gas composition. The mean probe is easily calibrated and shows acc...

  5. Phase Calibration of Microphones by Measurement in the Free-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Bartram, Scott M.; Humphreys, William M.; Zuckewar, Allan J.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past several years, significant effort has been expended at NASA Langley developing new Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS)-based microphone directional array instrumentation for high-frequency aeroacoustic measurements in wind tunnels. This new type of array construction solves two challenges which have limited the widespread use of large channel-count arrays, namely by providing a lower cost-per-channel and a simpler method for mounting microphones in wind tunnels and in field-deployable arrays. The current generation of array instrumentation is capable of extracting accurate noise source location and directivity on a variety of airframe components using sophisticated data reduction algorithms [1-2]. Commercially-available MEMS microphones are condenser-type devices and have some desirable characteristics when compared with conventional condenser-type microphones. The most important advantages of MEMS microphones are their size, price, and power consumption. However, the commercially-available units suffer from certain important shortcomings. Based on experiments with array prototypes, it was found that both the bandwidth and the sound pressure limit of the microphones should be increased significantly to improve the performance and flexibility of the microphone array [3]. It was also desired to modify the packaging to eliminate unwanted Helmholtz resonance s exhibited by the commercial devices. Thus, new requirements were defined as follows: Frequency response: 100 Hz to 100 KHz (+/-3dB) Upper sound pressure limit: Design 1: 130 dB SPL (THD less than 5%) Design 2: 150-160 dB SPL (THD less than 5%) Packaging: 3.73 x 6.13 x 1.3 mm can with laser-etched lid. In collaboration with Novusonic Acoustic Innovation, NASA modified a Knowles SiSonic MEMS design to meet these new requirements. Coupled with the design of the enhanced MEMS microphones was the development of a new calibration method for simultaneously obtaining the sensitivity and phase response of

  6. Reproducibility of BOLD, perfusion, and CMRO2 measurements with calibrated-BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-03-01

    The coupling of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index, n, defined as the ratio between fractional CBF change and fractional CMRO(2) change. The combination of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with CBF measurements from arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a potentially powerful experimental approach for measuring n, but the reproducibility of the technique previously has not been assessed. In this study, inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the method were determined. Block design %BOLD and %CBF responses to visual stimulation and mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) were measured, and these data were used to compute the BOLD scaling factor M, %CMRO(2) change with activation, and the coupling index n. Reproducibility was determined for three approaches to defining regions-of-interest (ROIs): 1) Visual area V1 determined from prior retinotopic maps, 2) BOLD-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer, and 3) CBF-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer. For estimates of %BOLD, %CMRO(2) and n, intra-subject reproducibility was found to be best for regions selected according to CBF activation. Among all fMRI measurements, estimates of n were the most robust and were substantially more stable within individual subjects (coefficient of variation, CV=7.4%) than across the subject pool (CV=36.9%). The stability of n across days, despite wider variability of CBF and CMRO(2) responses, suggests that the reproducibility of blood flow changes is limited by variation in the oxidative metabolic demand. We conclude that the calibrated BOLD approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of n that can serve as a useful quantitative probe of the coupling of blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain.

  7. Calibration Standards for Surface Topography Measuring Systems down to Nanometric Range

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trumpold, H.; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Andreasen, Jan Lasson

    calibrator has been designed, built and tested. Primary calibration standards have been produced by ion-beam and plasma etching (step height standards), by holographic generation of sinusoidal structures with two-beam interference exposure and by ultra-precision diamond cutting. From primary standards...

  8. Effects of lens distortion calibration patterns on the accuracy of monocular 3D measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A variety of lens distortion modelling techniques exist. Since they make use of different calibration metrics it is difficult to select one over the others. This work aims to compare lens distortion modelling techniques and calibration patterns in a...

  9. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaewook; Lampert, M; Ghim, Y -c

    2016-01-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, sizes of averaging time windows and ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  10. Reliability of the two-point measurement of the spatial correlation length from Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals in fusion-grade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaewook; Nam, Y. U.; Lampert, M.; Ghim, Y.-C.

    2016-10-01

    A statistical method for the estimation of the spatial correlation lengths of Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals with two measurement points is examined to quantitatively evaluate its reliability (variance) and accuracy (bias error). The standard deviation of the correlation value is analytically derived for randomly distributed Gaussian shaped fluctuations satisfying stationarity and homogeneity, allowing us to evaluate, as a function of fluctuation-to-noise ratios, the sizes of averaging time windows and the ratios of the distance between the two measurement points to the true correlation length, and the goodness of the two-point measurement for estimating the spatial correlation length. Analytic results are confirmed with numerically generated synthetic data and real experimental data obtained with the KSTAR beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic. Our results can be applied to Gaussian-shaped fluctuating signals where a correlation length must be measured with only two measurement points.

  11. Design and Instrumentation of a Measurement and Calibration System for an Acoustic Telemetry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqun Deng

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS is an active sensing technology developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, for detecting and tracking small fish. It is used primarily for evaluating behavior and survival of juvenile salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System to the Pacific Ocean. It provides critical data for salmon protection and development of more “fish-friendly” hydroelectric facilities. The objective of this study was to design and build a Measurement and Calibration System (MCS for evaluating the JSATS components, because the JSATS requires comprehensive acceptance and performance testing in a controlled environment before it is deployed in the field. The MCS consists of a reference transducer, a water test tank lined with anechoic material, a motion control unit, a reference receiver, a signal conditioner and amplifier unit, a data acquisition board, MATLAB control and analysis interface, and a computer. The fully integrated MCS has been evaluated successfully at various simulated distances and using different encoded signals at frequencies within the bandwidth of the JSATS transmitter. The MCS provides accurate acoustic mapping capability in a controlled environment and automates the process that allows real-time measurements and evaluation of the piezoelectric transducers, sensors, or the acoustic fields. The MCS has been in use since 2009 for acceptance and performance testing of, and further improvements to, the JSATS.

  12. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: Simultaneous Measurement of Electron Temperature and Density Fluctuations in the Core of DIII-D Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A. E.

    2009-11-01

    Multi-field fluctuation measurements provide opportunities for rigorous comparison between experiment and nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations. A unique set of diagnostics on DIII-D allows for simultaneous study of local, long-wavelength (0 < kθρs< 0.5) electron temperature and density fluctuations in the core plasma (0.4 < ρ< 0.8). Previous experiments in L-mode indicate that normalized electron temperature fluctuation levels (40 < f < 400,kHz) increase with radius from ˜0.4% at ρ= 0.5 to ˜2% at ρ=0.8, similar to simultaneously measured density fluctuations. Electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to increase Te, which increases electron temperature fluctuation levels and electron heat transport in the experiments. In contrast, long wavelength density fluctuation levels change very little. The different responses are consistent with increased TEM drive relative to ITG-mode drive. A new capability at DIII-D is the measurement of phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations using coupled correlation electron cyclotron emission radiometer and reflectometer diagnostics. Linear and nonlinear GYRO runs have been used to design validation experiments that focus on measurements of the phase angle. GYRO shows that if Te and ∇Te increase 50% in a beam-heated L-mode plasma (ρ=0.5), then the phase angle between electron temperature and density fluctuations decreases 30%-50% and electron temperature fluctuation levels increase a factor of two more than density fluctuations. Comparisons between these predictions and experimental results will be presented.

  13. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  14. Femtosecond measurements of electric fields: from classical amplitudes to quantum fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riek, Claudius; Seletskiy, Denis V.; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2017-03-01

    Ultrabroadband electro-optic sampling is presented as an extremely sensitive technique to detect electric field amplitudes in free space. The temporal resolution provided by few-femtosecond laser pulses results in a bandwidth exceeding 100 THz, potentially covering the entire infrared spectral range. A pedagogic introduction to the operational principle of the method is given along the lines of a classical coherent input field and a zincblende-type electro-optic sensor. We then show that even the bare vacuum fluctuations of the electric field in the quantum ground state may be detected. This time-domain approach to quantum physics operates directly on sub-cycle scales where no local energy conservation holds. Therefore, signals may be obtained from purely virtual photons without amplification to finite intensity.

  15. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuationsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C.; Donné, A. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  16. Theory and calibration of non-nulling seven-hole cone probes for use in complex flow measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, K. N.; Durston, D. A.; Gerner, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    A seven-hole conical pressure probe capable of measuring flow conditions at angles up to 75 deg relative to its axis is described. The theoretical rationale of the seven-hole probe is developed and the calibration procedure outlined. Three-variable third order polynomials are used to represent local values of total pressure, static pressure, Mach number and relative flow angles. These flow conditions can be determined explicitly from measured probe pressures. Flow angles may be determined within 2.5 deg and Mach number within 0.05 with 95% certainty. The probe was calibrated in subsonic compressible and incompressible flows. Results of a calibration of four seven-hole probes are presented.

  17. Application of Allan Deviation to Assessing Uncertainties of Continuous-measurement Instruments, and Optimizing Calibration Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Gloria; Rella, Chris; Farinas, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    Technological advancement of instrumentation in atmospheric and other geoscience disciplines over the past decade has lead to a shift from discrete sample analysis to continuous, in-situ monitoring. Standard error analysis used for discrete measurements is not sufficient to assess and compare the error contribution of noise and drift from continuous-measurement instruments, and a different statistical analysis approach should be applied. The Allan standard deviation analysis technique developed for atomic clock stability assessment by David W. Allan [1] can be effectively and gainfully applied to continuous measurement instruments. As an example, P. Werle et al has applied these techniques to look at signal averaging for atmospheric monitoring by Tunable Diode-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) [2]. This presentation will build on, and translate prior foundational publications to provide contextual definitions and guidelines for the practical application of this analysis technique to continuous scientific measurements. The specific example of a Picarro G2401 Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer used for continuous, atmospheric monitoring of CO2, CH4 and CO will be used to define the basics features the Allan deviation, assess factors affecting the analysis, and explore the time-series to Allan deviation plot translation for different types of instrument noise (white noise, linear drift, and interpolated data). In addition, the useful application of using an Allan deviation to optimize and predict the performance of different calibration schemes will be presented. Even though this presentation will use the specific example of the Picarro G2401 CRDS Analyzer for atmospheric monitoring, the objective is to present the information such that it can be successfully applied to other instrument sets and disciplines. [1] D.W. Allan, "Statistics of Atomic Frequency Standards," Proc, IEEE, vol. 54, pp 221-230, Feb 1966 [2] P. Werle, R. Miicke, F. Slemr, "The Limits

  18. "Hook"-calibration of GeneChip-microarrays: Chip characteristics and expression measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krohn Knut

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray experiments rely on several critical steps that may introduce biases and uncertainty in downstream analyses. These steps include mRNA sample extraction, amplification and labelling, hybridization, and scanning causing chip-specific systematic variations on the raw intensity level. Also the chosen array-type and the up-to-dateness of the genomic information probed on the chip affect the quality of the expression measures. In the accompanying publication we presented theory and algorithm of the so-called hook method which aims at correcting expression data for systematic biases using a series of new chip characteristics. Results In this publication we summarize the essential chip characteristics provided by this method, analyze special benchmark experiments to estimate transcript related expression measures and illustrate the potency of the method to detect and to quantify the quality of a particular hybridization. It is shown that our single-chip approach provides expression measures responding linearly on changes of the transcript concentration over three orders of magnitude. In addition, the method calculates a detection call judging the relation between the signal and the detection limit of the particular measurement. The performance of the method in the context of different chip generations and probe set assignments is illustrated. The hook method characterizes the RNA-quality in terms of the 3'/5'-amplification bias and the sample-specific calling rate. We show that the proper judgement of these effects requires the disentanglement of non-specific and specific hybridization which, otherwise, can lead to misinterpretations of expression changes. The consequences of modifying probe/target interactions by either changing the labelling protocol or by substituting RNA by DNA targets are demonstrated. Conclusion The single-chip based hook-method provides accurate expression estimates and chip-summary characteristics

  19. The competition of different measures to increase flexibility in energy systems with a high share of fluctuating renewable energy sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Christoph; Teufel, Felix [EnBW Energie Baden-Wuerttemberg AG, Karlsruhe (Germany). Research and Innovation Dept.

    2013-04-01

    The continuous expansion of electricity generation from intermittent renewable energy sources (RES) is changing the present generation structure that has been designed to follow fluctuating demand considerably. In order to utilise a high share of supply-dependent RES, the future energy system needs to become more flexible than it is today. This paper describes the different flexibility options that can be implemented with regard to their major restrictions as well as their suitability to balance a certain deficit or surplus of RES generation. Furthermore, it outlines the importance of competition between these different balancing measures to meet the required level of flexibility at lowest cost. (orig.)

  20. An in situ hand calibration method using a pseudo-observation scheme for low-end inertial measurement units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Niu, Xiaoji; Zhang, Quan; Zhang, Hongping; Shi, Chuang

    2012-10-01

    MEMS chips have become ideal candidates for various applications since they are small sized, light weight, have low power consumption and are extremely low cost and reliable. However, the performance of MEMS sensors, especially their biases and scale factors, is highly dependent on environmental conditions such as temperature. Thus a quick and convenient calibration is needed to be conducted by users in field without any external equipment or any expert knowledge of calibration. A novel and efficient in situ hand calibration method is presented to meet these demands in this paper. The algorithm of the proposed calibration method makes use of the navigation algorithm of the loosely-coupled GPS/INS integrated systems, but replaces the GPS observations with a kind of pseudo-observations, which can be stated as follows: if an inertial measurement unit (IMU) was rotating approximately around its measurement center, the range of its position and its linear velocity both would be within a limited scope. Using a Kalman filtering algorithm, the biases and scale factors of both accelerometer triad and gyroscope triad can be calibrated together within a short period (about 30 s), requiring only motions by hands. Real test results show that the proposed method is suitable for most consumer grade MEMS IMUs due to its zero cost, easy operation and sufficient accuracy.

  1. Calibration of GOES-derived solar radiation data using a distributed network of surface measurements in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, David M.; Pathak, Chandra S.; Mecikalski, John R.; Paech, Simon J.; Wu, Qinglong; Sangoyomi, Taiye; Babcock, Roger W.; Walton, Raymond

    2008-01-01

    Solar radiation data are critically important for the estimation of evapotranspiration. Analysis of visible-channel data derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) using radiative transfer modeling has been used to produce spatially- and temporally-distributed datasets of solar radiation. An extensive network of (pyranometer) surface measurements of solar radiation in the State of Florida has allowed refined calibration of a GOES-derived daily integrated radiation data product. This refinement of radiation data allowed for corrections of satellite sensor drift, satellite generational change, and consideration of the highly-variable cloudy conditions that are typical of Florida. To aid in calibration of a GOES-derived radiation product, solar radiation data for the period 1995–2004 from 58 field stations that are located throughout the State were compiled. The GOES radiation product was calibrated by way of a three-step process: 1) comparison with ground-based pyranometer measurements on clear reference days, 2) correcting for a bias related to cloud cover, and 3) deriving month-by-month bias correction factors. Pre-calibration results indicated good model performance, with a station-averaged model error of 2.2 MJ m–2 day–1 (13 percent). Calibration reduced errors to 1.7 MJ m–2 day–1 (10 percent) and also removed time- and cloudiness-related biases. The final dataset has been used to produce Statewide evapotranspiration estimates.

  2. Multivariate regression and discreminant calibration models for a novel optical non-invasive blood glucose measurement method named pulse glucometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakoshi, Yasuhiro; Ogawa, Mitsuhiro; Yamakoshi, Takehiro; Tamura, Toshiyo; Yamakoshi, Ken-ichi

    2009-01-01

    A novel optical non-invasive in vivo blood glucose concentration (BGL) measurement technique, named "Pulse Glucometry", was combined with a kernel method; support vector machines. The total transmitted radiation intensity (I(lambda)) and the cardiac-related pulsatile changes superimposed on I(lambda) in human adult fingertips were measured over the wavelength range from 900 to 1700 nm using a very fast spectrophotometer, obtaining a differential optical density (DeltaOD(lambda)) related to the blood component in the finger tissues. Subsequently, a calibration model using paired data of a family of DeltaOD(lambda)s and the corresponding known BGLs was constructed with support vector machines (SVMs) regression instead of using calibration by a conventional primary component regression (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLS). Secondly, SVM method was applied to make a nonlinear discriminant calibration model for "Pulse glucometry." Our results show that the regression calibration model based on the support vector machines can provide a good regression for the 101 paired data, in which the BGLs ranged from 89.0-219 mg/dl (4.94-12.2 mmol/l). The resultant regression was evaluated by the Clarke error grid analysis and all data points fell within the clinically acceptable regions (region A: 93%, region B: 7%). The discriminant calibration model using SVMs also provided a good result for classification (accuracy rate 84% in the best case).

  3. Variation of Fractional Electron Density Fluctuations Near 0.1 AU From the Sun Observed by Ulysses Dual-Frequency Ranging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, R.; Armstrong, J. W.; Bird, M. K.; Patzold, M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the results of determining fractional density fluctuations, which requires the measurement of absolute electron density as provided by dual-frequency observations of time delay or ranging conducted by the Ulysses Solar Corona Experiment.

  4. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration procedure for the drift tubes of the CMS barrel muon system and reports the main results obtained with data collected during a high statistics cosmic ray data-taking period. The main goal of the calibration is to determine, for each drift cell, the minimum time delay for signals relative to the trigger, accounting for the drift velocity within the cell. The accuracy of the calibration procedure is influenced by the random arrival time of cosmic muons. A more refined analysis of the drift velocity was performed during the offline reconstruction phase, which takes into account this feature of cosmic ray events.

  5. Calibration of the CMS Drift Tube Chambers and Measurement of the Drift Velocity with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

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