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Sample records for flow stress model

  1. Differential Reynolds stress modeling for separating flows in industrial aerodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book presents recent progress in the application of RANS turbulence models based on the Reynolds stress transport equations. A variety of models has been implemented by different groups into different flow solvers and applied to external as well as to turbomachinery flows. Comparisons between the models allow an assessment of their performance in different flow conditions. The results demonstrate the general applicability of differential Reynolds stress models to separating flows in industrial aerodynamics.

  2. A FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR AZ61 MAGNESIUM ALLOY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.Zhou; X.Q.Zeng; Q.D Wang; W.J.Ding

    2004-01-01

    The flow stress behaviors of AZ61 alloy has been investigated at temperature range from 523 to 673K with the strain rates of 0.001-1s-1.It is found that the average activation energy,strain rate sensitive exponent and stress exponent are different at various deformation conditions changing from 1i3.6 to 176.3k J/mol,0.125 to 0.167 and 6 to 8 respectively.A flow stress model for AZ61 alloy is derived by analyzing the stress data based on hot compression test.It is demonstrated that the flow stress model including strain hardening exponent and strain softening exponent is suitable to predicate the flow stress.The prediction of the flow stress of AZ61 alloy has shown to be good agreement with the test data.The maximum differences of the peak stresses calculated by the model and obtained by experiment is less than 8%.

  3. Reynolds-stress model prediction of 3-D duct flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gerolymos, G A

    2014-01-01

    The paper examines the impact of different modelling choices in second-moment closures by assessing model performance in predicting 3-D duct flows. The test-cases (developing flow in a square duct [Gessner F.B., Emery A.F.: {\\em ASME J. Fluids Eng.} {\\bf 103} (1981) 445--455], circular-to-rectangular transition-duct [Davis D.O., Gessner F.B.: {\\em AIAA J.} {\\bf 30} (1992) 367--375], and \\tsn{S}-duct with large separation [Wellborn S.R., Reichert B.A., Okiishi T.H.: {\\em J. Prop. Power} {\\bf 10} (1994) 668--675]) include progressively more complex strains. Comparison of experimental data with selected 7-equation models (6 Reynolds-stress-transport and 1 scale-determining equations), which differ in the closure of the velocity/pressure-gradient tensor $\\Pi_{ij}$, suggests that rapid redistribution controls separation and secondary-flow prediction, whereas, inclusion of pressure-diffusion modelling improves reattachment and relaxation behaviour.

  4. Numerical modelling of a turbulent bluff-body flow with Reynolds stress turbulent models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guoxiu; Dirk ROEKAERTS

    2005-01-01

    Numerical modelling of a turbulent bluff-body flow has been performed using differential Reynolds stress models (DRSMs). To clarify the applicability of the existing DRSMs in this complex flow, several typical DRSMs, including LRR-IP model, JM model, SSG model, as well as a modified LRR-IP model, have been validated and evaluated. The performance difference between various DRSMs is quite significant. Most of the above mentioned DRSMs cannot provide overall satisfactory predictions for this challenging test case. Motivated by the deficiency of the existing approaches, a new modification of LRR-IP model has been proposed. A very significant improvement of the prediction of flow field is obtained.

  5. Hot deformation behavior and flow stress model of F40MnV steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jin; CHEN Jun; ZHAO Zhen; RUAN Xue-yu

    2007-01-01

    Single hit compression tests were performed at 1 223-1 473 K and strain rate of 0.1-10 s-1 to study hot deformation behavior and flow stress model of F40MnV steel. The dependence of the peak stress, initial stress, saturation stress, steady state stress and peak stain on Zener-Hollomon parameter were obtained. The mathematical models of dynamic recrystallization fraction and grain size were also obtained. Based on the tested data.the flow stress model of F40MnV steel was established in dynamic recovery region and dynamic recrystallization region, respectively. The results show that the activation energy for dynamic recrystallization is 278.6 kJ/mol by regression analysis. The flow stress model of F40MnV steel is proved to approximate the tested data and suitable for numerical simulation of hot forging.

  6. FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR HARD MACHINING OF AISI H13 WORK TOOL STEEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Yan; J. Hua; R. Shivpuri

    2005-01-01

    An approach is presented to characterize the stress response of workpiece in hard machining,accounted for the effect of the initial workpiece hardness, temperature, strain and strain rate on flow stress. AISI H13 work tool steel was chosen to verify this methodology. The proposed flow stress model demonstrates a good agreement with data collected from published experiments.Therefore, the proposed model can be used to predict the corresponding flow stress-strain response of AISI H13 work tool steel with variation of the initial workpiece hardness in hard machining.

  7. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J

    2017-02-24

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This short technical note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille's Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  8. The microchannel flow model under shear stress and higher frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K. J.

    2017-04-01

    The microchannel flow model provides a framework for considering the effect of the vascular bed on the time domain and frequency domain response of soft tissues. The derivation originates with a single small fluid-filled vessel in an elastic medium under uniaxial compression. A fractal branching vasculature is also assumed to be present in the tissue under consideration. This note considers two closely related issues. First, the response of the element under compression or shear as a function of the orientation of the fluid-filled vessel is considered. Second, the transition from quasistatic (Poiseuille’s Law) to dynamic (Womersley equations) fluid flow is examined to better predict the evolution of behavior at higher frequencies. These considerations expand the conceptual framework of the microchannel flow model, particularly the range and limits of validity.

  9. Algebraic Stress Model with RNG ε-Equation for Simulating Confined Strongly Swirling Turbulent Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jiangrong; Yao Qiang; Cao Xingyu; Cen Kefa

    2001-01-01

    Strongly swirl flow simulation are still under developing. In this paper, ε equation based on the Renormalization Group theory is used into algebraic stress model. Standard k-ε model, algebraic stress model by Jiang Zhang[5]and present model (RNG-ASM) are applied simultaneously to simulating the confined strongly swirling flow.The Simulating results by RNG-ASM model are compared to the results by other two model, it is shown that the predictions by this model display reasonable agreement with experimental data, and lead to greater improvement than Zhang's ASM turbulence model[5].

  10. Development of an algebraic stress/two-layer model for calculating thrust chamber flow fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Shang, H. M.; Huang, J.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modeling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data, to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  11. PIV Measurement of Wall Shear Stress and Flow Structures within an Intracranial Aneurysm Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ricky; Sparrow, Eph; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    The formation and rupture of an intracranial aneurysm (IA) is a debilitating and often lethal event. Geometric features of the aneurysm bulb and upstream artery, such as bulb size, bulb shape, and curvature of the artery, are two groups of factors that define the flow and stresses within an IA. Abnormal flow stresses are related to rupture. This presentation discusses the development of a quasi-3D PIV technique and its application in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to experimentally assess at a preliminary level the impact of geometry and flow rate. Some conclusions are to be drawn linking geometry of the flow domain to rupture risk. The extracted results also serve as the baseline case and as a precursor to a companion presentation by the authors discussing the impact of flow diverters, a new class of medical devices. The PIV experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility, allowing for unobstructed observations over complex geometry. A reconstruction and analysis method was devised to obtain 3D mean wall stress distributions and flow fields. The quasi 3D measurements were reconstructed from orthogonal planes encompassing the entire glass model, spaced 0.4mm apart. Wall shear stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  12. Animal models of surgically manipulated flow velocities to study shear stress-induced atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkel, Leah C; Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Xing, Ruoyu; Wentzel, Jolanda J; Van der Heiden, Kim

    2015-07-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial tree that develops at predisposed sites, coinciding with locations that are exposed to low or oscillating shear stress. Manipulating flow velocity, and concomitantly shear stress, has proven adequate to promote endothelial activation and subsequent plaque formation in animals. In this article, we will give an overview of the animal models that have been designed to study the causal relationship between shear stress and atherosclerosis by surgically manipulating blood flow velocity profiles. These surgically manipulated models include arteriovenous fistulas, vascular grafts, arterial ligation, and perivascular devices. We review these models of manipulated blood flow velocity from an engineering and biological perspective, focusing on the shear stress profiles they induce and the vascular pathology that is observed.

  13. Hot deformation behaviors and flow stress model of GCr15 bearing steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Shu-lun; ZHANG Li-wen; YUE Chong-xiang; PEI Ji-bin; GAO Hui-ju

    2008-01-01

    The hot deformation behaviors of GCr15 bearing steel were investigated by isothermal compression tests, performed on a Gleeble-3800 thermal-mechanical simulator at temperatures between 950℃ and 1 150 ℃ and strain rates between 0.1 and 10s-1.The peak stress and peak strain as functions of processing parameters were obtained. The dependence of peak stress on strain rate and temperature obeys a hyperbolic sine equation with a Zener-Hollomon parameter. By regression analysis, in the temperature range of 950-1150℃ and strain rate range of 0.1-10 s-1, the mean activation energy and the stress exponent were determined to be 351kJ/mol and 4.728, respectively. Meanwhile, models of flow stress and dynamic recrystallization (DRX) grain size were also established. The model predictions show good agreement with experimental results.

  14. Modeling of Flow Stress of High Titanium Content 6061 Aluminum Alloy Under Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Guan, Yingping; Wang, Zhenhua

    2016-09-01

    Hot compression tests were performed on high titanium content 6061 aluminum alloy (AA 6061-Ti) using a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical testing system at temperatures from 350 to 510 °C with a constant strain rate in the range of 0.001-10 s-1. Three types of flow stress models were established from the experimental stress-strain curves, the correlation coefficient ( R), mean absolute relative error ( MARE), and root mean square deviation ( RMSD) between the predicted data and the experimental data were also calculated. The results show that the Fields-Backofen model, which includes a softening factor, was the simplest mathematical expression with a level of precision appropriate for the numerical simulations. However, the Arrhenius and artificial neural network (ANN) models were also consistent with the experimental results but they are more limited in their application in terms of their accuracy and the mathematical expression of the models.

  15. The turbulent flow in an enclosed corotating disk pair: axisymmetric numerical simulation and Reynolds stress modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randriamampianina, A.; Schiestel, R. [UMR CNRS, Marseille (France). Institut de Recherche sur les Phenomenes; Wilson, M. [University of Bath (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2004-12-01

    We present axisymmetric numerical simulation and modelling of the turbulent flow between corotating disks with a stationary outer casing, the enclosed corotating disk pair configuration. This follows previous work on laminar flow for an identical geometry defined by a gap ratio G=0.6 (=s/(b-a)) and a/b=0.5, where a and b are the inner and outer radii, and s is the inter-disk distance [J. Fluid Mech. 434 (2001) 39]. The rotation rate considered in the present case is equivalent to Re=1.46 x 10{sup 5}, where Re (={omega}b{sup 2}/{nu}) is the rotational Reynolds number. This corresponds to a value at which mean flow measurements have been obtained for the same configuration [Flow in a rotating cavity with a peripheral inlet and outlet of cooling air, in: ASME Int. Gas Turbine and Aeroengine Cong., paper 96-GT-309, Birmingham]. In computed laminar regimes, it was found previously for this aspect ratio that the flow structure is first characterized by a shift-and-reflect symmetry at lower values of Re before bifurcating to symmetry breaking at higher rotation rates. For the rotation rate under consideration here, the flow is turbulent and shows an unsteady behaviour in the mean, characterized by flapping of the flow between the two disks, inducing symmetry breaking with respect to the inter-disk midplane. Similarities are observed between the centripetal flow coming from the stationary casing and an impinging jet in a cavity. Comparisons are made between the computed results from the axisymmetric numerical simulation (ANS), a Reynolds Stress Transport Model (RSM) and the available experimental data. The RSM predictions are in close agreement with the mean flow measurements. The ANS results give a more detailed description of the flow characteristics, but suffer from the axisymmetry assumption that is not compatible with the three-dimensional turbulence. (author)

  16. Modeling of the flow stress for AISI H13 Tool Steel during Hard Machining Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umbrello, Domenico; Rizzuti, Stefania; Outeiro, José C.; Shivpuri, Rajiv

    2007-04-01

    In general, the flow stress models used in computer simulation of machining processes are a function of effective strain, effective strain rate and temperature developed during the cutting process. However, these models do not adequately describe the material behavior in hard machining, where a range of material hardness between 45 and 60 HRC are used. Thus, depending on the specific material hardness different material models must be used in modeling the cutting process. This paper describes the development of a hardness-based flow stress and fracture models for the AISI H13 tool steel, which can be applied for range of material hardness mentioned above. These models were implemented in a non-isothermal viscoplastic numerical model to simulate the machining process for AISI H13 with various hardness values and applying different cutting regime parameters. Predicted results are validated by comparing them with experimental results found in the literature. They are found to predict reasonably well the cutting forces as well as the change in chip morphology from continuous to segmented chip as the material hardness change.

  17. Wall shear stress measurement method based on parallel flow model near vascular wall in echography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motochika; Tanaka, Tomohiko; Okada, Takashi; Seki, Yoshinori; Nishiyama, Tomohide

    2017-07-01

    A high-risk vessel of arteriosclerosis is detected by assessing wall shear stress (WSS), which is calculated from the distribution of velocity in a blood flow. A novel echographic method for measuring WSS, which aims to distinguish a normal vessel from a high-risk vessel, is proposed. To achieve this aim, the measurement error should be less than 28.8%. The proposed method is based on a flow model for the area near a vascular wall under a parallel-flow assumption to avoid the influences of error factors. This was verified by an in vitro experiment in which the WSS of a carotid artery phantom was measured. According to the experimental results, the WSS measured by the proposed method correlated with the ground truth measured by particle image velocimetry; in particular, the correlation coefficient and measurement error between them were respectively 0.70 and 27.4%. The proposed method achieved the target measurement performance.

  18. Stress dependent fluid flow in porous rock: experiments and network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flornes, Olav

    2005-07-01

    During the lifetime of a hydrocarbon reservoir, the pore pressure decreases because fluids are drained. Changed pore pressure causes a deformation of the reservoir rock, and the flow channels may be narrowed by the increased weight carried by the rock matrix. Knowledge of how the rocks ability to transport fluids, the permeability, is changed by increased stress can be important for effective reservoir management. In this work, we present experimental results for how permeability changes with applied stress. The materials tested are several different sandstones and one limestone, all having porosities higher than 19 percent. Application of stress is done in a number of different ways. We subject the sample to an isotropic stress, and see how changing this applied stress affects permeability as opposed to changing the pore fluid pressure. This allows for investigating the effective stress law for permeability. Permeability decreased by 10 to 20 percent, when we deformed the materials hydro statically within the elastic regime. For all of our samples, we observed a higher permeability change than predicted by a conventional model for relating porosity and permeability, the Kozeny Carman model. For Red Wildmoor, a sandstone having some clay content, we observed that a change in pore pressure was slightly more important for permeability than a change in the applied stress with the same amount. A sandstone with no clay content, Bad Durckheim, showed the opposite behavior, with applied stress slightly more important than pore pressure. We present a new method for measuring permeability in two directions in the same experiment. We apply different anisotropic stresses, and see if a high stress in one direction causes a difference in permeability changes parallel and perpendicular to maximum stress. We observe that deforming the sample axially, causes a larger decrease in axial permeability than in the radial at low confining pressure. At high confining pressure, the

  19. A couple stress fluid modeling on free convection oscillatory hydromagnetic flow in an inclined rotating channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses analytically on the oscillatory hydromagnetic flow of a viscous, incompressible, electrically-conducting, non-Newtonian fluid in an inclined, rotating channel with non-conducting walls, incorporating couple stress effects. The model is then non-dimensionalized with appropriate variables and shown to be controlled by the inverse Ekman number (K2 = 1/Ek, the hydromagnetic body force parameter (M, channel inclination (α, Grashof number (Gr, Prandtl number (Pr, oscillation frequency (ω and time variable (ωT. Analytical solutions are derived using complex variables. Excellent agreement is obtained between both previous and present work. The influence of the governing parameters on the primary velocity, secondary velocity, temperature (θ, primary and secondary flow discharges per unit depth in the channel, and frictional shear stresses due to primary and secondary flow, is studied graphically and using tables. Applications of the study arise in the simulation of the manufacture of electrically-conducting polymeric liquids and hydromagnetic energy systems exploiting rheological working fluids.

  20. In vitro blood flow model with physiological wall shear stress for hemocompatibility testing-An example of coronary stent testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Gerwin Erik; Blok, Sjoerd Leendert Johannes; van Oeveren, Willem

    2016-09-18

    Hemocompatibility of blood contacting medical devices has to be evaluated before their intended application. To assess hemocompatibility, blood flow models are often used and can either consist of in vivo animal models or in vitro blood flow models. Given the disadvantages of animal models, in vitro blood flow models are an attractive alternative. The in vitro blood flow models available nowadays mostly focus on generating continuous flow instead of generating a pulsatile flow with certain wall shear stress, which has shown to be more relevant in maintaining hemostasis. To address this issue, the authors introduce a blood flow model that is able to generate a pulsatile flow and wall shear stress resembling the physiological situation, which the authors have coined the "Haemobile." The authors have validated the model by performing Doppler flow measurements to calculate velocity profiles and (wall) shear stress profiles. As an example, the authors evaluated the thrombogenicity of two drug eluting stents, one that was already on the market and one that was still under development. After identifying proper conditions resembling the wall shear stress in coronary arteries, the authors compared the stents with each other and often used reference materials. These experiments resulted in high contrast between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, showing the exceptional testing capabilities of the Haemobile. In conclusion, the authors have developed an in vitro blood flow model which is capable of mimicking physiological conditions of blood flow as close as possible. The model is convenient in use and is able to clearly discriminate between hemocompatible and incompatible materials, making it suitable for evaluating the hemocompatible properties of medical devices.

  1. Flow Stress Model of Stainless Steel OCr13Ni5Mo at Elevated Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Wan-peng; CHEN Jun; LI Wen-jun

    2008-01-01

    For a more accurate forming calculation and numerical simulation of hydraulic turbine blade,experimental studies on the flow stress of stainless steel OCr13Ni5Mo were carried out upon Gleeble-1500 thermal simulator under different deformation conditions.The results then were analyzed and the effects of all influencing factors were summarized consequently.New mathematic models were conceived.Utilizing the software Matlab,regression coefficients were calculated by the least square method.The model has an eminent capability of curve-fitting performance with impact structure whose correlation coefficient is up to 0.908 0 and the cosine coefficient is 0.995 8.All mathematic models and process parameters can be used in engineering calculations or computer simulations.

  2. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  3. FLOW STRESS MODEL FOR COLD-FORMED 40HM CONSTRUCTIONAL STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Dziubińska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of research undertaken to investigate cold forming process for 40HM constructional steel suitable for heat treatment. In the first part of the paper, mechanical properties of this steel and its industrial applications are described. The second part of the paper presents the results of the analysis of flow curves for two kinds of steel specimens: those that were subjected to annealing and those that did not undergo any heat treatment. It was found that the application of heat treatment had a significant effect on improving the forming conditions for this steel at room temperature. The experimental flow curves obtained in a compression test were described by constitutive equations illustrating the dependence between flow stresses and strain value. In order to determine the equation coefficients, the Generalized Reduced Gradient method implemented in Microsoft Excel was used. Based on the obtained equations, a material model will be developed to perform numerical simulations of cold forming for 40HM steel, using FEM-based software that aids the design of metal forming technologies.

  4. New explicit algebraic stress and flux model for active scalar and simulation of shear stratified cylinder wake flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    On the numerical simulation of active scalar,a new explicit algebraic expression on active scalar flux was derived based on Wikstrm,Wallin and Johansson model (aWWJ model). Reynolds stress algebraic expressions were added by a term to account for the buoyancy effect. The new explicit Reynolds stress and active scalar flux model was then established. Governing equations of this model were solved by finite volume method with unstructured grids. The thermal shear stratified cylinder wake flow was computed by this new model. The computational results are in good agreement with laboratorial measurements. This work is the development on modeling of explicit algebraic Reynolds stress and scalar flux,and is also a further modification of the aWWJ model for complex situations such as a shear stratified flow.

  5. Mathematical model for blood flow through a bifurcated artery using couple stress fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasacharya, D; Madhava Rao, G

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the blood flow through a bifurcated artery with mild stenosis is investigated taking blood as couple stress fluid. The artery configuring bifurcation is assumed to be symmetric about the axis of the artery and straight cylinders of finite length. The governing equations are non-dimensionalized and coordinate transformation is used to convert the irregular boundary to a regular boundary. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically using the finite difference method. The variation of shear stress, flow rate and impedance near the apex with pertinent parameters are studied graphically. It has been noticed that shear stress, flow rate and impedance have been changing suddenly with all the parameters on both sides of the apex. This occurs because of the backflow of the streaming blood at the onset of the lateral junction and secondary flow near the apex in the daughter artery.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Whole Three—Dimensional Flow in a Stirred Tank with Anisotropic Algebraic Stress Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNHaiyan; WANGWeijing; 等

    2002-01-01

    In accordance to the anisotropic feature of turbulent flow, an anisotropic algebraic stress model is adopted to predict the turbulent flow field and turbulent characteristics generated by a Rushton disc turbine with the improved inner-outer iterative procedure. The predicted turbulent flow is compared with experimental data and the simulation by the standard κ-ε turbulence model. The anisotropic algebraic stress model is found to give better prediction than the standard κ-ε turbulence model. The predicted turbulent flow field is in accordance to experimental data and the trend of the turbulence intensity can be effectively reflected in the simulation. The distribution of turbulent shear rate in the stirred tanks was simulated with the established numerical procedure.

  7. ABA flow modelling in Ricinus communis exposed to salt stress and variable nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuke, Andreas D.

    2016-01-01

    In a series of experiments with Ricinus communis, abscisic acid (ABA) concentrations in tissues and transport saps, its de novo biosynthesis, long-distance transport, and metabolism (degradation) were affected by nutritional conditions, nitrogen (N) source, and nutrient limitation, or salt stress. In the present study these data were statistically re-evaluated, and new correlations presented that underpin the importance of this universal phytohormone. The biggest differences in ABA concentration were observed in xylem sap. N source had the strongest effect; however, nutrient limitation (particularly phosphorus limitation) and salt also had significant effects. ABA was found in greater concentration in phloem sap compared with xylem sap; however, the effect of treatment on ABA concentration in phloem was lower. In the leaves, ABA concentration was most variable compared with the other tissues. This variation was only affected by the N source. In roots, ABA was significantly decreased by nutrient limitation. Of the compartments in which ABA was quantified, xylem sap ABA concentration was most significantly correlated with leaf stomatal conductance and leaf growth. Additionally, ABA concentration in xylem was significantly correlated to that in phloem, indicating a 6-fold concentration increase from xylem to phloem. The ABA flow model showed that biosynthesis of ABA in roots affected the xylem flow of ABA. Moreover, ABA concentration in xylem affected the degradation of the phytohormone in shoots and also its export from shoots via phloem. The role of phloem transport is discussed since it stimulates ABA metabolism in roots. PMID:27440939

  8. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  9. Numerical simulation of strongly swirling turbulent flows in a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone using the Reynolds stress transport equation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆耀军; 周力行; 沈熊

    2000-01-01

    The Reynolds stress transport equation model (DSM) is used to predict the strongly swirling turbulent flows in a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone, and the predictions are compared with LDV measurements . Predictions properly give the flow behavior observed in experiments, such as the Rankine-vortex structure and double peaks near the inlet region in tangential velocity profile, the downward flow near the wall and upward flow near the core in axial velocity profiles. In the inlet or upstream region of the hydrocyclone, the reverse flow near the axis is well predicted, but in the region with smaller cone angle and cylindrical section, there are some discrepancies between the model predictions and the LDV measurements. Predictions show that the pressure is small in the near-axis region and increases to the maximum near the wall. Both predictions and measurements indicate that the turbulence in hydrocy-clones is inhomogeneous and anisotropic.

  10. Numerical simulation of strongly swirling turbulent flows in a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone using the Reynolds stress transport equation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The Reynolds stress transport equation model (DSM) is used to predict the strongly swirling turbulent flows in a liquid-liquid hydrocyclone, and the predictions are compared with LDV measurements. Predictions properly give the flow behavior observed in experiments, such as the Rankine-vortex structure and double peaks near the inlet region in tangential velocity profile, the downward flow near the wall and upward flow near the core in axial velocity profiles. In the inlet or upstream region of the hydrocyclone, the reverse flow near the axis is well predicted, but in the region with smaller cone angle and cylindrical section, there are some discrepancies between the model predictions and the LDV measurements. Predictions show that the pressure is small in the near-axis region and increases to the maximum near the wall. Both predictions and measurements indicate that the turbulence in hydrocyclones is inhomogeneous and anisotropic.

  11. Numerical prediction of cavitating flow around a hydrofoil using pans and improved shear stress transport k-omega model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang De-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The prediction accuracies of partially-averaged Navier-Stokes model and improved shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model for simulating the unsteady cavitating flow around the hydrofoil were discussed in this paper. Numerical results show that the two turbulence models can effectively reproduce the cavitation evolution process. The numerical prediction for the cycle time of cavitation inception, development, detachment, and collapse agrees well with the experimental data. It is found that the vortex pair induced by the interaction between the re-entrant jet and mainstream is responsible for the instability of the cavitation shedding flow.

  12. A two-dimensional continuum model of biofilm growth incorporating fluid flow and shear stress based detachment

    KAUST Repository

    Duddu, Ravindra

    2009-05-01

    We present a two-dimensional biofilm growth model in a continuum framework using an Eulerian description. A computational technique based on the eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) and the level set method is used to simulate the growth of the biofilm. The model considers fluid flow around the biofilm surface, the advection-diffusion and reaction of substrate, variable biomass volume fraction and erosion due to the interfacial shear stress at the biofilm-fluid interface. The key assumptions of the model and the governing equations of transport, biofilm kinetics and biofilm mechanics are presented. Our 2D biofilm growth results are in good agreement with those obtained by Picioreanu et al. (Biotechnol Bioeng 69(5):504-515, 2000). Detachment due to erosion is modeled using two continuous speed functions based on: (a) interfacial shear stress and (b) biofilm height. A relation between the two detachment models in the case of a 1D biofilm is established and simulated biofilm results with detachment in 2D are presented. The stress in the biofilm due to fluid flow is evaluated and higher stresses are observed close to the substratum where the biofilm is attached. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 3-D flow characterization and shear stress in a stenosed carotid artery bifurcation model using stereoscopic PIV technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefayati, Sarah; Poepping, Tamie L

    2010-01-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation is a common site of atherosclerosis which is a major leading cause of ischemic stroke. The impact of stenosis in the atherosclerotic carotid artery is to disturb the flow pattern and produce regions with high shear rate, turbulence, and recirculation, which are key hemodynamic factors associated with plaque rupture, clot formation, and embolism. In order to characterize the disturbed flow in the stenosed carotid artery, stereoscopic PIV measurements were performed in a transparent model with 50% stenosis under pulsatile flow conditions. Simulated ECG gating of the flowrate waveform provides external triggering required for volumetric reconstruction of the complex flow patterns. Based on the three-component velocity data in the lumen region, volumetric shear-stress patterns were derived.

  14. Neural network modeling to evaluate the dynamic flow stress of high strength armor steels under high strain rate compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2014-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model is developed for high strength armor steel tempered at 500 ?C, 600 ?C and 650 ?C based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. A new neural network configuration consisting of both training and validation is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Tempering temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model is performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tempering temperatures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB, over a range of tempering temperatures (500e650 ?C), strains (0.05e0.2) and strain rates (1000e5500/s) are employed to formulate JeC model to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steels. The J-C model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the high strain rate deformation behavior of high strength armor steel and their predictability is evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the JeC model are found to be 0.7461 and 27.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. It was observed that the predictions by ANN model are in consistence with the experimental data for all tempering temperatures.

  15. Lagrangian viscoelastic flow computations using a generalized molecular stress function model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.

    2002-01-01

    –Sawyers fluid to a fluid described by a generalized molecular stress function (MSF) model allowing the use of dissipative convective constraint release in the constitutive equation. The convergence of the method is demonstrated on the axis-symmetric problem of the inflation of a polymeric membrane only...

  16. Modeling of microstructural evolution and flow stress of aluminium alloy during thermomechanical process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Jian(沈健); G.Gottstein

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of microstructural variables, including the densities of mobile dislocation, immobile dislocation at the cell interiors, immobile dislocation in the cell walls, as well as total dislocation density, of an Al-Mg-Si aluminium alloy during thermomechanical processing were simulated based on a three-internal-variables-model (3IVM) involving dislocation climb and interaction. Optimization was carried out to fit the calculated stress-strain curves to the experimental data of the Al-Mg-Si alloy with minimum mean deviation. Precipitations were taken into consideration of modeling. The stress-strain curves predicted by the kinetic equations of state in the 3IVM have a good agreement with the experimental data.

  17. Turbulent Bubbly Flow in a Vertical Pipe Computed By an Eddy-Resolving Reynolds Stress Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-19

    induced turbulence of the underlying flow and the modification of the turbulent quantities by the dispersed bubbles. Due to the lack of realisable data...is modelled with the coefficient CVM taking the standard value of 0.5. Other forces which mainly act in the lateral direc- tion, like the lift, wall... values were used for αG = 0.033 and the mean gas velocity, in accordance with the case 4 from Hosokawa and Tomiyama (2009). The domain was 160D long in

  18. Comparison of a Full Second-Order Moment Model and an Algebraic Stress Two-Phase Turbulence Model for Simulating Bubble-Liquid Flows in a Bubble Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A full second-order moment (FSM) model and an algebraic stress (ASM) two-phase turbulence modelare proposed and applied to predict turbulent bubble-liquid flows in a 2D rectangular bubble column. Predictiongives the bubble and liquid velocities, bubble volume fraction, bubble and liquid Reynolds stresses and bubble-liquidvelocity correlation. For predicted two-phase velocities and bubble volume fraction there is only slight differencebetween these two models, and the simulation results using both two models are in good agreement with the particleimage velocimetry (PIV) measurements. Although the predicted two-phase Reynolds stresses using the FSM are insomewhat better agreement with the PIV measurements than those predicted using the ASM, the Reynolds stressespredicted using both two models are in general agreement with the experiments. Therefore, it is suggested to usethe ASM two-phase turbulence model in engineering application for saving the computation time.

  19. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  20. Discussion and prediction on decreasing flow stress scale effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Based on crystal plasticity theory and surface layer model, relation of flow stress to billet dimension and grain size was built,and rationality of derived relation was verified with tensile tests of different size billets. With derived expressions, relation of decreasing flow stress scale effect to billet dimension, grain size as well as billet shape was discussed and predicted. The results show that flow stress is proportional to billet size; with decrease of grain size, flow stress is less influenced by billet dimension. When both cross section area and grain size are same, flow stress decrease of rectangular section billet or sheet is larger than that of circular section billet.

  1. Endothelial cell culture model for replication of physiological profiles of pressure, flow, stretch, and shear stress in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Rosendo; Giridharan, Guruprasad A; Nguyen, Mai-Dung; Roussel, Thomas J; Shakeri, Mostafa; Parichehreh, Vahidreza; Prabhu, Sumanth D; Sethu, Palaniappan

    2011-04-15

    The phenotype and function of vascular cells in vivo are influenced by complex mechanical signals generated by pulsatile hemodynamic loading. Physiologically relevant in vitro studies of vascular cells therefore require realistic environments where in vivo mechanical loading conditions can be accurately reproduced. To accomplish a realistic in vivo-like loading environment, we designed and fabricated an Endothelial Cell Culture Model (ECCM) to generate physiological pressure, stretch, and shear stress profiles associated with normal and pathological cardiac flow states. Cells within this system were cultured on a stretchable, thin (∼500 μm) planar membrane within a rectangular flow channel and subject to constant fluid flow. Under pressure, the thin planar membrane assumed a concave shape, representing a segment of the blood vessel wall. Pulsatility was introduced using a programmable pneumatically controlled collapsible chamber. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured within this system under normal conditions and compared to HAECs cultured under static and "flow only" (13 dyn/cm(2)) control conditions using microscopy. Cells cultured within the ECCM were larger than both controls and assumed an ellipsoidal shape. In contrast to static control control cells, ECCM-cultured cells exhibited alignment of cytoskeletal actin filaments and high and continuous expression levels of β-catenin indicating an in vivo-like phenotype. In conclusion, design, fabrication, testing, and validation of the ECCM for culture of ECs under realistic pressure, flow, strain, and shear loading seen in normal and pathological conditions was accomplished. The ECCM therefore is an enabling technology that allows for study of ECs under physiologically relevant biomechanical loading conditions in vitro. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  2. Mathematical modelling of couple stresses on fluid flow in constricted tapered artery in presence of slip velocity-effects of catheter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. V. R. REDDY; D. SRIKANTH; S. K. MURTHY

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the mathematical model for couple stress fluid flow through an annular region. The above model is used for studying the blood flow be-tween the clogged (stenotic) artery and the catheter. The asymmetric nature of the stenosis is considered. The closed form expressions for the physiological parameters such as impedance and shear stress at the wall are obtained. The effects of various geomet-ric parameters and the parameters arising out of the fluid considered are discussed by considering the slip velocity and tapering angle. The study of the above model is very significant as it has direct applications in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  3. An integrated workflow for stress and flow modelling using outcrop-derived discrete fracture networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisdom, Kevin; Nick, Hamid; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    stresssensitive fracture permeability and matrix flow to determine the full permeability tensor. The applicability of this workflow is illustrated using an outcropping carbonate pavement in the Potiguar basin in Brazil, from which 1082 fractures are digitised. The permeability tensor for a range of matrix...

  4. 3D time-dependent flow computations using a molecular stress function model with constraint release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of time dependent viscoelastic flow (in three dimensions) is of interest in connection with a variety of polymer processing operations. The application of the numerical simulation techniques is in the analysis and design of polymer processing problems. This is operations,...

  5. An exponential strain dependent Rusinek–Klepaczko model for flow stress prediction in austenitic stainless steel 304 at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Gupta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, to predict flow stress of Austenitic Stainless Steel (ASS 304 at elevated temperatures the extended Rusinek–Klepaczko (RK model has been modified using an exponential strain dependent term for dynamic strain aging (DSA region. Isothermal tensile tests are conducted on ASS 304 for a temperature range of 323–923 K with an interval of 50 K and at strain rates of 0.0001 s−1, 0.001 s−1, 0.01 s−1 and 0.1 s−1. DSA phenomenon is observed from 623 to 923 K at 0.0001 s−1, 0.001 s−1 and 0.01 s−1. Material constants are calculated using data obtained from these tensile tests for non-DSA and DSA region separately. The predicted results from the RK model are compared with the experimental data to check the accuracy of the constitutive relation. It is observed that to find out the constants of this model, some initial assumptions are required, and these initial values affect the predicted values. Hence, Genetic Algorithm (GA is used to optimize the constants for RK model. Statistical measures such as the correlation coefficient, the average absolute error and standard deviation are used to measure the accuracy of the model. The resulting values of the correlation coefficient for ASS 304 for non-DSA and DSA region using modified extended RK model are 0.9828 and 0.9701. This modified, extended RK model is compared with Johnson–Cook (JC, Zerilli–Armstrong (ZA and Arrhenius models and it is observed that specifically in DSA region, the modified extended RK model gives highly accurate predictions.

  6. Modeling of curvilinear suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey F.; Boulay, Fabienne

    1996-11-01

    The curvilinear parallel-plate and cone-and-plate rheometric flows of monodisperse noncolloidal suspensions have been modeled. Although nonuniform in shear rate, dotγ, the parallel-plate flow has been shown experimentally(A. W. Chow, S. W. Sinton, J. H. Iwayima & T. S. Stephens 1994 Phys. Fluids) 6, 2561. not to exhibit particle migration, contrary to predictions of prior suspension-flow modeling. Predictions of nonuniform particle volume fraction, φ, by the suspension-balance model(P. R. Nott & J. F. Brady 1994 J. Fluid Mech.) 275, 157. for parallel-plate and cone-and-plate flow without normal stress differences are presented. The ``nonmigration'' in parallel-plate flow may be attributed to bulk suspension normal stress differences: assuming the bulk stress has the form Σ ~ η dotγ Q(φ) with η the fluid viscosity, nonmigration is predicted for parallel-plate flow provided that Q_33 = (1/2) Q_11 at the bulk φ of interest, with 1 the flow direction and 3 the vorticity direction. Extending the model to include normal stress differences satisfying this requirement, a range of migration behavior is predicted for the cone-and-plate flow depending upon the ratio Q_11/Q_22.

  7. Continuous stroke volume monitoring by modelling flow from non-invasive measurement of arterial pressure in humans under orthostatic stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, M.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Pott, F.; Jenstrup, M.; Goudoever, J. van; Secher, N.H.; Lieshout, J.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The relationship between aortic flow and pressure is described by a three-element model of the arterial input impedance, including continuous correction for variations in the diameter and the compliance of the aorta (Modelflow). We computed the aortic flow from arterial pressure by this model, and

  8. MRI-determined carotid artery flow velocities and wall shear stress in a mouse model of vulnerable and stable atherosclerotic plaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bochove, Glenda S; Straathof, Roel; Krams, Rob; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2010-04-01

    We report here on the pre-clinical MRI characterization of an apoE-/- mouse model of stable and vulnerable carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques, which were induced by a tapered restriction (cast) around the artery. Specific focus was on the quantification of the wall shear stress, which is considered a key player in the development of the plaque phenotype. In vivo MRI was performed at 9.4 T. The protocol consisted of time-of-flight angiography, high-resolution T1- and T2-weighted black-blood imaging and phase-contrast flow velocity imaging as function of time in the cardiac cycle. Wall shear stress was determined by fitting the flow profile to a quadratic polynomial. Time-of-flight angiography confirmed preservation of blood flow through the carotid arteries in all cases. T1- and T2-weighted MRI resulted in high-resolution images in which the position of the cast, luminal narrowing introduced by cast and plaque, as well as the arterial wall could be well identified. Laminar flow with low wall shear stress (11.2+/- 5.2 Pa) was measured upstream to the cast at the position of the vulnerable plaque. Downstream to the cast at the position of the stable plaque, the apparent velocities were low, which is consistent with vortices and an oscillatory nature of the flow. Flow velocities and wall shear stress were successfully measured in this mouse model of stable and unstable plaque. The presented tools can be used to provide valuable insights in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  9. Effect of bottom stress formulation on modelled flow and turbidity maxima in cross-sections of tide-dominated estuaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schramkowski, G.P.; De Swart, H.E.; Schuttelaars, H.M.

    2009-01-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model with a prognostic salinity field is used to investigate the effect of a partial slip bottom boundary condition on lateral flow and sediment distribution in a transect of a tidally dominated channel. The transect has a symmetrical Gaussian cross-channel bottom prof

  10. Vertical Distribution of Tidal Flow Reynolds Stress in Shallow Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zhi-yao; NI Zhi-hui; LU Guo-nian

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of the tidal flow Reynolds stresses of the field observations,indoor experiments,and numerical models,the parabolic distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is proposed and its coefficients are determined theoretically in this paper.Having been well verified with the field data and experimental data,the proposed distribution of Reynolds stress is also compared with numerical model results,and a good agreement is obtained,showing that this distribution can well reflect the basic features of Reynolds stress deviating from the linear distribution that is downward when the tidal flow is of acceleration,upward when the tidal flow is of deceleration.Its dynamics cause is also discussed preliminarily and the influence of the water depth is pointed out from the definition of Reynolds stress,turbulent generation,transmission,and so on.The established expression for the vertical distribution of the tidal flow Reynolds stress is not only simple and explicit,but can also well reflect the features of the tidal flow acceleration and deceleration for further study on the velocity profile of tidal flow.

  11. Stress Analysis and Calculation of Flow Interruption Capability Test Loop

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; Bo; QI; Xiao-guang; CHENG; Dao-xi

    2012-01-01

    <正>A stress-analysis and calculation has been done for the flow interruption capability test loop (Fig. 1). In the design condition, the test loop is operated on 350 ℃ and 20MPa. By reasonably simplifying and modeling, a stress-analysis program named Triflex was used to analyze the piping stress and optimize the piping supports, which meet the compliance. The work will provide the necessary basis for the construction of the loop and operation security.

  12. Equilibrium circulation and stress distribution in viscoelastic creeping flow

    CERN Document Server

    Biello, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    An analytic, asymptotic approximation of the nonlinear steady-state equations for viscoelastic creeping flow, modeled by the Oldroyd-B equations with polymer stress diffusion, is derived. Near the extensional stagnation point the flow stretches and aligns polymers along the outgoing streamlines of the stagnation point resulting in a stress-island, or birefringent strand. The polymer stress diffusion coefficient is used, both, as an asymptotic parameter and a regularization parameter. The structure of the singular part of polymer stress tensor is a Gaussian aligned with the incoming streamline of the stagnation point; a smoothed $\\delta$-distribution whose width is proportional to the square-root of the diffusion coefficient. The amplitude of the stress island scales with the Wiessenberg number and, although singular in the limit of vanishing diffusion, it is integrable in the cross stream direction due to its vanishing width; this yields a convergent secondary flow. The leading order velocity response to this...

  13. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose with this deliverable 2.5 is to use fresh experimental data for validation and selection of a flow model to be used for control design in WP3-4. Initially the idea was to investigate the models developed in WP2. However, in the project it was agreed to include and focus on a additive...... model turns out not to be useful for prediction of the flow. Moreover, standard Box Jenkins model structures and multiple output auto regressive models proves to be superior as they can give useful predictions of the flow....

  14. A Modified Eyring Equation for Modeling Yield and Flow Stresses of Metals at Strain Rates Ranging from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramzi Othman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In several industrial applications, metallic structures are facing impact loads. Therefore, there is an important need for developing constitutive equations which take into account the strain rate sensitivity of their mechanical properties. The Johnson-Cook equation was widely used to model the strain rate sensitivity of metals. However, it implies that the yield and flow stresses are linearly increasing in terms of the logarithm of strain rate. This is only true up to a threshold strain rate. In this work, a three-constant constitutive equation, assuming an apparent activation volume which decreases as the strain rate increases, is applied here for some metals. It is shown that this equation fits well the experimental yield and flow stresses for a very wide range of strain rates, including quasi-static, high, and very high strain rates (from 10−5 to 5 × 104 s−1. This is the first time that a constitutive equation is showed to be able to fit the yield stress over a so large strain rate range while using only three material constants.

  15. Data flow modeling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavi, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    There have been a number of simulation packages developed for the purpose of designing, testing and validating computer systems, digital systems and software systems. Complex analytical tools based on Markov and semi-Markov processes have been designed to estimate the reliability and performance of simulated systems. Petri nets have received wide acceptance for modeling complex and highly parallel computers. In this research data flow models for computer systems are investigated. Data flow models can be used to simulate both software and hardware in a uniform manner. Data flow simulation techniques provide the computer systems designer with a CAD environment which enables highly parallel complex systems to be defined, evaluated at all levels and finally implemented in either hardware or software. Inherent in data flow concept is the hierarchical handling of complex systems. In this paper we will describe how data flow can be used to model computer system.

  16. History effect on the Reynolds stress in turbulent swirling flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamba, Fujihiro

    2017-02-01

    The eddy-viscosity model for turbulence has some difficulty in predicting rotating and swirling flows. Turbulent swirling flow in a straight pipe is a typical example. A rapidly rotating core in the pipe decays too quickly in results obtained from the standard k-ɛ model. The eddy viscosity needs to be reduced to predict the velocity profiles well; the mechanism of the decrease in the eddy viscosity has not been clarified yet. In this work, the eddy-viscosity model was investigated using a temporally nonlocal expression for the Reynolds stress that represents the history effect. A simple transport equation for the Reynolds stress was integrated along a mean-flow pathline to obtain a temporally nonlocal model for the Reynolds stress. The nonlocal model was applied to simple swirling flows for which the time integral can be further calculated to investigate the history effect. It was shown that the history effect associated with the rotating motion gives rise to a small factor in the expression for the eddy viscosity. In order to confirm the history effect, the present model and the linear eddy-viscosity model were used to simulate a swirling pipe flow. The velocity profiles obtained from the present model agree well with experimental results; the reduced eddy viscosity can account for the slow decay of the swirling motion in the core region. The anisotropic nature of the eddy viscosity was also discussed in relation to the small factor caused by the history effect.

  17. Reynolds stress and shear flow generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Søren Bang; Michelsen, Poul; Naulin, V.

    2001-01-01

    of improved confinement scenarios such as H-mode confinement regimes. However, the determination of the Reynolds stress requires measurements of the plasma potential, a task that is difficult in general and nearly impossible in hot plasmas in large devices. In this work we investigate an alternative method...... to the treatment of the pseudo-Reynolds stress, we present analytical and numerical results which demonstrate that the Reynolds stress in a plasma, indeed, generates a poloidal shear flow. The numerical simulations are performed both in a drift wave turbulence regime and a resistive interchange turbulence regime...

  18. Direct numerical simulation of particle-laden turbulent channel flows with two- and four-way coupling effects: models of terms in the Reynolds stress budgets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dritselis, Chris D.

    2017-04-01

    In the first part of this study (Dritselis 2016 Fluid Dyn. Res. 48 015507), the Reynolds stress budgets were evaluated through point-particle direct numerical simulations (pp-DNSs) for the particle-laden turbulent flow in a vertical channel with two- and four-way coupling effects. Here several turbulence models are assessed by direct comparison of the particle contribution terms to the budgets, the dissipation rate, the pressure-strain rate, and the transport rate with the model expressions using the pp-DNS data. It is found that the models of the particle sources to the equations of fluid turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation rate cannot represent correctly the physics of the complex interaction between turbulence and particles. A relatively poor performance of the pressure-strain term models is revealed in the particulate flows, while the algebraic models for the dissipation rate of the fluid turbulence kinetic energy and the transport rate terms can adequately reproduce the main trends due to the presence of particles. Further work is generally needed to improve the models in order to account properly for the momentum exchange between the two phases and the effects of particle inertia, gravity and inter-particle collisions.

  19. Modeling Rotating Turbulent Flows with the Body Force Potential Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Perot, Blair

    2000-11-01

    Like a Reynolds Stress Transport equation model, the turbulent potential model has an explicit Coriolis acceleration term that appears in the model that accounts for rotation effects. In this work the additional secondary effects that system rotation has on the dissipation rate, return-to-isotropy, and fast pressure strain terms are also included in the model. The resulting model is tested in the context of rotating isotropic turbulence, rotating homogeneous shear flow, rotating channel flow, and swirling pipe flow. Many of the model changes are applicable to Reynolds stress transport equation models. All model modifications are frame indifferent.

  20. Multicomponent flow modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GIOVANGIGLI; Vincent

    2012-01-01

    We present multicomponent flow models derived from the kinetic theory of gases and investigate the symmetric hyperbolic-parabolic structure of the resulting system of partial differential equations.We address the Cauchy problem for smooth solutions as well as the existence of deflagration waves,also termed anchored waves.We further discuss related models which have a similar hyperbolic-parabolic structure,notably the SaintVenant system with a temperature equation as well as the equations governing chemical equilibrium flows.We next investigate multicomponent ionized and magnetized flow models with anisotropic transport fluxes which have a different mathematical structure.We finally discuss numerical algorithms specifically devoted to complex chemistry flows,in particular the evaluation of multicomponent transport properties,as well as the impact of multicomponent transport.

  1. Determination of the Reynolds stress in canonical flow geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T.-W.

    2016-11-01

    We present a new theoretical result for solving for the Reynolds stress in turbulent flows, and show how it works for canonical flow geometries: flow over a flat plate, channel flow, and axi-symmetric jets. The theory is based on fundamental physics of turbulence transport. Comparison of the current theoretical result with experimental and DNS (direct numerical simulation) data show good agreement, and various considerations of the results indicate that this is not a fortuitous coincidence, and point to radically new solutions for Reynolds stress. The theory leads to a closed-form formula for the Reynolds stress in terms of the root variables, such as the mean velocity, velocity gradient, turbulence kinetic energy and a viscous term. The form of the solution also provides insight on how the Reynolds stress is generated and distributed. This is not a modeling study, but a theoretical one based on physical principles although some of the nuances are still being examined. Details of the theory are submitted elsewhere, and also will be presented at the conference. The theoretical result for the Reynolds stress is compared with various experimental and DNS data. The agreement is nearly perfect at low Reynolds numbers, which gives some confidence that we have captured the true physics of turbulent transport, and that the results are not a fortuitous coincidence.

  2. Stress field models from Maxwell stress functions: southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Peter

    2017-08-01

    shallow stress maxima and discontinuous horizontal compression at the Moho, which the new model can only approximate. The new model also lacks the spatial resolution to portray the localized stress states that may occur near the central surfaces of weak faults; instead, the model portrays the regional or background stress field which provides boundary conditions for weak faults. Peak shear stresses in one registered model and one alternate model are 120 and 150 MPa, respectively, while peak vertically integrated shear stresses are 2.9 × 1012 and 4.1 × 1012 N m-1. Channeling of deviatoric stress along the strong Great Valley and the western slope of the Peninsular Ranges is evident. In the neotectonics of southern California, it appears that deviatoric stress and long-term strain rate have a negative correlation, because regions of low heat flow are strong and act as stress guides, while undergoing very little internal deformation. In contrast, active faults lie preferentially in areas with higher heat flow, and their low strength keeps deviatoric stresses locally modest.

  3. Transport hub flow modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Despagne, Wilfried; Frenod, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the road freight haulage activity. Using the physical and data flow information from a freight forwarder, we intend to model the flow of inbound and outbound goods in a freight transport hub. Approach: This paper presents the operation of a road haulage group. To deliver goods within two days to any location in France, a haulage contractor needs to be part of a network. This network handles the processing of both physical goods and data. We...

  4. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Fagan, J.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbomachinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. This will be accomplished in a cooperative program by Penn State University and the Allison Engine Company. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tenor.

  5. Research on flow stress in ferrite deformation of a Ti-IF steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The experiments of the ferrite warm deformation of ultra-low carbon (ULC) Ti-IF steel were carried out on a hot simulator and the influences of deformation temperature, strain, and strain rate on the flow stress were analyzed. New flow stress models suitable to ferrite warm forming of Ti-IF steel were given on the basis of analyzing the influence of deformation technology parameters on the flow stress.

  6. Flow Stress and Mathematical Model for DRX Evolution of Semi-continuous Cast AZ80 Alloy During Hot Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Haicheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electromagnetic fields application ways, AZ80 magnesium alloy is semi-continuously cast into billets with diameter of 165 mm. And the dynamic recrystallization (DRX evolution of the semi-continuous cast AZ80 magnesium alloy during hot compression has been experimentally studied on Gleeble 2000 thermal-mechanical simulator, at temperatures from 260 to 410 °C and strain rates from 0.001 to 10s-1. It is found that the chief microstructure evolution is dynamic recrystallization, and the effect of deformation process parameters on DRX evolution is analyzed. The mathematical models including critical recrystallization model, kinetics model and grain size model of DRX are established and the results show good agreement between experiments and the models.

  7. Revised Reynolds Stress and Triple Product Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Lillard, Randolph P.

    2017-01-01

    Revised versions of Lag methodology Reynolds-stress and triple product models are applied to accepted test cases to assess the improvement, or lack thereof, in the prediction capability of the models. The Bachalo-Johnson bump flow is shown as an example for this abstract submission.

  8. Development of Flow Stress of AISI H13 Die Steel in Hard Machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Hong; QIAN Guohua; HU Qiang

    2007-01-01

    An approach was presented to characterize the stress response of workpiece in hard machining, accounting for the effect of the initial workpiece hardness in addition to temperature, strain and strain rate on flow stress in this paper. AISI H13 die steel was chosen to verify this methodology. The proposed flow stress model demonstrates a good agreement with experimental data. Therefore, the proposed model can be used to predict the corresponding flow stress-strain response of AISI H13 die steel with variation of the initial workpiece hardness in hard machining.

  9. Tectonic stress - Models and magnitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S. C.; Bergman, E. A.; Richardson, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that global data on directions of principal stresses in plate interiors can serve as a test of possible plate tectonic force models. Such tests performed to date favor force models in which ridge pushing forces play a significant role. For such models the general magnitude of regional deviatoric stresses is comparable to the 200-300 bar compressive stress exerted by spreading ridges. An alternative approach to estimating magnitudes of regional deviatoric stresses from stress orientations is to seek regions of local stress either demonstrably smaller than or larger than the regional stresses. The regional stresses in oceanic intraplate regions are larger than the 100-bar compression exerted by the Ninetyeast Ridge and less than the bending stresses (not less than 1 kbar) beneath Hawaii.

  10. MODELING THE CHAIN CONFORMATION OF POLYMER MELTS IN CONTRACTION FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Shen; Jian-feng Hu; Qing-feng Gu

    2003-01-01

    A constitutive model of quasi-Newtonian fluid based on the type of flow is used in abrupt planar contraction flow.The numerical results from finite element analysis are consistent with experimental data for stress patterns and velocity profiles in the flow field. The chain conformations of polymer melts are then investigated in such a planar contraction by using the phenomenological model with internal parameters proposed by the author. That is, the shape and orientation of polymer chain coils are predicted and discussed in different flow regions of the contraction flow field that possess simple shear flow, extensional flow, vortical flow, and mixed flow respectively.

  11. Traffic flow modeling: a Genealogy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Wageningen-Kessels, F.L.M.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Vuik, C.; Van Lint, J.W.C.

    2014-01-01

    80 years ago, Bruce Greenshields presented the first traffic flow model at the Annual Meeting of the Highway Research Board. Since then, many models and simulation tools have been developed. We show a model tree with four families of traffic flow models, all descending from Greenshields' model. The

  12. Improved modeling techniques for turbomachinery flow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakshminarayana, B. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fagan, J.R. Jr. [Allison Engine Company, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    This program has the objective of developing an improved methodology for modeling turbomachinery flow fields, including the prediction of losses and efficiency. Specifically, the program addresses the treatment of the mixing stress tensor terms attributed to deterministic flow field mechanisms required in steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models for turbo-machinery flow fields. These mixing stress tensors arise due to spatial and temporal fluctuations (in an absolute frame of reference) caused by rotor-stator interaction due to various blade rows and by blade-to-blade variation of flow properties. These tasks include the acquisition of previously unavailable experimental data in a high-speed turbomachinery environment, the use of advanced techniques to analyze the data, and the development of a methodology to treat the deterministic component of the mixing stress tensor. Penn State will lead the effort to make direct measurements of the momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors in high-speed multistage compressor flow field in the turbomachinery laboratory at Penn State. They will also process the data by both conventional and conditional spectrum analysis to derive momentum and thermal mixing stress tensors due to blade-to-blade periodic and aperiodic components, revolution periodic and aperiodic components arising from various blade rows and non-deterministic (which includes random components) correlations. The modeling results from this program will be publicly available and generally applicable to steady-state Navier-Stokes solvers used for turbomachinery component (compressor or turbine) flow field predictions. These models will lead to improved methodology, including loss and efficiency prediction, for the design of high-efficiency turbomachinery and drastically reduce the time required for the design and development cycle of turbomachinery.

  13. Flow Element Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Air distribution in ventilated rooms is a flow process that can be divided into different elements such as supply air jets, exhaust flows, thermal plumes, boundary layer flows, infiltration and gravity currents. These flow elements are isolated volumes where the air movement is controlled...... by a restricted number of parameters, and the air movement is fairly independent of the general flow in the enclosure. In many practical situations, the most convenient· method is to design the air distribution system using flow element theory....

  14. NUMERICAL MODELING OF COMPOUND CHANNEL FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A numerical model capable of predicting flow characteristics in a compound channel was established with the 3-D steady continuity and momentum equations along with the transport equations for turbulence kinetic energy and dissipation rate. Closure was achieved with the aid of algebraic relations for turbulent shear stresses. The above equations were discretized with implicit difference approach and solved with a step method along the flow direction. The computational results showing the lateral distribution of vertical average velocities and the latio of total flow in the compound channel agree well with the available experimental data.

  15. Stochastic power flow modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The stochastic nature of customer demand and equipment failure on large interconnected electric power networks has produced a keen interest in the accurate modeling and analysis of the effects of probabilistic behavior on steady state power system operation. The principle avenue of approach has been to obtain a solution to the steady state network flow equations which adhere both to Kirchhoff's Laws and probabilistic laws, using either combinatorial or functional approximation techniques. Clearly the need of the present is to develop sound techniques for producing meaningful data to serve as input. This research has addressed this end and serves to bridge the gap between electric demand modeling, equipment failure analysis, etc., and the area of algorithm development. Therefore, the scope of this work lies squarely on developing an efficient means of producing sensible input information in the form of probability distributions for the many types of solution algorithms that have been developed. Two major areas of development are described in detail: a decomposition of stochastic processes which gives hope of stationarity, ergodicity, and perhaps even normality; and a powerful surrogate probability approach using proportions of time which allows the calculation of joint events from one dimensional probability spaces.

  16. Turbomachinery Flows Modeled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.

    1997-01-01

    Last year, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center used the average passage code APNASA to complete the largest three-dimensional simulation of a multistage axial flow compressor to date. Consisting of 29 blade rows, the configuration is typical of those found in aeroengines today. The simulation, which was executed on the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program IBM SP2 parallel computer located at the NASA Ames Research Center, took nearly 90 hr to complete. Since the completion of this activity, a fine-grain, parallel version of APNASA has been written by a team of researchers from General Electric, NASA Lewis, and NYMA. Timing studies performed on the SP2 have shown that, with eight processors assigned to each blade row, the simulation time is reduced by a factor of six. For this configuration, the simulation time would be 15 hr. The reduction in computing time indicates that an overnight turnaround of a multistage configuration simulation is feasible. In addition, average passage forms of two-equation turbulence models were formulated. These models are currently being incorporated into APNASA.

  17. Anchoring Distortions Coupled with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    COUETTE & POISEUILLE FLOWS OF NEMATIC POLYMERS IN VISCOUS SOLVENTS: MORPHOLOGY IN MOLECULAR ORIENTATION, STRESS & FLOW Hong Zhou...viscoelastic stresses, and flow feedback. Pre- vious studies in plane Couette & Poiseuille flow (with the exception of [7]) have focused on the coupling between...with Plane Couette & Poiseuille Flows of Nematic Polymers in Viscous Solvents: Morphology in Molecular Orientation, Stress & Flow 5a. CONTRACT

  18. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Dixon

    2004-02-11

    The purpose of this Model Report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) fluid flow and tracer transport models and submodels as well as the flow fields generated utilizing the UZ Flow and Transport Model of Yucca Mountain (UZ Model), Nevada. This work was planned in ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Performance Assessment Unsaturated Zone'' (BSC 2002 [160819], Section 1.10, Work Package AUZM06). The UZ Model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ Flow Model REV 00 ICN 01 (BSC 2001 [158726]) by incorporation of the conceptual repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These 3-D UZ flow fields are used directly by Performance Assessment (PA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test conceptual hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, this Model Report supports several PA activities, including abstractions, particle-tracking transport simulations, and the UZ Radionuclide Transport Model.

  19. Viscoelastic flow simulations in model porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, S.; Kuipers, J. A. M.; Peters, E. A. J. F.; Padding, J. T.

    2017-05-01

    We investigate the flow of unsteadfy three-dimensional viscoelastic fluid through an array of symmetric and asymmetric sets of cylinders constituting a model porous medium. The simulations are performed using a finite-volume methodology with a staggered grid. The solid-fluid interfaces of the porous structure are modeled using a second-order immersed boundary method [S. De et al., J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 232, 67 (2016), 10.1016/j.jnnfm.2016.04.002]. A finitely extensible nonlinear elastic constitutive model with Peterlin closure is used to model the viscoelastic part. By means of periodic boundary conditions, we model the flow behavior for a Newtonian as well as a viscoelastic fluid through successive contractions and expansions. We observe the presence of counterrotating vortices in the dead ends of our geometry. The simulations provide detailed insight into how flow structure, viscoelastic stresses, and viscoelastic work change with increasing Deborah number De. We observe completely different flow structures and different distributions of the viscoelastic work at high De in the symmetric and asymmetric configurations, even though they have the exact same porosity. Moreover, we find that even for the symmetric contraction-expansion flow, most energy dissipation is occurring in shear-dominated regions of the flow domain, not in extensional-flow-dominated regions.

  20. Integrated Inflammatory Stress (ITIS) Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsgaard, Elisabeth O.; Hjorth, Poul G.; Olufsen, Mette S.

    2017-01-01

    maintains a long-term level of the stress hormone cortisol which is also anti-inflammatory. A new integrated model of the interaction between these two subsystems of the inflammatory system is proposed and coined the integrated inflammatory stress (ITIS) model. The coupling mechanisms describing...

  1. A novel concept of measuring mass flow rates using flow induced stresses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P I Jagad; B P Puranik; A W Date

    2015-08-01

    Measurement of mass flow rate is important for automatic control of the mass flow rate in many industries such as semiconductor manufacturing and chemical industry (for supply of catalyst to a reaction). In the present work, a new concept for direct measurement of mass flow rates which does not depend on the volumetric flow rate measurement and obviates the need for the knowledge of density is proposed from the measurement of the flow induced stresses in a substrate. The concept is formulated by establishing the relationship between the mass flow rate and the stress in the substrate. To this end, the flow field and the stress field in the substrate are evaluated simultaneously using a numerical procedure and the necessary correlations are derived. A least squares based procedure is used to derive the mass flow rate from the correlations as a function of the stress in the substrate.

  2. Use of large-scale transient stresses and a coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach to calibrate a groundwater-flow model at the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); LaVenue, A.M. (INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-01-01

    A coupled adjoint-sensitivity/kriging approach was used to calibrate a groundwater-flow model to 10 years of human-induced transient hydraulic stresses at the WIPP site in New Mexico, USA. Transmissivity data obtained from local-scale hydraulic tests were first kriged to define an initial transmissivity distribution. Steady-state model calibration was then performed employing adjoint-sensitivity techniques to identify regions where transmissivity changes would improve the model fit to the observed steady-state heads. Subsequent transient calibration to large-scale hydraulic stresses created by shaft construction and long-term pumping tests aided in the identification of smaller scale features not detected during steady-state calibration. This transient calibration resulted in a much more reliable and defendable model for use in performance-assessment calculations. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  3. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  4. Stress transmission and incipient yield flow in dense granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael

    2010-05-01

    Jammed granular matter transmits stresses non-uniformly like no conventional solid, especially when it is on the verge of failure. Jamming is caused by self-organization of granular matter under external loads, often giving rise to networks of force chains that support the loads non-uniformly. An ongoing debate in the literature concerns the correct way to model the static stress field in such media: good old elasticity theory or newcomer isostaticity theory. The two differ significantly and, in particular in 2D, isostaticity theory leads naturally to force chain solutions. More recently, it has been proposed that real granular materials are made of mixtures of regions, some behaving elastically and some isostatically. The theory to describe these systems has been named stato-elasticity. In this paper, I first present the rationale for stato-elasticity theory. An important step towards the construction of this theory is a good understanding of stress transmission in the regions of pure isostatic states. A brief description is given of recently derived general solutions for 2D isostatic regions with nonuniform structures, which go well beyond the over-simplistic picture of force chains. I then show how the static stress equations are related directly to incipient yield flow and derive the equations that govern yield and creep rheology of dense granular matter at the initial stages of failure. These equations are general and describe strains in granular materials of both rigid and compliant particles.

  5. Impact of flow rates in a cardiac cycle on correlations between advanced human carotid plaque progression and mechanical flow shear stress and plaque wall stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferguson Marina

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mechanical stresses are known to play important roles in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression and rupture. It has been well-accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and early progression correlate negatively with flow wall shear stresses (FSS. However, mechanisms governing advanced plaque progression are not well understood. Method In vivo serial MRI data (patient follow-up were acquired from 14 patients after informed consent. Each patient had 2-4 scans (scan interval: 18 months. Thirty-two scan pairs (baseline and follow-up scans were formed with slices matched for model construction and analysis. Each scan pair had 4-10 matched slices which gave 400-1000 data points for analysis (100 points per slice on lumen. Point-wise plaque progression was defined as the wall thickness increase (WTI at each data point. 3D computational models with fluid-structure interactions were constructed based on in vivo serial MRI data to extract flow shear stress and plaque wall stress (PWS on all data points to quantify correlations between plaque progression and mechanical stresses (FSS and PWS. FSS and PWS data corresponding to both maximum and minimum flow rates in a cardiac cycle were used to investigate the impact of flow rates on those correlations. Results Using follow-up scans and maximum flow rates, 19 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant positive correlation between WTI and FSS (positive/negative/no significance correlation ratio = 19/9/4, and 26 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS (correlation ratio = 2/26/4. Corresponding to minimum flow rates, the correlation ratio for WTI vs. FSS and WTI vs. PWS were (20/7/5 and (2/26/4, respectively. Using baseline scans, the correlation ratios for WTI vs. FSS were (10/12/10 and (9/13/10 for maximum and minimum flow rates, respectively. The correlation ratios for WTI vs. PWS were the same (18/5/9, corresponding to maximum and minimum

  6. Impact of flow rates in a cardiac cycle on correlations between advanced human carotid plaque progression and mechanical flow shear stress and plaque wall stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chun; Canton, Gador; Yuan, Chun; Ferguson, Marina; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Tang, Dalin

    2011-07-19

    Mechanical stresses are known to play important roles in atherosclerotic plaque initiation, progression and rupture. It has been well-accepted that atherosclerosis initiation and early progression correlate negatively with flow wall shear stresses (FSS). However, mechanisms governing advanced plaque progression are not well understood. In vivo serial MRI data (patient follow-up) were acquired from 14 patients after informed consent. Each patient had 2-4 scans (scan interval: 18 months). Thirty-two scan pairs (baseline and follow-up scans) were formed with slices matched for model construction and analysis. Each scan pair had 4-10 matched slices which gave 400-1000 data points for analysis (100 points per slice on lumen). Point-wise plaque progression was defined as the wall thickness increase (WTI) at each data point. 3D computational models with fluid-structure interactions were constructed based on in vivo serial MRI data to extract flow shear stress and plaque wall stress (PWS) on all data points to quantify correlations between plaque progression and mechanical stresses (FSS and PWS). FSS and PWS data corresponding to both maximum and minimum flow rates in a cardiac cycle were used to investigate the impact of flow rates on those correlations. Using follow-up scans and maximum flow rates, 19 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant positive correlation between WTI and FSS (positive/negative/no significance correlation ratio = 19/9/4), and 26 out of 32 scan pairs showed a significant negative correlation between WTI and PWS (correlation ratio = 2/26/4). Corresponding to minimum flow rates, the correlation ratio for WTI vs. FSS and WTI vs. PWS were (20/7/5) and (2/26/4), respectively. Using baseline scans, the correlation ratios for WTI vs. FSS were (10/12/10) and (9/13/10) for maximum and minimum flow rates, respectively. The correlation ratios for WTI vs. PWS were the same (18/5/9), corresponding to maximum and minimum flow rates. Flow shear stress

  7. A Marine Traffic Flow Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsz Leung Yip

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A model is developed for studying marine traffic flow through classical traffic flow theories, which can provide us with a better understanding of the phenomenon of traffic flow of ships. On one hand, marine traffic has its special features and is fundamentally different from highway, air and pedestrian traffic. The existing traffic models cannot be simply extended to marine traffic without addressing marine traffic features. On the other hand, existing literature on marine traffic focuses on one ship or two ships but does not address the issues in marine traffic flow.

  8. Flow Over a Model Submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan; Smits, Alexander

    2003-11-01

    Experimental investigation over a DARPA SUBOFF submarine model (SUBOFF Model) was performed using flow visualization and Digital Particle Image Velocimetry (DPIV). The model has an axisymmetric body with sail and fins, and it was supported by a streamlined strut that was formed by the extension of the sail appendage. The range of flow conditions studied correspond to a Reynolds numbers based on model length, Re_L, of about 10^5. Velocity vector fields, turbulence intensities, vorticity fields, and flow visualization in the vicinity of the junction flows are presented. In the vicinity of the control surface and sail hull junctions, the presence of streamwise vortices in the form of horseshoe or necklace vortices locally dominates the flow. The effects of unsteady motions about an axis passing through the sail are also investigated to understand the evolution of the unsteady wake.

  9. Multiple Temperature Model for Near Continuum Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    XU, Kun; Liu, Hongwei [Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Jiang, Jianzheng [Chinese Academy ofSciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-09-15

    In the near continuum flow regime, the flow may have different translational temperatures in different directions. It is well known that for increasingly rarefied flow fields, the predictions from continuum formulation, such as the Navier-Stokes equations, lose accuracy. These inaccuracies may be partially due to the single temperature assumption in the Navier-Stokes equations. Here, based on the gas-kinetic Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) equation, a multitranslational temperature model is proposed and used in the flow calculations. In order to fix all three translational temperatures, two constraints are additionally proposed to model the energy exchange in different directions. Based on the multiple temperature assumption, the Navier-Stokes relation between the stress and strain is replaced by the temperature relaxation term, and the Navier-Stokes assumption is recovered only in the limiting case when the flow is close to the equilibrium with the same temperature in different directions. In order to validate the current model, both the Couette and Poiseuille flows are studied in the transition flow regime.

  10. Constitutive model development for flows of granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chialvo, Sebastian

    Granular flows are ubiquitous in both natural and industrial processes. When com- posed of dry, noncohesive particles, they manifest three different flow regimes---commonly referred to as the quasistatic, inertial, and intermediate regimes---each of which exhibits its own dependences on solids volume fraction, shear rate, and particle-level properties. The differences in these regimes can be attributed to microscale phenomena, with quasistatic flows being dominated by enduring, frictional contacts between grains, inertial flows by grain collisions, and intermediate flows by a combination of the two. Existing constitutive models for the solids-phase stress tend to focus on one or two regimes at a time, with a limited degree of success; the same is true of models for wall-boundary conditions for granular flows. Moreover, these models tend not to be based on detailed particle-level flow data, either from experiment or simulation. Clearly, a comprehensive modeling framework is lacking. The work in this thesis aims to address these issues by proposing continuum models constructed on the basis of discrete element method (DEM) simulations of granular shear flows. Specifically, we propose (a) a constitutive stress model that bridges the three dense flow regimes, (b) an modified kinetic-theory model that covers both the dense and dilute ends of the inertial regime, and (c) a boundary-condition model for dense, wall-bounded flows. These models facilitate the modeling of a wide range of flow systems of practical interest and provide ideas for further model development and refinement.

  11. Shear flow generation by Reynolds stress and suppression of resistive g-modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Horton, W. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1993-08-01

    Suppression of resistive g-mode turbulence by background shear flow generated from a small external flow source and amplified by the fluctuation-induced Reynolds stress is demonstrated and analyzed. The model leads to a paradigm for the low-to-high (L-H) confinement mode transition. To demonstrate the L-H transition model, single-helicity nonlinear fluid simulations using the vorticity equation for the electrostatic potential, the pressure fluctuation equation and the background poloidal flow equation are used in the sheared slab configuration. The relative efficiency of the external flow and the Reynolds stress for producing shear flow depends on the poloidal flow damping parameter {nu} which is given by neoclassical theory. For large {nu}, the external flow is a dominant contribution to the total background poloidal shear flow and its strength predicted by the neoclassical theory is not enough to suppress the turbulence significantly. In contrast, for small {nu}, we show that the fluctuations drive a Reynolds stress that becomes large and suddenly, at some critical point in time, shear flow much larger than the external flow is generated and leads to an abrupt, order unity reduction of the turbulent transport just like that of the L-H transition in tokamak experiments. It is also found that, even in the case of no external flow, the shear flow generation due to the Reynolds stress occurs through the nonlinear interaction of the resistive g-modes and reduces the transport. To supplement the numerical solutions we derive the Landau equation for the mode amplitude of the resistive g-mode taking into account the fluctuation-induced shear flow and analyze the opposite action of the Reynolds stress in the resistive g turbulence compared with the classical shear flow Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) driven turbulence.

  12. Modeling Size Polydisperse Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueptow, Richard M.; Schlick, Conor P.; Isner, Austin B.; Umbanhowar, Paul B.; Ottino, Julio M.

    2014-11-01

    Modeling size segregation of granular materials has important applications in many industrial processes and geophysical phenomena. We have developed a continuum model for granular multi- and polydisperse size segregation based on flow kinematics, which we obtain from discrete element method (DEM) simulations. The segregation depends on dimensionless control parameters that are functions of flow rate, particle sizes, collisional diffusion coefficient, shear rate, and flowing layer depth. To test the theoretical approach, we model segregation in tri-disperse quasi-2D heap flow and log-normally distributed polydisperse quasi-2D chute flow. In both cases, the segregated particle size distributions match results from full-scale DEM simulations and experiments. While the theory was applied to size segregation in steady quasi-2D flows here, the approach can be readily generalized to include additional drivers of segregation such as density and shape as well as other geometries where the flow field can be characterized including rotating tumbler flow and three-dimensional bounded heap flow. Funded by The Dow Chemical Company and NSF Grant CMMI-1000469.

  13. Nonlinear Reynolds stress models and the renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert; Barton, J. Michael

    1990-01-01

    The renormalization group is applied to derive a nonlinear algebraic Reynolds stress model of anisotropic turbulence in which the Reynolds stresses are quadratic functions of the mean velocity gradients. The model results from a perturbation expansion that is truncated systematically at second order with subsequent terms contributing no further information. The resulting turbulence model applied to both low and high Reynolds number flows without requiring wall functions or ad hoc modifications of the equations. All constants are derived from the renormalization group procedure; no adjustable constants arise. The model permits inequality of the Reynolds normal stresses, a necessary condition for calculating turbulence-driven secondary flows in noncircular ducts.

  14. Shear stresses and mean flow in shoaling and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.; De Vriend, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    We investigate the vertical, wave averaged distributions of shear stresses and Eulerian flow in normally incident, shoaling and breaking waves. It is found that shear stresses are solely due to wave amplitude variations, which can be caused by shoaling, boundary layer dissipation and/or breaking wav

  15. DISCRETE AND CONTINUUM MODELLING OF GRANULAR FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. P. Zhu; Y. H. WU; A. B. Yu

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses three popular methods simulating granular flow at different time and length scales:discrete element method (DEM), averaging method and viscous, elastic-plastic continuum model. The theoretical models of these methods and their applications to hopper flows are discussed. It is shown that DEM is an effective method to study the fundamentals of granular flow at a particle or microscopic scale. By use of the continuum approach, granular flow can also be described at a continuum or macroscopic scale. Macroscopic quantities such as velocity and stress can be obtained by use of such computational method as FEM. However, this approach depends on the constitutive relationship of materials and ignores the effect of microscopic structure of granular flow. The combined approach of DEM and averaging method can overcome this problem. The approach takes into account the discrete nature of granular materials and does not require any global assumption and thus allows a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of granular flow. However, it is difficult to adapt this approach to process modelling because of the limited number of particles which can be handled with the present computational capacity, and the difficulty in handling non-spherical particles.Further work is needed to develop an appropriate approach to overcome these problems.

  16. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The program focuses on turbulence modeling enhancements for predicting high-speed rocket base flows. A key component of the effort is the collection of high-fidelity...

  17. Numerical experiments modelling turbulent flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trefilík Jiří

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The work aims at investigation of the possibilities of modelling transonic flows mainly in external aerodynamics. New results are presented and compared with reference data and previously achieved results. For the turbulent flow simulations two modifications of the basic k – ω model are employed: SST and TNT. The numerical solution was achieved by using the MacCormack scheme on structured non-ortogonal grids. Artificial dissipation was added to improve the numerical stability.

  18. Turbulent oscillating channel flow subjected to wind stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, V.; Armenio, Vincenzo; Geurts, Bernard; Fröhlich, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    The channel flow subjected to a wind stress at the free surface and an oscillating pressure gradient is investigated using large-eddy simulations (LES). a slowly pulsating mean flow occurs with the turbulent mechanics essentially being quasi steady. Logarithmic boundary layers are present at both th

  19. Turbulent oscillating channel flow subjected to a wind stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kramer, W.; Clercx, H.J.H.; Armenio, V.

    2008-01-01

    The Westerschelde estuary in the Netherlands is characterized by a strong tidal driven flow with typical velocities in the range of 0.2 to 1 m/s. In addition to the tides the wind (5 m/s) exerts a stress at the free surface driving the upper fluid layers. To investigate this flow we performed resolv

  20. Computational modeling of concrete flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roussel, Nicolas; Geiker, Mette Rica; Dufour, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides a general overview of the present status regarding computational modeling of the flow of fresh concrete. The computational modeling techniques that can be found in the literature may be divided into three main families: single fluid simulations, numerical modeling of discrete...

  1. Effect of thermal shield and gas flow on thermal elastic stresses in 300 mm silicon crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yu; XIAO Qinghua; ZHOU Qigang; DAI Xiaolin; TU Hailing

    2006-01-01

    The thermal elastic stresses induced in 300 mm Si crystal may be great troubles because it can incur the generation of dislocations and undesirable excessive residual stresses.A special thermal modeling tool, CrysVUn, was used for numerical analysis of thermal elastic stresses and stress distribution of 300 mm Si crystal under the consideration of different thermal shields and gas flow conditions.The adopted governing partial equations for stress calculation are Cauchy's first and second laws of motion.It is demonstrated that the presence and shape of thermal shield, the gas pressure and velocity can strongly affect von Mises stress distribution in Si crystal.With steep-wall shield, however, the maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are relatively low.With slope-wall shield or without shield, both maximal stress and ratio of high stress area are increased in evidence.Whether thermal shields are used or not, the increase of gas flow velocity could raise the stress level.In contrast, the increase of gas pressure cannot result in so significant effect.The influence of thermal shield and gas flow should be attributed to the modification of heat conduction and heat radiation by them.

  2. Modeling of Wall-Bounded Complex Flows and Free Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Zhu, Jiang; Lumley, John L.

    1994-01-01

    Various wall-bounded flows with complex geometries and free shear flows have been studied with a newly developed realizable Reynolds stress algebraic equation model. The model development is based on the invariant theory in continuum mechanics. This theory enables us to formulate a general constitutive relation for the Reynolds stresses. Pope was the first to introduce this kind of constitutive relation to turbulence modeling. In our study, realizability is imposed on the truncated constitutive relation to determine the coefficients so that, unlike the standard k-E eddy viscosity model, the present model will not produce negative normal stresses in any situations of rapid distortion. The calculations based on the present model have shown an encouraging success in modeling complex turbulent flows.

  3. Stimulated bioluminescence by fluid shear stress associated with pipe flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Jing; Wang Jiangan; Wu Ronghua, E-mail: caojing981@126.com [Col. of Electronic Eng., Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan 430033 (China)

    2011-01-01

    Dinoflagellate can be stimulated bioluminescence by hydrodynamic agitation. Two typical dinoflagellate (Lingulodinium polyedrum and Pyrocystis noctiluca) was choosed to research stimulated bioluminescence. The bioluminescence intensity and shear stress intensity were measured using fully developed pipe flow. There is shear stress threshold to agitate organism bioluminescence. From these experiment, the response thresholds of the stimulated bioluminscence always occurred in laminar flows at a shear stress level of 0.6-3 dyn/cm{sup 2}. At the same time, the spectral characteristc of dinoflagellate was recorded, the wavelength of them is about 470nm, and the full width at half maximum is approximate 30nm.

  4. Turbulence modelling of flow fields in thrust chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. P.; Kim, Y. M.; Shang, H. M.

    1993-01-01

    Following the consensus of a workshop in Turbulence Modelling for Liquid Rocket Thrust Chambers, the current effort was undertaken to study the effects of second-order closure on the predictions of thermochemical flow fields. To reduce the instability and computational intensity of the full second-order Reynolds Stress Model, an Algebraic Stress Model (ASM) coupled with a two-layer near wall treatment was developed. Various test problems, including the compressible boundary layer with adiabatic and cooled walls, recirculating flows, swirling flows, and the entire SSME nozzle flow were studied to assess the performance of the current model. Detailed calculations for the SSME exit wall flow around the nozzle manifold were executed. As to the overall flow predictions, the ASM removes another assumption for appropriate comparison with experimental data to account for the non-isotropic turbulence effects.

  5. An improved turbulence model for rotating shear flows*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yasutaka; Hattori, Hirofumi

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we construct a turbulence model based on a low-Reynolds-number non-linear k e model for turbulent flows in a rotating channel. Two-equation models, in particular the non-linear k e model, are very effective for solving various flow problems encountered in technological applications. In channel flows with rotation, however, the explicit effects of rotation only appear in the Reynolds stress components. The exact equations for k and e do not have any explicit terms concerned with the rotation effects. Moreover, the Coriolis force vanishes in the momentum equation for a fully developed channel flow with spanwise rotation. Consequently, in order to predict rotating channel flows, after proper revision the Reynolds stress equation model or the non-linear eddy viscosity model should be used. In this study, we improve the non-linear k e model so as to predict rotating channel flows. In the modelling, the wall-limiting behaviour of turbulence is also considered. First, we evaluated the non-linear k e model using the direct numerical simulation (DNS) database for a fully developed rotating turbulent channel flow. Next, we assessed the non-linear k e model at various rotation numbers. Finally, on the basis of these assessments, we reconstruct the non-linear k e model to calculate rotating shear flows, and the proposed model is tested on various rotation number channel flows. The agreement with DNS and experiment data is quite satisfactory.

  6. Modeling soil detachment capacity by rill flow using hydraulic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Zhanli; Shen, Nan; Chen, Hao

    2016-04-01

    The relationship between soil detachment capacity (Dc) by rill flow and hydraulic parameters (e.g., flow velocity, shear stress, unit stream power, stream power, and unit energy) at low flow rates is investigated to establish an accurate experimental model. Experiments are conducted using a 4 × 0.1 m rill hydraulic flume with a constant artificial roughness on the flume bed. The flow rates range from 0.22 × 10-3 m2 s-1 to 0.67 × 10-3 m2 s-1, and the slope gradients vary from 15.8% to 38.4%. Regression analysis indicates that the Dc by rill flow can be predicted using the linear equations of flow velocity, stream power, unit stream power, and unit energy. Dc by rill flow that is fitted to shear stress can be predicted with a power function equation. Predictions based on flow velocity, unit energy, and stream power are powerful, but those based on shear stress, especially on unit stream power, are relatively poor. The prediction based on flow velocity provides the best estimates of Dc by rill flow because of the simplicity and availability of its measurements. Owing to error in measuring flow velocity at low flow rates, the predictive abilities of Dc by rill flow using all hydraulic parameters are relatively lower in this study compared with the results of previous research. The measuring accuracy of experiments for flow velocity should be improved in future research.

  7. PERFORMANCE MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF BLOOD FLOW IN ELASTIC ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil Kumar; C.L. Varshney; G.C. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Two different non-Newtonian models for blood flow are considered, first a simple power law model displaying shear thinning viscosity, and second a generalized Maxwell model displaying both shear thinning viscosity and oscillating flow viscous-elasticity. These models are used along with a Newtonian model to study sinusoidal flow of blood in rigid and elastic straight arteries in the presence of magnetic field. The elasticity of blood does not appear to influence its flow behavior under physiological conditions in the large arteries,purely viscous shear thinning model should be quite realistic for simulating blood flow under these conditions. On using the power law model with high shear rate for sinusoidal flow simulation in elastic arteries, the mean and amplitude of the flow rate were found to be lower for a power law fluid compared to Newtonian fluid for the same pressure gradient. The governing equations have been solved by Crank-Niclson scheme. The results are interpreted in the context of blood in the elastic arteries keeping the magnetic effects in view. For physiological flow simulation in the aorta, an increase in mean wall shear stress, but a reduction in peak wall shear stress were observed for power law model compared to a Newtonian fluid model for matched flow rate wave form. Blood flow in the presence of transverse magnetic field in an elastic artery is investigated and the influence of factors such as morphology and surface irregularity is evaluated.

  8. Off-centered stagnation point flow of a couple stress fluid towards a rotating disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Najeeb Alam; Riaz, Fatima

    2014-01-01

    An investigation has been made to study the off-centered stagnation flow of a couple stress fluid over a rotating disk. The model developed for the governing problem in the form of partial differential equations has been converted to ordinary differential equations with the use of suitable similarity transformation. The analytical approximation has been made with the most promising analytical approach, homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence region of the obtained solution is determined and plotted. The effects of couple stress and nondimensional parameters have been observed on the flows of couple stress fluid. Also comparison has been made with the Newtonian fluid as the special case of considered problem.

  9. Officer Accessions Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-31

    18]) General Charles Campbell noted that , although…. “the Army has a system for organizing, staffing, equipping, training, deploying, sustaining...Harrell, Charles , Ghosh, Biman K., & Bowden Jr.,Royce O. 2004. Simulation Using ProModel. Second edition. McGraw Hill, New York. [22] Klimas, J...RUNS: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook. U.S. Army War College, Carlisle, PA. [24] McNeill , Dan K. 2005 (August). Army Force Generation

  10. ANALYSIS OF PULSATILE FLOW IN THE PARALLEL-PLATE FLOW CHAMBER WITH SPATIAL SHEAR STRESS GRADIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Kai-rong; HU Xu-qu; LIU Zhao-rong

    2007-01-01

    The Parallel-Plate Flow Chamber (PPFC), of which the height is far smaller than its own length and width, is one of the main apparatus for the in-vitro study of the mechanical behavior of cultured vascular Endothelical Cells (ECs) exposed to fluid shear stress. The steady flow in different kinds of PPFC has been extensively investigated, whereas, the pulsatile flow in the PPFC has little attention. In consideration of the characteristics of geometrical size and pulsatile flow in the PPFC, the 3-D pulsatile flow was decomposed into a 2-D pulsatile flow in the vertical plane, and an incompressible plane potential flow in the horizontal plane. A simple method was then proposed to analyze the pulsatile flow in the PPFC with spatial shear stress gradient. On the basis of the method, the pulsatile fluid shear stresses in several reported PPFCs with spatial shear stress gradients were calculated. The results were theoretically meaningful for applying the PPFCs in-vitro, to simulate the pulsatile fluid shear stress environment, to which cultured ECs were exposed.

  11. A NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE STRESS DISTRIBUTION IN HOPPER FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiping Zhu; Aibing Yu

    2003-01-01

    The stress distributions of granular flow in a cylindrical hopper with flat bottom are investigated by means of a combined approach of discrete element method (DEM) and averaging method. The filling and discharge of the hopper flow are first simulated at a particle level by means of a modified DEM. The results are then used to determine the velocity and stress profiles of the hopper flow by means of an averaging method. The analysis is focused on a central section plane of the hopper due to the relatively perfect axial symmetry. The velocity profiles are illustrated to be consistent with those obtained by the previous experiments, confirming the validity of the proposed approach. The distributions of four components of the planar stress tensor at different heights are quantified. It is shown that the vertical normal stress increases with increasing the height near the central axis, the horizontal normal stress varies more slowly at a higher level and is almost constant when the height is equal to or greater than about 12 particle diameter, and the magnitudes of two shear stresses are equal at the central zone of the hopper but not so at the points near the walls. The dependence of stress distributions on the wall mechanical properties such as sliding resistance and rolling resistance is also discussed.

  12. The model of stress distribution in polymer electrolyte membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Atrazhev, Vadim V; Dmitriev, Dmitry V; Erikhman, Nikolay S; Sultanov, Vadim I; Patterson, Timothy; Burlatsky, Sergei F

    2014-01-01

    An analytical model of mechanical stress in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) of a hydrogen/air fuel cell with porous Water Transfer Plates (WTP) is developed in this work. The model considers a mechanical stress in the membrane is a result of the cell load cycling under constant oxygen utilization. The load cycling causes the cycling of the inlet gas flow rate, which results in the membrane hydration/dehydration close to the gas inlet. Hydration/dehydration of the membrane leads to membrane swelling/shrinking, which causes mechanical stress in the constrained membrane. Mechanical stress results in through-plane crack formation. Thereby, the mechanical stress in the membrane causes mechanical failure of the membrane, limiting fuel cell lifetime. The model predicts the stress in the membrane as a function of the cell geometry, membrane material properties and operation conditions. The model was applied for stress calculation in GORE-SELECT.

  13. Flow-Induced Stress Distribution in Porous Scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavassiliou, Dimitrios; Voronov, Roman; Vangordon, Samuel; Sikavitsas, Vassilios

    2010-11-01

    Flow-induced stresses help the differentiation and proliferation of mesenchymal cells cultured in porous scaffolds within perfusion bioreactors. The distribution of stresses in a scaffold is thus important for understanding the tissue growth process in such reactors. Computational results for flow through Poly-L-Lactic Acid porous scaffolds that have been produced with salt-leaching techniques, and for scaffolds that have been constructed with nonwoven fibers, indicate that the probability density function (pdf) of the wall stress, when normalized with the mean and the standard deviation of the pdf, appears to follow a single type of pdf. The scaffolds were imaged with micro-CT and the simulations were run with lattice Boltzmann methods. The parameters of the distribution can be obtained using Darcy's law and the Blake-Kozeny-Carman equation. Experimental results available in the literature appear to corroborate the computational findings, leading to the conclusion that stresses in high-porosity porous materials follow a single distribution.

  14. Transient analysis of diffusive chemical reactive species for couple stress fluid flow over vertical cylinder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. P. RANI; G. J. REDDY; C. N. KIM

    2013-01-01

    The unsteady natural convective couple stress fluid flow over a semi-infinite vertical cylinder is analyzed for the homogeneous first-order chemical reaction effect. The couple stress fluid flow model introduces the length dependent effect based on the material constant and dynamic viscosity. Also, it introduces the biharmonic operator in the Navier-Stokes equations, which is absent in the case of Newtonian fluids. The solution to the time-dependent non-linear and coupled governing equations is carried out with an unconditionally stable Crank-Nicolson type of numerical schemes. Numerical results for the transient flow variables, the average wall shear stress, the Nusselt number, and the Sherwood number are shown graphically for both generative and destructive reactions. The time to reach the temporal maximum increases as the reaction constant K increases. The average values of the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate decrease as K increases, while increase with the increase in the Sherwood number.

  15. Computational turbulent stress closure for large-eddy simulation of compressible flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bos, F.; Geurts, Bernardus J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the computation of stress tensors for turbulent compressible flow for purposes of subgrid modeling for LES (large eddy simulation) methods in an effort to provide a model closure. The method uses and compares a variety of filters and special decomposition methods on the velocity

  16. Determination of flow stress and the critical strain for the onset of dynamic recrystallization using a sine function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solhjoo, Soheil

    2014-01-01

    A new model has been developed to estimate the flow stress under hot deformation conditions up to the peak of the stress-strain curves. The model is constructed on the basis of the general form of sine functions by introducing an additional exponent. Besides, an equation is derived from the model, w

  17. Prediction of flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate compression at elevated temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ravindranadh BOBBILI; B. RAMAKRISHNA; V. MADHU; A.K. GOGIA

    2015-01-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) constitutive model and JohnsoneCook (JeC) model were developed for 7017 aluminium alloy based on high strain rate data generated from split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments at various temperatures. A neural network configuration consists of both training and validation, which is effectively employed to predict flow stress. Temperature, strain rate and strain are considered as inputs, whereas flow stress is taken as output of the neural network. A comparative study on JohnsoneCook (JeC) model and neural network model was performed. It was observed that the developed neural network model could predict flow stress under various strain rates and tem-peratures. The experimental stressestrain data obtained from high strain rate compression tests using SHPB over a range of temperatures (25?e300 ?C), strains (0.05e0.3) and strain rates (1500e4500 s?1) were employed to formulate JeC model to predict the flow stress behaviour of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rate loading. The JeC model and the back-propagation ANN model were developed to predict the flow stress of 7017 aluminium alloy under high strain rates, and their predictability was evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). R and AARE for the J-C model are found to be 0.8461 and 10.624%, respectively, while R and AARE for the ANN model are 0.9995 and 2.58%, respectively. The predictions of ANN model are observed to be in consistent with the experimental data for all strain rates and temperatures.

  18. Flow stress prediction for B210P steel at hot working conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guangwei; Di, Hongshuang; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Zhongwei; Wang, Yafei; Sui, Pengfei

    2013-05-01

    Prediction of the flow stress is a significant step to optimize the hot working processes. In order to establish a proper deformation constitutive equation, the compressive deformation behavior of B210P steel was investigated at temperature from 950° to 1150° and strain rates from 0.1s-1 to 10s-1 on a Gleeble-2000 thermo-simulation machine. Based on the true stress-strain data from flow stress curves, a revised model describing the relationships of the flow stress, strain rate and temperature of B210P steel at elevated temperatures is proposed considering the effect of strain on flow stress. The activation energies have been in the range of 277.740-420.241kJ/mol for different amounts of strain. Finally, the accuracy of the developed constitutive equation has been verified using standard statistical parameters. The results confirm that the developed strain-dependent constitutive equation gives an accurate and precise estimate of the flow stress in the relevant deformation conditions.

  19. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K J

    2015-06-07

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  20. Flow rate dependency of critical wall shear stress in a radial-flow cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, J.G.; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk; Sindic, M.

    2009-01-01

    of a water or ethanol suspension of starch granules on the surfaces. Depending on the substrate and on the suspending liquid, the aggregates differed in size and shape. Aggregate removal was studied at two flow rates. At the lower flow rate (Re-inlet = 955), the values of critical wall shear stress......In the present work, a radial-flow cell was used to study the removal of starch particle aggregates from several solid substrates (glass, stainless steel, polystyrene and PTFE) in order to determine the critical wall shear stress value for each case. The particle aggregates were formed by aspersion...... for the different surfaces suggested that capillary forces were, for all of them, playing an important role in aggregate adhesion since aqueous based aggregates were always more difficult to remove. At the higher flow rate (Re-inlet = 2016) the critical wall shear stress increased as a result of the change...

  1. High Temperature Softening Behaviors and Flow Stress Model for a High Molybdenum Austenitic Stainless Steel%高钼奥氏体不锈钢高温软化行为与流变应力模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Single-stage and double-stage interrupted hot compression tests for physical simulating hot rolling have been carried out on the THERMECMATSTOR-Z simulator for 00Cr20Ni18Mo6Cu[ N] austenitic stainless steel under high temperature (1223~1373 K) and various strain rates (0.1~60 s- 1 ). The high temperature mechanical behaviors and microstructure evolution of the steel were studied. The activation energies of hot deformation and dynamic, static and metadynamic recrystallization were calculated. Serials of perfect flow stress model considering dynamic recrystallization were established. The predicted result by the model was well agreed with the experiment data.The kinetics of metadynamic and static recrystallization had also been determined.

  2. Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, R. B.; Giacomin, A. J.; Schmalzer, A. M.; Aumnate, C.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the simplest relevant molecular model for large-amplitude shear (LAOS) flow of a polymeric liquid: the suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian solvent. We find explicit analytical expressions for the shear rate amplitude and frequency dependences of the first and third harmonics of the alternating shear stress response. We include a detailed comparison of these predictions with the corresponding results for the simplest relevant continuum model: the corotational Maxwell model. We find that the responses of both models are qualitatively similar. The rigid dumbbell model relies entirely on the dumbbell orientation to explain the viscoelastic response of the polymeric liquid, including the higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Our analysis employs the general method of Bird and Armstrong ["Time-dependent flows of dilute solutions of rodlike macromolecules," J. Chem. Phys. 56, 3680 (1972)] for analyzing the behavior of the rigid dumbbell model in any unsteady shear flow. We derive the first three terms of the deviation of the orientational distribution function from the equilibrium state. Then, after getting the "paren functions," we use these for evaluating the shear stress for LAOS flow. We find the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops predicted to be reasonable.

  3. Numerical predictions and measurements of Reynolds normal stresses in turbulent pipe flow of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resende, P.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEMEGI, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)]. E-mail: resende@fe.up.pt; Escudier, M.P. [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: escudier@liv.ac.uk; Presti, F [Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GH (United Kingdom); Pinho, F.T. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, DEM, Universidade do Minho Campus de Azurem, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)]. E-mail: fpinho@dem.uminho.pt; Cruz, D.O.A. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Para-UFPa Campus Universitario do Guama, 66075-900 Belem, Para (Brazil)]. E-mail: doac@ufpa.br

    2006-04-15

    An anisotropic low Reynolds number k-{epsilon} turbulence model has been developed and its performance compared with experimental data for fully-developed turbulent pipe flow of four different polymer solutions. Although the predictions of friction factor, mean velocity and turbulent kinetic energy show only slight improvements over those of a previous isotropic model [Cruz, D.O.A., Pinho, F.T., Resende, P.R., 2004. Modeling the new stress for improved drag reduction predictions of viscoelastic pipe flow. J. Non-Newt. Fluid Mech. 121, 127-141], the new turbulence model is capable of predicting the enhanced anisotropy of the Reynolds normal stresses that accompanies polymer drag reduction in turbulent flow.

  4. Data assimilation using a hybrid ice flow model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Goldberg

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid models, or depth-integrated flow models that include the effect of both longitudinal stresses and vertical shearing, are becoming more prevalent in dynamical ice modeling. Under a wide range of conditions they closely approximate the well-known First Order stress balance, yet are of computationally lower dimension, and thus require less intensive resources. Concomitant with the development and use of these models is the need to perform inversions of observed data. Here, an inverse control method is extended to use a hybrid flow model as a forward model. We derive an adjoint of a hybrid model and use it for inversion of ice-stream basal traction from observed surface velocities. A novel aspect of the adjoint derivation is a retention of non-linearities in Glen's flow law. Experiments show that including those nonlinearities is advantageous in minimization of the cost function, yielding a more efficient inversion procedure.

  5. Prediction of the Hot Flow Stress Behavior of AA6063 Including Mg2Si Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Daniel; Mahmoodkhani, Yahya; Whitney, Mark; Wells, Mary

    2017-03-01

    A constitutive model that includes the effect of Mg2Si dissolution during pre-deformation heating and holding has been developed for the prediction of the hot flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy. The deformation behavior of homogenized AA6063 aluminum alloy was studied by performing compression tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator at temperatures ranging from 400 to 550 °C and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s-1. A one-dimensional model of particle dissolution in spherical coordinate system was developed to determine the Mg-Si solute content during pre-deformation heating and holding. Using the Mg solute content determined from the particle dissolution model, the flow stress during the deformation of AA6063 aluminum alloy at specific temperatures and strain rates was predicted using a modified hyperbolic sine equation. The constitutive model developed was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements in this study as well as other experimental and model results published in the literature. A 14% increase in flow stress of the alloy was observed for an increase in hold time from 60 to 1500 s at 450 °C. This is due to increased deformation resistance of the alloy as the Mg-Si solute content increases. The modified hyperbolic sine equation developed in this study clearly shows that accounting for Mg-Si solute content improves the ability to accurately predict the flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy.

  6. Prediction of the Hot Flow Stress Behavior of AA6063 Including Mg2Si Dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Daniel; Mahmoodkhani, Yahya; Whitney, Mark; Wells, Mary

    2017-02-01

    A constitutive model that includes the effect of Mg2Si dissolution during pre-deformation heating and holding has been developed for the prediction of the hot flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy. The deformation behavior of homogenized AA6063 aluminum alloy was studied by performing compression tests on a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator at temperatures ranging from 400 to 550 °C and strain rates from 0.01 to 10 s-1. A one-dimensional model of particle dissolution in spherical coordinate system was developed to determine the Mg-Si solute content during pre-deformation heating and holding. Using the Mg solute content determined from the particle dissolution model, the flow stress during the deformation of AA6063 aluminum alloy at specific temperatures and strain rates was predicted using a modified hyperbolic sine equation. The constitutive model developed was found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements in this study as well as other experimental and model results published in the literature. A 14% increase in flow stress of the alloy was observed for an increase in hold time from 60 to 1500 s at 450 °C. This is due to increased deformation resistance of the alloy as the Mg-Si solute content increases. The modified hyperbolic sine equation developed in this study clearly shows that accounting for Mg-Si solute content improves the ability to accurately predict the flow stress behavior of AA6063 aluminum alloy.

  7. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic fl...

  8. Modeling of Residual Stresses In Toughened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2006-01-01

    -depth knowledge of the residual stresses in toughened glass near holes and edges where the total stress state is a combination of contact stresses and residual stresses. The present paper, presenting the derivation and results for a model predicting the residual stresses in a glass plate far from edges and holes......, is a step towards such a model. The model is based on the Instant Freeze concept with a few modifications. Current work, using a partial differential equation approach for the modeling and state-of-the-art in modeling residual stresses in glass is briefly presented, and a short description of the toughening...

  9. Prediction of flow stress of Ti-15-3 alloy with artificial neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hot compression experiments were conducted on Ti-15-3 alloy specimens using Gleeble-1500 Thermal Simulator.These tests were focused to obtain the flow stress data under various conditions of strain,strain rate and temperature. On the basis of these data, the predicting model for the nonlinear relation between flow stress and deformation strain,strain rate and temperature for Ti-15-3 alloy was developed with a back-propagation artificial neural network method. Results show that the neural network can reproduce the flow stress in the sampled data and predict the nonsampled data well. Thus the neural network method has been verified to be used to tackle hot deformation problems of Ti-15-3 alloy.

  10. ON THE EDDY VISCOSITY MODEL OF PERIODIC TURBULENT SHEAR FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新军; 罗纪生; 周恒

    2003-01-01

    Physical argument shows that eddy viscosity is essentially different from molecular viscosity. By direct numerical simulation, it was shown that for periodic turbulent flows, there is phase difference between Reynolds stress and rate of strain. This finding posed great challenge to turbulence modeling, because most turbulence modeling, which use the idea of eddy viscosity, do not take this effect into account.

  11. Near-wall modelling of compressible turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ronald M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Work was carried out to formulate near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature-variance and its dissipation rate. With these equations properly modeled, a foundation is laid for their extension together with the heat-flux equations to compressible flows. This extension is carried out in a manner similar to that used to extend the incompressible near-wall Reynolds-stress models to compressible flows. The methodology used to accomplish the extension of the near-wall Reynolds-stress models is examined and the actual extension of the models for the Reynolds-stress equations and the near-wall dissipation-rate equation to compressible flows is given. Then the formulation of the near-wall models for the equations governing the transport of the temperature variance and its dissipation rate is discussed. Finally, a sample calculation of a flat plate compressible turbulent boundary-layer flow with adiabatic wall boundary condition and a free-stream Mach number of 2.5 using a two-equation near-wall closure is presented. The results show that the near-wall two-equation closure formulated for compressible flows is quite valid and the calculated properties are in good agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the near-wall behavior of the turbulence statistics and structure parameters is consistent with that found in incompressible flows.

  12. Flow Instability and Wall Shear Stress Ocillation in Intracranial Aneurysms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyoungsu; Jayamaran, Mahesh; Richardson, Peter; Karniadakis, George

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the flow dynamics and oscillatory behavior of wall shear stress (WSS) vectors in intracranial aneurysms using high-order spectral/hp simulations. We analyze four patient- specific internal carotid arteries laden with aneurysms of different characteristics : a wide-necked saccular aneurysm, a hemisphere-shaped aneurysm, a narrower-necked saccular aneurysm, and a case with two adjacent saccular aneurysms. Simulations show that the pulsatile flow in aneurysms may be subject to a hydrodynamic instability during the decelerating systolic phase resulting in a high-frequency oscillation in the range of 30-50 Hz. When the aneurysmal flow becomes unstable, both the magnitude and the directions of WSS vectors fluctuate. In particular, the WSS vectors around the flow impingement region exhibit significant spatial and temporal changes in direction as well as in magnitude.

  13. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  14. Prediction of Single-Peak Flow Stress Curves at High Temperatures Using a New Logarithmic-Power Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Ehsan; Dehghani, Kamran

    2016-09-01

    In this study, using a nonlinear estimation of strain hardening rate versus strain, a new phenomenological constitutive equation is developed. Utilizing the presented model, three new equations were presented to determine the peak strain, critical strain for initiation of dynamic recrystallization (DRX), and transition strain associated with the maximum softening rate of DRX. Also, two temperature and strain rate-sensitive parameters were introduced to generate flow stress curve at any desired deformation conditions. The predicted results were found to be in a good agreement with the ones measured experimentally. Maximum errors in prediction of peak strain, critical strain, and transition strain were about 8, 11, and 4%, respectively. In addition, evaluation of maximum errors in prediction of flow stress indicates that the presented constitutive equation gives a more precise estimation of flow stress curves in comparison with the previous models pertaining modeling of single-peak flow stress curves.

  15. Are Discrepancies in RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses Random?

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Heng; Wang, Jian-xun; Paterson, Eric G

    2016-01-01

    In the turbulence modeling community, significant efforts have been made to quantify the uncertainties in the Reynolds-Averaged Navier--Stokes (RANS) models and to improve their predictive capabilities. Of crucial importance in these efforts is the understanding of the discrepancies in the RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. However, to what extent these discrepancies can be predicted or whether they are completely random remains a fundamental open question. In this work we used a machine learning algorithm based on random forest regression to predict the discrepancies. The success of the regression--prediction procedure indicates that, to a large extent, the discrepancies in the modeled Reynolds stresses can be explained by the mean flow feature, and thus they are universal quantities that can be extrapolated from one flow to another, at least among different flows sharing the same characteristics such as separation. This finding has profound implications to the future development of RANS models, opening up new ...

  16. Coherent and random apparent stresses in periodically unsteady flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, Anthony Byrd

    1990-08-01

    The transitional flow field downstream of a smooth, symmetrically constricted Sylgard pipe was measured with a two color, two component Laser Doppler Anemometer for both pulsatile and steady flows. Vibrations in the flow system were induced with an exciter/shaker and were monitored with an accelerator. The vibration has little effect on the value of the maximum axial and radial turbulence intensities. A frequency domain signal processing technique to separate the disturbance velocity into coherent and random components was modified to guarantee that the sum of the decomposed velocity components equaled the original disturbance velocity. Results of the velocity separation demonstrated that the velocity disturbances prior to turbulent transition consisted almost entirely of coherent velocity fluctuations. The maximum apparent shear stress was found to occur just after the turbulent transition and consisted almost entirely of the random component. The data suggest that if the absolute magnitude of the apparent stress is the determining factor in red blood cell destruction, then the coherent apparent stress is not a significant destruction mechanism. However, the exact mechanism in hemolysis are not identified.

  17. Adipose tissue and skeletal muscle blood flow during mental stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linde, B.; Hjemdahl, P.; Freyschuss, U.; Juhlin-Dannfelt, A.

    1989-01-01

    Mental stress (a modified Stroop color word conflict test (CWT)) increased adipose tissue blood flow (ATBF; 133Xe clearance) by 70% and reduced adipose tissue vascular resistance (ATR) by 25% in healthy male volunteers. The vasculatures of adipose tissue (abdomen as well as thigh), skeletal muscle of the calf (133Xe clearance), and the entire calf (venous occlusion plethysmography) responded similarly. Arterial epinephrine (Epi) and glycerol levels were approximately doubled by stress. Beta-Blockade by metoprolol (beta 1-selective) or propranolol (nonselective) attenuated CWT-induced tachycardia similarly. Metoprolol attenuated stress-induced vasodilation in the calf and tended to do so in adipose tissue. Propranolol abolished vasodilation in the calf and resulted in vasoconstriction during CWT in adipose tissue. Decreases in ATR, but not in skeletal muscle or calf vascular resistances, were correlated to increases in arterial plasma glycerol (r = -0.42, P less than 0.05), whereas decreases in skeletal muscle and calf vascular resistances, but not in ATR, were correlated to increases in arterial Epi levels (r = -0.69, P less than 0.01; and r = -0.43, P less than 0.05, respectively). The results suggest that mental stress increases nutritive blood flow in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle considerably, both through the elevation of perfusion pressure and via vasodilatation. Withdrawal of vasoconstrictor nerve activity, vascular beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation by circulating Epi, and metabolic mechanisms (in adipose tissue) may contribute to the vasodilatation.

  18. Preferential paths in yield stress fluid flow through a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Waisbord, Nicolas; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn

    2016-11-01

    A broad range of biological, geological, and industrial materials with complex rheological properties are subjected to flow through porous media in applications ranging from oil recovery to food manufacturing. In this experimental study, we examine the flow of a model yield stress fluid (Carbopol micro-gel) through a quasi-2D porous medium, fabricated in a microfluidic channel. The flow is driven by applying a precisely-controlled pressure gradient and measured by particle tracking velocimetry, and our observations are complemented by a pore-network model of the yield stress fluid flow. While remaining unyielded at small applied pressure, the micro-gel begins to yield at a critical pressure gradient, exhibiting a single preferential flow path that percolates through the porous medium. As the applied pressure gradient increases, we observe a subsequent coarsening and invasion of the yielded, fluidized network. An examination of both the yielded network topology and pore-scale flow reveal that two cooperative phenomena are involved in sculpting the preferential flow paths: (1) the geometry of the porous microstructure, and (2) the adhesive surface interactions between the micro-gel and substrate. NSF CBET-1511340.

  19. A NEW MODEL FOR WORK STRESS PATTERNS

    OpenAIRE

    Belal Barhem; Samsinar Md Sidin; Iskandar Abdullah; Syed Kadir Alsagoff

    2004-01-01

    This study tests a new work stress model by evaluating the major work stress sources and work stress coping strategies experienced by the Malaysian and Jordanian Customs Department employees. It further ranks the sources and coping strategies of work stress, and evaluates the relationships between stress patterns. The sample consists of 216 Malaysian Customs employees and 248 Jordanian Customs officers, from which correlation, means, path analysis and frequencies were computed. The major find...

  20. The measurement of thermal stress distributions along the flow path in injection-molded flat plates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hastenberg, C.H.V.; Wildervanck, P.C.; Leenen, A.J.H.; Schennink, G.G.J.

    1992-01-01

    Internal stresses in injection-molded parts are the result of thermal, flow, and pressure histories. Internal stresses can be roughly divided into thermal and flow-induced stresses. In this paper, a modified layer-removal method is presented to determine thermal stress distributions in injection-mol

  1. Computational modelling of SCC flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Thrane, Lars Nyholm; Szabo, Peter

    2005-01-01

    To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Exampl...... of computational models for the time dependent flow behavior are given, and advantages and disadvantages of discrete particle and single fluid models are briefly described.......To benefit from the full potential of self-compacting concrete (SCC) prediction tools are needed for the form filling of SCC. Such tools should take into account the properties of the concrete, the shape and size of the structural element, the position of rebars, and the casting technique. Examples...

  2. STRESS RESPONSE STUDIES USING ANIMAL MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will provide the evidence that ozone exposure in animal models induce neuroendocrine stress response and this stress response modulates lung injury and inflammation through adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors.

  3. Relations of pulsatility index and particle residence time to the wall-shear-stress properties in pulsating flows with reverse flow phase

    CERN Document Server

    Kersh, Dikla

    2013-01-01

    Pulsating flows with a \\emph{total reverse flow} phase are ubiquitous in physiological systems in normal and pathological conditions. Irregularity of hemodynamic parameters in such flows is correlated with the appearance and development of several arterial pathologies. We study the relations between flow waveform parameters and the wall shear stress (WSS) related quantities such as mean, root-mean-square, gradient of WSS and the oscillating shear index. The phase-averaged velocity profiles measured by the digital particle image velocimetry are used to estimate WSS utilizing the Womersley pulsating flow model. In addition to the Reynolds and Womersley numbers, another dimensionless parameter, pulsating index (PI) which is the ratio of forward flow rate to the reverse flow rate is required. PI is essential for the complete description of the flow patterns with the total flow reversal. We demonstrate significant effects on the WSS quantities due to the pulsating frequency and PI. Furthermore, the particle reside...

  4. STRESS INDUCED OBESITY: LESSONS FROM RODENT MODELS OF STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Stress is defined as the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc., these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and loose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the elements that influence the metabolic outcome in order to further our understanding of stress

  5. Towards Comprehensive Job Stress Models of Reservists

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Integrating findings from the general stress literature into occupational stress research the present dissertation aimed at developing comprehensive job stress models that include additionally valuable antecedents and moderators on the link between workplace stress and psychological health problems. Therefore, this work made use of McEwen’s (1998) Allostatic Load Model to analyze the influence of chronic as well as acute stressors on the employees’ (i.e., Reservists) long-term psychological h...

  6. Research on flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al ahoy under hot compression deformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Yanguang; XIONG Baiqing; ZHANG Yong'an; LIU Hongwei; ZHU Baohong; WANG feng

    2006-01-01

    The flow stress of spray formed 70Si30Al alloy was studied by hot compression on a Gleeble-1500 test machine.The experimental results indicated that the flow stress depends on the strain rate and the deformation temperature. The flow stress increases with an increase in strain rate at a given deformation temperature. The flow stress decreases with the deformation temperature increasing at a given strain rate. The relational expression among the flow stress, the strain rate, and the deformation temperature satisfies the Arrhenius equation. The deformation activation energy of 70Si30Al alloy during hot deformation is 866.27 kJ/mol from the Arrhenius equation.

  7. Analysis of fluid flow and wall shear stress patterns inside partially filled agitated culture well plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, M Mehdi; Sattari, Pooria; Martinuzzi, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The appearance of highly resistant bacterial biofilms in both community and hospitals environments is a major challenge in modern clinical medicine. The biofilm structural morphology, believed to be an important factor affecting the behavioral properties of these "super bugs", is strongly influenced by the local hydrodynamics over the microcolonies. Despite the common use of agitated well plates in the biology community, they have been used rather blindly without knowing the flow characteristics and influence of the rotational speed and fluid volume in these containers. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the flow in these high-throughput devices to link local hydrodynamics to observed behavior in cell cultures. In this work, the flow and wall shear stress distribution in six-well culture plates under planar orbital translation is simulated using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Free surface, flow pattern and wall shear stress for two shaker speeds (100 and 200 rpm) and two volumes of fluid (2 and 4 mL) were investigated. Measurements with a non-intrusive optical shear stress sensor and High Frame-rate Particle Imaging Velocimetry (HFPIV) are used to validate CFD predictions. An analytical model to predict the free surface shape is proposed. Results show a complex three-dimensional flow pattern, varying in both time and space. The distribution of wall shear stress in these culture plates has been related to the topology of flow. This understanding helps explain observed endothelial cell orientation and bacterial biofilm distributions observed in culture dishes. The results suggest that the mean surface stress field is insufficient to capture the underlying dynamics mitigating biological processes.

  8. Cellular automata models for synchronized traffic flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang Rui

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a new cellular automata model for describing synchronized traffic flow. The fundamental diagrams, the spacetime plots and the 1 min average data have been analysed in detail. It is shown that the model can describe the outflow from the jams, the light synchronized flow as well as heavy synchronized flow with average speed greater than approximately 24 km h sup - sup 1. As for the synchronized flow with speed lower than 24 km h sup - sup 1 , it is unstable and will evolve into the coexistence of jams, free flow and light synchronized flow. This is consistent with the empirical findings (Kerner B S 1998 Phys. Rev. Lett. 81 3797).

  9. Modeling of Residual Stresses In Toughened Glass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Henrik

    2006-01-01

    The motivation for this work is the need for more extended guidelines considering structural design of glass structures. Realistic models predicting the strength of bolted connections are a step towards improvement of such guidelines. Improvement of guidelines for bolted connections require in......-depth knowledge of the residual stresses in toughened glass near holes and edges where the total stress state is a combination of contact stresses and residual stresses. The present paper, presenting the derivation and results for a model predicting the residual stresses in a glass plate far from edges and holes......, is a step towards such a model. The model is based on the Instant Freeze concept with a few modifications. Current work, using a partial differential equation approach for the modeling and state-of-the-art in modeling residual stresses in glass is briefly presented, and a short description of the toughening...

  10. Mass Transport and Shear Stress as Mediators of Flow Effects on Atherosclerotic Plaque Origin and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorder, Riley; Aliseda, Alberto

    2009-11-01

    The carotid artery bifurcation (CAB) is one of the leading site for atherosclerosis, a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. The specific mechanisms by which perturbed flow at the bifurcation and in the carotid bulge promotes plaque formation and growth are not fully understood. Shear stress, mass transport, and flow residence times are considered dominant factors. Shear stress causes restructuring of endothelial cells at the arterial wall which changes the wall's permeability. Long residence times are associated with enhanced mass transport through increased diffusion of lipids and white blood cells into the arterial wall. Although momentum and mass transfer are traditionally coupled by correlations similar to Reynolds Analogy, the complex flow patterns present in this region due to the pulsatile, transitional, detached flow associated with the complex geometry makes the validity of commonly accepted assumptions uncertain. We create solid models of the CAB from MRI or ultrasound medical images, build flow phantoms on clear polyester resin and use an IOR matching, blood mimicking, working fluid. Using PIV and dye injection techniques the shear stress and scalar transport are experimentally investigated. Our goal is to establish a quantitative relationship between momentum and mass transfer under a wide range of physiologically normal and pathological conditions.

  11. A speed-flow relationship model of highway traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wei; LI Wei; REN Gang

    2005-01-01

    In the view that the generally used speed-flow relationship model is insufficient in the traffic analysis under over-saturated conditions, this paper first establishes the theoretical models of speed flow relationship for each highway class based upon a large number of traffic data collected from the field. Then by analyzing the traffic flow dissipation mechanism under peak hour over-saturated traffic conditions, the speed flow relationship model structures for each highway class are reviewed under different traffic load conditions. Through curve-fitting of large numbers of observed data, functional equations of general speed-flow relationship models for each highway class under any traffic load conditions are established. The practical model parameters for each highway class under different design speeds are also put forward. This model is successful in solving the speed-forecasting problem of the traffic flow under peak hour over-saturated conditions. This provides the theoretical bases for the development of projects related to highway network planning, economic analysis, etc.

  12. A toy terrestrial carbon flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, William J.; Running, Steven W.; Walker, Brian

    1992-01-01

    A generalized carbon flow model for the major terrestrial ecosystems of the world is reported. The model is a simplification of the Century model and the Forest-Biogeochemical model. Topics covered include plant production, decomposition and nutrient cycling, biomes, the utility of the carbon flow model for predicting carbon dynamics under global change, and possible applications to state-and-transition models and environmentally driven global vegetation models.

  13. A multi-layer description of Reynolds stresses in canonical wall bounded flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Hussain, Fazle; She, Zhen-Su

    2015-11-01

    A complete description of the Reynolds stress tensor is obtained for all three canonical wall turbulence (channel, pipe and turbulent boundary layer - TBL). The result builds on a multi-layer description of length (order) functions and their ratios, including viscous sublayer, buffer layer, meso-layer for the near wall (inner) region, and bulk flow or a central core (absent in TBL) for the outer region. It is shown that the streamwise mean kinetic-energy profile is quantified with high accuracy over the entire flow domain. The model contains only three Re-dependent parameters for Reynolds number (Re) covering nearly three decades. Furthermore, the inner peak location is predicted to be invariant at y+ = 15, while its magnitude shows notable Re and geometry effects, predicted to be .9.2 for high Re's pipe flows. A mechanism is proposed for the emergence of outer peak in pipes, whose magnitude is predicted to scale as .Reτ0. 05 beyond a critical Reτ about 104(). The recently reported logarithmic dependence in the bulk is recovered, but with an alternative explanation. The result is successfully extended to TBL flows by a fractional total stress and an absence of core. Equally accurate descriptions of vertical and spanwise kinetic-energy are also presented for the three flows. The result has been used to modify turbulent engineering models (i.e. k- ω model) with significant improvement.

  14. A comparison of three turbulence models for axisymmetric isothermal swirling flows in the near burner zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstedt, H. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    In this work three different turbulence models, the k - {epsilon}, RNG k - {epsilon} and Reynolds stress model, have been compared in the case of confined swirling flow. The flow geometries are the isothermal swirling flows measured by International Flame Research Foundation (IFRF). The inlet boundary profiles have been taken from the measurements. At the outlet the effect of furnace end contraction has been studied. The k - {epsilon} model falls to predict the correct flow field. The RNG k - {epsilon} model can provide improvements, although it has problems near the symmetry axis. The Reynolds stress model produces the best agreement with measured data. (author) 13 refs.

  15. Modeling the flow of glaciers in steep terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egholm, D.L.; Knudsen, Mads Faurschou; Clark, Chris D.;

    2011-01-01

    The rugged topography of mountain ranges represents a special challenge to computational ice sheet models simulating past or present glaciations. In mountainous regions, the topography steers glaciers through relatively narrow and steep valleys, and as a consequence hereof, the flow rate of alpine......-style glaciers varies significantly at length scales comparable to that of the topography. Localized flow rate undulations generate longitudinal and transverse stress gradients within the ice, which, in turn, are of known importance to the flow itself, whether by internal deformation of the ice or by basal...

  16. The longitudinal relationship of work stress with peak expiratory flow: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Adrian; Karrasch, Stefan; Lunau, Thorsten

    2017-05-29

    Research has suggested that psychological stress is associated with reduced lung function and with the development of respiratory disease. Among the major potential sources of stress in adulthood are working conditions. We aimed to examine the relationship of work stress with lung function. We drew on 4-year prospective data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The analyzed sample comprised 2627 workers aged 50 years or older who were anamnestically free of respiratory disease. Work stress at baseline was operationalized by abbreviated instruments measuring the well-established effort-reward imbalance model (seven items) and the control component of the job-demand control (two items). Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was determined at baseline and at follow-up. Continuous and categorized (i.e., by the tertile) work stress variables were employed in multivariable linear regression models to predict PEF change. Work stress did not show statistically significant associations with PEF change. For instance, the unstandardized regression coefficient for PEF decline according to high versus low effort-reward imbalance was -1.41 (95% confidence interval = -3.75, 0.94). Our study is the first to examine prospective relationships between work stress and PEF. Overall, we did not observe meaningful associations. Future studies should consider a broader spectrum of spirometric parameters and should expand research to younger and possibly less-selected working populations (i.e., aged <50 years).

  17. Erosion by shallow concentrated flow - experimental model deconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, M.; Wirtz, S.; Ali, M.

    2012-04-01

    The force of the flowing water is considered to be the main determinant factor for soil particle detachment and transport. The flow of water is described with flow velocity and discharge, and is often summarised in different composite parameters such as shear stress, stream power etc. The entrainment and transport of soil particles is then expressed as a threshold problem, where a soil specific critical value of shear stress, stream power etc. has to be trespassed. Thereafter, the increase of erosion is considered to be lineal. Despite considerable efforts, the process based model concepts have not been able to produce more reliable and accurate reproduction and forecast of soil erosion than "simple" empirical models such as the USLE and its derivates. Therefore, there still remain some unanswered fundamental questions about soil erosion modelling: 1. What are the main parameters of soils and flowing water influencing soil erosion? 2. What relationship do these parameters have with the intensity and different types of soil erosion? 3. Are the present concepts suitable to describe and quantify soil erosion accurately? For approaching these questions, laboratory flume and field experiments were set up. The aim of the laboratory experiments was to elucidate the influence of basic parameters as grain size, slope, flow and flow velocity on sediment transport by shallow flowing water. Therefore, variable flow was applied under different slopes on moveable beds of non-coherent sands of different grain sizes. The field experiments were designed to quantify the hydraulic and erosive functionality of small rills in the field. Here, small existing rills were flushed with defined flows, and flow velocity, flow depth, discharge at the end of the rill as well as transported sediments were quantified. The laboratory flume experiments clearly show a strong influence of flow velocity on sediment transport, depending this at the same time on the size of the transported grains, and

  18. The importance of erosion for debris flow runout modelling from applications to the Swiss Alps

    OpenAIRE

    F. Frank; B. W. McArdell; Huggel, C; A. Vieli

    2015-01-01

    This study describes an investigation of channel-bed erosion of sediment by debris flows. An erosion model, developed using field data from debris flows at the Illgraben catchment, Switzerland, was incorporated into the existing RAMMS debris-flow model, which solves the 2-D shallow-water equations for granular flows. In the erosion model, the relationship between maximum shear stress and measured erosion is used to determine the maximum potential erosion depth. Additionally,...

  19. Hydromagnetic couple-stress nanofluid flow over a moving convective wall: OHAM analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awais, M.; Saleem, S.; Hayat, T.; Irum, S.

    2016-12-01

    This communication presents the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) flow of a couple-stress nanofluid over a convective moving wall. The flow dynamics are analyzed in the boundary layer region. Convective cooling phenomenon combined with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects has been discussed. Similarity transforms are utilized to convert the system of partial differential equations into coupled non-linear ordinary differential equation. Optimal homotopy analysis method (OHAM) is utilized and the concept of minimization is employed by defining the average squared residual errors. Effects of couple-stress parameter, convective cooling process parameter and energy enhancement parameters are displayed via graphs and discussed in detail. Various tables are also constructed to present the error analysis and a comparison of obtained results with the already published data. Stream lines are plotted showing a difference of Newtonian fluid model and couplestress fluid model.

  20. Modelling of transit-time ultrasonic flow meters under multi-phase flow conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simurda, Matej; Duggen, Lars; Lassen, Benny

    2016-01-01

    A pseudospectral model for transit time ultrasonic flowmeters under multiphase flow conditions is presented. The method solves first order stress-velocity equations of elastodynamics, with acoustic media being modelled by setting shear modulus to zero. Additional terms to account for the effect...... of the background flow are included. Spatial derivatives are calculated by a Fourier collocation scheme allowing the use of the Fast Fourier transform. The method is compared against analytical solutions and experimental measurements. Additionally, a study of clamp-on and in-line ultrasonic flowmeters operating...

  1. VELOCITY DISTRIBUTION IN TRAPEZOID-SECTION OPEN CHANNEL FLOW WITH A NEW REYNOLDS-STRESS EXPRESSION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Zheng

    2003-01-01

    By considering that the coherent structure is the main cause of the Reynolds stress, a new Reynolds stress expression was given. On this basis the velocity distribution in the trapezoid-section open channel flow was worked out with the pseudo-spectral method. The results were compared with experimental data and the influence of the ratio of length to width of the cross-section and the lateral inclination on the velocity distribution was analyzed. This model can be used the large flux in rivers and open channes.

  2. Creep measurements confirm steady flow after stress maximum in extension of branched polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javier Alvarez, Nicolas; Román Marín, José Manuel; Huang, Qian;

    2013-01-01

    We provide conclusive evidence of nonmonotonic mechanical behavior in the extension of long-chain branched polymer melts. While nonmonotonic behavior is known to occur for solids, for the case of polymeric melts, this phenomenon is in direct contrast with current theoretical models. We rule out...... the possibility of the overshoot being an experimental artifact by confirming the existence of steady flow after a maximum in the ratio of stress to strain rate versus strain under both constant stress and constant strain-rate kinematics. This observation indicates the omission of important physics from current...

  3. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  4. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly model

  5. A Note on the bottom shear stress in oscillatory planetary boundary layer flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Myrhaug

    1988-07-01

    Full Text Available A simple analytical theory is presented, which describes the motion in a turbulent oscillatory planetary boundary layer near a rough seabed using a two-layer, time-invariant eddy viscosity model. The bottom shear stress is outlined, and comparison is made with Pingree and Griffiths' (1974 measurements of turbulent tidal planetary boundary layer flow on the continental shelf south-west of Lands End, England.

  6. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function), heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation...

  7. Overland flow : interfacing models with measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van E.E.

    2002-01-01

    Index words: overland flow, catchment scale, system identification, ensemble simulations.This study presents new techniques to identify scale-dependent overland flow models and use these for ensemble-based predictions. The techniques are developed on the basis of overland flow, rain, discharge, soil

  8. Parallel glide: flow of dislocations with internal stress source/sink distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo T Raić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The unexpected glide of dislocations on a plane parallel to the film/substrate interface in ultrathin copper films, which has been called parallel glide (Balk et al 2003 Acta Metall. 51 447, is described using an analytical model. The phenomenon is observed as a problem involving inlet/outlet flow from different positions of a grain boundary into the grain channel. In this sense, parallel glide is presented as the flow of dislocations with an internal stress source/sink distribution.

  9. Modelling of the Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffer, Christian; Nielsen, S.B.

    Lateral density and topography variations yield in and important contribution to the lithospheric stress field. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column. The horizontal gradient of this quantity is related to horizontal stresses through...... the Equations of equilibrium of stresses. The Geopotential Energy furthermore can be linearly related to the Geoid under assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, also non-isostatic deeper mantle responses of long wavelength. Unfortunately, high-pass filtering of the Geoid...... flow in the presence of local isostasy and a steady state geotherm. Subsequently we use a FEM code to solve the Equations of equilibrium of stresses for a three dimensional elastic shell. The modelled results are shown and compared with the global stress field and other publications....

  10. A NEW MODEL FOR WORK STRESS PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belal Barhem

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tests a new work stress model by evaluating the major work stress sources and work stress coping strategies experienced by the Malaysian and Jordanian Customs Department employees. It further ranks the sources and coping strategies of work stress, and evaluates the relationships between stress patterns. The sample consists of 216 Malaysian Customs employees and 248 Jordanian Customs officers, from which correlation, means, path analysis and frequencies were computed. The major findings of the study show that Malaysian and Jordanian Customs employees identified role ambiguity as the main source of work stress while self-knowledge was the major coping strategy they used to overcome work stress. The relationship between sources of work stress and coping strategies is strong in the two cases while the relationship with personal differences is weak.

  11. Modeling and Prediction of Hot Deformation Flow Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzadeh, Hamed; Cabrera, Jose Maria; Najafizadeh, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    The modeling of hot flow stress and prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions are important in metal-forming processes because any feasible mathematical simulation needs accurate flow description. In the current work, in an attempt to summarize, generalize, and introduce efficient methods, the dynamic recrystallization (DRX) flow curves of a 17-4 PH martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steel, a medium carbon microalloyed steel, and a 304 H austenitic stainless steel were modeled and predicted using (1) a hyperbolic sine equation with strain dependent constants, (2) a developed constitutive equation in a simple normalized stress-normalized strain form and its modified version, and (3) a feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). These methods were critically discussed, and the ANN technique was found to be the best for the modeling available flow curves; however, the developed constitutive equation showed slightly better performance than that of ANN and significantly better predicted values than those of the hyperbolic sine equation in prediction of flow curves for unseen deformation conditions.

  12. Experimental and mathematical modeling of flow in headboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Mohammad Reza

    The fluid flow patterns in a paper-machine headbox have a strong influence on the quality of the paper produced by the machine. Due to increasing demand for high quality paper there is a need to investigate the details of the fluid flow in the paper machine headbox. The objective of this thesis is to use experimental and computational methods of modeling the flow inside a typical headbox in order to evaluate and understand the mean flow patterns and turbulence created there. In particular, spatial variations of the mean flow and of the turbulence quantities and the turbulence generated secondary flows are studied. In addition to the flow inside the headbox, the flow leaving the slice is also modeled both experimentally and computationally. Comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicated that streamwise mean components of the velocities in the headbox are predicted well by all the turbulence models considered in this study. However, the standard k-epsilon model and the algebraic turbulence models fail to predict the turbulence quantities accurately. Standard k-epsilon-model also fails to predict the direction and magnitude of the secondary flows. Significant improvements in the k-epsilon model predictions were achieved when the turbulence production term was artificially set to zero. This is justified by observations of the turbulent velocities from the experiments and by a consideration of the form of the kinetic energy equation. A better estimation of the Reynolds normal stress distribution and the degree of anisotropy of turbulence was achieved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Careful examination of the measured turbulence velocity results shows that after the initial decay of the turbulence in the headbox, there is a short region close to the exit, but inside the headbox, where the turbulent kinetic energy actually increases as a result of the distortion imposed by the contraction. The turbulence energy quickly resumes its decay in the

  13. Physics-Informed Machine Learning for Predictive Turbulence Modeling: Using Data to Improve RANS Modeled Reynolds Stresses

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Xiao, Heng

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Recently, data-driven methods have been proposed as a promising alternative to the traditional approaches of turbulence model development. In this work we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for predicting discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are first trained with benchmark flow data and then used to predict Reynolds stresses discrepancies in new flows. The method is used to predict the Reynolds stresses in the flow over periodic hills by using two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties: (1) ...

  14. RANS turbulence model form uncertainty quantification for wind engineering flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorle, Catherine; Zeoli, Stephanie; Bricteux, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes simulations with linear eddy-viscosity turbulence models are commonly used for modeling wind engineering flows, but the use of the results for critical design decisions is hindered by the limited capability of the models to correctly predict bluff body flows. A turbulence model form uncertainty quantification (UQ) method to define confidence intervals for the results could remove this limitation, and promising results were obtained in a previous study of the flow in downtown Oklahoma City. The objective of the present study is to further investigate the validity of these results by considering the simplified test case of the flow around a wall-mounted cube. DNS data is used to determine: 1. whether the marker, which identifies regions that deviate from parallel shear flow, is a good indicator for the regions where the turbulence model fails, and 2. which Reynolds stress perturbations, in terms of the tensor magnitude and the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the normalized anisotropy tensor, can capture the uncertainty in the flow field. A comparison of confidence intervals obtained with the UQ method and the DNS solution indicates that the uncertainty in the velocity field can be captured correctly in a large portion of the flow field.

  15. Numerical modeling of fluidic flow meters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D.; Patel, B. R.

    1992-05-01

    The transient fluid flow in fluidic flow meters has been modeled using Creare.x's flow modeling computer program FLUENT/BFC that solves the Navier-Stokes equations in general curvilinear coordinates. The numerical predictions of fluid flow in a fluidic flow meter have been compared with the available experimental results for a particular design, termed the PC-4 design. Overall flow structures such as main jet bending, and primary and secondary vortices predicted by FLUENT/BFC are in excellent agreement with flow visualization results. The oscillation frequencies of the PC-4 design have been predicted for a range of flow rates encompassing laminar and turbulent flow and the results are in good agreement with experiments. The details of the flow field predictions reveal that an important factor that determines the onset of oscillations in the fluidic flow meter is the feedback jet momentum relative to the main jet momentum. The insights provided by the analysis of the PC-4 fluidic flow meter design have led to an improved design. The improved design has sustained oscillations at lower flow rates compared with the PC-4 design and has a larger rangeability.

  16. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLOW AND BED SHEAR STRESS DISTRIBUTION AROUND THE SPAN SHOULDER OF PIPELINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Bing; CHENG Liang

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional flow around a pipeline span shoulder is simulated using a fractional step finite element method. The Reynolds number, based on the pipe-diameter and the approaching flow velocity, is set at 500 and 5×105to simulate both laminar and turbulent flow. In high Reynolds number case, Smagorinsky SGS closure is used to model the turbulent flows. The flow field visualization by vorticity iso-surfaces shows that a spiral vortex tube is formed around the span shoulder and extends around the span shoulder. The vortex cores defined by the eigenvalues of the symmetric tensor S2+Ω2(S and Ω are respectively the symmetric and antisymmetric parts of the velocity gradient tensor) gives more details of the flow field. It is also found that there are significant bed shear stress concentrations in the span shoulder area. The reasons for the shear stress concentration are discussed.

  17. Coordination of Flow and Traction in Migration of Amoeboid Physarum polycephalum: Model and Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert; Zhang, Shun; Del Alamo, Juan Carlos

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we develop a computational model of crawling Physarum based on the Immersed Boundary Method. Our model incorporates the effects of cell cytoplasm, the internal cytoskeleton and adhesions to the substrate. Cytoplasmic flows and traction stresses predicted by the model are compared to experimentally measured values obtained using simultaneous Traction Force Microscopy (TFM) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Of particular interest are stresses generated by flow and how transmission of stresses to the substrate is coordinated. We identify methods of adhesion-flow coordination which are consistent with experiments. Certain consisten coordinations are seen to be ``optimal'' with regards to crawling speed, and robust to perturbations in the extracellular environment.

  18. Investigating the flow and stress regime at the front of a tidewater outlet glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercenier, Rémy; Luethi, Martin; Vieli, Andreas; Rohner, Christoph; Small, David

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic changes in ocean-terminating glaciers are responsible for approximately half of the current high rate of mass loss of the Greenland ice sheet. The related calving process, which occurs when the stresses at the calving front exceed the fracture toughness of ice, is still not well understood and poorly represented in current generation ice-sheet models, but is a crucial requisite to understand and model dynamics and future mass loss of the ice sheet. Here, we use a two-dimensional finite-element model to compute the stress and flow fields near the front of a tidewater outlet glacier. First, we perform a sensitivity analysis for an idealized glacier exploring the effects of variable calving front slope, water depth and basal sliding. We then apply the model to two flowlines of Eqip Sermia, an ocean terminating outlet glacier in West Greenland. Detailed velocity and geometry measurements obtained from terrestrial radar interferometry serve as constraints to the model. These flowline geometries and velocities strongly differ. One flowline ends with a ˜ 50 meter vertical cliff, close to floatation, while the other has a 150-200 meter high grounded front with a ˜ 45° slope and for which extrusion flow is observed. These different geometry settings lead to substantial difference in stress and flow regimes. This stress analysis improves our understanding of how and where the ice is susceptible to failure and crevasse formation for different idealized as well as real conditions. In further work, we aim to use this information as a constraint to investigate the short-term and long-term processes related to outlet glacier calving.

  19. Prediction of flow stresses at high temperatures with artificial neural networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪凌云; 郑廷顺; 刘雪峰; 黄光杰

    2001-01-01

    On the basis of the data obtained on Gleeble-1500 Thermal Simulator, the predicting models for the relation between stable flow stress during high temperature plastic deformation and deformation strain, strain rate and temperature for 1420 Al-Li alloy have been developed with BP artificial neural networks method. The results show that the model on basis of BPNN is practical and it reflects the actual feature of the deforming process. It states that the difference between the actual value and the output of the model is in order of 5%.

  20. Modelling of the Czochralski flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Franc

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The Czochralski method of the industrial production of a silicon single crystal consists of pulling up the single crystal from the silicon melt. The flow of the melt during the production is called the Czochralski flow. The mathematical description of the flow consists of a coupled system of six P.D.E. in cylindrical coordinates containing Navier-Stokes equations (with the stream function, heat convection-conduction equations, convection-diffusion equation for oxygen impurity and an equation describing magnetic field effect.

  1. Model for charge/discharge-rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous battery materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosrownejad, S. M.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Plastic flow is an important mechanism for relaxing stresses that develop due to swelling/shrinkage during charging/discharging of battery materials. Amorphous high-storage-capacity Li-Si has lower flow stresses than crystalline materials but there is evidence that the plastic flow stress depends on the conditions of charging and discharging, indicating important non-equilibrium aspects to the flow behavior. Here, a mechanistically-based constitutive model for rate-dependent plastic flow in amorphous materials, such as LixSi alloys, during charging and discharging is developed based on two physical concepts: (i) excess energy is stored in the material during electrochemical charging and discharging due to the inability of the amorphous material to fully relax during the charging/discharging process and (ii) this excess energy reduces the barriers for plastic flow processes and thus reduces the applied stresses necessary to cause plastic flow. The plastic flow stress is thus a competition between the time scales of charging/discharging and the time scales of glassy relaxation. The two concepts, as well as other aspects of the model, are validated using molecular simulations on a model Li-Si system. The model is applied to examine the plastic flow behavior of typical specimen geometries due to combined charging/discharging and stress history, and the results generally rationalize experimental observations.

  2. Assessment of the kinetic-frictional model for dense granular flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Boon Ho Ng; Yulong Ding; Mojtaba Ghadiri

    2008-01-01

    This paper aims to quantitatively assess the application of kinetic-frictional model to simulate the motion of dry granular materials in dense condition, in particular, the annular shearing in Couette configuration. The weight of frictional stress was varied to study the contribution of the frictional stress in dense granular flows. The results show that the pure kinetic-theory-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model (without frictional stress) over-predicts the dominant solids motion of dense granular flow while adding frictional stress [Schaeffer, D. G. (1987). Instability in the evolution equations describing incompressible granular flow. Journal of Differential Equations, 66(1), 19-50] with the solids pressure of [Lun, C. KTK., Savage, S. B., Jeffrey, D. J., & Chepurniy, N. (1984). Kinetic theories for granular flow: Inelastic particles in Couette flow and slightly inelastic particles in a general flow field. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 140, 223-256] in the CFD model improves the simulation to better conform available experimental results. The results also suggest that frictional stress transmission plays an important role in dense granular flow and should not be neglected in granular flow simulations. Compatible simulation results to the experimental data are seen by increasing the weight of frictional stress to a factor of 1.25-1.5. These improved simulation results suggest the current constitutive relations (kinetic-frictional model) need to be improved in order to better reflect the real dense granular flow.

  3. Microgravity two-phase flow regime modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.; Best, F.R.; Faget, N.

    1987-01-01

    A flow pattern or flow regime is the characteristics spatial distribution of the phases of fluid in a duct. Since heat transfer and pressure drop are dependent on the characteristic distribution of the phases, it is necessary to describe flow patterns in an appropriate manner so that a hydrodynamic or heat transfer theory applicable to that pattern can be chosen. The objective of the present analysis is to create a flow regime map based on physical modeling of vapor/liquid interaction phenomena in a microgravity environment. In the present work, four basic flow patterns are defined: dispersed flow, stratified flow, slug flow, and annular flow. Fluid properties, liquid and vapor flow rates, and pipe size were chosen as the principal parameters. It is assumed that a transition from one flow pattern to another will occur when there is a change in the dominant force which controls that flow pattern. The forces considered in this modeling are surface tension force, both force, inertial force, friction, and turbulent fluctuations.

  4. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  5. Modeling interregional freight flow by distribution systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davydenko, I.; Tavasszy, L.A.; Blois, C.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Distribution Centers with a warehousing function have an important influence on the flow of goods from production to consumption, generating substantial goods flow and vehicle movements. This paper extends the classical 4-step freight modeling framework with a logistics chain model, explicitly

  6. Tensile behavior and flow stress anisotropy of accumulative roll bonded Cu-Nb nanolaminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nizolek, Thomas, E-mail: tnizolek@engr.ucsb.edu; Avallone, Jaclyn T.; Pollock, Tresa M. [Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Beyerlein, Irene J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Mara, Nathan A. [Institute for Materials Science and the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The flow stress, ductility, and in-plane anisotropy are evaluated for bulk accumulative roll bonded copper-niobium nanolaminates with layer thicknesses ranging from 1.8 μm to 15 nm. Uniaxial tensile tests conducted parallel to the rolling direction and transverse direction demonstrate that ductility generally decreases with decreasing layer thickness; however, at 30 nm, both high strengths (1200 MPa) and significant ductility (8%) are achieved. The yield strength increases monotonically with decreasing layer thickness, consistent with the Hall-Petch relationship, and significant in-plane flow stress anisotropy is observed. Taylor polycrystal modeling is used to demonstrate that crystallographic texture is responsible for the in-plane anisotropy and that the effects of texture dominate even at nanoscale layer thicknesses.

  7. Psychological stress impairs hepatic blood flow via central CRF receptors in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chida, Yoichi; Sudo, Nobuyuki; Kubo, Chiharu

    2005-02-25

    Some previous works have further expanded the 'Brain-Gut axis', that is a bi-directional interaction between the gut and brain function, into a relationship of the brain with the liver. However, all the details of such brain-liver relationship were not fully understood because appropriate animal models had not been established yet. Here we developed a novel animal model, in which hepatic blood flow of conscious mice could be measured in real-time. In addition, using this model, we also demonstrated that exposure to psychological stress considerably reduced hepatic blood flow via central CRF receptors. Thus, this new model is considered to be a useful and promising tool for elucidating the precise effects of emotional factors on liver function.

  8. Acute short-term mental stress does not influence salivary flow rate dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella A Naumova

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Results of studies that address the influence of stress on salivary flow rate and composition are controversial. The aim of this study was to reveal the influence of stress vulnerability and different phases of stress reactivity on the unstimulated and stimulated salivary flow rate. We examined that acute mental stress does not change the salivary flow rate. In addition, we also examined the salivary cortisol and protein level in relation to acute mental stress stimuli. METHODS: Saliva of male subjects was collected for five minutes before, immediately, 10, 30 and 120 min after toothbrushing. Before toothbrushing, the subjects were exposed to acute stress in the form of a 2 min public speech. Salivary flow rate and total protein was measured. The physiological stress marker cortisol was analyzed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. To determine the subjects' psychological stress reaction, the State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory State questionnaire (STAI data were obtained. The subjects were divided into stress subgroup (S1 (psychological reactivity, stress subgroup (S2 (psychological and physiological reactivity and a control group. The area under the curve for salivarycortisol concentration and STAI-State scores were calculated. All data underwent statistical analysis using one-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: Immediately after stress exposure, all participants exhibited a psychological stress reaction. Stress exposure did not change the salivary flow rate. Only 69% of the subjects continued to display a physiological stress reaction 20 minutes after the public talk. There was no significant change in the salivary flow rate during the psychological and the physiological stress reaction phases relative to the baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Acute stress has no impact on the salivary flow rate; however, there may be other responses through salivary proteins that are increased with the acute stress stimuli. Future studies are needed to examine

  9. Modelling of the Global Geopotential Energy & Stress Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, C.; Nielsen, S. B.

    2012-04-01

    Lateral density and topography variations yield in and important contribution to the lithospheric stress field. The leading quantity is the Geopotential Energy, the integrated lithostatic pressure in a rock column. The horizontal gradient of this quantity is related to horizontal stresses through the Equations of equilibrium of stresses. The Geopotential Energy furthermore can be linearly related to the Geoid under assumption of local isostasy. Satellite Geoid measurements contain, however, also non-isostatic deeper mantle responses of long wavelength. Unfortunately, high-pass filtering of the Geoid does not suppress only the deeper sources. The age-dependent signal of the oceanic lithosphere, for instance, is of long wave length and a prominent representative of in-plane stress, derived from the horizontal gradient of isostatic Geoid anomalies and responsible for the ridge push effect. Therefore a global lithospheric density model is required in order to isolate the shallow Geoid signal and calculate the stress pattern from isostatically compensated lithospheric sources. We use a linearized inverse method to fit a lithospheric reference model to observations such as topography and surface heat flow in the presence of local isostasy and a steady state geotherm. Subsequently we use a FEM code to solve the Equations of equilibrium of stresses for a three dimensional elastic shell. The modelled results are shown and compared with the global stress field and other publications.

  10. Discrete Element Modeling of Complex Granular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Asphaug, E. I.

    2010-12-01

    Granular materials occur almost everywhere in nature, and are actively studied in many fields of research, from food industry to planetary science. One approach to the study of granular media, the continuum approach, attempts to find a constitutive law that determines the material's flow, or strain, under applied stress. The main difficulty with this approach is that granular systems exhibit different behavior under different conditions, behaving at times as an elastic solid (e.g. pile of sand), at times as a viscous fluid (e.g. when poured), or even as a gas (e.g. when shaken). Even if all these physics are accounted for, numerical implementation is made difficult by the wide and often discontinuous ranges in continuum density and sound speed. A different approach is Discrete Element Modeling (DEM). Here the goal is to directly model every grain in the system as a rigid body subject to various body and surface forces. The advantage of this method is that it treats all of the above regimes in the same way, and can easily deal with a system moving back and forth between regimes. But as a granular system typically contains a multitude of individual grains, the direct integration of the system can be very computationally expensive. For this reason most DEM codes are limited to spherical grains of uniform size. However, spherical grains often cannot replicate the behavior of real world granular systems. A simple pile of spherical grains, for example, relies on static friction alone to keep its shape, while in reality a pile of irregular grains can maintain a much steeper angle by interlocking force chains. In the present study we employ a commercial DEM, nVidia's PhysX Engine, originally designed for the game and animation industry, to simulate complex granular flows with irregular, non-spherical grains. This engine runs as a multi threaded process and can be GPU accelerated. We demonstrate the code's ability to physically model granular materials in the three regimes

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Viscous Flow Over a Shrinking Sheet With Second Order Slip Flow Model

    CERN Document Server

    Mahmood, T; Abbas, G

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the magnetohydrodynamic viscous flow with second order slip flow model over a permeable shrinking surface. We have obtained the closed form of exact solution of Navier-Stokes equations by using similarity variable technique. The effects of slip, suction and magnetic parameter have been investigated in detail. The results show that there are two solution branches, namely lower and upper solution branch. The behavior of velocity and shear stress profiles for different values of slip, suction and magnetic parameters has been discussed through graphs.

  12. Approximate Model for Turbulent Stagnation Point Flow.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dechant, Lawrence [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Here we derive an approximate turbulent self-similar model for a class of favorable pressure gradient wedge-like flows, focusing on the stagnation point limit. While the self-similar model provides a useful gross flow field estimate this approach must be combined with a near wall model is to determine skin friction and by Reynolds analogy the heat transfer coefficient. The combined approach is developed in detail for the stagnation point flow problem where turbulent skin friction and Nusselt number results are obtained. Comparison to the classical Van Driest (1958) result suggests overall reasonable agreement. Though the model is only valid near the stagnation region of cylinders and spheres it nonetheless provides a reasonable model for overall cylinder and sphere heat transfer. The enhancement effect of free stream turbulence upon the laminar flow is used to derive a similar expression which is valid for turbulent flow. Examination of free stream enhanced laminar flow suggests that the rather than enhancement of a laminar flow behavior free stream disturbance results in early transition to turbulent stagnation point behavior. Excellent agreement is shown between enhanced laminar flow and turbulent flow behavior for high levels, e.g. 5% of free stream turbulence. Finally the blunt body turbulent stagnation results are shown to provide realistic heat transfer results for turbulent jet impingement problems.

  13. Chronic Stress Impairs Collateral Blood Flow Recovery in Aged Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-15

    0, normal; 1–5, cyanosis or loss of nail(s), where the score is dependent on the number of nails affected; 6–10, partial or complete atrophy of...digit(s), where the score reflects the number of digits affected; and 11, partial atrophy of forefoot [21]. Hind limb use scores (index of muscle function...brain, and cardiac fibrosis and, in many ways, provides a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) model for mice [26]. As a model of physical/neurogenic

  14. Wall shear stress characterization of a 3D bluff-body separated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrié, Grégoire; Keirsbulck, Laurent; Labraga, Larbi

    2013-10-01

    Efficient flow control strategies aimed at reducing the aerodynamic drag of road vehicles require a detailed knowledge of the reference flow. In this work, the flow around the rear slanted window of a generic car model was experimentally studied through wall shear stress measurements using an electrochemical method. The mean and fluctuating wall shear stress within the wall impact regions of the recirculation bubble and the main longitudinal vortex structures which develop above the rear window are presented. Correlations allow a more detailed characterization of the recirculation phenomenon within the separation bubble. In the model symmetry plane the recirculation structure compares well with simpler 2D configurations; specific lengths, flapping motion and shedding of large-scale vortices are observed, these similarities diminish when leaving the middle plane due to the strong three-dimensionality of the flow. A specific attention is paid to the convection processes occurring within the recirculation: a downstream convection velocity is observed, in accordance with 2D recirculations from the literature, and an upstream convection is highlighted along the entire bubble length which has not been underlined in some previous canonical configurations.

  15. Modeling the response of peach fruit growth to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génard, M; Huguet, J G

    1996-04-01

    We applied a semi-mechanistic model of fresh matter accumulation to peach fruit during the stage of rapid mesocarp development. The model, which is based on simple hypotheses of fluid flows into and out of the fruit, assumes that solution flow into the fruit increases with fruit weight and transpiration per unit weight, and decreases with the maximum daily shrinkage of the trunk, which was used as an indicator of water stress. Fruit transpiration was assumed to increase with fruit size and with radiation. Fruit respiration was considered to be related to fruit growth and to temperature. The model simulates variability in growth among fruits according to climatic conditions, degree of water stress and weight of the fruit at the beginning of the simulation. We used data obtained from well-watered and water-stressed trees grown in containers to estimate model parameters and to test the model. There was close agreement between the simulated and measured values. A sensitivity analysis showed that initial fruit weight partly determined the variation in growth among fruits. The analysis also indicated that there was an optimal irradiance for fruit growth and that the effect of high global radiation on growth varied according to the stage of fruit development. Water stress, which was the most important factor influencing fruit growth, rapidly depressed growth, particularly when applied late in the season.

  16. Analytical models for complex swirling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borissov, A.; Hussain, V.

    1996-11-01

    We develops a new class of analytical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations for swirling flows, and suggests ways to predict and control such flows occurring in various technological applications. We view momentum accumulation on the axis as a key feature of swirling flows and consider vortex-sink flows on curved axisymmetric surfaces with an axial flow. We show that these solutions model swirling flows in a cylindrical can, whirlpools, tornadoes, and cosmic swirling jets. The singularity of these solutions on the flow axis is removed by matching them with near-axis Schlichting and Long's swirling jets. The matched solutions model flows with very complex patterns, consisting of up to seven separation regions with recirculatory 'bubbles' and vortex rings. We apply the matched solutions for computing flows in the Ranque-Hilsch tube, in the meniscus of electrosprays, in vortex breakdown, and in an industrial vortex burner. The simple analytical solutions allow a clear understanding of how different control parameters affect the flow and guide selection of optimal parameter values for desired flow features. These solutions permit extension to other problems (such as heat transfer and chemical reaction) and have the potential of being significantly useful for further detailed investigation by direct or large-eddy numerical simulations as well as laboratory experimentation.

  17. Modeling and simulation of reactive flows

    CERN Document Server

    Bortoli, De AL; Pereira, Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Modelling and Simulation of Reactive Flows presents information on modeling and how to numerically solve reactive flows. The book offers a distinctive approach that combines diffusion flames and geochemical flow problems, providing users with a comprehensive resource that bridges the gap for scientists, engineers, and the industry. Specifically, the book looks at the basic concepts related to reaction rates, chemical kinetics, and the development of reduced kinetic mechanisms. It considers the most common methods used in practical situations, along with equations for reactive flows, and va

  18. Modeling and analysis of electrorheological suspensions in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2012-02-14

    A model capable of describing the flow behavior of electrorheological (ER) suspensions under different electric field strengths and over the full range of shear rates is proposed. Structural reformation in the low shear rate region is investigated where parts of a material are in an undeformed state, while aligned structures reform under the shear force. The model's predictions were compared with the experimental data of some ER fluids as well as the CCJ (Cho-Choi-Jhon) model. This simple model's predictions of suspension flow behavior with subsequent aligned structure reformation agreed well with the experimental data, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The proposed model plausibly predicted the static yield stress, whereas the CCJ model and the Bingham model predicted only the dynamic yield stress. The master curve describing the apparent viscosity was obtained by appropriate scaling both axes, which showed that a combination of dimensional analysis and flow curve analysis using the proposed model yielded a quantitatively and qualitatively precise description of ER fluid rheological behavior based on relatively few experimental measurements.

  19. Modeling thermal stress propagation during hydraulic stimulation of geothermal wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gunnar; Miller, Stephen A.

    2017-04-01

    A large fraction of the world's water and energy resources are located in naturally fractured reservoirs within the earth's crust. Depending on the lithology and tectonic history of a formation, fracture networks can range from dense and homogeneous highly fractured networks to single large scale fractures dominating the flow behavior. Understanding the dynamics of such reservoirs in terms of flow and transport is crucial to successful application of engineered geothermal systems (also known as enhanced geothermal systems or EGS) for geothermal energy production in the future. Fractured reservoirs are considered to consist of two distinct separate media, namely the fracture and matrix space respectively. Fractures are generally thin, highly conductive containing only small amounts of fluid, whereas the matrix rock provides high fluid storage but typically has much smaller permeability. Simulation of flow and transport through fractured porous media is challenging due to the high permeability contrast between the fractures and the surrounding rock matrix. However, accurate and efficient simulation of flow through a fracture network is crucial in order to understand, optimize and engineer reservoirs. It has been a research topic for several decades and is still under active research. Accurate fluid flow simulations through field-scale fractured reservoirs are still limited by the power of current computer processing units (CPU). We present an efficient implementation of the embedded discrete fracture model, which is a promising new technique in modeling the behavior of enhanced geothermal systems. An efficient coupling strategy is determined for numerical performance of the model. We provide new insight into the coupled modeling of fluid flow, heat transport of engineered geothermal reservoirs with focus on the thermal stress changes during the stimulation process. We further investigate the interplay of thermal and poro-elastic stress changes in the reservoir

  20. New DNS and modeling results for turbulent pipe flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Arne; El Khoury, George; Grundestam, Olof; Schlatter, Philipp; Brethouwer, Geert; Linne Flow Centre Team

    2013-11-01

    The near-wall region of turbulent pipe and channel flows (as well as zero-pressure gradient boundary layers) have been shown to exhibit a very high degree of similarity in terms of all statistical moments and many other features, while even the mean velocity profile in the two cases exhibits significant differences between in the outer region. The wake part of the profile, i.e. the deviation from the log-law, in the outer region is of substantially larger amplitude in pipe flow as compared to channel flow (although weaker than in boundary layer flow). This intriguing feature has been well known but has no simple explanation. Model predictions typically give identical results for the two flows. We have analyzed a new set of DNS for pipe and channel flows (el Khoury et al. 2013, Flow, Turbulence and Combustion) for friction Reynolds numbers up to 1000 and made comparing calculations with differential Reynolds stress models (DRSM). We have strong indications that the key factor behind the difference in mean velocity in the outer region can be coupled to differences in the turbulent diffusion in this region. This is also supported by DRSM results, where interesting differences are seen depending on the sophistication of modeling the turbulent diffusion coefficient.

  1. Comments on the present state of second-order closure models for incompressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziale, Charles G.

    1992-01-01

    Second-order closure models account for history and nonlocal effects of the mean velocity gradients on the Reynolds stress tensor. Turbulent flows involving body forces or curvature, Reynolds stress relaxational effects, and counter-gradient transport are usually better described. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include: (1) the Reynolds stress transport equation; (2) issues in second-order closure modeling; and (3) near wall models.

  2. Immersed boundary method predictions of shear stresses for different flow topologies occuring in cerebral aneurysms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mikhal, Julia Olegivna; Pereira, J.C.F; Sequeira, A.; Lopez Penha, D.J.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Pereira, J.M.C.; Janela, J.; Geurts, Bernardus J.; Borges, L.

    A volume-penalizing immersed boundary method is presented that facilitates the computation of incompressible fluid flow in complex flow domains. We apply this method to simulate the flow in cerebral aneurysms, and focus on the accuracy with which the flow field and the corresponding shear stress

  3. Experimental study of the solid-liquid interface in a yield-stress fluid flow upstream of a step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Li-Hua; Pierre, Philippe; Guillaume, Chambon

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study where a yield-stress fluid is implemented to carefully examine the interface between a liquid-like unyielded region and a solid-like yielded region. The studied hydrodynamics consists of a rectangular pipe-flow disturbed by the presence of a step. Upstream of the step, a solid-liquid interface between a dead zone and a flow zone appears. This configuration can both model geophysical erosion phenomenon in debris flows or find applications for industrial extrusion processes. We aim to investigate the dominant physical mechanism underlying the formation of the static domain, by combining the rheological characterization of the yield-stress fluid with local measurements of the related hydrodynamic parameters. In this work, we use a model fluid, namely polymer micro-gel Carbopol, that exhibits a Hershel-Bulkley viscoplastic rheology. Exploiting the fluid transparency, the flow is monitored by Particle Image Velocimetry thanks to internal visualization technique. In particular, we demonstrate that the flow above the dead zone roughly behaves as a plug flow whose velocity profile can successfully be described by a Poiseuille equation including a Hershel-Bulkley rheology (PHB theory), with exception of a thin zone at the close vicinity of the static domain. The border inside the flow zone above which the so-called PHB flow starts, is found to be the same regardless of the flow rate and to move with a constant velocity that increases with the flow rate. We interpret this feature as a slip frontier.

  4. Flow in a model turbine stator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggeln, R. C.; Shamroth, S. J.; Briley, W. R.

    1985-10-01

    In view of the complex nature of the flowfield in the hot section of gas turbine engines, the need to predict heat transfer and flow losses, the possible appearance of separation and strong secondary flows, etc., the present effort is focusing upon a Navier-Stokes approach to the three dimensional turbine stator problem. The advantages of a full Navier-Stokes approach are clear since when combined with a suitable turbulence model these equations represent the flow and heat transfer physics. In particular, the Navier-Stokes equations accurately represent possible separated regions and regions of significant secondary flow. In addition, the Navier-Stokes approach allows representation of the entire flow field by a single set of equations, thus avoiding problems associated with representing different regions of the flow by different equations and then matching flow regions.

  5. NUMERICAL MODEL FOR FLOW MOTION WITH VEGETATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-tao; SU Xiao-hui

    2008-01-01

    A set of governing equations for turbulent flows in vegetated area were derived with the assumption that vegetation is of straight and rigid cylinder. The effect of vegetation on flow motion was represented by additional inertial and drag forces. The new model was validated by available experimental data for open channel flows passing through vegetated areas with different vegetation size, density and distribution. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental data. Finally, the flow around a supposed isolated vegetated pile was simulated and the effects of vegetation density on the wake flow were discussed. It is found that the presence of vegetation, even at a very low density, has the pronounced influence on the dissipation of flow energy, both inside the vegetation domain and outside it in the wake flow region.

  6. Regression modeling of ground-water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, R.L.; Naff, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Nonlinear multiple regression methods are developed to model and analyze groundwater flow systems. Complete descriptions of regression methodology as applied to groundwater flow models allow scientists and engineers engaged in flow modeling to apply the methods to a wide range of problems. Organization of the text proceeds from an introduction that discusses the general topic of groundwater flow modeling, to a review of basic statistics necessary to properly apply regression techniques, and then to the main topic: exposition and use of linear and nonlinear regression to model groundwater flow. Statistical procedures are given to analyze and use the regression models. A number of exercises and answers are included to exercise the student on nearly all the methods that are presented for modeling and statistical analysis. Three computer programs implement the more complex methods. These three are a general two-dimensional, steady-state regression model for flow in an anisotropic, heterogeneous porous medium, a program to calculate a measure of model nonlinearity with respect to the regression parameters, and a program to analyze model errors in computed dependent variables such as hydraulic head. (USGS)

  7. Dynamic modelling of packaging material flow systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiliyannis, Christos A

    2005-04-01

    A dynamic model has been developed for reused and recycled packaging material flows. It allows a rigorous description of the flows and stocks during the transition to new targets imposed by legislation, product demand variations or even by variations in consumer discard behaviour. Given the annual reuse and recycle frequency and packaging lifetime, the model determines all packaging flows (e.g., consumption and reuse) and variables through which environmental policy is formulated, such as recycling, waste and reuse rates and it identifies the minimum number of variables to be surveyed for complete packaging flow monitoring. Simulation of the transition to the new flow conditions is given for flows of packaging materials in Greece, based on 1995--1998 field inventory and statistical data.

  8. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process

  9. Modeling process flow using diagrams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, B.; de Mast, J.; Mandjes, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the practice of process improvement, tools such as the flowchart, the value-stream map (VSM), and a variety of ad hoc variants of such diagrams are commonly used. The purpose of this paper is to present a clear, precise, and consistent framework for the use of such flow diagrams in process improv

  10. Multiphysics Simulations of Entrained Flow Gasification. Part I: Validating the Nonreacting Flow Solver and the Particle Turbulent Dispersion Model

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Mayank

    2012-01-19

    In this two-part paper, we describe the construction, validation, and application of a multiscale model of entrained flow gasification. The accuracy of the model is demonstrated by (1) rigorously constructing and validating the key constituent submodels against relevant canonical test cases from the literature and (2) validating the integrated model against experimental data from laboratory scale and commercial scale gasifiers. In part I, the flow solver and particle turbulent dispersion models are validated against experimental data from nonswirling flow and swirling flow test cases in an axisymmetric sudden expansion geometry and a two-phase flow test case in a cylindrical bluff body geometry. Results show that while the large eddy simulation (LES) performs best among all tested models in predicting both swirling and nonswirling flows, the shear stress transport (SST) k-ω model is the best choice among the commonly used Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. The particle turbulent dispersion model is accurate enough in predicting particle trajectories in complex turbulent flows when the underlying turbulent flow is well predicted. Moreover, a commonly used modeling constant in the particle dispersion model is optimized on the basis of comparisons with particle-phase experimental data for the two-phase flow bluff body case. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Performance of turbulence models for transonic flows in a diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangwei; Wu, Jianuo; Lu, Lipeng

    2016-09-01

    Eight turbulence models frequently used in aerodynamics have been employed in the detailed numerical investigations for transonic flows in the Sajben diffuser, to assess the predictive capabilities of the turbulence models for shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions (SWTBLI) in internal flows. The eight turbulence models include: the Spalart-Allmaras model, the standard k - 𝜀 model, the RNG k - 𝜀 model, the realizable k - 𝜀 model, the standard k - ω model, the SST k - ω model, the v2¯ - f model and the Reynolds stress model. The performance of the different turbulence models adopted has been systematically assessed by comparing the numerical results with the available experimental data. The comparisons show that the predictive performance becomes worse as the shock wave becomes stronger. The v2¯ - f model and the SST k - ω model perform much better than other models, and the SST k - ω model predicts a little better than the v2¯ - f model for pressure on walls and velocity profile, whereas the v2¯ - f model predicts a little better than the SST k - ω model for separation location, reattachment location and separation length for strong shock case.

  12. Modeling Flow Past a Tilted Vena Cava Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M A; Wang, S L

    2009-06-29

    Inferior vena cava filters are medical devices used to prevent pulmonary embolism (PE) from deep vein thrombosis. In particular, retrievable filters are well-suited for patients who are unresponsive to anticoagulation therapy and whose risk of PE decreased with time. The goal of this work is to use computational fluid dynamics to evaluate the flow past an unoccluded and partially occluded Celect inferior vena cava filter. In particular, the hemodynamic response to thrombus volume and filter tilt is examined, and the results are compared with flow conditions that are known to be thrombogenic. A computer model of the filter inside a model vena cava is constructed using high resolution digital photographs and methods of computer aided design. The models are parameterized using the Overture software framework, and a collection of overlapping grids is constructed to discretize the flow domain. The incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are solved, and the characteristics of the flow (i.e., velocity contours and wall shear stresses) are computed. The volume of stagnant and recirculating flow increases with thrombus volume. In addition, as the filter increases tilt, the cava wall adjacent to the tilted filter is subjected to low velocity flow that gives rise to regions of low wall shear stress. The results demonstrate the ease of IVC filter modeling with the Overture software framework. Flow conditions caused by the tilted Celect filter may elevate the risk of intrafilter thrombosis and facilitate vascular remodeling. This latter condition also increases the risk of penetration and potential incorporation of the hook of the filter into the vena caval wall, thereby complicating filter retrieval. Consequently, severe tilt at the time of filter deployment may warrant early clinical intervention.

  13. Acute stress reduces blood flow in the orofacial area, in conscious rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, Silvestro; Mohammed, Mazher; Passatore, Magda

    2009-04-01

    In the complex neurovascular control of the orofacial area, the only vasoconstrictor action is mediated by the sympathetic nervous system; however, its functional role is still unclear as little evidence exists of vasoconstrictor responses to physiological stimuli in both animal and human models. Aim of the present study was to investigate, orofacial vascular responses to acute stress in conscious rabbits. Twenty rabbits, implanted with chronic perivascular flow probes on the facial artery and with a telemetric probe for arterial blood pressure, were subjected to different alerting/stress stimuli, i.e., noise, taps on the rabbit's box, air jet, noxious cutaneous stimuli. Smaller groups of animal also underwent electromyographic (EMG) activity recording from the masseter muscle, unilateral section of the cervical sympathetic nerve (n=8), and alpha-adrenergic blockade with phentolamine (n=6). On average, all stressors evoked a pressor response accompanied by variable changes in heart rate and induced a marked, short-latency reduction in facial artery blood flow, corresponding to a decrease of 37-50% in vascular conductance of the facial artery. Local sympathetic denervation abolished the short-latency (15s) phase of the long-lasting response to the air jet. All vasoconstrictor effects were blocked by phentolamine. Increases in blood flow were observed only in concomitance with masseter EMG activity either during masticatory activity or in the form of brief occasional spontaneous contractions. This study provides evidence of an effective vasoconstrictor control by the sympathetic system in the orofacial area under stress conditions.

  14. A fully-coupled geomechanics and flow model for hydraulic fracturing and reservoir engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenwongsa, S.; Kazemi, H.; Miskimins, J.; Fakcharoenphol [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2010-07-01

    A fully coupled geomechanics flow model was used to assess how the changes in pore pressure and temperature influence rock stresses in tight gas reservoirs. The finite difference method was used to develop simulations for phases, components, and thermal stresses. A wave component was used to model the propagation of the strain displacement front as well as changes in stress with time. Fluid and heat flow volumes were modelled separately from rock formation properties. The influence of hydraulic fracturing on stress distributions surrounding the fracture was investigated as well as the effect of filter cake and filtrate. Results of the study showed that significant changes in shear stresses near hydraulic fractures occur as a result of hydraulic fracture face displacement perpendicular to the fracture face. While temperature effects also caused changes in stress distributions, changes in pore pressure did not significantly impact shear stresses as the filtrate did not travel very far into the reservoir. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  15. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-06-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  16. Modelling Canopy Flows over Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Eleanor R.; Ross, Andrew N.; Gardiner, Barry A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of flow over forested hills have been motivated by a number of important applications including understanding CO_2 and other gaseous fluxes over forests in complex terrain, predicting wind damage to trees, and modelling wind energy potential at forested sites. Current modelling studies have focussed almost exclusively on highly idealized, and usually fully forested, hills. Here, we present model results for a site on the Isle of Arran, Scotland with complex terrain and heterogeneous forest canopy. The model uses an explicit representation of the canopy and a 1.5-order turbulence closure for flow within and above the canopy. The validity of the closure scheme is assessed using turbulence data from a field experiment before comparing predictions of the full model with field observations. For near-neutral stability, the results compare well with the observations, showing that such a relatively simple canopy model can accurately reproduce the flow patterns observed over complex terrain and realistic, variable forest cover, while at the same time remaining computationally feasible for real case studies. The model allows closer examination of the flow separation observed over complex forested terrain. Comparisons with model simulations using a roughness length parametrization show significant differences, particularly with respect to flow separation, highlighting the need to explicitly model the forest canopy if detailed predictions of near-surface flow around forests are required.

  17. Incorporating groundwater flow into the WEPP model

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Elliot; Erin Brooks; Tim Link; Sue Miller

    2010-01-01

    The water erosion prediction project (WEPP) model is a physically-based hydrology and erosion model. In recent years, the hydrology prediction within the model has been improved for forest watershed modeling by incorporating shallow lateral flow into watershed runoff prediction. This has greatly improved WEPP's hydrologic performance on small watersheds with...

  18. Analysis of Cortical Flow Models In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benink, Hélène A.; Mandato, Craig A.; Bement, William M.

    2000-01-01

    Cortical flow, the directed movement of cortical F-actin and cortical organelles, is a basic cellular motility process. Microtubules are thought to somehow direct cortical flow, but whether they do so by stimulating or inhibiting contraction of the cortical actin cytoskeleton is the subject of debate. Treatment of Xenopus oocytes with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) triggers cortical flow toward the animal pole of the oocyte; this flow is suppressed by microtubules. To determine how this suppression occurs and whether it can control the direction of cortical flow, oocytes were subjected to localized manipulation of either the contractile stimulus (PMA) or microtubules. Localized PMA application resulted in redirection of cortical flow toward the site of application, as judged by movement of cortical pigment granules, cortical F-actin, and cortical myosin-2A. Such redirected flow was accelerated by microtubule depolymerization, showing that the suppression of cortical flow by microtubules is independent of the direction of flow. Direct observation of cortical F-actin by time-lapse confocal analysis in combination with photobleaching showed that cortical flow is driven by contraction of the cortical F-actin network and that microtubules suppress this contraction. The oocyte germinal vesicle serves as a microtubule organizing center in Xenopus oocytes; experimental displacement of the germinal vesicle toward the animal pole resulted in localized flow away from the animal pole. The results show that 1) cortical flow is directed toward areas of localized contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; 2) microtubules suppress cortical flow by inhibiting contraction of the cortical F-actin cytoskeleton; and 3) localized, microtubule-dependent suppression of actomyosin-based contraction can control the direction of cortical flow. We discuss these findings in light of current models of cortical flow. PMID:10930453

  19. Animal models of anxiety disorders and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alline C. Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and stress-related disorders are severe psychiatric conditions that affect performance in daily tasks and represent a high cost to public health. The initial observation of Charles Darwin that animals and human beings share similar characteristics in the expression of emotion raise the possibility of studying the mechanisms of psychiatric disorders in other mammals (mainly rodents. The development of animal models of anxiety and stress has helped to identify the pharmacological mechanisms and potential clinical effects of several drugs. Animal models of anxiety are based on conflict situations that can generate opposite motivational states induced by approach-avoidance situations. The present review revisited the main rodent models of anxiety and stress responses used worldwide. Here we defined as “ethological” the tests that assess unlearned/unpunished responses (such as the elevated plus maze, light-dark box, and open field, whereas models that involve learned/punished responses are referred to as “conditioned operant conflict tests” (such as the Vogel conflict test. We also discussed models that involve mainly classical conditioning tests (fear conditioning. Finally, we addressed the main protocols used to induce stress responses in rodents, including psychosocial (social defeat and neonatal isolation stress, physical (restraint stress, and chronic unpredictable stress.

  20. Simulation and modeling of turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Gatski, Thomas B; Lumley, John L

    1996-01-01

    This book provides students and researchers in fluid engineering with an up-to-date overview of turbulent flow research in the areas of simulation and modeling. A key element of the book is the systematic, rational development of turbulence closure models and related aspects of modern turbulent flow theory and prediction. Starting with a review of the spectral dynamics of homogenous and inhomogeneous turbulent flows, succeeding chapters deal with numerical simulation techniques, renormalization group methods and turbulent closure modeling. Each chapter is authored by recognized leaders in their respective fields, and each provides a thorough and cohesive treatment of the subject.

  1. Theory to predict shear stress on cells in turbulent blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Khandakar Niaz; Bark, David; Forleo, Marcio; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Shear stress on blood cells and platelets transported in a turbulent flow dictates the fate and biological activity of these cells. We present a theoretical link between energy dissipation in turbulent flows to the shear stress that cells experience and show that for the case of physiological turbulent blood flow: (a) the Newtonian assumption is valid, (b) turbulent eddies are universal for the most complex of blood flow problems, and (c) shear stress distribution on turbulent blood flows is possibly universal. Further we resolve a long standing inconsistency in hemolysis between laminar and turbulent flow using the theoretical framework. This work demonstrates that energy dissipation as opposed to bulk shear stress in laminar or turbulent blood flow dictates local mechanical environment of blood cells and platelets universally.

  2. Simple models for shear flow transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Dwight

    2011-11-01

    I will discuss recent developments in modeling transitional shear flows with simple two-variable models. Both pipe flow and plane Couette flow are considered. The essential insight is that most large-scale features of these shear flows can be traced to a change from excitability to bistability in the local dynamics. Models are presented in two variables, turbulence intensity and mean shear. A PDE model of pipe flow captures the essence of the puff-slug transition as a change from excitability to bistability. Extended models with turbulence as deterministic transient chaos or multiplicative noise reproduce almost all large-scale features of transitional pipe flow. In particular they capture metastable localized puffs, puff splitting, slugs, localized edge states, a continuous transition to sustained turbulence via spatiotemporal intermittency (directed percolation), and a subsequent increase in turbulence fraction towards uniform, featureless turbulence. A model that additionally takes into account the symmetries of plane Couette flow reproduces localized turbulence and periodic turbulent-laminar bands.

  3. A General Thermal Equilibrium Discharge Flow Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Min-fu; ZHANG; Dong-xu; LV; Yu-feng

    2015-01-01

    In isentropic and thermal equilibrium assumptions,a discharge flow model was derived,which unified the rules of normal temperature water discharge,high temperature and high pressure water discharge,two-phase critical flow,saturated steam and superheated steam critical

  4. The dynamics of pulsatile flow in distensible model arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liepsch, D W; Zimmer, R

    1995-12-01

    Deposits and blockages are often found in the carotid, coronary, renal and femoral arteries. This paper deals with laser-Doppler velocity measurements in models of bifurcations of the human femoral arteries. Several models were prepared for the studies: a simplified 35 degrees glass model, two elastic-silicone-rubber models with a wall thickness of 1 mm and 2 mm, and true-to-scale rigid and elastic models. These measurements give a clearer picture of how hemodynamics influences the formation of atherosclerotic plaques where there is a hardening of the arterial walls and a loss of elasticity. In addition to the effects of elasticity, the influence of the flow's pulsatility were studied. The measurements were done in steady and pulsatile flow. From the velocity measurements the shear stresses were calculated.

  5. PIV measurements and flow characteristics downstream of mangrove root models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Amirkhosro; Curet, Oscar

    2016-11-01

    Mangrove forests attracted attentions as a solution to protect coastal areas exposed to sea-level rising, frequent storms, and tsunamis. Mangrove forests found in tide-dominated flow regions are characterized by their massive and complex root systems, which play a prominent role in the structure of tidal flow currents. To understand the role of mangrove roots in flow structure, we modeled mangrove roots with rigid and flexible arrays of cylinders with different spacing between them as well as different configurations. In this work, we investigate the fluid dynamics downstream of the models using a 2-D time-resolved particle image velocimetry (PIV) and flow visualization. We carried out experiments for four different Reynolds number based on cylinder diameters ranges from 2200 to 12000. We present time-averaged and time-resolved flow parameters including velocity distribution, vorticity, streamline, Reynolds shear stress and turbulent kinetic energy. The results show that the flow structure has different vortex shedding downstream of the cylinders due to interactions of shear layers separating from cylinders surface. The spectral analysis of the measured velocity data is also performed to obtain Strouhal number of the unsteady flow in the cylinder wake.

  6. A simple one-dimensional model for urban canopy flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Wai Chi; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    In urban canopy parameterizations, an urban canopy is usually modelled as a drag force on the flow, and the turbulent shear stress is parametrized by various methods. One of the most common methods to parametrize the turbulent shear stress in urban canopies is to use a mixing length (lm) model. Different mixing length models have been proposed in the literature, and recent direct numerical simulation and large-eddy simulation (LES) studies have shown that these models underpredict the value of lm in urban canopies. The high value of lm in the canopies is in fact related to the turbulence generated at the high-shear region near the top of the canopy, which is similar to that in a plane mixing layer. By considering this effect, a new simple mixing length model is proposed based on physical arguments. The results of the new lm model and the previous models are compared with the LES results of flows within and above uniform cube arrays of different densities. The comparison clearly demonstrates the better performance of the new model in predicting the wind profiles especially near the top of the urban canopies. For the drag coefficient (Cd) representing an urban canopy, previous studies found that its value depends on the building density. Here, a simple model for Cd is suggested by considering the spatial distribution of mean wind within canopies of different building densities. The model prediction is found to agree reasonably well with the LES results.

  7. Flow velocities and bed shear stresses in a stone cover under an oscillatory flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenanato, F.; Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Sumer, B. Mutlu;

    2010-01-01

    I order to get a better understanding of the interaction between the wave-induced, near-bed oscillatory flow, the stome cover and the sea bed, physical model tests were carried out. The tests were conducted in an oscillating water tunnel. The bottom of the tunnes was covered by one, two and three...

  8. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  9. AN IMPROVED DYNAMIC SUBGRID-SCALE STRESS MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xue-ling; QIAN Zhong-dong; WU Yu-lin; LIU Shu-hong; YANG Fan

    2004-01-01

    According to modeling principle that a model must be more accurate if including more flow information, and based on the Cauchy-Helmholtz theorem and the Smagorinsky model, a second-order dynamic model with double dynamic coefficients was proposed by applying dimension analyses. The Subgrid-Scale (SGS) stress is a function of both strain-rate tensor and rotation-rate tensor. The SIMPLEC algorithm and staggering grid system was applied to give the solution of the discretized governing equations, and for the turbulent flow through a 90° bend, the distributions of velocity and pressure were achieved. The comparison between experimental data and simulation results at a Reynolds number 40000 shows a good agreement and implies that this model is practicable and credible.

  10. Molecular origins of higher harmonics in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P. H.; Giacomin, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Recent work has focused on deepening our understanding of the molecular origins of the higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. For instance, these higher harmonics have been explained by just considering the orientation distribution of rigid dumbbells suspended in a Newtonian solvent. These dumbbells, when in dilute suspension, form the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity, and this model specifically neglects interactions between the polymer molecules [R. B. Bird et al., "Dilute rigid dumbbell suspensions in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow: Shear stress response," J. Chem. Phys. 140, 074904 (2014)]. In this paper, we explore these interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory designed specifically to account for the restricted motions that arise when polymer chains are concentrated, thus interacting and specifically, entangled. We begin our comparison using a heretofore ignored explicit analytical solution [X.-J. Fan and R. B. Bird, "A kinetic theory for polymer melts. VI. Calculation of additional material functions," J. Non-Newtonian Fluid Mech. 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ = 0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1/8 to rod-climbing, 1/5 ≤ ɛ ≤ 3/4 to reasonable predictions for shear-thinning in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ = 1 to the dilute solution without hydrodynamic interaction. In this paper, we examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases ɛ = (" separators=" 0 , 1 / 8 , 3 / 8 , 1 ) , and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  11. Computational modelling flow and transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stelling, G.S.; Booij, N.

    1999-01-01

    Lecture notes CT wa4340. Derivation of equations using balance principles; numerical treatment of ordinary differential equations; time dependent partial differential equations; the strucure of a computer model:DUFLO; usage of numerical models.

  12. A new dynamics model for traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    As a study method of traffic flow, dynamics models were developedand applied in the last few decades. However, there exist some flaws in most existing models. In this note, a new dynamics model is proposed by using car-following theory and the usual connection method of micro-macro variables, which can overcome some ubiquitous problems in the existing models. Numerical results show that the new model can very well simulate traffic flow conditions, such as congestion, evacuation of congestion, stop-and-go phenomena and phantom jam.

  13. Physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing Reynolds stress modeling discrepancies based on DNS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-Xun; Wu, Jin-Long; Xiao, Heng

    2017-03-01

    Turbulence modeling is a critical component in numerical simulations of industrial flows based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. However, after decades of efforts in the turbulence modeling community, universally applicable RANS models with predictive capabilities are still lacking. Large discrepancies in the RANS-modeled Reynolds stresses are the main source that limits the predictive accuracy of RANS models. Identifying these discrepancies is of significance to possibly improve the RANS modeling. In this work, we propose a data-driven, physics-informed machine learning approach for reconstructing discrepancies in RANS modeled Reynolds stresses. The discrepancies are formulated as functions of the mean flow features. By using a modern machine learning technique based on random forests, the discrepancy functions are trained by existing direct numerical simulation (DNS) databases and then used to predict Reynolds stress discrepancies in different flows where data are not available. The proposed method is evaluated by two classes of flows: (1) fully developed turbulent flows in a square duct at various Reynolds numbers and (2) flows with massive separations. In separated flows, two training flow scenarios of increasing difficulties are considered: (1) the flow in the same periodic hills geometry yet at a lower Reynolds number and (2) the flow in a different hill geometry with a similar recirculation zone. Excellent predictive performances were observed in both scenarios, demonstrating the merits of the proposed method.

  14. Characterization and modelling of fluid flows in fissured and fractured media. relation with hydrothermal alterations and paleo-stress quantification; Caracterisation et modelisation des ecoulements fluides en milieu fissure. relation avec les alterations hydrothermales et quantification des paleocontraintes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausse, J.

    1998-10-15

    the modelization of the space-time evolution of the Brezouard granite crack permeability during fluid-rock interactions. The two used permeability models (geometrical or statistical) remain very dependent on the definition of the characteristic opening of fracture or fissure. Real fractures in a rocky mass are characterised by non parallel, flat and thus overlapped walls. The study of these natural fracture surfaces at micro and macroscopic scale is completed by a theoretical modelization of their hydro-mechanical behaviour. This work indicates the influence of the surface roughness on the fluid flow as well as the propagation of the alteration. These fractures were formed and percolated under a particular tectonic regime that controls their orientation. Numerous quartz veins in the Soultz granite are opened and sealed during the Oligocene extension. The characteristic fluid pressure of these opening - sealing stages are quantified thanks to fluid inclusion studies. These inclusions are located in secondary quartz which seal the veins. A new method of paleo-stress quantification is proposed, based on the knowledge of this fluid pressure. It takes i) the geometrical distribution of the vein poles, ii) some empirical considerations of rupture criteria, and iii) the fluid pressures into account. (author)

  15. Wall Orientation and Shear Stress in the Lattice Boltzmann Model

    CERN Document Server

    Matyka, Maciej; Mirosław, Łukasz

    2013-01-01

    The wall shear stress is a quantity of profound importance for clinical diagnosis of artery diseases. The lattice Boltzmann is an easily parallelizable numerical method of solving the flow problems, but it suffers from errors of the velocity field near the boundaries which leads to errors in the wall shear stress and normal vectors computed from the velocity. In this work we present a simple formula to calculate the wall shear stress in the lattice Boltzmann model and propose to compute wall normals, which are necessary to compute the wall shear stress, by taking the weighted mean over boundary facets lying in a vicinity of a wall element. We carry out several tests and observe an increase of accuracy of computed normal vectors over other methods in two and three dimensions. Using the scheme we compute the wall shear stress in an inclined and bent channel fluid flow and show a minor influence of the normal on the numerical error, implying that that the main error arises due to a corrupted velocity field near ...

  16. Testing of models of flow-induced hemolysis in blood flow through hypodermic needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangsheng; Kent, Timothy L; Sharp, M Keith

    2013-03-01

    Hemolysis caused by flow in hypodermic needles interferes with a number of tests on blood samples drawn by venipuncture, including assays for metabolites, electrolytes, and enzymes, causes discomfort during dialysis sessions, and limits transfusion flow rates. To evaluate design modifications to address this problem, as well as hemolysis issues in other cardiovascular devices, computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based prediction of hemolysis has potential for reducing the time and expense for testing of prototypes. In this project, three CFD-integrated blood damage models were applied to flow-induced hemolysis in 16-G needles and compared with experimental results, which demonstrated that a modified needle with chamfered entrance increased hemolysis, while a rounded entrance decreased hemolysis, compared with a standard needle with sharp entrance. After CFD simulation of the steady-state velocity field, the time histories of scalar stress along a grid of streamlines were calculated. A strain-based cell membrane failure model and two empirical power-law blood damage models were used to predict hemolysis on each streamline. Total hemolysis was calculated by weighting the predicted hemolysis along each streamline by the flow rate along each streamline. The results showed that only the strain-based blood damage model correctly predicted increased hemolysis in the beveled needle and decreased hemolysis in the rounded needle, while the power-law models predicted the opposite trends. © 2013, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2013, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Molecular Origins of Higher Harmonics in Large-Amplitude Oscillatory Shear Flow: Shear Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Peter; Giacomin, A. Jeffrey; Schmalzer, Andrew; Bird, R. B.

    Recent work has focused on understanding the molecular origins of higher harmonics that arise in the shear stress response of polymeric liquids in large-amplitude oscillatory shear flow. These higher harmonics have been explained using only the orientation distribution of a dilute suspension of rigid dumbbells in a Newtonian fluid, which neglects molecular interactions and is the simplest relevant molecular model of polymer viscoelasticity [R.B. Bird et al., J Chem Phys, 140, 074904 (2014)]. We explore these molecular interactions by examining the Curtiss-Bird model, a kinetic molecular theory that accounts for restricted polymer motions arising when chains are concentrated [Fan and Bird, JNNFM, 15, 341 (1984)]. For concentrated systems, the chain motion transverse to the chain axis is more restricted than along the axis. This anisotropy is described by the link tension coefficient, ɛ, for which several special cases arise: ɛ =0 corresponds to reptation, ɛ > 1 1 8 8 to rod-climbing, 1 1 2 2 >= ɛ >= 3 3 4 4 to reasonable shear-thinning predictions in steady simple shear flow, and ɛ =1 to a dilute solution of chains. We examine the shapes of the shear stress versus shear rate loops for the special cases, ɛ = 0 , 1 0 , 1 8 , 3 3 8 8 8 , 3 3 8 8 , 1 , of the Curtiss-Bird model, and we compare these with those of rigid dumbbell and reptation model predictions.

  18. Interfacial shear stress in stratified flow in a horizontal rectangular duct

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorencez, C.; Kawaji, M. [Univ. of Toronto (Canada); Murao, Y. [Tokushima Univ. (Japan)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Interfacial shear stress has been experimentally examined for both cocurrent and countercurrent stratified wavy flows in a horizontal interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress from the measurements were examined and the results have been compared with existing correlations. Some differences were found in the estimated interfacial shear stress values at high gas flow rates which could be attributed to the assumptions and procedures involved in each method. The interfacial waves and secondary motions were also found to have significant effects on the accuracy of Reynolds stress and turbulence kinetic energy extrapolation methods.

  19. Lower Crustal Flow and Its Relation to the Surface Deformation and Stress Distribution in Western Sichuan Region, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yujiang Li; Lianwang Chen; Pei Tan; Hong Li

    2014-01-01

    The channel flow model was gradually being accepted with the more important multidisci-plinary evidences from geology and geophysics, but how the lower crustal flow influenced the surface de-formation quantitatively was unknown. Here, we develop a three-dimensional viscoelastic model to ex-plore the mechanical relations between the lower crustal flow and the surface deformation in western Si-chuan. Based on numerous tests, our results show that the modeled results fit well with the observed GPS data when the lower crust flows faster than the upper crust about 11 mm/a in the rhombic block, which can be useful to understand the possible mechanism of the surface deformation in western Sichuan. Moreover, taking the Xianshuihe fault as an example, we preliminarily analyze the relation between the active fault and stress field, according to the boundary constraints that deduced from the best model. The results show that the maximum shear stress on the Xianshuihe fault zone is mainly located in the fault terminal, intersections and the bend of the fault geometry, the stress level on the northwestern segment that has the high slip rate is relatively high. Additionally, with the reduction of the Young’s modulus in the fault zone, it’s conducive to generate the greater strain distribution, hence forming the high stress level.

  20. Pulsatile flow in a compliant stenosed asymmetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmani, Abdullah Y.; Muralidhar, K.

    2016-12-01

    Time-varying velocity field in an asymmetric constricted tube is experimentally studied using a two-dimensional particle image velocimetry system. The geometry resembles a vascular disease which is characterized by arterial narrowing due to plaque deposition. The present study compares the nature of flow patterns in rigid and compliant asymmetric constricted tubes for a range of dimensionless parameters appearing in a human artery. A blood analogue fluid is employed along with a pump that mimics cardioflow conditions. The peak Reynolds number range is Re 300-800, while the Womersley number range considered in experiments is Wo 6-8. These values are based on the peak velocity in a straight rigid tube connected to the model, over a pulsation frequency range of 1.2-2.4 Hz. The medial-plane velocity distribution is used to investigate the nature of flow patterns. Temporal distribution of stream traces and hemodynamic factors including WSS, TAWSS and OSI at important phases of the pulsation cycle are discussed. The flow patterns obtained from PIV are compared to a limited extent against numerical simulation. Results show that the region downstream of the constriction is characterized by a high-velocity jet at the throat, while a recirculation zone, attached to the wall, evolves in time. Compliant models reveal large flow disturbances upstream during the retrograde flow. Wall shear stress values are lower in a compliant model as compared to the rigid. Cross-plane flow structures normal to the main flow direction are visible at select phases of the cycle. Positive values of largest Lyapunov exponent are realized for wall movement and are indicative of chaotic motion transferred from the flow to the wall. These exponents increase with Reynolds number as well as compliance. Period doubling is observed in wall displacement of highly compliant models, indicating possible triggering of hemodynamic events in a real artery that may cause fissure in the plaque deposits.

  1. Tracer technology modeling the flow of fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Levenspiel, Octave

    2012-01-01

    A vessel’s behavior as a heat exchanger, absorber, reactor, or other process unit is dependent upon how fluid flows through the vessel.  In early engineering, the designer would assume either plug flow or mixed flow of the fluid through the vessel.  However, these assumptions were oftentimes inaccurate, sometimes being off by a volume factor of 100 or more.  The result of this unreliable figure produced ineffective products in multiple reaction systems.   Written by a pioneering researcher in the field of chemical engineering, the tracer method was introduced to provide more accurate flow data.  First, the tracer method measured the actual flow of fluid through a vessel.  Second, it developed a suitable model to represent the flow in question.  Such models are used to follow the flow of fluid in chemical reactors and other process units, like in rivers and streams, or solid and porous structures.  In medicine, the tracer method is used to study the flow of chemicals—harmful  and harmless—in the...

  2. Exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Alam Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at presenting exact solutions for MHD flow of couple stress fluid with heat transfer. The governing partial differential equations (PDEs for an incompressible MHD flow of couple stress fluid are reduced to ordinary differential equations by employing wave parameter. The methodology is implemented for linearizing the flow equations without extra transformation and restrictive assumptions. Comparison is made with the result obtained previously.

  3. Plastic flow rule for sands with friction, dilation, density and stress state coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowski Marek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a flow rule and failure criterion for sands in plane strain conditions based on Drucker-Prager formulation and enhanced with empirical Houlsby formula, which couples friction, dilation, density and stress state in the material. The resulting elasto-plastic, non-associated, shear hardening material model is implemented as a numerical procedure in the frame of finite element method and a simple compression example is presented. Because of the empirical nature of Houlsby formula, it is believed that results of numerical simulations will be more realistic both in deformation and shear strength estimation of sands.

  4. Flow field mapping in data rack model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matěcha J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to map the flow field inside the data rack model, fitted with three 1U server models. The server model is based on the common four-processor 1U server. The main dimensions of the data rack model geometry are taken fully from the real geometry. Only the model was simplified with respect to the greatest possibility in the experimental measurements. The flow field mapping was carried out both experimentally and numerically. PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry method was used for the experimental flow field mapping, when the flow field has been mapped for defined regions within the 2D/3D data rack model. Ansys CFX and OpenFOAM software were used for the numerical solution. Boundary conditions for numerical model were based on data obtained from experimental measurement of velocity profile at the output of the server mockup. This velocity profile was used as the input boundary condition in the calculation. In order to achieve greater consistency of the numerical model with experimental data, the numerical model was modified with regard to the results of experimental measurements. Results from the experimental and numerical measurements were compared and the areas of disparateness were identified. In further steps the obtained proven numerical model will be utilized for the real geometry of data racks and data.

  5. Base Flow Model Validation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation is the systematic "building-block" validation of CFD/turbulence models employing a GUI driven CFD code (RPFM) and existing as well as new data sets to...

  6. Groundwater flow through a natural fracture. Flow experiments and numerical modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Erik [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept of Geology

    1997-09-01

    Groundwater flow and transport play an important role not only for groundwater exploration but also in environmental engineering problems. This report considers how the hydraulic properties of fractures in crystalline rock depend on the fracture aperture geometry. Different numerical models are discussed and a FDM computer code for two- and three- dimensional flow-modelling has been developed. Different relations between the cells in the model are tested and compared with results in the literature. A laboratory experimental work has been done to carry out flow experiments and aperture measurements on the same specimen of a natural fracture. The drilled core sample had fractures parallel to the core axis and was placed inside a biaxial cell during the experiments. The water pressure gradient and the compression stress were varied during the experiments and also a tracer test was done. After the flow experiments, the aperture distribution for a certain compression was measured by injecting an epoxy resin into the fracture. The thickness of the resin layer was then studied in saw cut sections of the sample. The results from the experiments were used to validate numerical and analytical models, based on aperture distribution, for flow and transport simulations. In the disturbed zone around a drift both water and air are present in the fractures. The gas will go to the most wide part of the fracture because the capillarity and the conductivity decrease. The dependence of the effective conductivity on the variance of the conductivity and the effect of extinction of highly conductive cells has also been studied. A discussion of how gas in fractures around a drift can cause a skin effect is modelled and an example is given of what a saturation depending on the magnitude of the flow causes. 25 refs, 17 tabs, 43 figs.

  7. Modeling the Collisional-Plastic Stress Transition for Bin Discharge of Granular Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannala, Sreekanth; Daw, C. Stuart; Finney, Charles E. A.; Benyahia, Sofiane; Syamlal, Madhava; O'Brien, Thomas J.

    2009-06-01

    We propose a heuristic model for the transition between collisional and frictional/plastic stresses in the flow of granular material. Our approach is based on a physically motivated, nonlinear `blending' function that produces a weighted average of the limiting stresses, depending on the local void fraction in the flow field. Previously published stress models are utilized to describe the behavior in the collisional (Lun et al., 1984) and quasi-static limits (Schaeffer, 1987 and Syamlal et al.., 1993). Sigmoidal and hyperbolic tangent functions are used to mimic the observed smooth yet rapid transition between the collisional and plastic stress zones. We implement our stress transition model in an open-source multiphase flow solver, MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges, www.mfix.org) and demonstrate its application to a standard bin discharge problem. The model's effectiveness is illustrated by comparing computational predictions to the experimentally derived Beverloo correlation. With the correct choice of function parameters, the model predicts bin discharge rates within the error margins of the Beverloo correlation and is more accurate than one of the alternative granular stress models proposed in the literature. Although a second granular stress model in the literature is also reasonably consistent with the Beverloo correlation, we propose that our alternative blending function is likely to be more adaptable to situations with more complex solids properties (e.g., `sticky' solids).

  8. Modeling the Collisional-Plastic Stress Transition for Bin Discharge of Granular Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL; Benyahia, S. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); Syamlal, M. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL); O' Brien, T. J. [National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)

    2009-01-01

    We propose a heuristic model for the transition between collisional and frictional/plastic stresses in the flow of granular material. Our approach is based on a physically motivated, nonlinear blending function that produces a weighted average of the limiting stresses, depending on the local void fraction in the flow field. Previously published stress models are utilized to describe the behavior in the collisional (Lun et al., 1984) and quasi-static limits (Schaeffer, 1987 and Syamlal et al., 1993). Sigmoidal and hyperbolic tangent functions are used to mimic the observed smooth yet rapid transition between the collisional and plastic stress zones. We implement our stress transition model in an opensource multiphase flow solver, MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges, www.mfix.org) and demonstrate its application to a standard bin discharge problem. The model s effectiveness is illustrated by comparing computational predictions to the experimentally derived Beverloo correlation. With the correct choice of function parameters, the model predicts bin discharge rates within the error margins of the Beverloo correlation and is more accurate than one of the alternative granular stress models proposed in the literature. Although a second granular stress model in the literature is also reasonably consistent with the Beverloo correlation, we propose that our alternative blending function is likely to be more adaptable to situations with more complex solids properties (e.g., sticky solids).

  9. Flow under standing waves Part 1. Shear stress distribution, energy flux and steady streaming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislason, Kjartan; Fredsøe, Jørgen; Deigaard, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The conditions for energy flux, momentum flux and the resulting streaming velocity are analysed for standing waves formed in front of a fully reflecting wall. The exchange of energy between the outer wave motion and the near bed oscillatory boundary layer is considered, determining the horizontal...... energy flux inside and outside the boundary layer. The momentum balance, the mean shear stress and the resulting time averaged streaming velocities are determined. For a laminar bed boundary layer the analysis of the wave drift gives results similar to the original work of Longuet-Higgins from 1953....... The work is extended to turbulent bed boundary layers by application of a numerical model. The similarities and differences between laminar and turbulent flow conditions are discussed, and quantitative results for the magnitude of the mean shear stress and drift velocity are presented. Full two...

  10. TWO MODIFICATORY K-ε TURBULENCE MODELS FOR TURBULENT SWIRLING FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Ze; Liu Wei-ming

    2003-01-01

    Since the standard K-ε model used to predict the strongly swirling flow leads to a large deviation from experimental results, it is necessary to introduce modification to the standard K-ε model. Based on the algebraic Reynolds stress model and Bradshaw's turbulent length scale modification conception, we present two modified K-ε models. To investigate the behaviour of the modified turbulence models, they are used to predict two representative turbulent swirling flows. The computational results, after compared with the experimental data, show that the modified K-ε models substantially improve the prediction of the standard K-ε model for the turbulent swirling flows.

  11. Development of advanced techniques for identification of flow stress and friction parameters for metal forming analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyunjoong

    The accuracy of process simulation in metal forming by finite element method depends on the accuracy of flow stress data and friction value that are input to FEM programs. Therefore, it is essential that these input values are determined using reliable tests and evaluation methods. This study presents the development of inverse analysis methodology and its application to determine flow stress data of bulk and sheet materials at room and elevated temperatures. The inverse problem is defined as the minimization of the differences between the experimental measurements and the corresponding FEM predictions. Rigid-viscoplastic FEM is used to analyze the metal flow while a numerical optimization algorithm adjusts the material parameters used in the simulation until the calculated response matches the measured data within a specified tolerance. The use of the developed inverse analysis methodology has been demonstrated by applying it to the selected reference rheological tests; cylinder compression test, ring compression test, instrumented indentation test, modified limiting dome height test, and sheet hydraulic bulge test. Furthermore, using the determined material property data, full 3-D finite element simulation models, as examples of industrial applications for orbital forming and thermoforming processes have been developed for reliable process simulation. As results of this study, it was shown that the developed inverse analysis methodology could identify both the material parameters and friction factors from one set of tests, simultaneously. Therefore, this technique can offer a systematic and cost effective way for determining material property data for simulation of metal forming processes.

  12. Advances in transitional flow modeling applications to helicopter rotors

    CERN Document Server

    Sheng, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive description of numerical methods and validation processes for predicting transitional flows based on the Langtry–Menter local correlation-based transition model, integrated with both one-equation Spalart–Allmaras (S–A) and two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) turbulence models. A comparative study is presented to combine the respective merits of the two coupling methods in the context of predicting the boundary-layer transition phenomenon from fundamental benchmark flows to realistic helicopter rotors. The book will of interest to industrial practitioners working in aerodynamic design and the analysis of fixed-wing or rotary wing aircraft, while also offering advanced reading material for graduate students in the research areas of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), turbulence modeling and related fields.

  13. MCRG Flow for the nonlinear Sigma Model

    CERN Document Server

    Koerner, Daniel; Wipf, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A study of the renormalization group flow in the three-dimensional nonlinear O(N) sigma model using Monte Carlo Renormalization Group (MCRG) techniques is presented. To achieve this, we combine an improved blockspin transformation with the canonical demon method to determine the flow diagram for a number of different truncations. Systematic errors of the approach are highlighted. Results are discussed with hindsight on the fixed point structure of the model and the corresponding critical exponents. Special emphasis is drawn on the existence of a nontrivial ultraviolet fixed point as required for theories modeling the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  14. Numerical modeling of multiphase flow in rough and propped fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, Marcin; Dzikowski, Michał; Jasinski, Lukasz; Olkiewicz, Piotr

    2017-04-01

    crystalline rocks. The detailed pattern of flow paths and effective fracture conductivity are largely dependent on the level of confining stresses and fracture wall roughness, which both determine the shape and distribution of fracture apertures and contact areas. The distribution of proppant grains, which are used to maintain apertures of hydraulic fractures, is a key factor governing fracture flow in industrial applications. The flow of multiphase fluids in narrow apertures of rock fractures may substantially differ from the flow of a single-phase fluid. For example, multiphase flow effects play an important role during all stages of unconventional reservoir life cycle. Multiphase flow conditions are also expected to prevail in high temperature geothermal fields and during the transport of non aqueous phase liquid contaminants in groundwaters. We use direct numerical simulations to study single- and multiphase flow in rough and propped fractures. We compute the fluid flow using either the finite element or the lattice Boltzmann method. Body-fitting, unstructured computational meshes are used to improve the numerical accuracy. The fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces are directly resolved and an implicit approach to surface tension is used to alleviate restrictions due to capillary CFL condition. In FEM simulations, the Beltrami-Laplace operator is integrated by parts to avoid interface curvature computation during evaluation of the surface tension term. We derive and validate an upscaled approach to Stokes flow in propped and rough fractures. Our upscaled 2.5D fracture flow model features a Brinkman term and is capable of treating no-slip boundary conditions on the rims of proppant grains and fracture wall contact areas. The Stokes-Brinkman fracture flow model provides an improvement over the Reynolds model, both in terms of the effective fracture permeability and the local flow pattern. We present numerical and analytical models for the propped fracture

  15. 应激对反流性食管炎模型大鼠食管下段pH值及黏膜血流的影响%The Influence of pH Values and Blood Flow of Lower Esophageal in Reflux Esophagitis Model Rat by Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑞; 唐艳萍; 弓艳霞; 刘思邈; 康丽丽

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the influence of pH values and blood flow of lower esophageal in reflux Esophagitis model rat by stress, and to explore the effect of esophageal by psychological factor. Methods Pre⁃operative rats were randomly divided into 4 groups, control group, stress group, model group and stress plus mod⁃eling group, 15 rats in each group. Reflux Esophagitis rat model was established by the method of improved part cardiac muscle incision and part outlay-pyloric ligation. 7 days later, stress group and stress plus modeling group were induced by water immersion and immobilization. And then, the pH values of distal esophagus, the esophageal mucosal blood flow were compared. Results Compare with control group, the stress group lead to the pH values(3.21 ± 0.32)and the blood flow[(38.62 ± 6.11)BPU]down(P<0.01), the model group lead to the pH values(2.23 ± 0.27)and the blood flow[(30.16 ± 6.79)BPU]down(P<0.01); compare with model group, the stress plus model group lead to the pH values(2.01 ± 0.19)and the blood flow[(14.41 ± 7.04)BPU] down(P<0.01). Conclusion The stress could aggravate ischemia of esophageal mucosa and make pH values and the blood flow down.%目的::观察应激对反流性食管炎模型大鼠食管下段pH值及黏膜血流的影响,探讨心理因素在反流性食管炎发生、发展中的作用。方法:雄性Wistar大鼠,随机分为对照组、应激组、模型组、应激-模型组,每组15只。采用改良部分贲门肌切开术联合外置幽门部分结扎术制备大鼠反流性食管炎模型。造模后7 d,应激组和模型-应激组用水浸束缚法行应激实验。实验结束后,各组大鼠麻醉、剖腹,检测各组大鼠食管下段pH值、黏膜血流。结果:与对照组比较,应激组大鼠食管下段pH值(3.21±0.32)、黏膜血流[(38.62±6.11)BPU]均下降(P<0.01),模型组大鼠食管下段pH值(2.23±0.27)、黏膜血流[(30.16±6.79) BPU

  16. Mesoscopic Rhelogical Model for Polymeric Media Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshelev, K.; Kuznetcov, A.; Merzlikina, D.; Pyshnograi, G.; Pyshnograi, I.; Tolstykh, M. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The paper compares hydrodynamic properties of three-dimensional flows of polymer melts. A modified Vinogradov and Pokrovskii rheological model is used for the mathematical description of nonlinear viscoelastic fluid flows in a planeparallel channel with a sudden convergence. Discrete analogs for partial differential equations were obtained via the control volume method separating physical processes. The numerical implementation is carried out using the GPU-based parallel computing technology. Velocity and pressure fields have been calculated for two samples of polyethylene melts and the circulating flow at the entrance of the slit channel is noticeable. It is shown that the size of the vortex zone depends significantly on melt rheology.

  17. Particle in the Brusselator Model with Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuptsov, P.V.; Kuznetsov, S.P.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2002-01-01

    We consider the interaction of a small moving particle with a stationary space-periodic pattern in a chemical reaction-diffusion system with a flow. The pattern is produced by a one-dimensional Brusselator model that is perturbed by a constant displacement from the equilibrium state at the inlet....... By partially blocking the flow, the particle gives rise to a local increment of the flow rate. For certain parameter values a response with intermittent Hopf and Turing type structures is observed. In other regimes a wave of substitution of missing peaks runs across the pattern....

  18. SIMPLE LATTICE BOLTZMANN MODEL FOR TRAFFIC FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Guangwu; Hu Shouxin

    2000-01-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with 5-bit lattice for traffic flows is proposed.Using the Chapman-Enskog expansion and multi-scale technique,we obtain the higher-order moments of equilibrium distribution function.A simple traffic light problem is simulated by using the present lattice Boltzmann model,and the result agrees well with analytical solution.

  19. Review and selection of unsaturated flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, M.; Baker, N.A.; Duguid, J.O. [INTERA, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-04-04

    Since the 1960`s, ground-water flow models have been used for analysis of water resources problems. In the 1970`s, emphasis began to shift to analysis of waste management problems. This shift in emphasis was largely brought about by site selection activities for geologic repositories for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes. Model development during the 1970`s and well into the 1980`s focused primarily on saturated ground-water flow because geologic repositories in salt, basalt, granite, shale, and tuff were envisioned to be below the water table. Selection of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for potential disposal of waste began to shift model development toward unsaturated flow models. Under the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor (CRWMS M&O) has the responsibility to review, evaluate, and document existing computer models; to conduct performance assessments; and to develop performance assessment models, where necessary. This document describes the CRWMS M&O approach to model review and evaluation (Chapter 2), and the requirements for unsaturated flow models which are the bases for selection from among the current models (Chapter 3). Chapter 4 identifies existing models, and their characteristics. Through a detailed examination of characteristics, Chapter 5 presents the selection of models for testing. Chapter 6 discusses the testing and verification of selected models. Chapters 7 and 8 give conclusions and make recommendations, respectively. Chapter 9 records the major references for each of the models reviewed. Appendix A, a collection of technical reviews for each model, contains a more complete list of references. Finally, Appendix B characterizes the problems used for model testing.

  20. A model for transonic plasma flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guazzotto, Luca, E-mail: luca.guazzotto@rochester.edu [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Hameiri, Eliezer, E-mail: hameiri@cims.nyu.edu [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A linear, two-dimensional model of a transonic plasma flow in equilibrium is constructed and given an explicit solution in the form of a complex Laplace integral. The solution indicates that the transonic state can be solved as an elliptic boundary value problem, as is done in the numerical code FLOW [Guazzotto et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 604 (2004)]. Moreover, the presence of a hyperbolic region does not necessarily imply the presence of a discontinuity or any other singularity of the solution.

  1. Modelling of gas flow through metallic foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosnier, S. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Thermohydraulique et de Physique, 38 (France); Riva, R. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bador, B.; Blet, V.

    2003-09-01

    The transport and distribution of gases (hydrogen at the anode and air at the cathode) and water over the front surfaces of the electrodes in contact with electrolyte membrane are of great importance for the enhancement of efficiency of the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC). The use of metallic foam as a flow distributor in comparison with grooved plate (formed by parallel channels) commonly used in commercial fuel cells may be advantageous since this porous material has a porosity close to unity and then high specific surface area. In fact, the potentially active surface area is generally considered to be almost equal to the front surface area of the electrodes. In order to ensure a homogeneous flow distribution all over the active surface of such devices, a good understanding of gas flow through these particular porous media is necessary. For that purpose, studying of two-phase flow (oxygen, hydrogen and water) through metallic foams must be undertaken. This is carried out in the present work but, in a first step, only for single-phase flow, since the behaviour of two-phase flow derives from the first one. Novels hydraulic models have then been developed in the literature these last years. However, these models do not take into account the viscous dissipation of the flow along the walls bordering the porous media. Unfortunately, metallic foam used as distributors in fuel cell have thigh thickness (of the order of the millimeter), that shedding a doubt on the validity of the latter assumption. In this paper, we review the different hydraulic models in order to discuss the relevance and the limits of each to describe single-phase flow through foams which could be used as distributor in a fuel cell. For that purpose, numerical solutions obtained using modified MC3D-REPO package originally developed for the modelling of multicomponent two-phase flows in granular porous media have been compared to experimental data measured on a dedicated hydraulic device

  2. Nonlocal modeling of granular flows down inclines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrin, Ken; Henann, David L

    2015-01-07

    Flows of granular media down a rough inclined plane demonstrate a number of nonlocal phenomena. We apply the recently proposed nonlocal granular fluidity model to this geometry and find that the model captures many of these effects. Utilizing the model's dynamical form, we obtain a formula for the critical stopping height of a layer of grains on an inclined surface. Using an existing parameter calibration for glass beads, the theoretical result compares quantitatively to existing experimental data for glass beads. This provides a stringent test of the model, whose previous validations focused on driven steady-flow problems. For layers thicker than the stopping height, the theoretical flow profiles display a thickness-dependent shape whose features are in agreement with previous discrete particle simulations. We also address the issue of the Froude number of the flows, which has been shown experimentally to collapse as a function of the ratio of layer thickness to stopping height. While the collapse is not obvious, two explanations emerge leading to a revisiting of the history of inertial rheology, which the nonlocal model references for its homogeneous flow response.

  3. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuqureque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    Various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially non-uniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  4. Unsaturated zone flow modeling for GWTT-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, C.K.; Altman, S.J.; McKenna, S.A.; Arnold, B.W.

    1995-12-31

    In accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation regarding groundwater travel times at geologic repositories, various models of unsaturated flow in fractured tuff have been developed and implemented to assess groundwater travel times at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Kaplan used one-dimensional models to describe the uncertainty and sensitivity of travel times to various processes at Yucca Mountain. Robey and Arnold et al. used a two-dimensional equivalent continuum model (ECM) with inter- and intra-unit heterogeneity in an attempt to assess fast-flow paths through the unsaturated, fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain (GWTT-94). However, significant flow through the fractures in previous models was not simulated due to the characteristics of the ECM, which requires the matrix to be nearly saturated before flow through the fractures is initiated. In the current study (GWTT-95), four two-dimensional cross-sections at Yucca Mountain are simulated using both the ECM and dual-permeability (DK) models. The properties of both the fracture and matrix domains are geostatistically simulated, yielding completely heterogeneous continua. Then, simulations of flow through the four cross-sections are performed using spatially nonuniform infiltration boundary conditions. Steady-state groundwater travel times from the potential repository to the water table are calculated.

  5. Non-Newtonian model study for blood flow through a tapered artery with a stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen Sher Akbar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The blood flow through a tapered artery with a stenosis is analyzed, assuming the blood as tangent hyperbolic fluid model. The resulting nonlinear implicit system of partial differential equations is solved analytically with the help of perturbation method. The expressions for shear stress, velocity, flow rate, wall shear stress and longitudinal impedance are obtained. The variations of power law index m, Weissenberg number We, shape of stenosis n and stenosis size δ are discussed different type of tapered arteries.

  6. Test code for the assessment and improvement of Reynolds stress models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubesin, M. W.; Viegas, J. R.; Vandromme, D.; Minh, H. HA

    1987-01-01

    An existing two-dimensional, compressible flow, Navier-Stokes computer code, containing a full Reynolds stress turbulence model, was adapted for use as a test bed for assessing and improving turbulence models based on turbulence simulation experiments. To date, the results of using the code in comparison with simulated channel flow and over an oscillating flat plate have shown that the turbulence model used in the code needs improvement for these flows. It is also shown that direct simulation of turbulent flows over a range of Reynolds numbers are needed to guide subsequent improvement of turbulence models.

  7. A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sun; Tao, Li

    2000-05-01

    A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects is proposed for unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites. The stress gradient terms are introduced by solving a micromechanical model under a non-uniform stress loading. It is shown that the stress gradient effect is significant on both the fiber-bridging stress distribution and the value of the critical load of fiber failure.

  8. Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, K. J.

    1997-05-30

    This report presents results of the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation (UZFMEE) project at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The objective of this project was to identify and assess the uncertainties associated with certain key components of the unsaturated zone flow system at Yucca Mountain. This assessment reviewed the data inputs, modeling approaches, and results of the unsaturated zone flow model (termed the ''UZ site-scale model'') being developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to data input and modeling issues, the assessment focused on percolation flux (volumetric flow rate per unit cross-sectional area) at the potential repository horizon. An understanding of unsaturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the unsaturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent physical controls on unsaturated zone flow and the parameter values used in the models. To ensure that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and uncertainties about key issues regarding the unsaturated zone at the Yucca

  9. GROUNDWATER FLOW MODEL CALIBRATION USING WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS AT SHORT INTERVALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater flow models are usually calibrated with respect to water level measurements collected at intervals of several months or even years. Measurements of these kinds are not sensitive to sudden or short stress conditions, such as impact from stormwater drainage flow or flas...

  10. Technological thermal stresses in the shrink fitting of cylindrical bodies with consideration of plastic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dats, E. P.; Tkacheva, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a solution of a sequence of one-dimensional boundary-value problems of thermal stresses defining the elastic-plastic deformation processes used in the shrink fitting of cylindrical bodies. The initiation and development of plastic flow in the materials of the assembly elements are studied taking into account the temperature dependence of the yield stress of these materials. During temperature equalization, the flow can slow down, followed by unloading and formation of a residual stress field providing tension. The conditions of formation and motion of the boundaries of the elastic and plastic states in plastic flow and during unloading are determined.

  11. Amendment to Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of WP2 is to establish flow models relating the wind speed at turbines in a farm. Until now, active control of power reference has not been included in these models as only data with standard operation has been available. In this report the first data series with power reference...... excitations from the Thanet farm are used for trying to update some of the models discussed in D2.5. Because of very limited amount of data only simple dynamic transfer function models can be obtained. The three obtained data series are somewhat different. Only the first data set seems to have the front...... turbine in undisturbed flow. For this data set both the multiplicative model and in particular the simple first order transfer function model can predict the down wind wind speed from upwind wind speed and loading....

  12. Multiphase reacting flows modelling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Marchisio, Daniele L

    2007-01-01

    The papers in this book describe the most widely applicable modeling approaches and are organized in six groups covering from fundamentals to relevant applications. In the first part, some fundamentals of multiphase turbulent reacting flows are covered. In particular the introduction focuses on basic notions of turbulence theory in single-phase and multi-phase systems as well as on the interaction between turbulence and chemistry. In the second part, models for the physical and chemical processes involved are discussed. Among other things, particular emphasis is given to turbulence modeling strategies for multiphase flows based on the kinetic theory for granular flows. Next, the different numerical methods based on Lagrangian and/or Eulerian schemes are presented. In particular the most popular numerical approaches of computational fluid dynamics codes are described (i.e., Direct Numerical Simulation, Large Eddy Simulation, and Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach). The book will cover particle-based meth...

  13. A Policy Model for Secure Information Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetoye, Adedayo O.; Badii, Atta

    When a computer program requires legitimate access to confidential data, the question arises whether such a program may illegally reveal sensitive information. This paper proposes a policy model to specify what information flow is permitted in a computational system. The security definition, which is based on a general notion of information lattices, allows various representations of information to be used in the enforcement of secure information flow in deterministic or nondeterministic systems. A flexible semantics-based analysis technique is presented, which uses the input-output relational model induced by an attacker’s observational power, to compute the information released by the computational system. An illustrative attacker model demonstrates the use of the technique to develop a termination-sensitive analysis. The technique allows the development of various information flow analyses, parametrised by the attacker’s observational power, which can be used to enforce what declassification policies.

  14. Model Polyelectrolytes in Turbulent Couette Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Brian; Hoagland, David A.

    1997-03-01

    Isolated polymer chains in strong flow are deformed significantly from their equilibrium conformations, imparting a pronounced change in the local velocity field. Turbulent drag reduction by dilute polymer solutions is an important example. The onset of drag reduction appears dependent on a characteristic shear stress at the wall τw for a given polymer. (Virk, P.S. AIChE Journal 21 1975) Length and time scales formed from τw and solvent kinematic viscosity provide different scalings of the onset with chain length. It is likely that length polydispersity could be responsible for the disparity among the previously reported results concerning the correct onset condition. We have employed preparative gel electrophoresis to produce samples of very low polydispersity to determine the onset scaling of drag reduction in turbulent couette flow. The same technique provides information about chain scission in turburlence, yielding an indirect indication of chain conformation.

  15. Chaos control in traffic flow models

    CERN Document Server

    Shahverdiev, E M; Shahverdiev, Elman Mohammed; Tadaki, Shin-ichi

    1998-01-01

    Chaos control in some of the one- and two-dimensional traffic flow dynamical models in the mean field theory is studied.One dimensional model is investigated taking into account the effect of random delay. Two dimensional model takes into account the effects of overpasses, symmetric distribution of cars and blockages of cars moving in the same direction. Chaos synchronization is performed within both replica and nonreplica approaches, and using parameter perturbation method.

  16. Development of improved thermal hydraulics and fuel performance technology; development of turbulence model for flow analysis in nuclear fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, W. K.; Kong, D. W.; Park, H. Z. [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The flow through a nuclear rod bundle with mixing vanes are very complex and required a suitable turbulence model to be predicted accurately. Subchannel flow in a nuclear bundle having vanes to mix flow appears complex turbulent flow. Objective of this study is to develop turbulence model which can predict complex flow. Also, the module will be produced, which can implement the developed turbulence model in the CFX code. The selected turbulence models are k-epsilon model, non-linear k-epsilon model, Reynolds stress model and modified Reynolds stress model to test their performance in the prediction of the flow in nuclear assembly. These models are tested for a 2-D backwise step flow, square duct flow, rod bundle flow and subchannel flow using CFX. The modules, which can implement Reynolds stress model and non-linear k-epsilon odel in CFX code, are produced. The advantages and disadvantages for these turbulence models are described and the limitation of implementation of non-linear model in CFX code is discussed. The results obtained from the research would give a help for the development of turbulence model which can accurately predict the flow through the rod bundles with mixing vanes. 18 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  17. Mathematical Modeling of Flow Field in Ceramic Candle Filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TaewonSeo; Joo-HongChoi; 等

    1998-01-01

    Integrated gasification combined cycle(IGCC)is one of the candidates to achieve stringent environmental regulation among the clean coal technologies.Advancing the technology of the hot gas cleanup systems is the most critical component in the development of the IGCC.Thus the aim of this study is to understand the flow field in the ceramic filter and the influence of ceramic filter in removal of the particles contained in the hot gas flow.The numerical model based on the Reynolds stress turbulence model with the Darycy's law in the porous region is adopted.It is found that the effect of the porosity in the flowfield is negligibly small while the effect of the filter length is significant.It is also found as the permeability decreases,the reattachment point due to the flow separation moves upstream,This is because the fluid is sucked into the filter region due to the pressure drop before the flow separation occurs.The particle follows well with the fluid stream and the particle is directly sucked into the filter due to the pressure drop even in the flow separation region.

  18. Flow and bed shear stresses in scour protections around a pile in a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Wedel; Liu, Xiaofeng; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    with uniformly distributed coarse stones and a lower filter layer with finer stones. For the numerical simulations, the Flow-3D software was used. The scour protection layers were simulated with different numerical approaches, namely regularly arranged spheres, porous media, or their combinations (hybrid models...... on it in an unfavourable manner. Using physical models and 3D computational fluid dynamic (CFD) numerical simulations, the velocity and bed shear stresses are investigated in complex scour protections around mono piles in steady current. In the physical model the scour protections consisted of an upper cover layer......). Numerical simulations with one or four layers of cover stones without filter layer were first computed. Three additional simulations were then made for a scour protection with a cover layer and a single filter layer. Finally, a simulation of a full scale foundation and scour protection was made with porous...

  19. High Temperature Flow Stress Prediction of Nano-Al2O3/Cu Composite Using an Artificial Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jian-xin; XU Xiao-feng; SONG Ke-xing; LI Pei-quan; GUO Xiu-hua; LIU Rui-hua

    2006-01-01

    Alumina dispersion strengthened copper composite (nano-Al2O3/Cu composite) was recently emerged as a kind of potentially viable and attractive engineering material for applications requiring high strength, high thermal and electrical conductivities and resistance to softening at elevated temperatures. The nano-Al2O3/Cu composite was produced by internal oxidation. The microstructures of the composite were analyzed by the TEM and its hot deformation behavior was investigated by means of continuous compression tests performed on a Gleeble 1500 thermo-simulator. Making use of the modified algorithm-Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) algorithm BP neural network, a model for predicting the flow stresses during hot deformation was set up on the base of the experimental data. Results show that the microstructures of the composite are characterized by uniform distribution of nano-Al2O3 particles in Cu-matrix. The sliding of dislocations is the main deformation mechanism. The dynamic recovery is the main softening mode with the flow stress decreasing gently from 500 ℃ to 850 ℃. The recrystallization of Cu-matrix can be retarded late into as high as 850 ℃, when it happens only partially. The well-trained BP neural network model can accurately describe the influence of the temperature, strain rate, and true strain on the flow stresses, therefore, it can precisely predict the flow stresses of the composite under given deforming conditions and provide a new way to optimize hot deforming process parameters.

  20. Transient magneto-peristaltic flow of couple stress biofluids: a magneto-hydro-dynamical study on digestive transport phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Dharmendra; Anwar Bég, O

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic fields are increasingly being utilized in endoscopy and gastric transport control. In this regard, the present study investigates the influence of a transverse magnetic field in the transient peristaltic rheological transport. An electrically-conducting couple stress non-Newtonian model is employed to accurately simulate physiological fluids in peristaltic flow through a sinusoidally contracting channel of finite length. This model is designed for computing the intra-bolus oesophageal and intestinal pressures during the movement of food bolus in the digestive system under magneto-hydro-dynamic effects. Long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximations have been employed to reduce the governing equations from nonlinear to linear form, this being a valid approach for creeping flows which characterizes physiological dynamics. Analytical approximate solutions for axial velocity, transverse velocity, pressure gradient, local wall shear stress and volumetric flow rate are obtained for the non-dimensional conservation equations subject to appropriate boundary conditions. The effects of couple stress parameter and transverse magnetic field on the velocity profile, pressure distribution, local wall shear stress and the averaged flow rate are discussed with the aid of computational results. The comparative study of non-integral and integral number of waves propagating along the finite length channel is also presented. Magnetic field and non-Newtonian properties are found to strongly influence peristaltic transport.

  1. Dangerous situations in a synchronized flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Qing-Song

    2007-04-01

    This paper studies the dangerous situation (DS) in a synchronized flow model. The DS on the two branches of the fundamental diagram are investigated, respectively. It is shown that different relationship between DS probability and the density exists in the synchronized flow and in the jams. Moreover, we prove that there is no DS caused by non-stopped car although the model itself is a non-exclusion process. We classify the DS into four sub-types and study the probability of these four sub-types. The simulation result is consistent with the real traffic.

  2. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuhovcak Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  3. Modelling fluid flow in a reciprocating compressor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuhovcak, Jan; Hejčík, Jiří; Jícha, Miroslav

    2015-05-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on the valves characteristics, which affects the flow through the suction and discharge line. Understanding the phenomenon inside the compressor is necessary step in development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide capabilities to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor, however they are too complicated in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several parameters describing compressor could be therefore examined without the CFD analysis, such is valve characteristic, flow through the cycle and heat transfer. The aim of this paper is to show a numerical tool for reciprocating compressor based on the energy balance through the cycle, which provides valve characteristics, flow through the cycle and heat losses from the cylinder. Spring-damping-mass model was used for the valve description. Boundary conditions were extracted from the performance test of 4-cylinder semihermetic compressor and numerical tool validation was performed with indicated p-V diagram comparison.

  4. Stress, faulting and fluid flow in the Coso Geothermal Field, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davatzes, N. C.; Hickman, S.

    2006-12-01

    and account for related surface hydrothermal activity. This interpretation is also consistent with local GPS- and InSAR-based surface displacement vectors which indicate subsidence above the Main Field and East Flank. At reservoir depth, preliminary results from borehole image, temperature, and mud log analyses indicate that fluid flow in the geothermal field is concentrated in the densely fractured damage zones of large faults that are well oriented for slip. In contrast, the cores of these faults appear to function as hydrologic barriers and separate regions of distinct fluid inclusion chemistry and temperature gradient. In addition, significant horizontal principal stress rotations are recorded by drilling-induced structures in borehole image logs. These variations in the azimuth of induced structures indicate local stress heterogeneity induced by active fault slip and are consistent with the high rates of seismicity observed in the geothermal field which might impact damage zone behavior. In the regions between large faults, distributed fracture networks appear to play only a minor role in transferring fluids despite relatively high fracture density that include some fractures well-oriented for slip. This geomechanical model provides a first step in studying the mechanical interactions and permeability of fault zones, their natural evolution, and their response to engineered stimulation. In addition, this model is a critical element of the stimulation strategy that will be applied to Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well 46A-19RD in the southwest portion of the geothermal field.

  5. Low Reynolds number turbulence modeling of blood flow in arterial stenoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalichi, F; Deng, X; De Champlain, A; Douville, Y; King, M; Guidoin, R

    1998-01-01

    Moderate and severe arterial stenoses can produce highly disturbed flow regions with transitional and or turbulent flow characteristics. Neither laminar flow modeling nor standard two-equation models such as the kappa-epsilon turbulence ones are suitable for this kind of blood flow. In order to analyze the transitional or turbulent flow distal to an arterial stenosis, authors of this study have used the Wilcox low-Re turbulence model. Flow simulations were carried out on stenoses with 50, 75 and 86% reductions in cross-sectional area over a range of physiologically relevant Reynolds numbers. The results obtained with this low-Re turbulence model were compared with experimental measurements and with the results obtained by the standard kappa-epsilon model in terms of velocity profile, vortex length, wall shear stress, wall static pressure, and turbulence intensity. The comparisons show that results predicted by the low-Re model are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This model accurately predicts the critical Reynolds number at which blood flow becomes transitional or turbulent distal an arterial stenosis. Most interestingly, over the Re range of laminar flow, the vortex length calculated with the low-Re model also closely matches the vortex length predicted by laminar flow modeling. In conclusion, the study strongly suggests that the proposed model is suitable for blood flow studies in certain areas of the arterial tree where both laminar and transitional/turbulent flows coexist.

  6. Numerical modeling of the debris flows runout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Francesco; Cesali, Chiara

    2017-06-01

    Rapid debris flows are identified among the most dangerous of all landslides. Due to their destructive potential, the runout length has to be predicted to define the hazardous areas and design safeguarding measures. To this purpose, a continuum model to predict the debris flows mobility is developed. It is based on the well known depth-integrated avalanche model proposed by Savage and Hutter (S&H model) to simulate the dry granular materials flows. Conservation of mass and momentum equations, describing the evolving geometry and the depth averaged velocity distribution, are re-written taking into account the effects of the interstitial pressures and the possible variation of mass along the motion due to erosion/deposition processes. Furthermore, the mechanical behaviour of the debris flow is described by a recently developed rheological law, which allows to take into account the dissipative effects of the grain inelastic collisions and friction, simultaneously acting within a `shear layer', typically at the base of the debris flows. The governing PDEs are solved by applying the finite difference method. The analysis of a documented case is finally carried out.

  7. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  8. Residual stresses and vector hysteresis modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ktena, Aphrodite, E-mail: aktena@teiste.gr

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses in magnetic materials, whether the result of processing or intentional loading, leave their footprint on macroscopic data, such hysteresis loops and differential permeability measurements. A Preisach-type vector model is used to reproduce the phenomenology observed based on assumptions deduced from the data: internal stresses lead to smaller and misaligned grains, hence increased domain wall pinning and angular dispersion of local easy axes, favouring rotation as a magnetization reversal mechanism; misaligned grains contribute to magnetostatic fields opposing the direction of the applied field. The model is using a vector operator which accounts for both reversible and irreversible processes; the Preisach concept for interactions for the role of stress related demagnetizing fields; and a characteristic probability density function which is constructed as a weighed sum of constituent functions: the material is modeled as consisting of various subsystems, e.g. reversal mechanisms or areas subject to strong/weak long range interactions and each subsystem is represented by a constituent probability density function. Our assumptions are validated since the model reproduces the hysteresis loops and differential permeability curves observed experimentally and calculations involving rotating inputs at various residual stress levels are consistent and in agreement with experimental evidence.

  9. Residual stresses and vector hysteresis modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ktena, Aphrodite

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses in magnetic materials, whether the result of processing or intentional loading, leave their footprint on macroscopic data, such hysteresis loops and differential permeability measurements. A Preisach-type vector model is used to reproduce the phenomenology observed based on assumptions deduced from the data: internal stresses lead to smaller and misaligned grains, hence increased domain wall pinning and angular dispersion of local easy axes, favouring rotation as a magnetization reversal mechanism; misaligned grains contribute to magnetostatic fields opposing the direction of the applied field. The model is using a vector operator which accounts for both reversible and irreversible processes; the Preisach concept for interactions for the role of stress related demagnetizing fields; and a characteristic probability density function which is constructed as a weighed sum of constituent functions: the material is modeled as consisting of various subsystems, e.g. reversal mechanisms or areas subject to strong/weak long range interactions and each subsystem is represented by a constituent probability density function. Our assumptions are validated since the model reproduces the hysteresis loops and differential permeability curves observed experimentally and calculations involving rotating inputs at various residual stress levels are consistent and in agreement with experimental evidence.

  10. A comprehensive model of stress - The roles of experienced stress and neuroticism in explaining the stress-distress relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, GM; van Sonderen, E; Emmelkamp, PMG

    1999-01-01

    Background: In this study, a complex theoretical model regarding the stress-distress relationship was evaluated. The various components in the model included experienced stress (daily hassles), psychological distress, neuroticism, problem-focused coping, avoidant coping, satisfaction with received s

  11. A Nonlinear k-ε Turbulence Model Applicable to High Pressure Gradient and Large Curvature Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiyao Gu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the RANS turbulence models solve the Reynolds stress by linear hypothesis with isotropic model. They can not capture all kinds of vortexes in the turbomachineries. In this paper, an improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is proposed, which is modified from the RNG k-ε turbulence model and Wilcox's k-ω turbulence model. The Reynolds stresses are solved by nonlinear methods. The nonlinear k-ε turbulence model can calculate the near wall region without the use of wall functions. The improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is used to simulate the flow field in a curved rectangular duct. The results based on the improved nonlinear k-ε turbulence model agree well with the experimental results. The calculation results prove that the nonlinear k-ε turbulence model is available for high pressure gradient flows and large curvature flows, and it can be used to capture complex vortexes in a turbomachinery.

  12. Flow stress and tribology size effects in scaled down cylinder compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Bin; GONG Feng; WANG Chun-ju; SHAN De-bin

    2009-01-01

    Microforming is an effective method to manufacture small metal parts. However, macro forming can not be transferred to microforming directly because of size effects. Flow stress and tribology size effects were studied. Scaled down copper T2 cylinder compression was carried out with the lubrication of castor oil and without lubrication. The results show that the flow stress decreases with decreasing the initial specimen diameter in both lubrication conditions, and the flow stress decreases by 30 MPa with the initial specimen diameter decreasing from 8 mm to 1 mm. The friction factor increases obviously with decreasing the initial specimen diameter in the case of lubricating with castor oil, and the friction factor increases by 0.11 with the initial specimen diameter decreasing from 8mm to 1mm. However, the tribology size effect is not found in the case without lubrication. The reasons of the flow stress and tribology size effects were also discussed.

  13. Quadrature-based Lattice Boltzmann Model for Relativistic Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Blaga, Robert

    2016-01-01

    A quadrature-based finite-difference lattice Boltzmann model is developed that is suitable for simulating relativistic flows of massless particles. We briefly review the relativistc Boltzmann equation and present our model. The quadrature is constructed such that the stress-energy tensor is obtained as a second order moment of the distribution function. The results obtained with our model are presented for a particular instance of the Riemann problem (the Sod shock tube). We show that the model is able to accurately capture the behavior across the whole domain of relaxation times, from the hydrodynamic to the ballistic regime. The property of the model of being extendable to arbitrarily high orders is shown to be paramount for the recovery of the analytical result in the ballistic regime.

  14. Analysis of a Regularized Bingham Model with Pressure-Dependent Yield Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouja, Nazek; Roquet, Nicolas; Cazacliu, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this article is to provide some essential results for the solution of a regularized viscoplastic frictional flow model adapted from the extensive mathematical analysis of the Bingham model. The Bingham model is a standard for the description of viscoplastic flows and it is widely used in many application areas. However, wet granular viscoplastic flows necessitate the introduction of additional non-linearities and coupling between velocity and stress fields. This article proposes a step toward a frictional coupling, characterized by a dependence of the yield stress to the pressure field. A regularized version of this viscoplastic frictional model is analysed in the framework of stationary flows. Existence, uniqueness and regularity are investigated, as well as finite-dimensional and algorithmic approximations. It is shown that the model can be solved and approximated as far as a frictional parameter is small enough. Getting similar results for the non-regularized model remains an issue. Numerical investigations are postponed to further works.

  15. Direct measurements of bed sediment entrainment and basal stress from the headwaters of a natural debris-flow basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, S. W.; Kean, J. W.; Coe, J. A.; Tucker, G. E.; Staley, D. M.; Wasklewicz, T. A.

    2010-12-01

    When mixtures of soil, rock and water flow down slope as a debris flow they can entrain and transport large amounts of bed sediment and erode underlying bedrock. Although sediment entrainment and bedrock scour by debris flows are commonplace in steep terrain, there are few measurements to constrain key terms in event-scale debris-flow routing models or longer-term landscape evolution models that include the effects of bedrock erosion by debris-flows. Particularly conspicuous are the lack of bed sediment entrainment measurements and measurements of the evolving stress state at the flow-bedrock interface as the shielding layer of sediment is removed and sediment entrainment gives way to bedrock erosion. Here we present data from the headwaters of a debris-flow basin at Chalk Cliffs, Colorado, where we directly measured entrainment of channel sediment and the evolving stress state at the bedrock interface during three debris-flow events. We made these measurements through the combined the use of a novel sediment entrainment sensor and a force plate with more commonly used video imagery and instrumentation, to measure pore-fluid pressure, flow stage, soil moisture, and rainfall during the three debris-flow events. We extended these at-a-point process measurements to evaluate the reach-scale response using pre- and post-event terrestrial laser scans. During the three separate debris-flow events approximately 1.1 m, 0.5 m, and 0.4 m of unconsolidated bed sediment were entrained. Following entrainment of the sediment, bedrock was scoured by flows that ranged from water-poor coarse-grained surge fronts to water-rich turbulent flows with vigorous bedload transport. In all cases, entrainment of bed sediment was progressive, rather than by a single en masse failure of the sediment at the sediment-bedrock interface. The measured rates were dependent on bed sediment water content. When the bed sediment was unsaturated, entrainment was relatively slow, generally taking several

  16. Response of hot element wall shear stress gages in laminar oscillating flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, W. J.; Murphy, J. D.; Giddings, T. A.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the time-dependent response of hot element wall shear stress gages in unsteady periodic air flows is reported. The study has focused on wall shear stress in laminar oscillating flows produced on a flat plate by a free stream velocity composed of a mean component and a superposed sinusoidal variation. Two types of hot element gages, platinum film and flush wire, were tested for values of reduced frequency ranging from 0.14 to 2.36. Values of the phase angle of the wall shear stress variation relative to the free stream velocity, as indicated by the hot element gages, are compared with numerical prediction. The comparisons show that the gages indicate a wall shear stress variation that lags the true variation, and that the gages will also not indicate the correct wall shear stress variation in periodic turbulent flows.

  17. Modeling hypersonic boundary-layer flows with second-moment closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, P. George

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing research effort designed to apply the best possible second-moment-closure model to simulate complex hypersonic flows is presented. The baseline model under consideration is the Launder-Reece-Rodi Reynolds stress transport turbulence model. Two add-ons accounting for wall effects, namely, the Launder-Shima low-Reynolds-number model and the compressible wall-function technique, are tested. Results are reported for flow over a flat plate, both adiabatic-wall and cooled-wall cases. It has been found that further improvements of the existing models are necessary to achieve accurate prediction in high Mach number flow range.

  18. Baroclinic flow and the Lorenz-84 model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, Lennaert van

    2002-01-01

    The bifurcation diagram of a truncation to six degrees of freedom of the equations for quasi-geostrophic, baroclinic flow is investigated. Period doubling cascades and Shil'nikov bifurcations lead to chaos in this model. The low dimension of the chaotic attractor suggests the possibility to reduce t

  19. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an instanta

  20. Modelling of flow phenomena during DC casting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of Flow Phenomena during DC Casting Jan Zuidema The production of aluminium ingots, by semi-continuous casting, is a complex process. DC Casting stands for direct chill casting. During this process liquid aluminium transforms to solid aluminium while cooling down. This is not an

  1. Adaptive Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new lattice Boltzmann model for compressible flows is presented. The main difference from the standard lattice Boltzmann model is that the particle velocities are no longer constant, but vary with the mean velocity and internal energy. The adaptive nature of the particle velocities permits the mean flow to have a high Mach number. The introduction of a particle potential energy makes the model suitable for a perfect gas with arbitrary specific heat ratio. The Navier-Stokes (N-S) equations are derived by the Chapman-Enskog method from the BGK Boltzmann equation. Two kinds of simulations have been carried out on the hexagonal lattice to test the proposed model. One is the Sod shock-tube simulation. The other is a strong shock of Mach number 5.09 diffracting around a corner.

  2. A Simple Analytical Model of Coupled Single Flow Channel over Porous Electrode in Vanadium Redox Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Channel

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Xinyou; Prahl, Joseph M; Savinell, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    A simple analytical model of a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer) is proposed. This analytical model is derived from Navier-Stokes motion in the flow channel and Darcy-Brinkman model in the porous layer. The continuities of flow velocity and normal stress are applied at the interface between the flow channel and the porous layer. The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, thickness of the flow channel and thickness of a typical carbon fiber paper porous layer on the volumetric flow rate within this porous layer are studied. The maximum current density based on the electrolyte volumetric flow rate is predicted, and found to be consistent with reported numerical simulation. It is found that, for a mean inlet flow velocity of 33.3 cm s-1, the analytical maximum current density is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experimental result reported by others of ~400 mA cm-2.

  3. A simple analytical model of coupled single flow channel over porous electrode in vanadium redox flow battery with serpentine flow channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Prahl, Joseph M.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2015-08-01

    A simple analytical model of a layered system comprised of a single passage of a serpentine flow channel and a parallel underlying porous electrode (or porous layer) is proposed. This analytical model is derived from Navier-Stokes motion in the flow channel and Darcy-Brinkman model in the porous layer. The continuities of flow velocity and normal stress are applied at the interface between the flow channel and the porous layer. The effects of the inlet volumetric flow rate, thickness of the flow channel and thickness of a typical carbon fiber paper porous layer on the volumetric flow rate within this porous layer are studied. The maximum current density based on the electrolyte volumetric flow rate is predicted, and found to be consistent with reported numerical simulation. It is found that, for a mean inlet flow velocity of 33.3 cm s-1, the analytical maximum current density is estimated to be 377 mA cm-2, which compares favorably with experimental result reported by others of ∼400 mA cm-2.

  4. State of stress in exhumed basins and implications for fluid flow: insights from the Illizi Basin, Algeria

    KAUST Repository

    English, Joseph M.

    2017-05-31

    The petroleum prospectivity of an exhumed basin is largely dependent on the ability of pre-existing traps to retain oil and gas volumes during and after the exhumation event. Although faults may act as lateral seals in petroleum traps, they may start to become hydraulically conductive again and enable fluid flow and hydrocarbon leakage during fault reactivation. We constrain the present day in situ stresses of the exhumed Illizi Basin in Algeria and demonstrate that the primary north–south and NW–SE (vertical strike-slip) fault systems in the study area are close to critical stress (i.e. an incipient state of shear failure). By contrast, the overpressured and unexhumed Berkine Basin and Hassi Messaoud areas to the north do not appear to be characterized by critical stress conditions. We present conceptual models of stress evolution and demonstrate that a sedimentary basin with benign in situ stresses at maximum burial may change to being characterized by critical stress conditions on existing fault systems during exhumation. These models are supportive of the idea that the breaching of a closed, overpressured system during exhumation of the Illizi Basin may have been a driving mechanism for the regional updip flow of high-salinity formation water within the Ordovician reservoirs during Eocene–Miocene time. This work also has implications for petroleum exploration in exhumed basins. Fault-bounded traps with faults oriented at a high angle to the maximum principal horizontal stress direction in strike-slip or normal faulting stress regimes are more likely to have retained hydrocarbons in exhumed basins than fault-bounded traps with faults that are more optimally oriented for shear failure and therefore have a greater propensity to become critically stressed during exhumation.

  5. Mechanically induced residual stresses: Modelling and characterisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranart, Jean-Claude E.

    Accurate characterisation of residual stress represents a major challenge to the engineering community. This is because it is difficult to validate the measurement and the accuracy is doubtful. It is with this in mind that the current research program concerning the characterisation of mechanically induced residual stresses was undertaken. Specifically, the cold expansion of fastener holes and the shot peening treatment of aerospace alloys, aluminium 7075 and titanium Ti-6Al-4V, are considered. The objective of this study is to characterise residual stresses resulting from cold working using three powerful techniques. These are: (i) theoretical using three dimensional non-linear finite element modelling, (ii) semi-destructive using a modified incremental hole drilling technique and (iii) nondestructive using a newly developed guided wave method supplemented by traditional C-scan measurements. The three dimensional finite element results of both simultaneous and sequential cold expansion of two fastener holes revealed the importance of the separation distance, the expansion level and the loading history upon the development and growth of the plastic zone and unloading residual stresses. It further showed that the commonly adopted two dimensional finite element models are inaccurate and incapable of predicting these residual stresses. Similarly, the dynamic elasto-plastic finite element studies of shot peening showed that the depth of the compressed layer, surface and sub-surface residual stresses are significantly influenced by the shot characteristics. Furthermore, the results reveal that the separation distance between two simultaneously impacting shots governs the plastic zone development and its growth. In the semi-destructive incremental hole drilling technique, the accuracy of the newly developed calibration coefficients and measurement techniques were verified with a known stress field and the method was used to measure peening residual stresses. Unlike

  6. Modelling stress-dependent permeability in fractured rock including effects of propagating and bending fractures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Latham, J.P.; Xiang, J.; Belayneh, M.; Nick, H.M.; Tsang, C.F.; Blunt, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The influence of in-situ stresses on flow processes in fractured rock is investigated using a novel modelling approach. The combined finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) is used to model the deformation of a fractured rock mass. The fracture wall displacements and aperture changes are modelled in

  7. A depth integrated model for dry geophysical granular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giulia; Armanini, Aronne

    2017-04-01

    Granular flows are rapid to very rapid flows, made up of dry sediment (rock and snow avalanches) or mixture of water and sediment (debris flows). They are among the most dangerous and destructive natural phenomena and the definition of run-out scenarios for risk assessment has received wide interest in the last decades. Nowadays there are many urbanized mountain areas affected by these phenomena, which cause several properties damages and loss of lives. The numerical simulation is a fundamental step to analyze these phenomena and define the runout scenarios. For this reason, a depth-integrated model is developed to analyze the case of dry granular flows, representative of snow avalanches or rock avalanches. The model consists of a two-phase mathematical description of the flow motion: it is similar to the solid transport equations but substantially different since there is no water in this case. A set of partial differential equations is obtained and written in the form of a hyperbolic system. The numerical solution is computed through a path-conservative SPH (Smoothed Particles Hydrodynamics) scheme, in the two dimensional case. Appropriate closure relations are necessary, with respect to the concentration C and the shear stress at the bed τ0. In first approximation, it is possible to derive a formulation for the two closure relations from appropriate rheological models (Bagnold theory and dense gas analogy). The model parameters are determined by means of laboratory tests on dry granular material and the effectiveness of the closure relation verified through a comparison with the experimental results. In particular, the experimental investigation aims to reproduce two case of study for dry granular material: the dam-break test problem and the stationary motion with changes in planimetry. The experiments are carried out in the Hydraulic Laboratory of the University of Trento, by means of channels with variable slope and variable shape. The mathematical model will

  8. Computational Modeling of Blood Flow in the TrapEase Inferior Vena Cava Filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M A; Henshaw, W D; Wang, S L

    2008-02-04

    To evaluate the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase vena cava filter using three dimensional computational fluid dynamics, including simulated thrombi of multiple shapes, sizes, and trapping positions. The study was performed to identify potential areas of recirculation and stagnation and areas in which trapped thrombi may influence intrafilter thrombosis. Computer models of the TrapEase filter, thrombi (volumes ranging from 0.25mL to 2mL, 3 different shapes), and a 23mm diameter cava were constructed. The hemodynamics of steady-state flow at Reynolds number 600 was examined for the unoccluded and partially occluded filter. Axial velocity contours and wall shear stresses were computed. Flow in the unoccluded TrapEase filter experienced minimal disruption, except near the superior and inferior tips where low velocity flow was observed. For spherical thrombi in the superior trapping position, stagnant and recirculating flow was observed downstream of the thrombus; the volume of stagnant flow and the peak wall shear stress increased monotonically with thrombus volume. For inferiorly trapped spherical thrombi, marked disruption to the flow was observed along the cava wall ipsilateral to the thrombus and in the interior of the filter. Spherically shaped thrombus produced a lower peak wall shear stress than conically shaped thrombus and a larger peak stress than ellipsoidal thrombus. We have designed and constructed a computer model of the flow hemodynamics of the TrapEase IVC filter with varying shapes, sizes, and positions of thrombi. The computer model offers several advantages over in vitro techniques including: improved resolution, ease of evaluating different thrombus sizes and shapes, and easy adaptation for new filter designs and flow parameters. Results from the model also support a previously reported finding from photochromic experiments that suggest the inferior trapping position of the TrapEase IVC filter leads to an intra-filter region of recirculating

  9. Polymer Stress-Gradient Induced Migration in Thin Film Flow Over Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouka, Sophia; Dimakopoulos, Yiannis; Tsamopoulos, John

    2014-11-01

    We consider the 2D, steady film flow of a dilute polymer solution over a periodic topography. We examine how the distribution of polymer in the planarization of topographical features is affected by flow intensity and physical properties. The thermodynamically acceptable, Mavrantzas-Beris two-fluid Hamiltonian model is used for polymer migration. The resulting system of differential equations is solved via the mixed FE method combined with an elliptic grid generation scheme. We present numerical results for polymer concentration, stress, velocity and flux of components as a function of the non-dimensional parameters of the problem (Deborah, Peclet, Reynolds and Capillary numbers, ratio of solvent viscosity to total liquid viscosity and geometric features of the topography). Polymer migration to the free surface is enhanced when the cavity gets steeper and deeper. This increases the spatial extent of the polymer depletion layer and induces strong banding in the stresses away from the substrate wall, especially in low polymer concentration. Macromolecules with longer relaxation times are predicted to migrate towards the free surface more easily, while high surface tension combined with a certain range of Reynolds numbers affects the free surface deformations. Work supported by the General Secretariat of Research & Technology of Greece through the program ``Excellence'' (Grant No. 1918) in the framework ``Education and Lifelong Learning'' co-funded by the ESF.

  10. [Comparison of adhesion of different endothelial cells under shear stress load in the flow field in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bengui; Zhang, Eryong; Xu, Weilin; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Yingqiang

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to compare the differences of adhesion properties of endothelial cells (EC) from arteries (AEC), veins (VEC) and capillaries (MVEC) under shear stress condition, and to explore whether they can get the same adhesive ability as graft in similar shear stress conditions. With mended parallel plate flow apparatus and peristalsis pump providing fluid shear stress used, endothelial culture models were established in vitro with the same environmental factors as steady culture. To compare the adhesion among three kinds of endothelial cells under dynamic condition and static condition, the dynamic change of cytoskeletal actin filaments and the effects of different adhesive proteins coated on the adhesion of EC to the glass were studied. The cultured endothelial cells under flow conditions were extended and arranged along the direction of flow. The adhesive ability from high to low under static condition were AEC, MVEC and VEC (VEC compared with AEC or MVEC, P different between AEC and MVEC. But VEC was significantly different (P stress fibers were formed, which even interconnected to form a whole in the MVEC. The adhesion of AEC, VEC and MVEC under shear stress conditions are more significantly increased than those under the static culture conditions, and the MVEC can achieve the same adhesion as AEC.

  11. Effect of Hematocrit on Wall Shear Stress for Blood Flow through Tapered Artery

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, A. K.; Singh, D. P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study to show the effects of Hematocrit (Red blood cells), height of stenosis, porous parameter and velocity of blood on wall shear stress of the flow of blood through tapered artery. The study reveals that wall shear stress reduces for increasing Hematocrit percentage. It is also observed that wall shear stress increases as stenosis height and porous parameter increase whereas it decreases with the increasing values of velocity of blood and slope of tapered artery.

  12. Multilayer Numerical Modeling of Flows through Vegetation Using a Mixing-Length Turbulence Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Barrios-Piña

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the effects of vegetation on a fluid flow pattern. In this numerical research, we verify the applicability of a simpler turbulence model than the commonly used k-" model to predict the mean flow through vegetation. The novel characteristic of this turbulence model is that the horizontal mixing-length is explicitly calculated and coupled with a multi-layer approach for the vertical mixing-length, within a general three-dimensional eddy-viscosity formulation. This mixing-length turbulence model has been validated in previous works for different kinds of non-vegetated flows. The hydrodynamic numerical model used for simulations is based on the Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations for shallow water flows, where a vegetation shear stress term is considered to reproduce the effects of drag forces on flow. A second-order approximation is used for spatial discretization and a semi-implicit Lagrangian–Eulerian scheme is used for time discretization. In order to validate the numerical results, we compare them against experimental data reported in the literature. The comparisons are carried out for two cases of study: submerged vegetation and submerged and emergent vegetation, both within an open channel flow.

  13. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  14. Traffic flow dynamics data, models and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Treiber, Martin

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides a comprehensive and instructive coverage of vehicular traffic flow dynamics and modeling. It makes this fascinating interdisciplinary topic, which to date was only documented in parts by specialized monographs, accessible to a broad readership. Numerous figures and problems with solutions help the reader to quickly understand and practice the presented concepts. This book is targeted at students of physics and traffic engineering and, more generally, also at students and professionals in computer science, mathematics, and interdisciplinary topics. It also offers material for project work in programming and simulation at college and university level. The main part, after presenting different categories of traffic data, is devoted to a mathematical description of the dynamics of traffic flow, covering macroscopic models which describe traffic in terms of density, as well as microscopic many-particle models in which each particle corresponds to a vehicle and its driver. Focus chapters on ...

  15. On the mixture model for multiphase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manninen, M.; Taivassalo, V. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Nuclear Energy; Kallio, S. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Numerical flow simulation utilising a full multiphase model is impractical for a suspension possessing wide distributions in the particle size or density. Various approximations are usually made to simplify the computational task. In the simplest approach, the suspension is represented by a homogeneous single-phase system and the influence of the particles is taken into account in the values of the physical properties. This study concentrates on the derivation and closing of the model equations. The validity of the mixture model is also carefully analysed. Starting from the continuity and momentum equations written for each phase in a multiphase system, the field equations for the mixture are derived. The mixture equations largely resemble those for a single-phase flow but are represented in terms of the mixture density and velocity. The volume fraction for each dispersed phase is solved from a phase continuity equation. Various approaches applied in closing the mixture model equations are reviewed. An algebraic equation is derived for the velocity of a dispersed phase relative to the continuous phase. Simplifications made in calculating the relative velocity restrict the applicability of the mixture model to cases in which the particles reach the terminal velocity in a short time period compared to the characteristic time scale of the flow of the mixture. (75 refs.)

  16. Modeling groundwater flow on massively parallel computers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashby, S.F.; Falgout, R.D.; Fogwell, T.W.; Tompson, A.F.B.

    1994-12-31

    The authors will explore the numerical simulation of groundwater flow in three-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. An interdisciplinary team of mathematicians, computer scientists, hydrologists, and environmental engineers is developing a sophisticated simulation code for use on workstation clusters and MPPs. To date, they have concentrated on modeling flow in the saturated zone (single phase), which requires the solution of a large linear system. they will discuss their implementation of preconditioned conjugate gradient solvers. The preconditioners under consideration include simple diagonal scaling, s-step Jacobi, adaptive Chebyshev polynomial preconditioning, and multigrid. They will present some preliminary numerical results, including simulations of groundwater flow at the LLNL site. They also will demonstrate the code`s scalability.

  17. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W. (eds.)

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  18. Dynamics of electrochemical flows 3 Closure models

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Chengjun

    2013-01-01

    The electrolyte (comprising of solute ions and solvents) flow-through the porous media is frequently encountered in nature or in many engineering applications, such as the electrochemical systems, manufacturing of composites, oil production, geothermal engineering, nuclear thermal disposal, soil pollution. Our previous work derived the interfacial interaction terms between the solid and the fluid, which can be used to investigate the details of transports of mass, heat, electric flied, potential, or momentum in the process of the electrochemical flows-through porous electrode. In this work, we establish the closure models for these interfacial interaction terms to close the governing equations from mathematical algebra. The interfacial interaction terms regard to the electric field, potential and electric force are firstly revealed. Our new theory provides a new approach to describe the electrochemical flows-through porous media.

  19. Experimental evaluation of the pure configurational stress assumption in the flow dynamics of entangled polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Hassager, Ole

    2010-01-01

    with the assumption of pure configurational stress was accurately able to predict the startup as well as the reversed flow behavior. This confirms that this commonly used theoretical picture for the flow of polymeric liquids is a correct physical principle to apply. c 2010 The Society of Rheology. [DOI: 10.1122/1.3496378]...

  20. Intra Plate Stresses Using Finite Element Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most challenging problems in the estimation of seismic hazard is the ability to quantify seismic activity. Empirical models based on the available earthquake catalogue are often used to obtain activity of source regions. The major limitation with this approach is the lack of sufficient data near a specified source. The non-availability of data poses difficulties in obtaining distribution of earthquakes with large return periods. Such events recur over geological time scales during which tectonic processes, including mantle convection, formation of faults and new plate boundaries, are likely to take place. The availability of geometries of plate boundaries, plate driving forces, lithospheric stress field and GPS measurements has provided numerous insights on the mechanics of tectonic plates. In this article, a 2D finite element model of Indo-Australian plate is developed with the focus of representing seismic activity in India. The effect of large scale geological features including sedimentary basins, fold belts and cratons on the stress field in India is explored in this study. In order to address long term behaviour, the orientation of stress field and tectonic faults of the present Indo-Australian plate are compared with a reconstructed stress field from the early Miocene (20 Ma.

  1. Removal of angular momentum by strong magnetic field stresses in advective accretion flows around black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2016-01-01

    We show that the removal of angular momentum is possible in the presence of large scale magnetic stresses, arisen by fields much stronger than that required for magnetorotational instability, in geometrically thick, advective, sub-Keplerian accretion flows around black holes in steady-state, in the complete absence of alpha-viscosity. The efficiency of such angular momentum transfer via Maxwell stress, with the field well below its equipartition value, could be equivalent to that of alpha-viscosity, arisen via Reynolds stress, with $\\alpha=0.01-0.08$. We find in our simpler vertically averaged advective disk model that stronger the magnetic field and/or larger the vertical-gradient of azimuthal component of magnetic field, stronger the rate of angular momentum transfer is, which in turn may lead to a faster rate of outflowing matter, which has important implications to describe the hard spectral states of black hole sources. When the generic origin of alpha-viscosity is still being explored, mechanism of effi...

  2. EFFECTS OF VASCULAR ZERO-STRESS STATE ON PULSATILE BLOOD FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, blood flow in artery was treated as the flow under equilibrium state (the steady flow under mean pressure) combined with the periodically small pulsatile flow. Based on vascular zero-stress state[1], the pulsatile strains according to the radial and axial displacements of blood vessel were obtained. With the use of Hooke’s law, the pulsatile strains and the corresponding Cauchy stresses were connected, so the corresponding wall motion equations could be established here. By solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations, the analytic expressions of the blood flow velocities and the vascular displacements could be obtained, and the influence of the circumferential and axial stretch ratio on pulsatile blood flow and vascular motion was discussed in details.

  3. Mutiscale Modeling of Segregation in Granular Flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Modeling and simulation of segregation phenomena in granular flows are investigated. Computational models at different scales ranging from particle level (microscale) to continuum level (macroscale) are employed in order to determine the important microscale physics relevant to macroscale modeling. The capability of a multi-fluid model to capture segregation caused by density difference is demonstrated by simulating grain-chaff biomass flows in a laboratory-scale air column and in a combine harvester. The multi-fluid model treats gas and solid phases as interpenetrating continua in an Eulerian frame. This model is further improved by incorporating particle rotation using kinetic theory for rapid granular flow of slightly frictional spheres. A simplified model is implemented without changing the current kinetic theory framework by introducing an effective coefficient of restitution to account for additional energy dissipation due to frictional collisions. The accuracy of predicting segregation rate in a gas-fluidized bed is improved by the implementation. This result indicates that particle rotation is important microscopic physics to be incorporated into the hydrodynamic model. Segregation of a large particle in a dense granular bed of small particles under vertical. vibration is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Wall friction is identified as a necessary condition for the segregation. Large-scale force networks bearing larger-than-average forces are found with the presence of wall friction. The role of force networks in assisting rising of the large particle is analyzed. Single-point force distribution and two-point spatial force correlation are computed. The results show the heterogeneity of forces and a short-range correlation. The short correlation length implies that even dense granular flows may admit local constitutive relations. A modified minimum spanning tree (MST) algorithm is developed to asymptotically recover the force statistics in the

  4. Constitutive model of discontinuous plastic flow at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Skoczen, B; Bielski, J; Marcinek, D

    2010-01-01

    FCC metals and alloys are frequently used in cryogenic applications, nearly down to the temperature of absolute zero, because of their excellent physical and mechanical properties including ductility. Some of these materials, often characterized by the low stacking fault energy (LSFE), undergo at low temperatures three distinct phenomena: dynamic strain ageing (DSA), plastic strain induced transformation from the parent phase (gamma) to the secondary phase (alpha) and evolution of micro-damage. The constitutive model presented in the paper is focused on the discontinuous plastic flow (serrated yielding) and takes into account the relevant thermodynamic background. The discontinuous plastic flow reflecting the DSA effect is described by the mechanism of local catastrophic failure of Lomer-Cottrell (LC) locks under the stress fields related to the accumulating edge dislocations (below the transition temperature from the screw dislocations to the edge dislocations mode T-1). The failure of LC locks leads to mass...

  5. Analytical solutions of couple stress fluid flows with slip boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devakar M.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, the exact solutions for fundamental flows namely Couette, Poiseuille and generalized Couette flows of an incompressible couple stress fluid between parallel plates are obtained using slip boundary conditions. The effect of various parameters on velocity for each problem is discussed. It is found that, for each of the problems, the solution in the limiting case as couple stresses approaches to zero is similar to that of classical viscous Newtonian fluid. The results indicate that, the presence of couple stresses decreases the velocity of the fluid.

  6. Numerical modeling of regional stress distributions for geothermal exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Theophile; Peter-Borie, Mariane; Gentier, Sylvie; Blaisonneau, Arnold

    2017-04-01

    Any high-enthalpy unconventional geothermal projectcan be jeopardized by the uncertainty on the presence of the geothermal resource at depth. Indeed, for the majority of such projects the geothermal resource is deeply seated and, with the drilling costs increasing accordingly, must be located as precisely as possible to increase the chance of their economic viability. In order to reduce the "geological risk", i.e., the chance to poorly locate the geothermal resource, a maximum amount of information must be gathered prior to any drilling of exploration and/or operational well. Cross-interpretation from multiple disciplines (e.g., geophysics, hydrology, geomechanics …) should improve locating the geothermal resource and so the position of exploration wells ; this is the objective of the European project IMAGE (grant agreement No. 608553), under which the work presented here was carried out. As far as geomechanics is concerned, in situ stresses can have a great impact on the presence of a geothermal resource since they condition both the regime within the rock mass, and the state of the major fault zones (and hence, the possible flow paths). In this work, we propose a geomechanical model to assess the stress distribution at the regional scale (characteristic length of 100 kilometers). Since they have a substantial impact on the stress distributions and on the possible creation of regional flow paths, the major fault zones are explicitly taken into account. The Distinct Element Method is used, where the medium is modeled as fully deformable blocks representing the rock mass interacting through mechanically active joints depicting the fault zones. The first step of the study is to build the model geometry based on geological and geophysical evidences. Geophysical and structural geology results help positioning the major fault zones in the first place. Then, outcrop observations, structural models and site-specific geological knowledge give information on the fault

  7. A numerical model for dynamic crustal-scale fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Till; Bons, Paul; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Koehn, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Fluid flow in the crust is often envisaged and modeled as continuous, yet minimal flow, which occurs over large geological times. This is a suitable approximation for flow as long as it is solely controlled by the matrix permeability of rocks, which in turn is controlled by viscous compaction of the pore space. However, strong evidence (hydrothermal veins and ore deposits) exists that a significant part of fluid flow in the crust occurs strongly localized in both space and time, controlled by the opening and sealing of hydrofractures. We developed, tested and applied a novel computer code, which considers this dynamic behavior and couples it with steady, Darcian flow controlled by the matrix permeability. In this dual-porosity model, fractures open depending on the fluid pressure relative to the solid pressure. Fractures form when matrix permeability is insufficient to accommodate fluid flow resulting from compaction, decompression (Staude et al. 2009) or metamorphic dehydration reactions (Weisheit et al. 2013). Open fractures can close when the contained fluid either seeps into the matrix or escapes by fracture propagation: mobile hydrofractures (Bons, 2001). In the model, closing and sealing of fractures is controlled by a time-dependent viscous law, which is based on the effective stress and on either Newtonian or non-Newtonian viscosity. Our simulations indicate that the bulk of crustal fluid flow in the middle to lower upper crust is intermittent, highly self-organized, and occurs as mobile hydrofractures. This is due to the low matrix porosity and permeability, combined with a low matrix viscosity and, hence, fast sealing of fractures. Stable fracture networks, generated by fluid overpressure, are restricted to the uppermost crust. Semi-stable fracture networks can develop in an intermediate zone, if a critical overpressure is reached. Flow rates in mobile hydrofractures exceed those in the matrix porosity and fracture networks by orders of magnitude

  8. Flow Stress Behavior and Processing Map of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag Alloy during Hot Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Sheng; YI Danqing; ZHANG Hong; YAO Sujuan

    2008-01-01

    The hot deformation behavior of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag was studied by isothermal hot compression tests in the temperature range of 573-773 K and strain rate range of 0.001-1 s-1 on a Gleeble 1500 D thermal mechanical simulator. The results show the flow stress of Al-Cu-Mg-Ag alloy increases with strain rate and decreases after a peak value, indicating dynamic recovery and recrystallization. A hyperbolic sine relationship is found to correlate well the flow stress with the strain rate and temperature, the flow stress equation is estimated to illustrate the relation of strain rate and stress and temperature during high temperature deformation process. The processing maps exhibit two domains as optimum fields for hot deformation at different strains, including the high strain rate domain in 623-773 K and the low strain rate domain in 573-673 K.

  9. Reynolds stress flow shear and turbulent energy transfer in reversed field pinch configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Nicola; Spolaore, Monica; Serianni, Gianluigi; Regnoli, Giorgio; Spada, Emanuele; Antoni, Vanni; Bergsåker, Henric; Drake, James R.

    2003-10-01

    The role of Reynolds Stress tensor on flow generation in turbulent fluids and plasmas is still an open question and the comprehension of its behavior may assist the understanding of improved confinement scenario. It is generally believed that shear flow generation may occur by an interaction of the turbulent Reynolds stress with the shear flow. It is also generally believed that this mechanism may influence the generation of zonal flow shears. The evaluation of the complete Reynolds Stress tensor requires contemporary measurements of its electrostatic and magnetic part: this requirement is more restrictive for Reversed Field Pinch configuration where magnetic fluctuations are larger than in tokamak . A new diagnostic system which combines electrostatic and magnetic probes has been installed in the edge region of Extrap-T2R reversed field pinch. With this new probe the Reynolds stress tensor has been deduced and its radial profile has been reconstructed on a shot to shot basis exploring differen plasma conditions. These profiles have been compared with the naturally occurring velocity flow profile, in particular during Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive experiment, where a strong variation of ExB flow radial profile has been registered. The study of the temporal evolution of Reynolds stress reveals the appearance of strong localized bursts: these are considered in relation with global MHD relaxation phenomena, which naturally occur in the core of an RFP plasma sustaining its configuration.

  10. Modeling of dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laux, Harald

    1998-08-01

    A general two-fluid model is derived and applied in CFD computations to various test cases of important industrial multiphase flows. It is general in the sense of its applicability to dilute and dense dispersed fluid-particle flows. The model is limited to isothermal flow without mass transfer and only one particle phase is described. The instantaneous fluid phase equations, including the phase interaction terms, are derived from a volume averaging technique, and the instantaneous particle phase equations are derived from the kinetic theory of granular material. Whereas the averaging procedure, the treatment of the interaction terms, and the kinetic theory approach have been reported in literature prior to this work the combination of the approaches is new. The resulting equations are derived without ambiguity in the interpretation of the particle phase pressure (equation-of-state of particle phase). The basic modeling for the particle phase is improved in two steps. Because in the basic modeling only stresses due to kinetic and collisional interactions are included, a simple model for an effective viscosity is developed in order to allow also frictional stresses within the particle phase. Moreover, turbulent stresses and turbulent dispersion of particles play often an important role for the transport processes. Therefore in a second step, a two-equation turbulence model for both fluid and particle phase turbulence is derived by applying the phasic average to the instantaneous equations. The resulting k-{epsilon}-k{sup d}-{epsilon}{sup d} model is new. Mathematical closure is attempted such that the resulting set of equations is valid for both dilute arid dense flows. During the development of the closure relations a clear distinction is made between granular or ''viscous'' microscale fluctuations and turbulent macro scale fluctuations (true particle turbulence) within the particle phase. The set of governing equations is discretized by using a

  11. Analysis of thermal stress of the piston during non-stationary heat flow in a turbocharged Diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustof, P.; Hornik, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the paper, numeric calculations of thermal stresses of the piston in a turbocharged Diesel engine in the initial phase of its work were carried out based on experimental studies and the data resulting from them. The calculations were made using a geometrical model of the piston in a five-cylinder turbocharged Diesel engine with a capacity of about 2300 cm3, with a direct fuel injection to the combustion chamber and a power rating of 85 kW. In order to determine the thermal stress, application of own mathematical models of the heat flow in characteristic surfaces of the piston was required to show real processes occurring on the surface of the analysed component. The calculations were performed using a Geostar COSMOS/M program module. A three-dimensional geometric model of the piston was created in this program based on a real component, in order to enable the calculations and analysis of thermal stresses during non-stationary heat flow. Modelling of the thermal stresses of the piston for the engine speed n=4250 min-1 and engine load λ=1.69 was carried out.

  12. Measurement and analysis of flow wall shear stress in an interior subchannel of triangular array rods. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakori-Monazah, M.R.; Todreas, N.E.

    1977-08-01

    A simulated model of triangular array rods with pitch to diameter ratio of 1.10 (as a test section) and air as the fluid flow was used to study the LMFBR hydraulic parameters. The wall shear stress distribution around the rod periphery, friction factors, static pressure distributions and turbulence intensity corresponding to various Reynolds numbers ranging from 4140 to 36170 in the central subchannel were measured. Various approaches for measurement of wall shear stress were compared. The measurement was performed using the Preston tube technique with the probe outside diameter equal to 0.014 in.

  13. Using the stress function in the flow of generalized Newtonian fluids through pipes and slits

    CERN Document Server

    Sochi, Taha

    2015-01-01

    We use a generic and general numerical method to obtain solutions for the flow of generalized Newtonian fluids through circular pipes and plane slits. The method, which is simple and robust can produce highly accurate solutions which virtually match any analytical solutions. The method is based on employing the stress, as a function of the pipe radius or slit thickness dimension, combined with the rate of strain function as represented by the fluid rheological constitutive relation that correlates the rate of strain to stress. Nine types of generalized Newtonian fluids are tested in this investigation and the solutions obtained from the generic method are compared to the analytical solutions which are obtained from the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch-Mooney-Schofield method. Very good agreement was obtained in all the investigated cases. All the required quantities of the flow which include local viscosity, rate of strain, flow velocity profile and volumetric flow rate, as well as shear stress, can be obtained from ...

  14. Analysis of Transitional and Turbulent Flow Through the FDA Benchmark Nozzle Model Using Laser Doppler Velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joshua O; Good, Bryan C; Paterno, Anthony V; Hariharan, Prasanna; Deutsch, Steven; Malinauskas, Richard A; Manning, Keefe B

    2016-09-01

    Transitional and turbulent flow through a simplified medical device model is analyzed as part of the FDA's Critical Path Initiative, designed to improve the process of bringing medical products to market. Computational predictions are often used in the development of devices and reliable in vitro data is needed to validate computational results, particularly estimations of the Reynolds stresses that could play a role in damaging blood elements. The high spatial resolution of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) is used to collect two component velocity data within the FDA benchmark nozzle model. Two flow conditions are used to produce flow encompassing laminar, transitional, and turbulent regimes, and viscous stresses, principal Reynolds stresses, and turbulence intensities are calculated from the measured LDV velocities. Axial velocities and viscous stresses are compared to data from a prior inter-laboratory study conducted with particle image velocimetry. Large velocity gradients are observed near the wall in the nozzle throat and in the jet shear layer located in the expansion downstream of the throat, with axial velocity changing as much as 4.5 m/s over 200 μm. Additionally, maximum Reynolds shear stresses of 1000-2000 Pa are calculated in the high shear regions, which are an order of magnitude higher than the peak viscous shear stresses (<100 Pa). It is important to consider the effects of both viscous and turbulent stresses when simulating flow through medical devices. Reynolds stresses above commonly accepted hemolysis thresholds are measured in the nozzle model, indicating that hemolysis may occur under certain flow conditions. As such, the presented turbulence quantities from LDV, which are also available for download at https://fdacfd.nci.nih.gov/ , provide an ideal validation test for computational simulations that seek to characterize the flow field and to predict hemolysis within the FDA nozzle geometry.

  15. Graphical Models for Optimal Power Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Dvijotham, Krishnamurthy; Chertkov, Michael; Misra, Sidhant; Vuffray, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Optimal power flow (OPF) is the central optimization problem in electric power grids. Although solved routinely in the course of power grid operations, it is known to be strongly NP-hard in general, and weakly NP-hard over tree networks. In this paper, we formulate the optimal power flow problem over tree networks as an inference problem over a tree-structured graphical model where the nodal variables are low-dimensional vectors. We adapt the standard dynamic programming algorithm for inference over a tree-structured graphical model to the OPF problem. Combining this with an interval discretization of the nodal variables, we develop an approximation algorithm for the OPF problem. Further, we use techniques from constraint programming (CP) to perform interval computations and adaptive bound propagation to obtain practically efficient algorithms. Compared to previous algorithms that solve OPF with optimality guarantees using convex relaxations, our approach is able to work for arbitrary distribution networks an...

  16. The cycle of instability: stress release and fissure flow as controls on gully head retreat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, A. J. C.

    2001-01-01

    Gully head and wall retreat has commonly been attributed to fluvial scour and head collapse as a result of soil saturation, sapping or piping. The empirical evidence to substantiate these conceptual models is sparse, however, and often contradictory. This paper explores the hydrological and mechanical controls on gully head and wall stability by modelling the hydrology, stability and elastic deformation of a marl gully complex in Granada Province, south-east Spain. The hydrological and slope-stability simulations show that saturated conditions can be reached only where preferential fissure flow channels water from tension cracks into the base of the gully head, and that vertical or subvertical heads will be stable unless saturation is achieved. Owing to the high unsaturated strengths of marl measured in this research, failure in unsaturated conditions is possible only where the gully head wall is significantly undercut. Head retreat thus requires the formation of either a tension crack or an undercut hollow. Finite-element stress analysis of eroding slopes reveals a build up of shear stress at the gully head base, and a second stress anomaly just upslope of the head wall. Although tension cracks on gully heads have often been attributed to slope unloading, this research provides strong evidence that the so called sapping hollow commonly found in the gully headwall base is also a function of stress release. Although further research is needed, it seems possible that pop out failures in river channels may be caused by the same process. The hydrological analysis shows that, once a tension crack has developed, throughflow velocity in the gully headwall will increase by an order of magnitude, promoting piping and enlargement of this weakened area. It is, therefore, possible to envisage a cycle of gully expansion in which erosion, channel incision or human action unloads the slope below a gully head, leading to stress patterns that account for the tension crack and a

  17. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Voronov, Roman S.; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone.

  18. Bulk stress distributions in the pore space of sphere-packed beds under Darcy flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H; Voronov, Roman S; Tummala, Naga Rajesh; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, bulk stress distributions in the pore space of columns packed with spheres are numerically computed with lattice Boltzmann simulations. Three different ideally packed and one randomly packed configuration of the columns are considered under Darcy flow conditions. The stress distributions change when the packing type changes. In the Darcy regime, the normalized stress distribution for a particular packing type is independent of the pressure difference that drives the flow and presents a common pattern. The three parameter (3P) log-normal distribution is found to describe the stress distributions in the randomly packed beds within statistical accuracy. In addition, the 3P log-normal distribution is still valid when highly porous scaffold geometries rather than sphere beds are examined. It is also shown that the 3P log-normal distribution can describe the bulk stress distribution in consolidated reservoir rocks like Berea sandstone.

  19. Simultaneous effects of Hall and convective conditions on peristaltic flow of couple-stress fluid in an inclined asymmetric channel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Hayat; Maryam Iqbal; Humaira Yasmin; Fuad E Alsaadi; Huijun Gao

    2015-07-01

    A mathematical model is developed to analyse the peristaltic flow of couple-stress fluid in an inclined asymmetric channel with convective conditions. Soret and Dufour and Hall effects are taken into account. Analysis has been carried out in a wave frame of reference. Expressions for velocity, pressure gradient, temperature and concentration are constructed. Pumping and trapping phenomena are examined. Impact of sundry parameters on the velocity, temperature and concentration is discussed.

  20. Turbulence modelling of thermal plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, Masaya

    2016-12-01

    This article presents a discussion of the ideas for modelling turbulent thermal plasma flows, reviewing the challenges, efforts, and state-of-the-art simulations. Demonstrative simulations are also performed to present the importance of numerical methods as well as physical models to express turbulent features. A large eddy simulation has been applied to turbulent thermal plasma flows to treat time-dependent and 3D motions of multi-scale eddies. Sub-grid scale models to be used should be able to express not only turbulent but also laminar states because both states co-exist in and around thermal plasmas which have large variations of density as well as transport properties under low Mach-number conditions. Suitable solution algorithms and differencing schemes must be chosen and combined appropriately to capture multi-scale eddies and steep gradients of temperature and chemical species, which are turbulent features of thermal plasma flows with locally variable Reynolds and Mach numbers. Several simulations using different methods under different conditions show commonly that high-temperature plasma regions exhibit less turbulent structures, with only large eddies, whereas low-temperature regions tend to be more turbulent, with numerous small eddies. These numerical results agree with both theoretical insight and photographs that show the characteristics of eddies. Results also show that a turbulence transition of a thermal plasma jet through a generation-breakup process of eddies in a torch is dominated by fluid dynamic instability after ejection rather than non-uniform or unsteady phenomena.

  1. Modeling density segregation in granular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongyi; Lueptow, Richard; Umbanhowar, Paul

    2015-11-01

    A recently developed continuum-based model accurately predicts segregation in flows of granular mixtures varying in particle size by considering the interplay of advection, diffusion and segregation. In this research, we extend the domain of the model to include density driven segregation. Discrete Element Method (DEM) simulations of density bidisperse flows of mono-sized particles in a quasi-2D bounded heap were performed to determine the dependence of the density driven segregation velocity on local shear rate, particle concentration, and a segregation length which scales with the particle size and the logarithm of the density ratio. With these inputs, the model yields theoretical predictions of density segregation patterns that quantitatively match the DEM simulations over a range of density ratios (1.11-3.33) and flow rates (19.2-113.6 cm3/s). Matching experiments with various combinations of glass, steel and ceramic particles were also performed which reproduced the segregation patterns obtained in both the simulations and the theory.

  2. Modelling debris flows down general channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Pudasaini

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an extension of the single-phase cohesionless dry granular avalanche model over curved and twisted channels proposed by Pudasaini and Hutter (2003. It is a generalisation of the Savage and Hutter (1989, 1991 equations based on simple channel topography to a two-phase fluid-solid mixture of debris material. Important terms emerging from the correct treatment of the kinematic and dynamic boundary condition, and the variable basal topography are systematically taken into account. For vanishing fluid contribution and torsion-free channel topography our new model equations exactly degenerate to the previous Savage-Hutter model equations while such a degeneration was not possible by the Iverson and Denlinger (2001 model, which, in fact, also aimed to extend the Savage and Hutter model. The model equations of this paper have been rigorously derived; they include the effects of the curvature and torsion of the topography, generally for arbitrarily curved and twisted channels of variable channel width. The equations are put into a standard conservative form of partial differential equations. From these one can easily infer the importance and influence of the pore-fluid-pressure distribution in debris flow dynamics. The solid-phase is modelled by applying a Coulomb dry friction law whereas the fluid phase is assumed to be an incompressible Newtonian fluid. Input parameters of the equations are the internal and bed friction angles of the solid particles, the viscosity and volume fraction of the fluid, the total mixture density and the pore pressure distribution of the fluid at the bed. Given the bed topography and initial geometry and the initial velocity profile of the debris mixture, the model equations are able to describe the dynamics of the depth profile and bed parallel depth-averaged velocity distribution from the initial position to the final deposit. A shock capturing, total variation diminishing numerical scheme is implemented to

  3. Incorporating immigrant flows into microsimulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duleep, Harriet Orcutt; Dowhan, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    Building on the research on immigrant earnings reviewed in the first article of this series, "Research on Immigrant Earnings," the preceding article, "Adding Immigrants to Microsimulation Models," linked research results to various issues essential for incorporating immigrant earnings into microsimulation models. The discussions of that article were in terms of a closed system. That is, it examined a system in which immigrant earnings and emigration are forecast for a given population represented in the base sample in the microsimulation model. This article, the last in the series, addresses immigrant earnings projections for open systems--microsimulation models that include projections of future immigration. The article suggests a simple method to project future immigrants and their earnings. Including the future flow of immigrants in microsimulation models can dramatically affect the projected Social Security benefits of some groups.

  4. Comparison of in vitro flows past a mechanical heart valve in anatomical and axisymmetric aorta models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haya, Laura; Tavoularis, Stavros

    2017-06-01

    Flow characteristics past a bileaflet mechanical heart valve were measured under physiological flow conditions in a straight tube with an axisymmetric expansion, similar to vessels used in previous studies, and in an anatomical model of the aorta. We found that anatomical features, including the three-lobed sinus and the aorta's curvature affected significantly the flow characteristics. The turbulent and viscous stresses were presented and discussed as indicators for potential blood damage and thrombosis. Both types of stresses, averaged over the two axial measurement planes, were significantly lower in the anatomical model than in the axisymmetric one. This difference was attributed to the lower height-to-width ratio and more gradual contraction of the anatomical aortic sinus. The curvature of the aorta caused asymmetries in the velocity and stress distributions during forward flow. Secondary flows resulting from the aorta's curvature are thought to have redistributed the fluid stresses transversely, resulting in a more homogeneous stress distribution in the anatomical aortic root than in the axisymmetric root. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of modelling accurately the aortic geometry in experimental and computational studies of prosthetic devices. Moreover, our findings suggest that grafts used for aortic root replacement should approximate as closely as possible the shape of the natural sinuses.

  5. Foam rheology: A model of viscous effects in shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraynik, Andrew M.; Reinelt, Douglas A.

    Foams consisting of gas bubbles dispersed in a continuous network of thin liquid films display a remarkable range of rheological characteristics that include a finite shear modulus, yield stress, non-Newtonian viscosity, and slip at the wall. Progress in developing micromechanical theories to describe foam rheology has depended upon two-dimensional models, which in most cases are assumed to have perfectly ordered structure. Princen accounted for surface tension and geometrical effects, and analyzed the nonlinear elastic response of a spatially periodic foam in simple shear. His analysis has been extended to account for more general deformations. Khan and Armstrong and Kraynik and Hansen have proposed ad hoc models for viscous effects in foam rheology. Their models capture numerous qualitative phenomena but incorporate relaxation mechanisms based upon overly simplified assumptions of liquid flow in the thin films. Mysels, Shinoda, and Frankel considered soap films with interfaces that are inextensible due to the presence of surfactants. They analyzed the primary flow that occurs when such films are slowly withdrawn from or recede into essentially static junction regions such as the Plateau borders in a foam. Adopting this mechanism, Schwartz and Princen considered small periodic deformations of a foam and calculated the energy dissipation due to viscous flow in the thin films. In the following, we also adopt the basic interfacial and viscous mechanisms introduced by Mysels et al. and analyze simple shearing deformations of finite amplitude. The configuration and effective stress of the foam are determined. Under these deformation conditions, the foam is a nonlinear viscoelastic material. Results for the uniform expansion of a foam are also presented.

  6. Porosity model for flows in CMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chao-hui; YE Wei; LUO Jian-bin; WEN Shi-zhu

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to explore the contribution of the pad which is usually full of pores,to the performance of CMP (chemical mechanical polishing),a three-dimensional flow model of CMP is presented by assuming that the fluids in the porous layer comply with Darcy's law,which states that the flow velocity is proportional to the pressure gradient and inverse proportional to the viscosity.The flow equation is deduced accordingly and,by taking advantage of the multilevel technique and line relaxation technique,numerical simulations are carried out to reveal the relationships between the load capacities and operational parameters (including pivot height,roll angle and pitch angle),under conditions with different porous parameters and different thicknesses of the porous layer.The little porous parameter will lead to a prominent increase of load capability (for instance,the load and the moment predicted),which is still augmented by the thicker layer parameter.This will result in a higher material removal ratio of CMP.A pad full of large pores will be used to deduce load capability,facilitating the free flow of the fluids through the pores.The research will add some insights on the mechanism of the CMP technique.

  7. An introduction to multilevel flow modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Morten

    2011-01-01

    environment. MFM has a primary focus on plant goals and functions and provide a methodological way of using those concepts to represent complex industrial plant. The paper gives a brief introduction to the historical development, introduces the concepts of MFM and presents the application of the concepts......Multilevel Flow Modeling (MFM) is a methodology for functional modeling of industrial processes on several interconnected levels of means-end and part-whole abstractions. The basic idea of MFM is to represent an industrial plant as a system which provides the means required to serve purposes in its...

  8. A FIBER-BRIDGING MODEL WITH STRESS GRADIENT EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙毅; 李涛

    2000-01-01

    Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China)ABSTRACT: A fiber-bridging model with stress gradient effects is proposed for unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites. The stress gradient terms are introduced by solving a micromechanical model under a non-uniform stress loading. It is shown that the stress gradient effect is significant on both the fiber-bridging stress distribution and the value of the critical load of fiber failure.

  9. Comparison Between LES and RANS Modeling of Turbulent Swirling Flows and Swirling Diffusion Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡瓅元; 周力行; 张健

    2005-01-01

    Turbulent swirling flows and methane-air swirling diffusion combustion are simulated by both large-eddy simulation (LES) using a Smagorinsky-Lilly subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model, a second-order moment (SOM) subgrid-scale combustion model and an eddy break up (EBU) combustion model and Reynolds-averaged NavierStokes (RANS) modeling using the Reynolds stress equation model and a second-order moment (SOM) combustion model. For swirling flows, the LES statistical results give better agreement with the experimental results than the RANS modeling, indicating that the adopted subgrid-scale turbulence model is suitable for swirling flows. For swirling combustion, both the proposed SOM SGS combustion model and the RANS-SOM model give the results in good agreement with the experimental results, but the LES-EBU modeling results are not in agreement with the experimental results.

  10. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Evaluation of Full Reynolds Stress Turbulence Models in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Julianne C.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2017-01-01

    Full seven-equation Reynolds stress turbulence models are a relatively new and promising tool for todays aerospace technology challenges. This paper uses two stress-omega full Reynolds stress models to evaluate challenging flows including shock-wave boundary layer interactions, separation and mixing layers. The Wilcox and the SSG/LRR full second-moment Reynolds stress models have been implemented into the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes Three Dimensional) unstructured Navier-Stokes code and are evaluated for four problems: a transonic two-dimensional diffuser, a supersonic axisymmetric compression corner, a compressible planar shear layer, and a subsonic axisymmetric jet. Simulation results are compared with experimental data and results using the more commonly used Spalart-Allmaras (SA) one-equation and the Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST-V) two-equation turbulence models.

  12. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e.,fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rate. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  13. Modeling variability in porescale multiphase flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Bowen; Bao, Jie; Oostrom, Mart; Battiato, Ilenia; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2017-07-01

    Microfluidic devices and porescale numerical models are commonly used to study multiphase flow in biological, geological, and engineered porous materials. In this work, we perform a set of drainage and imbibition experiments in six identical microfluidic cells to study the reproducibility of multiphase flow experiments. We observe significant variations in the experimental results, which are smaller during the drainage stage and larger during the imbibition stage. We demonstrate that these variations are due to sub-porescale geometry differences in microcells (because of manufacturing defects) and variations in the boundary condition (i.e., fluctuations in the injection rate inherent to syringe pumps). Computational simulations are conducted using commercial software STAR-CCM+, both with constant and randomly varying injection rates. Stochastic simulations are able to capture variability in the experiments associated with the varying pump injection rate.

  14. Numerical modeling of geophysical granular flows: 1. A comprehensive approach to granular rheologies and geophysical multiphase flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartevelle, SéBastien

    2004-08-01

    Geophysical granular materials display a wide variety of behaviors and features. Typically, granular flows (1) are multiphase flows, (2) are very dissipative over many different scales, (3) display a wide range of grain concentrations, and (4), as a final result of these previous features, display complex nonlinear, nonuniform, and unsteady rheologies. Therefore the objectives of this manuscript are twofold: (1) setting up a hydrodynamic model which acknowledges the multiphase nature of granular flows and (2) defining a comprehensive rheological model which accounts for all the different forms of viscous dissipations within granular flows at any concentration. Hence three important regimes within granular flows must be acknowledged: kinetic (pure free flights of grain), kinetic-collisional, and frictional. The momentum and energy transfer will be different according to the granular regimes, i.e., strain rate dependent in the kinetic and kinetic-collisional cases and strain rate independent in the frictional case. A "universal" granular rheological model requires a comprehensive unified stress tensor able to adequately describe viscous stress within the flow for any of these regimes, and without imposing a priori what regime will dominate over the others. The kinetic-collisional viscous regime is defined from a modified Boltzmann's kinetic theory of dense gas. The frictional viscous regime is defined from the plastic potential and the critical state theories which account for compressibility of granular matter (e.g., dilatancy, consolidation, and critical state). In the companion paper [, 2004] we will introduce a multiphase computer code, (G)MFIX, which accounts for all the granular regimes and rheology and present typical simulations of diluted (e.g., plinian clouds) and concentrated geophysical granular flows (i.e., pyroclastic flows and surges).

  15. DS-777 Spatial Location of Gages with Total Flow and estimated Base Flow, organized by Seasonal Stress Periods for the Development Simulation Period for the Northern High Plains Groundwater-Flow Model in Parts of Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, and Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Baseflow is the portion of streamflow derived from groundwater flow. It is an important component of the groundwater budget, and can be estimated using known total...

  16. Modeling steam pressure under martian lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.

    2013-01-01

    Rootless cones on Mars are a valuable indicator of past interactions between lava and water. However, the details of the lava–water interactions are not fully understood, limiting the ability to use these features to infer new information about past water on Mars. We have developed a model for the pressurization of a dry layer of porous regolith by melting and boiling ground ice in the shallow subsurface. This model builds on previous models of lava cooling and melting of subsurface ice. We find that for reasonable regolith properties and ice depths of decimeters, explosive pressures can be reached. However, the energy stored within such lags is insufficient to excavate thick flows unless they draw steam from a broader region than the local eruption site. These results indicate that lag pressurization can drive rootless cone formation under favorable circumstances, but in other instances molten fuel–coolant interactions are probably required. We use the model results to consider a range of scenarios for rootless cone formation in Athabasca Valles. Pressure buildup by melting and boiling ice under a desiccated lag is possible in some locations, consistent with the expected distribution of ice implanted from atmospheric water vapor. However, it is uncertain whether such ice has existed in the vicinity of Athabasca Valles in recent history. Plausible alternative sources include surface snow or an aqueous flood shortly before the emplacement of the lava flow.

  17. Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California -- hydrogeologic framework and transient ground-water flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.

    2004-01-01

    provided by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional ground-water flow system. Ground-water flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex ground-water flow systems. Ground-water flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional ground-water flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and evapotranspiration (ET) are the dominant natural ground-water discharge processes. Ground water also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Ground-water flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, a 3D finite-difference modular ground-water flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 m on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins, also simulated by drains. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient model gener

  18. Impact of individual and cumulative coronary risk factors on coronary flow reserve assessed by dobutamine stress echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmari, Saeed A L; Bunch, T Jared; Modesto, Karen; Stussy, Vicky; Dichak, Amy; Seward, James B; Pellikka, Patricia A; Chandrasekaran, Krishnaswamy

    2008-06-15

    Traditional cardiovascular risk factors have been shown to cause microvascular dysfunction. Most studies that have evaluated microcirculation rely on invasive measurement tools. We used dobutamine stress echocardiography, a validated method to measure coronary flow velocity (CFV) and coronary flow reserve (CFR), in a previously unstudied population without known significant coronary artery disease to determine the impact of traditional risk factors on CFR. Consecutive patients who had no evidence of regional wall motion abnormalities at rest or during dobutamine stress echocardiography were studied. Left anterior descending artery CFV was measured at baseline and at peak dobutamine stress and CFR was calculated as the ratio of peak stress CFV to baseline CFV. Fifty-nine consecutive patients (28 men) with mean age of 66.8+/-14.5 years were studied. CFR was lower in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) compared with those without (1.7+/-0.74 vs 2.48+/-0.98, p50 mm Hg), and obesity with a wide pulse pressure. In a multivariate model, DM, obesity, and wide pulse pressure were significantly associated with variation in CFR (p<0.0008). In conclusion, CFR was abnormal in patients with DM, hypertension, and obesity. CFR impairment is exaggerated as the number of risk factors increases. Despite a negative dobutamine stress echocardiographic result, aggressive risk factor assessment and control should be implemented in patients with coronary risk factors due to an underlying abnormal CFR.

  19. VisFlow - Web-based Visualization Framework for Tabular Data with a Subset Flow Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bowen; Silva, Claudio T

    2017-01-01

    Data flow systems allow the user to design a flow diagram that specifies the relations between system components which process, filter or visually present the data. Visualization systems may benefit from user-defined data flows as an analysis typically consists of rendering multiple plots on demand and performing different types of interactive queries across coordinated views. In this paper, we propose VisFlow, a web-based visualization framework for tabular data that employs a specific type of data flow model called the subset flow model. VisFlow focuses on interactive queries within the data flow, overcoming the limitation of interactivity from past computational data flow systems. In particular, VisFlow applies embedded visualizations and supports interactive selections, brushing and linking within a visualization-oriented data flow. The model requires all data transmitted by the flow to be a data item subset (i.e. groups of table rows) of some original input table, so that rendering properties can be assigned to the subset unambiguously for tracking and comparison. VisFlow features the analysis flexibility of a flow diagram, and at the same time reduces the diagram complexity and improves usability. We demonstrate the capability of VisFlow on two case studies with domain experts on real-world datasets showing that VisFlow is capable of accomplishing a considerable set of visualization and analysis tasks. The VisFlow system is available as open source on GitHub.

  20. In-situ shear stress indicator using heated strain gages at the flow boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chi-An; Yang, Fuling

    2011-11-01

    This work borrows the concept of hot-wire anemometry and sketch a technique that uses local heat transfer to infer the flow field and the corresponding stress. Conventional strain gages were mounted at the flow solid boundary as the heat source and acrylic boundary was chosen for its low thermal conductivity ensuring heat accumulation when a gage is energized. The gage would now work in slightly overheated state and its self-heating leads to an additional thermal strain. When exposed to a flow field, heat is brought away by local forced convection, resulting in deviations in gage signal from that developed in quiescent liquid. We have developed a facility to achieve synchronous gage measurements at different locations on a solid boundary. Three steady flow motions were considered: circular Couette flow, rectilinear uniform flow, and rectilinear oscillating flow. Preliminary tests show the gage reading does respond to the imposed flow through thermal effects and greater deviation was measured in flows of higher shear strain rates. The correlation between the gage signals and the imposed flow field is further examined by theoretical analysis. We also introduced a second solid boundary to the vicinity of the gage in the two rectilinear flows. The gage readings demonstrate rises in its magnitudes indicating wall amplification effect on the local shear strain, agreeing to the drag augmentation by a second solid boundary reported in many multiphase flow literatures.

  1. Observing and Modeling Earth's Energy Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Bjorn; Schwartz, Stephen E.

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews, from the authors' perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within ±2 W m-2. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute

  2. Death Valley regional groundwater flow system, Nevada and California-Hydrogeologic framework and transient groundwater flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Belcher, Wayne R.; Sweetkind, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    by acquiring additional data, by reevaluating existing data using current technology and concepts, and by refining earlier interpretations to reflect the current understanding of the regional groundwater flow system. Groundwater flow in the Death Valley region is composed of several interconnected, complex groundwater flow systems. Groundwater flow occurs in three subregions in relatively shallow and localized flow paths that are superimposed on deeper, regional flow paths. Regional groundwater flow is predominantly through a thick Paleozoic carbonate rock sequence affected by complex geologic structures from regional faulting and fracturing that can enhance or impede flow. Spring flow and ET are the dominant natural groundwater discharge processes. Groundwater also is withdrawn for agricultural, commercial, and domestic uses. Groundwater flow in the DVRFS was simulated using MODFLOW-2000, the U.S. Geological Survey 3D finitedifference modular groundwater flow modeling code that incorporates a nonlinear least-squares regression technique to estimate aquifer parameters. The DVRFS model has 16 layers of defined thickness, a finite-difference grid consisting of 194 rows and 160 columns, and uniform cells 1,500 meters (m) on each side. Prepumping conditions (before 1913) were used as the initial conditions for the transient-state calibration. The model uses annual stress periods with discrete recharge and discharge components. Recharge occurs mostly from infiltration of precipitation and runoff on high mountain ranges and from a small amount of underflow from adjacent basins. Discharge occurs primarily through ET and spring discharge (both simulated as drains) and water withdrawal by pumping and, to a lesser amount, by underflow to adjacent basins simulated by constant-head boundaries. All parameter values estimated by the regression are reasonable and within the range of expected values. The simulated hydraulic heads of the final calibrated transient mode

  3. FlowPing - The New Tool for Throughput and Stress Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondrej Vondrous

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a new tool for network throughput and stress testing. The FlowPing tool is easy to use, and its basic output is very similar to standard Linux ping application. The FlowPing tool is not limited to reach-ability or round trip time testing but is capable of complex UDP based throughput stress testing with rich reporting capabilities on client and server sides. Our new tool implements features, which allow the user to perform tests with variable packet size and traffic rate. All these features can be used in one single test run. This allows the user to use and develop new methodologies for network throughput and stress testing. With the FlowPing tool, it is easy to perform the test with the slowly increasing the amount of network traffic and monitor the behavior of network when the congestion occurs.

  4. DYNAMIC MODELING STRATEGY FOR FLOW REGIME TRANSITION IN GAS-LIQUID TWO-PHASE FLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    X. Wang; X. Sun; H. Zhao

    2011-09-01

    In modeling gas-liquid two-phase flows, the concept of flow regime has been used to characterize the global interfacial structure of the flows. Nearly all constitutive relations that provide closures to the interfacial transfers in two-phase flow models, such as the two-fluid model, are often flow regime dependent. Currently, the determination of the flow regimes is primarily based on flow regime maps or transition criteria, which are developed for steady-state, fully-developed flows and widely applied in nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes, such as RELAP5. As two-phase flows are observed to be dynamic in nature (fully-developed two-phase flows generally do not exist in real applications), it is of importance to model the flow regime transition dynamically for more accurate predictions of two-phase flows. The present work aims to develop a dynamic modeling strategy for determining flow regimes in gas-liquid two-phase flows through the introduction of interfacial area transport equations (IATEs) within the framework of a two-fluid model. The IATE is a transport equation that models the interfacial area concentration by considering the creation and destruction of the interfacial area, such as the fluid particle (bubble or liquid droplet) disintegration, boiling and evaporation; and fluid particle coalescence and condensation, respectively. For the flow regimes beyond bubbly flows, a two-group IATE has been proposed, in which bubbles are divided into two groups based on their size and shape (which are correlated), namely small bubbles and large bubbles. A preliminary approach to dynamically identifying the flow regimes is provided, in which discriminators are based on the predicted information, such as the void fraction and interfacial area concentration of small bubble and large bubble groups. This method is expected to be applied to computer codes to improve their predictive capabilities of gas-liquid two-phase flows, in particular for the applications in

  5. Topography mediates plant water stress: coupling groundwater flow and rhizosphere-xylem hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, D. S.; Tai, X.

    2016-12-01

    Explicit representation of groundwater movement and its subsidy to the unsaturated zone have long been recognized to affect land surface fluxes. But its impact on mediating plant safety during drought has not yet been evaluated, due to the oversimplified representation of the soil-plant-atmospheric continuum in current mainstream land surface models. Here we evaluated the interaction between groundwater processes and plant hydraulics by integrating a three-dimensional groundwater model - ParFlow with a physiologically sophisticated plant model - TREES. A series of simulation experiments using representative hillslope shapes during a general dry down period were carried out to explore the impacts of topography, soil properties, and plant traits - maximum hydraulic conductance (Kmax), root area (Ar), and vulnerability to cavitation on plant hydraulic stress and the potential feedbacks to soil water spatial dynamics. From an initial condition of uniform pressure, lateral redistribution dominated the first stage when soils were wet, resulting in various water table depths. As drought progressed, the tension wetted zone provided a water subsidy to the root zone, causing various rates of soil dry down at different locations. In the end, the root zone soil water remains stable and dry, with diurnal fluctuations induced by the hydraulic redistribution of plant roots. Plants, in general, had higher transpiration and lower hydraulic stress on concave hillslopes. The same plant growing on fine-textured soils had higher transpiration rate, and therefore stronger feedbacks to the water table depths, compared to coarse-textured soil. But these responses could further vary by plant traits. For locations with shallow water table, Kmax is the most important factor determining plant function. When soil is dry, plants with higher Ar and more resistant xylem sustained higher transpiration rates. Those promising performance suggests that the coupled model could be a powerful tool for

  6. On the similarity in shape between debris-flow channels and high-gradient flood channels: Initial insight from continuum models for granular and water flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kean, J. W.; McCoy, S. W.; Tucker, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    The cross-sectional shape of high-gradient bedrock channels carved by debris flows is often very similar to that of channels formed by fluvial erosion. Both tend to have narrow U-shapes with width-to-depth ratios much less than 10. Gullies and channels cut into colluvium by both water erosion and debris-flow erosion have similarly narrow geometries. Given that the physics governing debris flow and turbulent water flow are very different, why are channels eroded by these two processes so similar in shape? To begin to investigate this question, we conducted a series of numerical simulations using continuum models for the end-member cases of granular flow and water flow. Each model is used to evolve the steady-state channel shape formed by uniform flow of the respective material. The granular model is based on the constitutive equation for dense granular flow proposed by Jop et al. (Nature, 2006). They demonstrated that without any fitting parameters, a numerical model using this constitutive equation could reproduce the velocity and depth profiles observed in granular-flow laboratory experiments. The model for water flow uses a ray-isovel turbulence closure to calculate the boundary shear stress across the wetted perimeter of the channel. This fully predictive model has also been shown to be in good agreement with laboratory data. We start the calculations for the granular and water-flow cases by determining the velocity and boundary shear-stress fields in an initial V-shape cross section. We then erode both channels using a simple wear law scaled linearly by the bed-normal boundary shear stress. The calculation is repeated until the channel reaches an equilibrium shape. Initial comparisons of the granular and water-flow channels show that they have very similar width-to-depth ratios of about four, and only moderate differences in bottom geometries and boundary shear-stress distributions. The structure of the velocity field differs more substantially between the two

  7. Consequence Reasoning in Multilevel Flow Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Lind, Morten; Ravn, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Consequence reasoning is a major element for operation support system to assess the plant situations. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate how Multilevel Flow Models can be used to reason about consequences of disturbances in complex engineering systems. MFM is a modelling methodology...... for representing process knowledge for complex systems. It represents the system by using means-end and part-whole decompositions, and describes not only the purposes and functions of the system but also the causal relations between them. Thus MFM is a tool for causal reasoning. The paper introduces MFM modelling...... syntax and gives detailed reasoning formulas for consequence reasoning. The reasoning formulas offers basis for developing rule-based system to perform consequence reasoning based on MFM, which can be used for alarm design, risk monitoring, and supervision and operation support system design....

  8. The biopsychosocial model of stress in adolescence: self-awareness of performance versus stress reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rith-Najarian, Leslie R; McLaughlin, Katie A; Sheridan, Margaret A; Nock, Matthew K

    2014-03-01

    Extensive research among adults supports the biopsychosocial (BPS) model of challenge and threat, which describes relationships among stress appraisals, physiological stress reactivity, and performance; however, no previous studies have examined these relationships in adolescents. Perceptions of stressors as well as physiological reactivity to stress increase during adolescence, highlighting the importance of understanding the relationships among stress appraisals, physiological reactivity, and performance during this developmental period. In this study, 79 adolescent participants reported on stress appraisals before and after a Trier Social Stress Test in which they performed a speech task. Physiological stress reactivity was defined by changes in cardiac output and total peripheral resistance from a baseline rest period to the speech task, and performance on the speech was coded using an objective rating system. We observed in adolescents only two relationships found in past adult research on the BPS model variables: (1) pre-task stress appraisal predicted post-task stress appraisal and (2) performance predicted post-task stress appraisal. Physiological reactivity during the speech was unrelated to pre- and post-task stress appraisals and to performance. We conclude that the lack of association between post-task stress appraisal and physiological stress reactivity suggests that adolescents might have low self-awareness of physiological emotional arousal. Our findings further suggest that adolescent stress appraisals are based largely on their performance during stressful situations. Developmental implications of this potential lack of awareness of one's physiological and emotional state during adolescence are discussed.

  9. On the pressure and stress singularities induced by steady flows of incompressible viscous fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.B.Sinclair; X.Chi; T.I-P.Shih

    2009-01-01

    Design for structural integrity requires an appreciation of where stress singularities can occur in structural configurations. While there is a rich literature devoted to the identification of such singular behavior in solid mechanics, to date there has been relatively little explicit identification of stress singularities caused by fluid flows. In this study, stress and pressure singularities induced by steady flows of viscous incompressible fluids are asymptotically identified. This is done by taking advantage of an earlier result that the Navier-Stokes equations are locally governed by Stokes flow in angular corners. Findings for power singularities are confirmed by developing and using an analogy with solid mechanics. This analogy also facilitates the identification of flow-induced log singularities. Both types of singularity are further confirmed for two global configurations by applying convergence-divergence checks to numerical results. Even though these flow-induced stress singularities are analogous to singularities in solid mechanics, they nonetheless render a number of structural configurations singular that were not previously appreciated as such from identifications within solid mechanics alone.

  10. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A.; Roudbari, M. A.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler-Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  11. Surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effects on the electro-thermo nonlocal wave propagation of SWBNNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbanpour Arani, A., E-mail: aghorban@kashanu.ac.ir [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Roudbari, M.A. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigates the electro-thermal nonlocal wave propagation of fluid-conveying single-walled Boron Nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs) using nonlocal piezoelasticity with surface stress, initial stress and Knudsen-dependent flow velocity effect. SWBNNT is embedded in a vicsoelastic medium which is simulated as visco-Pasternak foundation. Using Euler–Bernoulli beam (EBB) model, Hamilton's principle and nonlocal piezoelasticity theory, the higher order governing equation is derived. A detailed parametric study is conducted, focusing on the combined effects of the electric parameters, viscoelastic medium, initial stress, surface stress, Knudsen number (Kn) and small scale on the wave propagation behaviour of the fluid-conveying SWBNNT. The results show that for smaller values of wave number the dispersion relation for different fluid viscosities seems to be similar. At the higher values of wave numbers, increase in the wave frequency values is remarkable due to increase in fluid viscosity. The electric field as a smart controller, surface effect, initial stress, temperature change and slip velocity effect have significant role on the wave frequency. The results of this work is hoped to be of use in design and manufacturing of smart MEMS/NEMS in advanced medical applications such as drug delivery systems with great applications in biomechanics.

  12. A new sensor for stress measurement based on blood flow fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, I.; Kaminsky, A. V.; Shenkman, L.

    2016-03-01

    It is widely recognized that effective stress management could have a dramatic impact on health care and preventive medicine. In order to meet this need, efficient and seamless sensing and analytic tools for the non-invasive stress monitoring during daily life are required. The existing sensors still do not meet the needs in terms of specificity and robustness. We utilized a miniaturized dynamic light scattering sensor (mDLS) which is specially adjusted to measure skin blood flow fluctuations and provides multi- parametric capabilities. Based on the measured dynamic light scattering signal from the red blood cells flowing in skin, a new concept of hemodynamic indexes (HI) and oscillatory hemodynamic indexes (OHI) have been developed. This approach was utilized for stress level assessment for a few usecase scenario. The new stress index was generated through the HI and OHI parameters. In order to validate this new non-invasive stress index, a group of 19 healthy volunteers was studied by measuring the mDLS sensor located on the wrist. Mental stress was induced by using the cognitive dissonance test of Stroop. We found that OHIs indexes have high sensitivity to the mental stress response for most of the tested subjects. In addition, we examined the capability of using this new stress index for the individual monitoring of the diurnal stress level. We found that the new stress index exhibits similar trends as reported for to the well-known diurnal behavior of cortisol levels. Finally, we demonstrated that this new marker provides good sensitivity and specificity to the stress response to sound and musical emotional arousal.

  13. An improved dynamic subgrid-scale model and its application to large eddy simulation of stratified channel flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG; Fengquan(仲峰泉); LIU; Nansheng(刘难生); LU; Xiyun(陆夕云); ZHUANG; Lixian(庄礼贤)

    2002-01-01

    In the present paper, a new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model of turbulent stress and heat flux for stratified shear flow is proposed. Based on our calculated results of stratified channel flow, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed in this paper is shown to be effective for large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent shear flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the LES of the stratified turbulent channel flow to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the behavior of turbulent statistics, turbulent heat transfer and flow structures at different Richardson numbers.

  14. Toward a Multicultural Model of the Stress Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Lesley A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Attempts to expand Lazarus and Folkman's stress model to include culture-relevant dimensions. Discusses cultural factors that influence each component of the stress model, including types and frequency of events experienced, appraisals of stressfulness of events, appraisals of available coping resources, selection of coping strategies, and…

  15. Stress/strain Modelling of Casting Processes in the Framework of the Control-Volume Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattel, Jesper Henri; Thorborg, Jesper; Andersen, Søren

    1998-01-01

    Realistic computer simulations of casting processes call for the solution of both thermal, fluid-flow and stress/strain related problems. The multitude of the influencing parameters, and their non-linear, transient and temperature dependent nature, make the calculations complex. Therefore the need......, the present model is based on the mainly decoupled representation of the thermal, mechanical and microstructural processes. Examples of industrial applications, such as predicting residual deformations in castings and stress levels in die casting dies, are presented...

  16. Prediction of hygiene in food processing equipment using flow modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Alan; Jensen, Bo Boye Busk

    2002-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been applied to investigate the design of closed process equipment with respect to cleanability. The CFD simulations were validated using the standardized cleaning test proposed by the European Hygienic Engineering and Design Group. CFD has been proven...... expansions in tubes. Results show that cleaning can be efficient in complex geometries even when the critical wall shear stress (determined in uni-axial flow) is not exceeded. This renders the need for considerations concerning three-dimensional flow, the degree of turbulence and the type of flow pattern....... The controlling factors for cleaning identified were the wall shear stress and the nature and magnitude of recirculation zones present....

  17. Wall functions for numerical modeling of laminar MHD flows

    CERN Document Server

    Widlund, O

    2003-01-01

    general wall function treatment is presented for the numerical modeling of laminar magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows. The wall function expressions are derived analytically from the steady-state momentum and electric potential equations, making use only of local variables of the numerical solution. No assumptions are made regarding the orientation of the magnetic field relative to the wall, nor of the magnitude of the Hartmann number, or the wall conductivity. The wall functions are used for defining implicit boundary conditions for velocity and electric potential, and for computing mass flow and electrical currents in near wall-cells. The wall function treatment was validated in a finite volume formulation, and compared with an analytic solution for a fully developed channel flow in a transverse magnetic field. For the case with insulating walls, a uniform 20 x 20 grid, and Hartmann numbers Ha = [10,30,100], the accuracy of pressure drop and wall shear stress predictions was [1.1%,1.6%,0.5%], respectively. Com...

  18. Towards a model of large scale dynamics in transitional wall-bounded flows

    CERN Document Server

    Manneville, Paul

    2015-01-01

    A system of simplified equations is proposed to govern the feedback interactions of large-scale flows present in laminar-turbulent patterns of transitional wall-bounded flows, with small-scale Reynolds stresses generated by the self-sustainment process of turbulence itself modeled using an extension of Waleffe's approach (Phys. Fluids 9 (1997) 883-900), the detailed expression of which is displayed as an annex to the main text.

  19. Intermittent flow in yield-stress fluids slows down chaotic mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendell, D M; Pigeonneau, F; Gouillart, E; Jop, P

    2013-08-01

    We present experimental results of chaotic mixing of Newtonian fluids and yield-stress fluids using a rod-stirring protocol with a rotating vessel. We show how the mixing of yield-stress fluids by chaotic advection is reduced compared to the mixing of Newtonian fluids and explain our results, bringing to light the relevant mechanisms: the presence of fluid that only flows intermittently, a phenomenon enhanced by the yield stress, and the importance of the peripheral region. This finding is confirmed via numerical simulations. Anomalously slow mixing is observed when the synchronization of different stirring elements leads to the repetition of slow stretching for the same fluid particles.

  20. Progress in modeling of fluid flows in crystal growth processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qisheng Chen; Yanni Jiang; Junyi Yan; Ming Qin

    2008-01-01

    Modeling of fluid flows in crystal growth processes has become an important research area in theoretical and applied mechanics.Most crystal growth processes involve fluid flows,such as flows in the melt,solution or vapor.Theoretical modeling has played an important role in developing technologies used for growing semiconductor crystals for high performance electronic and optoelectronic devices.The application of devices requires large diameter crystals with a high degree of crystallographic perfection,low defect density and uniform dopant distribution.In this article,the flow models developed in modeling of the crystal growth processes such as Czochralski,ammono-thermal and physical vapor transport methods are reviewed.In the Czochralski growth modeling,the flow models for thermocapillary flow,turbulent flow and MHD flow have been developed.In the ammonothermal growth modeling,the buoyancy and porous media flow models have been developed based on a single-domain and continuum approach for the composite fluid-porous layer systems.In the physical vapor transport growth modeling,the Stefan flow model has been proposed based on the flow-kinetics theory for the vapor growth.In addition,perspectives for future studies on crystal growth modeling are proposed.

  1. Dynamics of Star Polymers in Fast Extensional Flow and Stress Relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Agostini, Serena; Hengeller, Ludovica;

    2016-01-01

    We confirm the observation from Ianniruberto and Marrucci [ Macromolecules 2013, 46, 267-275 ] that entangled melts of branched polystyrenes behave like linear polystyrenes in the steady state of fast extensional flow, by measuring a linear, an asymmetric star, and a symmetric star polystyrene...... with the same span molecular weight (180 kg/mol). We show that all three melts reach the same extensional steady-state viscosity in fast extensional flow (faster than the inverse Rouse time). We further measure stress relaxation following steady extensional flow for the three melts. We show that initially...

  2. Fluid structure interaction of patient specific abdominal aortic aneurysms: a comparison with solid stress models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thom Simon A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA is a dilatation of the aortic wall, which can rupture, if left untreated. Previous work has shown that, maximum diameter is not a reliable determinant of AAA rupture. However, it is currently the most widely accepted indicator. Wall stress may be a better indicator and promising patient specific results from structural models using static pressure, have been published. Since flow and pressure inside AAA are non-uniform, the dynamic interaction between the pulsatile flow and wall may influence the predicted wall stress. The purpose of the present study was to compare static and dynamic wall stress analysis of patient specific AAAs. Method Patient-specific AAA models were created from CT scans of three patients. Two simulations were performed on each lumen model, fluid structure interaction (FSI model and static structural (SS model. The AAA wall was created by dilating the lumen with a uniform 1.5 mm thickness, and was modeled as a non-linear hyperelastic material. Commercial finite element code Adina 8.2 was used for all simulations. The results were compared between the FSI and SS simulations. Results Results are presented for the wall stress patterns, wall shear stress patterns, pressure, and velocity fields within the lumen. It is demonstrated that including fluid flow can change local wall stresses slightly. However, as far as the peak wall stress is concerned, this effect is negligible as the difference between SS and FSI models is less than 1%. Conclusion The results suggest that fully coupled FSI simulation, which requires considerable computational power to run, adds little to rupture risk prediction. This justifies the use of SS models in previous studies.

  3. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  4. An improved turbulence model for separation flow in a centrifugal pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ren

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available For the stable and reliable operation of centrifugal pump, the transient flow must be studied and the separation region should be avoided. Three-dimensional, incompressible, steady, and transient flows in a centrifugal pump at specific speed within 74 were numerically studied using shear stress transport k-ω turbulence model, and an improved explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model–rotation-curvature turbulence model was proposed by considering the effects of rotation and curvature in the impeller passages in this work. Steady and transient computations were conducted to compare with the experiments. The comparison of pump hydraulic performance showed that the explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model–rotation-curvature turbulence model was better than the original model, especially between 0.6QBEP and 1.2QBEP; the improved model could enhance the head prediction of pump by about 1%–7% than that with the original model. Then, the visualization of the vortex evolution was observed to validate the unsteady simulations. Good agreement was investigated between calculations and visualizations. It is indicated that the explicit algebraic Reynolds stress model–rotation-curvature model can successfully capture the separation flow.

  5. A semiparametric approach to physiological flow models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verotta, D; Sheiner, L B; Ebling, W F; Stanski, D R

    1989-08-01

    By regarding sampled tissues in a physiological model as linear subsystems, the usual advantages of flow models are preserved while mitigating two of their disadvantages, (i) the need for assumptions regarding intratissue kinetics, and (ii) the need to simultaneously fit data from several tissues. To apply the linear systems approach, both arterial blood and (interesting) tissue drug concentrations must be measured. The body is modeled as having an arterial compartment (A) distributing drug to different linear subsystems (tissues), connected in a specific way by blood flow. The response (CA, with dimensions of concentration) of A is measured. Tissues receive input from A (and optionally from other tissues), and send output to the outside or to other parts of the body. The response (CT, total amount of drug in the tissue (T) divided by the volume of T) from the T-th one, for example, of such tissues is also observed. From linear systems theory, CT can be expressed as the convolution of CA with a disposition function, F(t) (with dimensions 1/time). The function F(t) depends on the (unknown) structure of T, but has certain other constant properties: The integral integral infinity0 F(t) dt is the steady state ratio of CT to CA, and the point F(0) is the clearance rate of drug from A to T divided by the volume of T. A formula for the clearance rate of drug from T to outside T can be derived. To estimate F(t) empirically, and thus mitigate disadvantage (i), we suggest that, first, a nonparametric (or parametric) function be fitted to CA data yielding predicted values, CA, and, second, the convolution integral of CA with F(t) be fitted to CT data using a deconvolution method. By so doing, each tissue's data are analyzed separately, thus mitigating disadvantage (ii). A method for system simulation is also proposed. The results of applying the approach to simulated data and to real thiopental data are reported.

  6. Modeling Fluid Flow in Faulted Basins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faille I.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a basin simulator designed to better take faults into account, either as conduits or as barriers to fluid flow. It computes hydrocarbon generation, fluid flow and heat transfer on the 4D (space and time geometry obtained by 3D volume restoration. Contrary to classical basin simulators, this calculator does not require a structured mesh based on vertical pillars nor a multi-block structure associated to the fault network. The mesh follows the sediments during the evolution of the basin. It deforms continuously with respect to time to account for sedimentation, erosion, compaction and kinematic displacements. The simulation domain is structured in layers, in order to handle properly the corresponding heterogeneities and to follow the sedimentation processes (thickening of the layers. In each layer, the mesh is unstructured: it may include several types of cells such as tetrahedra, hexahedra, pyramid, prism, etc. However, a mesh composed mainly of hexahedra is preferred as they are well suited to the layered structure of the basin. Faults are handled as internal boundaries across which the mesh is non-matching. Different models are proposed for fault behavior such as impervious fault, flow across fault or conductive fault. The calculator is based on a cell centered Finite Volume discretisation, which ensures conservation of physical quantities (mass of fluid, heat at a discrete level and which accounts properly for heterogeneities. The numerical scheme handles the non matching meshes and guaranties appropriate connection of cells across faults. Results on a synthetic basin demonstrate the capabilities of this new simulator.

  7. Non-linear hydrotectonic phenomena: Part I - fluid flow in open fractures under dynamical stress loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archambeau, C.B. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A fractured solid under stress loading (or unloading) can be viewed as behaving macroscopically as a medium with internal, hidden, degrees of freedom, wherein changes in fracture geometry (i.e. opening, closing and extension) and flow of fluid and gas within fractures will produce major changes in stresses and strains within the solid. Likewise, the flow process within fractures will be strongly coupled to deformation within the solid through boundary conditions on the fracture surfaces. The effects in the solid can, in part, be phenomenologically represented as inelastic or plastic processes in the macroscopic view. However, there are clearly phenomena associated with fracture growth and open fracture fluid flows that produce effects that can not be described using ordinary inelastic phenomenology. This is evident from the fact that a variety of energy release phenomena can occur, including seismic emissions of previously stored strain energy due to fracture growth, release of disolved gas from fluids in the fractures resulting in enhanced buoyancy and subsequent energetic flows of gas and fluids through the fracture system which can produce raid extension of old fractures and the creation of new ones. Additionally, the flows will be modulated by the opening and closing of fractures due to deformation in the solid, so that the flow process is strongly coupled to dynamical processes in the surrounding solid matrix, some of which are induced by the flow itself.

  8. Evaluation of a Filter-Based Model for Computations of Cavitating Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Biao; WANG Guo-Yu

    2011-01-01

    To identify ways to improve the predictive capability of the current RANS-based cavitating turbulent closure,a filter-based model (FBM) is introduced by considering sub-filter stresses. The sub-filter stress is constructed directly by using the filter size and the conventional turbulence closure. The model is evaluated in steady cavitating flow over a blunt body revolution and unsteady cavitating flow around a Clark-Y hydrofoil respectively.Compared with the experimental data, those results indicate that FBM can be used to improve the predictive capability considerably.%@@ To identify ways to improve the predictive capability of the current RANS-based cavitating turbulent closure, a filter-based model (FBM) is introduced by considering sub-filter stresses.The sub-filter stress is constructed directly by using the filter size and the conventional turbulence closure.The model is evaluated in steady cavitating flow over a blunt body revolution and unsteady cavitating flow around a Clark-Y hydrofoil respectively.Compared with the experimental data, those results indicate that FBM can be used to improve the predictive capability considerably.

  9. DETECTING FOREST STRESS AND DECLINE IN RESPONSE TO INCREASING RIVER FLOW IN SOUTHWEST FLORIDA, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest stress and decline resulting from increased river flows were investigated in Myakka River State Park (MRSP), Florida, USA. Since 1977, land-use changes around the upper Myakka River watershed have resulted in significant increases in water entering the river, which have...

  10. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  11. Stress and Damage Induced Gas Flow Pattern and Permeability Variation of Coal from Songzao Coalfield in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minghui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The permeability of coal is a critical parameter in estimating the performance of coal reservoirs. Darcy’s law describes the flow pattern that the permeability has a linear relationship with the flow velocity. However, the stress induced deformation and damage can significantly influence the gas flow pattern and permeability of coal. Coals from Songzao coalfield in Chongqing, southwest China were collected for the study. The gas flow velocities under different injection gas pressures and effective stresses in the intact coal and damaged coal were tested using helium, incorporating the role of gas flow pattern on the permeability of coal. The relationships between the flow velocity and square of gas pressure gradient were discussed, which can help us to investigate the transformation conditions of gas linear flow and gas nonlinear flow in the coal. The results showed that the gas flow in the intact coal existed pseudo-initial flow rate under low effective stress. The low-velocity non-Darcy gas flow gradually occurred and the start-up pressure gradient increased in the coal as the effective stress increased. The gas flow rate in the damaged coal increased nonlinearly as the square of pressure gradient increased under low effective stress. The instability of gas flow caused by high ratio of injection gas pressure over effective stress in the damaged coal contributed to the increase of the gas flow rate. As the effective stress increased, the increase of gas flow rate in coal turned to be linear. The mechanisms of the phenomena were explored according to the experimental results. The permeability of coal was corrected based on the relationships between the flow velocity and square of gas pressure gradient, which showed advantages in accurately estimating the performance of coal reservoirs.

  12. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghyeon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k − ε turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  13. Numerical investigation on cavitation flow of hydrofoil and its flow noise with emphasis on turbulence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyeon; Cheong, Cheolung; Park, Warn-Gyu

    2017-06-01

    In this study, cavitation flow of hydrofoils is numerically investigated to characterize the effects of turbulence models on cavitation-flow patterns and the corresponding radiated sound waves. The two distinct flow conditions are considered by varying the mean flow velocity and angle of attack, which are categorized under the experimentally observed unstable or stable cavitation flows. To consider the phase interchanges between the vapor and the liquid, the flow fields around the hydrofoil are analyzed by solving the unsteady compressible Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations coupled with a mass-transfer model, also referred to as the cavitation model. In the numerical solver, a preconditioning algorithm with dual-time stepping techniques is employed in generalized curvilinear coordinates. The following three types of turbulence models are employed: the laminar-flow model, standard k - ɛ turbulent model, and filter-based model. Hydro-acoustic field formed by the cavitation flow of the hydrofoil is predicted by applying the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation to the predicted flow field. From the predicted results, the effects of the turbulences on the cavitation flow pattern and radiated flow noise are quantitatively assessed in terms of the void fraction, sound-pressure-propagation directivities, and spectrum.

  14. Linear surface roughness growth and flow smoothening in a three-dimensional biofilm model

    CERN Document Server

    Head, D A

    2013-01-01

    The sessile microbial communities known as biofilms exhibit different surface structures as environmental factors are varied, including nutrient availability and flow-generated shear stresses. Here we modify an established agent-based biofilm model to include adhesive interactions, permitting it to mechanically react to an imposed stress. This model is employed to analyse the growth of surface roughness of single-species, three-dimensional biofilms. We find linear growth laws of surface geometry in both horizontal and vertical directions, and an active surface layer whose thickness anti-correlates with roughness. Flow is consistently shown to reduce surface roughness without affecting the active layer. We argue that the rapid roughening is due to non-local surface interactions mediated by the nutrient field which are curtailed by sufficiently rapid flows, and suggest simplified models will need to be developed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  15. Modeling and Design of Semi-Solid Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunini, Victor Eric

    A three-dimensional dynamic model of the recently introduced semi-solid flow battery system is developed and applied to address issues with important design and operation implications. Because of the high viscosity of semi-solid flow battery suspensions, alternative modes of operation not typically used in conventional redox flow battery systems must be explored to reduce pumping energy losses. Modeling results are presented .and compared to experimental observations to address important considerations for both stoichiometric and intermittent flow operation. The importance of active material selection, and its impact on efficient stoichiometric flow operation is discussed. Electrochemically active zone considerations relevant to intermittent flow operation of semi-solid flow batteries (or other potential electronically conductive flow battery systems) are addressed. Finally, the use of the model as a design tool for optimizing flow channel design to improve system level performance is demonstrated.(Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs@mit.edu)

  16. Modelling cavitating flow around underwater missiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Petitpas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse interface model of Saurel et al. (2008 is used for the computation of compressible cavitating flows around underwater missiles. Such systems use gas injection and natural cavitation to reduce drag effects. Consequently material interfaces appear separating liquid and gas. These interfaces may have a really complex dynamics such that only a few formulations are able to predict their evolution. Contrarily to front tracking or interface reconstruction method the interfaces are computed as diffused numerical zones, that are captured in a routinely manner, as is done usually with gas dynamics solvers for shocks and contact discontinuity. With the present approach, a single set of partial differential equations is solved everywhere, with a single numerical scheme. This leads to very efficient solvers. The algorithm derived in Saurel et al. (2009 is used to compute cavitation pockets around solid bodies. It is first validated against experiments done in cavitation tunnel at CNU. Then it is used to compute flows around high speed underwater systems (Shkval-like missile. Performance data are then computed showing method ability to predict forces acting on the system.

  17. Hybrid turbulence models for atmospheric flow: A proper comparison with RANS models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bautista Mary C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A compromise between the required accuracy and the need for affordable simulations for the wind industry might be achieved with the use of hybrid turbulence models. Detached-Eddy Simulation (DES [1] is a hybrid technique that yields accurate results only if it is used according to its original formulation [2]. Due to its particular characteristics (i.e., the type of mesh required, the modeling of the atmospheric flow might always fall outside the original scope of DES. An enhanced version of DES called Simplify Improved Delayed Detached-Eddy Simulation (SIDDES [3] can overcome this and other disadvantages of DES. In this work the neutrally stratified atmospheric flow over a flat terrain with homogeneous roughness will be analyzed using a Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS model called k – ω SST (shear stress transport [4], and the hybrids k – ω SST-DES and k – ω SST-SIDDES models. An obvious test is to validate these hybrid approaches and asses their advantages and disadvantages over the pure RANS model. However, for several reasons the technique to drive the atmospheric flow is generally different for RANS and LES or hybrid models. The flow in a RANS simulation is usually driven by a constant shear stress imposed at the top boundary [5], therefore modeling only the atmospheric surface layer. On the contrary the LES and hybrid simulations are usually driven by a constant pressure gradient, thus a whole atmospheric boundary layer is simulated. Rigorously, this represents two different simulated cases making the model comparison not trivial. Nevertheless, both atmospheric flow cases are studied with the mentioned models. The results prove that a simple comparison of the time average turbulent quantities obtained by RANS and hybrid simulations is not easily achieved. The RANS simulations yield consistent results for the atmospheric surface layer case, while the hybrid model results are not correct. As for the atmospheric boundary

  18. Vascular wall shear stress in zebrafish model of early atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woorak; Seo, Eunseok; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-11-01

    Although atherosclerosis is a multifactorial disease, the role of hemodynamic force has strong influence on the outbreak of the disease. Low and oscillating wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with the incidence of atherosclerosis. Many researchers have investigated relationships between WSS and the occurrence of atherosclerosis using in vitro and in vivo models. However, these models possess technological limitations in mimicking real biophysiological conditions and monitoring the temporal progression of atherosclerosis. In this study, a hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model was established as a novel model to resolve these technical limitations. WSS in blood vessels of 15 days post-fertilisation zebrafish was measured using a micro PIV technique, and the spatial distribution of lipids inside blood vessels was quantitatively visualized using a confocal microscopy. As a result, lipids are mainly deposited in the regions of low WSS. The oscillating WSS is not induced by blood flows in the zebrafish disease model. The present hypercholesterolaemic zebrafish model would be useful for understanding the effect of WSS on the early stage of atherosclerosis. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) under a Grant funded by the Korean government (MSIP) (No. 2008-0061991).

  19. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  20. Simulation of platelets suspension flowing through a stenosis model using a dissipative particle dynamics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Joao S; Gao, Chao; Alemu, Yared; Slepian, Marvin; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-11-01

    Stresses on blood cellular constituents induced by blood flow can be represented by a continuum approach down to the μm level; however, the molecular mechanisms of thrombosis and platelet activation and aggregation are on the order of nm. The coupling of the disparate length and time scales between molecular and macroscopic transport phenomena represents a major computational challenge. In order to bridge the gap between macroscopic flow scales and the cellular scales with the goal of depicting and predicting flow induced thrombogenicity, multi-scale approaches based on particle methods are better suited. We present a top-scale model to describe bulk flow of platelet suspensions: we employ dissipative particle dynamics to model viscous flow dynamics and present a novel and general no-slip boundary condition that allows the description of three-dimensional viscous flows through complex geometries. Dissipative phenomena associated with boundary layers and recirculation zones are observed and favorably compared to benchmark viscous flow solutions (Poiseuille and Couette flows). Platelets in suspension, modeled as coarse-grained finite-sized ensembles of bound particles constituting an enclosed deformable membrane with flat ellipsoid shape, show self-orbiting motions in shear flows consistent with Jeffery's orbits, and are transported with the flow, flipping and colliding with the walls and interacting with other platelets.

  1. Optimal bounds with semidefinite programming: An application to stress-driven shear flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantuzzi, G; Wynn, A

    2016-04-01

    We introduce an innovative numerical technique based on convex optimization to solve a range of infinite-dimensional variational problems arising from the application of the background method to fluid flows. In contrast to most existing schemes, we do not consider the Euler-Lagrange equations for the minimizer. Instead, we use series expansions to formulate a finite-dimensional semidefinite program (SDP) whose solution converges to that of the original variational problem. Our formulation accounts for the influence of all modes in the expansion, and the feasible set of the SDP corresponds to a subset of the feasible set of the original problem. Moreover, SDPs can be easily formulated when the fluid is subject to imposed boundary fluxes, which pose a challenge for the traditional methods. We apply this technique to compute rigorous and near-optimal upper bounds on the dissipation coefficient for flows driven by a surface stress. We improve previous analytical bounds by more than 10 times and show that the bounds become independent of the domain aspect ratio in the limit of vanishing viscosity. We also confirm that the dissipation properties of stress-driven flows are similar to those of flows subject to a body force localized in a narrow layer near the surface. Finally, we show that SDP relaxations are an efficient method to investigate the energy stability of laminar flows driven by a surface stress.

  2. Constitutive Equations and ANN Approach to Predict the Flow Stress of Ti-6Al-4V Alloy Based on ABI Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuzeng; Zhao, Jun; Zhu, Ningbo

    2016-09-01

    The flow behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy was studied by automated ball indentation (ABI) tests in a wide range of temperatures (293, 493, 693, and 873 K) and strain rates (10-6, 10-5, and 10-4 s-1). Based on the experimental true stress-plastic strain data derived from the ABI tests, the Johnson-Cook (JC), Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) and modified Zerilli-Armstrong (ZA) constitutive models, as well as artificial neural network (ANN) methods, were employed to predict the flow behavior of Ti-6Al-4V. A comparative study was made on the reliability of the four models, and their predictability was evaluated in terms of correlation coefficient (R) and mean absolute percentage error. It is found that the flow stresses of Ti-6Al-4V alloy are more sensitive to temperature than strain rate under current experimental conditions. The predicted flow stresses obtained from JC model and KHL model show much better agreement with the experimental results than modified ZA model. Moreover, the ANN model is much more efficient and shows a higher accuracy in predicting the flow behavior of Ti-6Al-4V alloy than the constitutive equations.

  3. Effects of flow-induced shear stress on limbal epithelial stem cell growth and enrichment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gyeong Kang

    Full Text Available The roles of limbal epithelial stem cells (LESCs are widely recognized, but for these cells to be utilized in basic research and potential clinical applications, researchers must be able to efficiently isolate them and subsequently maintain their stemness in vitro. We aimed to develop a biomimetic environment for LESCs involving cells from their in vivo niche and the principle of flow-induced shear stress, and to subsequently demonstrate the potential of this novel paradigm. LESCs, together with neighboring cells, were isolated from the minced limbal tissues of rabbits. At days 8 and 9 of culture, the cells were exposed to a steady flow or intermittent flow for 2 h per day in a custom-designed bioreactor. The responses of LESCs and epithelial cells were assessed at days 12 and 14. LESCs and epithelial cells responded to both types of flow. Proliferation of LESCs, as assessed using a BrdU assay, was increased to a greater extent under steady flow conditions. Holoclones were found under intermittent flow, indicating that differentiation into transient amplifying cells had occurred. Immunofluorescent staining of Bmi-1 suggested that steady flow has a positive effect on the maintenance of stemness. This finding was confirmed by real-time PCR. Notch-1 and p63 were more sensitive to intermittent flow, but this effect was transient. K3 and K12 expression, indicative of differentiation of LESCs into epithelial cells, was induced by flow and lasted longer under intermittent flow conditions. In summary, culture of LESCs in a bioreactor under a steady flow paradigm, rather than one of intermittent flow, is beneficial for both increasing proliferation and maintaining stemness. Conversely, intermittent flow appears to induce differentiation of LESCs. This novel experimental method introduces micro-mechanical stimuli to traditional culture techniques, and has potential for regulating the proliferation and differentiation of LESCs in vitro, thereby

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Electrolyte Flow Dynamic Patterns and Volumetric Flow Penetrations in the Flow Channel over Porous Electrode Layered System in Vanadium Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Field Design

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Xinyou; Prahl, Joseph M.; Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Savinell, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional mathematical model is developed to study the flow patterns and volumetric flow penetrations in the flow channel over the porous electrode layered system in vanadium flow battery with serpentine flow field design. The flow distributions at the interface between the flow channel and porous electrode are examined. It is found that the non-linear pressure distributions can distinguish the interface flow distributions under the ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic fl...

  5. A Fractional-Flow Based Compressible Multiphase Flow Model with Newly Proposed Constitutive Retentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C.; Yeh, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this investigation, newly proposed constitutive retentions are implemented to a fractional-flow based compressible multiphase-phase flow model. With the new model, a compressible three-phase (water, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) and air) flow problem is simulated. In fractional-flow approaches, the three mass balance equations written in terms of three phase pressures are transformed to those in terms of the total pressure, saturation of water, and saturation of total liquid. These three governing equations are discretized with the Galerkin finite element method (FEM). The resulted matrix equation is solved with Bi-CGSTAB. Several numerical experiments are presented to examine the accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. The results show the presented fractional-flow based multiphase flow model is feasible and yields physically realistic solutions for compressible three-phase flow problems in porous media.

  6. Modeling Flows Around Merging Black Hole Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Coalescing massive black hole binaries are produced by the merger of galaxies. The final stages of the black hole coalescence produce strong gravitational radiation that can be detected by the space-borne LISA. In cases in which the black hole merger takes place in the presence of gas and magnetic fields, various types of electromagnetic signals may also be produced. Modeling such electromagnetic counterparts of the final merger requires evolving the behavior of both gas and fields in the strong-field regions around the black holes. We have taken a first step towards this problem by mapping the flow of pressureless matter in the dynamic, 3-D general relativistic spacetime around the merging black holes. We report on the results of these initial simulations and discuss their likely importance for future hydrodynamical simulations.

  7. Water Modeling of Optimizing Tundish Flow Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jin-gang; YAN Hui-cheng; LIU Liu; WANG Xin-hua

    2007-01-01

    In the water modeling experiments, three cases were considered, i.e. , a bare tundish, a tundish equipped with a turbulence inhibitor, and a rectangular tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor. Comparing the RTD curves, inclusion separation, and the result of the streamline experiment, it can be found that the tundish equipped with weirs (dams) and a turbulence inhibitor has a great effect on the flow field and the inclusion separation when compared with the sole use or no use of the turbulent inhibitor or weirs (dams). In addition, the enlargement of the distance between the weir and dam will result in a better effect when the tundish equipped with weirs (dam) and a turbulence inhibitor was used.

  8. Modeling the thermally governed transient flow surges in multitube condensing flow systems with thermal and flow distribution asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedekind, G.L.; Bhatt, B.L. (Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (United States))

    1989-08-01

    In a tube-type condenser involving complete condensation, small changes in the inlet vapor flow rate momentarily cause very large transient surges in the outlet liquid flow rate. An equivalent single-tube model is proposed that predicts these transient flow surges for a multitube system. The model, based upon a system mean void fraction model developed earlier, includes the effects of thermal and flow distribution asymmetry associated with each individual condenser tube in the multitube system. Theoretical and experimental verification for a two-tube system is presented.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Electrolyte Flow Dynamic Patterns and Volumetric Flow Penetrations in the Flow Channel over Porous Electrode Layered System in Vanadium Flow Battery with Serpentine Flow Field Design

    CERN Document Server

    Ke, Xinyou; Alexander, J Iwan D; Savinell, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional mathematical model is developed to study the flow patterns and volumetric flow penetrations in the flow channel over the porous electrode layered system in vanadium flow battery with serpentine flow field design. The flow distributions at the interface between the flow channel and porous electrode are examined. It is found that the non-linear pressure distributions can distinguish the interface flow distributions under the ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic flow inlet boundary conditions. However, the volumetric flow penetration within the porous electrode beneath the flow channel through the integration of interface flow velocity reveals that this value is identical under both ideal plug flow and ideal parabolic flow inlet boundary conditions. The volumetric flow penetrations under the advection effects of flow channel and landing/rib are estimated. The maximum current density achieved in the flow battery can be predicted based on the 100% amount of electrolyte flow reactant ...

  10. Laser Doppler anemometer measurements of pulsatile flow in a model carotid bifurcation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, D N; Giddens, D P

    1987-01-01

    Hemodynamics at the human carotid bifurcation is important to the understanding of atherosclerotic plaque initiation and progression as well as to the diagnosis of clinically important disease. Laser Doppler anemometry was performed in a large scale model of an average human carotid. Pulsatile waveforms and physiologic flow divisions were incorporated. Disturbance levels and shear stresses were computed from ensemble averages of the velocity waveform measurements. Flow in the common carotid was laminar and symmetric. Flow patterns in the sinus, however, were complex and varied considerably during the cycle. Strong helical patterns and outer wall flow separation waxed and waned during each systole. The changing flow patterns resulted in an oscillatory shear stress at the outer wall ranging from -13 to 9 dyn cm-2 during systole with a time-averaged mean of only -0.5 dyn cm-2. This contrasts markedly with an inner wall shear stress range of 17-50, (mean 26) dyn cm-2. The region of transient separation was confined to the carotid sinus outer wall with no reverse velocities detected in the distal internal carotid. Notable disturbance velocities were also time-dependent, occurring only during the deceleration phase of systole and the beginning of diastole. The present pulsatile flow studies have aided in identifying hemodynamic conditions which correlate with early intimal thickening and predict the physiologic level of flow disturbances in the bulb of undiseased internal carotid arteries.

  11. Modeling radial flow ion exchange performance for condensate polisher conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shallcross, D. [University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Department of Chemical Engineering; Renouf, P.

    2001-11-01

    A theoretical model is developed which simulates ion exchange performance within an annular resin bed. Flow within the mixed ion exchange bed is diverging, with the solution flowing outwards away from the bed's axis. The model is used to simulate performance of a mixed annular bed operating under condensate polisher conditions. The simulation predictions are used to develop design envelope curves for practical radial flow beds and to estimate potential cost savings flowing from less expensive polisher vessels. (orig.)

  12. Comparative study of hybrid RANS-LES models for separated flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, G.; Lakshmanan, S. K.; Gopalan, H.; De, A.

    2016-06-01

    Hybrid RANS-LES models are proven to be capable of predicting massively separated flows with reasonable computation cost. In this paper, Spalart-Allmaras (S-A) based detached eddy simulation (DES) model and three SST based hybrid models with different RANS to LES switching criteriaare investigated. The flow over periodic hill at Re = 10,595 is chosen as the benchmark for comparing the performance of the different models due to the complex flow physics and reasonablecomputational cost. The model performances are evaluated based on their prediction capabilities of velocity and stress profiles, and separation and reattachment point. The simulated results are validatedagainst experimental and numerical results available in literature. The S-A DES model predicted separation bubble accurately at the top of the hill, as reported earlier in experiments and other numerical results. This model also correctly predicted velocity and stress profiles in recirculation region. However, the performance of this model was poor in the post reattachment region. On the other hand, the k-ω SST based hybrid models performed poorly in recirculation region, but it fairly predicted stress profiles in post reattachment region.

  13. Expanding stress generation theory: test of a transdiagnostic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher C; Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A

    2012-08-01

    Originally formulated to understand the recurrence of depressive disorders, the stress generation hypothesis has recently been applied in research on anxiety and externalizing disorders. Results from these investigations, in combination with findings of extensive comorbidity between depression and other mental disorders, suggest the need for an expansion of stress generation models to include the stress generating effects of transdiagnostic pathology as well as those of specific syndromes. Employing latent variable modeling techniques to parse the general and specific elements of commonly co-occurring Axis I syndromes, the current study examined the associations of transdiagnostic internalizing and externalizing dimensions with stressful life events over time. Analyses revealed that, after adjusting for the covariation between the dimensions, internalizing was a significant predictor of interpersonal dependent stress, whereas externalizing was a significant predictor of noninterpersonal dependent stress. Neither latent dimension was associated with the occurrence of independent, or fateful, stressful life events. At the syndrome level, once variance due to the internalizing factor was partialed out, unipolar depression contributed incrementally to the generation of interpersonal dependent stress. In contrast, the presence of panic disorder produced a "stress inhibition" effect, predicting reduced exposure to interpersonal dependent stress. Additionally, dysthymia was associated with an excess of noninterpersonal dependent stress. The latent variable modeling framework used here is discussed in terms of its potential as an integrative model for stress generation research.

  14. Stress, glucocorticoids and absences in a genetic epilepsy model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tolmacheva, E.A.; Oitzl, M.S.; Luijtelaar, E.L.J.M. van

    2012-01-01

    Although stress can alter the susceptibility of patients and animal models to convulsive epilepsy, little is known about the role of stress and glucocorticoid hormones in absence epilepsy. We measured the basal and acute stress-induced (foot-shocks: FS) concentrations of corticosterone in WAG/Rij ra

  15. The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

  16. The Culture-Work-Health Model and Work Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael; Wilson, John F.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the role of organizational culture in the etiology of workplace stress through the framework of the Culture-Work- Health model. A review of relevant business and health literature indicates that culture is an important component of work stress and may be a key to creating effective organizational stress interventions. (SM)

  17. A dynamic model of stress and sustained attention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Peter A.; Warm, Joel S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of stress on sustained attention. With recognition of the task itself as the major source of cognitive stress, a dynamic model is presented that addresses the effects of stress on vigilance and, potentially, a wide variety of attention performance tasks.

  18. Documentation for the MODFLOW 6 Groundwater Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Banta, Edward R.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Panday, Sorab; Provost, Alden M.

    2017-08-10

    This report documents the Groundwater Flow (GWF) Model for a new version of MODFLOW called MODFLOW 6. The GWF Model for MODFLOW 6 is based on a generalized control-volume finite-difference approach in which a cell can be hydraulically connected to any number of surrounding cells. Users can define the model grid using one of three discretization packages, including (1) a structured discretization package for defining regular MODFLOW grids consisting of layers, rows, and columns, (2) a discretization by ver­tices package for defining layered unstructured grids consisting of layers and cells, and (3) a general unstruc­tured discretization package for defining flexible grids comprised of cells and their connection properties. For layered grids, a new capability is available for removing thin cells and vertically connecting cells overlying and underlying the thin cells. For complex problems involving water-table conditions, an optional Newton-Raphson formulation, based on the formulations in MODFLOW-NWT and MODFLOW-USG, can be acti­vated. Use of the Newton-Raphson formulation will often improve model convergence and allow solutions to be obtained for difficult problems that cannot be solved using the traditional wetting and drying approach. The GWF Model is divided into “packages,” as was done in previous MODFLOW versions. A package is the part of the model that deals with a single aspect of simulation. Packages included with the GWF Model include those related to internal calculations of groundwater flow (discretization, initial conditions, hydraulic conduc­tance, and storage), stress packages (constant heads, wells, recharge, rivers, general head boundaries, drains, and evapotranspiration), and advanced stress packages (streamflow routing, lakes, multi-aquifer wells, and unsaturated zone flow). An additional package is also available for moving water available in one package into the individual features of the advanced stress packages. The GWF Model

  19. Neotectonic stresses in Fennoscandia: field observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    The present-day stress state of Fennoscandia is traditionally viewed as the combination of far field sources and residual glacial loading stresses. Investigations were conducted in different regions of Norway with the purpose of detecting and measuring stress-relief features and to derive from them valuable information on the crustal stress state. Stress-relief features are induced by blasting and sudden rock unloading in road construction and quarrying operations and are common in Norway and very likely in other regions of Fennoscandia. Stress relief at the Earth's surface is diagnostic of anomalously high stress levels at shallow depths in the crust and appears to be a characteristic of the formerly glaciated Baltic and Canadian Precambrian shields. The studied stress-relief features are, in general, indicative of NW-SE compression, suggesting ridge-push as the main source of stress. Our derived stress directions are also in excellent agreement with the ones derived from other kinds of stress indicators, including focal mechanisms from deep earthquakes, demonstrating that stress-relief features are valuable for neotectonic research. As a second step we applied numerical modelling techniques to simulate the neotectonic stress field in Fennoscandia with particular emphasis to southern Norway. A numerical method was used to reconstruct the structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere. The numerical method involves classical steady-state heat equations to derive lithosphere thickness, geotherm and density distribution and, in addition, requires the studied lithosphere to be isostatically compensated at its base. The a priori crustal structure was derived from previous geophysical studies. Undulations of the geoid were used to calibrate the models. Once the density structure of the Fennoscandian lithosphere is reconstructed it is straightforward to quantify its stress state and compare modelling results with existing stress indicators. The modelling suggests that

  20. Nonlinear flow model for well production in an underground formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Guo

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fluid flow in underground formations is a nonlinear process. In this article we modelled the nonlinear transient flow behaviour of well production in an underground formation. Based on Darcy's law and material balance equations, we used quadratic pressure gradients to deduce diffusion equations and discuss the origins of nonlinear flow issues. By introducing an effective-well-radius approach that considers skin factor, we established a nonlinear flow model for both gas and liquid (oil or water. The liquid flow model was solved using a semi-analytical method, while the gas flow model was solved using numerical simulations because the diffusion equation of gas flow is a stealth function of pressure. For liquid flow, a series of standard log-log type curves of pressure transients were plotted and nonlinear transient flow characteristics were analyzed. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were used to compare the solutions of the linear and nonlinear models. The effect of nonlinearity upon pressure transients should not be ignored. For gas flow, pressure transients were simulated and compared with oil flow under the same formation and well conditions, resulting in the conclusion that, under the same volume rate production, oil wells demand larger pressure drops than gas wells. Comparisons between theoretical data and field data show that nonlinear models will describe fluid flow in underground formations realistically and accurately.

  1. Assessment of pulsatile wall shear stress in compliant arteries: numerical model, validation and experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, Fernando P; Perazzo, Carlos A; Barra, Juan G; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2009-01-01

    There is evidence that wall shear stress (WSS) is associated with vascular disease. In particular, it is widely accepted that vascular segments with low or oscillatory values of WSS are more probable to develop vascular disease. It is then necessary to establish a realistic model of the blood flow in blood vessels in order to determine precisely WSS. We proposed a numerical 1D model which takes into account the pulsatile nature of blood flow, the elasticity of the vessel, and its geometry. The model allows the calculation of shear stress. It was validated for stationary situations. Then, we computed the time-dependent WSS distribution from experimental data in the sheep thoracic aorta. Results showed that mean WSS calculated through steady flow and rigid walls models is overestimated. Peak WSS values for pulsatile flow must be considered since they resulted to be at least one order higher than mean values. Oscillations in shear stress in a period showed to be approximately of 40%. These findings show that the proposed model is suitable for estimating time-dependent WSS distributions, and confirm the need of using this kind of model when trying to evaluate realistic WSS in blood vessels.

  2. THREE DIMENSIONAL NUMERICAL MODELLING OF FLOW AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN RIVERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The 3D numerical model, ECOMSED (open source code), was used to simulate flow and sediment transport in rivers. The model has a long history of successful applications to oceanic, coastal and estuarine waters. Improvements in the advection scheme, treatment of river roughness parameterization and shear stress partitioning were necessary to reproduce realistic and comparable results in a river application. To account for the dynamics of the mobile bed boundary, a model for the bed load transport was included in the code. The model reproduced observed secondary currents,bed shear stress distribution and erosion-deposition patterns on a curved channel. The model also successfully predicted the general flow patterns and sediment transport characteristics ora l-km long reach of the River Klar(a)lven, located in the north of the county of V(a)rmland, Sweden.

  3. Universal and non-universal features in coarse-grained models of flow in disordered solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Alexandre; Martens, Kirsten; Bocquet, Lydéric; Barrat, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-14

    We study the two-dimensional (2D) shear flow of amorphous solids within variants of an elastoplastic model, paying particular attention to spatial correlations and time fluctuations of, e.g., local stresses. The model is based on the local alternation between an elastic regime and plastic events during which the local stress is redistributed. The importance of a fully tensorial description of the stress and of the inclusion of (coarse-grained) convection in the model is investigated; scalar and tensorial models yield similar results, while convection enhances fluctuations and breaks the spurious symmetry between the flow and velocity gradient directions, for instance when shear localisation is observed. Besides, correlation lengths measured with diverse protocols are discussed. One class of such correlation lengths simply scale with the spacing between homogeneously distributed, simultaneous plastic events. This leads to a scaling of the correlation length with the shear rate as γ̇(-1/2) in 2D in the athermal regime, regardless of the details of the model. The radius of the cooperative disk, defined as the near-field region in which plastic events induce a stress redistribution that is not amenable to a mean-field treatment, notably follows this scaling. On the other hand, the cooperative volume measured from the four-point stress susceptibility and its dependence on the system size and the shear rate are model-dependent.

  4. Regional Flow Simulation in Fractured Aquifers Using Stress-Dependent Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Preisig, G; Perrochet, P

    2011-01-01

    A model function relating effective stress to fracture permeability is developed from Hooke's law, implemented in the tensorial form of Darcy's law, and used to evaluate discharge rates and pressure distributions at regional scales. The model takes into account elastic and statistical fracture parameters, and is able to simulate real stress-dependent permeabilities from laboratory to field studies. This modeling approach gains in phenomenology in comparison to the classical ones because the permeability tensors may vary in both strength and principal directions according to effective stresses. Moreover this method allows evaluation of the fracture porosity changes, which are then translated into consolidation of the medium.

  5. Soil Compressibility Models for a Wide Stress Range

    KAUST Repository

    Chong, Song-Hun

    2016-03-03

    Soil compressibility models with physically correct asymptotic void ratios are required to analyze situations that involve a wide stress range. Previously suggested models and other functions are adapted to satisfy asymptotic void ratios at low and high stress levels; all updated models involve four parameters. Compiled consolidation data for remolded and natural clays are used to test the models and to develop correlations between model parameters and index properties. Models can adequately fit soil compression data for a wide range of stresses and soil types; in particular, models that involve the power of the stress σ\\'β display higher flexibility to capture the brittle response of some natural soils. The use of a single continuous function avoids numerical discontinuities or the need for ad hoc procedures to determine the yield stress. The tangent stiffness-readily computed for all models-should not be mistaken for the small-strain constant-fabric stiffness. © 2016 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  6. Fluid Flow Modeling of Arc Plasma and Bath Circulation in DC Electric Arc Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng-hua; JIN Zhi-jian; ZHU Zi-shu

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the flow field, heat transfer and the electromagnetic phenomenon in a DC electric arc furnace has been developed. First the governing equations in the arc plasma region are solved and the calculated results of heat transfer, current density and shear stresses on the anode surface are used as boundary conditions in a model of molten bath. Then a two-dimensional time-dependent model is used to describe the flow field and electromagnetic phenomenon in the molten bath. Moreover, the effect of bottom electrode diameter on the circulation of molten bath is studied.

  7. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  8. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  9. Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow

  10. Coupled model of deformation and gas flow process with temperature and slippage effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, slippage effect and effective stress of coal on the coupled mechanism of deformation and gas glow are key issues to control coal and gas outburst and design the methane recovery engineering. Firstly, intact coal from Huaxing mine in Jilin Province is crushed and coal briquette specimen are made. Then the tri-axial coupled test setup of the deformation, gas flow and temperature developed by ourselves is adopted to investigate the effects of pore pressure, effective stress and temperature on the permeability of coal briquette specimen. The results show that: 1 Under the condition of low pore pressure, the permeability first reduces with pore pressure increasing, then at a threshold of pore pressure it rises with pore pressure increasing, which is called “slippage effect”. 2 The effective confining stress significantly influences the permeability. With increasing effective confining stress, the space of pores and cracks are compressed and the permeability reduces. 3 The temperature significantly influences the permeability and the permeability decreases with temperature increasing. The main reason is that the space of pores and cracks is compressed due to the temperature stress. Because of the constraint around, temperature compressive stress appears in internal coal samples. Coal pore and fracture space is compressed, and the sample permeability decreases. Besides, the viscosity of gas increases with temperature increasing. It decreases the trend of coal permeability . The temperature influence on coal permeability approximates to linear relationship. 4 The empirical permeability evolution equation with varying temperature, effective stress and slippage effects is presented. The coal is viewed as elastic medium, combined with effective stress principle and the empirical permeability equation, the coupled model of deformation and gas flow with varying temperature and slippage effects is built. Furthermore, the code

  11. Modeling of the blood rheology in steady-state shear flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolidis, Alex J.; Beris, Antony N., E-mail: beris@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    We undertake here a systematic study of the rheology of blood in steady-state shear flows. As blood is a complex fluid, the first question that we try to answer is whether, even in steady-state shear flows, we can model it as a rheologically simple fluid, i.e., we can describe its behavior through a constitutive model that involves only local kinematic quantities. Having answered that question positively, we then probe as to which non-Newtonian model best fits available shear stress vs shear-rate literature data. We show that under physiological conditions blood is typically viscoplastic, i.e., it exhibits a yield stress that acts as a minimum threshold for flow. We further show that the Casson model emerges naturally as the best approximation, at least for low and moderate shear-rates. We then develop systematically a parametric dependence of the rheological parameters entering the Casson model on key physiological quantities, such as the red blood cell volume fraction (hematocrit). For the yield stress, we base our description on its critical, percolation-originated nature. Thus, we first determine onset conditions, i.e., the critical threshold value that the hematocrit has to have in order for yield stress to appear. It is shown that this is a function of the concentration of a key red blood cell binding protein, fibrinogen. Then, we establish a parametric dependence as a function of the fibrinogen and the square of the difference of the hematocrit from its critical onset value. Similarly, we provide an expression for the Casson viscosity, in terms of the hematocrit and the temperature. A successful validation of the proposed formula is performed against additional experimental literature data. The proposed expression is anticipated to be useful not only for steady-state blood flow modeling but also as providing the starting point for transient shear, or more general flow modeling.

  12. A dynamic subgrid-scale model for the large eddy simulation of stratified flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘宁宇; 陆夕云; 庄礼贤

    2000-01-01

    A new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model, including subgrid turbulent stress and heat flux models for stratified shear flow is proposed by using Yoshizawa’ s eddy viscosity model as a base model. Based on our calculated results, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed here is effective for the large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent channel flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the large eddy simulation of stratified turbulent channel flow under gravity to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the near-wall turbulent statistics and the turbulent heat transfer at different Richardson numbers. The critical Richardson number predicted by the present calculation is in good agreement with the value of theoretical analysis.

  13. A dynamic subgrid-scale model for the large eddy simulation of stratified flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new dynamic subgrid-scale (SGS) model, including subgrid turbulent stress and heat flux models for stratified shear flow is proposed by using Yoshizawa's eddy viscosity model as a base model. Based on our calculated results, the dynamic subgrid-scale model developed here is effective for the large eddy simulation (LES) of stratified turbulent channel flows. The new SGS model is then applied to the large eddy simulation of stratified turbulent channel flow under gravity to investigate the coupled shear and buoyancy effects on the near-wall turbulent statistics and the turbulent heat transfer at different Richardson numbers. The critical Richardson number predicted by the present calculation is in good agreement with the value of theoretical analysis.

  14. Parametric study of irradiation effects on the ductile damage and flow stress behavior in ferritic-martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Pritam; Biner, S. Bulent

    2015-10-01

    Ferritic-martensitic steels are currently being considered as structural materials in fusion and Gen-IV nuclear reactors. These materials are expected to experience high dose radiation, which can increase their ductile to brittle transition temperature and susceptibility to failure during operation. Hence, to estimate the safe operational life of the reactors, precise evaluation of the ductile to brittle transition temperatures of ferritic-martensitic steels is necessary. Owing to the scarcity of irradiated samples, particularly at high dose levels, micro-mechanistic models are being employed to predict the shifts in the ductile to brittle transition temperatures. These models consider the ductile damage evolution, in the form of nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids; and the brittle fracture, in the form of probabilistic cleavage initiation, to estimate the influence of irradiation on the ductile to brittle transition temperature. However, the assessment of irradiation dependent material parameters is challenging and influences the accuracy of these models. In the present study, the effects of irradiation on the overall flow stress and ductile damage behavior of two ferritic-martensitic steels is parametrically investigated. The results indicate that the ductile damage model parameters are mostly insensitive to irradiation levels at higher dose levels though the resulting flow stress behavior varies significantly.

  15. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  16. Effective Stress Management: A Model of Emotional Intelligence, Self-Leadership, and Student Stress Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Jeffery D.; Wu, Jinpei; Godwin, Jeffrey L.; Neck, Christopher P.; Manz, Charles C.

    2012-01-01

    This article develops and presents a model of the relationships among emotional intelligence, self-leadership, and stress coping among management students. In short, the authors' model suggests that effective emotion regulation and self-leadership, as mediated through positive affect and self-efficacy, has the potential to facilitate stress coping…

  17. Two-Fluid Mathematical Models for Blood Flow in Stenosed Arteries: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar DS

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The pulsatile flow of blood through stenosed arteries is analyzed by assuming the blood as a two-fluid model with the suspension of all the erythrocytes in the core region as a non-Newtonian fluid and the plasma in the peripheral layer as a Newtonian fluid. The non-Newtonian fluid in the core region of the artery is assumed as a (i Herschel-Bulkley fluid and (ii Casson fluid. Perturbation method is used to solve the resulting system of non-linear partial differential equations. Expressions for various flow quantities are obtained for the two-fluid Casson model. Expressions of the flow quantities obtained by Sankar and Lee (2006 for the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model are used to get the data for comparison. It is found that the plug flow velocity and velocity distribution of the two-fluid Casson model are considerably higher than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. It is also observed that the pressure drop, plug core radius, wall shear stress and the resistance to flow are significantly very low for the two-fluid Casson model than those of the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model. Hence, the two-fluid Casson model would be more useful than the two-fluid Herschel-Bulkley model to analyze the blood flow through stenosed arteries.

  18. Shear wave dispersion behaviors of soft, vascularized tissues from the microchannel flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K J; Ormachea, J; McAleavey, S A; Wood, R W; Carroll-Nellenback, J J; Miller, R K

    2016-07-07

    The frequency dependent behavior of tissue stiffness and the dispersion of shear waves in tissue can be measured in a number of ways, using integrated imaging systems. The microchannel flow model, which considers the effects of fluid flow in the branching vasculature and microchannels of soft tissues, makes specific predictions about the nature of dispersion. In this paper we introduce a more general form of the 4 parameter equation for stress relaxation based on the microchannel flow model, and then derive the general frequency domain equation for the complex modulus. Dispersion measurements in liver (ex vivo) and whole perfused placenta (post-delivery) correspond to the predictions from theory, guided by independent stress relaxation measurements and consideration of the vascular tree structure.

  19. Modeling liquid hydrogen cavitating flow with the full cavitation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.B.; Qiu, L.M.; Qi, H.; Zhang, X.J.; Gan, Z.H. [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenic Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Cavitation is the formation of vapor bubbles within a liquid where flow dynamics cause the local static pressure to drop below the vapor pressure. This paper strives towards developing an effective computational strategy to simulate liquid hydrogen cavitation relevant to liquid rocket propulsion applications. The aims are realized by performing a steady state computational fluid dynamic (CFD) study of liquid hydrogen flow over a 2D hydrofoil and an axisymmetric ogive in Hord's reports with a so-called full cavitation model. The thermodynamic effect was demonstrated with the assumption of thermal equilibrium between the gas phase and liquid phase. Temperature-dependent fluid thermodynamic properties were specified along the saturation line from the ''Gaspak 3.2'' databank. Justifiable agreement between the computed surface pressure, temperature and experimental data of Hord was obtained. Specifically, a global sensitivity analysis is performed to examine the sensitivity of the turbulent computations to the wall grid resolution, wall treatments and changes in model parameters. A proper near-wall model and grid resolution were suggested. The full cavitation model with default model parameters provided solutions with comparable accuracy to sheet cavitation in liquid hydrogen for the two geometries. (author)

  20. Modeling the Effects of Stress: An Approach to Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuper, Taryn

    2010-01-01

    Stress is an integral element of the operational conditions experienced by combat medics. The effects of stress can compromise the performance of combat medics who must reach and treat their comrades under often threatening circumstances. Examples of these effects include tunnel vision, loss of motor control, and diminished hearing, which can result in an inability to perceive further danger, satisfactorily treat the casualty, and communicate with others. While many training programs strive to recreate this stress to aid in the experiential learning process, stress inducement may not always be feasible or desired. In addition, live simulations are not always a practical, convenient, and repeatable method of training. Instead, presenting situational training on a personal computer is proposed as an effective training platform in which the effects of stress can be addressed in a different way. We explore the cognitive and motor effects of stress, as well as the benefits of training for mitigating these effects in real life. While many training applications focus on inducing stress in order to "condition" the stress response, the author explores the possibilities of modeling stress to produce a similar effect. Can presenting modeled effects of stress help prepare or inoculate soldiers for stressful situations in which they must perform at a high level? This paper investigates feasibility of modeling stress and describes the preliminary design considerations of a combat medic training system that utilizes this method of battlefield preparation.

  1. Modeling of stresses at grain boundaries with respect to occurrence of stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozaczek, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Sinharoy, A.; Ruud, C.O. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); McIlree, A.R. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The distributions of elastic stresses/strains in the grain boundary regions were studied by the analytical and the finite element models. The grain boundaries represent the sites where stress concentration occurs as a result of discontinuity of elastic properties across the grain boundary and the presence of second phase particles elastically different from the surrounding matrix grains. A quantitative analysis of those stresses for steels and nickel based alloys showed that the stress concentrations in the grain boundary regions are high enough to cause a local microplastic deformation even when the material is in the macroscopic elastic regime. The stress redistribution as a result of such a plastic deformation was discussed.

  2. Improvement and Validation of Weld Residual Stress Modelling Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Weilin; Gunnars, Jens (Inspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Dong, Pingsha; Hong, Jeong K. (Center for Welded Structures Research, Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States))

    2009-06-15

    The objective of this work is to identify and evaluate improvements for the residual stress modelling procedure currently used in Sweden. There is a growing demand to eliminate any unnecessary conservatism involved in residual stress assumptions. The study was focused on the development and validation of an improved weld residual stress modelling procedure, by taking advantage of the recent advances in residual stress modelling and stress measurement techniques. The major changes applied in the new weld residual stress modelling procedure are: - Improved procedure for heat source calibration based on use of analytical solutions. - Use of an isotropic hardening model where mixed hardening data is not available. - Use of an annealing model for improved simulation of strain relaxation in re-heated material. The new modelling procedure is demonstrated to capture the main characteristics of the through thickness stress distributions by validation to experimental measurements. Three austenitic stainless steel butt-welds cases are analysed, covering a large range of pipe geometries. From the cases it is evident that there can be large differences between the residual stresses predicted using the new procedure, and the earlier procedure or handbook recommendations. Previously recommended profiles could give misleading fracture assessment results. The stress profiles according to the new procedure agree well with the measured data. If data is available then a mixed hardening model should be used

  3. Experimental stress analysis for materials and structures stress analysis models for developing design methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Freddi, Alessandro; Cristofolini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    This book summarizes the main methods of experimental stress analysis and examines their application to various states of stress of major technical interest, highlighting aspects not always covered in the classic literature. It is explained how experimental stress analysis assists in the verification and completion of analytical and numerical models, the development of phenomenological theories, the measurement and control of system parameters under operating conditions, and identification of causes of failure or malfunction. Cases addressed include measurement of the state of stress in models, measurement of actual loads on structures, verification of stress states in circumstances of complex numerical modeling, assessment of stress-related material damage, and reliability analysis of artifacts (e.g. prostheses) that interact with biological systems. The book will serve graduate students and professionals as a valuable tool for finding solutions when analytical solutions do not exist.

  4. AN ANALYSIS MODEL OF PULSATILE BLOOD FLOW IN ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhao-rong; XUGang; CHENYong; TENGZhong0=zhao; QINKai-rong

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in artery was treated as the flow under equilibriums state(the steady flow under mean pressure)combined with the periodically small pulsatile flow.Using vascular strain energy function advanced by Fung,the vascular stress-strain relationship under equilibrium state was analyzed and the circumferential and axial elastic moduli were deduced that are expressed while the arterial strains around the equilibrium state are relatively small,so that the equations of vesse wall motion under the pulsatile pressure could be established here.Through solving both the vessel equations and the linear Navier-Stokes equations,the analytic expressions of the blood flow velocities and the vascular displacements were obtained.The influence of the difference between vascular circumferentia and axial elasticities on pulsatile blood flow and vascular motion was discussed in details.

  5. AN ANALYSIS MODEL OF PULSATILE BLOOD FLOW IN ARTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳兆荣; 徐刚; 陈泳; 滕忠照; 覃开蓉

    2003-01-01

    Blood flow in artery was treated as the flow under equilibrium state ( the steady flow under mean pressure ) combined with the periodically small pulsatile flow. Using vascular strain energy function advanced by Fung, the vascular stress-strain relationship under equilibrium state was analyzed and the circumferential and axial elastic moduli were deduced that are expressed while the arterial strains around the equilibrium state are relatively small, so that the equations of vessel wall motion under the pulsatile pressure could be established here. Through solving both the vessel equations and the linear NavierStokes equations, the analytic expressions of the blood flow velocities and the vascular displacements were obtained. The influence of the difference between vascular circumferential and axial elasticities on pulsatile blood flow and vascular motion was discussed in details.

  6. Combined effect of couple stresses and heat and mass transfer on peristaltic flow with slip conditions in a tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobh, Ayman M

    2013-10-01

    In this article, the influence of heat and mass transfer on peristaltic transport of a couple stress fluid in a uniform tube with slip conditions on the wall is studied. The problem can model the blood flow in living creatures. Under long wavelength approximation and zero Reynolds number, exact solutions for the axial velocity component, pressure gradient, and both temperature and concentration fields are derived. The pressure rise is computed numerically and explained graphically. Moreover, effects of various physical parameters of the problem on temperature distribution, concentration field, and trapping are studied and discussed graphically.

  7. Concepts and parameterisation of Perla and FLM model using Flow-R for debris flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, P.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Rudaz, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Flow-R software was built to allow regional debris flow susceptibility assessment. It uses propagation algorithms such as the friction model from Perla and friction-limited models (FLM). By using concepts from both models, a methodology is proposed to evaluate the friction angle and mass-to-drag ratio based on the maximum velocity estimation for debris flows, and on the observed runout on the debris fan. The goal is to use the energy line concept, the debris fan slope, and the runout on the latter, to estimate the friction angle, the Mass to Drag ratio and maximum flow velocity for a given debris flow event and specific conditions of a catchment. A relation between those parameters themselves and between them and the observed characteristics of the flow (runout, speed of flow, viscosity, thickness) is established. The sensitivity of the Flow-R model is tested on two real cases and a theoretical topography for both model types. The importance of the friction angle, relative to M/D, is established. It demonstrates that the FLM model gives results similar to the Perla model, and is useful to determine the friction angle and M/D parameters on debris fan topography, using known events as calibration for each case. Those parameters can then be used as input for local hazard simulation and prediction. In addition, using a broad set of parameters instead of of an ideal one, inducing different propagation results, is proposed for debris flow hazard mapping and assessment.

  8. Architecture Models and Data Flows in Local and Group Datawarehouses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogza, R. M.; Zaharie, Dorin; Avasilcai, Silvia; Bacali, Laura

    Architecture models and possible data flows for local and group datawarehouses are presented, together with some data processing models. The architecture models consists of several layers and the data flow between them. The choosen architecture of a datawarehouse depends on the data type and volumes from the source data, and inflences the analysis, data mining and reports done upon the data from DWH.

  9. Fluid flow shear stress upregulates prostanoid receptor EP2 but not EP4 in murine podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tarak; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Kats, Alexander; Carlton, Carol G; Alon, Uri S; Cudmore, Patricia A; El-Meanawy, Ashraf; Sharma, Mukut

    2013-01-01

    Podocytes in the glomerular filtration barrier regulate the passage of plasma proteins into urine. Capillary pressure and ultrafiltration impact the structure and function of podocytes. The mechanism of podocyte injury by fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) from hyperfiltration in chronic kidney disease (CKD) is not completely understood. Recently, we demonstrated increased synthesis of prostaglandin E2 in podocytes exposed to FFSS. Here, we determine the effect of FFSS on prostanoid receptors EP1-EP4 in cultured podocytes and in Os/+ mouse kidney, a model of hyperfiltration. Results of RT-PCR, qRT-PCR, immunoblotting and immunofluorescence studies indicate that cultured podocytes express EP1, EP2 and EP4 but not EP3. FFSS resulted in upregulated expression of only EP2 in podocytes. Kidney immunostaining showed significantly increased expression of EP2 in Os/+ mice compared with littermate controls. These novel results suggest that EP2 may be responsible for mediating podocyte injury from hyperfiltration-induced augmented FFSS in CKD.

  10. 3-D numerical modelling of flow around a groin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, R.; Roulund, A.; Sumer, B. Mutlu

    2003-01-01

    A 3-D flow code, EllipSys3D, has been implemented to simulate the 3-D flow around a groin in steady current. The k  turbulence model has been used for closure. Two kinds of groins are considered: (1) A vertical-wall groin, and (2) A groin with a side slope. Steady-flow simulations were conducted...

  11. Modeling sheet-flow sand transport under progressive surface waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the near-shore zone, energetic sea waves generate sheet-flow sand transport. In present day coastal models, wave-induced sheet-flow sand transport rates are usually predicted with semi-empirical transport formulas, based on extensive research on this phenomenon in oscillatory flow tunnels. Howeve

  12. SECOND-ORDER MOMENT MODEL FOR DENSE TWO-PHASE TURBULENT FLOW OF BINGHAM FLUID WITH PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Zhuo-xiong; ZHOU Li-xing; LIU Zhi-he

    2006-01-01

    The USM-θ model of Bingham fluid for dense two-phase turbulent flow was developed, which combines the second-order moment model for two-phase turbulence with the particle kinetic theory for the inter-particle collision. In this model, phases interaction and the extra term of Bingharn fluid yield stress are taken into account. An algorithm for USM-θ model in dense two-phase flow was proposed, in which the influence of particle volume fraction is accounted for. This model was used to simulate turbulent flow of Bingham fluid single-phase and dense liquid-particle two-phase in pipe. It is shown USM-θ model has better prediction result than the five-equation model, in which the particle-particle collision is modeled by the particle kinetic theory, while the turbulence of both phase is simulated by the two-equation turbulence model. The USM-θ model was then used to simulate the dense two-phase turbulent up flow of Bingham fluid with particles. With the increasing of the yield stress, the velocities of Bingham and particle decrease near the pipe centre. Comparing the two-phase flow of Bingham-particle with that of liquid-particle, it is found the source term of yield stress has significant effect on flow.

  13. Data-Flow Modeling: A Survey of Issues and Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina-Claudia DOLEAN; Razvan PETRUSEL

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a survey of previous research on modeling the data flow perspective of business processes. When it comes to modeling and analyzing business process models the current research focuses on control flow modeling (i.e. the activities of the process) and very little attention is paid to the data-flow perspective. But data is essential in a process. In order to execute a workflow, the tasks need data. Without data or without data available on time, the control flow cannot be exe...

  14. An electricity consumption model for electric vehicular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hong; Huang, Hai-Jun; Tang, Tie-Qiao

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we apply the relationships between the macro and micro variables of traffic flow to develop an electricity consumption model for electric vehicular flow. We use the proposed model to study the quantitative relationships between the electricity consumption/total power and speed/density under uniform flow, and the electricity consumptions during the evolution processes of shock, rarefaction wave and small perturbation. The numerical results indicate that the proposed model can perfectly describe the electricity consumption for electric vehicular flow, which shows that the proposed model is reasonable.

  15. Stochastic evolutions of dynamic traffic flow modeling and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xiqun (Michael); Shi, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    This book reveals the underlying mechanisms of complexity and stochastic evolutions of traffic flows. Using Eulerian and Lagrangian measurements, the authors propose lognormal headway/spacing/velocity distributions and subsequently develop a Markov car-following model to describe drivers’ random choices concerning headways/spacings, putting forward a stochastic fundamental diagram model for wide scattering flow-density points. In the context of highway onramp bottlenecks, the authors present a traffic flow breakdown probability model and spatial-temporal queuing model to improve the stability and reliability of road traffic flows. This book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of transportation engineering and civil engineering.

  16. Adaptation of endothelial cells to physiologically-modeled, variable shear stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph S Uzarski

    Full Text Available Endothelial cell (EC function is mediated by variable hemodynamic shear stress patterns at the vascular wall, where complex shear stress profiles directly correlate with blood flow conditions that vary temporally based on metabolic demand. The interactions of these more complex and variable shear fields with EC have not been represented in hemodynamic flow models. We hypothesized that EC exposed to pulsatile shear stress that changes in magnitude and duration, modeled directly from real-time physiological variations in heart rate, would elicit phenotypic changes as relevant to their critical roles in thrombosis, hemostasis, and inflammation. Here we designed a physiological flow (PF model based on short-term temporal changes in blood flow observed in vivo and compared it to static culture and steady flow (SF at a fixed pulse frequency of 1.3 Hz. Results show significant changes in gene regulation as a function of temporally variable flow, indicating a reduced wound phenotype more representative of quiescence. EC cultured under PF exhibited significantly higher endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS activity (PF: 176.0±11.9 nmol/10(5 EC; SF: 115.0±12.5 nmol/10(5 EC, p = 0.002 and lower TNF-a-induced HL-60 leukocyte adhesion (PF: 37±6 HL-60 cells/mm(2; SF: 111±18 HL-60/mm(2, p = 0.003 than cells cultured under SF which is consistent with a more quiescent anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic phenotype. In vitro models have become increasingly adept at mimicking natural physiology and in doing so have clarified the importance of both chemical and physical cues that drive cell function. These data illustrate that the variability in metabolic demand and subsequent changes in perfusion resulting in constantly variable shear stress plays a key role in EC function that has not previously been described.

  17. FLUENT/BFC - A general purpose fluid flow modeling program for all flow speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvinsky, Arkady S.

    FLUENT/BFC is a fluid flow modeling program for a variety of applications. Current capabilities of the program include laminar and turbulent flows, subsonic and supersonic viscous flows, incompressible flows, time-dependent and stationary flows, isothermal flows and flows with heat transfer, Newtonian and power-law fluids. The modeling equations in the program have been written in coordinate system invariant form to accommodate the use of boundary-conforming, generally nonorthogonal coordinate systems. The boundary-conforming coordinate system can be generated using both an internal grid generator, which is an integral part of the code, and external application-specific grid generators. The internal grid generator is based on a solution of a system of elliptic partial differential equations and can produce grids for a wide variety of two- and three-dimensional geometries.

  18. Enhancing debris flow modeling parameters integrating Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, C.; Stoffel, M.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2009-04-01

    Applied debris-flow modeling requires suitably constraint input parameter sets. Depending on the used model, there is a series of parameters to define before running the model. Normally, the data base describing the event, the initiation conditions, the flow behavior, the deposition process and mainly the potential range of possible debris flow events in a certain torrent is limited. There are only some scarce places in the world, where we fortunately can find valuable data sets describing event history of debris flow channels delivering information on spatial and temporal distribution of former flow paths and deposition zones. Tree-ring records in combination with detailed geomorphic mapping for instance provide such data sets over a long time span. Considering the significant loss potential associated with debris-flow disasters, it is crucial that decisions made in regard to hazard mitigation are based on a consistent assessment of the risks. This in turn necessitates a proper assessment of the uncertainties involved in the modeling of the debris-flow frequencies and intensities, the possible run out extent, as well as the estimations of the damage potential. In this study, we link a Bayesian network to a Geographic Information System in order to assess debris-flow risk. We identify the major sources of uncertainty and show the potential of Bayesian inference techniques to improve the debris-flow model. We model the flow paths and deposition zones of a highly active debris-flow channel in the Swiss Alps using the numerical 2-D model RAMMS. Because uncertainties in run-out areas cause large changes in risk estimations, we use the data of flow path and deposition zone information of reconstructed debris-flow events derived from dendrogeomorphological analysis covering more than 400 years to update the input parameters of the RAMMS model. The probabilistic model, which consistently incorporates this available information, can serve as a basis for spatial risk

  19. Historical Account to the State of the Art in Debris Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pudasaini, Shiva P.

    2013-04-01

    In this contribution, I present a historical account of debris flow modelling leading to the state of the art in simulations and applications. A generalized two-phase model is presented that unifies existing avalanche and debris flow theories. The new model (Pudasaini, 2012) covers both the single-phase and two-phase scenarios and includes many essential and observable physical phenomena. In this model, the solid-phase stress is closed by Mohr-Coulomb plasticity, while the fluid stress is modeled as a non-Newtonian viscous stress that is enhanced by the solid-volume-fraction gradient. A generalized interfacial momentum transfer includes viscous drag, buoyancy and virtual mass forces, and a new generalized drag force is introduced to cover both solid-like and fluid-like drags. Strong couplings between solid and fluid momentum transfer are observed. The two-phase model is further extended to describe the dynamics of rock-ice avalanches with new mechanical models. This model explains dynamic strength weakening and includes internal fluidization, basal lubrication, and exchanges of mass and momentum. The advantages of the two-phase model over classical (effectively single-phase) models are discussed. Advection and diffusion of the fluid through the solid are associated with non-linear fluxes. Several exact solutions are constructed, including the non-linear advection-diffusion of fluid, kinematic waves of debris flow front and deposition, phase-wave speeds, and velocity distribution through the flow depth and through the channel length. The new model is employed to study two-phase subaerial and submarine debris flows, the tsunami generated by the debris impact at lakes/oceans, and rock-ice avalanches. Simulation results show that buoyancy enhances flow mobility. The virtual mass force alters flow dynamics by increasing the kinetic energy of the fluid. Newtonian viscous stress substantially reduces flow deformation, whereas non-Newtonian viscous stress may change the

  20. Finite difference methods for coupled flow interaction transport models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly McGee

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Understanding chemical transport in blood flow involves coupling the chemical transport process with flow equations describing the blood and plasma in the membrane wall. In this work, we consider a coupled two-dimensional model with transient Navier-Stokes equation to model the blood flow in the vessel and Darcy's flow to model the plasma flow through the vessel wall. The advection-diffusion equation is coupled with the velocities from the flows in the vessel and wall, respectively to model the transport of the chemical. The coupled chemical transport equations are discretized by the finite difference method and the resulting system is solved using the additive Schwarz method. Development of the model and related analytical and numerical results are presented in this work.

  1. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  2. Introduction to stochastic models of transportation flows. Part I

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshev, V A

    2011-01-01

    We consider here probabilistic models of transportation flows. The main goal of this introduction is rather not to present various techniques for problem solving but to present some intuition to invent adequate and natural models having visual simplicity and simple (but rigorous) formulation, the main objects being cars not abstract flows. The papers consists of three parts. First part considers mainly linear flows on short time scale - dynamics of the flow due to changing driver behavior. Second part studies linear flow on longer time scales - individual car trajectory from entry to exit from the road. Part three considers collective car movement in complex transport networks.

  3. A Realistic Cellular Automaton Model for Synchronized Traffic Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Bo-Han; HU Mao-Bin; JIANG Rui; WU Qing-Song

    2009-01-01

    A cellular automaton model is proposed to consider the anticipation effect in drivers' behavior. It is shown that the anticipation effect can be one of the origins of synchronized traffic flow. With anticipation effect, the congested traffic flow simulated by the model exhibits the features of synchronized flow. The spatiotemporal patterns induced by an on-ramp are also consistent with the three-phaee traffic theory. Since the origin of synchronized flow is still controversial, our work can shed some light on the mechanism of synchronized flow.

  4. A process model for work-flow management in construction

    OpenAIRE

    Jongeling, Rogier

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes a novel approach for management of work-flow in construction, based on the combination of location-based scheduling and modelling with 4D CAD. Construction planners need to carefully design a process that ensures a continuous and reliable flow of resources through different locations in a project. The flow of resources through locations, termed work-flow, and the resultant ability to control the hand-over between both locations and crews, greatly empowers the management ...

  5. Investigation of proper modeling of very dense granular flows in the recirculation system of CFBs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aristeidis Nikolopoulos; Nikos Nikolopoulos; Nikos Varveris; Sotirios Karellas; Panagiotis Grammelis; Emmanuel Kakaras

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the development of new models and/or the improvement of existing numerical models,used for simulating granular flow in CFB (circulating fluidized bed) recirculation systems.Most recent models follow the TFM (two-fluid model) methodology,but they cannot effectively simulate the inter-particle friction forces in the recirculation system,because the respective stress tensor does not incorporate compressibility of flow due to change of effective particle density.As a consequence,the induced normal and shear stresses are not modeled appropriately during the flow of the granular phase in the CFB recirculation system.The failure of conventional models,such as that of von Mises/Coulomb,is mainly caused by false approximation of the yield criterion which is not applicable to the CFB recirculation system.The present work adopts an alternative yield function,used for the first time in TFM Eulerian modeling.The proposed model is based on the Pitman-Schaeffer-Gray-Stiles yield criterion.Both the temporal deformation of the solid granular phase and the repose angle that the granular phase forms are more accurately simulated by this model.The numerical results of the proposed model agree well with experimental data,implying that frictional forces are efficiently simulated by the new model.

  6. Numerical model of fluid flow and oxygen transport in a radial-flow microchannel containing hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledezma, G A; Folch, A; Bhatia, S N; Balis, U J; Yarmush, M L; Toner, M

    1999-02-01

    The incorporation of monolayers of cultured hepatocytes into an extracorporeal perfusion system has become a promising approach for the development of a temporary bioartificial liver (BAL) support system. In this paper we present a numerical investigation of the oxygen tension, shear stress, and pressure drop in a bioreactor for a BAL composed of plasma-perfused chambers containing monolayers of porcine hepatocytes. The chambers consist of microfabricated parallel disks with center-to-edge radial flow. The oxygen uptake rate (OUR), measured in vitro for porcine hepatocytes, was curve-fitted using Michaelis-Menten kinetics for simulation of the oxygen concentration profile. The effect of different parameters that may influence the oxygen transport inside the chambers, such as the plasma flow rate, the chamber height, the initial oxygen tension in the perfused plasma, the OUR, and K(m) was investigated. We found that both the plasma flow rate and the initial oxygen tension may have an important effect upon oxygen transport. Increasing the flow rate and/or the inlet oxygen tension resulted in improved oxygen transport to cells in the radial-flow microchannels, and allowed significantly greater diameter reactor without oxygen limitation to the hepatocytes. In the range investigated in this paper (10 microns < H < 100 microns), and for a constant plasma flow rate, the chamber height, H, had a negligible effect on the oxygen transport to hepatocytes. On the contrary, it strongly affected the mechanical stress on the cells that is also crucial for the successful design of the BAL reactors. A twofold decrease in chamber height from 50 to 25 microns produced approximately a fivefold increase in maximal shear stress at the inlet of the reactor from 2 to 10 dyn/cm2. Further decrease in chamber height resulted in shear stress values that are physiologically unrealistic. Therefore, the channel height needs to be carefully chosen in a BAL design to avoid deleterious hydrodynamic

  7. Modeling of Cavitating Flow through Waterjet Propulsors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    break down due to massive suction side flow separation (stall). In Figure 3, photographs from tunnel testing and computed results are shown. The...128, pp. 1308-1323. Mishra C. & Peles, Y. (2005) "Cavitation in flow through a micro- orifice inside a silicon micro- channel,’ Phvs. Fluids 17

  8. Causal Model of Stress and Coping: Women in Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Bonita C.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Tested model of managerial women's (n=249) stress. Model was developed from Lazarus's theoretical framework of stress/coping and incorporated causal antecedent constructs (demographics, sex role attitudes, agentic traits), mediating constructs (environment, appraisals, engagement coping, disengagement coping), and outcomes (work performance,…

  9. Flow stress equation for multipass hot-rolling of aluminum alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of simple axisymmetric compression tests were carried out on the computer servo-controlled Gleeble 1 500 machine when strain rates ranged between 0.05-25 s-1 and deformation temperature 300-500 ℃. The results show that flow stress is related to the Zener-Hollonom parameter Z and strain, as well as the static recrystallization fraction between passes during multipass hot deformation of 5182 aluminum alloy. Hence, a modified exponential flow stress equation was presented by considering the values of lnA and β as functions of strain, and by using the uniform softening method and incorporating the static recrystallization fraction between passes to consider the effects of residual strain during multipass hot-rolling of 5182 aluminum alloy. The validity of the equation was examined by a typical non-isothermal multipass deformation test.

  10. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress.

  11. Assessment of turbulent viscous stress using ICOSA 4D Flow MRI for prediction of hemodynamic blood damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Hojin; Lantz, Jonas; Haraldsson, Henrik; Casas, Belen; Ziegler, Magnus; Karlsson, Matts; Saloner, David; Dyverfeldt, Petter; Ebbers, Tino

    2016-12-01

    Flow-induced blood damage plays an important role in determining the hemodynamic impact of abnormal blood flow, but quantifying of these effects, which are dominated by shear stresses in highly fluctuating turbulent flow, has not been feasible. This study evaluated the novel application of turbulence tensor measurements using simulated 4D Flow MRI data with six-directional velocity encoding for assessing hemodynamic stresses and corresponding blood damage index (BDI) in stenotic turbulent blood flow. The results showed that 4D Flow MRI underestimates the maximum principal shear stress of laminar viscous stress (PLVS), and overestimates the maximum principal shear stress of Reynolds stress (PRSS) with increasing voxel size. PLVS and PRSS were also overestimated by about 1.2 and 4.6 times at medium signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 20. In contrast, the square sum of the turbulent viscous shear stress (TVSS), which is used for blood damage index (BDI) estimation, was not severely affected by SNR and voxel size. The square sum of TVSS and the BDI at SNR >20 were underestimated by less than 1% and 10%, respectively. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the feasibility of 4D Flow MRI based quantification of TVSS and BDI which are closely linked to blood damage.

  12. A model for complex flows of soft glassy materials with application to flows through fixed fiber beds

    KAUST Repository

    Sarkar, Arijit

    2015-11-01

    © 2015 The Society of Rheology. The soft glassy rheology (SGR) model has successfully described the time dependent simple shear rheology of a broad class of complex fluids including foams, concentrated emulsions, colloidal glasses, and solvent-free nanoparticle-organic hybrid materials (NOHMs). The model considers a distribution of mesoscopic fluid elements that hop from trap to trap at a rate which is enhanced by the work done to strain the fluid element. While an SGR fluid has a broad exponential distribution of trap energies, the rheology of NOHMs is better described by a narrower energy distribution and we consider both types of trap energy distributions in this study. We introduce a tensorial version of these models with a hopping rate that depends on the orientation of the element relative to the mean stress field, allowing a range of relative strengths of the extensional and simple shear responses of the fluid. As an application of these models we consider the flow of a soft glassy material through a dilute fixed bed of fibers. The dilute fixed bed exhibits a range of local linear flows which alternate in a chaotic manner with time in a Lagrangian reference frame. It is amenable to an analytical treatment and has been used to characterize the strong flow response of many complex fluids including fiber suspensions, dilute polymer solutions and emulsions. We show that the accumulated strain in the fluid elements has an abrupt nonlinear growth at a Deborah number of order one in a manner similar to that observed for polymer solutions. The exponential dependence of the hopping rate on strain leads to a fluid element deformation that grows logarithmically with Deborah number at high Deborah numbers. SGR fluids having a broad range of trap energies flowing through fixed beds can exhibit a range of rheological behaviors at small Deborah numbers ranging from a yield stress, to a power law response and finally to Newtonian behavior.

  13. LES And URANS simulations of the swirling flow in a dynamic model of a uniflow-scavenged cylinder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Casper Schytte; Ingvorsen, Kristian Mark; Mayer, Stefan;

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent swirling flow in a uniflow-scavenged two-stroke engine cylinder is investigated using computational fluid dynamics. The investigation is based on the flow in a scale model with a moving piston. Two numerical approaches are tested; a large eddy simulation (LES) approach with the wall......-adaptive local eddy-viscosity (WALE) model and a Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes approach using the k−ω Shear-Stress Transport model. Combustion and compression are neglected. The simulations are verified by a sensitivity study and the performance of the turbulence models are evaluated by comparison...... with superimposed swirl. The turbulence models predict several flow reversals in the vortex breakdown region through the scavenge process. Flow separations in the scavenge ports lead to a secondary axial flow, in the separated region. The secondary flow exits in the top of the scavenge ports, resulting in large...

  14. Application of Entropy Concept for Shear Stress Distribution in Laminar Pipe Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Yeon Moon; Choo, Tai Ho; Jung, Donghwi; Seon, Yun Gwan; Kim, Joong Hoon

    2016-04-01

    In the river fluid mechanics, shear stress is calculated from frictional force caused by viscosity and fluctuating velocity. Traditional shear stress distribution equations have been widely used because of their simplicity. However, they have a critical limitation of requiring energy gradient which is generally difficult to estimate in practice. Especially, measuring velocity/velocity gradient on the boundary layer is difficult in practice. It requires point velocity throughout the entire cross section to calculate velocity gradient. This study proposes shear stress distribution equations for laminar flow based on entropy theory using mean velocity and entropy coefficient. The proposed equations are demonstrated and compared with measured shear stress distribution using Nikuradse's data. Results showed that the coefficient of determination is around 0.99 indicating that the proposed method well describes the true shear stress distribution. Therefore, it was proved that shear stress distribution can be easily and accurately estimated by using the proposed equations. (This research was supported by a gran(13AWMP-B066744-01) from Advanced Water Management Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean Government)

  15. Modelling of laminar flow in the inlet section of rectangular microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Matteo; Viktorov, Vladimir

    2009-02-01

    This paper is a study of laminar flow in rectangular microchannels. The behaviour of compressible and incompressible fluids in microchannels was simulated using CFD software. Numerical data were compared to experimental measurements to test the validity of CFD models. The velocity profile of flow developing inside the channel is described as a function of the Reynolds number Re, varying from 100 to 2000, and the aspect ratio h/w, ranging from 1 to 0.125. The fundamental importance of the entrance length of microchannels is highlighted. Numerical data were applied to define analytical formulae covering the minimum entrance length for fully developed laminar flow of compressible fluids, viscous stress and incremental pressure drop effect during flow development, and the velocity profiles of flow for compressible and incompressible fluids.

  16. Mixed Convection Flow of Couple Stress Fluid in a Vertical Channel with Radiation and Soret Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaladhar Kolla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The radiation and thermal diffusion effects on mixed convection flow of couple stress fluid through a channel are investigated. The governing non-linear partial differential equations are transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations using similarity transformations. The resulting equations are then solved using the Spectral Quasi-linearization Method (QLM. The results, which are discussed with the aid of the dimensionless parameters entering the problem, are seen to depend sensitively on the parameters.

  17. Modeling of drag reduction in turbulent channel flow with hydrophobic walls by FVM method and weakly-compressible flow equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Li; Ming-Shun Yuan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the effects of hydrophobic wall on skin-friction drag in the channel flow are investigated through large eddy simulation on the basis of weaklycompressible flow equations with the MacCormack's scheme on collocated mesh in the FVM framework. The slip length model is adopted to describe the behavior of the slip velocities in the streamwise and spanwise directions at the interface between the hydrophobic wall and turbulent channel flow. Simulation results are presented by analyzing flow behaviors over hydrophobic wall with the Smagorinky subgrid-scale model and a dynamic model on computational meshes of different resolutions. Comparison and analysis are made on the distributions of timeaveraged velocity, velocity fluctuations, Reynolds stress as well as the skin-friction drag. Excellent agreement between the present study and previous results demonstrates the accuracy of the simple classical second-order scheme in representing turbulent vertox near hydrophobic wall. In addition, the relation of drag reduction efficiency versus time-averaged slip velocity is established. It is also found that the decrease of velocity gradient in the close wall region is responsible for the drag reduction. Considering its advantages of high calculation precision and efficiency, the present method has good prospect in its application to practical projects.

  18. A simple spectral model for the modification of turbulence in flow over gentle hills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, H.P.

    1996-01-01

    A model is presented which calculates the changes of the velocity variances and stress in flow over gentle isolated hills. At intermediate frequencies spectra of the velocity components are modified according to rapid distortion theory. At low frequencies spectral densities change...... in proportion to the square of the mean wind. The inner and outer layer of the flow are distinguished. Streamline curvature effects are accounted for in the vertical velocity variance and the covariance. The sensitivity of the model to several parameters is investigated. Then, its results are compared...

  19. Modeling of Breaching Due to Overtopping Flow and Waves Based on Coupled Flow and Sediment Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo He

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breaching of earthen or sandy dams/dunes by overtopping flow and waves is a complicated process with strong, unsteady flow, high sediment transport, and rapid bed changes in which the interactions between flow and morphology should not be ignored. This study presents a depth-averaged two-dimensional (2D coupled flow and sediment transport model to investigate the flow and breaching processes with and without waves. Bed change and variable flow density are included in the flow continuity and momentum equations to consider the impacts of sediment transport. The model adopts the non-equilibrium approach for total-load sediment transport and specifies different repose angles to handle non-cohesive embankment slope avalanching. The equations are solved using an explicit finite volume method on a rectangular grid with the improved Godunov-type central upwind scheme and the nonnegative reconstruction of the water depth method to handle mixed-regime flows near the breach. The model has been tested against two sets of experimental data which show that it well simulates the flow characteristics, bed changes, and sediment transport. It is then applied to analyze flow and morphologic changes by overtopping flow with and without waves. The simulated bed change and breach cross-section shape show a significant difference if waves are considered. Erosion by flow without waves mainly occurs at the breach and is dominated by vertical erosion at the initial stage followed by the lateral erosion. With waves, the flow overtops the entire length of the dune to cause faster erosion along the entire length. Erosion mainly takes place at the upper layer at the initial stage and gradually accelerates as the height of the dune reduces and flow discharge increases, which indicates the simulated results with waves shall be further verified by physical experimental evidence.

  20. Interfacial stress balances in structured continua and free surface flows in ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Arlex [School of Chemical Engineering, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9 Cra. 27, Edificio 24, Bucaramanga, Santander (Colombia); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.rinaldi@bme.ufl.edu [J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611, USA and Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Interfacial linear and internal angular momentum balances are obtained for a structured continuum and for the special case of a ferrofluid, a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles in a Newtonian fluid. The interfacial balance equations account for the effects of surface tension and surface tension gradient, magnetic surface excess forces, antisymmetric stresses, and couple stresses in driving interfacial flows in ferrofluids. Application of the interfacial balance equations is illustrated by obtaining analytical expressions for the translational and spin velocity profiles in a thin film of ferrofluid on an infinite flat plate when a rotating magnetic field is applied with axis of rotation parallel to the ferrofluid/air interface. The cases of zero and non-zero spin viscosity are considered for small applied magnetic field amplitude. Expressions for the maximum translational velocity, slope of the translational velocity profile at the ferrofluid/air interface, and volumetric flow rate are obtained and their use to test the relevance of spin viscosity and couple stresses in the flow situation under consideration is discussed.

  1. BEHAVIOR OF FLOW STRESS OF ALUMINUM SHEETS USED FOR PRESSURE CAN DURING COMPRESSION AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.S. Fu; W.Z. Chen; K.W. Qian

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of flow stress of Al sheets used for pressure can prepared by different melt-treatment during plastic deformation at elevated temperature was studied by isothermal compression testusing Gleeble1500 dynamic hot-simulation testing machine. The results show that the A1 sheets possess the remarkable characteristic of steady state flow stress when they are deformed in the temperature range of 350-500℃ at strain rates within the range of 0.01-10.0s-1. A hyperbolic sine relationship is found to correlate well the flow stress with the strain rate, and an Arrhenius relationship with the temperature, which implies that the process of plastic deformation at elevated temperature for this material is thermally activated. Compared with the Al pieces prepared by no or conventional melt-treatment, hot deformation activation energy of Al sheets prepared by high-efficient melt-treatment is the smallest (Q = 168.0kJ/mol), which reveals that the hot working formability of this material is very better, and has directly to do with the effective improvement of its metallurgical quality.

  2. A mechanical erosion model for two-phase mass flows

    CERN Document Server

    Pudasaini, Shiva P

    2016-01-01

    Erosion, entrainment and deposition are complex and dominant, but yet poorly understood, mechanical processes in geophysical mass flows. Here, we propose a novel, process-based, two-phase, erosion-deposition model capable of adequately describing these complex phenomena commonly observed in landslides, avalanches, debris flows and bedload transport. The model is based on the jump in the momentum flux including changes of material and flow properties along the flow-bed interface and enhances an existing general two-phase mass flow model (Pudasaini, 2012). A two-phase variably saturated erodible basal morphology is introduced and allows for the evolution of erosion-deposition-depths, incorporating the inherent physical process including momentum and rheological changes of the flowing mixture. By rigorous derivation, we show that appropriate incorporation of the mass and momentum productions or losses in conservative model formulation is essential for the physically correct and mathematically consistent descript...

  3. Evaluation of Full Reynolds Stress Turbulence Models in FUN3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudek, Julianne C.; Carlson, Jan-Renee

    2017-01-01

    Full seven-equation Reynolds stress turbulence models are promising tools for today’s aerospace technology challenges. This paper examines two such models for computing challenging turbulent flows including shock-wave boundary layer interactions, separation and mixing layers. The Wilcox and the SSG/LRR full second-moment Reynolds stress models have been implemented into the FUN3D (Fully Unstructured Navier-Stokes Three Dimensional) unstructured Navier-Stokes code and were evaluated for four problems: a transonic two-dimensional diffuser, a supersonic axisymmetric compression corner, a compressible planar shear layer, and a subsonic axisymmetric jet. Simulation results are compared with experimental data and results computed using the more commonly used Spalart-Allmaras (SA) one-equation and the Menter Shear Stress Transport (SST-V) two-equation turbulence models.

  4. A Model for TSUnami FLow INversion from Deposits (TSUFLIND)

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Modern tsunami deposits are employed to estimate the overland flow characteristics of tsunamis. With the help of the overland-flow characteristics, the characteristics of the causative tsunami wave can be estimated. The understanding of tsunami deposits has tremendously improved over the last decades. There are three prominent inversion models: Moore advection model, Soulsby's model and TsuSedMod model. TSUFLIND incorporates all three models and adds new modules to better simulate tsunami deposit formation and calculate flow condition. TSUFLIND takes grain-size distribution, thickness, water depth and topography information as inputs. TSUFLIND computes sediment concentration, grain-size distribution of sediment source and initial flow condition to match the sediment thickness and grain size distribution from field observation. Furthermore, TSUFLIND estimates the flow speed, Froude number and representative wave amplitude. The model is tested by using field data collected at Ranganathapuram, India after the 20...

  5. A forward modeling approach for interpreting impeller flow logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Alison H; West, L Jared; Odling, Noelle E; Bown, Richard T

    2010-01-01

    A rigorous and practical approach for interpretation of impeller flow log data to determine vertical variations in hydraulic conductivity is presented and applied to two well logs from a Chalk aquifer in England. Impeller flow logging involves measuring vertical flow speed in a pumped well and using changes in flow with depth to infer the locations and magnitudes of inflows into the well. However, the measured flow logs are typically noisy, which leads to spurious hydraulic conductivity values where simplistic interpretation approaches are applied. In this study, a new method for interpretation is presented, which first defines a series of physical models for hydraulic conductivity variation with depth and then fits the models to the data, using a regression technique. Some of the models will be rejected as they are physically unrealistic. The best model is then selected from the remaining models using a maximum likelihood approach. This balances model complexity against fit, for example, using Akaike's Information Criterion.

  6. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  7. Effect of Shear Stress in Flow on Cultured Cell: Using Rotating Disk at Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Hino

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental system of the Couette type flow with a rotating disk has been designed to apply wall shear stress quantitatively on the cell culture at the microscopic observation in vitro. The shear stress on the wall is calculated with an estimated Couette type of the velocity profile between the rotating disk and the culture plate. The constant rotational speed (lower than 400 rpm produces the wall shear stress lower than 2 Pa. The rotating disk system is mounted on the stage of an inverted phase contrast microscope to observe the behavior of cells adhered on the plate under the shear flow. Two kinds of cells were used in the test: C2C12 (mouse myoblast cell line, and MC3T3-E1 (mouse osteoblast precursor cell line. The experiments show that C2C12 tends to make orientation diagonal to the stream line, and that MC3T3-E1 tends to make orientation parallel to the stream line. Deformation and exfoliation of cells can be observed under controlled wall shear stress by the experimental system.

  8. Effect of the bifurcation angle on the flow within a synthetic model of lower human airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Moreno, Andres Santiago; Duque Daza, Carlos Alberto

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the bifurcation angle on the flow pattern developed during respiratory inhalation and exhalation processes was explored numerically using a synthetic model of lower human airways featuring three generations of a dichotomous morphology as described by a Weibel model. Laminar flow simulations were performed for six bifurcation angles and four Reynolds numbers relevant to human respiratory flow. Numerical results of the inhalation process showed a peak displacement trend of the velocity profile towards the inner walls of the model. This displacement exhibited correlation with Dean-type secondary flow patterns, as well as with the onset and location of vortices. High wall shear stress regions on the inner walls were observed for a range of bifurcation angles. Noteworthy, specific bifurcation angles produced higher values of pressure drop, compared to the average behavior, as well as changes in the volumetric flow through the branches. Results of the simulations for exhalation process showed a different picture, mainly the appearance of symmetrical velocity profiles and the change of location of the regions of high wall shear stress. The use of this modelling methodology for biomedical applications is discussed considering the validity of the obtained results. Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Universidad Nacional de Colombia.

  9. New advance on non-hydrostatic shallow granular flow model in a global Cartesian coordinate system

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, L; Zhai, J; Wu, S F; Patra, A K; Pitman, E B

    2016-01-01

    Mathematical modeling of granular avalanche flows over a general topography needs appropriate forms of shallow granular flow models. Current shallow granular flow models suited to arbitrary topography can be grossly divided into two types, those formulated in bed-fitted curvilinear coordinates (e.g., Ref.~\\cite{{Puda2003}}), and those formulated in global Cartesian coordinates (e.g., Refs.~\\cite{{Bouchut2004},{Denlinger2004},{Castro2014}}). In the recent years, several improvements have been made in global Cartesian formulations for shallow granular flows. In this paper, we first perform a review of the Cartesian model of Denlinger and Iverson \\cite{Denlinger2004} and the Cartesian Boussinesq-type granular flow theory of Castr-Ogaz \\emph{et al.} \\cite{Castro2014}. Both formulations account for the effect of nonzero vertical acceleration on depth-averaged momentum fluxes and stress states. We then further calculate the vertical normal stress of Castr-Ogaz \\emph{et al.}~\\cite{Castro2014} and the basal normal st...

  10. On a Decomposition Model for Optical Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhau, Jochen; Belhachmi, Zakaria; Scherzer, Otmar

    In this paper we present a variational method for determining cartoon and texture components of the optical flow of a noisy image sequence. The method is realized by reformulating the optical flow problem first as a variational denoising problem for multi-channel data and then by applying decomposition methods. Thanks to the general formulation, several norms can be used for the decomposition. We study a decomposition for the optical flow into bounded variation and oscillating component in greater detail. Numerical examples demonstrate the capabilities of the proposed approach.

  11. A two-dimensional parabolic model for vertical annular two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, F.M.; Toledo, A. Alvarez; Paladino, E.E. [Graduate Program in Mechanical Engineering, Universidade Federal de Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil)], e-mail: emilio@ct.ufrn.br

    2010-07-01

    This work presents a solution algorithm for predicting hydrodynamic parameters for developing and equilibrium, adiabatic, annular, vertical two-phase flow. It solves mass and momentum transport differential equations for both the core and the liquid film across their entire domains. Thus, the velocity and shear stress distributions from the tube center to the wall are obtained, together with the average film thickness and the pressure gradient, making no use of empirical closure relations nor assuming any known velocity profile to solve the triangular relationship in the liquid film. The model was developed using the Finite Volume Method and an iterative procedure is proposed to solve all flow variables for given phase superficial velocities. The procedure is validated against the analytical solution for laminar flow and experimental data for gas-liquid turbulent flow with entrainment. For the last case, an algebraic turbulence model is used for turbulent viscosity calculation for both, liquid film and gas core. (author)

  12. Rotating Turbulent Flow Simulation with LES and Vreman Subgrid-Scale Models in Complex Geometries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Guo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The large eddy simulation (LES method based on Vreman subgrid-scale model and SIMPIEC algorithm were applied to accurately capture the flowing character in Francis turbine passage under the small opening condition. The methodology proposed is effective to understand the flow structure well. It overcomes the limitation of eddy-viscosity model which is excessive, dissipative. Distributions of pressure, velocity, and vorticity as well as some special flow structure in guide vane near-wall zones and blade passage were gained. The results show that the tangential velocity component of fluid has absolute superiority under small opening condition. This situation aggravates the impact between the wake vortices that shed from guide vanes. The critical influence on the balance of unit by spiral vortex in blade passage and the nonuniform flow around guide vane, combined with the transmitting of stress wave, has been confirmed.

  13. Predicting Zonal Flows -- A Comprehensive Reynolds-Stress Response-Functional from First-Principles-Plasma-Turbulence Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Guertler, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence driven zonal flows play an important role in fusion devices since they improve plasma confinement by limiting the level of anomalous transport. Current theories mostly focus on flow excitation but do not self-consistently describe the nearly stationary zonal flow turbulence equilibrium state. First-principles two-fluid turbulence studies are used to construct a Reynolds stress response functional from observations in turbulent states. This permits, for the first time, a reliable charting of zonal flow turbulence equilibria.

  14. Pattern of Stress-Induced Hyperglycemia according to Type of Diabetes: A Predator Stress Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Sun Chang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe aimed to quantify stress-induced hyperglycemia and differentiate the glucose response between normal animals and those with diabetes. We also examined the pattern in glucose fluctuation induced by stress according to type of diabetes.MethodsTo load psychological stress on animal models, we used a predator stress model by exposing rats to a cat for 60 minutes and measured glucose level from the beginning to the end of the test to monitor glucose fluctuation. We induced type 1 diabetes model (T1D for ten Sprague-Dawley rats using streptozotocin and used five Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats as obese type 2 diabetes model (OT2D and 10 Goto-Kakizaki rats as nonobese type 2 diabetes model (NOT2D. We performed the stress loading test in both the normal and diabetic states and compared patterns of glucose fluctuation among the three models. We classified the pattern of glucose fluctuation into A, B, and C types according to speed of change in glucose level.ResultsIncrease in glucose, total amount of hyperglycemic exposure, time of stress-induced hyperglycemia, and speed of glucose increase were significantly increased in all models compared to the normal state. While the early increase in glucose after exposure to stress was higher in T1D and NOT2D, it was slower in OT2D. The rate of speed of the decrease in glucose level was highest in NOT2D and lowest in OT2D.ConclusionThe diabetic state was more vulnerable to stress compared to the normal state in all models, and the pattern of glucose fluctuation differed among the three types of diabetes. The study provides basic evidence for stress-induced hyperglycemia patterns and characteristics used for the management of diabetes patients.

  15. Evaluation Study of Pressure-Strain Correlation Models in Compressible Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aicha Hanafi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the second-order closure for compressible turbulent flows with special attention paid to modeling the pressure-strain correlation appearing in the Reynolds stress equation. This term appears as the main one responsible for the changes of the turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. The structure of the gradient Mach number is similar to that of turbulence, therefore this parameter may be appropriate to study the changes in turbulence structures that arise from structural compressibility effects. Thus, the incompressible model (LRR of the pressure-strain correlation and its corrected form by using the turbulent Mach number, fail to correctly evaluate the compressibility effects at high shear flow. An extension of the widely used incompressible model (LRR on compressible homogeneous shear flow is the major aim of the present work. From this extension the standard coefficients Ci became a function of the compressibility parameters (the turbulent Mach number and the gradient Mach number. Application of the model on compressible homogeneous shear flow by considering various initial conditions shows reasonable agreement with the DNS results of Sarkar. The ability of the models to predict the equilibrium states for the flow in cases A1 and A4 from DNS results of Sarkar is examined, the results appear to be very encouraging. Thus, both parameters Mt and Mg should be used to model significant structural compressibility effects at high-speed shear flow.

  16. Experimental unsteady flow study in a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulos, Ch.; Mathioulakis, D. S.; Papaharilaou, Y.; Katsamouris, A.

    2011-06-01

    The velocity field in a patient-specific abdominal aneurysm model including the aorto-iliac bifurcation was measured by 2D PIV. Phase-averaged velocities obtained in 14 planes reveal details of the flow evolution during a cycle. The aneurysm expanding asymmetrically toward the anterior side of the aorta causes the generation of a vortex at its entrance, covering the entire aneurysm bulge progressively before flow peak. The fluid entering the aneurysm impinges on the left side of its distal end, following the axis of the upstream aorta segment, causing an increased flow rate in the left (compared to the right) common iliac artery. High shear stresses appear at the aneurysm inlet and outlet as well as along the posterior wall, varying proportionally to the flow rate. At the same regions, elevated flow disturbances are observed, being intensified at flow peak and during the deceleration phase. Low shear stresses are present in the recirculation region, being two orders of magnitude smaller than the previous ones. At flow peak and during the deceleration phase, a clockwise swirling motion (viewed from the inlet) is present in the aneurysm due to the out of plane curvature of the aorta.

  17. Numerical model of total artificial heart hemodynamics and the effect of its size on stress accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Gil; Chiu, Wei-Che; Slepian, Marvin J; Bluestein, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a bi-ventricular mechanical circulatory support device that replaces the heart in patients with end-stage congestive heart failure. The device acts as blood pump via pneumatic activation of diaphragms altering the volume of the ventricular chambers. Flow in and out of the ventricles is controlled by mechanical heart valves. The aim of this study is to evaluate the flow regime in the TAH and to estimate the thrombogenic potential during systole. Toward that goal, three numerical models of TAHs of differing sizes, that include the deforming diaphragm and the blood flow from the left chamber to the aorta, are introduced. A multiphase model with injection of platelet particles is employed to calculate their trajectories. The shear stress accumulation in the three models are calculated along the platelets trajectories and their probability density functions, which represent the `thrombogenic footprint' of the device are compared. The calculated flow regime successfully captures the mitral regurgitation and the flows that open and close the aortic valve during systole. Physiological velocity magnitudes are found in all three models, with higher velocities and increased stress accumulation predicted for smaller devices.

  18. Mathematical model of transportation flow dynamics on a multilane highway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazurin, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    We present a microscopic model for the dynamics of a transportation flow based on cellular automata with improved lane changing rules. With this model, we study the influence of crossing transportation flows on the throughput of a multilane highway. For a two-lane highway with an exit, we obtain spa

  19. Unsteady flow through in-vitro models of the glottis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmans, G.C.J.; Groot, G.; Ranucci, M.; Graziani, G.; Hirschberg, A.

    2003-01-01

    The unsteady two-dimensional flow through fixed rigid in vitro models of the glottis is studied in some detail to validate a more accurate model based on the prediction of boundary-layer separation. The study is restricted to the flow phenomena occurring within the glottis and does not include effec

  20. Modeling of high speed micro rotors in moderate flow confinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikmen, E.; Hoogt, van der P.J.M.; Aarts, R.G.K.M.

    2008-01-01

    The recent developments in high speed micro rotating machinery lead to the need for multiphysical modeling of the rotor and the surrounding medium. In this study, thermal and flow induced effects on rotor dynamics of geometries with moderate flow confinement are studied. The structure is modeled via